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Sample records for delta hepatitis molecular

  1. Delta hepatitis: molecular biology and clinical and epidemiological features.

    PubMed Central

    Polish, L B; Gallagher, M; Fields, H A; Hadler, S C

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus, discovered in 1977, requires the help of hepatitis B virus to replicate in hepatocytes and is an important cause of acute, fulminant, and chronic liver disease in many regions of the world. Because of the helper function of hepatitis delta virus, infection with it occurs either as a coinfection with hepatitis B or as a superinfection of a carrier of hepatitis B surface antigen. Although the mechanisms of transmission are similar to those of hepatitis B virus, the patterns of transmission of delta virus vary widely around the world. In regions of the world in which hepatitis delta virus infection is not endemic, the disease is confined to groups at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection and high-risk hepatitis B carriers. Because of the propensity of this viral infection to cause fulminant as well as chronic liver disease, continued incursion of hepatitis delta virus into areas of the world where persistent hepatitis B infection is endemic will have serious implications. Prevention depends on the widespread use of hepatitis B vaccine. This review focuses on the molecular biology and the clinical and epidemiologic features of this important viral infection. PMID:8358704

  2. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Hepatitis D (Delta agent) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis D is a viral infection caused by the ...

  3. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B.

  4. Therapy of Delta Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yurdaydin, Cihan; Idilman, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Delta hepatitis is the less frequently encountered but most severe form of viral hepatitis. Acute delta hepatitis, as a result of coinfection with hepatitis B and hepatitis delta, is rare, but may lead to fulminant hepatitis, and no therapy exists for this form. Chronic delta hepatitis (CDH) mostly develops as a result of superinfection of a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier with hepatitis delta virus (HDV). In general, HDV is the dominant virus. However, a dynamic shift of the dominant virus may occur with time in rare instances, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) may become the dominant virus, at which time nucleos(t)ide analog therapy may be indicated. Otherwise, the only established management of CDH consists of conventional or pegylated interferon therapy, which has to be administered at doses used for hepatitis B for a duration of at least 1 year. Posttreatment week-24 virologic response is the most widely used surrogate marker of treatment efficacy, but it does not represent a sustained virologic response, and late relapse can occur. As an easy-to-use simple serological test, anti-HDV-immunoglobulin M (IgM) correlates with histological inflammatory activity and clinical long-term outcome; however, it is not as sensitive as HDV RNA in assessing treatment response. No evidence-based rules for treating CDH exist, and treatment duration needs to be individualized based on virologic response at end of treatment or end of follow-up. Effective treatment may decrease liver-related complications, such as decompensation or liver-related mortality. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, interferons are contraindicated and liver transplantation has to be considered. Alternative treatment options are an urgent need in CDH. New treatment strategies targeting different steps of the HDV life cycle, such as hepatocyte entry inhibitors or prenylation inhibitors, are emerging and provide hope for the future. PMID:26253093

  5. Epidemiological and molecular features of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus transmission in a remote rural community in central Africa.

    PubMed

    François-Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Bisvigou, Ulrich; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis delta virus (HDV) occur worldwide and are prevalent in both urban and remote rural communities. In a remote village in Gabon, central Africa, we observed a high prevalence of HBsAg carriage and HDV infection, particularly in children and adolescents. The prevalence of HBsAg differed significantly by gender and age, females being more likely than males to carry the HBsAg during the first 10 years of life, while the prevalence was higher among males than females aged 11-20 years. We also characterised HBV and HDV strains circulating in the village. The principal HBV strains belonged to genotype HBV-E and subgenotype QS-A3. Complete genome analysis revealed for the first time the presence of the HBV-D genotype in Gabon, in the form of an HBV-D/E recombinant. Molecular analysis of HDV strains and their complete genomic characterisation revealed two distinct groups within the dominant HDV clade 8. Molecular analysis of HBV and HDV strains did not reveal vertical transmission within the families studied but rather horizontal, intrafamilial transmission among children aged 0-10 years. Our findings indicate that HBV is transmitted in early childhood by body fluids rather than by sexual contact. Health education adapted to the different age groups might therefore help to reduce HBV transmission. Young children should be vaccinated to control HBV infection in areas of extremely high prevalence.

  6. Serological and Molecular Diagnosis of Hepatitis Delta Virus Infection: Results of a French National Quality Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Brichler, Ségolène; Le Gal, Frédéric; Neri-Pinto, Fernando; Mansour, Wael; Roulot, Dominique; Laperche, Syria

    2014-01-01

    A French national quality control study for the serological and molecular diagnosis of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) was organized. Total HDV antibodies were properly detected by all laboratories; 8/14 laboratories failed to detect low titers of IgM, and 6/11 failed to quantify and/or underestimated the RNA viral load in several samples. These discrepancies are likely related to the molecular diversity of HDV. PMID:24523467

  7. Viroids and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Serra, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    There is a subviral world, whose most prominent representatives are viroids. Despite being solely composed by a circular, highly structured RNA of ~250 to 400 nucleotides without protein-coding ability (all viruses code for one or more proteins), viroids can infect and incite specific diseases in higher plants. The RNA of human hepatitis delta virus (HDV), the smallest genome of an animal virus, displays striking similarities with viroids: It is circular, folds into a rodlike secondary structure, and replicates through a rolling-circle mechanism catalyzed by host enzymes and cis-acting ribozymes. However, HDV RNA is larger (~1700 nucleotides), encodes a protein in its antigenomic polarity (the ∂ antigen), and depends for transmission on hepatitis B virus. The presence of ribozymes in some viroids and in HDV RNA, along with their structural simplicity, makes them candidates for being molecular fossils of the RNA world that presumably preceded our extant world based on DNA and proteins. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta viruses circulating in the Western Amazon region, North Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) represent important public health problems in the Western Amazon region with reported cases of fulminant hepatitis. This cross sectional study describes HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods HBsAg positive individuals (n = 224) were recruited in Manaus/Amazonas State (130 blood donors from the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation from Amazonas/HEMOAM; 60 subjects from outpatient clinic) and in Eirunepe city (n = 34) from 2003–2009. Most participants (n = 153) lived in Manaus, 63 were from 20 remote isolated municipalities, 8 lived outside Amazonas State. Genotyping was based on PCR products: HBV genotype A-F specific primers, restricted length polymorphism for HDV. HDV isolates were directly sequenced (delta antigen 405 nucleotide fragment) and phylogenetic analysis performed (MEGA; neighbor-joining, Kimura’s two parameter). Results Most participants were young adult males and HBV mono-infection predominated (70.5%, 158/224). Among blood donors, outpatient subjects and individuals from Eirunepe, HBV/A prevailed followed by HBV/D and F (p > 0.05). HBV/A was more frequent in blood donors (p < 0.05). HBV-HDV coinfection rate was 8.5% in blood donors (11/130), 65.0% (39/60) in outpatient subjects and 47.0% (16/34) in individuals from Eirunepe. Compared to blood donors, coinfection was higher in outpatient subjects (65.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.0; CI 3.4-7.9; p < 0.0001) and in subjects from Eirunepe (47.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.5; CI 3.0-9.9; p < 0.0001). HBV-HDV coinfection rates were higher in patients from highly endemic remote cities. Only HDV genotype 3 was detected, HBV/F-HDV/3 predominated (20/38; 52.7%), followed by HBV/A-HDV/3 (31.6%; 12/38) and HBV/D-HDV/3 (15.8%; 6/38). Conclusions The description of HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the western Amazon can contribute to a better understanding of their relevance on the

  9. Whole-genome analysis of genetic recombination of hepatitis delta virus: molecular domain in delta antigen determining trans-activating efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mei; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lin, Feng-Ming; Li, Hsin-Pai; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only animal RNA virus that has an unbranched rod-like genome with ribozyme activity and is replicated by host RNA polymerase. HDV RNA recombination was previously demonstrated in patients and in cultured cells by analysis of a region corresponding to the C terminus of the delta antigen (HDAg), the only viral-encoded protein. Here, a whole-genome recombination map of HDV was constructed using an experimental system in which two HDV-1 sequences were co-transfected into cultured cells and the recombinants were analysed by sequencing of cloned reverse transcription-PCR products. Fifty homologous recombinants with 60 crossovers mapping to 22 junctions were identified from 200 analysed clones. Small HDAg chimeras harbouring a junction newly detected in the recombination map were then constructed. The results further indicated that the genome-replication level of HDV was sensitive to the sixth amino acid within the N-terminal 22 aa of HDAg. Therefore, the recombination map established in this study provided a tool for not only understanding HDV RNA recombination, but also elucidating the related mechanisms, such as molecular elements responsible for the trans-activation levels of the small HDAg.

  10. Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Free Energy Simulations of the Self-Cleavage Reaction in the Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme catalyzes a self-cleavage reaction using a combination of nucleobase and metal ion catalysis. Both divalent and monovalent ions can catalyze this reaction, although the rate is slower with monovalent ions alone. Herein, we use quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations to investigate the mechanism of this ribozyme and to elucidate the roles of the catalytic metal ion. With Mg2+ at the catalytic site, the self-cleavage mechanism is observed to be concerted with a phosphorane-like transition state and a free energy barrier of ∼13 kcal/mol, consistent with free energy barrier values extrapolated from experimental studies. With Na+ at the catalytic site, the mechanism is observed to be sequential, passing through a phosphorane intermediate, with free energy barriers of 2–4 kcal/mol for both steps; moreover, proton transfer from the exocyclic amine of protonated C75 to the nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate occurs to stabilize the phosphorane intermediate in the sequential mechanism. To explain the slower rate observed experimentally with monovalent ions, we hypothesize that the activation of the O2′ nucleophile by deprotonation and orientation is less favorable with Na+ ions than with Mg2+ ions. To explore this hypothesis, we experimentally measure the pKa of O2′ by kinetic and NMR methods and find it to be lower in the presence of divalent ions rather than only monovalent ions. The combined theoretical and experimental results indicate that the catalytic Mg2+ ion may play three key roles: assisting in the activation of the O2′ nucleophile, acidifying the general acid C75, and stabilizing the nonbridging oxygen to prevent proton transfer to it. PMID:24383543

  11. Substitution rates in hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Krushkal, J; Li, W H

    1995-12-01

    Substitution rates were estimated for the coding and noncoding regions of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The estimated rates of synonymous substitution in HDV were lower than the rates of substitution at non-synonymous sites and in the noncoding region. HDV has lower synonymous substitution rates than the hepatitis C virus, though both are RNA viruses. The relatively low rate of synonymous substitution in HDV may be due to a strong preference of G and C nucleotides at third codon positions. Variation in substitution rate among HDV lineages may be correlated with the clinical development of the HDV-induced hepatitis. The phylogenetic tree inferred for 24 HDV strains reveals similarities between lineages isolated from the same geographic region.

  12. Mutational analysis of delta antigen: effect on assembly and replication of hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, M F; Chen, C J; Chang, S C

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus requires a helper function from hepatitis B virus for packaging, release, and infection of hepatocytes. The assembly of large delta antigen (HDAg) is mediated by copackaging with the small surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg), and the assembly of small HDAg requires interactions with large HDAg. To examine the molecular mechanisms by which small HBsAg, large HDAg, and small HDAg interact, we have established a virion assembly system in COS7 cells by cotransfecting plasmids encoding the small HBsAg, the small HDAg, and large HDAg mutants. Results indicate that sequences within the C-terminal 19-amino-acid domain flanking the Cxxx isoprenylation motif are important for the assembly of large HDAg. In addition, a large HDAg mutant bearing extra sequences separating the C-terminal 19-amino-acid domain from the common regions of the small and large HDAgs is capable, like the wild-type large HDAg, of copackaging with small HBsAg. The ability of assembly is also demonstrated for a large HDAg mutant from which nuclear localization signals have been removed. Furthermore, a cryptic signal within the N-terminal 50 amino acid residues other than the putative N-terminal coiled-coil structure and a subdomain between amino acid residues 50 and 65 of the large HDAg are important for the assembly of small HDAg as well as the trans-dominant negative regulation of large HDAg in hepatitis delta virus replication. Images PMID:8289368

  13. [A study of 158 cases of acute delta hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Castro, A; Buti, M; Esteban, R; Jardí, R; Allende, H; Roget, M; Rodríguez-Frías, F; Guardia, J

    1990-09-22

    We have prospectively studied 158 cases of acute hepatitis delta observed during the last 7 years in a general hospital. Among them 136 were male and 22 female. The mean age was 22.7 years with a range between 16 and 61 years. The epidemiologic factors were drug addiction by parenteral route in 145 cases (92%), sexual transmission in 5 (3%), post transfusional in 2 (1%) and unknown in 6 (4%). With respect to the delta type infection, 105 cases (66%) were coinfections with type B and delta, and 53 patients had a type delta superinfection (34%). The clinical course was a fulminant hepatitis in three cases (two cases of coinfection B and delta an one case of delta superinfection), and an acute benign hepatitis in 155 patients. The follow-up of 118 patients revealed that 96% of coinfections by type B and delta evolved to the chronicity showing findings of active chronic hepatitis or hepatic cirrhosis. It should be noted that in 4 cases of superinfection delta type (11%) the HBsAg was negative after several months of positivity. In these patients the level of transaminases normalized and the hepatic histology evidenced alterations of chronic active hepatitis (2 cases) and hepatic cirrhosis (2 cases) without identification of tissular delta antigen.

  14. High Prevalence and Predominance of Hepatitis Delta Virus Genotype 1 Infection in Cameroon▿

    PubMed Central

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  15. High prevalence and predominance of hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 infection in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon.

  16. Hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus infection in South America.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, J R

    1996-01-01

    About 100,000 cases of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occur annually in South America. The overall prevalence of HBV infection in low risk populations ranges from 6.7% to 41%, while hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) rates range from 0.4% to 13%. In high endemicity aboriginal or rural populations, perinatal transmission may play a major part in the spread of HBV. In urban populations, however, horizontal transmission, probably by sexual contact, is the predominant mode of spread, with higher rates of HBV positivity in lower socioeconomic groups. High risk populations such as health care workers and haemodialysis patients show higher rates of HBV infection than comparable populations elsewhere. The risk of posttransfusion hepatitis B remains high in some areas. Concomitant HBV infection may accelerate the chronic liver disease seen in decompensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. In the north, the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection ranks among the highest in the world. In the south, the problem appears negligible although it is increasing within high risk urban communities. HDV superinfection has been the cause of large outbreaks of fulminant hepatitis. The cost of comprehensive or mass vaccination programmes remains unaffordable for most South American countries. Less expensive alternatives such as low dose intradermal schedules of immunisation have been used with success in selected adult subjects. PMID:8786054

  17. Hepatitis delta: virological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Botelho-Souza, Luan Felipo; Vasconcelos, Mariana Pinheiro Alves; Dos Santos, Alcione de Oliveira; Salcedo, Juan Miguel Villalobos; Vieira, Deusilene Souza

    2017-09-13

    There are an estimated 400 million chronic carriers of HBV worldwide; between 15 and 20 million have serological evidence of exposure to HDV. Traditionally, regions with high rates of endemicity are central and northern Africa, the Amazon Basin, eastern Europe and the Mediterranean, the Middle East and parts of Asia. There are two types of HDV/HBV infection which are differentiated by the previous status infection by HBV for the individual. Individuals with acute HBV infection contaminated by HDV is an HDV/HBV co-infection, while individuals with chronic HBV infection contaminated by HDV represent an HDV/HBV super-infection. The appropriate treatment for chronic hepatitis delta is still widely discussed since it does not have an effective drug. Alpha interferon is currently the only licensed therapy for the treatment of chronic hepatitis D. The most widely used drug is pegylated interferon but only approximately 25% of patients maintain a sustained viral response after 1 year of treatment. The best marker of therapeutic success would be the clearance of HBsAg, but this data is rare in clinical practice. Therefore, the best way to predict a sustained virologic response is the maintenance of undetectable HDV RNA levels.

  18. Assessment of metal-assisted nucleophile activation in the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme from molecular simulation and 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Radak, Brian K.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Harris, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is an efficient catalyst of RNA 2′-O-transphosphorylation and has emerged as a key experimental system for identifying and characterizing fundamental features of RNA catalysis. Recent structural and biochemical data have led to a proposed mechanistic model whereby an active site Mg2+ ion facilitates deprotonation of the O2′ nucleophile, and a protonated cytosine residue (C75) acts as an acid to donate a proton to the O5′ leaving group as noted in a previous study. This model assumes that the active site Mg2+ ion forms an inner-sphere coordination with the O2′ nucleophile and a nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. These contacts, however, are not fully resolved in the crystal structure, and biochemical data are not able to unambiguously exclude other mechanistic models. In order to explore the feasibility of this model, we exhaustively mapped the free energy surfaces with different active site ion occupancies via quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations. We further incorporate a three-dimensional reference interaction site model for the solvated ion atmosphere that allows these calculations to consider not only the rate associated with the chemical steps, but also the probability of observing the system in the presumed active state with the Mg2+ ion bound. The QM/MM results predict that a pathway involving metal-assisted nucleophile activation is feasible based on the rate-controlling transition state barrier departing from the presumed metal-bound active state. However, QM/MM results for a similar pathway in the absence of Mg2+ are not consistent with experimental data, suggesting that a structural model in which the crystallographically determined Mg2+ is simply replaced with Na+ is likely incorrect. It should be emphasized, however, that these results hinge upon the assumption of the validity of the presumed Mg2+-bound starting state, which has not yet been definitively verified experimentally

  19. Is Hepatitis Delta infections important in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Cicero, Maira Ferreira; Pena, Nathalia Mantovani; Santana, Luiz Claudio; Arnold, Rafael; Azevedo, Rafael Gonçalves; Leal, Élcio de Souza; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie; Komninakis, Shirley Vasconcelos

    2016-09-29

    The Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) can increase the incidence of fulminant hepatitis. For this infection occurs, the host must also be infected with Hepatitis B Virus. Previous studies demonstrated the endemicity and near exclusivity of this infection in the Amazon region, and as a consequence of the difficulty in accessing this area we used dried blood spots (DBS) in sample collection. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of recombination, to analyze the epidemiology, ancestry and evolutionary pressures on HDV in Brazil. Blood samples from 50 individuals were collected using dried-blood spots (DBS 903, Whatman), and sent via regular mail to Retrovirology Laboratory from Federal University of São Paulo, where the samples were processed. In the analysis the following software were used: PhyML, RDP, BEAST, jModelTest and CODEML. Our results confirm the prevalence of HDV-3 in the Amazon region of Brazil, with the absence of inter-genotypic recombination. It was identified a positive selection in probable epitopes of HDV on B lymphocytes that might indicate that the virus is changing to escape the humoral response of the host. The analysis of the time of the most common ancestor demonstrated the exponential growth of this virus in late 1970s that lasted until 1995, after which it remained constant. It was also observed a probable founder effect in two cities, which demonstrate the need to focus on prevention methods against HBV/HDV infection. We confirmed the prevalence of HDV-3 in the Amazon region of Brazil, without inter-genotypic recombination. The analysis of the time of the most common ancestor showed that this infection remain constant in the studied area. Taking into account the probable founder effect established in the cities of Rio Branco and Porto Velho, a focus on preventive methods is recommended against these infections.

  20. Hepatitis Delta Virus: Replication Strategy and Upcoming Therapeutic Options for a Neglected Human Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Lempp, Florian A; Urban, Stephan

    2017-07-04

    The human Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) is unique among all viral pathogens. Encoding only one protein (Hepatitis Delta Antigen; HDAg) within its viroid-like self-complementary RNA, HDV constitutes the smallest known virus in the animal kingdom. To disseminate in its host, HDV depends on a helper virus, the human Hepatitis B virus (HBV), which provides the envelope proteins required for HDV assembly. HDV affects an estimated 15-20 million out of the 240 million chronic HBV-carriers and disperses unequally in disparate geographical regions of the world. The disease it causes (chronic Hepatitis D) presents as the most severe form of viral hepatitis, leading to accelerated progression of liver dysfunction including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and a high mortality rate. The lack of approved drugs interfering with specific steps of HDV replication poses a high burden for gaining insights into the molecular biology of the virus and, consequently, the development of specific novel medications that resiliently control HDV replication or, in the best case, functionally cure HDV infection or HBV/HDV co-infection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HBV molecular biology, presents an update on novel cell culture and animal models to study the virus and provides updates on the clinical development of the three developmental drugs Lonafarnib, REP2139-Ca and Myrcludex B.

  1. Hepatitis Delta Virus: Replication Strategy and Upcoming Therapeutic Options for a Neglected Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Lempp, Florian A.; Urban, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The human Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) is unique among all viral pathogens. Encoding only one protein (Hepatitis Delta Antigen; HDAg) within its viroid-like self-complementary RNA, HDV constitutes the smallest known virus in the animal kingdom. To disseminate in its host, HDV depends on a helper virus, the human Hepatitis B virus (HBV), which provides the envelope proteins required for HDV assembly. HDV affects an estimated 15–20 million out of the 240 million chronic HBV-carriers and disperses unequally in disparate geographical regions of the world. The disease it causes (chronic Hepatitis D) presents as the most severe form of viral hepatitis, leading to accelerated progression of liver dysfunction including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and a high mortality rate. The lack of approved drugs interfering with specific steps of HDV replication poses a high burden for gaining insights into the molecular biology of the virus and, consequently, the development of specific novel medications that resiliently control HDV replication or, in the best case, functionally cure HDV infection or HBV/HDV co-infection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HBV molecular biology, presents an update on novel cell culture and animal models to study the virus and provides updates on the clinical development of the three developmental drugs Lonafarnib, REP2139-Ca and Myrcludex B. PMID:28677645

  2. HDVDB: a data warehouse for hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarita; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Nischal, Anuradha; Pant, Kamlesh Kumar; Seth, Prahlad Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) is an RNA virus and causes delta hepatitis in humans. Although a lot of data is available for HDV, but retrieval of information is a complicated task. Current web database 'HDVDB' provides a comprehensive web-resource for HDV. The database is basically concerned with basic information about HDV and disease caused by this virus, genome structure, pathogenesis, epidemiology, symptoms and prevention, etc. Database also supplies sequence data and bibliographic information about HDV. A tool 'siHDV Predict' to design the effective siRNA molecule to control the activity of HDV, is also integrated in database. It is a user friendly information system available at public domain and provides annotated information about HDV for research scholars, scientists, pharma industry people for further study.

  3. Estimation of the secondary attack rate for delta hepatitis coinfection among injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Christiane; Gyorkos, Theresa; Joseph, Lawrence

    1993-01-01

    The secondary attack rate for delta hepatitis coinfection was estimated among a cluster of injection drug users (IDUs). The infections occurred during an epidemic of hepatitis B in a rural area of Nova Scotia in 1988 and 1989. Six IDUs formed a cluster of delta hepatitis coinfections, representing the first reported outbreak of delta hepatitis in Canada. Contact-tracing was used to identify a cluster of 41 IDUs potentially exposed to delta hepatitis. The index case of delta hepatitis coinfection was presumed to have led to five secondary cases. The secondary attack rate was estimated to be 13.2% (95% confidence interval 0.044 to 0.281). The estimated secondary attack rate may be a useful predictor of disease due to delta hepatitis coinfection in similar IDU populations. PMID:22346420

  4. Management of hepatitis delta: Need for novel therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Abbas, Minaam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the smallest single stranded RNA virus infecting humans. The hepatitis B surface antigen envelope protein protects the HDV nucleocapsid antigen and provides a means for the virus to enter and exit the hepatocyte. Hepatitis B and D viruses exploit the human sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), a receptor, for their entry into hepatocytes. Prenylation of the large delta antigen is a critical determinant of HDV particle assembly. Treatment with pegylated interferon results in sustained virological response six months post-treatment in one fourth of the patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) have been widely tested in hepatitis delta, but they appear to be ineffective. Combination treatment of NAs with interferon also proved to be disappointing so there is a need for novel therapeutic options. The receptor function of NTCP is blocked by Myrcludex B, a synthetic N-acylated preS1 lipopeptide that competes with infectious virions for receptor binding. There are already some approved drugs available, including irbesartan, ezetimibe, and ritonavir and cyclosporin A, with documented inhibitory effects on NTCP’s metabolic function. These drugs may have a role in HDV treatment. Interference with host-mediated post-translational changes of proteins that are crucial to the HDV life cycle, such as prenylation may become an important tool to control HDV infection and prevent replication. Lonafarnib, a prenylation inhibitor significantly reduces virus levels in hepatitis delta patients. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which are complementary to genomic HDV ribozyme self-cleavage site and stem I regions can inhibit genomic HDV ribozyme activity. PMID:26327754

  5. Management of hepatitis delta: Need for novel therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Zaigham; Abbas, Minaam

    2015-08-28

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the smallest single stranded RNA virus infecting humans. The hepatitis B surface antigen envelope protein protects the HDV nucleocapsid antigen and provides a means for the virus to enter and exit the hepatocyte. Hepatitis B and D viruses exploit the human sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), a receptor, for their entry into hepatocytes. Prenylation of the large delta antigen is a critical determinant of HDV particle assembly. Treatment with pegylated interferon results in sustained virological response six months post-treatment in one fourth of the patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) have been widely tested in hepatitis delta, but they appear to be ineffective. Combination treatment of NAs with interferon also proved to be disappointing so there is a need for novel therapeutic options. The receptor function of NTCP is blocked by Myrcludex B, a synthetic N-acylated preS1 lipopeptide that competes with infectious virions for receptor binding. There are already some approved drugs available, including irbesartan, ezetimibe, and ritonavir and cyclosporin A, with documented inhibitory effects on NTCP's metabolic function. These drugs may have a role in HDV treatment. Interference with host-mediated post-translational changes of proteins that are crucial to the HDV life cycle, such as prenylation may become an important tool to control HDV infection and prevent replication. Lonafarnib, a prenylation inhibitor significantly reduces virus levels in hepatitis delta patients. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which are complementary to genomic HDV ribozyme self-cleavage site and stem I regions can inhibit genomic HDV ribozyme activity.

  6. Clinical and virological heterogeneity of hepatitis delta in different regions world-wide: The Hepatitis Delta International Network (HDIN).

    PubMed

    Wranke, Anika; Pinheiro Borzacov, Lourdes M; Parana, Raymundo; Lobato, Cirley; Hamid, Saeed; Ceausu, Emanoil; Dalekos, George N; Rizzetto, Mario; Turcanu, Adela; Niro, Grazia A; Lubna, Farheen; Abbas, Minaam; Ingiliz, Patrick; Buti, Maria; Ferenci, Peter; Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Hayden, Tonya; Dashdorj, Naranjargal; Motoc, Adriana; Cornberg, Markus; Abbas, Zaigham; Yurdaydin, Cihan; Manns, Michael P; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Hardtke, Svenja

    2017-09-29

    Chronic hepatitis D (delta) is a major global health burden. Clinical and virological characteristics of patients with hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection and treatment approaches in different regions world-wide are poorly defined. The Hepatitis Delta International Network (HDIN) registry was established in 2011 with centres in Europe, Asia, North- and South America. Here, we report on clinical/ virological characteristics of the first 1576 patients with ongoing or past HDV infection included in the database until October 2016 and performed a retrospective outcome analysis. The primary aim was to investigate if the region of origin was associated with HDV replication and clinical outcome. The majority of patients was male (n=979, 62%) and the mean age was 36.7 years (range 1-79, with 9% of patients younger than 20 years). Most patients were HBeAg-negative (77%) and HDV-RNA positive (85%). Liver cirrhosis was reported in 48.7% of cases which included 13% of patients with previous or ongoing liver decompensation. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 30 patients (2.5%) and 44 (3.6%) underwent liver transplantation. Regions of origin were independently associated with clinical endpoints and detectability of HDV RNA. Antiviral therapy was administered to 356 patients with different treatment uptakes in different regions. Of these, 264 patients were treated with interferon-a and 92 were treated with HBV-Nucs only. The HDIN registry confirms the severity of hepatitis delta but also highlights the heterogeneity of patient characteristics and clinical outcomes in different regions. There is an urgent need for novel treatment options for HDV infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased serum IgE in acute type A, B and delta hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, D; Guardia, P; Delgado, J; Gutiérrez, J; Monteseirin, F J; de la Calle, A; Lobatón, P; Senra, A; Conde, J

    1997-01-01

    Serum IgE levels have been documented in patients of acute type B hepatitis. There are very few studies on serum IgE in acute type A hepatitis and, to our knowledge, there are no data on serum IgE in acute delta hepatitis patients. The purpose of this study was to measure total IgE levels in 38 patients with acute A, B and delta hepatitis and in 181 controls in order to determine the possible existence of changes in this parameter in the course of these infections. Our results showed a relevant increase in IgE levels in the three groups (hepatitis A, B and delta) with respect to the control group. Moreover, the hepatitis B group showed increased total serum IgE levels with respect to the hepatitis delta group.

  8. Infection with hepatitis A, B, C, and delta viruses among patients with acute hepatitis in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Takahashi, Masaharu; Endo, Kazunori; Buyankhuu, Osorjin; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    One hundred ten consecutive patients (60 males and 50 females; age, mean +/- standard deviation [SD], 22.6 +/- 6.4 years; range 16-48 years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis between December 2004 and January 2005 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus were detected in 18 patients (16.4%), IgM antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc IgM) in 38 patients (34.5%) including two patients with concurrent hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection, and hepatitis C virus RNA in nine patients (8.2%). There were 30 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HDV but were negative for anti-HBc IgM, suggesting that they acquired type D acute hepatitis due to superinfection of HDV on a background of chronic HBV infection. None had IgM antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Consequently, 16.4, 32.7, 6.4, 1.8, and 27.3% of the patients were diagnosed as having acute hepatitis of type A, B, C, type B + D (HBV/HDV coinfection), and type D (superinfection of HDV), respectively. The cause of hepatitis was not known in the remaining 17 patients (15.5%). All 18 HAV isolates were genotyped as IA, all 9 HCV isolates were genotyped as 1b, and all 32 HDV isolates were classified into genotype I. The distribution of HBV genotypes among the 67 HBV isolates was A (1.5%, n = 1) and D (98.5%, n = 66). The present study indicates that de novo infections of HAV, HBV, HCV, and HDV are prevalent among young adults in Mongolia.

  9. Packaging of hepatitis delta virus RNA via the RNA-binding domain of hepatitis delta antigens: different roles for the small and large delta antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H W; Chen, P J; Lee, C Z; Wu, H L; Chen, D S

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is composed of four specific components. The first component is envelope protein which contains hepatitis B surface antigens. The second and third components are nucleocapsid proteins, referred to as small and large hepatitis delta antigens (HDAgs). The final component is a single-stranded circular RNA molecule known as the viral genome. In order to study the mechanism of HDV RNA packaging, a four-plasmid cotransfection system in which each viral component was provided by a separate plasmid was employed. Virus-like particles released from Huh-7 cells receiving such a cotransfection were found to contain HDV RNA along with three proteins. Therefore, the four-plasmid cotransfection system could lead to successful HDV RNA packaging in vitro. The system was then used to show that the large HDAg alone was able to achieve a low level of HDV RNA packaging. Analysis of a variety of large HDAg mutants revealed that the RNA-binding domain was essential for viral RNA packaging. By increasing the incorporation of small HDAg into virus-like particles, we found a three- to fourfold enhancement of HDV RNA packaging. This effect was probably through a direct binding of HDV RNA, independent from that of large HDAg, with the small HDAg. The subsequent RNA-protein complex was packaged into particles. The results provided insight into the roles and functional domains of small and large HDAgs in HDV RNA packaging. Images PMID:8083975

  10. Pathogenesis by subviral agents: viroids and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Owens, Robert A; Taylor, John

    2016-04-01

    The viroids of plants are the simplest known infectious genetic elements. They have RNA genomes of up to 400 nucleotides in length and no protein encoding capacity. Hepatitis delta virus (HDV), an infectious agent found only in humans co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), is just slightly more complex, with an RNA genome of about 1700 nucleotides, and the ability to express just one small protein. Viroid and HDV RNAs share several features that include circular structure, compact folding, and replication via a rolling-circle mechanism. Both agents were detected because of their obvious pathogenic effects. Their simplicity demands a greater need than conventional RNA or DNA viruses to redirect host components for facilitating their infectious cycle, a need that directly and indirectly incites pathogenic effects. The mechanisms by which these pathogenic effects are produced are the topic of this review. In this context, RNA silencing mediates certain aspects of viroid pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A conformational switch controls hepatitis delta virus ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ailong; Zhou, Kaihong; Ding, Fang; Cate, Jamie H D; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2004-05-13

    Ribozymes enhance chemical reaction rates using many of the same catalytic strategies as protein enzymes. In the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme, site-specific self-cleavage of the viral RNA phosphodiester backbone requires both divalent cations and a cytidine nucleotide. General acid-base catalysis, substrate destabilization and global and local conformational changes have all been proposed to contribute to the ribozyme catalytic mechanism. Here we report ten crystal structures of the HDV ribozyme in its pre-cleaved state, showing that cytidine is positioned to activate the 2'-OH nucleophile in the precursor structure. This observation supports its proposed role as a general base in the reaction mechanism. Comparison of crystal structures of the ribozyme in the pre- and post-cleavage states reveals a significant conformational change in the RNA after cleavage and that a catalytically critical divalent metal ion from the active site is ejected. The HDV ribozyme has remarkable chemical similarity to protein ribonucleases and to zymogens for which conformational dynamics are integral to biological activity. This finding implies that RNA structural rearrangements control the reactivity of ribozymes and ribonucleoprotein enzymes.

  12. Prevalence and genotype distribution of hepatitis delta virus among chronic hepatitis B carriers in Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Minh; Sy, Bui Tien; Trung, Nguyen Thanh; Hoan, Nghiem Xuan; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Bock, C-Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection plays an important role in liver diseases. However, the molecular epidemiology and impact of HDV infection in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain uncertain in Vietnam. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence and genotype distribution of HDV among HBsAg-positive patients in Central Vietnam. 250 CHB patients were tested for HDV using newly established HDV-specific RT-PCR techniques. HDV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing. Of the 250 patients 25 (10%) had detectable copies of HDV viral RNA. HDV-2 was predominant (20/25; 80%) followed by HDV-1 (5/25; 20%). Proven HDV genotypes share the Asian nomenclature. Chronic hepatitis B patients with concomitant HDV-1 showed higher HBV loads as compared to HDV-2 infected patients [median log10 (HBV-DNA copies/ml): 8.5 vs. 4.4, P = 0.036]. Our findings indicate that HDV infection is highly prevalent and HDV-2 is predominant in Central Vietnam. The data will add new information to the management of HBsAg-positive patients in a highly HBV endemic region to in- or exclude HDV infection in terms of diagnostic and treatment options.

  13. Prevalence of Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) Infection in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients with Unusual Clinical Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Ghamari, Shiva; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Rizzetto, Mario; Olivero, Antonella; Smedile, Antonina; Khedive, Abulfazl; Alavian, Seyed Ehsan; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background Probably 5% of the HBV carriers have HDV super infection. The risk of fulminant hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is higher in superinfection than the settings when HBV is alone. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HDV in Iranian HBV isolates and to compare their clinical and virological pictures as well as their HDV genetic variations with other worldwide isolates. Patients and Methods 81 carriers with positive results for HBsAg with upper limit ranges of ALT and low or undetectable levels of HBV viral load who did not respond to HBV therapy were selected. After RT amplification of HDV Delta antigen, direct sequencing and phylogenetic study were performed to explore the genotype(s) and nucleotide/amino acid variations. Results 12 (14.8%) patients had positive results for both HDV RNA and anti-HDV. The mean ALT level was higher in HDV positive patients (75.9 U/ML) than HBV-mono-infected individuals; however, the mean HBV viral load was lower in coinfected patients than HBV-mono-infected patients. Phylogenetically, genotype I was the only detected genotype, and the most closely related isolates were of Turkish, Italian and Mongolian origin. Within the delta Ag, there were 326 nucleotide mutations, of which 111 and 215 were silent and missense, respectively. The total number of amino acid substitution was 148; most were located in known functional/epitopic domains. There was no correlation between the numbers of amino acid mutations, with clinical, virological status of the patients. Conclusions HDV should be suspected in HBV carriers with unusual clinical and virological pictures. Relatedness of Iranian HDV isolates to Italian and Turkish sequences proposed a common Caucasian origin for the distribution of HDV genotype I in this ethnic group. PMID:24098308

  14. Treatment of Delta Hepatitis: Today and in the Future - A review.

    PubMed

    Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Sahin, Abdurrahman

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective satellite virus and propagates in the presence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg). Approximately 5% of the people who infected with HBV are also infected with HDV. Chronic hepatitis caused by delta is the most severe form of chronic viral hepatitis including accelerated fibrosis, liver decompensation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Interferon-based therapies still remain the only treatment option of the hepatitis delta. The beneficiary effects of the interferon-based therapies, however, stop frequently with termination of the given therapy and relapse rate is very high. Accordingly, the efficiency rate of this treatment does not exceed 30%. On the other hand, serious side effects of interferons are another troublesome leading to withdrawal of the therapy. The main goal of the current treatments is clearance of HBsAg. There is no available drug acting directly against the HDV. New therapies interacting with HDV life cycle are under investigation. While prenylation inhibitors act on merely HDV, viral entry inhibitors and HBsAg release inhibitors would be used in the treatment of both HBV and HDV. We hope that in the future, the use of novel therapies and HBV vaccination provide to clinicians to cope with this troublesome agent.

  15. Expression of the hepatitis delta virus large and small antigens in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S; Huang, S N; Xia, Y P; La Monica, N; Lai, M M; Chisari, F V

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous infection with hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) in humans is often associated with severe viral liver disease including fulminant hepatitis. Since HBV is thought to be noncytopathic to the hepatocyte, the enhanced disease severity observed during dual infection has been attributed to either simultaneous immune responses against the two viruses or direct cytotoxic effects of HDV products on the hepatocyte or both. To examine these alternate possibilities, we produced transgenic mice that express the small and large delta antigens (HDAg) in hepatocyte nuclei at levels equal to those observed during natural HDV infection. No biological or histopathological evidence of liver disease was detectable during 18 months of observation, suggesting that neither the large nor small form of HDAg is directly cytopathic to the hepatocyte in vivo. Images PMID:8289334

  16. Cloned hepatitis delta virus cDNA is infectious in the chimpanzee.

    PubMed Central

    Sureau, C; Taylor, J; Chao, M; Eichberg, J W; Lanford, R E

    1989-01-01

    A head-to-tail trimer of a full-length cDNA clone of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) genome was examined for infectivity by direct inoculation into the liver of a chimpanzee that was already infected with hepatitis B virus. Five weeks after inoculation, a marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase activity was observed, followed by the appearance of high levels of HDV RNA and antigen in both liver and serum and a high level of viral particles in the serum. A transient suppression of hepatitis B virus replication was evident during the acute phase of HDV infection. Seroconversion for antibodies to delta antigen occurred 3 weeks after the onset of the disease. These results demonstrate that a typical HDV infection can be initiated by inoculation of a susceptible animal with recombinant HDV cDNA. Images PMID:2778877

  17. Antiviral therapy of hepatitis delta virus infection - progress and challenges towards cure.

    PubMed

    Wranke, Anika; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B-/D-virus co-infection causes the most severe form of viral hepatitis, frequently leading to liver cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation and consecutive liver-related mortality. Treatment options for hepatitis delta are limited. The only recommended therapy is pegylated interferon alpha which leads to virological responses in about 25-30% of patients. However, interferon therapy is associated with frequent side-effects and late HDV RNA relapses have been described during long-term follow even in patients who were HDV RNA negative 24 weeks after the end of therapy. Thus, alternative treatment options are urgently needed. Clinical studies have been performed exploring prenylation inhibitors, viral entry inhibitors and nucleic acid polymers to block particle release. We here summarize the progress and challenges towards cure of HDV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of the IgM antibody to the Hepatitis delta virus

    SciTech Connect

    Farci, P.; Gerin, J.L.; Aragona, M.; Lindsey, I.; Crivelli, O.; Balestrieri, A.; Smedile, A.; Thomas, H.C.; Rizzetto, M.

    1986-03-21

    The IgM class antibody to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) was determined in different clinical categories of hepatitis B surface antigen carriers infected by the HDV (positive in the test for total antibody to HDV). The IgM antibody was found at high titers in each 70 patients with inflammatory liver disease and at a low titer in one six patients with inactive cirrhosis; it was not found in eight carriers with normal liver histology. Testing for Igm antibody to HDV distinguishes hepatitis B surface antigen carriers who have underlying inflammatory HDV liver disease from those with past HDV infection and provides prognostic information on the course of chronic HDV hepatitis.

  19. Characterization of hepatitis delta virus in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Leiss, Lukas V; Tarnagda, Zekiba S; Tahita, Marc C; Otegbayo, Jesse A; Forbi, Joseph C; Omilabu, Sunday; Gouandjika-Vasilache, Ionela; Komas, Narcisse P; Mbah, Okwen P; Muller, Claude P

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV), and infection with this virus aggravates acute and chronic liver disease. While HBV seroprevalence is very high across sub-Saharan Africa, much less is known about HDV in the region. In this study, almost 2,300 blood serum samples from Burkina Faso (n=1,131), Nigeria (n=974), Chad (n=50), and the Central African Republic (n = 118) were screened for HBV and HDV. Among 743 HBsAg-positive serum samples, 74 were positive for HDV antibodies and/or HDV RNA, with considerable differences in prevalence, ranging from <2% (pregnant women from Burkina Faso) to 50% (liver patients from Central African Republic). HDV seems to be much more common in chronic liver disease patients in the Central African Republic (CAR) than in similar cohorts in Nigeria. In a large nested mother-child cohort in Burkina Faso, the prevalence of HDV antibodies was 10 times higher in the children than in their mothers, despite similar HBsAg prevalences, excluding vertical transmission as an important route of infection. The genotyping of 16 full-length and 8 partial HDV strains revealed clade 1 (17/24) in three of the four countries, while clades 5 (5/24) and 6 (2/24) were, at least in this study, confined to Central Nigeria. On the amino acid level, almost all our clade 1 strains exhibited a serine at position 202 in the hepatitis D antigen, supporting the hypothesis of an ancient African HDV-1 subgroup. Further studies are required to understand the public health significance of the highly varied HDV prevalences in different cohorts and countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. [Quantitative relationship between molecular structure of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and enthalpy change (deltaH), entropy change (deltaS') in chromatographic process].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Dai, Chaozheng

    2005-09-01

    The relationship between the rule of chromatographic retention value and molecular structure is an important part in the research of chromatographic thermodynamics. The topological index structural parameter JG and the topological index adjoining parameter LJ are put forward. Parameter J(G) describes the correlation of quantity and position of chlorine atoms in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecules. Parameter L(J) describes the ortho-position correlation of chlorine atoms in PCB molecules. The relational expression between the PCB molecular structures and their enthalpy change (deltaH), entropy change (deltaS') in chromatographic process was discovered. The values of enthalpy change and entropy change for about 140 kinds of polychlorinated biphenyls in chromatographic process on three stationary phases, DB-1, DB-5 and DB-1701, were determined. In comparison with deltaH and deltaS' of the experimental data those calculated from the relational expression had the average relative deviations for deltaH and deltaS' are 0.56% -0.97% and 0.55% - 1.06%, respectively.

  1. Hepatitis B and Delta Virus: Advances on Studies about Interactions between the Two Viruses and the Infected Hepatocyte

    PubMed Central

    Giersch, Katja; Dandri, Maura

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms determining persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and long-term pathogenesis of HBV-associated liver disease appear to be multifactorial. Although viral replication can be efficiently suppressed by the antiviral treatments currently available, viral clearance is generally not achieved since HBV has developed unique replication strategies, enabling persistence of its genome within the infected hepatocytes. Moreover, no direct antiviral therapy exists for the more than 15 million people worldwide that are also coinfected with the hepatitis delta virus (HDV), a defective virus that needs the HBV envelope proteins for propagation. The limited availability of robust HBV and HDV infection systems has hindered the understanding of the complex network of virus-virus and virus-host interactions that are established in the course of infection and slowed down progress in drug development. Since chronic HBV/HDV coinfection leads to the most severe form of chronic viral hepatitis, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regulating virus-host interplay and pathogenesis are urgently needed. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the interactions among HBV, HDV, and the infected target cell and discusses the dependence of HDV on HBV activity and possible future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26623269

  2. Molecular Virology of Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Holla, R. Prasida; Jameel, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    This review details the molecular virology of the hepatitis E virus (HEV). While replicons and in vitro infection systems have recently become available, a lot of information on HEV has been generated through comparisons with better-studied positive-strand RNA viruses and through subgenomic expression of viral open reading frames. These models are now being verified with replicon and infection systems. We provide here the current knowledge on the HEV genome and its constituent proteins - ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3. Based on the available information, we also modify the existing model of the HEV life cycle. PMID:21345356

  3. [The molecular biology of hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Koutsoudakis, George; Forns, Xavier; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, Sofía

    2013-04-01

    Since the discovery of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a plethora of experimental models have evolved, allowing the virus's life cycle and the pathogenesis of associated liver diseases to be investigated. These models range from inoculation of cultured cells with serum from patients with hepatitis C to the use of surrogate models for the study of specific stages of the HCV life cycle: retroviral pseudoparticles for the study of HCV entry, replicons for the study of HCV replication, and the HCV cell culture model, which reproduces the entire life cycle (replication and production of infectious particles). The use of these tools has been and remains crucial to identify potential therapeutic targets in the different stages of the virus's life cycle and to screen new antiviral drugs. A clear example is the recent approval of two viral protease inhibitors (boceprevir and telaprevir) in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. This review analyzes the advances made in the molecular biology of HCV and highlights possible candidates as therapeutic targets for the treatment of HCV infection.

  4. Advanced Molecular Surveillance of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health problem worldwide. HCV exploits complex molecular mechanisms, which result in a high degree of intrahost genetic heterogeneity. This high degree of variability represents a challenge for the accurate establishment of genetic relatedness between cases and complicates the identification of sources of infection. Tracking HCV infections is crucial for the elucidation of routes of transmission in a variety of settings. Therefore, implementation of HCV advanced molecular surveillance (AMS) is essential for disease control. Accounting for virulence is also important for HCV AMS and both viral and host factors contribute to the disease outcome. Therefore, HCV AMS requires the incorporation of host factors as an integral component of the algorithms used to monitor disease occurrence. Importantly, implementation of comprehensive global databases and data mining are also needed for the proper study of the mechanisms responsible for HCV transmission. Here, we review molecular aspects associated with HCV transmission, as well as the most recent technological advances used for virus and host characterization. Additionally, the cornerstone discoveries that have defined the pathway for viral characterization are presented and the importance of implementing advanced HCV molecular surveillance is highlighted. PMID:25781918

  5. Advanced molecular surveillance of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Livia Maria Gonçalves; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula

    2015-03-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health problem worldwide. HCV exploits complex molecular mechanisms, which result in a high degree of intrahost genetic heterogeneity. This high degree of variability represents a challenge for the accurate establishment of genetic relatedness between cases and complicates the identification of sources of infection. Tracking HCV infections is crucial for the elucidation of routes of transmission in a variety of settings. Therefore, implementation of HCV advanced molecular surveillance (AMS) is essential for disease control. Accounting for virulence is also important for HCV AMS and both viral and host factors contribute to the disease outcome. Therefore, HCV AMS requires the incorporation of host factors as an integral component of the algorithms used to monitor disease occurrence. Importantly, implementation of comprehensive global databases and data mining are also needed for the proper study of the mechanisms responsible for HCV transmission. Here, we review molecular aspects associated with HCV transmission, as well as the most recent technological advances used for virus and host characterization. Additionally, the cornerstone discoveries that have defined the pathway for viral characterization are presented and the importance of implementing advanced HCV molecular surveillance is highlighted.

  6. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the hepatitis delta virus antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Carolina; Freitas, Natalia; Cunha, Celso

    2008-01-05

    The delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA genome. The HDAg contains an RNA binding domain, a dimerization domain, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The nuclear import of HDV RNPs is thought to be one of the first tasks of the HDAg during the HDV replication cycle. Using c-myc-PK fusions with several regions of the HDAg in transfection assays in Huh7 cells, we found that the HDAg NLS consists of a single stretch of 10 amino acids, EGAPPAKRAR, located in positions 66-75. Deletion and mutation analysis of this region showed that both the acidic glutamic acid residue at position 66 and the basic arginine residue at position 75 are essential for promoting nuclear import.

  7. Hepatitis E: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subrat K.; Varma, Satya P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a single, positive-sense, capped and poly A tailed RNA virus classified under the family Hepeviridae. Enteric transmission, acute self-limiting hepatitis, frequent epidemic and sporadic occurrence, high mortality in affected pregnants are hallmarks of hepatitis E infection. Lack of an efficient culture system and resulting reductionist approaches for the study of replication and pathogenesis of HEV made it to be a less understood agent. Early studies on animal models, sub-genomic expression of open reading frames (ORF) and infectious cDNA clones have helped in elucidating the genome organization, important stages in HEV replication and pathogenesis. The genome contains three ORF's and three untranslated regions (UTR). The 5′ distal ORF, ORF1 is translated by host ribosomes in a cap dependent manner to form the non-structural polyprotein including the viral replicase. HEV replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate which helps in the formation of the positive-sense genomic RNA and a single bi-cistronic sub-genomic RNA. The 3′ distal ORF's including the major structural protein pORF2 and the multifunctional host interacting protein pORF3 are translated from the sub-genomic RNA. Pathogenesis in HEV infections is not well articulated, and remains a concern due to the many aspects like host dependent and genotype specific variations. Animal HEV, zoonosis, chronicity in immunosuppressed patients, and rapid decompensation in affected chronic liver diseased patients warrants detailed investigation of the underlying pathogenesis. Recent advances about structure, entry, egress and functional characterization of ORF1 domains has furthered our understanding about HEV. This article is an effort to review our present understanding about molecular biology and pathogenesis of HEV. PMID:25755485

  8. Molecular pathophysiology of hepatic glucose production.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Kfir; Tavares, Clint D J; Rines, Amy K; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within a relatively narrow range through periods of fasting or excess nutrient availability is essential to the survival of the organism. This is achieved through an intricate balance between glucose uptake and endogenous glucose production to maintain constant glucose concentrations. The liver plays a major role in maintaining normal whole body glucose levels by regulating the processes of de novo glucose production (gluconeogenesis) and glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis), thus controlling the levels of hepatic glucose release. Aberrant regulation of hepatic glucose production (HGP) can result in deleterious clinical outcomes, and excessive HGP is a major contributor to the hyperglycemia observed in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Indeed, adjusting glycemia as close as possible to a non-diabetic range is the foremost objective in the medical treatment of patients with T2DM and is currently achieved in the clinic primarily through suppression of HGP. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms controlling HGP in response to nutritional and hormonal signals and discuss how these signals are altered in T2DM.

  9. Molecular Pathophysiology of Hepatic Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Kfir; Tavares, Clint D. J.; Rines, Amy K.; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within a relatively narrow range through periods of fasting or excess nutrient availability is essential to the survival of the organism. This is achieved through an intricate balance between glucose uptake and endogenous glucose production to maintain constant glucose concentrations. The liver plays a major role in maintaining normal whole body glucose levels by regulating the processes of de novo glucose production (gluconeogenesis) and glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis), thus controlling the levels of hepatic glucose release. Aberrant regulation of hepatic glucose production (HGP) can result in deleterious clinical outcomes, and excessive HGP is a major contributor to the hyperglycemia observed in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Indeed, adjusting glycaemia as close as possible to a non-diabetic range is the foremost objective in the medical treatment of patients with T2DM and is currently achieved in the clinic primarily through suppression of HGP. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms controlling HGP in response to nutritional and hormonal signals and discuss how these signals are altered in T2DM. PMID:26549348

  10. Hepatitis delta virus genotype-1 alone cocirculates with hepatitis B virus genotypes A and D in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Butt, Fatima A; Amin, Iram; Idrees, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been identified as major causes of morbidity and mortality in Pakistan because HDV causes infection only in the presence of HBV. Coinfection with both hepatitis viruses can lead to a more severe acute form of disease and to an increased risk of fulminant hepatitis. HDV infection differs in its distribution and severity depending on the geographical distribution, and several genotypes of HDV have been identified so far. The aim of the present study was to establish the HDV and HBV genotypes in chronically infected Pakistani patients and to determine whether there is any correlation between HDV and HBV genotypes. We studied samples from a total of 46 chronically infected HBV and HDV patients for HBV and HDV genotype analysis out of a total of 75 chronic HBV carriers enrolled. HBV and HDV genotypes were determined using type-specific PCR, followed by sequencing of PCR amplified products. The results of HBV genotyping showed that 33 of 46 (71.7%) patients had genotype D, five (10.9%) had A+D mixed genotypes, whereas eight (17.3) samples were untypable. We could detect only one HDV genotype (HDV-1) prevalent in the Pakistani population. The HDV-1 genotype isolate was associated with HBV genotype D alone or in combination with A (HBV-A+D). The present study concludes that HDV/HBV coinfection is very high in the Pakistani population and was previously underestimated. The most prevalent circulating genotypes of HBV and HDV are HDV-1 and HBV-D, respectively, in the studied area. There is no specific interaction between HBV and HDV genotypes as suggested by HDV-1/HBV-D or HDV-1/HBV-A+D coinfection. Coinfection of HDV-1 and HBV-D simply reflects the most frequent genotypes circulating in this specific geographical region of the world.

  11. Protein-induced alterations in murine hepatic alpha-aminoadipate delta-semialdehyde synthase activity are mediated posttranslationally.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Aaron S; Cleveland, Beth M; Wilson, Matthew E; Klandorf, Hillar; Blemings, Kenneth P

    2008-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for alterations in lysine alpha-ketoglutarate reductase (LKR) activity are unknown. Therefore, the aim of these studies was to discern the mechanism(s) responsible for induction of hepatic LKR activity in rodents fed excess dietary protein. Four studies were conducted that used 84 mice. Mice were fed either a high-protein (50% casein) or adequate-protein (20% casein) diet in powder form in study 1 and a high-protein (46% casein) or adequate-protein (21% casein) diet in pellet form in the remaining studies. No significant differences in weight gain between the mice fed the different diets were detected. As expected, mice fed high-protein diets had a greater (P< .05) LKR activity in all 4 experiments. Mice fed high- and adequate-protein diets for 8 days showed no difference (P> .1) in alpha-aminoadipate delta-semialdehyde synthase (AASS) mRNA in experiment 1. However, after pooling the data from the remaining 3 experiments, mice receiving the high-protein diet had greater (P< .05) AASS mRNA compared to mice fed the adequate protein diet. In this investigation, no differences (P> .1) in AASS protein abundance were detected. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which posttranslational regulation is responsible for hepatic induction of LKR activity in mice fed high-protein diets.

  12. The Subviral RNA Database: a toolbox for viroids, the hepatitis delta virus and satellite RNAs research

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Lynda; Pelchat, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Viroids, satellite RNAs, satellites viruses and the human hepatitis delta virus form the 'brotherhood' of the smallest known infectious RNA agents, known as the subviral RNAs. For most of these species, it is generally accepted that characteristics such as cell movement, replication, host specificity and pathogenicity are encoded in their RNA sequences and their resulting RNA structures. Although many sequences are indexed in publicly available databases, these sequence annotation databases do not provide the advanced searches and data manipulation capability for identifying and characterizing subviral RNA motifs. Description The Subviral RNA database is a web-based environment that facilitates the research and analysis of viroids, satellite RNAs, satellites viruses, the human hepatitis delta virus, and related RNA sequences. It integrates a large number of Subviral RNA sequences, their respective RNA motifs, analysis tools, related publication links and additional pertinent information (ex. links, conferences, announcements), allowing users to efficiently retrieve and analyze relevant information about these small RNA agents. Conclusion With its design, the Subviral RNA Database could be considered as a fundamental building block for the study of these related RNAs. It is freely available via a web browser at the URL: . PMID:16519798

  13. Computational design of d-peptide inhibitors of hepatitis delta antigen dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, Carl D.; Zuccola, Harmon J.; Hogle, James M.; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2000-11-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) encodes a single polypeptide called hepatitis delta antigen (DAg). Dimerization of DAg is required for viral replication. The structure of the dimerization region, residues 12 to 60, consists of an anti-parallel coiled coil [Zuccola et al., Structure, 6 (1998) 821]. Multiple Copy Simultaneous Searches (MCSS) of the hydrophobic core region formed by the bend in the helix of one monomer of this structure were carried out for many diverse functional groups. Six critical interaction sites were identified. The Protein Data Bank was searched for backbone templates to use in the subsequent design process by matching to these sites. A 14 residue helix expected to bind to the d-isomer of the target structure was selected as the template. Over 200 000 mutant sequences of this peptide were generated based on the MCSS results. A secondary structure prediction algorithm was used to screen all sequences, and in general only those that were predicted to be highly helical were retained. Approximately 100 of these 14-mers were model built as d-peptides and docked with the l-isomer of the target monomer. Based on calculated interaction energies, predicted helicity, and intrahelical salt bridge patterns, a small number of peptides were selected as the most promising candidates. The ligand design approach presented here is the computational analogue of mirror image phage display. The results have been used to characterize the interactions responsible for formation of this model anti-parallel coiled coil and to suggest potential ligands to disrupt it.

  14. Analysis of a hepatitis delta virus isolate from the Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Langon, T; Fillon, S; Pichoud, C; Hantz, O; Trépo, C; Kay, A

    1998-01-01

    Based on the analysis of HDV genomes from different areas of the world, three genotypes of HDV have been identified. Genotype I is the most prevalent and widespread. Genotype II is represented by two isolates from Japan and Taiwan. Genotype III has been found only in the Amazonian basin where it is associated with a history of severe disease, fulminant hepatitis with microvesicular steatosis (spongiocytosis). We report here the cloning and the analysis of the complete viral genome from woodchuck serum-derived HDV RNA after transmission from Central African Republic (RCA) patients with fulminant spongiocytic delta hepatitis. Two overlapping cDNA fragments, covering the entire HDV genome, were generated by RT-PCR and cloned. Three clones obtained from each fragment were fully sequenced. A complete consensus RCA HDV genome was reconstituted. The individual and the consensus nucleotide sequences were compared with those of 16 other fully sequenced isolates belonging to the three genotypes. Phylogenetic trees generated by the neighbour joining method firmly place our isolate in genotype I, and show that this RCA isolate differs significantly from the east African isolates previously analysed. Transfection experiments showed that the isolate is replication-competent, but less so than the control "wild-type" strain. Two novel mutations encountered in this work, one in the antigenomic ribozyme sequence and one affecting delta antigen, were studied.

  15. The Subviral RNA Database: a toolbox for viroids, the hepatitis delta virus and satellite RNAs research.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Lynda; Pelchat, Martin

    2006-03-06

    Viroids, satellite RNAs, satellites viruses and the human hepatitis delta virus form the 'brotherhood' of the smallest known infectious RNA agents, known as the subviral RNAs. For most of these species, it is generally accepted that characteristics such as cell movement, replication, host specificity and pathogenicity are encoded in their RNA sequences and their resulting RNA structures. Although many sequences are indexed in publicly available databases, these sequence annotation databases do not provide the advanced searches and data manipulation capability for identifying and characterizing subviral RNA motifs. The Subviral RNA database is a web-based environment that facilitates the research and analysis of viroids, satellite RNAs, satellites viruses, the human hepatitis delta virus, and related RNA sequences. It integrates a large number of Subviral RNA sequences, their respective RNA motifs, analysis tools, related publication links and additional pertinent information (ex. links, conferences, announcements), allowing users to efficiently retrieve and analyze relevant information about these small RNA agents. With its design, the Subviral RNA Database could be considered as a fundamental building block for the study of these related RNAs. It is freely available via a web browser at the URL: http://subviral.med.uottawa.ca.

  16. Evidence of an Exponential Decay Pattern of the Hepatitis Delta Virus Evolution Rate and Fluctuations in Quasispecies Complexity in Long-Term Studies of Chronic Delta Infection.

    PubMed

    Homs, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Gregori, Josep; Ruiz, Alicia; Reimundo, Pilar; Casillas, Rosario; Tabernero, David; Godoy, Cristina; Barakat, Salma; Quer, Josep; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Roggendorf, Michael; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HDV infection can cause a severe form of viral hepatitis for which there is no specific treatment. Characterization of the hepatitis B or C viral quasispecies has provided insight into treatment failure and disease recurrence following liver transplantation, has proven useful to understand hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion, and has helped to predict whether hepatitis C infection will resolve or become chronic. It is likely that characterization of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) quasispecies will ultimately have similar value for the management of this infection. This study sought to determine the RNA evolution rates in serum of chronic hepatitis delta (CHD) treatment-naïve patients, using next-generation sequencing methods. The region selected for study encompassed nucleotide positions 910 to 1270 of the genome and included the amber/W codon. Amber/W is a substrate of the editing process by the ADAR1 host enzyme and is essential for encoding the 2 delta antigens (HDAg). The amber codon encodes the small (unedited) HDAg form and the W codon the large (edited) HDAg form. The evolution rate was analyzed taking into account the time elapsed between samples, the percentage of unedited and edited genomes, and the complexity of the viral population. The longitudinal studies included 29 sequential samples from CHD patients followed up for a mean of 11.5 years. In total, 121,116 sequences were analyzed. The HDV evolution rate ranged from 9.5x10-3 to 1.2x10-3 substitutions/site/year and showed a negative correlation with the time elapsed between samples (p<0.05). An accumulation of transition-type changes was found to be responsible for higher evolution rates. The percentages of unedited and edited genomes and the quasispecies complexity showed no relationships with the evolution rate, but the fluctuations in the percentages of genomes and in complexity suggest continuous adaptation of HDV to the host conditions.

  17. Evidence of an Exponential Decay Pattern of the Hepatitis Delta Virus Evolution Rate and Fluctuations in Quasispecies Complexity in Long-Term Studies of Chronic Delta Infection

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Gregori, Josep; Ruiz, Alicia; Reimundo, Pilar; Casillas, Rosario; Tabernero, David; Godoy, Cristina; Barakat, Salma; Quer, Josep; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Roggendorf, Michael; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HDV infection can cause a severe form of viral hepatitis for which there is no specific treatment. Characterization of the hepatitis B or C viral quasispecies has provided insight into treatment failure and disease recurrence following liver transplantation, has proven useful to understand hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion, and has helped to predict whether hepatitis C infection will resolve or become chronic. It is likely that characterization of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) quasispecies will ultimately have similar value for the management of this infection. This study sought to determine the RNA evolution rates in serum of chronic hepatitis delta (CHD) treatment-naïve patients, using next-generation sequencing methods. The region selected for study encompassed nucleotide positions 910 to 1270 of the genome and included the amber/W codon. Amber/W is a substrate of the editing process by the ADAR1 host enzyme and is essential for encoding the 2 delta antigens (HDAg). The amber codon encodes the small (unedited) HDAg form and the W codon the large (edited) HDAg form. The evolution rate was analyzed taking into account the time elapsed between samples, the percentage of unedited and edited genomes, and the complexity of the viral population. The longitudinal studies included 29 sequential samples from CHD patients followed up for a mean of 11.5 years. In total, 121,116 sequences were analyzed. The HDV evolution rate ranged from 9.5x10-3 to 1.2x10-3 substitutions/site/year and showed a negative correlation with the time elapsed between samples (p<0.05). An accumulation of transition-type changes was found to be responsible for higher evolution rates. The percentages of unedited and edited genomes and the quasispecies complexity showed no relationships with the evolution rate, but the fluctuations in the percentages of genomes and in complexity suggest continuous adaptation of HDV to the host conditions. PMID:27362848

  18. Epidemiology of acute and chronic hepatitis B and delta over the last 5 decades in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Sagnelli, Caterina; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Coppola, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has gradually decreased in Italy in the last 5 decades as shown by the steady reduction in the incidence rates of acute hepatitis B, from 10/100000 inhabitants in 1984 to 0.85/100000 in 2012, and by the reduced prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive cases among chronic hepatitis patients with different etiologies, from 60% in 1975 to about 10% in 2001. The prevalence of HBsAg chronic carriers in the general population also decreased from nearly 3% in the 1980s to 1% in 2010. Linked to HBV by its characteristics of defective virus, the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has shown a similar epidemiological impact on the Italian population over time. The incidence of acute HDV infection decreased from 3.2/100000 inhabitants in 1987 to 0.8/100000 in 2010 and the prevalence of HDV infection in HBsAg chronic carriers decreased from 24% in 1990 to 8.5% in 2006. Before the beneficial effects of HBV mass vaccination introduced in 1991, the decreased endemicity of HBV and HDV infection in Italy paralleled the improvement in screening blood donations, the higher standard of living and impressive reduction in the birth rate associated with a marked reduction in the family size. A further contribution to the decline in HBV and HDV infections most probably came from the media campaigns to prevent the spread of human immunodeficiency virus infection by focusing the attention of the general population on the same routes of transmission of viral infections such as unsafe sexual intercourse and parenteral exposures of different kinds. PMID:24976701

  19. Hepatitis Delta Virus Minimal Substrates Competent for Editing by ADAR1 and ADAR2

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shuji; Wong, Swee Kee; Lazinski, David W.

    2001-01-01

    A host-mediated RNA-editing event allows hepatitis delta virus (HDV) to express two essential proteins, the small delta antigen (HDAg-S) and the large delta antigen (HDAg-L), from a single open reading frame. One or several members of the ADAR (adenosine deaminases that act on RNA) family are thought to convert the adenosine to an inosine (I) within the HDAg-S amber codon in antigenomic RNA. As a consequence of replication, the UIG codon is converted to a UGG (tryptophan [W]) codon in the resulting HDAg-L message. Here, we used a novel reporter system to monitor the editing of the HDV amber/W site in the absence of replication. In cultured cells, we observed that both human ADAR1 (hADAR1) and hADAR2 were capable of editing the amber/W site with comparable efficiencies. We also defined the minimal HDV substrate required for hADAR1- and hADAR2-mediated editing. Only 24 nucleotides from the amber/W site were sufficient to enable efficient editing by hADAR1. Hence, the HDV amber/W site represents the smallest ADAR substrate yet identified. In contrast, the minimal substrate competent for hADAR2-mediated editing contained 66 nucleotides. PMID:11507200

  20. [Surveillance of hepatitis A by molecular epidemiologic studies].

    PubMed

    Stene-Johansen, K; Skaug, K; Blystad, H

    1999-10-20

    Hepatitis A virus was studied by molecular epidemiology in connection with an outbreak of hepatitis A associated with intravenous drug users (IVDU) in Norway. Hepatitis A virus was characterised by sequencing 114 of 1,242 notified cases of hepatitis A from January 1995 to July 1998. One hepatitis A variant (IVDU variant I) was detected among IVDU during an outbreak of hepatitis A, as well as among 19 out of 49 cases with no apparent association to this outbreak. During the autumn of 1997, a new variant (IVDU variant II) was detected in the IVDU communities. Genotyping of virus from imported cases associated with travel to endemic regions, revealed that they were distinct from the two other IVDU variants. Hepatitis A has disseminated among IVDU over years; this indicates that hepatitis A is endemic in these communities. At the turn of the year 1997/98, there was a smaller outbreak of hepatitis A among homosexual men in Oslo, distinguished by genotyping from the outbreaks in the IVDU communities. By molecular epidemiology we have been able to identify individual outbreaks of hepatitis A and distinguish them from the IVDU outbreak.

  1. Hepatitis delta in HIV/HBV co-infected patients in Brazil: is it important?

    PubMed

    Mendes-Correa, Maria Cássia; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele S; Alvarado-Mora, Mónica V; Da Silva, Mariliza H; Lázari, Carolina; Cavalcanti, Norma C S; Alonso, Flaviane K; Carpinelli, Cátia C; Uip, David E; Pinho, João R R

    2011-12-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infected patients from São Paulo, in the Southeast Region of Brazil. A total of 3259 HIV patients with serological markers for HBV were initially enrolled in the study. Among these patients, 154 (4.7%) were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-reactive. Serum samples were obtained from 86 HBsAg-positive patients and were submitted to anti-HDV serological assay. One (1.2%) HIV/HBV patient was found to be anti-HDV-positive, and the HDV infection was confirmed by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this HDV sequence grouped with other HDV genotype 1 sequences from Mediterranean European countries, suggesting that this virus has a common ancestor with HDV from that region. This patient was probably infected by sexual transmission, as he reported unprotected sexual intercourse with multiple partners over the course of many years but denied intravenous drug use or any travel to the Brazilian Amazon, an area known to have a high HDV prevalence. HDV infection is infrequent in the Southeast Region of Brazil, however there have been a few cases in this region. HIV/HBV patients are at potential risk for HDV infection, therefore investigations for the presence of HDV infection must be carried out in these patients. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The heterogeneous ribonuclear protein C interacts with the hepatitis delta virus small antigen

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is considered to be a satellite virus of the Hepatitis B virus. The genome consists of a 1679 nt ssRNA molecule in which a single ORF was identified. This ORF codes for a unique protein, the Delta antigen (HDAg). During transcription, two forms, small (S-HDAg; p24) and large (L-HDAg; p27) of this antigen are derived as a result of an editing mechanism catalyzed by cellular adenosine deaminase 1. Despite its simplicity, little is still known about the host factors that interact with the virus RNA and antigens being to modulate virus replication. Methods A yeast two-hybrid screening of a human liver cDNA library, using the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) small antigen (S-HDAg) as bait, was performed. Blot overlay and co-immunoprecipitation assays were used in an attempt to confirm the interaction of hnRNPC and S-HDAg. siRNA knockdown assays of hnRNPC were performed to assess the effect on HDV antigen expression. Results Thirty known proteins were identified as S-HDAg interactors in the yeast two-hybrid screening. One of the identified proteins, hnRNPC, was found to interact with S-HDAg in vitro and in vivo in human liver cells. The interaction of the two proteins is mediated by the C-terminal half of the S-HDAg which contains a RNA-binding domain (aa 98-195). HDV RNA, S-HDAg, and hnRNPC, were also found to co-localize in the nucleus of human liver cells. Knockdown of hnRNPC mRNA using siRNAs resulted in a marked decreased expression of HDV antigens. Conclusions S-HDAg was found to interact with human liver proteins previously assigned to different functional categories. Among those involved in nucleic acid metabolism, hnRNPC was found to interact in vitro and in vivo in human liver cells. Similar to other RNA viruses, it seems plausible that hnRNPC may also be involved in HDV replication. However, further investigation is mandatory to clarify this question. PMID:21774814

  3. The molecular virology of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Glebe, Dieter; Bremer, Corinna M

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the smallest enveloped DNA viruses and the prototype member of the family of Hepadnaviridae that causes acute and chronic infections of mammals (including human) and birds. HBV has evolved an extreme adaptation and dependency to differentiated hepatocytes of its host. Despite its very limited coding capacity with only four open-reading frames, HBV is able to evade the immune system of the host and persist lifelong within infected hepatocytes. During active replication, HBV produces enormous viral loads in the blood and a massive surplus of subviral surface antigen particles in the serum of infected patients without killing their hepatocytes. Together with the use of a reverse transcriptase during replication, it provides an enormous genetic flexibility for selection of viral mutants upon selective pressure, for example, by the immune system or antiviral therapy. In addition, viral wild-type and mutated genomes are stably archived in the nucleus of the infected hepatocyte in an episomal DNA form that provides independence from cellular replication or integration within the host genome. We are just beginning to understand the delicate molecular and cellular interactions during the HBV replicative cycle within infected hepatocytes, so further studies are urgently needed to provide a better basis for further diagnostic and therapeutic options. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. The prevalence and impact of brucellosis in patients with hepatitis delta virus infection: inside the Brucella outbreak with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Suvak, Ozlem; Yesilyurt, Aysun Özel; Gultepe, Bilge; Guducuoglu, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is a serious health problem leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite evidence that zoonotic infections are associated with end-stage liver disease, brucellosis in patients with delta hepatitis related to liver disease has not been well characterized. So, we examined this relationship using recent hospital-based data. Material and methods We analyzed data from 96 delta hepatitis patients (mean age: 52.5 ±12.8 years; 50 male; 52 cirrhotics) and 117 (mean age: 50.4 ±7 years; 60 male) control subjects who were selected from patients with splenomegaly. The Brucella Wright test in connection with blood culture was used to detect active Brucella infection. Demographic features, laboratory data, results of ultrasonographic examination of the abdomen and Wright agglutination titers were compared between groups. Results There were 9 (9%) patients with active brucellosis in delta hepatitis patients. Compared to the control group, there was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of having active brucellosis (9 vs. 2 patients; p < 0.001). Higher MELD scores were also associated with active Brucella infection (p < 0.005). Conclusions Patients with chronic hepatitis D related cirrhosis (CHD-C) were at risk of developing brucellosis requiring hospitalization. Higher Wright titers among patients with more advanced liver disease may reflect a unique phenomenon that requires further investigation to determine underlying causative factors. PMID:28261291

  5. Adoptive transfer of unresponsiveness to allogeneic skin grafts with hepatic gamma delta + T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, R M

    1994-01-01

    C3H/HEJ mice injected with irradiated multiple minor incompatible B10.BR lymphoid cells via the portal vein showed delayed rejection of subsequent B10.BR skin grafts. Similar delayed rejection was produced by lateral tail vein injection of B10.BR hepatic mononuclear cells or H-2k cells pulsed in vivo with B10 minor histocompatibility antigens. Inhibition of C3H anti-B10.BR immunity in vivo (assessed by delayed graft rejection) and in vitro (assessed by B10.BR-induced lymphokine production) can be transferred by radioresistant, plastic-adherent F4/80+33D1-CD4-CD8-alpha beta TcR-gamma delta TcR- mononuclear hepatic cells from (C3H/HEJ x C3H.SW)F1 mice injected 36 hr earlier with 100 x 10(6) irradiated spleen cells. By 10 days post-injection, cells transferring delayed rejection are radiosensitive, plastic non-adherent, F4/80-33D1-CD4-CD8- alpha beta Tc+- gamma delta TcR+ cells. Injection of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in vivo into mice receiving pretreatment with B10.BR cells via the portal vein, or adoptive transfer into such mice of immune anti-B10.BR lymphoid cells, abolished delayed rejection on subsequent skin grafting. Delayed rejection or modulation of lymphokine production was associated in all cases with suppression of IL-2 production and preferential retention of IL-4 production from cells stimulated in vitro. PMID:8132216

  6. Liver transplantation in bearers of hepatitis B associated or not with delta hepatitis in the age of the new antiviral drugs: is hyperimmune globulin still necessary?

    PubMed

    Genzini, T; Dos Santos, R G; Pedrosa, C; Curvelo, L A; Noujaim, H M; Crescentini, F; Mota, L T; Guirro, T G; Ferreira, F Y; Salomão, P; Pereira, J R B; de Miranda, M P

    2010-03-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) is a public health problem worldwide; one-third of the population has already been in contact with HBV, and 350 million people are chronic carriers of virus. The appearance of hyperimmune gamma globulin and antiviral drugs has allowed that group to undergone hepatic transplantation, achieving satisfactory results to prevent a relapse. But the use of hyperimmune gamma globulin has an extremely high cost, and combined therapies with new antiviral drugs seem to be a therapeutic alternative. We analyzed 21 patients with hepatitis B associated or not with Delta hepatitis over a mean follow-up period of 19.5 months, concluding that use of only nucleotide analogues has sufficient to achieve satisfactory results. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  8. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. ); Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  9. Delta opioid receptor analgesia: recent contributions from pharmacology and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte Lina

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors represent a promising target for the development of novel analgesics. A number of tools have been developed recently that have significantly improved our knowledge of delta receptor function in pain control. These include several novel delta agonists with potent analgesic properties, as well as genetic mouse models with targeted mutations in the delta opioid receptor gene. Also, recent findings have further documented the regulation of delta receptor function at cellular level, which impacts on the pain-reducing activity of the receptor. These regulatory mechanisms occur at transcriptional and post-translational levels, along agonist-induced receptor activation, signaling and trafficking, or in interaction with other receptors and neuromodulatory systems. All these tools for in vivo research, as well as proposed mechanisms at molecular level, have tremendously increased our understanding of delta receptor physiology, and contribute to designing innovative strategies for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases such as mood disorders. PMID:21836459

  10. Prominent polypurine and polypyrimidine tracts in plant viroids and in RNA of the human hepatitis delta agent.

    PubMed Central

    Branch, A D; Lee, S E; Neel, O D; Robertson, H D

    1993-01-01

    To seek patterns of nucleotide usage in the three types of circular subviral RNA pathogens, trimer frequencies and nearest-neighbor biases were studied in 12 plant viroid sequences; five sequences of circular plant viral satellite RNAs; and the sequence of RNA from the human hepatitis delta agent. The viroids and RNA of the delta agent contain tracts of polypurines and polypyrimidines which make up substantial portions of their genomes. Such tracts are not common in the virusoids or in the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus. Viroids, the delta hepatitis agent, and the circular satellite RNAs of certain plant viruses have several features in common: all have circular genomic RNA and replicate through an RNA to RNA rolling circle replication cycle. However, virusoids and related satellite RNAs are directly or indirectly dependent on their helper viruses for replication, while the delta agent and viroids are not. The difference in the pattern of nucleotide usage between the plant viral satellite RNAs on the one hand, and viroids and delta RNA on the other, may relate to this difference in replication strategy. PMID:7688455

  11. Molecular Pathology of Hepatic Neoplasms: Classification and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Zenta; Jain, Dhanpat

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled investigators to characterize the molecular genetics and genomics of hepatic neoplasia in remarkable detail. From these studies, an increasing number of molecular markers are being identified that correlate with clinically important tumor phenotypes. This paper discusses current knowledge relevant to the molecular classification of epithelial primary hepatic tumors that arise in adults, including focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CC), and combined HCC-CC. Genetic analysis has defined molecular subtypes of HCA that are clinicopathologically distinct and can be distinguished through immunohistochemistry. Gene expression studies have identified molecular signatures of progression from dysplastic nodules (DNs) to early HCC in cirrhosis. Analyses of the mutational spectra, chromosomal aberrations and instability, transcriptomics, and microRNA profiles of HCC have revealed the existence of biologically distinct subtypes of this common malignancy, with prognostic implications. Molecular characterization of biliary and hepatic progenitor cell phenotypes in liver cancer has shed new light on the histogenesis of these tumors and has focused attention on novel therapeutic targets. In coming years, the molecular classification of hepatic neoplasms will be increasingly valuable for guiding patient care, as targeted therapies for liver cancer are developed and brought into clinical practice. PMID:21559202

  12. [Hepatitis E: molecular virology, epidemiology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Frias, Francisco; Jardi, Rosendo; Buti, María

    2012-12-01

    Hepatitis E represents a significant proportion of enteric transmitted liver diseases and poses a major public health problem, mainly associated with epidemics due to contamination of water supplies, especially in developing countries. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for self-limiting acute liver oral-faecal infections. In industrialised countries, acute hepatitis E is sporadic, detected in travellers from endemic areas but also in sporadic cases with no risk factors. HEV is a non-enveloped virus with a single-stranded RNA genome classified into 4 genotypes and a single serotype. Genotypes 1 and 2 only infect humans, and are predominant in the developing countries, while 3 and 4 are predominant in industrialised countries, and also infect other species of mammals, especially pigs, and multiple evidence classifies HEV as a zoonotic agent. Some HEV chronic infections have recently been reported in kidney and liver transplant patients. The mortality rate of HEV infection is greater than hepatitis A. In addition to faecal-oral transmission, parenteral transmission of HEV has also been reported. Several vaccines are currently in development. The severity of this infection in some groups of patients, especially pregnant women, and the occurrence of chronic hepatitis, even with progression to cirrhosis, have raised interest in the application of interferon and/or ribavirin therapy.

  13. An outbreak of fulminant hepatitis delta in the Waorani, an indigenous people of the Amazon basin of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Manock, S R; Kelley, P M; Hyams, K C; Douce, R; Smalligan, R D; Watts, D M; Sharp, T W; Casey, J L; Gerin, J L; Engle, R; Alava-Alprecht, A; Martínez, C M; Bravo, N B; Guevara, A G; Russell, K L; Mendoza, W; Vimos, C

    2000-01-01

    An outbreak of delta hepatitis occurred during 1998 among the Waorani of the Amazon basin of Ecuador. Among 58 people identified with jaundice, 79% lived in four of 22 Waorani communities. Serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was found in the sera of 54% of the jaundiced persons, and 14% of asymptomatic persons. Ninety-five percent of 105 asymptomatic Waorani had hepatitis B core (HBc) IgG antibody, versus 98% of 51 with jaundice. These data confirm that hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is highly endemic among the Waorani. Sixteen of 23 (70%) HBsAg carriers identified at the onset of the epidemic had serologic markers for hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection. All 16 were jaundiced, where as only two of seven (29%) with negative HDV serology were jaundiced (P = .0006). The delta cases clustered in families, 69% were children and most involved superinfection of people chronically infected with HBV. The data suggest that HDV spread rapidly by a horizontal mode of transmission other than by the sexual route.

  14. Influence of hepatitis delta virus infection on morbidity and mortality in compensated cirrhosis type B

    PubMed Central

    Fattovich, G; Giustina, G; Christensen, E; Pantalena, M; Zagni, I; Realdi, G; Schalm, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The effect of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection on the clinical course of cirrhosis type B is poorly defined.
AIMS—To investigate the impact of HDV status on morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis type B.
PATIENTS/METHODS—Retrospective cohort study of 200 Western European patients with compensated cirrhosis type B followed for a median period of 6.6 years.
RESULTS—At diagnosis, 20% of patients had antibodies to HDV (anti-HDV); median age was lower in anti-HDV positive cirrhotics (34 v 48 years respectively). Kaplan-Meier five year probability of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was 6, 10, and 9% in anti-HDV positive/HBeAg negative, anti-HDV negative/HBeAg negative, and anti-HDV negative/HBeAg positive cirrhotics respectively; the corresponding figures for decompensation were 22, 16, and 19% and for survival they were 92, 89, and 83% respectively. Cox regression analysis identified age, albumin concentration, γ-globulin concentration, and HDV status as significant independent prognostic variables. After adjustment for clinical and serological differences at baseline, the risk (95% confidence interval) for HCC, decompensation, and mortality was increased by a factor of 3.2 (1.0 to 10), 2.2 (0.8 to 5.7), and 2.0 (0.7 to 5.7) respectively in anti-HDV positive relative to HDV negative cirrhotic patients. The adjusted estimated five year risk for HCC was 13, 4, and 2% for anti-HDV positive/HBeAg negative, anti-HDV negative/HBeAg negative, and anti-HDV negative/HBeAg positive cirrhotics respectively; the corresponding figures for decompensation were 18, 8, and 14% and for survival 90, 95, and 93% respectively.
CONCLUSIONS—HDV infection increases the risk for HCC threefold and for mortality twofold in patients with cirrhosis type B.


Keywords: delta hepatitis; prognosis; hepatocellular carcinoma; decompensation; survival PMID:10673308

  15. Prokaryotic Expression, Purification and Immunogenicity in Rabbits of the Small Antigen of Hepatitis Delta Virus.

    PubMed

    Tunitskaya, Vera L; Eliseeva, Olesja V; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T; Tyurina, Daria A; Zakirova, Natalia F; Khomich, Olga A; Kalis, Martins; Latyshev, Oleg E; Starodubova, Elizaveta S; Ivanova, Olga N; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Isaguliants, Maria G; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2016-10-20

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a viroid-like blood-borne human pathogen that accompanies hepatitis B virus infection in 5% patients. HDV has been studied for four decades; however, the knowledge on its life-cycle and pathogenesis is still sparse. The studies are hampered by the absence of the commercially-available HDV-specific antibodies. Here, we describe a set of reproducible methods for the expression in E. coli of His-tagged small antigen of HDV (S-HDAg), its purification, and production of polyclonal anti-S-HDAg antibodies in rabbits. S-HDAg was cloned into a commercial vector guiding expression of the recombinant proteins with the C-terminal His-tag. We optimized S-HDAg protein purification procedure circumventing a low affinity of the His-tagged S-HDAg to the Ni-nitrilotriacetyl agarose (Ni-NTA-agarose) resin. Optimization allowed us to obtain S-HDAg with >90% purity. S-HDAg was used to immunize Shinchilla grey rabbits which received 80 μg of S-HDAg in two subcutaneous primes in the complete, followed by four 40 μg boosts in incomplete Freunds adjuvant. Rabbits were bled two weeks post each boost. Antibody titers determined by indirect ELISA exceeded 10⁷. Anti-S-HDAg antibodies detected the antigen on Western blots in the amounts of up-to 100 pg. They were also successfully used to characterize the expression of S-HDAg in the eukaryotic cells by immunofluorescent staining/confocal microscopy.

  16. Epidemiological update of hepatitis B, C and delta in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica V; Pinho, João R Rebello

    2013-01-01

    Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem in Latin America. Data from the 1980s indicated that HBV and HDV infection are the main causes of chronic hepatitis. However, the spread of HBV infection could be controlled through the implementation of immunization programmes. Different countries from Mexico to Argentina display marked differences in terms of HBV genotype distribution. HBV genotype F has been identified as the most frequent in most Latin America countries, except for Mexico and Brazil, where genotypes H and A are the most frequent, respectively. In Latin America, the overall prevalence of HCV antibody is estimated to be 1.5%. Latin American countries have been very proactive in screening their blood supplies, thus minimizing risk of HCV transmission through transfusion. The number of diagnosed and treated patients is still low, thereby increasing the burden of complications such as liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The most prevalent HCV genotype is 1, which is the genotype with the greatest worldwide spread, but it is a different genotype from other regions like Africa and Asia. HDV is present worldwide but its distribution pattern is not uniform. HDV was recently detected in novel geographic regions, reinforcing that it is a very serious health threat in under-developed countries. The main prevalence areas are the Mediterranean basin, the Middle East, central and northern Asia, western and central Africa, the Amazonian basin (Brazil, Peru, Venezuela and Colombia) and the Pacific islands. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the Latin American population are needed to warrant thorough coverage in the rural areas.

  17. Prokaryotic Expression, Purification and Immunogenicity in Rabbits of the Small Antigen of Hepatitis Delta Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tunitskaya, Vera L.; Eliseeva, Olesja V.; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T.; Tyurina, Daria A.; Zakirova, Natalia F.; Khomich, Olga A.; Kalis, Martins; Latyshev, Oleg E.; Starodubova, Elizaveta S.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.; Ivanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a viroid-like blood-borne human pathogen that accompanies hepatitis B virus infection in 5% patients. HDV has been studied for four decades; however, the knowledge on its life-cycle and pathogenesis is still sparse. The studies are hampered by the absence of the commercially-available HDV-specific antibodies. Here, we describe a set of reproducible methods for the expression in E. coli of His-tagged small antigen of HDV (S-HDAg), its purification, and production of polyclonal anti-S-HDAg antibodies in rabbits. S-HDAg was cloned into a commercial vector guiding expression of the recombinant proteins with the C-terminal His-tag. We optimized S-HDAg protein purification procedure circumventing a low affinity of the His-tagged S-HDAg to the Ni-nitrilotriacetyl agarose (Ni-NTA-agarose) resin. Optimization allowed us to obtain S-HDAg with >90% purity. S-HDAg was used to immunize Shinchilla grey rabbits which received 80 μg of S-HDAg in two subcutaneous primes in the complete, followed by four 40 μg boosts in incomplete Freunds adjuvant. Rabbits were bled two weeks post each boost. Antibody titers determined by indirect ELISA exceeded 107. Anti-S-HDAg antibodies detected the antigen on Western blots in the amounts of up-to 100 pg. They were also successfully used to characterize the expression of S-HDAg in the eukaryotic cells by immunofluorescent staining/confocal microscopy. PMID:27775592

  18. [Hepatitis B and delta: the prevalence of seroepidemiological markers in volunteer blood donors and their families].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Muñoz, M T; Bustamante-Calvillo, M E; Guiscafré-Gallardo, J P; Muñoz, O

    1991-01-01

    41 volunteer blood donors and his relatives were studied in order to know about the prevalence of hepatitis B and D virus infections in selected groups. Frequency of HBsAg+ carriers was 0.34 per cent in the Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea and 0.15 per cent in the Banco Central de Sangre, IMSS. Most of the HBsAg+ blood donors were 21 to 40 years old (87.8%); 21.9 per cent had IgM antibodies against HBc and just 2.4 per cent were HBeAg positive. Forty one (26.9%) of 152 relatives had one or more of the HBV markers, 3.9 per cent were HBsAg carriers and 1.3 per cent were HBeAg positive. In the infected relatives group 36.6 per cent were ancestory or brothers and just 14.6 per cent of wives were infected. None of the HBsAg+ blood donors or his relatives had antibodies against delta agent. These results support the fact that the frequency of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAg in the volunteer blood donors group is similar to he frequency in the general population and identifies the group of relatives as those with the highest risk to acquire HBV infection.

  19. Reduced genetic distance and high replication levels increase the RNA recombination rate of hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Chi; Yang, Zhi-Wei; Iang, Shan-Bei; Chao, Mei

    2015-01-02

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) replication is carried out by host RNA polymerases. Since homologous inter-genotypic RNA recombination is known to occur in HDV, possibly via a replication-dependent process, we hypothesized that the degree of sequence homology and the replication level should be related to the recombination frequency in cells co-expressing two HDV sequences. To confirm this, we separately co-transfected cells with three different pairs of HDV genomic RNAs and analyzed the obtained recombinants by RT-PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing analyses. The sequence divergence between the clones ranged from 24% to less than 0.1%, and the difference in replication levels was as high as 100-fold. As expected, significant differences were observed in the recombination frequencies, which ranged from 0.5% to 47.5%. Furthermore, varying the relative amounts of parental RNA altered the dominant recombinant species produced, suggesting that template switching occurs frequently during the synthesis of genomic HDV RNA. Taken together, these data suggest that during the host RNA polymerase-driven RNA recombination of HDV, both inter- and intra-genotypic recombination events are important in shaping the genetic diversity of HDV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and clinical significance of SEN-H virus in chronic hepatitis B, C and delta infections in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cakaloğlu, Yilmaz; Akyüz, Filiz; Bozaci, Mürvet; Ibrişim, Duygu; Pinarbaşi, Binnur; Demir, Kadir; Kaymakoğlu, Sabahattin; Beşişik, Fatih; Badur, Selim; Okten, Atilla

    2008-06-01

    SEN viruses are transmitted parenterally and can cause post-transfusion hepatitis. The prevalence and clinical significance of SEN viruses have been investigated in patients with chronic hepatitis C and B but not in D. We aimed to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of SEN viruses- H in patients with chronic hepatitis C, B and delta in Turkey. SEN viruses-H was analyzed in 85 patients with chronic viral hepatitis (30 HCV, 30 HBV and 25 HDV) and 43 non-professional blood donors. HBV DNA, HCV RNA and HDV RNA were positive in patients with hepatitis B, C and D, respectively. SEN viruses-H DNA was detected by semi-nested polymerase chain reaction method (L2AS, C5S primer in first step, L2AS, D11 in second step) after extraction of DNA from sera (NucleoSpin blood; Macherey-Nagel GmbH & Co KG, Germany). SEN viruses-H DNA was found to be positive in 7/30 (23.3%), 10/30 (33.3%), 6/25 (24%), and 7/43 (16.2%) of patients with chronic C, B, and D hepatitis and healthy blood donors, respectively. There was no significant difference in clinical features and treatment response between SEN viruses- H-positive and -negative patients with chronic viral hepatitis. SEN viruses is more frequent in chronic hepatitis patients than in healthy blood donors. These results indicate that SEN viruses has no effect on the clinical course and treatment response of chronic viral hepatitis.

  1. Adult Living with Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Prevention & ... Institute Education & Training Hep B United Coalition Hepatitis Delta Connect 2017 International HBV Meeting National Patient Advocacy ...

  2. Diagnosis of Hepatitis A Virus Infection: a Molecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nainan, Omana V.; Xia, Guoliang; Vaughan, Gilberto; Margolis, Harold S.

    2006-01-01

    Current serologic tests provide the foundation for diagnosis of hepatitis A and hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Recent advances in methods to identify and characterize nucleic acid markers of viral infections have provided the foundation for the field of molecular epidemiology and increased our knowledge of the molecular biology and epidemiology of HAV. Although HAV is primarily shed in feces, there is a strong viremic phase during infection which has allowed easy access to virus isolates and the use of molecular markers to determine their genetic relatedness. Molecular epidemiologic studies have provided new information on the types and extent of HAV infection and transmission in the United States. In addition, these new diagnostic methods have provided tools for the rapid detection of food-borne HAV transmission and identification of the potential source of the food contamination. PMID:16418523

  3. Influence of delta virus infection on the virologic status in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis B virus genotype D.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Rabab; Abdo, Mahmoud; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Sabry, Dina; Atef, Mira; Ahmed, Rasha; Zayed, Naglaa

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) usually have an unfavorable clinical outcome in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients. In Egypt, data about epidemiology, the spectrum of disease, and impact of HDV on HBV infection are rare. To assess the prevalence, clinical and virological characteristics of HDV infection among Egyptian patients with chronic HBV. Adult patients with Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive were evaluated for the presence of HDV using anti HDV-IgG and HDV RNA by RT-PCR. Routine laboratory investigations, genotypes and subtypes for both HBV and HDV, abdominal sonography, and transient elastography (TE) were done. Liver biopsy was performed only in whenever indicated. One hundred and twenty-one treatment-naïve chronic HBV patients were included. Wild HBV genotype-D2 was found in 98.2% and 81.9% were HBeAg negative. Prevalence of HDV was 8.3% by anti-HDV IgG and 9.9% by RT-PCR. Wild HDV genotype-IIb was reported in 83.3%. HDV infection was more common in males, 90.9% of delta patients were HBeAg negative. Compared to the mono-infected HBV, concomitant HBV/HDV infection was not associated with more derangment in ALT nor advanced stage of fibrosis. 66.7% of HDV patients had significantly lower HBV-DNA level compared to the non-delta patients (P < 0.001). HDV is not uncommon in Egypt. HBV genotype-D was associated with HDV genotype-IIb. Delta infection was associated with negative HBeAg status, reduction of HBV replication, but neither influenced the clinical course nor increased significant liver damage risk.

  4. Molecular mediators of hepatic steatosis and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Jeffrey D.; Horton, Jay D.

    2004-01-01

    Obesity and its associated comorbidities are among the most prevalent and challenging conditions confronting the medical profession in the 21st century. A major metabolic consequence of obesity is insulin resistance, which is strongly associated with the deposition of triglycerides in the liver. Hepatic steatosis can either be a benign, noninflammatory condition that appears to have no adverse sequelae or can be associated with steatohepatitis: a condition that can result in end-stage liver disease, accounting for up to 14% of liver transplants in the US. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the molecular events contributing to hepatic steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:15254578

  5. deltaGseg: macrostate estimation via molecular dynamics simulations and multiscale time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Low, Diana H P; Motakis, Efthymios

    2013-10-01

    Binding free energy calculations obtained through molecular dynamics simulations reflect intermolecular interaction states through a series of independent snapshots. Typically, the free energies of multiple simulated series (each with slightly different starting conditions) need to be estimated. Previous approaches carry out this task by moving averages at certain decorrelation times, assuming that the system comes from a single conformation description of binding events. Here, we discuss a more general approach that uses statistical modeling, wavelets denoising and hierarchical clustering to estimate the significance of multiple statistically distinct subpopulations, reflecting potential macrostates of the system. We present the deltaGseg R package that performs macrostate estimation from multiple replicated series and allows molecular biologists/chemists to gain physical insight into the molecular details that are not easily accessible by experimental techniques. deltaGseg is a Bioconductor R package available at http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/deltaGseg.html.

  6. Hepatitis Delta virus genotype 8 infection in Northeast Brazil: inheritance from African slaves?

    PubMed

    Barros, L M F; Gomes-Gouvêa, M S; Pinho, J R R; Alvarado-Mora, M V; Dos Santos, A; Mendes-Corrêa, M C J; Caldas, A J M; Sousa, M T; Santos, M D C; Ferreira, A S P

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) is endemic worldwide, but its prevalence varies in different geographical areas. While in the Brazilian Amazon, HDV is known to be endemic and to represent a significant public health problem, few studies have assessed its prevalence in other regions in the country. This study evaluated the seroprevalence of HDV among HBsAg chronic carriers from Maranhão state, a region located in the Northeast of Brazil. Among 133 patients, 5 had anti-HD, of whom 3 had HDV RNA. HDV genotypes were characterized by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences from the HDAg coding region. HDV-3 was identified in one patient who lives in Maranhão, but was born in Amazonas state (Western Amazon basin). Phylogenetic analysis shows that this HDV-3 sequence grouped with other HDV-3 sequences isolated in this state, which suggests that the patient probably contracted HDV infection there. Surprisingly, the other two patients were infected with HDV-8, an African genotype. These patients were born and have always lived in Urbano Santos, a rural county of Maranhão state, moreover they had never been to Africa and denied any contact with people from that continent. This is the first description of the HDV-8 in non-native African populations. This genotype may have been introduced to Brazil through the slaves brought to the country from the West Africa regions during the 16-18th centuries. Our results indicate that the need of clinical and epidemiological studies to investigate the presence of this infection in other areas in Brazil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clade homogeneity and low rate of delta virus despite hyperendemicity of hepatitis B virus in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Belyhun, Yeshambel; Liebert, Uwe Gerd; Maier, Melanie

    2017-09-12

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) is hyperendemic and heterogeneous in its genetic diversity in Ethiopia, little is known about hepatitis D virus (HDV) circulating genotypes and molecular diversity. A total of 321 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positives (125 HIV co-infected, 102 liver disease patients and 94 blood donors) were screened for anti-HDV antibody. The anti-HDV positive sera were subjected to Real time PCR for HDV-RNA confirmation. The non coding genome region (spanning from 467 to 834 nucleotides) commonly used for HDV genotyping as well as complete HDV genome were sequenced for genotyping and molecular analysis. The anti-HDV antibody was found to be 3.2% (3) in blood donors, 8.0% (10) in HIV co-infected individuals and 12.7% (13) in liver disease patients. None of the HIV co-infected patients who revealed HBV lamivudine (3TC) resistance at tyrosine-methionine/isoleucine-aspartate-aspartate (YM(I)DD) reverse transcriptase (RT) motif with concomitant vaccine escape gene mutants was positive for anti-HDV antibody. The HDV viremia rate was 33.3%, 30.0% and 23.1% in respect to the above study groups. All the six isolates sequenced were phylogenetically classified as HDV genotype 1 (HDV-1) and grouped into two monophyletic clusters. Amino acid (aa) residues analysis of clathrin heavy chain (CHC) domain and the isoprenylation signal site (Py) at 19 carboxyl (C)-terminal amino acids (aa 196-214) and the HDV RNA binding domain (aa 79-107) were highly conserved and showed a very little nucleotide variations. All the sequenced isolates showed serine at amino acid position 202. The RNA editing targets of the anti-genomic HDV RNA (nt1012) and its corresponding genomic RNA (nt 580) showed nucleotides A and C, respectively. The low seroprevalence and viraemic rates of HDV in particular during HIV-confection might be highly affected by HBV drug resistance selected HBsAg mutant variants in this setting, although HDV-1 sequences analysis revealed clade homogeneity

  8. Molecular biology and inhibitors of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Debing, Yannick; Neyts, Johan; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan

    2014-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a faeco-orally transmitted picornavirus and is one of the main causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. An overview of the molecular biology of HAV is presented with an emphasis on recent findings. Immune evasion strategies and a possible correlation between HAV and atopy are discussed as well. Despite the availability of efficient vaccines, antiviral drugs targeting HAV are required to treat severe cases of fulminant hepatitis, contain outbreaks, and halt the potential spread of vaccine-escape variants. Additionally, such drugs could be used to shorten the period of illness and decrease associated economical costs. Several known inhibitors of HAV with various mechanisms of action will be discussed. Since none of these molecules is readily useable in the clinic and since the availability of an anti-HAV drug would be of clinical importance, increased efforts should be targeted toward discovery and development of such antivirals.

  9. Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis Delta (HDV) Viruses in the Colombian Population—How Is the Epidemiological Situation?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Gutierrez Fernandez, María Fernanda; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Soares; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem worldwide. In Colombia, data from 1980s described that HBV and HDV infection are important causes of hepatitis, but little is known about HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the currently frequency of HBV, HCV and HDV in four different Colombian regions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in 697 habitants from 4 Colombian departments: Amazonas, Chocó, Magdalena and San Andres Islands. Epidemiological data were obtained from an interview applied to each individual aiming to evaluate risk factors related to HBV, HCV or HDV infections. All samples were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV markers. Samples that were positive to HBsAg and/or anti-HBc were tested to anti-HDV. Concerning the geographical origin of the samples, the three HBV markers showed a statistically significant difference: HBsAg (p = 0.033) and anti-HBc (p<0.001) were more frequent in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Isolated anti-HBs (a marker of previous vaccination) frequencies were: Chocó (53.26%), Amazonas (32.88%), Magdalena (17.0%) and San Andrés (15.33%) - p<0.001. Prevalence of anti-HBc increased with age; HBsAg varied from 1.97 to 8.39% (p = 0.033). Amazonas department showed the highest frequency for anti-HCV marker (5.68%), while the lowest frequency was found in San Andrés Island (0.66%). Anti-HDV was found in 9 (5.20%) out of 173 anti-HBc and/or HBsAg positive samples, 8 of them from the Amazonas region and 1 from them Magdalena department. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, HBV, HCV and HDV infections are detected throughout Colombia in frequency levels that would place some areas as hyperendemic for HBV, especially those found in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the rural population and to strengthen HCV surveillance are reinforced by these results. PMID:21559488

  10. Molecular biology of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Christoph; Mason, William S

    2015-05-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the prototype of a family of small DNA viruses that productively infect hepatocytes, the major cell of the liver, and replicate by reverse transcription of a terminally redundant viral RNA, the pregenome. Upon infection, the circular, partially double-stranded virion DNA is converted in the nucleus to a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that assembles into a minichromosome, the template for viral mRNA synthesis. Infection of hepatocytes is non-cytopathic. Infection of the liver may be either transient (<6 months) or chronic and lifelong, depending on the ability of the host immune response to clear the infection. Chronic infections can cause immune-mediated liver damage progressing to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analog inhibitors of viral DNA synthesis delay sequelae, but cannot cure HBV infections due to the persistence of cccDNA in hepatocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatitis B virus molecular biology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, R. Jason; Bagga, Sumedha; Bouchard, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses need a host cell to provide a milieu favorable to viral replication. Consequently, viruses often adopt mechanisms to subvert host cellular signaling processes. While beneficial for the viral replication cycle, virus-induced deregulation of host cellular signaling processes can be detrimental to host cell physiology and can lead to virus-associated pathogenesis, including, for oncogenic viruses, cell transformation and cancer progression. Included among these oncogenic viruses is the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Despite the availability of an HBV vaccine, 350–500 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HBV, and a significant number of these chronically infected individuals will develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Epidemiological studies indicate that chronic infection with HBV is the leading risk factor for the development of HCC. Globally, HCC is the second highest cause of cancer-associated deaths, underscoring the need for understanding mechanisms that regulate HBV replication and the development of HBV-associated HCC. HBV is the prototype member of the Hepadnaviridae family; members of this family of viruses have a narrow host range and predominately infect hepatocytes in their respective hosts. The extremely small and compact hepadnaviral genome, the unique arrangement of open reading frames, and a replication strategy utilizing reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate to generate the DNA genome are distinguishing features of the Hepadnaviridae. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of HBV biology, summarize the model systems used for studying HBV infections, and highlight potential mechanisms that link a chronic HBV-infection to the development of HCC. For example, the HBV X protein (HBx), a key regulatory HBV protein that is important for HBV replication, is thought to play a cofactor role in the development of HBV-induced HCC, and we highlight the functions of HBx that may

  12. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and dual HBV-hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection in apparently healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Brehar-Cioflec, D; Claici, C; Roşiu, N; Negrea, D A; Moldovan, R; Coşniţă, M

    1998-01-01

    The main aims of the present study were to evaluate the transfusional risk concerning HBV and HBV-HDV infections and the prevalence of viral serum markers in apparently healthy persons. Our study included 226 apparently healthy persons in whom we performed tests for HBV (HBsAg, HBsAb, HBcAb) and HDV (Delta Ab) serum markers, using the enzyme immunoassay. In 45 (19.9%) subjects we detected serum HBsAg. In the 181 HBsAg-negative apparently healthy persons, our tests detected HBsAb (31 subjects) and HBcAb (49 subjects). Thus, 125 (55.3%) of the 226 apparently healthy persons had serologic evidence of past HBV infections. Delta Ab were detected in 3 (1.3%) of our subjects. We must state that one of the three Delta Ab-positive apparently healthy persons tested negative for both HBsAg and HBcAb.

  13. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotypes 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy, and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus. PMID:27656178

  14. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human voltage-gated calcium channel alpha(2)delta-4 subunit.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ning; Yagel, Susan; Momplaisir, Mary-Lou; Codd, Ellen E; D'Andrea, Michael R

    2002-09-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel is composed of a pore-forming alpha(1) subunit and several regulatory subunits: alpha(2)delta, beta, and gamma. We report here the identification of a novel alpha(2)delta subunit, alpha(2)delta-4, from the expressed sequence tag database followed by its cloning and characterization. The novel alpha(2)delta-4 subunit gene contains 39 exons spanning about 130 kilobases and is co-localized with the CHCNA1C gene (alpha(1C) subunit) on human chromosome 12p13.3. Alternative splicing of the alpha(2)delta-4 gene gives rise to four potential variants, a through d. The open reading frame of human alpha(2)delta-4a is composed of 3363 base pairs encoding a protein with 1120 residues and a calculated molecular mass of 126 kDa. The alpha(2)delta-4a subunit shares 30, 32, and 61% identity with the human calcium channel alpha(2)delta-1, alpha(2)delta-2, and alpha(2)delta-3 subunits, respectively. Primary sequence comparison suggests that alpha(2)delta-4 lacks the gabapentin binding motifs characterized for alpha(2)delta-1 and alpha(2)delta-2; this was confirmed by a [(3)H]gabapentin-binding assay. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells, the alpha(2)delta-4 subunit associated with Ca(V)1.2 and beta(3) subunits and significantly increased Ca(V)1.2/beta(3)-mediated Ca(2+) influx. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the alpha(2)delta-4 subunit has limited distribution in special cell types of the pituitary, adrenal gland, colon, and fetal liver. Whether the alpha(2)delta-4 subunit plays a distinct physiological role in select endocrine tissues remains to be demonstrated.

  16. Cellular Nuclear Export Factors TAP and Aly Are Required for HDAg-L-mediated Assembly of Hepatitis Delta Virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lee, Chung-Pei; Liu, Hui-Kang; Chang, Ming-Fu; Lai, Yu-Heng; Lee, Yu-Ching; Huang, Cheng

    2016-12-09

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a satellite virus of hepatitis B virus (HBV). HDV genome encodes two forms of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), small HDAg (HDAg-S), which is required for viral replication, and large HDAg (HDAg-L), which is essential for viral assembly. HDAg-L is identical to HDAg-S except that it bears a 19-amino acid extension at the C terminus. Both HDAgs contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS), but only HDAg-L contains a CRM1-independent nuclear export signal at its C terminus. The nuclear export activity of HDAg-L is important for HDV particle formation. However, the mechanisms of HDAg-L-mediated nuclear export of HDV ribonucleoprotein are not clear. In this study, the host cellular RNA export complex TAP-Aly was found to form a complex with HDAg-L, but not with an export-defective HDAg-L mutant, in which Pro(205) was replaced by Ala. HDAg-L was found to colocalize with TAP and Aly in the nucleus. The C-terminal domain of HDAg-L was shown to directly interact with the N terminus of TAP, whereas an HDAg-L mutant lacking the NLS failed to interact with full-length TAP. In addition, small hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation of TAP or Aly reduced nuclear export of HDAg-L and assembly of HDV virions. Furthermore, a peptide, TAT-HDAg-L(198-210), containing the 10-amino acid TAT peptide and HDAg-L(198-210), inhibited the interaction between HDAg-L and TAP and blocked HDV virion assembly and secretion. These data demonstrate that formation and release of HDV particles are mediated by TAP and Aly.

  17. Architecture of coatomer: molecular characterization of delta-COP and protein interactions within the complex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Coatomer is a cytosolic protein complex that forms the coat of COP I- coated transport vesicles. In our attempt to analyze the physical and functional interactions between its seven subunits (coat proteins, [COPs] alpha-zeta), we engaged in a program to clone and characterize the individual coatomer subunits. We have now cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed bovine alpha-COP, the 135-kD subunit of coatomer as well as delta-COP, the 57-kD subunit and have identified a yeast homolog of delta-COP by cDNA sequence comparison and by NH2-terminal peptide sequencing. delta-COP shows homologies to subunits of the clathrin adaptor complexes AP1 and AP2. We show that in Golgi-enriched membrane fractions, the protein is predominantly found in COP I-coated transport vesicles and in the budding regions of the Golgi membranes. A knock-out of the delta-COP gene in yeast is lethal. Immunoprecipitation, as well as analysis exploiting the two-hybrid system in a complete COP screen, showed physical interactions between alpha- and epsilon-COPs and between beta- and delta-COPs. Moreover, the two-hybrid system indicates interactions between gamma- and zeta-COPs as well as between alpha- and beta' COPs. We propose that these interactions reflect in vivo associations of those subunits and thus play a functional role in the assembly of coatomer and/or serve to maintain the molecular architecture of the complex. PMID:8858162

  18. Molecular alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Francesco; Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections with hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C viruses (HCV) are the leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. Both viruses encode multifunctional regulatory proteins activating several oncogenic pathways, which induce accumulation of multiple genetic alterations in the infected hepatocytes. Gene mutations in HBV- and HCV-induced HCCs frequently impair the TP53, Wnt/b-catenin, RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase and AKT/mTOR pathways, which represent important anti-cancer targets. In this review, we highlight the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of primary liver cancer, with particular emphasis on the host genetic variations identified by high-throughput technologies. In addition, we discuss the importance of genetic alterations, such as mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, for the diagnosis, prognosis, and tumor stratification for development of more effective treatment approaches. PMID:26943571

  19. The application of hepatic P450 reductase null gpt delta mice in studying the role of hepatic P450 in genotoxic carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone-induced mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yang; Xing, Guozhen; Qi, Xinming; Wu, Mengjun; Li, Chenggang; Yao, Jun; Gong, Likun; Nohmi, Takehiko; Gu, Jun; Zhou, Wanhong; Zheng, Saijing; Ren, Jin

    2012-11-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) is involved in both detoxification and metabolic activation of many carcinogens. In order to identify the role of hepatic P450 in the mutagenesis of genotoxic carcinogens, we generated a novel hepatic P450 reductase null (HRN) gpt delta mouse model, which lacks functional hepatic P450 on a gpt delta mouse background. In this study, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) was used to treat HRN gpt delta mice and control littermates. Gene mutations in the liver and lungs were detected, and mutation spectra were analyzed. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed, and tissue levels of NNK and metabolite were determined. NNK-induced mutant frequencies (MFs) were equivalent to spontaneous MFs in the liver, but increased more than 3 times in the lungs of HRN gpt delta mice compared to control mice. NNK-induced mutation spectra showed no difference between HRN gpt delta mice and control littermates. Toxicokinetic studies revealed reduced clearance of NNK with elevated tissue concentrations in HRN gpt delta mice. To our knowledge, these are the first data demonstrating that NNK cannot induce mutagenesis in the liver without P450 metabolic activation, but can induce mutagenesis in lungs by a hepatic P450-independent mechanism. Moreover, our data show that hepatic P450 plays a major role in the systemic clearance of NNK, thereby protecting the lungs against NNK-induced mutagenesis. Our model will be useful in establishing the role of hepatic versus extrahepatic P450-mediated mutagenesis, and the relative contributions of P450 compared to other biotransformation enzymes in the genotoxic carcinogens' activation.

  20. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chatterjee, Soumya; Veer, Vijay

    2014-10-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the important global health problems today. Infection with HBV can lead to a variety of clinical manifestations including severe hepatic complications like liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Presently, routine HBV screening and diagnosis is primarily based on the immuno-detection of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). However, identification of HBV DNA positive cases, who do not have detectable HBsAg has greatly encouraged the use of nucleic acid amplification based assays, that are highly sensitive, specific and are to some extent tolerant to sequence variation. In the last few years, the field of HBV molecular diagnostics has evolved rapidly with advancements in the molecular biology tools, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR. Recently, apart of PCR based amplification methods, a number of isothermal amplification assays, such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, transcription mediated amplification, ligase chain reaction, and rolling circle amplification have been utilized for HBV diagnosis. These assays also offer options for real time detection and integration into biosensing devices. In this manuscript, we review the molecular technologies that are presently available for HBV diagnostics, with special emphasis on isothermal amplification based technologies. We have also included the recent trends in the development of biosensors and use of next generation sequencing technologies for HBV.

  1. Hepatitis A virus: host interactions, molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Goncalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Forbi, Joseph C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Purdy, Michael A; Xia, Guoliang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the commonest viral cause of liver disease and presents an important public health problem worldwide. Several unique HAV properties and molecular mechanisms of its interaction with host were recently discovered and should aid in clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatitis A. Genetic characterization of HAV strains have resulted in the identification of different genotypes and subtypes, which exhibit a characteristic worldwide distribution. Shifts in HAV endemicity occurring in different parts of the world, introduction of genetically diverse strains from geographically distant regions, genotype displacement observed in some countries and population expansion detected in the last decades of the 20th century using phylogenetic analysis are important factors contributing to the complex dynamics of HAV infections worldwide. Strong selection pressures, some of which, like usage of deoptimized codons, are unique to HAV, limit genetic variability of the virus. Analysis of subgenomic regions has been proven useful for outbreak investigations. However, sharing short sequences among epidemiologically unrelated strains indicates that specific identification of HAV strains for molecular surveillance can be achieved only using whole-genome sequences. Here, we present up-to-date information on the HAV molecular epidemiology and evolution, and highlight the most relevant features of the HAV-host interactions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Molecular biology and replication of hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus, is responsible for acute hepatitis E epidemics in many developing countries, and the virus is also endemic in some industrialized countries. Hepatitis E is a recognized zoonotic disease, and several animal species, including pigs, are potential reservoirs for HEV. The genome of HEV contains three open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 encodes the nonstructural proteins, ORF2 encodes the capsid protein, and ORF3 encodes a small multifunctional protein. The ORF2 and ORF3 proteins are translated from a single, bicistronic mRNA. The coding sequences for these two ORFs overlap each other, but neither overlaps with ORF1. Whereas the mechanisms underlying HEV replication are poorly understood, the construction of infectious viral clones, the identification of cell lines that support HEV replication, and the development of small animal models have allowed for more detailed study of the virus. As result of these advances, recently, our understanding of viral entry, genomic replication and viral egress has improved. Furthermore, the determination of the T=1 and T=3 structure of HEV virus-like particles has furthered our understanding of the replication of HEV. This article reviews the latest developments in the molecular biology of HEV with an emphasis on the genomic organization, the expression and function of genes, and the structure and replication of HEV. PMID:26038426

  3. Structure, sequence and expression of the hepatitis delta (δ) viral genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Sheng; Choo, Qui-Lim; Weiner, Amy J.; Ou, Jing-Hsiung; Najarian, Richard C.; Thayer, Richard M.; Mullenbach, Guy T.; Denniston, Katherine J.; Gerin, John L.; Houghton, Michael

    1986-10-01

    Biochemical and electron microscopic data indicate that the human hepatitis δ viral agent contains a covalently closed circular and single-stranded RNA genome that has certain similarities with viroid-like agents from plants. The sequence of the viral genome (1,678 nucleotides) has been determined and an open reading frame within the complementary strand has been shown to encode an antigen that binds specifically to antisera from patients with chronic hepatitis δ viral infections.

  4. Arsenic {delta}-doped HgTe/HgCdTe superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsen, G. K. O.; Musca, C. A.; Dell, J. M.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L.; Becker, C. R.

    2008-02-25

    Arsenic incorporation in HgTe/Hg{sub 0.05}Cd{sub 0.95}Te superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is reported. The incorporation was carried out by a {delta}-doping approach where arsenic was incorporated during MBE growth as acceptors. The superlattices were characterized via high resolution x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and magnetotransport Hall measurements coupled with the quantitative mobility spectrum analysis algorithm.

  5. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Miron, Paul; Abrahem, Abrahem; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2007-01-05

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

  6. The hepatitis delta genotype 8 in Northeast Brazil: The North Atlantic slave trade as the potential route for infection.

    PubMed

    Santos, Max Diego Cruz; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Nunes, Jomar Diogo Costa; Barros, Lena Maria Fonseca; Carrilho, Flair José; Ferreira, Adalgisa de Sousa Paiva; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2016-09-15

    Hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) is not well known, even though HDV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection leads to severe forms of acute and chronic liver diseases. HDV is endemic in the Western Amazon region. Recently, the HDV genotype 8 was found in chronic patients followed at the center for liver studies in the Northeast Brazil, Maranhão. Previous studies suggested that this genotype was introduced in Maranhão during the slave trade. The presence of HDV in that study, which was done outside the Amazon region, led us to investigate whether the virus is found infecting individuals in other regions of Maranhão as well. Thus, we screened ninety-two HBsAg positive individuals from five Municipalities of Maranhão for anti-HD antibody and eight were found positive (8.7%). These eight positive individuals were submitted to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to investigate active HDV infection. Half of them were positive for a fragment sequence of the delta antigen; their sequence samples were submitted to genotype characterization by phylogenetic analysis. All sequences clustered in a unique branch of the tree separated from the other branch described in Africa. Our study confirmed the presence of HDV-8 in Maranhão. These infected individuals had no evidence of contact with African people. Furthermore, we found individuals infected with HDV-8 in two more different municipalities. More studies like ours are urgent because the co-infection HBV/HDV is more difficult to treat. Identification of the endemic regions and implementation of healthy policies for preventing this infection are urgent in this region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultraviolet-sensitive RNA structural element in a viroid-like domain of the hepatitis delta virus

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, A.D.; Benenfeld, B.J.; Baroudy, B.M.; Wells, F.V.; Gerin, J.L.; Robertson, H.D.

    1989-02-03

    The RNA genome of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) appears to be made up of two parts: a small domain with a high degree of sequence conservation and structural features likely to promote replication; plus a second, larger domain that is less conserved and encodes the delta antigen. This report focuses on one of the several sets of data that have led to the proposal of this model: the existence of a novel structural element in HDV genomic RNA. This structural element lies within the highly conserved domain of HDV RNA and may be related to the local tertiary structure previously mapped to the central conserved region of the plant viroid genome. Both elements occur in regions with no apparent coding capacity and are distinctively responsive to ultraviolet (UV) light. Transcripts containing partial and full-length genomic sequences of HDV readily undergo a UV-induced crosslinking reaction, which establishes a covalent bond between two noncontiguous segments. By locking two segments of the overall structure into place, this crosslink has permitted the unbranched, rodlike model of HDV RNA to be examined and confirmed in the portion of the RNA analyzed. The clustering of the novel tertiary structure and the recently discovered self-cleavage sites into a highly conserved, but apparently noncoding, portion of the genome defines a viroid-like domain in HDV RNA and raises questions about the possible events leading up to the association of free-living RNAs with messenger RNAs and other RNA molecules.

  8. delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase inhibition by ascorbic acid is mediated by an oxidation system existing in the hepatic supernatant.

    PubMed

    Beber, F A; Wollmeister, J; Brigo, M J; Silva, M C; Pereira, C N; Rocha, J B

    1998-01-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid (AA) on hepatic delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) activity was studied. AA decreased enzyme activity by reducing maximum velocity and tended to increase the Michaelis constant. ALA-D inactivation by AA occurred similarly both in air and argonium atmosphere incubation. DTT reduced considerably the inhibitory effect of AA on ALA-D, but glutathione was ineffective in reversing inactivation. These data indicate that inhibition occurs mainly due to an acceleration of the oxidation rate mediated by the hepatic supernatant utilizing AA in sulfhydryl groups of cysteine residues present at the ALA-D active site. AA probably acts on cysteine from the ALA-D B site since cucumber and radish leaves ALA-D was not inhibited by AA (up to 16 mM). The addition of free radical scavengers to the medium did not alter ALA-D inactivation caused by AA, indicating that active oxygen species formed during AA oxidation were not directly related to -SH oxidation. The chelation of zinc ions from the enzyme by EDTA turned ALA-D more susceptible to the inhibitory effect of AA. This effect seems to involve mainly ZnB, which is known to bind to four cysteines. The present data suggest that AA may participate in the regulation of the heme biosynthesis pathway by promoting a reversible inactivation of ALA-D.

  9. Efficient Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA Replication in Avian Cells Requires a Permissive Factor(s) from Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Brazas, Rob; Ganem, Don

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a highly pathogenic human RNA virus whose genome is structurally related to those of plant viroids. Although its spread from cell to cell requires helper functions supplied by hepatitis B virus (HBV), intracellular HDV RNA replication can proceed in the absence of HBV proteins. As HDV encodes no RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the identity of the (presumably cellular) enzyme responsible for this reaction remains unknown. Here we show that, in contrast to mammalian cells, avian cells do not support efficient HDV RNA replication and that this defect cannot be rescued by provision of HDV gene products in trans. Contrary to earlier assertions, this defect is not due to enhanced apoptosis triggered in avian cells by HDV. Fusion of avian cells to mammalian cells rescues HDV replication in avian nuclei, indicating that the nonpermissive phenotype of avian cells is not due to the presence of dominantly acting inhibitors of replication. Rather, avian cells lack one or more essential permissive factors present in mammalian cells. These results set the stage for the identification of such factors and also explain the failure of earlier efforts to transmit HDV infection to avian hosts harboring indigenous hepadnaviruses. PMID:11462021

  10. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infection in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Moumita; Bose, Sujoy; Saikia, Anjan; Medhi, Subhash; Deka, Manab

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to screen the molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Northeast India (NEI) who are ethnically distinct, tribal dominated and of lower socio-economic status with almost no information available from NEI on these aspects. Briefly, 3 ml blood was collected from 324 random liver disease cases with jaundice, receiving care at Central Hospital, N.F. Railway, Guwahati, Assam with informed consent. The patients detected with HAV-IgM positive status were included and were stratified as acute viral hepatitis (AVH) and fulminant hepatitis (FHF) based on clinical profile. Viral RNA was isolated and HAV-RNA was detected by Real-time PCR using primers for the VP3-VP1 region. HAV genotyping was studied by PCR-direct sequencing-phylogenetic analysis approach using the VP1/2A region of HAV isolates. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS13.0 software. A total of 69 cases were HAV infected with two HBV co-infected cases (n = 69 + 2 = 71), 62 cases and two co-infected cases were AVH and others were FHF cases. HAV infection was predominant in especially in the young and adult age group. HAV-RNA was detected in 28 cases, out of which 19 cases could be genotyped (12 AVH, 7 FHF); which showed the prevalence of genotype IIIA or IA only. Although HAV genotype IIIA was the major genotype in both the AVH (10/12, 83.33%) and FHF (5/7, 71.43%) group, but the difference in distribution of genotypes in AVH and FHF cases was statistically non-significant (P = 0.550). HAV genotype IIIA is associated with the majority of HAV infected cases and severity in NEI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Scotomas in molecular virology and epidemiology of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue

    2013-11-28

    In the 1970s, scientists learned of a new pathogen causing non-A, non-B hepatitis. Classical approaches were used to isolate and characterize this new pathogen, but it could be transmitted experimentally only to chimpanzees and progress was slow until the pathogen was identified as hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989. Since then, research and treatment of HCV have expanded with the development of modern biological medicine: HCV genome organization and polyprotein processing were delineated in 1993; the first three-dimensional structure of HCV nonstructural protein (NS3 serine protease) was revealed in 1996; an infectious clone of HCV complementary DNA was first constructed in 1997; interferon and ribavirin combination therapy was established in 1998 and the therapeutic strategy gradually optimized; the HCV replicon system was produced in 1999; functional HCV pseudotyped viral particles were described in 2003; and recombinant infectious HCV in tissue culture was produced successfully in 2005. Recently, tremendous advances in HCV receptor discovery, understanding the HCV lifecycle, decryption of the HCV genome and proteins, as well as new anti-HCV compounds have been reported. Because HCV is difficult to isolate and culture, researchers have had to avail themselves to the best of modern biomedical technology; some of the major achievements in HCV research have not only advanced the understanding of HCV but also promoted knowledge of virology and cellular physiology. In this review, we summarize the advancements and remaining scotomas in the molecular virology and epidemiology of HCV.

  12. [Molecular basis of obesity-related hepatic steatosis].

    PubMed

    Buqué, X; Aspichueta, P; Ochoa, B

    2008-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a chronic inflammation liver condition that is currently highly relevant because of its strong association with increasingly incident diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus. The primary purpose of this paper is to discuss the best part of current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in hepatic steatosis development, the condition s initial stage, and on progression to steatohepatitis. Special attention has been paid to clinical and experimental obesity-related fatty liver. In the latter, the fa/fa rat is assessed, which constitutes an animal model for obesity with phenotype features similar to human obesity, including insulin resistance and dyslipemia. Hepatic steatosis is a complex, mainly metabolic condition where apparently non-compatible metabolic processes concur, in addition to oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased expression of survival genes. Extrahepatic signals underlie the disorder, such as those arising from peripheral insulin resistance associated with an increase in adipose mass and systemic free fatty acids, together with intrahepatic signals leading to derangement of liver glycostatic and lipidostatic functions, as well as to greater vulnerability to other aggressions.

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... have liver damage because of it. What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  14. Hepatitis B virus receptors and molecular drug targets.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Colpitts, Che C; Sureau, Camille; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Virus-induced diseases include cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapeutic strategies may at best control infection without reaching cure. Complementary antiviral strategies aimed at viral cure are therefore urgently needed. HBV entry is the first step of the infection cycle, which leads to the formation of cccDNA and the establishment of chronic infection. Viral entry may thus represent an attractive target for antiviral therapy. This review summarizes the molecular virology and cell biology of HBV entry, including the discovery and development of new HBV entry inhibitors, and discusses their potential in future treatment of HBV infection.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vescovo, T; Refolo, G; Vitagliano, G; Fimia, G M; Piacentini, M

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process resulting from a combination of pathway alterations that are either caused directly by viral factors or immune mediated as a consequence of a chronic state of inflammation. Host genetic variation is now emerging as an additional element that contribute to increase the risk of developing HCC. The advent of direct-acting antiviral agents foresees a rapid decline of HCC rate in HCV patients. However, a full understanding of the HCV-mediated tumourigenic process is required to elucidate if pro-oncogenic signatures may persist after virus clearance, and to identify novel tools for HCC prevention and therapy. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

  16. Coinfection of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus in Belgium: a multicenter BASL study. Prospective epidemiology and comparison with HBV mono-infection.

    PubMed

    Ho, E; Deltenre, P; Nkuize, M; Delwaide, J; Colle, I; Michielsen, P

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological data on hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection in Belgium are lacking. A multicenter questionnaire-based registry on HDV infection was collated between March 1, 2008 and February 28, 2009. It consisted of patients coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HDV. The data samples were compared to those of a concurrent registry on HBV infection. Prospective data of patients with HBV-HDV coinfection were collected. Active HBV replication is defined as HBeAg positivity or HBV DNA > 2,000 IU/ml. Forty-four patients from 15 centers were registered. A comparison of 29 patients infected with HDV (registered in the concurrent HBV registry) was made against 785 HBV mono-infected patients. The seroprevalence of patients coinfected with HBV and HDV in Belgium is reported to be 3.7% (29/785), consisting solely of the HBV-HDV coinfected patients in the HBV registry. This rises to 5.5% (44/800) if all patients infected with HDV from the two registries combined are included. The patients coinfected with HBV and HDV had higher (P < 0.05) ALT values and more advanced liver disease (Metavir score ≥F2), but had less active HBV replication and lower HBV DNA titers when compared with the patients infected only with HBV. Additionally, the majority of HBV-HDV coinfected patient was male, and 13.6% (6/44) of the patients that were coinfected HBV and HDV were also infected with HCV. In conclusion, this study provided much needed epidemiological data on the current state of HDV infection in Belgium. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Virological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis delta virus in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims There is a paucity of data on the impact of hepatitis D virus (HDV) in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection from South Asia. We studied the impact of HDV co-infection on virological and clinical characteristics. Methods We collected data of 480 patients with HBsAg positive and a detectable HBV DNA PCR, who presented to the Aga Khan University, Karachi and Isra University in Hyderabad, Pakistan in the last 5 years. HDV co-infection was diagnosed on the basis of anti-HDV. ALT, HBeAg, HBeAb and HBV DNA PCR quantitative levels were checked in all patients. We divided all patients into two groups based on anti-HDV, and compared their biochemical, serological & virological labs and clinical spectrum. Clinical spectrum of disease included asymptomatic carrier (AC), chronic active hepatitis (CAH), immuno-tolerant phase (IP), and compensated cirrhosis (CC). Results HDV co-infection was found in 169 (35.2%). There were 164 (34.6%) HBeAg positive and 316 (65.4%) HBeAg negative patients. Mean ALT level was 66 ± 73 IU. 233 (48.5%) had raised ALT. HBV DNA level was ≥ 10e5 in 103(21.5%) patients. Overall, among HBV/HDV co-infection, 146/169 (86.4%) had suppressed HBV DNA PCR as compared to 231/311 (74.3%) patients with HBV mono-infection; p-value = 0.002. Among HBeAg negative patients 71/128(55.5%) had raised ALT levels among HBV/HDV co-infection as compared to 71/188 (37.8%) with HBV mono-infection (p-value = 0.002); levels of HBV DNA were equal in two groups; there were 27/128 (21%) patients with CC among HBV/HDV co-infection as compared to 23 (12%) in HBV mono-infection (p-value = 0.009); there were less AC (p-value = 0.009) and more CAH (p-value = 0.009) among HBV/HDV co-infection patients. Among HBeAg positive patients, serum ALT, HBV DNA levels and the spectrum of HBV were similar in the two groups. Conclusions HBV/HDV co-infection results in the suppression of HBV DNA. A fair proportion of HBV/HDV co-infected patients with HBeAg negative

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a complex clinical entity frequently associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The persistence of HBV genomes in the absence of detectable surface antigenemia is termed occult HBV infection. Mutations in the surface gene rendering HBsAg undetectable by commercial assays and inhibition of HBV by suppression of viral replication and viral proteins represent two fundamentally different mechanisms that lead to occult HBV infections. The molecular mechanisms underlying occult HBV infections, including recently identified mechanisms associated with the suppression of HBV replication and inhibition of HBV proteins, are reviewed in detail. The availability of highly sensitive molecular methods has led to increased detection of occult HBV infections in various clinical settings. The clinical relevance of occult HBV infection and the utility of appropriate diagnostic methods to detect occult HBV infection are discussed. The need for specific guidelines on the diagnosis and management of occult HBV infection is being increasingly recognized; the aspects of mechanistic studies that warrant further investigation are discussed in the final section. PMID:22232374

  19. Continuous expression and replication of the hepatitis delta virus genome in Hep G2 hepatoblastoma cells transfected with cloned viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P J; Kuo, M Y; Chen, M L; Tu, S J; Chiu, M N; Wu, H L; Hsu, H C; Chen, D S

    1990-01-01

    To establish stable cell clones allowing continuous replication of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), Hep G2, a hepatoblastoma cell line containing no hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA sequences, was transfected with a recombinant plasmid containing a tandem trimer of HDV cDNA (driven by the simian virus 40 late promoter) and a neomycin-resistance gene. After selection with the neomycin analogue G418, at least two of the resistant clones were shown to have intact delta antigen by specific immunoblotting, and the delta antigen was located in the cell nucleus by immunofluorescence. Transfected cloned viral DNAs were found to be integrated into cell chromosomes. Replication of the HDV genome was demonstrated by the presence of not only genomic and antigenomic HDV RNAs but also HDV RNAs in multimeric and circular forms. In addition, a 0.8-kilobase antigenomic RNA containing a poly(A) tail and encoding the delta-antigen open reading frame was documented. Continuous replication and transcription of the HDV genome was thus achieved in these transfected cell lines. The results confirmed that replication of HDV was unassisted by HBV. Stable passage of such cell lines strongly suggests that HDV lacks direct cytopathicity in hepatocytes. These clones should be useful in studying the details of the HDV life cycle and the relationship between HDV and its helper virus, HBV. Images PMID:2164671

  20. Binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) to the hepatitis delta virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Thibault, Catherine St-Laurent; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2006-12-20

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has a very limited protein coding capacity and must rely on host proteins for its replication. A ribonucleoprotein complex was detected following UV cross-linking between HeLa nuclear proteins and an RNA corresponding to the right terminal stem-loop domain of HDV genomic RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis of the complex revealed the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) as a novel HDV RNA-interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the interaction between HDV RNA and PSF both in vitro in HeLa nuclear extract and in vivo within HeLa cells containing both polarities of the HDV genome. Analysis of the binding of various HDV-derived RNAs to purified, recombinant PSF further confirmed the specificity of the interaction and revealed that PSF directly binds to the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Our findings provide evidence of the involvement of a host mRNA processing protein in the HDV life cycle.

  1. Rolling-circle replication of viroids, viroid-like satellite RNAs and hepatitis delta virus: variations on a theme.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Grubb, Douglas; Elleuch, Amine; Nohales, María-Ángeles; Delgado, Sonia; Gago, Selma

    2011-01-01

    Viroids and viroid-like satellite RNAs from plants, and the human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA share some properties that include small size, circularity and replication through a rolling-circle mechanism. Replication occurs in different cell compartments (nucleus, chloroplast and membrane-associated cytoplasmatic vesicles) and has three steps: RNA polymerization, cleavage and ligation. The first step generates oligomeric RNAs that result from the reiterative transcription of the circular templates of one or both polarities, and is catalyzed by either the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the helper virus on which viroid-like satellite RNAs are functionally dependent, or by host DNA-dependent RNA polymerases that, remarkably, viroids and HDV redirect to transcribe RNA templates. Cleavage is mediated by host enzymes in certain viroids and viroid-like satellite RNAs, while in others and in HDV is mediated by cis-acting ribozymes of three classes. Ligation appears to be catalyzed mainly by host enzymes. Replication most likely also involves many other non-catalytic proteins of host origin and, in HDV, the single virus-encoded protein.

  2. Molecular Testing in the Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Valsamakis, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped virus with a small (3.2-kb) partially double-stranded DNA genome that causes acute and chronic infections. The impact of these infections on public health worldwide is enormous, with an estimated prevalence of 2 billion acute infections and 360 million chronic infections globally. This review focuses on chronic hepatitis B and the molecular assays used in its diagnosis and management. Background information, including that about features of the hepatitis B virion, viral replication, and epidemiology of infection, that is important for understanding chronic hepatitis B and molecular diagnostic tests for HBV is provided. To facilitate an understanding of the utility of molecular testing for chronic hepatitis B, the four stages of chronic hepatitis B infection that are currently recognized, as well as an additional entity, occult hepatitis B, that can be diagnosed only by sensitive nucleic acid amplification methods, are reviewed in detail, including available therapeutic agents. The molecular diagnostic content focuses on tests for HBV DNA quantification, genotyping, and mutation detection (including precore/core promoter and antiviral resistance mutations). The discussion of these tests encompasses their current utility and performance characteristics, drawing from current clinical guidelines and other studies from the literature. In recognition of the continual evolution of this field, the final section describes emerging molecular markers with future diagnostic potential. PMID:17630333

  3. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  4. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  5. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  6. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Munné, María S; Vladimirsky, Sara; Otegui, Lucio; Soto, Sonia; Brajterman, Leonardo; Castro, Raúl; Velasco, María C Cañero; Bonnano, Alicia; Fernández, Eduardo; Remondegui, Carlos; Passeggi, Carlos; Rodríguez, Claudia; Pizarro, Marta; Fabre, Adriana; Moreiro, Rita; Quarleri, Jorge; González, Jorge E

    2007-07-01

    Hepatitis A, a vaccine preventable disease, is now of transitional or intermediate endemicity in Argentina, as the epidemiologic pattern of the disease has shifted with improvements in living conditions in some parts of the country. Increase in the susceptibility of older children and adults has led to increasing disease incidence. Molecular epidemiology has played an important role in the understanding of HAV infection by identifying modes of spreading and by permitting the monitoring of changes in circulating virus brought about by prevention programs. South American isolates characterized are limited. Eighty-two sporadic and outbreak isolates from Argentina were sequenced in the VP1/2A region of HAV genome over a 9-year period. All the isolates belonged to subgenotype IA. All our sequences grouped into two big clusters. Apparently, at least two lineages have been co-circulating in the same place at the same time. Despite great genetic variability, few point amino acid changes could be deduced. Four sequences showed an Arg --> Lys substitution at 1-297 which characterized the genotype IB at the amino acid level. Many isolates carried a conservative amino acid substitution Leu --> Ile at position 42 of the 2A domain, previously described as a possible fingerprint of HAV sequences in Brazil. The other rare changes have been found before, except for a 1-277 Asn --> Ser substitution displayed in two isolates that has not been previously reported. Argentina recently implemented universal vaccination in 1-year-old children. Molecular tools would be useful in an active surveillance program.

  7. Molecular approaches to validate disinfectants against human hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Jursch, C A; Gerlich, W H; Glebe, D; Schaefer, S; Marie, O; Thraenhart, O

    2002-03-01

    Disinfection is an important measure to prevent hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission by instruments. However, virucidal testing of disinfectants against HBV is difficult, because no simple quantitative infectivity assay exists. Since molecular changes of viral epitopes and the genome may indicate virus inactivation, we measured the alteration of these constituents with 0.065% peracetic acid (PAA) for exposure times up to 1 h. Plasma of a chronic HBV carrier with 10(9) HBV genomes/ml served as viral source in the form of a 10% dilution or of a purified HB-antigen preparation. Alterations of HBV epitopes were analyzed with four monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Changes of the HBV genomes were determined by the inability to amplify the target sequence with a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, either of a short fragment (189 bp) or of the full-length (3,200 bp). The determination of the epitope and genome alteration was quantified as log10 reduction factor (RF) with the parallel line bioassay. Under a high protein load of 10% human plasma, PAA induced a HBV genome alteration of RF = 1.5 after an exposure time of 60 min. Similar RFs were seen with the four HB epitopes. Without protein load, the alteration of these epitopes amounted to a RF of more than 3.5 within 30 min. Such inhibition of PAA activity by protein load was also seen in the virucidal tests with parvovirus. Although the RF were higher in the virucidal tests, the time-dependent dose-response curves for the epitope and genome alteration and for the infectivity inactivation followed the same inactivation kinetics. The molecular alteration and disintegration epitope and genome test may therefore be suitable to measure antiviral activity of disinfectants against HBV.

  8. Inverse Thio Effects in the Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozyme Reveal that the Reaction Pathway Is Controlled by Metal Ion Charge Density

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme self-cleaves in the presence of a wide range of monovalent and divalent ions. Prior theoretical studies provided evidence that self-cleavage proceeds via a concerted or stepwise pathway, with the outcome dictated by the valency of the metal ion. In the present study, we measure stereospecific thio effects at the nonbridging oxygens of the scissile phosphate under a wide range of experimental conditions, including varying concentrations of diverse monovalent and divalent ions, and combine these with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations on the stereospecific thio substrates. The RP substrate gives large normal thio effects in the presence of all monovalent ions. The SP substrate also gives normal or no thio effects, but only for smaller monovalent and divalent cations, such as Li+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Sr2+; in contrast, sizable inverse thio effects are found for larger monovalent and divalent cations, including Na+, K+, NH4+, and Ba2+. Proton inventories are found to be unity in the presence of the larger monovalent and divalent ions, but two in the presence of Mg2+. Additionally, rate–pH profiles are inverted for the low charge density ions, and only imidazole plus ammonium ions rescue an inactive C75Δ variant in the absence of Mg2+. Results from the thio effect experiments, rate–pH profiles, proton inventories, and ammonium/imidazole rescue experiments, combined with QM/MM free energy simulations, support a change in the mechanism of HDV ribozyme self-cleavage from concerted and metal ion-stabilized to stepwise and proton transfer-stabilized as the charge density of the metal ion decreases. PMID:25799319

  9. Inverse thio effects in the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme reveal that the reaction pathway is controlled by metal ion charge density.

    PubMed

    Thaplyal, Pallavi; Ganguly, Abir; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2015-03-31

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme self-cleaves in the presence of a wide range of monovalent and divalent ions. Prior theoretical studies provided evidence that self-cleavage proceeds via a concerted or stepwise pathway, with the outcome dictated by the valency of the metal ion. In the present study, we measure stereospecific thio effects at the nonbridging oxygens of the scissile phosphate under a wide range of experimental conditions, including varying concentrations of diverse monovalent and divalent ions, and combine these with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations on the stereospecific thio substrates. The RP substrate gives large normal thio effects in the presence of all monovalent ions. The SP substrate also gives normal or no thio effects, but only for smaller monovalent and divalent cations, such as Li(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Sr(2+); in contrast, sizable inverse thio effects are found for larger monovalent and divalent cations, including Na(+), K(+), NH4(+), and Ba(2+). Proton inventories are found to be unity in the presence of the larger monovalent and divalent ions, but two in the presence of Mg(2+). Additionally, rate-pH profiles are inverted for the low charge density ions, and only imidazole plus ammonium ions rescue an inactive C75Δ variant in the absence of Mg(2+). Results from the thio effect experiments, rate-pH profiles, proton inventories, and ammonium/imidazole rescue experiments, combined with QM/MM free energy simulations, support a change in the mechanism of HDV ribozyme self-cleavage from concerted and metal ion-stabilized to stepwise and proton transfer-stabilized as the charge density of the metal ion decreases.

  10. General Base Catalysis for Cleavage by the Active-Site Cytosine of the Hepatitis Delta Virus Ribozyme: QM/MM Calculations Establish Chemical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Banáš, Pavel; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hánošová, Veronika; Svozil, Daniel; Walter, Nils G.

    2008-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is an RNA motif embedded in human pathogenic HDV RNA. Previous experimental studies have established that the active-site nucleotide C75 is essential for self-cleavage of the ribozyme, although its exact catalytic role in the process remains debated. Structural data from X-ray crystallography generally indicate that C75 acts as the general base that initiates catalysis by deprotonating the 2′-OH nucleophile at the cleavage site, while a hydrated magnesium ion likely protonates the 5′-oxygen leaving group. In contrast, some mechanistic studies support the role of C75 acting as general acid and thus being protonated before the reaction. We report combined quantum chemical/molecular mechanical calculations for the C75 general base pathway, utilizing the available structural data for the wild type HDV genomic ribozyme as a starting point. Several starting configurations differing in magnesium ion placement were considered and both one-dimensional and two-dimensional potential energy surface scans were used to explore plausible reaction paths. Our calculations show that C75 is readily capable of acting as the general base, in concert with the hydrated magnesium ion as the general acid. We identify a most likely position for the magnesium ion, which also suggests it acts as a Lewis acid. The calculated energy barrier of the proposed mechanism, ~20 kcal/mol, would lower the reaction barrier by ~15 kcal/mol compared to the uncatalyzed reaction and is in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:18686993

  11. Molecular biology of the hepatitis B virus for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chatterjee, Soumya; Veer, Vijay; Chakravarty, Runu

    2012-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the major global health problems, especially in economically under-developed or developing countries. HBV infection can lead to a number of clinical outcomes including chronic infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer. It ranks among the top 10 causes of death, being responsible for around 1 million deaths every year. Despite the availability of a highly efficient vaccine and potent antiviral agents, HBV infection still remains a significant clinical problem, particularly in those high endemicity areas where vaccination of large populations has not been possible due to economic reasons. Although HBV is among the smallest viruses in terms of virion and genome size, it has numerous unique features that make it completely distinct from other DNA viruses. It has a partially double stranded DNA with highly complex genome organization, life cycle and natural history. Remarkably distinct from other DNA viruses, it uses an RNA intermediate called pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and reverse transcriptase for its genome replication. Genome replication is accomplished by a complex mechanism of primer shifting facilitated by direct repeat sequences encoded in the genome. Further, the genome has evolved in such a manner that every single nucleotide of the genome is used for either coding viral proteins or used as regulatory regions or both. Moreover, it utilizes internal in-frame translation initiation codons, as well as different reading frames from the same RNA to generate different proteins with diverse functions. HBV also shows considerable genetic variability which has been related with clinical outcomes, replication potential, therapeutic response etc. This review aims at reviewing fundamental events of the viral life cycle including viral replication, transcription and translation, from the molecular standpoint, as well as, highlights the clinical relevance of genetic variability of HBV.

  12. Molecular Biology of the Hepatitis B Virus for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chatterjee, Soumya; Veer, Vijay; Chakravarty, Runu

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the major global health problems, especially in economically under-developed or developing countries. HBV infection can lead to a number of clinical outcomes including chronic infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer. It ranks among the top 10 causes of death, being responsible for around 1 million deaths every year. Despite the availability of a highly efficient vaccine and potent antiviral agents, HBV infection still remains a significant clinical problem, particularly in those high endemicity areas where vaccination of large populations has not been possible due to economic reasons. Although HBV is among the smallest viruses in terms of virion and genome size, it has numerous unique features that make it completely distinct from other DNA viruses. It has a partially double stranded DNA with highly complex genome organization, life cycle and natural history. Remarkably distinct from other DNA viruses, it uses an RNA intermediate called pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and reverse transcriptase for its genome replication. Genome replication is accomplished by a complex mechanism of primer shifting facilitated by direct repeat sequences encoded in the genome. Further, the genome has evolved in such a manner that every single nucleotide of the genome is used for either coding viral proteins or used as regulatory regions or both. Moreover, it utilizes internal in-frame translation initiation codons, as well as different reading frames from the same RNA to generate different proteins with diverse functions. HBV also shows considerable genetic variability which has been related with clinical outcomes, replication potential, therapeutic response etc. This review aims at reviewing fundamental events of the viral life cycle including viral replication, transcription and translation, from the molecular standpoint, as well as, highlights the clinical relevance of genetic variability of HBV. PMID:25755457

  13. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus in Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; Badano, Inés; Malan, Richard; Flichman, Diego Martin; Liotta, Domingo Javier; Campos, Rodolfo Hector

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. The aims of this study were to describe the molecular epidemiology of HBV in the Province of Misiones, Argentina and estimate the phylodynamic of the main groups in a Bayesian coalescent framework. To this end, partial or complete genome sequences were obtained from 52 blood donor candidates. The phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of S/P region showed a predominance of genotype D (65.4%), followed by genotype F (30.8%) and genotype A as a minority (3.8%). At subgenotype level, the circulation of subgenotypes D3 (42.3%), D2 (13.5%), F1b (11.5%) and F4 (9.6%) was mainly identified. The Bayesian coalescent analysis of 29 complete genome sequences for the main groups revealed that the subgenotypes D2 and D3 had several introductions to the region, with ancestors dating back from 1921 to 1969 and diversification events until the late '70s. The genotype F in Misiones has a more recent history; subgenotype F4 isolates were intermixed with sequences from Argentina and neighboring countries and only one significant cluster dated back in 1994 was observed. Subgenotype F1b isolates exhibited low genetic distance and formed a closely related monophyletic cluster, suggesting a very recent introduction. In conclusion, the phylogenetic and coalescent analyses showed that the European genotype D has a higher circulation, a longer history of diversification and may be responsible for the largest proportion of chronic HBV infections in the Province of Misiones. Genotype F, especially subgenotype F1b, had a more recent introduction and its diversification in the last 20years might be related to its involvement in new transmission events.

  14. Molecular and morphological characterization of myxozoan actinospore types from a commercial catfish pond in the Mississippi Delta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The actinospore diversity of infected Dero digitata was surveyed (May, 2011) from a channel catfish production pond in the Mississippi Delta region for the elucidation of unknown myxozoan life cycles. Only two myxozoan life cycles have been molecularly confirmed in channel catfish (Ictalurus puncta...

  15. Pharmacophore modeling, in silico screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics approaches for potential alpha-delta bungarotoxin-4 inhibitors discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier; Priya, B. Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Background: The alpha-delta bungartoxin-4 (α-δ-Bgt-4) is a potent neurotoxin produced by highly venomous snake species, Bungarus caeruleus, mainly targeting neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) and producing adverse biological malfunctions leading to respiratory paralysis and mortality. Objective: In this study, we predicted the three-dimensional structure of α-δ-Bgt-4 using homology modeling and investigated the conformational changes and the key residues responsible for nAchRs inhibiting activity. Materials and Methods: From the selected plants, which are traditionally used for snake bites, the active compounds are taken and performed molecular interaction studies and also used for modern techniques like pharmacophore modeling and mapping and absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity analysis which may increase the possibility of success. Results: Moreover, 100's of drug-like compounds were retrieved and analyzed through computational virtual screening and allowed for pharmacokinetic profiling, molecular docking and dynamics simulation. Conclusion: Finally the top five drug-like compounds having competing level of inhibition toward α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin were suggested based on their interaction with α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin. PMID:26109766

  16. Analyses of a whole-genome inter-clade recombination map of hepatitis delta virus suggest a host polymerase-driven and viral RNA structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for viral RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Yung-Liang Wang, Robert; Lin, Wen-Bin; Lee, Shang-En; Cheng, Ying-Yu; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2017-09-22

    The genome of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a 1.7-kb single-stranded circular RNA that folds into an unbranched rod-like structure and has ribozyme activity. HDV redirects host RNA polymerase(s) (RNAP) to perform viral RNA-directed RNA transcription. RNA recombination is known to contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of HDV, but its molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we established a whole-genome HDV-1/HDV-4 recombination map using two cloned sequences coexisting in cultured cells. Our functional analyses of the resulting chimeric delta antigens (the only viral-encoded protein) and recombinant genomes provide insights into how recombination promotes the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of HDV. Our examination of crossover distribution and subsequent mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that ribozyme activity on HDV genome, which is required for viral replication, also contributes to the generation of an inter-clade junction. These data provide circumstantial evidence supporting our contention that HDV RNA recombination occurs via a replication-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, we identify an intrinsic asymmetric bulge on the HDV genome, which appears to promote recombination events in the vicinity. We therefore propose a mammalian RNAP-driven and viral-RNA-structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for HDV genetic recombination. The present findings improve our understanding of the capacities of the host RNAP beyond typical DNA-directed transcription.

  17. Analyses of a whole-genome inter-clade recombination map of hepatitis delta virus suggest a host polymerase-driven and viral RNA structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for viral RNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Yung-Liang Wang, Robert; Lin, Wen-Bin; Lee, Shang-En; Cheng, Ying-Yu; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2017-01-01

    The genome of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a 1.7-kb single-stranded circular RNA that folds into an unbranched rod-like structure and has ribozyme activity. HDV redirects host RNA polymerase(s) (RNAP) to perform viral RNA-directed RNA transcription. RNA recombination is known to contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of HDV, but its molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we established a whole-genome HDV-1/HDV-4 recombination map using two cloned sequences coexisting in cultured cells. Our functional analyses of the resulting chimeric delta antigens (the only viral-encoded protein) and recombinant genomes provide insights into how recombination promotes the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of HDV. Our examination of crossover distribution and subsequent mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that ribozyme activity on HDV genome, which is required for viral replication, also contributes to the generation of an inter-clade junction. These data provide circumstantial evidence supporting our contention that HDV RNA recombination occurs via a replication-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, we identify an intrinsic asymmetric bulge on the HDV genome, which appears to promote recombination events in the vicinity. We therefore propose a mammalian RNAP-driven and viral-RNA-structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for HDV genetic recombination. The present findings improve our understanding of the capacities of the host RNAP beyond typical DNA-directed transcription.

  18. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  1. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the Trp/amber editing site of hepatitis delta virus (+)RNA: a case of rational design

    SciTech Connect

    MacElrevey, Celeste; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2005-12-01

    Well diffracting decamer crystals of the hepatitis delta virus RNA-editing site were prepared, but exhibited merohedral twinning and base averaging owing to duplex symmetry. A longer asymmetric construct that includes additional flanking RNA sequences has been crystallized that does not appear to exhibit these defects. RNA editing by mammalian ADAR1 (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA) is required for the life cycle of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Editing extends the single viral open reading frame to yield two protein products of alternate length. ADARs are believed to recognize double-stranded RNA substrates via a ‘structure-based’ readout mechanism. Crystals of 10-mer duplexes representing the HDV RNA-editing site diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution, but suffered from merohedral twinning and averaging of the base registry. Expansion of the construct to include two flanking 3 × 1 internal loops yielded crystals in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution, revealing a unit cell with parameters a = 62.5, c = 63.5 Å. The crystallization and X-ray analysis of multiple forms of the HDV RNA-editing substrate, encounters with common RNA crystal-growth defects and a strategy to overcome these problems are reported.

  2. Nuclear export signal-interacting protein forms complexes with lamin A/C-Nups to mediate the CRM1-independent nuclear export of large hepatitis delta antigen.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Jiang, Jia-Yin; Chang, Shin C; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chen, Mei-Ru; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear export is an important process that not only regulates the functions of cellular factors but also facilitates the assembly of viral nucleoprotein complexes. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) that mediates the transport of proteins bearing the classical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) is the best-characterized nuclear export receptor. Recently, several CRM1-independent nuclear export pathways were also identified. The nuclear export of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L), a nucleocapsid protein of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), which contains a CRM1-independent proline-rich NES, is mediated by the host NES-interacting protein (NESI). The mechanism of the NESI protein in mediating nuclear export is still unknown. In this study, NESI was characterized as a highly glycosylated membrane protein. It interacted and colocalized well in the nuclear envelope with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. Importantly, HDAg-L could be coimmunoprecipitated with lamin A/C and nucleoporins. In addition, binding of the cargo HDAg-L to the C terminus of NESI was detected for the wild-type protein but not for the nuclear export-defective HDAg-L carrying a P205A mutation [HDAg-L(P205A)]. Knockdown of lamin A/C effectively reduced the nuclear export of HDAg-L and the assembly of HDV. These data indicate that by forming complexes with lamin A/C and nucleoporins, NESI facilitates the CRM1-independent nuclear export of HDAg-L.

  3. Association of heterocellular HPFH, beta(+)-thalassaemia, and delta beta(0)-thalassaemia: haematological and molecular aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Cianetti, L; Care, A; Sposi, N M; Giampaolo, A; Calandrini, M; Petrini, M; Massa, A; Marinucci, M; Mavilio, F; Ceccanti, M

    1984-01-01

    An Italian family in which heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal haemoglobin (HPFH) interacts with both beta(+)- and delta beta-thalassaemia is described. The index case was an 8 year old girl who was presumed to inherit both heterocellular HPFH and beta (+)-thalassaemia from her mother and delta beta-thalassaemia from her father. She was healthy and never needed blood transfusions. The possible contribution of heterocellular HPFH to the less severe expression of the compound delta beta/beta(+)-thalassaemia heterozygosity is discussed. By DNA analysis the specific delta beta-thalassaemia defect on the gamma delta beta globin gene region has been established. In addition, a previously unreported association of a polymorphic restriction site haplotype with a beta (+)-thalassaemia mutation has been observed. PMID:6208362

  4. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  5. Molecular characterization of hepatitis E virus in patients with acute hepatitis in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    García, Cristina Gutiérrez; Sánchez, Doneyla; Villalba, Maria Caridad Montalvo; Pujol, Flor Helene; de Los Ángeles Rodríguez Lay, Licel; Pinto, Belquis; Chacón, Elsa Patricia; Guzmán, Maria Guadalupe

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes a common infection in developing countries. HEV infection occurs as outbreaks, as sporadic clinical cases and as large epidemics in endemic areas. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HEV infection in patients with clinical suspicion of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, referred to the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in Venezuela. Seventy-four sera were tested for anti-HAV and anti-HEV IgM antibodies. HEV-RNA was amplified from anti-HEV IgM positive sera using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for ORF1 (RNA dependent RNA polymerase region) and the amplicons sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. The frequency of anti-HEV IgM was 22/74 (30%) in the samples tested. Dual infection with HAV and HEV was found in 31% (12/39) of anti-HAV IgM positive patients. Viremia was detected in 3/22 (14%) of sera positive for anti-HEV IgM. Two HEV strains were classified as genotype 1 and one as genotype 3, which were closely related to Yam 67 (north of India) and US1 isolates from the USA, respectively. These findings suggest that HEV is an important cause of acute viral hepatitis in Venezuela as a single infection or co-infection with HAV, with high morbidity in children and young adults suggesting that this infection is endemic in Venezuela.

  6. Delta-like 1 homolog in Capra hircus: molecular characteristics, expression pattern and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangtao; Zhao, Wei; Zhan, Siyuan; Xiao, Ping; Zhou, Jingxuan; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Niu, Lili; Zhong, Tao

    2016-06-01

    To research the molecular characteristics, expression pattern and phylogeny of the Delta-like 1 homolog gene (Dlk1) in goats. Dlk1 transcripts were identified in the Jianyang Da'er goats by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic trees were constructed by Bayesian inference and neighbor-joining methods. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blotting and in situ hybridization were performed to analyze the expression pattern of Dlk1. Five alternatively transcripts were identified in different tissues and designated as Dlk1-AS1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Compared with the normal transcript Dlk1-AS1, Dlk1-AS4 and Dlk1-AS5 retained the identical open reading frame (ORF) and encoded proteins with truncated epidermal-growth-factor like repeats of 121 and 83 amino acids, respectively. Using the Bayesian inference method, the consensus phylogenetic tree indicated that caprine Dlk1 had a closer relationship with bovine Dlk1 than with Dlk1 from pigs, humans and mice. qPCR revealed high expression levels of Dlk1 in the kidney (P < 0.01). However, mRNA and protein levels presented an inconsistent correlation, possibly because of post-transcriptional regulation. RNA in situ hybridization indicated that Dlk1 mRNA was localized in the interlobular bile duct and alongside the hepatocyte nuclei, in the epithelial cells of proximal and distal convoluted tubules and in the connective region between the mesothelium and myocardium in the heart. The Dlk1 gene in goats produces alternatively spliced transcripts, with specific expression and cellular localization patterns. These findings would lay the foundation for further study.

  7. Molecular surveillance of hepatitis A virus in Argentina: first subgenotype IB detected in a traveler.

    PubMed

    Munné, María S; Altabert, Nancy R; Vladimirsky, Sara N; Arribere, Maria G; Ortali, Sandra F; Sijvarger, Carina; Otegui-Mares, Lucio O; Soto, Sonia S; Brajterman, Leonardo S; González, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    By using molecular surveillance of hepatitis A virus, we characterized for the first time a subgenotype IB imported case in Argentina, a country with universal vaccination since 2005. The case was a crew member of a cruise ship. We consider this a case alert because of its multiple implications.

  8. Type A viral hepatitis: A summary and update on the molecular virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Stanley M; Ott, Jördis J; Van Damme, Pierre; Shouval, Daniel

    2017-09-05

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is an ancient disease and likely to have afflicted mankind since humans first began to live in groups large enough to sustain transmission of the causative agent, HAV. In reviewing what was known as 'catarrhal jaundice' in 1912, Cockayne noted descriptions of epidemic jaundice extending back to antiquity1. The infectious nature of the disease was proven several decades later in deliberate human transmission studies2. Such experiments led to a clear distinction between hepatitis A ('infectious hepatitis') and hepatitis B ('homologous serum jaundice') and recognition of the lack of cross immunity between these two forms of transmissible hepatitis as early as 19453. However, the responsible virus was not identified until almost 30 years later, when small, round viral particles were discovered by immune electron microscopy in the feces of an experimentally-infected human subject by Feinstone et al. in 19734. This review provides an up-to-date in in-depth overview of HAV and the acute inflammatory hepatic infection it causes in humans, including recently recognized aspects of its molecular virology, evolution, natural history, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis B Virus Variants in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Grethe, Stefanie; Heckel, Jens-Ove; Rietschel, Wolfram; Hufert, Frank T.

    2000-01-01

    We characterized hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates from sera of 21 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive apes, members of the families Pongidae and Hylobatidae (19 gibbon spp., 1 chimpanzee, and 1 gorilla). Sera originate from German, French, Thai, and Vietnamese primate-keeping institutions. To estimate the phylogenetic relationships, we sequenced two genomic regions, one located within the pre-S1/pre-S2 region and one including parts of the polymerase and the X protein open reading frames. By comparison with published human and ape HBV isolates, the sequences could be classified into six genomic groups. Four of these represented new genomic groups of gibbon HBV variants. The gorilla HBV isolate was distantly related to the chimpanzee isolate described previously. To confirm these findings, the complete HBV genome from representatives of each genomic group was sequenced. The HBV isolates from gibbons living in different regions of Thailand and Vietnam could be classified into four different phylogenetically distinct genomic groups. The same genomic groups were found in animals from European zoos. Therefore, the HBV infections of these apes might have been introduced into European primate-keeping facilities by direct import of already infected animals from different regions in Thailand. Taken together, our data suggest that HBV infections are indigenous in the different apes. One event involving transmission between human and nonhuman primates in the Old World of a common ancestor of human HBV genotypes A to E and the ape HBV variants might have occurred. PMID:10799618

  10. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Krista; Marra, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disease in Western countries. The more severe form of this condition, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), may progress to cirrhosis and its complications. Fibrosis and cirrhosis are the final outcomes of all chronic liver diseases; however, some morphological and biological differences distinguish fibrosis due to NASH from the forms secondary to other causes of liver damage. Fibrosis due to NASH develops primarily in the pericentral areas, surrounding groups of hepatocytes and thickening the space of Disse. This pericellular fibrosis eventually forms septa isolating regenerating nodules. The main cell type responsible for extracellular matrix deposition is represented by hepatic stellate cells that undergo activation in conditions of liver injury enabling them to participate in the liver wound healing process. Although the profibrogenic mechanisms operating in NASH are partly in common with those observed in other chronic liver diseases, the altered pattern of circulating adipokines, oxidative stress generation and the hormonal profile associated with the metabolic syndrome might have a specific role for the induction of fibrogenesis in this condition. In this paper, we review recent developments regarding the basic mechanisms of NASH and the involvement of hepatic stellate cells in this disease.

  11. Characterization of Si volume- and delta-doped InGaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoryshyn, Y.; Kaspar, P.; Jaeckel, H.; Beck, M.

    2010-05-15

    Bulk InGaAs layers were grown at 400 deg. C lattice-matched to InP semi-insulating substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Si doping of the layers was performed by applying volume- and delta-doping techniques. The samples were characterized by capacitance-voltage, van der Pauw-Hall, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements. Good agreement in terms of dependence of mobility and Burstein-Moss shift shift on doping concentration in samples doped by the two different techniques was obtained. Amphoteric behavior of Si was observed at doping concentrations higher than {approx}2.9x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} in both delta- and volume-doped samples. Degradation of InGaAs crystalline quality occurred in samples with Si concentrations higher than {approx}4x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}.

  12. Paleo-Reconstruction of Carbon Cycling in Large-River Delta-Front Estuaries: Use of Molecular Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The burial of organic carbon (OC) in river deltas and continental margins worldwide account for approximately 90% of the carbon burial in the ocean. In particular, sediments in large-river delta-front estuaries have been shown to be repositories and integrators of land-use change across expansive watersheds that drain the continents to the ocean. Thus, separating natural and human-driven changes in the transport of terrestrial organic carbon (TOC) to ocean is important in understanding the effects of climate change on TOC fluxes. Molecular biomarkers of TOC (e.g., lignin phenols, fatty acids, sterols) in LDE sediments have been used extensively to reconstruct of carbon cycling changes that are reflective of land-use change in the watersheds. However, due to the highly variable hydrologic regimes across continents, continental margins (e.g., active versus passive), and coastal dynamics in LDEs, the fate and transport of these molecular biomarkers varies considerably. Here I will discuss some of the key molecular biomarkers that have been used to date in such historical reconstruction exercises in LDEs (e.g., Mississippi/Atchafalaya, Yangtze, Yellow, Ganges-Brahmaputra, Colville Rivers), and explore how margin-type, residence time of transport, redox, and molecular stability, to name a few, impact the utility of using different biomarkers in paleo-reconstruction studies.

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2013-09-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis D virus circulating in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele; Japhet, Oluwatoyin Margaret; Adewumi, Olubusuyi Moses; Omoruyi, Ewean Chukwuma; Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Oluremi, Adeolu Sunday; Wang, Bo; Tong, Hoang van; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Bock, C-Thomas

    2016-04-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major public health problems in sub-Saharan Africa. Whereas it is known that HBV infection is endemic in Nigeria, there is only little data about HDV prevalence available. Here, we assessed the HDV seroprevalence and determined the HDV and HBV genotypes distribution among HBsAg positive individuals in Southwestern Nigeria. This cross-sectional study involved 188 serum samples from HBsAg positive outpatients recruited at four tertiary hospitals in Southwestern Nigeria. Anti-HDV antibodies were detected by ELISA while HDV-RNA was detected by RT-PCR. Sequencing followed by phylogenetic analyses and HBV genotype-specific PCR were used to characterize HDV and HBV genotypes, respectively. Out of 188 HBsAg positive serum samples, 17 (9 %) showed detectable HDV-RNA. Anti-HDV antibodies test was possible from 103 samples and were observed in 4.9 % (5/103) patients. There was no significant difference in HDV prevalence between four main cities across the country. 64.7 % of HDV-RNA positive samples were from males and 35.3 % from females (P < 0.05). No significant associations were observed with regard to HDV seroprevalence and available demographic factors. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated a predominance of HDV genotype 1 and HBV genotype E among the HDV-RNA/HBsAg positive patients. In conclusion, our study showed a high prevalence of HDV infection in HBsAg carriers and the predominance of HDV genotype 1 infection in Nigerian HBV endemic region. The findings contribute to a better understanding of the relevance of HDV/HBV co-infection and circulating genotypes.

  16. Systems Virology Identifies a Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation Enzyme, Dodecenoyl Coenzyme A Delta Isomerase, Required for Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Likely Pathogenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Angela L.; Diamond, Deborah L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Carter, Victoria S.; Belisle, Sarah E.; Korth, Marcus J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    We previously employed systems biology approaches to identify the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme dodecenoyl coenzyme A delta isomerase (DCI) as a bottleneck protein controlling host metabolic reprogramming during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here we present the results of studies confirming the importance of DCI to HCV pathogenesis. Computational models incorporating proteomic data from HCV patient liver biopsy specimens recapitulated our original predictions regarding DCI and link HCV-associated alterations in cellular metabolism and liver disease progression. HCV growth and RNA replication in hepatoma cell lines stably expressing DCI-targeting short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were abrogated, indicating that DCI is required for productive infection. Pharmacologic inhibition of fatty acid oxidation also blocked HCV replication. Production of infectious HCV was restored by overexpression of an shRNA-resistant DCI allele. These findings demonstrate the utility of systems biology approaches to gain novel insight into the biology of HCV infection and identify novel, translationally relevant therapeutic targets. PMID:21917952

  17. Tracing entire operation cycles of molecular motor hepatitis C virus helicase in structurally resolved dynamical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus helicase is a molecular motor that splits duplex DNA while actively moving over it. An approximate coarse-grained dynamical description of this protein, including its interactions with DNA and ATP, is constructed. Using such a mechanical model, entire operation cycles of an important protein machine could be followed in structurally resolved dynamical simulations. Ratcheting inchworm translocation and spring-loaded DNA unwinding, suggested by experimental data, were reproduced. Thus, feasibility of coarse-grained simulations, bridging a gap between full molecular dynamics and reduced phenomenological theories of molecular motors, has been demonstrated. PMID:21081697

  18. Application of mass spectrometry to molecular surveillance of hepatitis B and C viral infections.

    PubMed

    Ganova-Raeva, Lilia M; Dimitrova, Zoya E; Campo, David S; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Detection of genotypes and drug resistance mutations are important molecular tools assisting in clinical management of patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Together with methods for assessment of genetic heterogeneity and relatedness of viral strains, they form the foundation of molecular surveillance. Currently, all these methods are based mainly on DNA sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. Mass spectrometry (MS) emerged recently as a rapid, cost-effective, reproducible and accurate alternative approach. MS-based molecular assays are highly amenable to automation and provide a suitable platform for routine application to the surveillance of HBV and HCV infections.

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: molecular pathways of hepatitis viruses-induced hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Concetta; Saracino, Chiara; Pazienza, Valerio

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fifth most common tumor and the third cause of death for cancer in the world. Among the main causative agents of this tumor is the chronic infection by hepatitis viruses B and C, which establish a context of chronic inflammation degenerating in fibrosis, cirrhosis, and, finally, cancer. Recent findings, however, indicate that hepatitis viruses are not only responsible for cancer onset but also for its progression towards metastasis. Indeed, they are able to promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a process of cellular reprogramming underlying tumor spread. In this manuscript, we review the currently known molecular mechanisms by which hepatitis viruses induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition and, thus, hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

  20. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus X gene in chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HBV-X protein is associated with the pathogenesis of HBV related diseases, specially in hepatocellular carcinomas of chronic patients. Genetic variability of the X gene includes genotypic specific variations and mutations emerging during chronic infection. Its coding sequence overlaps important regions for virus replication, including the basal core promoter. Differences in the X gene may have implications in biological functions of the protein and thus, affect the evolution of the disease. There are controversial results about the consequences of mutations in this region and their relationship with pathogenesis. The purpose of this work was to describe the diversity of HBV-X gene in chronic hepatitis patients infected with different genotypes, according to liver disease. Methods HBV-X gene was sequenced from chronic hepatitis B patient samples, analyzed by phylogeny and genotyped. Nucleotide and aminoacid diversity was determined calculating intragenetic distances. Mutations at 127, 130 and 131 aminoacids were considered in relation to liver disease. Results The most prevalent genotype detected in this cohort was F (F1 and F4), followed by D and A. Most of the samples corresponding to genotypes A and F1 were HBeAg(+) and for genotypes D and F4, HBeAg(−) samples were represented in a higher percentage. Intragenetic distance values were higher in HBeAg(−) than in positive samples for all genotypes, and lower in overlapped regions, compared to single codification ones. Nucleotide and aminoacid diversities were higher in HBeAg(−), than in HBeAg(+) samples. Conclusions Independently of the infecting genotypes, mutations at any of 127, 130 and/or 131 aminoacid positions and HBeAg(−) status were associated with mild liver disease in this cohort. PMID:22769058

  1. TRIB1 downregulates hepatic lipogenesis and glycogenesis via multiple molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Yuumi; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Ayumi; Makishima, Saho; Boonvisut, Supichaya; Hirao, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Yada, Toshihiko; Yanagisawa, Yoshiko; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masafumi; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian tribbles homolog 1 (TRIB1) regulates hepatic lipogenesis and is genetically associated with plasma triglyceride (TG) levels and cholesterol, but the molecular mechanisms remain obscure. We explored these mechanisms in mouse livers transfected with a TRIB1 overexpression, a shRNA template or a control (LacZ) adenovirus vector. The overexpression of TRIB1 reduced, whereas induction of the shRNA template increased, plasma glucose, TG, and cholesterol and simultaneously hepatic TG and glycogen levels. The involvement of TRIB1 in hepatic lipid accumulation was supported by the findings of a human SNP association study. A TRIB1 SNP, rs6982502, was identified in an enhancer sequence, modulated enhancer activity in reporter gene assays, and was significantly (P=9.39 × 10(-7)) associated with ultrasonographically diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a population of 5570 individuals. Transcriptome analyses of mouse livers revealed significant modulation of the gene sets involved in glycogenolysis and lipogenesis. Enforced TRIB1 expression abolished CCAAT/enhancer binding protein A (CEBPA), CEBPB, and MLXIPL proteins, whereas knockdown increased the protein level. Levels of TRIB1 expression simultaneously affected MKK4 (MAP2K4), MEK1 (MAP2K1), and ERK1/2 (MAPK1/3) protein levels and the phosphorylation of JNK, but not of ERK1/2. Pull-down and mammalian two-hybrid analyses revealed novel molecular interaction between TRIB1 and a hepatic lipogenic master regulator, MLXIPL. Co-expression of TRIB1 and CEBPA or MLXIPL reduced their protein levels and proteasome inhibitors attenuated the reduction. These data suggested that the modulation of TRIB1 expression affects hepatic lipogenesis and glycogenesis through multiple molecular interactions.

  2. Molecular tracing of Japan-indigenous hepatitis E viruses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Orito, Etsuro; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Kang, Jong-Hon; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Matsui, Atsushi; Hori, Akiko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Sakugawa, Hiroshi; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Kitamura, Tsuneo; Mizokami, Masashi; Mishiro, Shunji

    2006-04-01

    The ancestor(s) of apparently Japan-indigenous strains of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was probably of foreign origin, but it remains unclear when and from where it made inroads. In this study, 24 genotype 3 and 24 genotype 4 HEV strains recovered in Japan each showed a significant cluster, clearly distinct from those of foreign strains, in the phylogenetic tree constructed from an 821 nt RNA polymerase gene fragment. The evolutionary rate, approximately 0.8 x 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year, enabled tracing of the demographic history of HEV and suggested that the ancestors of Japan-indigenous HEV had made inroads around 1900, when several kinds of Yorkshire pig were imported from the UK to Japan. Interestingly, the evolutionary growth of genotype 3 in Japan has been slow since the 1920s, whereas genotype 4 has spread rapidly since the 1980s. In conclusion, these data suggest that the indigenization and spread of HEV in Japan were associated with the popularization of eating pork.

  3. Molecular analysis of hepatitis A virus strains obtained from patients with acute hepatitis A in Mongolia, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Baasanjav, Nachin; Nyamkhuu, Dulmaa; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tominari; Nagashima, Shigeo; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high endemicity of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Mongolia, the genetic information on those HAV strains is limited. Serum samples obtained from 935 patients with acute hepatitis in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia during 2004-2013 were tested for the presence of HAV RNA using reverse transcription-PCR with primers targeting the VP1-2B region (481 nucleotides, primer sequences at both ends excluded). Overall, 180 patients (19.3%) had detectable HAV RNA. These 180 isolates shared 94.6-100% identity and formed four phylogenetic clusters within subgenotype IA. One or three representative HAV isolates from each cluster exhibited 2.6-3.9% difference between clusters over the entire genome. Cluster 1 accounted for 65.0% of the total, followed by Cluster 2 (30.6%), Cluster 3 (3.3%), and Cluster 4 (1.1%). Clusters 1 and 2 were predominant throughout the observation period, whereas Cluster 3 was undetectable in 2009 and 2013 and Cluster 4 became undetectable after 2009. The Mongolian HAV isolates were closest to those of Chinese or Japanese origin (97.7-98.5% identities over the entire genome), suggesting the evolution from a common ancestor with those circulating in China and Japan. Further molecular epidemiological analyses of HAV infection are necessary to investigate the factors underlying the spread of HAV and to implement appropriate prevention measures in Mongolia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Han; Park, Yong Kwang; Park, Eun-Sook; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2014-05-21

    Oral antiviral agents have been developed in the last two decades for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). However, antiviral resistance remains an important challenge for long-term CHB therapy. All of the clinically available oral antiviral agents are nucleoside or nucleotide analogues that target the activity of viral reverse transcriptase (RT), and all are reported to have resistant mutations. Since the hepatitis B virus (HBV) RT, like other viral polymerases, lacks proofreading activity, the emergence of drug-resistance occurs readily under selective pressure from the administration of antiviral agents. The molecular diagnosis of drug-resistant HBV is based on sequence variations, and current diagnostic methods include sequencing, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis, and hybridization. Here, we will discuss the currently available molecular diagnosis tools, in vitro phenotypic assays for validation of drug-resistant HBV, and treatment options for drug-resistant HBV.

  5. Molecular Determinants and Dynamics of Hepatitis C Virus Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Coller, Kelly E.; Heaton, Nicholas S.; Berger, Kristi L.; Cooper, Jacob D.; Saunders, Jessica L.; Randall, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    The current model of hepatitis C virus (HCV) production involves the assembly of virions on or near the surface of lipid droplets, envelopment at the ER in association with components of VLDL synthesis, and egress via the secretory pathway. However, the cellular requirements for and a mechanistic understanding of HCV secretion are incomplete at best. We combined an RNA interference (RNAi) analysis of host factors for infectious HCV secretion with the development of live cell imaging of HCV core trafficking to gain a detailed understanding of HCV egress. RNAi studies identified multiple components of the secretory pathway, including ER to Golgi trafficking, lipid and protein kinases that regulate budding from the trans-Golgi network (TGN), VAMP1 vesicles and adaptor proteins, and the recycling endosome. Our results support a model wherein HCV is infectious upon envelopment at the ER and exits the cell via the secretory pathway. We next constructed infectious HCV with a tetracysteine (TC) tag insertion in core (TC-core) to monitor the dynamics of HCV core trafficking in association with its cellular cofactors. In order to isolate core protein movements associated with infectious HCV secretion, only trafficking events that required the essential HCV assembly factor NS2 were quantified. TC-core traffics to the cell periphery along microtubules and this movement can be inhibited by nocodazole. Sub-populations of TC-core localize to the Golgi and co-traffic with components of the recycling endosome. Silencing of the recycling endosome component Rab11a results in the accumulation of HCV core at the Golgi. The majority of dynamic core traffics in association with apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and VAMP1 vesicles. This study identifies many new host cofactors of HCV egress, while presenting dynamic studies of HCV core trafficking in infected cells. PMID:22241992

  6. The gene controlling marijuana psychoactivity: molecular cloning and heterologous expression of Delta1-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase from Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Ishikawa, Yu; Wada, Yoshiko; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Taura, Futoshi

    2004-09-17

    Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase is the enzyme that catalyzes oxidative cyclization of cannabigerolic acid into THCA, the precursor of Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinol. We cloned a novel cDNA (GenBank trade mark accession number AB057805) encoding THCA synthase by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions from rapidly expanding leaves of Cannabis sativa. This gene consists of a 1635-nucleotide open reading frame, encoding a 545-amino acid polypeptide of which the first 28 amino acid residues constitute the signal peptide. The predicted molecular weight of the 517-amino acid mature polypeptide is 58,597 Da. Interestingly, the deduced amino acid sequence exhibited high homology to berberine bridge enzyme from Eschscholtzia californica, which is involved in alkaloid biosynthesis. The liquid culture of transgenic tobacco hairy roots harboring the cDNA produced THCA upon feeding of cannabigerolic acid, demonstrating unequivocally that this gene encodes an active THCA synthase. Overexpression of the recombinant THCA synthase was achieved using a baculovirus-insect expression system. The purified recombinant enzyme contained covalently attached FAD cofactor at a molar ratio of FAD to protein of 1:1. The mutant enzyme constructed by changing His-114 of the wild-type enzyme to Ala-114 exhibited neither absorption characteristics of flavoproteins nor THCA synthase activity. Thus, we concluded that the FAD binding residue is His-114 and that the THCA synthase reaction is FAD-dependent. This is the first report on molecular characterization of an enzyme specific to cannabinoid biosynthesis.

  7. Raman spectroscopy-based screening of hepatitis C and associated molecular changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Maria; Bilal, M.; Saleem, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Fatima, Kiran; Ahmed, M.; Hayat, Abbas; Shahzada, Shaista; Ullah Khan, Ehsan

    2017-09-01

    This study presents the optical screening of hepatitis C and its associated molecular changes in human blood sera using a partial least-squares regression model based on their Raman spectra. In total, 152 samples were tested through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for confirmation. This model utilizes minor spectral variations in the Raman spectra of the positive and control groups. Regression coefficients of this model were analyzed with reference to the variations in concentration of associated molecules in these two groups. It was found that trehalose, chitin, ammonia, and cytokines are positively correlated while lipids, beta structures of proteins, and carbohydrate-binding proteins are negatively correlated with hepatitis C. The regression vector yielded by this model is utilized to predict hepatitis C in unknown samples. This model has been evaluated by a cross-validation method, which yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.91. Moreover, 30 unknown samples were screened for hepatitis C infection using this model to test its performance. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from these predictions were found to be 93.3%, 100%, 96.7%, and 1, respectively.

  8. [Molecular characteristic of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 causing pancreatitis ].

    PubMed

    Fu, Guanghua; Huang, Yu; Fu, Qiuling; Cheng, Longfei; Wan, Chunhe; Shi, Shaohua; Chen, Hongmei; Lin, Jiansheng; Lin, Fang

    2014-09-04

    [OBJECTIVE] We studied the molecular characteristics of the full-length genome of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 causing pancreatitis in Muscovy ducklings. [METHODS] We determined the entire genomic sequence of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 strain MPZJ1206 using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay and analyzed the bioinformatics of the viral genome sequence. [ RESULTS] The genome length of strain MPZJ1206 comprised 7703 bases, with a G + C content of 43.05%. The genome of MPZJ1206 contains a single, long open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 2249 amino acids, with a genomic orgariization similar to those of other isolates of duck hepatitis A virus type 1. MPZJ1206 is identical with previously isolates by 93. 5% - 99. 6% in nucleotide sequence and 97. 9% - 99. 6% in amino acid sequence and shares genetic distance no more than 7%. Phylogenetic analysis based on genome sequence indicates that MPZJ1206 shares a close genetic relationship with two strains isolated in 2011. [CONCLUSION] Although pathotype caused by MPZJ1206 strain is significantly distinct from those induced by classical isolates of duck hepatitis A virus type 1, the genome of MPZJ1206 shares high homology with those of previous isolates. The change of pathotype may result from an alteration in viral tissue tropism of MPZJ1206.

  9. Identification of a natural intergenotypic recombinant hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 and 2 in Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Sy, B T; Nguyen, H M; Toan, N L; Song, L H; Tong, H V; Wolboldt, C; Binh, V Q; Kremsner, P G; Velavan, T P; Bock, C-T

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is acquired as a co- /superinfection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and can modulate the pathophysiology of chronic hepatitis B and related liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. Among the eight distinct HDV genotypes reported, relatively few studies have attempted to investigate the prevalence of HDV mixed genotypes and RNA recombination of HDV. With a recorded prevalence of 10-20% HBV infection in Vietnam, this study investigated the HDV variability, HDV genotypes and HDV recombination among twenty-one HDV isolates in Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patients. HDV subgenomic and full-length genome sequences were obtained using newly established HDV-specific RT-PCR techniques. The nucleotide homology was observed from 74.6% to 99.4% among the investigated full-length genome of the HDV isolates. We observed HDV genotype 1 and HDV genotype 2 in the investigated Vietnamese patients. Although no HDV genotype mixtures were observed, we report here a newly identified recombinant of HDV genotypes (HDV 1 and HDV 2). The identified recombinant HDV isolate C03 revealed sequence homology to both HDV genotype 1 (nt1 to nt907) and HDV genotype 2 (nt908 to nt1675; HDAg coding region) with a breakpoint at nt908. Our findings demonstrate the prevalence of intergenotypic recombination between HDV genotypes 1 and 2 in a Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patient. Extended investigation on the distribution and prevalence of HDV, HDV mixed genotypes and recombinant HDV genotypes in a larger Vietnamese population offers vital insights into understanding of the micro-epidemiology of HDV and subsequent pathophysiology in chronic HBV- /HDV-related liver diseases.

  10. Hepatic nuclear receptor PPARalpha in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus): cloning and molecular characterisation.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Suong Ngoc Thi; McKinnon, Ross Allan; Stupans, Ieva

    2007-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a member of the nuclear/steroid receptor gene superfamily that plays an essential role in fatty acid metabolism. PPARalpha modulates the expression of genes encoding peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes and microsomal fatty acid hydroxylases CYP4As. We have previously reported that the obligate Eucalyptus feeder koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) exhibits a higher hepatic CYP4A activity and an absence of peroxisomal palmitoyl-CoA oxidation as compared to non-Eucalyptus feeders human, rat or wallaby. Here we describe the cloning, expression and molecular characterisation of koala hepatic PPARalpha. A full-length PPARalpha cDNA of size 1515 bp was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The koala PPARalpha cDNA encodes a protein of 468 amino acids. Transfection of the koala PPARalpha cDNA into Cos-7 cells resulted in the expression of a protein recognised by a rabbit anti-human PPARalpha polyclonal antibody. PPARalpha immunoreactive bands of the same molecular mass were detected in nuclear extracts of koala livers. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of koala hepatic PPARalpha which shares several common features with other published PPARalphas; however, it exhibits important differences in both the DNA and ligand binding domains.

  11. Two years' experience of implementing molecular screening of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus 1, 2 in Riyadh blood donors.

    PubMed

    Mohamud, Hanat S; Mohamed, Deqa H; Alqahtani, Farjah H; Almajid, Fahad M; Alswat, Khalid; Somily, Ali M

    2016-04-01

    Molecular screening technologies have improved blood safety by reducing the number of window-period transmissions relative to serological screening. In the two years following the introduction of molecular testing in King Khalid University Hospital, Saudi Arabia, 25,920 donor samples were screened in parallel by both serological and molecular techniques for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). No HCV or HIV NAT yields were detected. However, molecular screening enabled the interdiction of two confirmed HBV NAT yields. This is only the second report of confirmed HBV NAT yield in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and amongst the few reports in the wider Middle East and North Africa region.

  12. A one step real time PCR method for the quantification of hepatitis delta virus RNA using an external armored RNA standard and intrinsic internal control.

    PubMed

    Karataylı, Ersin; Altunoğlu, Yasemin Çelik; Karataylı, Senem Ceren; Alagöz, S Gökçe K; Cınar, Kubilay; Yalçın, Kendal; Idilman, Ramazan; Yurdaydın, Cihan; Bozdayı, A Mithat

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA viral load measurement is critical in diagnosis and monitoring the response to antiviral treatment. Our aim is to design a real time PCR method for accurate quantitation of HDV RNA in clinical specimens using an armored RNA as external standard, and an intrinsic internal control. A plasmid bearing delta antigen region of genotype I HDV genome was used to develop an armored RNA. Serial dilutions of the armored HDV RNA standard with 10(12)copy/mL were used as standards for quantitation. A primer-probe set derived from HDAg region was used in one step EZ RT PCR kit chemistry which uses rTth enzyme allowing reverse transcription and polymerization in the same tube. The kit also uses the advantage of uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) enzyme treatment to prevent PCR contamination. The established assay has a dynamic range of 10(2)-10(11)copy/mL with a PCR efficiency of 96.9%. Detection limit was 858±32copy/mL with 95% confidence interval. Intra- and inter-assay variabilities were low for high, medium and low levels of viremia. Incorporation of freely circulating GAPDH in serum into the assay as an intrinsic internal control prevented false negative results and failures in PCR amplifications due to inhibitors, inefficient extraction procedures or enzymatic reactions. In conclusion, this study defines a novel assay for sensitive and reliable quantification of HDV RNA using an armored HDV RNA as a standard and GAPDH in plasma or serum as an intrinsic internal control in a single tube. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hepatic gene expression during treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin: Identifying molecular pathways for treatment response.

    PubMed

    Feld, Jordan J; Nanda, Santosh; Huang, Ying; Chen, Weiping; Cam, Maggie; Pusek, Susan N; Schweigler, Lisa M; Theodore, Dickens; Zacks, Steven L; Liang, T Jake; Fried, Michael W

    2007-11-01

    The reasons for hepatitis C treatment failure remain unknown but may be related to different host responses to therapy. In this study, we compared hepatic gene expression in patients prior to and during peginterferon and ribavirin therapy. In the on-treatment group, patients received either ribavirin for 72 hours prior to peginterferon alpha-2a injection or peginterferon alpha-2a for 24 hours, prior to biopsy. The patients were grouped into rapid responders (RRs) with a greater than 2-log drop and slow responders (SRs) with a less than 2-log drop in hepatitis C virus RNA by week 4. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were obtained from a matched control group. The pretreatment patients were grouped as RRs or SRs on the basis of the subsequent treatment response. Gene expression profiling was performed with Affymetrix microarray technology. Known interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) were induced in treated patients. In the pretreatment group, future SRs had higher pretreatment ISG expression than RRs. On treatment, RRs and SRs had similar absolute ISG expression, but when it was corrected for the baseline expression with the pretreatment group, RRs showed a greater fold change in ISGs, whereas SRs showed a greater change in interferon (IFN)-inhibitory pathways. The patients pretreated with ribavirin had heightened induction of IFN-related genes and down-regulation of genes involved in IFN inhibition and hepatic stellate cell activation. These data suggest that ISG inducibility is important for the treatment response and that ribavirin may improve outcomes by enhancing hepatic gene responses to peginterferon. Collectively, these mechanisms may provide a molecular basis for the improved efficacy of combination therapy.

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis C infection among children with β-thalassaemia major in Mid Delta, Egypt: a single centre study.

    PubMed

    El-Shanshory, Mohamed R; Kabbash, Ibrahim A; Soliman, Hanan H; Nagy, Hala M; Abdou, Said H

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion dependant patients are at a higher risk of acquiring bloodborne infections even under conditions of safe transfusion. This study was designed to determine sero-prevalence of hepatitis C infection and possible associated risk factors in thalassaemic children. One hundred and twenty five children with β thalassaemia major (β-TM) were recruited from the Haematology/Oncology Unit, Paediatric Department, Tanta University Hospital, Egypt, between April 2010 and October 2011. Patients underwent history taking, full clinical examination, routine investigations and venous blood sampling. Serum was stored at -20°C till tested for hepatitis C (HCV Ab) and B (HBsAg) by ELISA. HCV Ab positive cases were confirmed by PCR. All patients were HBsAg negative. HCV Ab ELISA was positive in 76%, negative in 20% and equivocal in 4%. Fifty patients (40%) had positive PCR for HCV. PCR showed low viraemia in 78%, moderate viraemia in 20% and high viraemia in 2%. A positive family history of HCV, history of minor operative intervention and/or dental procedures were significantly associated with higher frequency of HCV infection in thalassaemic children, while amount and frequency of transfused blood, age at transfusion and chelation state were not. HCV infection is highly prevalent in children with β-TM in Egypt despite strict pre-transfusion blood testing. This should arouse the attention for environmental and community acquired factors. Quality management to insure infection control in minor operative procedures and adding more sensitive tests for blood screening are recommended.

  15. Effects of delta-tocotrienol on obesity-related adipocyte hypertrophy, inflammation and hepatic steatosis in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, London; Ramalingam, Latha; Menikdiwela, Kalhara; Scoggin, Shane; Shen, Chwan-Li; Tomison, Michael D; Kaur, Gurvinder; Dufour, Jannette M; Chung, Eunhee; Kalupahana, Nishan S; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima

    2017-10-01

    Inflammation is a major underlying cause for obesity-associated metabolic diseases. Hence, anti-inflammatory dietary components may improve obesity-related disorders. We hypothesized that delta-tocotrienol (δT3), a member of the vitamin E family, reduces adiposity, insulin resistance and hepatic triglycerides through its anti-inflammatory properties. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J male mice were fed a high-fat diet (HF) with or without supplementation of δT3 (HF+δT3) at 400 mg/kg and 1600 mg/kg for 14 weeks, and they were compared to mice fed a low-fat diet (LF) or HF supplemented with metformin as an antidiabetic control. Glucose tolerance tests were administered 2 weeks prior to the end of treatments. Histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and protein analyses were performed to assess inflammation and fatty acid metabolism in adipose and liver tissues. Significant improvements in glucose tolerance, and reduced hepatic steatosis and serum triglycerides were observed in δT3-supplemented groups compared to the HF group. Body and fat pad weights were not significantly reduced in HF+δT3 groups; however, we observed smaller fat cell size and reduced macrophage infiltration in their adipose tissues compared to other groups. These changes were at least in part mechanistically explained by a reduction of mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory adipokines and increased expression of anti-inflammatory adipokines in HF+δT3 mice. Moreover, δT3 dose-dependently increased markers of fatty acid oxidation and reduced markers of fatty acid synthesis in adipose tissue and liver. In conclusion, our studies suggest that δT3 may promote metabolically healthy obesity by reducing fat cell hypertrophy and decreasing inflammation in both liver and adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Delta 32 mutation of the chemokine-receptor 5 gene neither is correlated with chronic hepatitis C nor does it predict response to therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Glas, J; Török, H P; Simperl, C; König, A; Martin, K; Schmidt, F; Schaefer, M; Schiemann, U; Folwaczny, C

    2003-07-01

    Unlike in HIV, homozygosity for a 32-bp deletion (Delta 32) of the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene was recently described in increased frequency in patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV). Thus, it was speculated that this mutation might be relevant for disease susceptibility and influence the response to antiviral therapy. The present study sought to confirm the association between HCV and the Delta 32 mutation of the CCR5 gene and to correlate it with the response to therapy with interferon-alpha-2a and ribavirin. Sixty-two patients with HCV and 119 healthy unrelated controls were genotyped for the Delta 32 mutation. For the correlation between the Delta 32 mutation and response to therapy, only patients (n = 59) who completed 6 months of combination therapy as part of a prospective study were evaluated. The Delta 32 mutation was not observed in increased frequency in HCV. Furthermore, a significant difference of the HCV load or aminotransferase concentrations was not observed in carriers versus noncarriers of the Delta 32 mutation. After stratification for potentially confounding factors such as gender or HCV genotype, a significant difference was also not detected with respect to treatment outcome. These observations argue strongly against a role of CCR5 for susceptibility to HCV infection or response to combination therapy.

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular mechanism of hepatic fat metabolism disorder caused by Muscovy duck reovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxi; Liu, Mengxi; Xu, Lihui; Wu, Yijian; Huang, Yifan

    2017-10-10

    The aim of this work was to clarify the molecular mechanism underlying the fatty degeneration of livers infected with Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV), which produces obvious white necrotic foci in the liver. Transcriptome data for MDRV-infected Muscovy duck livers and control livers were sequenced, assembled, and annotated with Illumina(®) HiSeq 2000. The differentially expressed genes were screened and their functions were analysed. We also determined and confirmed the molecular mechanism of the hepatic fat metabolism disorder caused by MDRV infection. The expression of 4190 genes was higher in the infected livers than in the control livers, and the expression of 1113 genes was reduced. A Gene Ontology analysis showed that these genes were involved in 48 biological functions, and were significantly enriched in 237 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The free fatty acid content was significantly higher in the livers of infected Muscovy ducks than in the control livers (P < 0.01). The KEGG analysis showed that MDRV infection inhibited the cholesterol efflux from hepatic cells and reduced the expression of key enzymes involved in fatty acid degradation (scavenger receptor class b type 1, ABCG8, and APOA4), leading to the accumulation of fatty acids and cholesterol in the liver cells. In this study, we have identified the genes differentially expressed in livers infected by MDRV, from which we inferred the genes associated with lipodystrophia, and elucidated the molecular mechanism of the hepatic steatosis induced by MDRV. ABC: ATP binding cassette transport; ACADVL: acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain; ACAT: mitochondrial-like acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase A; ACAT2: acetyl-CoA acyltransferase 2; ACNAT2: acyl-coenzyme A amino acid N-acyltransferase 2-like; ACOT1: acyl-CoA thioesterase 1; ACOT7: acyl-CoA thioesterase 7; ACOX1: acyl-CoA oxidase 1, palmitoyl; ACSBG2: acyl-CoA synthetase bubblegum family member 2; ACSL1: acyl-CoA synthetase long

  18. Morphologic and molecular identifications of digenetic trematodes in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from the Mississippi Delta, USA.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Mary; Pote, Linda; Yost, Marlena; Doffitt, Cynthia; King, Tommy; Panuska, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the Mississippi River Delta, USA, have been observed over the past few decades. This piscivorous bird is a definitive host for numerous digenetic trematodes, some of which may cause pathology in a fish host. We conducted a 2-yr survey of intestinal trematodes in 35 Double-crested Cormorants collected in the Mississippi Delta. We counted gastrointestinal trematodes, identified them to species using morphometric and molecular techniques, and sequenced the 18S and cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes. We collected 4,909 trematodes, representing five digenetic species: Drepanocephalus spathans, Hysteromorpha triloba, Pseudopsilostoma varium, Austrodiplostomum ostrowskiae, and Ascocotyle longa. The most prevalent trematode of the Double-crested Cormorants was D. spathans (91%), followed by H. triloba (78%), P. varium (74%), A. ostrowskiae (57%), and A. longa (29%). Among these, the life cycles are only known for H. triloba and A. longa. Novel DNA sequences of the COI gene were obtained for D. spathans, A. ostrowskiae, P. varium, and A. longa adults. Using these DNA sequences, the identification and confirmation of the larval stages of these parasites in the fish and snail hosts will be possible.

  19. Prevalence and predictors for compensated Advanced Chronic Liver Disease (c-ACLD) in patients with chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Ingrid; Victoria, Marilu; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Rodrigues, Lorena; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Lacerda, Marcus; Victoria, Flamir; Perazzo, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictor factors for compensated advanced chronic liver disease (c-ACLD) in patients with hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) infection. Methods This cross-sectional study included consecutive HDV-infected patients defined by positive anti-HDV. Patients with hepatitis C coinfection, liver transplantation or presence of conditions that limit liver (LSM) or spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) were excluded. Blood tests, abdominal ultrasound, SSM and LSM by transient elastography (FibroScan®) were performed at the same day. Alcohol consumption was quantified using the AUDIT score and c-ACLD was defined by LSM ≥ 15 kPa performed by an experimented operator blinded for clinical and laboratory data. Results 101 patients were eligible and few patients were excluded due to negative anti-HDV (n = 7), hepatitis C coinfection (n = 2), liver transplantation (n = 10) and limitation for LSM or SSM (n = 5). Therefore, 77 patients [61% male, age = 43 (IQR,36–52) years] were included. The prevalence of c-ACLD was 57% (n = 44/77). Patients with c-ACLD had a higher rate of detectable HBV viral load (p = 0.039), higher levels of transaminases, GGT, alkaline phosphatases, total bilirubin and INR (p<0.001 for all), as well as lower platelet count and albumin levels (p>0.001 for both) compared to those without c-ACLD. Patients with c-ACLD had higher SSM [65.2 (IQR,33.8–75.0) vs 21.8 (16.5–32.0) kPa; p<0.001] and higher splenic volume [475 (IQR,311–746) vs 154 (112–283) cm3; p<0.001] compared to those without. Detectable HBV viral load (>10 UI/ml), alkaline phosphatase (per IU/L) and GGT levels (per IU/L) were independently associated with c-ACLD in all multivariate models. Splenic volume [per cm3,OR = 1.01 (95%CI,1.01–1.02);p = 0.002], SSM [per kPa, OR = 1.04 (1.01–1.07);p = 0.012] and splenomegaly [yes vs no,OR = 28.45 (4.42–182.95);p<0.001] were independently associated with c-ACLD. Conclusions The prevalence of c

  20. Prevalence and predictors for compensated Advanced Chronic Liver Disease (c-ACLD) in patients with chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) infection.

    PubMed

    Couto, Ingrid; Victoria, Marilu; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Rodrigues, Lorena; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Lacerda, Marcus; Victoria, Flamir; Perazzo, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictor factors for compensated advanced chronic liver disease (c-ACLD) in patients with hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) infection. This cross-sectional study included consecutive HDV-infected patients defined by positive anti-HDV. Patients with hepatitis C coinfection, liver transplantation or presence of conditions that limit liver (LSM) or spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) were excluded. Blood tests, abdominal ultrasound, SSM and LSM by transient elastography (FibroScan®) were performed at the same day. Alcohol consumption was quantified using the AUDIT score and c-ACLD was defined by LSM ≥ 15 kPa performed by an experimented operator blinded for clinical and laboratory data. 101 patients were eligible and few patients were excluded due to negative anti-HDV (n = 7), hepatitis C coinfection (n = 2), liver transplantation (n = 10) and limitation for LSM or SSM (n = 5). Therefore, 77 patients [61% male, age = 43 (IQR,36-52) years] were included. The prevalence of c-ACLD was 57% (n = 44/77). Patients with c-ACLD had a higher rate of detectable HBV viral load (p = 0.039), higher levels of transaminases, GGT, alkaline phosphatases, total bilirubin and INR (p<0.001 for all), as well as lower platelet count and albumin levels (p>0.001 for both) compared to those without c-ACLD. Patients with c-ACLD had higher SSM [65.2 (IQR,33.8-75.0) vs 21.8 (16.5-32.0) kPa; p<0.001] and higher splenic volume [475 (IQR,311-746) vs 154 (112-283) cm3; p<0.001] compared to those without. Detectable HBV viral load (>10 UI/ml), alkaline phosphatase (per IU/L) and GGT levels (per IU/L) were independently associated with c-ACLD in all multivariate models. Splenic volume [per cm3,OR = 1.01 (95%CI,1.01-1.02);p = 0.002], SSM [per kPa, OR = 1.04 (1.01-1.07);p = 0.012] and splenomegaly [yes vs no,OR = 28.45 (4.42-182.95);p<0.001] were independently associated with c-ACLD. The prevalence of c-ACLD was high in patients with chronic HDV infection in

  1. Subpicomolar sensing of delta-opioid receptor ligands by molecular-imprinted polymers using plasmon-waveguide resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Savitha; Salamon, Zdzislaw; Nagar, Anoop; Narang, Subhash; Schleich, Donald; Darman, Paul; Hruby, Victor; Tollin, Gordon

    2005-04-15

    Here we report, for the first time, the formation of a biomimetic covalently imprinted polymeric sensor for a target ligand, the delta-opioid G-protein coupled receptor agonist DPDPE, which reproducibly exhibits subpicomolar binding affinity in an aqueous environment. In addition to having a well-defined and homogeneous binding site, the imprinted polymer template is quite stable to storage in both the dry and wet states and has at least 6 orders of magnitude higher affinities than exhibited by similar peptide-based molecular-imprinted polymers (MIPs) thus far. A highly sensitive optical detection methodology, plasmon-waveguide resonance spectroscopy, was employed, capable of measuring binding in real time and discriminating between ligand molecules, without requiring labeling protocols (fluorophores or radioisotopes). The DPDPE-imprinted polymer showed a broad structure-activity relationship profile, not unlike that found for protein receptors. Such sensitivity and robustness of MIPs suggests potential applications ranging from biowarfare agent detection to pharmaceutical screening.

  2. Quantum anharmonic oscillator plus delta-function potential: a molecular view of pairing formation and breaking in the coordinate space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumaryada, Tony; Maha Putra, Bima; Pramudito, Sidikrubadi

    2017-05-01

    We propose an alternative way to describe the pairing formation and breaking via a quantum anharmonic oscillator with a delta-function potential model. Unlike BCS theory, which describes the pairing formation in the momentum space, this model works in the coordinate space and is able to give a molecular view of pairing formation and breaking in the coordinate space. By exploring the dynamical interplay between the intrinsic factor (dissociation energy) and external factor (pairing strength) of this system additional information was gained, including the critical pairing strength and critical scattering length, which might relate to the BCS-BEC crossover phenomena and halo state formation. Although only the energetic aspect of pairing is described by this model, its simplicity and pedagogical steps might help undergraduate students to understand the pairing problem in a simple way.

  3. Processing and Translation Initiation of Non-long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons by Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV)-like Self-cleaving Ribozymes*

    PubMed Central

    Ruminski, Dana J.; Webb, Chiu-Ho T.; Riccitelli, Nathan J.; Lupták, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    Many non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons lack internal promoters and are co-transcribed with their host genes. These transcripts need to be liberated before inserting into new loci. Using structure-based bioinformatics, we show that several classes of retrotransposons in phyla-spanning arthropods, nematodes, and chordates utilize self-cleaving ribozymes of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) family for processing their 5′ termini. Ribozyme-terminated retrotransposons include rDNA-specific R2, R4, and R6, telomere-specific SART, and Baggins and RTE. The self-scission of the R2 ribozyme is strongly modulated by the insertion site sequence in the rDNA, with the most common insertion sequences promoting faster processing. The ribozymes also promote translation initiation of downstream open reading frames in vitro and in vivo. In some organisms HDV-like and hammerhead ribozymes appear to be dedicated to processing long and short interspersed elements, respectively. HDV-like ribozymes serve several distinct functions in non-LTR retrotransposition, including 5′ processing, translation initiation, and potentially trans-templating. PMID:21994949

  4. A novel hepatitis B vaccine containing Advax™, a polysaccharide adjuvant derived from delta inulin, induces robust humoral and cellular immunity with minimal reactogenicity in preclinical testing

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Trec, Samay; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    Although current HBV vaccines have an outstanding record of safety and efficacy, reduced immunogenicity is a problem in those of older age, or having renal impairment or diabetes mellitus. In this study, we tested the ability of Advax™ adjuvant, a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin, to enhance the immunogenicity of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs) in mice and guinea pigs by comparison to the traditional alum adjuvant. Advax™ provided antigen-sparing and significantly enhanced both anti-HBs antibody titers and anti-HBs CD4 and CD8 T-cells, with increases in Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine responses. Unlike alum, the adjuvant effect of Advax™ was seen even when injected 24 hours before the HBs antigen. Advax™ adjuvant similarly enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses in guinea pigs to a third generation preS-HBs antigen. Inclusion Advax™ adjuvant when combined with HBs antigen could provide enhanced protection over current generation HBV vaccines for immunization of low responder populations. PMID:23306367

  5. Identification of an hepatitis delta virus-like ribozyme at the mRNA 5′-end of the L1Tc retrotransposon from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Luque, Francisco J.; López, Manuel C.; Macias, Francisco; Alonso, Carlos; Thomas, M. Carmen

    2011-01-01

    L1Tc is a non-LTR LINE element from Trypanosoma cruzi that encodes its transposition machinery and bears an internal promoter. Herewith, we report the identification of an in vitro active hepatitis delta virus-like ribozyme located in the first 77 nt at the 5′-end of the L1Tc mRNA (L1TcRz). The data presented show that L1TcRz has a co-transcriptional function. Using gel-purified uncleaved RNA transcripts, the data presented indicate that the kinetics of the self-cleaving, in a magnesium-dependent reaction, fits to a two-phase decay curve. The cleavage point identified by primer extension takes place at +1 position of the element. The hydroxyl nature of the 5′-end of the 3′-fragment generated by the cleavage activity of L1TcRz was confirmed. Since we have previously described that the 77-nt long fragment located at the 5′-end of L1Tc has promoter activity, the existence of a ribozyme in L1Tc makes this element to be the first described non-LTR retroelement that has an internal promoter–ribozyme dual function. The L1Tc nucleotides located downstream of the ribozyme catalytic motif appear to inhibit its activity. This inhibition may be influenced by the existence of a specific L1Tc RNA conformation that is recognized by RNase P. PMID:21724615

  6. Optimal self-cleavage activity of the hepatitis delta virus RNA is dependent on a homopurine base pair in the ribozyme core.

    PubMed Central

    Been, M D; Perrotta, A T

    1995-01-01

    A non-Watson-Crick G.G interaction within the core region of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) antigenomic ribozyme is required for optimal rates of self-cleavage activity. Base substitutions for either one or both G's revealed that full activity was obtained only when both G's were replaced with A's. At those positions, substitutions that generate potential Watson-Crick, G.U, heteropurine, or homopyrimidine combinations resulted in dramatically lower cleavage activity. A homopurine symmetric base pair, of the same type identified in the high-affinity binding site of the HIV RRE, is most consistent with this data. Additional features shared between the antigenomic ribozyme and the Rev binding site in the vicinity of the homopurine pairs suggest some structural similarity for this region of the two RNAs and a possible motif associated with this homopurine interaction. Evidence for a homopurine pair at the equivalent position in a modified form of the HDV genomic ribozyme was also found. With the postulated symmetric pairing scheme, large distortions in the nucleotide conformation, the sugar-phosphate backbone, or both would be necessary to accommodate this interaction at the end of a helix; we hypothesize that this distortion is critical to the structure of the active site of the ribozyme and it is stabilized by the homopurine base pair. PMID:8595561

  7. A novel hepatitis B vaccine containing Advax™, a polysaccharide adjuvant derived from delta inulin, induces robust humoral and cellular immunity with minimal reactogenicity in preclinical testing.

    PubMed

    Saade, Fadi; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Trec, Samay; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-04-08

    Although current HBV vaccines have an outstanding record of safety and efficacy, reduced immunogenicity is a problem in those of older age, or having renal impairment or diabetes mellitus. In this study, we tested the ability of Advax™ adjuvant, a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin, to enhance the immunogenicity of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs) in mice and guinea pigs by comparison to the traditional alum adjuvant. Advax™ provided antigen-sparing, significantly enhanced both anti-HBs antibody titers, and anti-HBs CD4 and CD8 T-cells, with increases in Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine responses. Unlike alum, the adjuvant effect of Advax™ was seen even when injected 24h before the HBs antigen. Advax™ adjuvant similarly enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses in guinea pigs to a third generation preS-HBs antigen. Advax™ adjuvant when combined with HBs antigen could provide enhanced protection over current generation HBV vaccines for immunization of low responder populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular and morphological characterization of myxozoan actinospore types from a commercial catfish pond in the Mississippi delta.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Thomas G; Griffin, Matt J; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Greenway, Terrence E; Khoo, Lester H; Wise, David J; Pote, Linda M

    2014-12-01

    The actinospore diversity of infected Dero digitata was surveyed (May 2011) from a channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) production pond in the Mississippi Delta region for the elucidation of unknown myxozoan life cycles. At present, only 2 myxozoan life cycles have been molecularly confirmed in channel catfish, linking the actinospore stage from an aquatic oligochaete (D. digitata ) and the myxospore stage from the catfish. In this study D. digitata (n = 2,592) were isolated from oligochaetes collected from the bottom sediment of a channel catfish production pond. After 1 wk of daily observation, a total of 6 genetically different actinospore types were observed. The collective groups were classified as 2 aurantiactinomyxons, 2 helioactinomyxons, 1 raabeia, and 1 triactinomyxon. Overall prevalence of myxozoan infections in the isolated oligochaetes was 4.4%. Actinospores were photographed and measured for morphological characterization. Four previously undescribed actinospore types were identified and characterized molecularly and morphologically. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the raabeia and one of the helioactinomyxon (type 1) actinospores were closely related to the group of myxozoans known to parasitize ictalurids in North America. To date, no myxospores have been linked to the newly sequenced actinospores reported in this survey. The morphological and molecular data generated from this study will assist in the identification of myxospore counterparts for these actinospore stages and aid in the elucidation of unknown myxozoan life cycles in closed production systems.

  9. The alpha-5 segment of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin: in vitro activity, ion channel formation and molecular modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, E; Bach, D; Kerr, I D; Sansom, M S; Chejanovsky, N; Shai, Y

    1994-01-01

    A peptide with a sequence corresponding to the highly conserved alpha-5 segment of the Cry delta-endotoxin family (amino acids 193-215 of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIIIA [Gazit and Shai (1993) Biochemistry 32, 3429-3436]), was investigated with respect to its interaction with insect membranes, cytotoxicity in vitro towards Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells, and its propensity to form ion channels in planar lipid membranes (PLMs). Selectively labelled analogues of alpha-5 at either the N-terminal amino acid or the epsilon-amine of its lysine, were used to monitor the interaction of the peptides with insect membranes. The fluorescent emission spectra of the 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-4-yl (NBD)-labelled alpha-5 peptides displayed a blue shift upon binding to insect (Spodoptera littoralis) mid-gut membranes, reflecting the relocation of the fluorescent probes to an environment of increased apolarity, i.e. within the lipidic constituent of the membrane. Moreover, midgut membrane-bound NBD-labelled alpha-5 peptides were protected from enzymic proteolysis. Functional characterization of alpha-5 has revealed that it is cytotoxic to Sf-9 insect cells, and that it forms ion channels in PLMs with conductances ranging from 30 to 1000 pS. A proline-substituted analogue of alpha-5 is less cytolytic and slightly more exposed to enzymic digestion. Molecular modelling utilizing simulated annealing via molecular dynamics suggests that a transbilayer pore may be formed by alpha-5 monomers that assemble to form a left-handed coiled coil of approximately parallel helices. These findings further support a role for alpha-5 in the toxic mechanism of delta-endotoxins, and assign alpha-5 as one of the transmembrane helices which form the toxic pore. The suggested role is consistent with the recent finding that cleavage of CryIVB delta-endotoxin in a loop between alpha-5 and alpha-6 is highly important for its larvicidal activity [Angsuthanasombat, Crickmore and Ellar (1993) FEMS

  10. Role of Serologic and Molecular Diagnostic Assays in Identification and Management of Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Cloherty, Gavin; Talal, Andrew; Coller, Kelly; Steinhart, Corklin; Hackett, John; Dawson, George; Rockstroh, Juergen; Feld, Jordan

    2016-02-01

    The drugs available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have evolved to provide shorter treatment duration and higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), and the role of HCV infection diagnostic tests has had to evolve in order to meet changing clinical needs. This review gives an overview on the role of HCV infection diagnostic testing (molecular and serological tools) used in the diagnosis and management of HCV infection. All of this critical information guides physician decisions to optimize patient clinical outcomes. Also discussed is the future direction of diagnostic testing in the context of further advances in drug development. Copyright © 2016 Cloherty et al.

  11. Unraveling the complexity of hepatitis B virus: from molecular understanding to therapeutic strategy in 50 years.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wen, Xin; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a well-known hepadnavirus with a double-stranded circular DNA genome. Although HBV was first described approximately 50 years ago, the precise mechanisms of HBV infection and effective therapeutic strategies remain unclear. Here, we focus on summarizing the complicated mechanisms of HBV replication and infection, as well as genomic factors and epigenetic regulation. Additionally, we discuss in vivo models of HBV, as well as diagnosis, prevention and therapeutic drugs for HBV. Together, the data in this 50-year review may provide new clues to elucidate molecular mechanisms of HBV pathogenesis and shed new light on the future HBV therapies.

  12. Serological and molecular markers of hepatitis E virus infection in HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A C; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Lisboa-Neto, G; Mendes-Correa, M C J; Picone, C M; Salles, N A; Mendrone-Junior, A; Carrilho, F J; Pinho, J R R

    2017-09-30

    In Brazil, the circulation of hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been demonstrated in distinct groups of individuals and some animals, but its prevalence among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is unknown. This study aimed to assess the frequency of serological and molecular HEV markers in individuals infected with HIV from São Paulo, Brazil. Serum and plasma samples of 354 HIV-infected patients collected between 2007 and 2013 were included. All samples were tested for anti-HEV IgG and IgM antibodies and HEV RNA. Anti-HEV IgG and IgM antibodies were detected in 10.7% (38/354) and 1.4% (5/354) of the samples, respectively. Both antibodies were detected simultaneously in only two samples. HEV RNA was not detected in any sample. There was no significant correlation of anti-HEV serological status (positivity to anti-HEV IgG and/or IgM) with sex, age, CD4(+) T cell count, HIV viral load, antiretroviral therapy, liver enzyme levels, or coinfection with hepatitis B virus and/or hepatitis C virus. Our study provides serological evidence of past and recent HEV infections in HIV-infected patients from São Paulo, Brazil. However, the occurrence of ongoing HEV infection appears be a rare event in this population.

  13. Serological Patterns and Molecular Characterization of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Zhao, Hong; Tang, Xinyi; Hu, Wenjia; Jiang, Nizheng; Zhu, Shaowen; Huang, Chengyin

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B infections, characterized by the presence of a viral genome without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg; Occult hepatitis B infection [OBI]), have been reported recently. Objectives We performed serological and molecular characterization of OBI among blood donors at Jiangsu province blood center during years 2013 and 2014. Methods All donor samples were routinely screened by double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Treponema pallidum (TP), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Single-reactive, nonreactive, and ALT-elevated samples were pooled or resolved by nucleic acid testing (NAT). Seromarkers were examined in HBsAg-/DNA+ samples. After 1 to 12 months of follow up, seromarkers were screened again to verify OBI samples. Results We studied 157119 samples from blood donors. A total of 154397 ELISA nonreactive donor samples were identified, and HBV DNA was detected in 81 samples; no samples were positive for HIV or HCV RNA. Hepatitis B virus viral loads in most donors were less than 20 - 200 IU/mL. There was only one HBsAg-positive sample. Eighty HBsAg-/DNA+ samples were evaluated further. Of these samples, 85% (68/80) were reactive for anti-HBc and 36.2% (29/800) were reactive for anti-HBc and anti-HBs; 11.3% (9/80) did not have any detectable serological markers. Twenty-nine donors were followed up. One was HBsAg ELISA positive, and of six seronegative donors, all had anti-HBc and anti-HBs, but were negative for DNA. Samples were HBV genotypes B, C and D. Mutations in the S region of HBV DNA included S114T, G119R, P120S, T125M, C139Y, T140I, C147W, T148A, A159V/G, E164D, V168A, and R169C. Conclusions Overall, we found that OBI was rare, but that the prevalence of OBI was slightly higher in Jiangsu than in other areas of China. PMID:27882070

  14. Preliminary molecular epidemiological investigation of hepatitis E virus sequences from Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Barbara; Muellner, Petra; Pearl, David L; Rajić, Andrijana; Houde, Alain; McEwen, Scott A

    2015-03-01

    Our study objective was to describe the Canadian Hepatitis E virus (HEV) sequences currently cataloged in GenBank from three populations: commercially raised pigs, retail pork, and locally acquired Hepatitis E cases, and to interpret the molecular evidence they provide. We searched the GenBank for any/all Canadian HEV sequences from these populations, and identified highly similar matches using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) algorithm, studying sequences of the partial ORF2 gene. We validated the findings made using Multiple Sequence Comparison by Log-Expectation (MUSCLE) and Clustal 2 programs for multiple sequence alignments, as inputs to estimate dendrograms using both neighbour-joining and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) methods. The GenBank search yielded 47 sequences collected from pigs: 32 sequences from two to four month old commercial pigs in Québec, one from three to four month old pigs at a research station in Ontario, one from two month old pigs in a commercial Saskatchewan herd, and 13 collected from finisher pigs in a national survey. Additionally, 14 sequences were collected from a national survey of Canadian retail pork livers, and seven sequences from two Canadian pediatric patients with locally acquired Hepatitis E, both from the province of Québec. All sequences belonged to genotype 3. Eight of the 14 sequences from retail pork livers had human-derived sequences in their top ten BLAST matches; six did not. Those eight sequences having close human BLAST matches clustered within a dendrogram, as did those with no close human BLAST matches. Human sequences with close matches to the eight retail sequences included both of the Québec Hepatitis E cases, as well as sequences from Japanese Hepatitis E cases, and Japanese blood donors. Seven of the eight HEV sequences from retail liver with close human BLAST matches originated in Québec. Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic showed a significant (P<0.05) spatial

  15. Prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C patients in Mid Delta, Egypt: A single center study.

    PubMed

    Ziada, Dina H; El Sadany, Sherif; Soliman, Hanan; Abd-Elsalam, Sherief; Salama, Marwa; Hawash, Nehad; Selim, Amal; Hamisa, Manal; Elsabagh, Hala M

    2016-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has an increasing incidence worldwide. In this study we aimed to assess the prevalence of HCC among HCV patients in our center in Mid Delta, Egypt. During the period between April 2013 and January 2015, we screened sequentially chronic HCV patients attending inpatient wards or outpatient Clinic of Tropical Medicine Department in Tanta University Hospital for HCC. Individuals with focal lesion in Ultrasound (US) and/or serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) level >200ng/ml were examined by triphasic computed tomography scanning (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among 514 HCV patients interviewed and accepted sharing in this study, 90 (17.5%), 144 (28%), and 280 (54.5%) were Child A, B, and C, respectively. We found that 108/514 patients (21%) had focal lesion detected by US. Also, 89/514 (17.3%) had elevated AFP >200, 13 of them (14.6%) had no focal lesion on US, but further work up showed HCC in 2 of them. Overall HCC diagnosis was confirmed in 103 cases, 94 of them (91.3%) were Child B or C. Occurrence of HCC was significantly higher in smokers, diabetics, patients with decompensated liver and those with positive family history of HCC. Only 20/103 (19.4%) were candidates to curative treatments, 8 of them were Child A asymptomatic and discovered accidentally during screening. The high prevalence of HCC in our HCV patients (22%) was mainly associated with decompensated cirrhosis. A national surveillance program for the detection of HCC in cirrhotic HCV Egyptian patients by combining ultrasound examination and AFP is highly recommended. Copyright © 2016 National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Signatures of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-Induced Type II Mixed Cryoglobulinemia (MCII)

    PubMed Central

    Sautto, Giuseppe; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the induction of type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII) and the possible establishment of related lymphoproliferative disorders, such as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), is well ascertained. However, the molecular pathways involved and the factors predisposing to the development of these HCV-related extrahepatic complications deserve further consideration and clarification. To date, several host- and virus-related factors have been implicated in the progression to MCII, such as the virus-induced expansion of selected subsets of B-cell clones expressing discrete immunoglobulin variable (IgV) gene subfamilies, the involvement of complement factors and the specific role of some HCV proteins. In this review, we will analyze the host and viral factors taking part in the development of MCII in order to give a general outlook of the molecular mechanisms implicated. PMID:23202510

  17. Molecular sequence data of hepatitis B virus and genetic diversity after vaccination.

    PubMed

    van Ballegooijen, W Marijn; van Houdt, Robin; Bruisten, Sylvia M; Boot, Hein J; Coutinho, Roel A; Wallinga, Jacco

    2009-12-15

    The effect of vaccination programs on transmission of infectious disease is usually assessed by monitoring programs that rely on notifications of symptomatic illness. For monitoring of infectious diseases with a high proportion of asymptomatic cases or a low reporting rate, molecular sequence data combined with modern coalescent-based techniques offer a complementary tool to assess transmission. Here, the authors investigate the added value of using viral sequence data to monitor a vaccination program that was started in 1998 and was targeted against hepatitis B virus in men who have sex with men in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The incidence in this target group, as estimated from the notifications of acute infections with hepatitis B virus, was low; therefore, there was insufficient power to show a significant change in incidence. In contrast, the genetic diversity, as estimated from the viral sequence collected from the target group, revealed a marked decrease after vaccination was introduced. Taken together, the findings suggest that introduction of vaccination coincided with a change in the target group toward behavior with a higher risk of infection. The authors argue that molecular sequence data provide a powerful additional monitoring instrument, next to conventional case registration, for assessing the impact of vaccination.

  18. Molecular evolution in court: analysis of a large hepatitis C virus outbreak from an evolving source

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular phylogenetic analyses are used increasingly in the epidemiological investigation of outbreaks and transmission cases involving rapidly evolving RNA viruses. Here, we present the results of such an analysis that contributed to the conviction of an anesthetist as being responsible for the infection of 275 of his patients with hepatitis C virus. Results We obtained sequences of the NS5B and E1-E2 regions in the viral genome for 322 patients suspected to have been infected by the doctor, and for 44 local, unrelated controls. The analysis of 4,184 cloned sequences of the E1-E2 region allowed us to exclude 47 patients from the outbreak. A subset of patients had known dates of infection. We used these data to calibrate a relaxed molecular clock and to determine a rough estimate of the time of infection for each patient. A similar analysis led to an estimate for the time of infection of the source. The date turned out to be 10 years before the detection of the outbreak. The number of patients infected was small at first, but it increased substantially in the months before the detection of the outbreak. Conclusions We have developed a procedure to integrate molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of rapidly evolving viral populations into a forensic setting adequate for molecular epidemiological analysis of outbreaks and transmission events. We applied this procedure to a large outbreak of hepatitis C virus caused by a single source and the results obtained played a key role in the trial that led to the conviction of the suspected source. PMID:23870105

  19. Hepatitis Delta co-infection in humanized mice leads to pronounced induction of innate immune responses in comparison to HBV mono-infection.

    PubMed

    Giersch, Katja; Allweiss, Lena; Volz, Tassilo; Helbig, Martina; Bierwolf, Jeanette; Lohse, Ansgar W; Pollok, Joerg M; Petersen, Joerg; Dandri, Maura; Lütgehetmann, Marc

    2015-08-01

    The limited availability of hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) infection models has hindered studies of interactions between HDV and infected hepatocytes. The aim was to investigate the antiviral state of HDV infected human hepatocytes in the setting of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) compared to HBV mono-infection using human liver chimeric mice. Viral loads, human interferon stimulated genes (hISGs) and cytokines were determined in humanized uPA/SCID/beige (USB) mice by qRT-PCR, ELISA and immunofluorescence. Upon HBV/HDV inoculation, all mice developed viremia, which was accompanied by a significant induction of hISGs (i.e. hISG15, hSTATs, hHLA-E) compared to uninfected mice, while HBV mono-infection led to weaker hISG elevations. In the setting of chronic infection enhancement of innate defense mechanisms was significantly more prominent in HBV/HDV infected mice. Also the induction of human-specific cytokines (hIP10, hTGF-ß, hIFN-ß and hIFN-λ) was detected in HBV/HDV co-infected animals, while levels remained lower or below detection in uninfected and HBV mono-infected mice. Moreover, despite the average increase of hSTAT levels determined in HBV/HDV infected livers, we observed a weaker hSTAT accumulation in nuclei of hepatocytes displaying very high HDAg levels, suggesting that HDAg may in part limit hSTAT signaling. Establishment of HDV infection provoked a clear enhancement of the antiviral state of the human hepatocytes in chimeric mice. Elevated pre-treatment ISG and interferon levels may directly contribute to inflammation and liver damage, providing a rationale for the more severe course of HDV-associated liver disease. Such antiviral state induction might also contribute to the lower levels of HBV activity frequently found in co-infected hepatocytes. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  1. Immunogenicity and safety of Advax™, a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin, when formulated with hepatitis B surface antigen; a randomized controlled Phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, David; Kelley, Peter; Heinzel, Susanne; Cooper, Peter; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for additional safe and effective human vaccine adjuvants. Advax is a novel adjuvant produced from semi-crystalline particles of delta inulin. In animal studies Advax enhanced humoral and cellular immunity to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) without inducing local or systemic reactogenicity. This first-in-man Phase 1 clinical trial tested the safety and tolerability of three intramuscular doses of HBsAg formulated with Advax in a group of healthy adult subjects. Advax was well tolerated with injection site pain scores not significantly different to subjects receiving HBsAg alone and no adverse events were reported in subjects that received Advax. Seroprotection and HBsAb geometric mean titers (GMT) after three immunizations were higher in the Advax 5mg (seroprotection 5/6, 83.3%, GMT 40.7, 95% CI 11.9–139.1) and 10mg (seroprotection 4/5, 80%, GMT 51.6, 95% CI 10.0–266.2) groups versus HBsAg alone (seroprotection 1/5, 20%, GMT 4.1, 95% CI 1.3–12.8). Similarly the proportion of subjects with positive CD4 T-cell responses to HBsAg was higher in the Advax 5mg (4/6, 67%) and Advax 10mg (4/5, 80%) groups versus HBsAg alone (1/5, 20%). These results confirm the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of Advax adjuvant observed in preclinical studies. Advax may represent a suitable replacement for alum adjuvants in prophylactic human vaccines subject to confirmation of current results in larger studies. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000598482 PMID:25267153

  2. Growth of a delta-doped silicon layer by molecular beam epitaxy on a charge-coupled device for reflection-limited ultraviolet quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Terhune, R. W.; Fattahi, Masoud; Tseng, Hsin-Fu

    1992-01-01

    Low-temperature silicon molecular beam epitaxy is used to grow a delta-doped silicon layer on a fully processed charge-coupled device (CCD). The measured quantum efficiency of the delta-doped backside-thinned CCD is in agreement with the reflection limit for light incident on the back surface in the spectral range of 260-600 nm. The 2.5 nm silicon layer, grown at 450 C, contained a boron delta-layer with surface density of about 2 x 10 exp 14/sq cm. Passivation of the surface was done by steam oxidation of a nominally undoped 1.5 nm Si cap layer. The UV quantum efficiency was found to be uniform and stable with respect to thermal cycling and illumination conditions.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  7. Molecular detection and typing of duck hepatitis A virus directly from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Pan, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yongliang; Yang, Hanchun; Zhang, Dabing

    2008-10-15

    To develop a new approach for the detection and typing of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a pair of non-degenerate primers was designed to amplify a approximately 250-bp genomic region in the 5'UTR. 3 reference strains and 6 duck embryo-derived isolates from various regions in China, involving 2 serotypes, were successfully amplified with the primer set. By determining the nucleotide sequence of the amplicon, a molecular typing method was developed. If isolate sequences were compared to DHAV 5'UTR sequences available in public databases, nucleotide identity was > or =94% with homologous serotype and < or =73% with heterologous serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed monophyletic clustering of 5'UTR sequences of a homologous serotype, confirming the new classification of DHAV (serotype 1 and the two new serotypes recently described in Taiwan and South Korea, respectively) into three genotypes (A, B and C) defined by the capsid coding region. Analysis of the results showed that the primer pair should aid in the detection of DHAV, and that the amplicon sequence contains type-specific information and can be used for effective and rapid molecular typing. The molecular methods proved their utility through the detection and typing of DHAV directly from 28 liver specimens collected from dead ducklings during duck viral hepatitis outbreaks in different regions of China between 2001 and 2007. The results confirmed the presence of DHAV in all of the 28 samples and demonstrated that genotypes A (13/28) and C (15/28) of DHAV are co-circulating in China.

  8. Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis E virus in Domestic Animals and Wildlife in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Prpić, Jelena; Černi, Silvija; Škorić, Dijana; Keros, Tomislav; Brnić, Dragan; Cvetnić, Željko; Jemeršić, Lorena

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis E is becoming a growing health concern in European countries as an increase of sporadic human cases of unknown origin has been recorded lately. Its causative agent, Hepatitis E virus (HEV), is known to have zoonotic potential and thus the role of domestic and wild animals in the chain of viral spread should be considered when investigating risk factors and the epidemiology of the disease. A comprehensive survey based on viral RNA detection was carried out in Croatia including blood, spleen and liver samples originating from 1816 different domestic and wild animals and digestive gland samples from 538 molluscs. A high HEV prevalence was detected in domestic pigs (24.5%) and wild boars (12.3%), whereas cattle, molluscs, ruminant and carnivore wildlife samples tested negative. Molecular characterization of both ORF1 and ORF2 genomic regions confirmed the phylogenetic clustering of the obtained sequences into genotype 3, previously reported in Europe. Furthermore, our results proved the presence of identical sequence variants in different samples, regardless of their origin, age or habitat of the host, suggesting transmission events between domestic swine, as well as between domestic swine and wild boars in the country. Moreover, a close genetic relationship of Croatian animal strains and known human HEV strains from GenBank opens the question of possible cross-species HEV transmission in Croatia, especially in the areas with an intensive swine production.

  9. Effect of molecular adsorbent recirculating system in hepatitis C virus-related intractable pruritus.

    PubMed

    Doria, Cataldo; Mandalá, Lucio; Smith, Jan; Vitale, Claudio H; Lauro, Augusto; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Marino, Ignazio R; Foglieni, Carlo Scotti; Magnone, Mario; Scott, Victor L

    2003-04-01

    Intractable pruritus is more common in cholestatic liver diseases and may be the presenting symptom and/or major complaint of hepatitis C and/or hepatitic C virus-related cirrhosis. From September 2000 to May 2002, three patients affected by intractable pruritus secondary to hepatitis C cirrhosis that failed medical treatment were treated with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS). MARS is an artificial liver support system that aims to clear the blood of metabolic waste products normally metabolized by the liver. Each patient underwent seven MARS sessions. Liver function tests, the 36-Item Short Form quality-of-life test, visual analog scale for itching, and bile acid measurement in the serum, albumin circuit and ultrafiltrate were performed before and after each MARS session. Moreover, at hospital admission, each patient underwent a psychological workup and abdominal imaging study. Subjective improvement in pruritus and quality of life, along with a decrease in serum bile acid concentration, was observed in every patient; no patient underwent retreatment and/or liver transplantation up to a 9-month follow-up. One patient died 201 days after MARS treatment. Although we observed a decreased level of serum bile acids, one cannot conclude that this was the mechanism of action for the reduction in pruritus intensity in patients in our series. Different toxins and/or a placebo effect might have had a role in this setting.

  10. Serological and Molecular Investigation of Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Pigs Raised in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Nicola; Sarno, Eleonora; Peretti, Vincenzo; Ciambrone, Lucia; Casalinuovo, Francesco; Santoro, Adriano

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common acute hepatitis transmitted by the fecal-oral route. In developed countries, the virus has a zoonotic potential, and domestic pigs and wild boars are considered main reservoirs. To assess the prevalence of HEV-positive animals in the Calabria region (southern Italy) on a serological and molecular level, a total of 216 autochthonous healthy pigs (Apulo-Calabrese breed) were sampled. Both sera and feces were collected. Pigs were grouped based on age: 117 pigs <6 months and 99 pigs >6 months. By using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system, a total of 173 (80%) of the 216 pigs tested seropositive. In all sampled farms (n = 8), pigs with antibodies (immunoglobulin G) against HEV were detected at a level higher than 60%, with a significant difference among age groups (P < 0.0001). Moreover, 16 fattening pigs were found to be nested reverse transcription PCR positive and thus to shed viral genomes in their feces. These positive findings resulted in a prevalence of 48.4% on the farm level (16 of 35 pigs) and an overall prevalence of 7.4% at the animal level (16 of 216 pigs). Based on the present study, HEV seems to circulate among the autochthonous domestic pig population of southern Italy with a low sharing rate. Further studies exploring the origin of infection are needed to minimize the risk of human exposure and to reduce consequences for public health.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus in patients in the Ahwaz region of Iran.

    PubMed

    Nejati, Ahmad; Makvandi, Manochehr; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Neisi, Niloofar; Moradzadegan, Hamid

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the etiologic agents of acute viral hepatitis, an important public health problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of HAV in Southwest Iran (Ahwaz). A total of 59 sera were collected from acutely ill patients with anti-HAV IgM antibodies during 2009 and 2010 were tested also by RT-PCR targeting the 5' NCR for molecular diagnosis and examined in the VP1-2A and VP3-VP1 regions for genotyping. Twelve (20%) patients were detected VP1-2A by RT-PCR and 10 patients had VP3-VP1. The resulting amplicons were sequenced for genotype identification. All HAV strains were identified as subgenotype IB. Phylogenetic analysis revealed an extensive genetic heterogeneity among the strains. Seven hundred sixty-five S→F and 788 K→R amino acid substitutions in IRI49 isolate were found. It is concluded that subgenotype 1b is the sole genotype HAV in this region.

  12. Epidemiologic and molecular investigation of outbreaks of hepatitis C virus infection on a pediatric oncology service.

    PubMed

    Widell, A; Christensson, B; Wiebe, T; Schalén, C; Hansson, H B; Allander, T; Persson, M A

    1999-01-19

    Despite screening of blood donors, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can occur in patients who receive multiple transfusions. To clarify mechanisms of nosocomial transmission of HCV. Epidemiologic and molecular analyses of hepatitis C outbreaks. Pediatric oncology ward. Children with cancer. Epidemiologic analysis, HCV RNA detection, genotyping, and hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequencing. Ten cases of infection with acute HCV genotype 3a occurred between 1990 and 1993. Sequencing of HVR1 revealed three related strains. Despite an overhaul of hygiene procedures, a patient infected with genotype 1b generated nine subsequent infected patients in 1994. Several patients had high virus titers and strongly delayed anti-HCV antibody responses. All had permanent intravenous catheters. Multidose vials used for flushing or treatment had probably been contaminated during periods of overlapping treatment. Contamination of multidose vials was the most likely mode of HCV transmission; therefore, use of such vials should be restricted. Rigorous adherence to hygiene routines remains essential to preventing transmission of bloodborne infections.

  13. Molecular changes in hepatic metabolism and transport in cirrhosis and their functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Götze, Oliver; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the common endpoint of many hepatic diseases and represents a relevant risk for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The progress of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis is accompanied by deteriorating liver function. This review summarizes the regulatory and functional changes in phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes as well as transport proteins and provides an overview regarding lipid and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, phase I enzymes are generally downregulated transcriptionally, while phase II enzymes are mostly preserved transcriptionally but are reduced in their function. Transport proteins are regulated in a specific way that resembles the molecular changes observed in obstructive cholestasis. Lipid and glucose metabolism are characterized by insulin resistance and catabolism, leading to the disturbance of energy expenditure and wasting. Possible non-invasive tests, especially breath tests, for components of liver metabolism are discussed. The heterogeneity and complexity of changes in hepatic metabolism complicate the assessment of liver function in individual patients. Additionally, studies in humans are rare, and species differences preclude the transferability of data from rodents to humans. In clinical practice, some established global scores or criteria form the basis for the functional evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis, but difficult treatment decisions such as selection for transplantation or resection require further research regarding the application of existing non-invasive tests and the development of more specific tests. PMID:26755861

  14. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  15. Source Apportionment of Background PAHs in the Peace-Athabasca Delta (Alberta, Canada) Using Molecular Level Radiocarbon Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jautzy, Josué J; Ahad, Jason M E; Hall, Roland I; Wiklund, Johan A; Wolfe, Brent B; Gobeil, Charles; Savard, Martine M

    2015-08-04

    The downstream accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD), an ecologically important landscape, is a key issue of concern given the rapid development of the oil sands industry in Northern Alberta, Canada. In addition to PAHs derived from industrial activity (i.e., oil sands mining) within the Athabasca watershed, however, forest fires and erosion of fossil fuel deposits within both the Athabasca and Peace watersheds are two potentially important natural sources of PAHs delivered to the PAD. Consequently, evaluating the environmental impact of mining activities requires a quantitative understanding of natural, background PAHs. Here, we utilize molecular-level natural-abundance radiocarbon measurements on an amalgamated sediment record from a Peace River flood-susceptible oxbow lake in the northern Peace sector of the PAD to quantitatively discriminate sources of naturally occurring alkylated PAHs (fossil and modern biomass). A radiocarbon mass balance quantified a predominantly natural petrogenic source (93% petrogenic, 7% forest fire) for alkylated PAHs during the past ∼50 years. Additionally, a significant petrogenic component determined for retene, a compound usually considered a biomarker for softwood combustion, suggests that its use as a unique forest fire indicator may not be suitable in PAD sediments receiving Peace watershed-derived fluvial inputs.

  16. Diversity of anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the microbial mats of the Ebro Delta: a combined morphological and molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Van Bleijswijk, Judith; Gaju, Núria; Muyzer, Gerard

    2005-05-01

    The diversity of purple and green sulfur bacteria in the multilayered sediments of the Ebro Delta was investigated. Specific oligonucleotide primers for these groups were used for the selective amplification of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Subsequently, amplification products were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequenced, which yielded a total of 32 sequences. Six of the sequences were related to different cultivated members of the green sulfur bacteria assemblage, whereas seven fell into the cluster of marine or halophilic Chromatiaceae. Six sequences were clustered with the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, three of the six being closely related to chemotrophic bacteria grouped together with Halorhodospira genus, and the other three forming a group related to the genus Ectothiorhodospira. The last thirteen sequences constituted a cluster where no molecular isolate from microbial mats has so far been reported. Our results indicate that the natural diversity in the ecosystem studied has been significantly underestimated in the past and point out the presence of novel species not related to all known purple sulfur bacteria. Furthermore, the detection of green sulfur bacteria, after only an initial step of enrichment, suggests that -- with the appropriate methodology -- several genera, such as Prosthecochloris, could be established as regular members of marine microbial mats.

  17. New molecular methods for the detection of hepatitis A and Norwalk viruses in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Romalde, J L

    1996-12-01

    Outbreaks of viral enteric diseases after consumption of shellfish are a major health risk. Methodological problems (such as toxicity for cell cultures and low viral concentrations) and the unculturability of some strains (i.e. hepatitis A virus, Norwalk virus) have made it difficult to study those viruses in the environmental samples. Currently, the analysis of the hygienic quality of marketable shellfish is determined by the use of fecal indicator bacteria, but their reliability in determining viral pollution of shellfish is very low. Recent biotechnology developments are providing available rapid, sensitive, and specific tools for detecting food-borne viruses in shellfish and in shellfish-growing waters. In this paper, a review of these new molecular methods is carried out, discussing their advantages and possible applications.

  18. A complete molecular biology assay for hepatitis C virus detection, quantification and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Yara Silva; Boeira, Thais da Rocha; Sisti, Elisa; Celmer, Álvaro; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Ikuta, Nilo; Simon, Daniel; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology procedures to detect, genotype and quantify hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in clinical samples have been extensively described. Routine commercial methods for each specific purpose (detection, quantification and genotyping) are also available, all of which are typically based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the HCV 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). This study was performed to develop and validate a complete serial laboratory assay that combines real-time nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques for the complete molecular analysis of HCV (detection, genotyping and viral load) in clinical samples. Published HCV sequences were compared to select specific primers, probe and restriction enzyme sites. An original real-time nested RT-PCR-RFLP assay was then developed and validated to detect, genotype and quantify HCV in plasma samples. The real-time nested RT-PCR data were linear and reproducible for HCV analysis in clinical samples. High correlations (> 0.97) were observed between samples with different viral loads and the corresponding read cycle (Ct - Cycle threshold), and this part of the assay had a wide dynamic range of analysis. Additionally, HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3 were successfully distinguished using the RFLP method. A complete serial molecular assay was developed and validated for HCV detection, quantification and genotyping.

  19. Hepatitis C virus molecular evolution: transmission, disease progression and antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Preciado, Maria Victoria; Valva, Pamela; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Yamasaki, Lilian; Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos; Martinez-Guarneros, Armando; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra

    2014-11-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents an important public health problem worldwide. Reduction of HCV morbidity and mortality is a current challenge owned to several viral and host factors. Virus molecular evolution plays an important role in HCV transmission, disease progression and therapy outcome. The high degree of genetic heterogeneity characteristic of HCV is a key element for the rapid adaptation of the intrahost viral population to different selection pressures (e.g., host immune responses and antiviral therapy). HCV molecular evolution is shaped by different mechanisms including a high mutation rate, genetic bottlenecks, genetic drift, recombination, temporal variations and compartmentalization. These evolutionary processes constantly rearrange the composition of the HCV intrahost population in a staging manner. Remarkable advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanism controlling HCV replication have facilitated the development of a plethora of direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV. As a result, superior sustained viral responses have been attained. The rapidly evolving field of anti-HCV therapy is expected to broad its landscape even further with newer, more potent antivirals, bringing us one step closer to the interferon-free era.

  20. Hepatitis C virus RNA: molecular switches mediated by long-range RNA–RNA interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumangala; Stefanovic, Snezana; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2013-01-01

    Multiple conserved structural cis-acting regulatory elements have been recognized both in the coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. For example, the cis-element 5BSL3.2 in the HCV-coding region has been predicted to use both its apical and internal loops to interact with the X RNA in the 3′-UTR, with the IIId domain in the 5′-UTR and with the Alt sequence in the coding region. Additionally, the X RNA region uses a palindromic sequence that overlaps the sequence required for the interaction with 5BSL3.2, to dimerize with another HCV genome. The ability of the 5BSL3.2 and X RNA regions to engage in multi-interactions suggests the existence of one or more molecular RNA switches which may regulate different steps of the HCV life cycle. In this study, we used biophysical methods to characterize the essential interactions of these HCV cis-elements at the molecular level. Our results indicate that X RNA interacts with 5BSL3.2 and another X RNA molecule by adopting two different conformations and that 5BSL3.2 engages simultaneously in kissing interactions using its apical and internal loops. Based on these results, we propose a mode of action for possible molecular switches involving the HCV RNA. PMID:23275555

  1. Hepatitis C virus molecular evolution: Transmission, disease progression and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Preciado, Maria Victoria; Valva, Pamela; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Yamasaki, Lilian; Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos; Martinez-Guarneros, Armando; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents an important public health problem worldwide. Reduction of HCV morbidity and mortality is a current challenge owned to several viral and host factors. Virus molecular evolution plays an important role in HCV transmission, disease progression and therapy outcome. The high degree of genetic heterogeneity characteristic of HCV is a key element for the rapid adaptation of the intrahost viral population to different selection pressures (e.g., host immune responses and antiviral therapy). HCV molecular evolution is shaped by different mechanisms including a high mutation rate, genetic bottlenecks, genetic drift, recombination, temporal variations and compartmentalization. These evolutionary processes constantly rearrange the composition of the HCV intrahost population in a staging manner. Remarkable advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanism controlling HCV replication have facilitated the development of a plethora of direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV. As a result, superior sustained viral responses have been attained. The rapidly evolving field of anti-HCV therapy is expected to broad its landscape even further with newer, more potent antivirals, bringing us one step closer to the interferon-free era. PMID:25473152

  2. Molecular Evolution and Phylodynamics of Acute Hepatitis B Virus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Serena Y C; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is prevalent worldwide and causes liver diseases, including acute and chronic hepatitis. Ten HBV genotypes (A-J) with distinct geographic distributions have been reported. Cases of acute HBV infection with genotype A have increased in Japan nationwide since the 1990s, mainly through sexual transmission. To investigate the molecular evolution and phylodynamics of HBV genotypes, we collected acute HBV isolates acquired in Japan from 1992-2002. Full genomes were obtained for comprehensive phylogenetic and phylodynamic analysis, with other Japanese HBV sequences from GenBank that were isolated during 1991-2010. HBV genotypes were classified using the maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods. The GMRF Bayesian Skyride was used to estimate the evolution and population dynamics of HBV. Four HBV genotypes (A, B, C, and H) were identified, of which C was the major genotype. The phylodynamic results indicated an exponential growth between the 1960s and early 1990s; this was followed by a population bottleneck after 1995, possibly linked with successful implementation of a nationwide vaccination program. However, HBV/A increased from 1990 to 2003-2004, and then started to decrease. The prevalence of genotype A has increased over the past 10 years. Phylodynamic inference clearly demonstrates a steady population growth compatible with an ongoing subepidemic; this might be due to the loss of immunity to HBV in adolescents and people being born before the vaccination program. This is the first phylodynamic study of HBV infection in Japan and will facilitate understanding the molecular epidemiology and long-term evolutionary dynamics of this virus in Japan.

  3. Molecular Evolution and Phylodynamics of Acute Hepatitis B Virus in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Serena Y. C.; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is prevalent worldwide and causes liver diseases, including acute and chronic hepatitis. Ten HBV genotypes (A–J) with distinct geographic distributions have been reported. Cases of acute HBV infection with genotype A have increased in Japan nationwide since the 1990s, mainly through sexual transmission. To investigate the molecular evolution and phylodynamics of HBV genotypes, we collected acute HBV isolates acquired in Japan from 1992–2002. Full genomes were obtained for comprehensive phylogenetic and phylodynamic analysis, with other Japanese HBV sequences from GenBank that were isolated during 1991–2010. HBV genotypes were classified using the maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods. The GMRF Bayesian Skyride was used to estimate the evolution and population dynamics of HBV. Four HBV genotypes (A, B, C, and H) were identified, of which C was the major genotype. The phylodynamic results indicated an exponential growth between the 1960s and early 1990s; this was followed by a population bottleneck after 1995, possibly linked with successful implementation of a nationwide vaccination program. However, HBV/A increased from 1990 to 2003–2004, and then started to decrease. The prevalence of genotype A has increased over the past 10 years. Phylodynamic inference clearly demonstrates a steady population growth compatible with an ongoing subepidemic; this might be due to the loss of immunity to HBV in adolescents and people being born before the vaccination program. This is the first phylodynamic study of HBV infection in Japan and will facilitate understanding the molecular epidemiology and long-term evolutionary dynamics of this virus in Japan. PMID:27280441

  4. Generation of cholesterol carboxyaldehyde by the reaction of singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Delta(g))] as well as ozone with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Uemi, Miriam; Ronsein, Graziella E; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    A few years ago, it was reported that ozone is produced in human atherosclerotic arteries, on the basis of the identification of 3beta-hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al and 3beta-hydroxy-5beta-hydroxy-B-norcholestane-6beta-carboxaldehyde (ChAld) as their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones. The formation of endogenous ozone was attributed to water oxidation catalyzed by antibodies, with the formation of dihydrogen trioxide as a key intermediate. We now report that ChAld is also generated by the reaction of cholesterol with singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Delta(g))] that is produced by photodynamic action or by the thermodecomposition of 1,4-dimethylnaphthalene endoperoxide, a defined pure chemical source of O2 (1Delta(g)). On the basis of 18O-labeled ChAld mass spectrometry, NMR, light emission measurements, and derivatization studies, we propose that the mechanism of ChAld generation involves the formation of the well-known cholesterol 5alpha-hydroperoxide (5alpha-OOH) (the major product of O2 ((1)Delta(g))-oxidation of cholesterol) and/or a 1,2-dioxetane intermediate formed by O2 (1Delta(g)) attack at the Delta(5) position. The Hock cleavage of 5alpha-OOH (the major pathway) or unstable cholesterol dioxetane decomposition (a minor pathway, traces) gives a 5,6-secosterol intermediate, which undergoes intramolecular aldolization to yield ChAld. These results show clearly and unequivocally that ChAld is generated upon the reaction of cholesterol with O2 (1Delta(g)) and raises questions about the role of ozone in biological processes.

  5. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  6. Molecular and Contextual Markers of Hepatitis C Virus and Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shapshak, Paul; Somboonwit, Charurut; Drumright, Lydia N.; Frost, Simon D.W.; Commins, Deborah; Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Scott, William K.; Duncan, Robert; McCoy, Clyde; Page, J. Bryan; Giunta, Brian; Fernandez, Francisco; Singer, Elyse; Levine, Andrew; Minagar, Alireza; Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Kotila, Taiwo; Chiappelli, Francesco; Sinnott, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection involves a complex interplay of social risks, and molecular factors of both virus and host. Injection drug abuse is the most powerful risk factor for HCV infection, followed by sexual transmission and additional non-injection drug abuse factors such as co-infection with other viruses and barriers to treatment. It is clearly important to understand the wider context in which the factors related to HCV infection occur. This understanding is required for a comprehensive approach leading to the successful prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HCV. An additional consideration is that current treatments and advanced molecular methods are generally unavailable to socially disadvantaged patients. Thus, the recognition of behavioral/social, viral, and host factors as components of an integrated approach to HCV is important to help this vulnerable group. Equally important, this approach is key to the development of personalized patient treatment – a significant goal in global healthcare. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the impact of drug abuse, epidemiology, social behavior, virology, immunopathology, and genetics on HCV infection and the course of disease. PMID:19650670

  7. Strategies towards Improved Feed Efficiency in Pigs Comprise Molecular Shifts in Hepatic Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Oster, Michael; Magowan, Elizabeth; Dannenberger, Dirk; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2017-01-01

    Due to the central role of liver tissue in partitioning and metabolizing of nutrients, molecular liver-specific alterations are of considerable interest to characterize an efficient conversion and usage of feed in livestock. To deduce tissue-specific and systemic effects on nutrient metabolism and feed efficiency (FE) twenty-four animals with extreme phenotypes regarding residual feed intake (RFI) were analyzed. Transcriptome and fatty acid profiles of liver tissue were complemented with measurements on blood parameters and thyroid hormone levels. Based on 803 differentially-abundant probe sets between low- and high-FE animals, canonical pathways like integrin signaling and lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, were shown to be affected. Molecular alterations of lipid metabolism show a pattern of a reduced hepatic usage of fatty acids in high-FE animals. Complementary analyses at the systemic level exclusively pointed to increased circulating triglycerides which were, however, accompanied by considerably lower concentrations of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver of high-FE pigs. These results are in accordance with altered muscle-to-fat ratios usually ascribed to FE animals. It is concluded that strategies to improve FE might favor a metabolic shift from energy storage towards energy utilization and mobilization. PMID:28763040

  8. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  9. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on suppression of raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Ke; Yu, Guo-Zheng; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ren, Xue-Qun

    2017-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) has been shown to be a suppressor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and is reported to be involved in human malignancy. However, the molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in regulating RKIP expression is not yet clarified. In this study, we compared RKIP expression in 107 pairs of matched liver cancer and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Among seven HBV-encoded proteins, we found HBV X (HBX) protein could significantly inhibit the expression level of RKIP, indicating that HBV could suppress RKIP expression through regulating HBX. To further elucidate the mechanism, analyses on transcriptional regulation and promoter methylation inhibition were conducted in Huh7 cells. Our results showed that HBX can interact with AP1 protein to inhibit the RKIP transcription. Moreover, we observed that the promoter methylation level of RKIP could be enhanced by HBV. In conclusion, our study revealed that RKIP could act as a molecular marker for HBV-infected liver cancer, but had no tumor-suppressing effect. PMID:27902472

  10. Molecular characterization of the human delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase 2 (ALAD2) allele: implications for molecular screening of individuals for genetic susceptibility to lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Wetmur, J G; Kaya, A H; Plewinska, M; Desnick, R J

    1991-01-01

    The second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD), is a homooctameric protein encoded by a gene localized to human chromosome 9q34. Expression of the two common alleles, ALAD1 (p = .9) and ALAD2 (q = .1), results in a polymorphic enzyme system with three distinct charge isozymes, designated 1-1, 1-2, and 2-2. Individuals heterozygous (2pq = .18) or homozygous (q2 = .01) for the ALAD2 allele have significantly higher blood lead levels than do ALAD1 homozygotes, when exposed to low or high levels of lead in the environment. To investigate the molecular nature of this common polymorphism, total RNA from an ALAD2 homozygote was oligo-dT primed and reverse transcribed, and then the ALAD2 cDNA was amplified, subcloned, and sequenced. Compared with the ALAD1 sequence, the only difference in the ALAD2 cDNA was a G-to-C transversion of nucleotide 177 in the coding region, which created an MspI restriction site. This base substitution predicted the replacement of a positively charged lysine by a neutral asparagine (K59N), an amino acid change consistent with the more electronegative charge of the ALAD-2 subunit. The ALAD1 and ALAD2 alleles were easily detected by amplification of a 916-bp region of genomic DNA and MspI digestion which results in 582- and 511-bp products, respectively. Molecular analysis of 85 ALAD1/ALAD2 heterozygotes and of eight ALAD2 homozygotes revealed no discrepancy between the predicted genotype and the erythrocyte isozyme phenotype, indicating that all the ALAD2 alleles analyzed had the G-to-C transversion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1716854

  11. Molecular status of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus among transgender commercial sex workers in Surakarta, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Sari, Yulia; Dharmawan, Ruben; Marwoto

    2017-02-01

    Sexual contact and other risk behavior among transgender working as commercial sex workers are important factors for sexual and blood-borne virus (BBV) infections. However, there no data concerning the molecular status of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) circulated among transgender working as commercial sex workers. Blood samples obtained from transgender working as commercial sex workers in Surakarta were examined for HIV antibodies, HBsAg and HCV antibodies, respectively, by immunological assays. All blood samples were also subjected for viral nucleic acid extraction and molecular detection of HIV, HBV and HCV by nested RT-PCR. The PCR products were purified from agarose gels, and the nucleotide sequences were retrieved and molecular analyzed. HIV, HBV and HCV was detected in 26.9% (7/26), 19.2% (5/26) and 46.2% (12/26), respectively. HIV CRF01_AE and B were found to be circulating in the community. HBV genotype B3 predominated, followed by C1. HCV genotype 1a predominated among HCV-infected transgender working as commercial sex workers, followed by 1c, 3a, and 4a. HIV, HBV, and HCV were found circulating in the transgender working as commercial sex workers in Surakarta, Indonesia.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Characteristics of Hepatitis B Identified through the French Mandatory Notification System

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Vincent; Laperche, Syria; Thiers, Valérie; Sayon, Sophie; Letort, Marie-José; Delarocque-Astagneau, Elisabeth; Antona, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Strains responsible for acute hepatitis B infections (AHB) in France have not been characterized. This study was first designed to analyze the molecular epidemiology of AHB and second to describe the differences between AHB and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) exacerbations. Methods This prospective study was based on the French mandatory notification system for AHB. 147 samples corresponding to declared cases were shipped to a central laboratory for classification as AHB or CHB according to the level of anti-HBc IgM and anti-HBc avidity. Results Based on biological marker values and file examination, 75 cases (59%) were classified as AHB. Independently of the acute or chronic status, genotype A (57%), D (22%) and E (14%) were the most prevalent and no phylogenetic clustering was observed among HBV sequences (n=68). Precore or basal core-promoter variants were not particularly associated with disease severity but were more prevalent in CHB. No antiviral resistant strains or immune-escape HBsAg was observed. HBV viral loads in AHB or CHB were comparable but with opposite distributions. ALT levels reached 10 times the upper normal value in 94% of AHB but only in 24% of CHB. Conclusions After rigorous classification, no major difference at the genetic level was found between HBV strains isolated from AHB and CHB. Absence of potentially deleterious variant detection is reassuring. When based upon HBsAg and anti-HBc IgM determination, AHB notification may falsely include more than 40% CHB, leading to an important risk of bias in national surveillance programs of AHB. PMID:24086488

  13. Molecular cloning of the human hepatitis C virus genome from Japanese patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Nobuyuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Ootsuyama, Yuko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ohkoshi, Showgo; Sugimura, Takashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada )

    1990-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Japanese type of hepatitis C virus (HCV-J) genome, consisting of 9413 nucleotides, was determined by analyses of cDNA clones from plasma specimens from Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis. HCV-J genome contains a long open reading frame that can encode a sequence of 3010 amino acid residues. Comparison of HCV-J with the American isolate of HCV showed 22.6% difference in nucleotide sequence and 15.1% difference in amino acid sequence. Thus HCV-J and the American isolate of HCV are probably different subtypes of HCV. The relationship of HCV-J with other animal RNA virus families and the putative organization of the HCV-J genome are discussed.

  14. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  15. Molecular Survey of Hepatitis C Virus in the Touristic City of Mar Del Plata, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Culasso, Andrés C. A.; Elizalde, Mercedes; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Barbini, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) may be roughly described by two groups of genotypes: the worldwide distributed ones (subtypes 1a, 1b, 2a and 3a, among others) and the endemic ones (subtypes 4a, 5a, 6a, among others). Epidemiological and population dynamic studies of the worldwide distributed genotypes have shown that subtypes 1a and 3a are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and that they are also in expansion in some countries. The molecular survey of HCV provides some clues about the epidemiological status of the infections in a local scale and the phylogenetic and demographic reconstruction analyses complement this study by inferring whether the infections of certain subtypes are in a steady state or expanding. Here, a molecular survey of the HCV variants that circulate in the touristic city of Mar del Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina) was performed in samples obtained from 42 patients. The subtypes detected were 1a (32 patients), 3a (8 patients) and 1b (2 patients). The demographic history of subtype 1a inferred using the sequence data showed an exponential growth in the 1990′s. The period of viral expansion was delayed compared with that observed for the same genotype in other countries where the transmission was associated with IDUs. Also, the phylogeographic analysis of HCV-1a showed a statistically significant association between the location of the samples and the phylogeny, which may be the result of the local transmission of HCV in the city. The molecular analysis helped in the description of the complex epidemiological context of a touristic city, and pointed out that some sanitary measures should be taken in order to reduce the transmission of HCV (and maybe of HIV) among IDUs. PMID:23028605

  16. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice.

  17. Volga Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea     View ... appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax ... include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping ...

  18. Proof by EPR spectroscopy that the unpaired electron in an Os(2)(7+) species is in a delta* metal-based molecular orbital.

    PubMed

    Cotton, F Albert; Chiarella, Gina M; Dalal, Naresh S; Murillo, Carlos A; Wang, Zhenxing; Young, Mark D

    2010-01-04

    Variable temperature structural and EPR studies are reported on the paddlewheel compound [Os(2)(hpp)(4)Cl(2)]PF(6), 1, (hpp = the anion of the bicyclic guanidine 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidine) that contains a rare M(2)(7+) species, with the goal of determining whether the unpaired electron resides in a metal- or ligand-based molecular orbital. Crystallographic studies show that the Os-Os distance in 1 remains essentially unchanged from 213 to 30 K, which is consistent with no changes in electronic structure in this range of temperature. It is noteworthy that the metal-metal distance in 1 is about 0.05 A shorter than that in the precursor Os(2)(hpp)(4)Cl(2), which is consistent with the loss of an electron in a delta* orbital. EPR spectra of 1 were measured in dilute frozen solution, powder, and single crystals. The spectra were observable only below about 50 K, with an exceptionally large line width, approximately 3,750 gauss, for a powdered sample, due to dipolar interactions and to short relaxation times. There is a very small average g value of approximately 0.750 and a cylindrical symmetry about the Os-Os bond. These data are consistent with the unpaired electron orbital having a large L value, such as that of a delta* orbital. The combination of X-ray structural data, the short relaxation time, and the magnetic data provide strong evidence that the unpaired electron in this nine-electron Os(2)(7+) species is localized in a metal-based orbital with this electron residing predominantly in a delta* orbital rather than in a pi* orbital and, thus, having an electronic configuration of sigma(2)pi(4)delta(2)delta*.

  19. The cell biology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) lipid addiction: molecular mechanisms and its potential importance in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Piver, Eric; Roingeard, Philippe; Pagès, Jean-Christophe

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis associated with liver steatosis, commonly evolving to cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that there are around 170 million chronic HCV carriers worldwide. The virus has a highly variable sequence, allowing definition of seven genotypes with different geographical distributions. Both clinical outcome and response to antiviral therapy are strongly influenced by HCV genotype. Importantly, several recent papers have suggested that the lipid profile of infected patients is strongly indicative of the various clinical outcomes of HCV infection. Furthermore, viral molecular and cellular studies have shown a tight link between cellular lipid metabolism and almost every step of the HCV infectious cycle. In the present review we summarise the current knowledge establishing the interplay between the molecular features of HCV replication, the cellular lipid biology and the lipid profiles observed in the serum of infected patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linking molecular biomarkers with higher level condition indicators to identify effects of copper exposures on the endangered delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus).

    PubMed

    Connon, Richard E; Beggel, Sebastian; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Geist, Juergen P; Pfeiff, Janice; Loguinov, Alexander V; Vulpe, Christopher D; Werner, Inge

    2011-02-01

    The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is an endangered pelagic fish species endemic to the Sacramento-San Joaquin estuary (CA, USA), and considered an indicator of ecosystem health. Copper is a contaminant of concern in Californian waterways that may affect the development and survival of this endangered species. The experimental combination of molecular biomarkers with higher level effects may allow for interpretation of responses in a functional context that can be used to predict detrimental outcomes caused by exposure. A delta smelt microarray was developed and applied to screen for candidate molecular biomarkers that may be used in monitoring programs. Functional classifications of microarray responses were used along with quantitative polymerase chain reaction determining effects upon neuromuscular, digestive, and immune responses in Cu-exposed delta smelt. Differences in sensitivity were measured between juveniles and larvae (median lethal concentration = 25.2 and 80.4 µg/L Cu(2+), respectively). Swimming velocity declined with higher exposure concentrations in a dose-dependent manner (r =  -0.911, p < 0.05), though was not statistically significant to controls. Genes encoding for aspartoacylase, hemopexin, α-actin, and calcium regulation proteins were significantly affected by exposure and were functionally interpreted with measured swimming responses. Effects on digestion were measured by upregulation of chitinase and downregulation of amylase, whereas downregulation of tumor necrosis factor indicated a probable compromised immune system. Results from this study, and many others, support the use of functionally characterized molecular biomarkers to assess effects of contaminants in field scenarios. We thus propose that to attribute environmental relevance to molecular biomarkers, research should concentrate on their application in field studies with the aim of assisting monitoring programs.

  1. [The hepatitis A virus: structural and functional organization of the genome, its molecular diagnostic value and cultivation].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, T Iu; Ternovoĭ, V A; Netesov, S V

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of recently published data on hepatitis A virus (HAV) genome clinical features, molecular diagnostic value and cell culture propagation are reviewed. The growing need in the study of the genetic diversity of HAV isolates and the search of its possible new antigenic variants are underlined. The results of the cultivation of different HAV strains are analyzed for possible application in vaccine and diagnostic kit production.

  2. Molecular interplays in hepatic stellate cells: apoptosis, senescence, and phenotype reversion as cellular connections that modulate liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira da Silva, Brenda; Ramos, Letícia Ferrreira; Moraes, Karen C M

    2017-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is a pathophysiological process correlated with intense repair and cicatrization mechanisms in injured liver, and over the past few years, the characterization of the fine-tuning of molecular interconnections that support the development of liver fibrosis has been investigated. In this cellular process, the hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) support the organ fibrogenesis. The HSCs are found in two distinct morpho-physiological states: quiescent and activated. In normal liver, most HSCs are found in quiescent state, presenting a considerable amount of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm, while in injured liver, the activated phenotype of HSCs is a myofibroblast, that secrete extracellular matrix elements and contribute to the establishment of the fibrotic process. Studies on the molecular mechanisms by which HSCs try to restore their quiescent state have been performed; however, no effective treatment to reverse fibrosis has been so far prescribed. Therefore, the elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, senescence, and the cell reversion phenotype process from activate to quiescent state will certainly contribute to the development of effective therapies to treat hepatic fibrosis. In this context, this review aimed to address central elements of apoptosis, senescence, and reversal of HSC phenotype in the control of hepatic fibrogenesis, as a guide to future development of therapeutic strategies. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. A molecular phylogenetics-based approach for identifying recent hepatitis C virus transmission events.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Andrea D; Joy, Jeffrey B; Montoya, Vincent; Luo, Iris; Poon, Art F Y; Jacka, Brendan; Lamoury, François; Applegate, Tanya; Montaner, Julio; Khudyakov, Yury; Grebely, Jason; Cook, Darrel; Harrigan, P Richard; Krajden, Mel

    2015-07-01

    Improved surveillance methods are needed to better understand the current hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease burden and to monitor the impact of prevention and treatment interventions on HCV transmission dynamics. Sanger sequencing (HCV NS5B, HVR1 and Core-E1-HVR1) and phylogenetics were applied to samples from individuals diagnosed with HCV in British Columbia, Canada in 2011. This included individuals with two or three sequential samples collected <1 year apart. Patristic distances between sequential samples were used to set cutoffs to identify recent transmission clusters. Factors associated with transmission clustering were analyzed using logistic regression. From 618 individuals, 646 sequences were obtained. Depending on the cutoff used, 63 (10%) to 92 (15%) unique individuals were identified within transmission clusters of predicted recent origin. Clustered individuals were more likely to be <40 years old (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 2.12, 95% CI 1.21-3.73), infected with genotype 1a (AOR 6.60, 95% CI 1.98-41.0), and to be seroconverters with estimated infection duration of <1 year (AOR 3.13, 95% CI 1.29-7.36) or >1 year (AOR 2.19, 95% CI 1.22-3.97). Systematic application of molecular phylogenetics may be used to enhance traditional surveillance methods through identification of recent transmission clusters. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational model of hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase: Molecular dynamics and docking to understand resistant mutations

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Pankaj R; Duan, Jinsong; Doerksen, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase (HDP) is a pharmacological target of intense interest. Of the seven agents approved in USA for the treatment of HBV infections, five are HDP inhibitors. However, resistance development against HDP inhibitors, such as lamivudine and adefovir, has severely hurt their efficacy to treat HBV. As a step toward understanding the mechanism of resistance development and for gaining detailed insights about the active site of the enzyme, we have built a homology model of HDP which is an advance over previously reported ones. Validation using various techniques, including PROSTAT, PROCHECK, and Verify-3D profile, proved the model to be stereochemically significant. The stability of the model was studied using a 5 ns molecular dynamics simulation. The model was found to be sufficiently stable after the initial 2.5 ns with overall root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of 4.13 Å. The homology model matched the results of experimental mutation studies of HDP reported in the literature, including those of antiviral-resistant mutations. Our model suggests the significant role of conserved residues, such as rtLys32, in binding of the inhibitors, contrary to previous studies. The model provides an explanation for the inactivity of some anti-HIV molecules which are inactive against HDP. Conformational changes which occurred in certain binding pocket amino acids helped to explain the better binding of some of the inhibitors in comparison to the substrates. PMID:20162615

  5. Heart transplantation in patients with chronic hepatitis B: clinical evolution, molecular analysis, and effect of treatment.

    PubMed

    Zampino, Rosa; Marrone, Aldo; Ragone, Enrico; Costagliola, Loredana; Cirillo, Grazia; Karayiannis, Peter; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Utili, Riccardo

    2005-11-15

    We evaluated clinical evolution and hepatitis B virus (HBV) molecular changes in heart recipients with chronic HBV infection before transplantation, and studied the effects of lamivudine treatment in patients who experienced HBV reactivation. Nine patients with chronic HBV infection who underwent heart transplantation were investigated. HBV surface/core-promoter/precore/core regions were sequenced. Prior to transplantation, all nine patients had consistently normal ALT and low HBV-DNA levels. Seven experienced HBV reactivation after transplantation (ALT elevated, HBV-DNA>200.000 cps/ml). Lamivudine treatment was initially effective in all patients; three patients during the second year of treatment developed lamivudine resistance-associated mutations (rt-L180M, rt-M204V) with severe disease reactivation, remitted after switch to adefovir treatment. No other significant HBV mutations were identified in the genomic regions studied. Immune suppression is crucial in the reactivation of previous inactive HBV infection and in the liver disease progression in heart recipients. Preemptive lamivudine treatment could be useful in the early management of these patients.

  6. Molecular diagnosis of Eimeria stiedae in hepatic tissue of experimentally infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Khaled M; Arafa, Waleed M; Mousa, Waheed M; Shokier, Khaled A M; Shany, Salama A; Aboelhadid, Shawky M

    2016-10-01

    The early detection of Eimeria stiedae in the hepatic tissue of experimentally infected rabbits was investigated using molecular assay. Forty 6-week-old male New Zealand rabbits were divided into two groups. Group A (30 animals) was infected with 2.5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. stiedae per animal on Day 0 and Group B (10 animals) was used as the uninfected controls. Three animals from Group A and one from Group B were sacrificed at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24 and 27 days post infection (PI). Gross and microscopic post-mortem findings were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the E. stiedae internal transcribed spacer 1 genomic region was conducted on blood, liver tissue, and feces from the Group A experimentally infected animals. Macroscopically, the liver showed irregular yellowish white nodules pathognomonic to E. stiedae infection beginning on Day 15 PI. Hepatomegaly and ascites were obvious from Day 21-24 PI. The presence of different E. stiedae schizonts and gametocytes in the histopathological sections of the biliary epithelium were evident on Day 15 PI. The E. stiedae PCR was first positive in liver tissues on Day 12 and in fecal samples on Day 18 PI, but the blood samples were negative. In conclusion, the PCR can be used for early diagnosis and control of E. stiedae schizonts before shedding of the oocysts in feces.

  7. [Molecular aspects of the antiviral response against hepatitis C virus implicated in vaccines development].

    PubMed

    Llanes, María Soledad; Palacios, Natalia Soledad; Piccione, Magalí; Ruiz, María Guillermina; Layana, Carla

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease caused by hepacivirus of the Flaviviridae family. It has a RNA genome, a unique highly variable molecule. It encodes ten proteins which are necessary to infect cells and multiply. Replication occurs only in hepatocytes. Because of its wide genomic variability and the absence of symptoms, it is difficult to make an early diagnosis and successful treatment. In this review we analyze the molecular mechanism by which the virus infects the hepatocytes and causes the disease. We focused the analysis on different therapies, with the possibility of improving treatment with the use of new specific vaccines. We highlight the use of new therapies based on nucleic acids, mainly DNA vectors. In the near future, once this treatment is adequately evaluated in clinical trials, and the costs are calculated, it could be a very beneficial alternative to conventional methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel virus-like particle based on hepatitis B core antigen and substrate-binding domain of bacterial molecular chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Jun; Gu, Kai; Xiong, Qi Yan; Shen, Liang; Cao, Rong Yue; Li, Ming Hui; Li, Tai Ming; Wu, Jie; Liu, Jing Jing

    2009-12-09

    Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein has been proved to be an attractive carrier for foreign epitopes, and can display green fluorescent protein (GFP) on its surface. The structure of substrate-binding domain of DnaK [DnaK (394-504 aa), DnaK SBD] is similar to GFP, we therefore reasoned that DnaK SBD might also be tolerated. Electron microscopic observations suggested that the chimeric proteins containing the truncated HBc (HBcDelta) and DnaK SBD could self-assemble into virus-like particle (VLP). Then the accessibility of DnaK SBD and the adjuvanticity of VLP HBcDelta-SBD were demonstrated by two recombinant peptide vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GhM and GhMNR. The latter carries in addition the peptide motif NRLLLTG which is known to bind to DnaK and DnaK SBD. The combination of VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhMNR elicited stronger humoral responses and caused further testicular atrophy than the combinations of VLP HBcDelta and GhMNR or VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhM in Balb/c mice. These findings indicate VLP HBcDelta-SBD might serve as an excellent carrier for GhMNR and some other peptide vaccines.

  9. A Multicentre Molecular Analysis of Hepatitis B and Blood-Borne Virus Coinfections in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Dunford, Linda; Carr, Michael J.; Dean, Jonathan; Nguyen, Linh Thuy; Ta Thi, Thu Hong; Nguyen, Binh Thanh; Connell, Jeff; Coughlan, Suzie; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Hall, William W.; Thi, Lan Anh Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) infection is endemic in Viet Nam, with up to 8.4 million individuals estimated to be chronically infected. We describe results of a large, multicentre seroepidemiological and molecular study of the prevalence of HBV infection and blood-borne viral coinfections in Viet Nam. Individuals with varying risk factors for infection (n = 8654) were recruited from five centres; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. A mean prevalence rate of 10.7% was observed and levels of HBsAg were significantly higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (17.4%, n = 174/1000) and dialysis patients (14.3%, n = 82/575) than in lower-risk groups (9.4%; p<0.001). Coinfection with HIV was seen in 28% of HBV-infected IDUs (n = 49/174) and 15.2% of commercial sex workers (CSWs; n = 15/99). HCV infection was present in 89.8% of the HBV-HIV coinfected IDUs (n = 44/49) and 40% of HBV-HIV coinfected CSWs (n = 16/40). Anti-HDV was detected in 10.7% (n = 34/318) of HBsAg positive individuals. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV S gene (n = 187) showed a predominance of genotype B4 (82.6%); genotypes C1 (14.6%), B2 (2.7%) and C5 (0.5%) were also identified. The precore mutation G1896A was identified in 35% of all specimens, and was more frequently observed in genotype B (41%) than genotype C (3%; p<0.0001). In the immunodominant ‘a’ region of the surface gene, point mutations were identified in 31% (n = 58/187) of sequences, and 2.2% (n = 4/187) and 5.3% (n = 10/187) specimens contained the major vaccine escape mutations G145A/R and P120L/Q/S/T, respectively. 368 HBsAg positive individuals were genotyped for the IL28B SNP rs12979860 and no significant association between the IL28B SNP and clearance of HBsAg, HBV viral load or HBeAg was observed. This study confirms the high prevalence of HBV infection in Viet Nam and also highlights the significant levels of blood-borne virus coinfections, which have important implications for

  10. Molecular evolution of hepatitis B vaccine escape variants in China, during 2000-2016.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Qiu, Jing; Zhu, Yinwei; Zhou, Hui; Yu, Lugang; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Lige; Guo, Zhirong; Dong, Chen

    2017-10-13

    Hepatitis B vaccine escape variants are the main threat to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in vaccination era worldwide. With 215 genotype B HBV and 313 genotype C HBV vaccine escape variants isolated from China during 2000-2016, we reported that genotype B HBV vaccine escape strains diverged in ∼1997 (95% HPD; 1987-2005), while genotype C HBV vaccine escape strains diverged in ∼1976 (95% HPD; 1955-2003). Additionally, the p-distance of genotype C HBV vaccine escape strains was 0.0291±0.0169, which was significantly higher than that in the genotype B HBV (t=131.02, p<0.05). However, genotype B HBV vaccine escape strains evolved more rapidly than genotype C HBV (2.103×10(-3) vs 1.083×10(-3) substitutions/site/year). Bayesian skyline plot analysis showed that the populations of genotype C HBV vaccine escape strains fluctuated more than those in genotype B HBV. Four sites (A5T/S, L21S, T/A126S and T/N131I/A) and 13 sites (N3S, T5A, G10Q/R/E, L21S, T47K/A/V, L98V/P, I/S126N/V/T, Q129H/R/L, T131P/I/N/A, G145A/R, L175S/F, L213I/S, V224A/G) were found to be under positive selection in genotype B and C HBV vaccine escape strains, respectively. More importantly, N3S, L21S, T47K, L98V, I/S126T and L213I mutations were detected in 1 (2.5%), 1 (2.5%), 1 (2.5%), 3 (7.5%), 1 (2.5%), 1 (2.5%) genotype C HBV infected Chinese younger with neonatal HBV vaccination, respectively. Therefore, our results should be valuable in further understanding the molecular evolution of HBV and providing new ideas for the elimination of HBV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an infectious form of hepatitis associated with contaminated water. By analyzing the sequence of several HEV isolates, a reverse transciption-polymerase chain reaction method was developed and optimized that should be able to identify all of the kn...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an infectious form of hepatitis associated with contaminated water. By analyzing the sequence of several HEV isolates, a reverse transciption-polymerase chain reaction method was developed and optimized that should be able to identify all of the kn...

  13. 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies on designing inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlian; Si, Hongzong; Li, Yang; Ge, Cuizhu; Song, Fucheng; Ma, Xiuting; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2016-08-01

    Viral hepatitis C infection is one of the main causes of the hepatitis after blood transfusion and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health threat. The HCV NS5B polymerase, an RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and an essential role in the replication of the virus, has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells. So the research and development of efficient NS5B polymerase inhibitors provides a great strategy for antiviral therapy against HCV. A combined three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling was accomplished to profoundly understand the structure-activity correlation of a train of indole-based inhibitors of the HCV NS5B polymerase to against HCV. A comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (COMSIA) model as the foundation of the maximum common substructure alignment was developed. The optimum model exhibited statistically significant results: the cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 was 0.627 and non-cross-validated r2 value was 0.943. In addition, the results of internal validations of bootstrapping and Y-randomization confirmed the rationality and good predictive ability of the model, as well as external validation (the external predictive correlation coefficient rext2 = 0.629). The information obtained from the COMSIA contour maps enables the interpretation of their structure-activity relationship. Furthermore, the molecular docking study of the compounds for 3TYV as the protein target revealed important interactions between active compounds and amino acids, and several new potential inhibitors with higher activity predicted were designed basis on our analyses and supported by the simulation of molecular docking. Meanwhile, the OSIRIS Property Explorer was introduced to help select more satisfactory compounds. The satisfactory results from this study may lay a reliable theoretical base for drug development of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

  14. Mitochondrial Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (MTDs) Are Released during Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion and Induce Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qianni; Wood, Caroline Ruth; Cimen, Sanem; Venkatachalam, Ananda Baskaran; Alwayn, Ian Patrick Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia / reperfusion injury (IRI) during the course of liver transplantation enhances the immunogenicity of allografts and thus impacts overall graft outcome. This sterile inflammatory insult is known to activate innate immunity and propagate organ damage through the recognition of damage-associate molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of mitochondrial DAMPs (MTDs) in the pathogenesis of hepatic IRI. Using in vitro models we observed that levels of MTDs were significantly higher in both transplantation-associated and warm IR, and that co-culture of MTDs with human and rat hepatocytes significantly increased cell death. MTDs were also released in an in vivo rat model of hepatic IRI and associated with increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10) and increased liver injury compared to the sham group. Our results suggest that hepatic IR results in a significant increase of MTDs both in vitro and in vivo suggesting that MTDs may serve as a novel marker in hepatic IRI. Co-culture of MTDs with hepatocytes showed a decrease in cell viability in a concentration dependent manner, which indicates that MTDs is a toxic mediator participating in the pathogenesis of liver IR injury.

  15. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zahid; Husain, Syed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Kar, Premashis

    2011-05-23

    Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was similar genotypic distribution in both acute and fulminant category, with predominance of genotype IIIA (70%) compared to IA (30%). Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  16. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was similar genotypic distribution in both acute and fulminant category, with predominance of genotype IIIA (70%) compared to IA (30%). Conclusions Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity. PMID:21605420

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Interaction Effects of Alcohol and Hepatitis C Virus in Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Valeria R; Fassnacht, Ryan; Archer, Kellie J; Maluf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which alcohol consumption accelerates liver disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are not well understood. To identify the characteristics of molecular pathways affected by alcohol in HCV patients, we fit probe-set level linear models that included the additive effects as well as the interaction between alcohol and HCV. The study included liver tissue samples from 78 patients, 23 (29.5%) with HCV-cirrhosis, 13 (16.7%) with alcohol-cirrhosis, 23 (29.5%) with HCV/alcohol cirrhosis and 19 (24.4%) with no liver disease (no HCV/no alcohol group). We performed gene-expression profiling by using microarrays. Probe-set expression summaries were calculated by using the robust multiarray average. Probe-set level linear models were fit where probe-set expression was modeled by HCV status, alcohol status, and the interaction between HCV and alcohol. We found that 2172 probe sets (1895 genes) were differentially expressed between HCV cirrhosis versus alcoholic cirrhosis groups. Genes involved in the virus response and the immune response were the more important upregulated genes in HCV cirrhosis. Genes involved in apoptosis regulation were also overexpressed in HCV cirrhosis. Genes of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes were upregulated in alcoholic cirrhosis, and 1230 probe sets (1051 genes) had a significant interaction estimate. Cell death and cellular growth and proliferation were affected by the interaction between HCV and alcohol. Immune response and response to the virus genes were downregulated in HCV-alcohol interaction (interaction term alcohol*HCV). Alcohol*HCV in the cirrhotic tissues resulted in a strong negative regulation of the apoptosis pattern with concomitant positive regulation of cellular division and proliferation. PMID:20386865

  18. Genotyping and molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus in liver disease patients in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ochwoto, Missiani; Chauhan, Ranjit; Gopalakrishnan, Deepak; Chen, Chien-Yu; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Okoth, Fredrick; Kioko, Henry; Kimotho, James; Kaiguri, Peter; Kramvis, Anna

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes are important in both the clinical manifestation of disease and treatment response. Although Kenya belongs to the African Region (AFR-E) characterized by high mortality and hyperendemicity of HBV, there is a paucity of HBV genotyping data. The aim of this study was to molecularly characterize the basic core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and complete surface (S) regions of HBV isolated from 61 HBsAg-positive liver disease patients attending Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi. HBsAg, HBeAg and viral loads were determined. HBV DNA was amplified and sequenced from 58/61 patients. In addition to the complete genome of two isolates, the BCP/PC and the complete S regions of 43 and 38 isolates, respectively were sequenced. Following phylogenetic analysis of the S region, 38 isolates clustered with subgenotype A1, whereas two isolates clustered with genotype D, one with subgenotype D1 and another as an outlier of the clade containing subgenotype D6 and the D/E recombinant. When the complete genome of the latter isolate was sequenced it clustered with D6. The majority of isolates belonged to serological subtype adw2 and only four to ayw2. Three distinct groups of subgenotype A1, distinguished by different amino acid motifs, circulate in Kenya: two in the African cluster and a monophyletic clade in the "Asian" cluster. HBeAg-negativity was a result of G1896A in genotype D isolates, whereas in subgenotype A1, the HBeAg-negativity was a result of mutations in the Kozak region (1809-1812) or precore start codon (1814-1816). Mutations at positions 1762 and 1764 occurred more frequently in HCC patients (p<0.05). In conclusion, subgenotypes A1, D1 and D6 circulate in liver disease patients in Kenya, with A1 predominating.

  19. Genotype Distribution and Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus in Hubei, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Lu, Yanjun; Liu, Weiyong; Zhu, Yaowu; Yan, Xiaoling; Xu, Jingxin; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Yue; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Central China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 patients from Hubei Province in central China were enrolled. These patients were tested positive for HCV antibody prior to blood transfusion. Among them, 177 were characterized by partial NS5B and/or Core-E1 sequences and classified into five subtypes: 1b, 83.0% (147/177); 2a, 13.0% (23/177); 3b, 2.3% (4/177); 6a, 1.1% (2/177); 3a, 0.6% (1/177). Analysis of genotype-associated risk factors revealed that paid blood donation and transfusion before 1997 were strongly associated with subtypes 1b and 2a, while some subtype 2a cases were also found in individuals with high risk sexual behaviors; subtypes 3b, 6a, and 3a were detected only in intravenous drug users. Phylogeographic analyses based on the coalescent datasets demonstrated that 1b, 2a, 3b, and 6a were locally epidemic in Hubei Province. Among them, subtype 1b Hubei strains may have served as the origins of this subtype in China, and 2a and 3b Hubei strains may have descended from the northwest and southwest of China, respectively, while 6a Hubei strains may have been imported from the central south and southwest. Conclusion/Significance The results suggest that the migration patterns of HCV in Hubei are complex and variable among different subtypes. Implementation of mandatory HCV screening before donation has significantly decreased the incidence of transfusion-associated HCV infection since 1997. More attention should be paid to intravenous drug use and unsafe sexual contact, which may have become new risk factors for HCV infection in Hubei Province. PMID:26325070

  20. The dynamic properties of the Hepatitis C Virus E2 envelope protein unraveled by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Barone, Daniela; Balasco, Nicole; Autiero, Ida; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is one of the most persistent human viruses. Although effective therapeutic approaches have been recently discovered, their use is limited by the elevated costs. Therefore, the development of alternative/complementary strategies is an urgent need. The E2 glycoprotein, the most immunogenic HCV protein, and its variants represent natural candidates to achieve this goal. Here we report an extensive molecular dynamics (MD) analysis of the intrinsic properties of E2. Our data provide interesting clues on the global and local intrinsic dynamic features of the protein. Present MD data clearly indicate that E2 combines a flexible structure with a network of covalent bonds. Moreover, the analysis of the two most important antigenic regions of the protein provides some interesting insights into their intrinsic structural and dynamic properties. Our data indicate that a fluctuating β-hairpin represents a populated state by the region E2(412-423). Interestingly, the analysis of the epitope E2(427-446) conformation, that undergoes a remarkable rearrangement in the simulation, has significant similarities with the structure that the E2(430-442) fragment adopts in complex with a neutralizing antibody. Present data also suggest that the strict conservation of Gly436 in E2 protein of different HCV genotypes is likely dictated by structural restraints. Moreover, the analysis of the E2(412-423) flexibility provides insights into the mechanisms that some antibodies adopt to anchor Trp437 that is fully buried in E2. Finally, the present investigation suggests that MD simulations should systematically complement crystallographic studies on flexible proteins that are studied in combination with antibodies.

  1. Pattern and molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Awan, Zunaira; Idrees, Muhammad; Amin, Irum; Butt, Sadia; Afzal, Samia; Akbar, Haji; Rehman, Irshad-ur; Younas, Saima; Shahid, Muhammad; Lal, Amreek; Saleem, Sana; Rauff, Bisma

    2010-12-01

    The continuously mutating nature of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the emergence of varying genotypes in different regions of the world affecting the disease outcome. The objective of the current study was to find out the pattern of HBV genotypes circulating in Pakistan. HBV genotypes were determined in HBV chronic patients of different age and gender from all the four different geographical regions (provinces) of Pakistan for a period of 2 years (2007-2009). Out of the total 3137 consecutive patients, 300 (175; 58.3% males and 125; 41.7% females) were randomly selected for HBV genotype A through H determination using molecular genotyping methods. Total 269 (89.6%) isolates were successfully genotyped where as 31 (10.3%) samples failed to generate a type-specific PCR band and were found untypable. Out of the successfully genotyped samples, 43 (14.3%) were with type A, 54 (18%) were with type B, 83 (27.6%) were with type C, 39 (13%) were with type D, 2 (0.6%) were with type E, 4 (1.3%) were with genotype F and total 44 (14.6%) were with mixed HBV infections. Of the mixed genotype infection cases, 16 were with genotypes A/D, 9 were B/C, six were A/D/F, five were with genotypes A/F, two were with A/B/D and B/E and one each for A/C as well as A/E genotypes. Four common genotypes of HBV found worldwide (A, B, C & D) were isolated from Pakistan along with uncommon genotypes E and F for the first time in Pakistan. Overall Genotype C is the most prevalent genotype. Genotypes B and C are predominant in Punjab & Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, respectively whereas genotype A in Sindh. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Delineation of molecular pathways that regulate hepatic PCSK9 and LDL receptor expression during fasting in normolipidemic hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Minhao; Dong, Bin; Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Background PCSK9 has emerged as a key regulator of serum LDL-C metabolism by promoting the degradation of hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR). In this study, we investigated the effect of fasting on serum PCSK9, LDL-C, and hepatic LDLR expression in hamsters and further delineated the molecular pathways involved in fasting-induced repression of PCSK9 transcription. Results Fasting had insignificant effects on serum total cholesterol and HDL-C levels, but reduced LDL-C, triglyceride and insulin levels. The decrease in serum LDL-C was accompanied by marked reductions of hepatic PCSK9 mRNA and serum PCSK9 protein levels with concomitant increases of hepatic LDLR protein amounts. Fasting produced a profound impact on SREBP1 expression and its transactivating activity, while having modest effects on mRNA expressions of SREBP2 target genes in hamster liver. Although PPARα mRNA levels in hamster liver were elevated by fasting, ligand-induced activation of PPARα with WY14643 compound in hamster primary hepatocytes did not affect PCSK9 mRNA or protein expressions. Further investigation on HNF1α, a critical transactivator of PCSK9, revealed that fasting did not alter its mRNA expression, however, the protein abundance of HNF1α in nuclear extracts of hamster liver was markedly reduced by prolonged fasting. Conclusion Fasting lowered serum LDL-C in hamsters by increasing hepatic LDLR protein amounts via reductions of serum PCSK9 levels. Importantly, our results suggest that attenuation of SREBP1 transactivating activity owing to decreased insulin levels during fasting is primarily responsible for compromised PCSK9 gene transcription, which was further suppressed after prolonged fasting by a reduction of nuclear HNF1α protein abundance. PMID:22954675

  3. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus strains in a tertiary care health set up in north western India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mini Pritam; Majumdar, Manasi; Thapa, Babu Ram; Gupta, Puneet Kumar; Khurana, Jasmine; Budhathoki, Bimal; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus usually causes acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in the paediatric age group with a recent shift in age distribution and disease manifestations like acute liver failure (ALF). This has been attributed to mutations in 5'non-translated region (5'NTR) which affects the viral multiplication. The present study was aimed to carry out the molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis A virus strains circulating in north western India. Serum samples from in patients and those attending out patient department of Pediatric Gastroenterology in a tertiary care hospital in north India during 2007-2011 with clinically suspected AVH were tested for anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM antibodies. Acute phase serum samples were subjected to nested PCR targeting the 5'NTR region followed by sequencing of the representative strains. A total of 1334 samples were tested, 290 (21.7%) were positive for anti-HAV IgM antibody. Of these, 78 serum samples (< 7 days old) were subjected to PCR and 47.4% (37/78) samples showed the presence of HAV RNA. Children < 15 yr of age accounted for majority (94%) of cases with highest seropositivity during rainy season. Sequencing of 15 representative strains was carried out and the circulating genotype was found to be III A. The nucleotide sequences showed high homology among the strains with a variation ranging from 0.1-1 per cent over the years. An important substitution of G to A at 324 position was shown by both AVH and ALF strains. The cumulative substitution in AVH strains Vs ALF strains as compared to GBM, Indian and prototype strain in the 200-500 region of 5' NTR was comparable. Our results showed hepatitis A still a disease of children with III A as a circulating genotype in this region. The mutations at 5'NTR region warrant further analysis as these affect the structure of internal ribosomal entry site which is important for viral replication.

  4. Mechanistic characterization and molecular modeling of hepatitis B virus polymerase resistance to entecavir.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ann W; Langley, David R; Colonno, Richard J; Tenney, Daniel J

    2010-02-12

    Entecavir (ETV) is a deoxyguanosine analog competitive inhibitor of hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase that exhibits delayed chain termination of HBV DNA. A high barrier to entecavir-resistance (ETVr) is observed clinically, likely due to its potency and a requirement for multiple resistance changes to overcome suppression. Changes in the HBV polymerase reverse-transcriptase (RT) domain involve lamivudine-resistance (LVDr) substitutions in the conserved YMDD motif (M204V/I +/- L180M), plus an additional ETV-specific change at residues T184, S202 or M250. These substitutions surround the putative dNTP binding site or primer grip regions of the HBV RT. To determine the mechanistic basis for ETVr, wildtype, lamivudine-resistant (M204V, L180M) and ETVr HBVs were studied using in vitro RT enzyme and cell culture assays, as well as molecular modeling. Resistance substitutions significantly reduced ETV incorporation and chain termination in HBV DNA and increased the ETV-TP inhibition constant (K(i)) for HBV RT. Resistant HBVs exhibited impaired replication in culture and reduced enzyme activity (k(cat)) in vitro. Molecular modeling of the HBV RT suggested that ETVr residue T184 was adjacent to and stabilized S202 within the LVDr YMDD loop. ETVr arose through steric changes at T184 or S202 or by disruption of hydrogen-bonding between the two, both of which repositioned the loop and reduced the ETV-triphosphate (ETV-TP) binding pocket. In contrast to T184 and S202 changes, ETVr at primer grip residue M250 was observed during RNA-directed DNA synthesis only. Experimentally, M250 changes also impacted the dNTP-binding site. Modeling suggested a novel mechanism for M250 resistance, whereby repositioning of the primer-template component of the dNTP-binding site shifted the ETV-TP binding pocket. No structural data are available to confirm the HBV RT modeling, however, results were consistent with phenotypic analysis of comprehensive substitutions of each ETVr position

  5. Molecular characteristics of a novel strain of canine minute virus associated with hepatitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Jung, Ji-Youl; Lee, Jae-Il; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2016-08-01

    A 5-year-old female Yorkshire terrier dog died a few days following hernia and ovariohysterectomy surgeries. Necropsy performed on the dog revealed that the surgeries were not the cause of death; however, degenerative viral hepatitis, showing intranuclear inclusion bodies in hepatic cells, was observed in histopathologic examination. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for the cause of disease, and minute virus of canines (MVC) was detected in all parenchymal organs, including the liver. Other pathogens that may cause degenerative viral hepatitis were not found. Infection with MVC was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of MVC nucleic acid in the liver tissue of the dog. Through sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete genome sequence, the strain was found to be distinct from other previously reported MVC strains. These results indicate that this novel MVC strain might be related to degenerative viral hepatitis in dogs.

  6. Immunohistochemical and molecular study on the protective effect of curcumin against hepatic toxicity induced by paracetamol in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Abdo Nassan, Mohamed; Ismail, Tamer Ahmed

    2014-11-29

    An overdose of paracetamol is a frequent reason for liver and renal toxicity and possible death and curcumin has hepatoprotective properties against liver damage. The exact mechanism of such protection is not clear. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the molecular levels of the protective effect of curcumin on paracetamol overdose induced hepatic toxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were allocated into 4 groups. Control group, administered corn oil; curcumin group, administered curcumin (400 mg/kg BW daily intra-gastric) dissolved in corn oil; paracetamol group, administered corn oil with a single dose of paracetamol (500 mg/kg BW intra-gastric) and protective group, administered curcumin with a single dose of paracetamol. Curcumin was administered for 7 successive days, while paracetamol was administered at day six of treatment. Blood and liver tissues were collected for biochemical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular examination. Serum analysis revealed an alteration in parameters of kidney and liver. A decrease in the antioxidant activity of liver was recorded in paracetamol group while curcumin administration restored it. Histopathological findings showed an extensive coagulative necrosis in hepatocytes together with massive neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration. Immunostaining of liver matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) in paracetamol administered rats showed an increase in MMP-8 expression in the area of coagulative necrosis surrounding the central vein of hepatic lobules. Curcumin administration decreased MMP-8 expression in liver of paracetamol administered rats. Gene expression measurements revealed that paracetamol decreased the expression of antioxidant genes and increased the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and acute phase proteins. Curcumin administration ameliorated paracetamol-induced alterations in genes expression of antioxidant and inflammatory cytokines. The results

  7. Delta-doping of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, E. F.

    2005-08-01

    Part I: 1. Introduction E. F. Schubert; Part II: 2. Electronic structure of delta-doped semiconductors C. R. Proetto; Part III: 3. Recent progress in delta-like confinement of impurities in GaAs K. H. Ploog; 4. Flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME) of III-V semiconductors T. Makimoto and Y. Horikoshi; 5. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of delta-doped III-V semiconductors D. Ritter; 6. Solid phase epitaxy for delta-doping in silicon I. Eisele; 7. Low temperature MBE of silicon H.-J. Gossmann; Part IV: 8. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of delta-doped semiconductors H. S. Luftmann; 9. Capacitance-voltage profiling E. F. Schubert; 10. Redistribution of impurities in III-V semiconductors E. F. Schubert; 11. Dopant diffusion and segregation in delta-doped silicon films H.-J. Gossmann; 12. Characterisation of silicon and delta-doped structures in GaAs R. C. Newman; 13. The DX-center in silicon delta-doped GaAs and AlxGa1-xAs P. M. Koenraad; Part V: 14. Luminescence and ellipsometry spectroscopy H. Yao and E. F. Schubert; 15. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy of single delta-doped III-V semiconductor heterostructures J. Wagner and D. Richards; 16. Electron transport in delta-doped quantum wells W. T. Masselink; 17. Electron mobility in delta-doped layers P. M. Koenraad; 18. Hot electrons in delta-doped GaAs M. Asche; 19. Ordered delta-doping R. L. Headrick, L. C. Feldman and B. E. Weir; Part IV: 20. Delta-doped channel III-V field effect transistors (FETs) W.-P. Hong; 21. Selectively doped heterostructure devices E. F. Schubert; 22. Silicon atomic layer doping FET K. Nakagawa and K. Yamaguchi; 23. Planar doped barrier devices R. J. Malik; 24. Silicon interband and intersubband photodetectors I. Eisele; 25. Doping superlattice devices E. F. Schubert.

  8. Molecular characterization of hepatitis-A-virus infections, in the context of two outbreaks in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Theamboonlers, A; Jantaradsamee, P; Chatchatee, P; Chongsrisawat, V; Mokmula, M; Poovorawan, Y

    2002-10-01

    As hepatitis A virus (HAV) is usually transmitted through the faecal-oral route, hepatitis A is a communicable disease. In countries of intermediate to low endemicity, sudden outbreaks of human infection with the virus may occur. Between September 2001 and April 2002, there were two outbreaks of HAV infection in the Ruso and Yeengor districts of Narathiwas province, in southern Thailand. Isolates of HAV were recovered during these outbreaks, from 14 in-patients with acute hepatitis in Ruso (12 positive for anti-HAV IgM and all positive for HAV RNA), 16 children with asymptomatic infection in Yeengor (14 positive for anti-HAV IgM and nine for HAV RNA), and four isolated cases in Bangkok (all positive for anti-HAV IgM). Molecular characterization of the VP1-P2A region of each isolate was followed by phylogenetic analysis. All of the isolates from Narathiwas province were found to be of genotype 1a, to have the same VP1 nucleotide sequence, and to show a high level of sequence homology (>/= 99.5%) with the isolates from Bangkok and with previous Thai isolates. These results should facilitate further research into HAV transmission and genotype identification in community outbreaks.

  9. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Francisco C A; Souto, Francisco J D; Nabuco, Leticia C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henrique Sergio M; Franz, Helena Cristina F; Saraiva, Joao Carlos P; Virgolino, Helaine A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Melo, Mabel M M; Martins, Regina M B; Gomes, Selma A

    2007-11-23

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%), and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%). Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2%) and Central (47.6%) regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13%) countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5%) belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin) indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F isolates belonged to cluster II, the presence of some

  10. [Comparison of two commercial molecular assays for quantitative measurement of hepatitis B viral DNA].

    PubMed

    Zalewska, Małgorzata; Domagała, Małgorzata; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2003-12-01

    The detection and quantification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomes appear to be the most reliable method for monitoring HBV infection and assessing responses to antiviral treatment. For quantitative determination of HBV viremia molecular biology-based assays are used. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the performance of two HBV DNA detection and quantification commercial assays: hybrid-capture Digene Hybrid Capture HBV DNA assays and based on competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor Roche Diagnostics. Reproducibility, linearity, sensitivity were determined with 2-fold dilution series of high-titers samples and with 113 sera samples from patients with chronic HBV infection. Within-run and between-run coefficients of variation ranged from 2.4-9.7% for hybrid-capture and from 3.7-15% for PCR-based Monitor. The hybrid-capture and PCR Monitor assays appeared to be linear throughout their range of quantification: 5-2000 pg/ml and 2 x 10(2)-2 x 10(5) copies/ml respectively. The HBV DNA units used in the two assays were not comparable. Hybrid-capture and Monitor gave concordant results with 87 (82.1%) of 106 samples. The assays were both positive with 79 (74.5%) samples and were negative in 7 (7.5%) cases. Hybrid-capture and Monitor gave discordant results in 17 (17.9%) cases. The Monitor Assay was positive in 13 (61.9%) of the 21 samples negative in hybrid-capture. The competitive PCR-based Monitor assay appear to be significantly more sensitive but slightly less reproducible than the hybrid-capture. In the group of patients with seroconversion to anti-HBe PCR method should be used for measurement of viral load. In the presence of HBe antigen concentration of HBV DNA may be tested by hybrid-capture assay. Also these two assays may be used in complementary fashion in the management of HBV infected patients. It seems reasonable to use a hybrid-capture assay first, because its linear range of quantification is extended to high

  11. A global transcriptional analysis of Megalobrama amblycephala revealing the molecular determinants of diet-induced hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingdong; Lu, Kangle; Jiang, Guangzhen; Liu, Wenbin; Dong, Zaijie; Tian, Hongyan; Li, Xiangfei

    2015-10-10

    Blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala), a prevalent species in China's intensive polyculture systems, is highly susceptible to hepatic steatosis, resulting in considerable losses to the fish farming industry. Due to a lack of genomic resources, the molecular mechanisms of lipid metabolism in M. amblycephala are poorly understood. Here, a hepatic cDNA library was generated from equal amounts of mRNAs isolated from M. amblycephala fed normal-fat and high-fat diets. Sequencing of this library using the Illumina/Solexa platform produced approximately 51.87 million clean reads, which were assembled into 48,439 unigenes with an average length of 596 bp and an N50 value of 800 bp. These unigenes were searched against the nucleotide (NT), non-redundant (NR), Swiss-Prot, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) databases using the BLASTn or BLASTx algorithms (E-value ≤ 10(-5)). A total of 8602 unigenes and 22,155 unigenes were functionally classified into 25 COG categories and 259 KEGG pathways, respectively. Furthermore, 22,072 unigenes were grouped into 62 sub-categories belonging to three main Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Using a digital gene expression analysis and the M. amblycephala transcriptome as a reference, 477 genes (134 up-regulated and 343 down-regulated) were identified as differentially expressed in fish fed a high-fat diet versus a normal-fat diet. KEGG and GO functional enrichment analyses of the differentially expressed unigenes were performed and 12 candidate genes related to lipid metabolism were identified. This study provides a global survey of hepatic transcriptome profiles and identifies candidate genes that may be related to lipid metabolism in M. amblycephala. These findings will facilitate further investigations of the mechanisms underlying hepatic steatosis in M. amblycephala.

  12. Non-travel-associated hepatitis E in England and Wales: demographic, clinical, and molecular epidemiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Samreen; Arnold, Eve; Banks, Malcolm; Bendall, Richard P; Cramp, Matthew E; Cunningham, Richard; Dalton, Harry R; Harrison, Tim J; Hill, Simon F; Macfarlane, Lorna; Meigh, Rolf E; Shafi, Shuja; Sheppard, Martin J; Smithson, Jacquie; Wilson, Melanie P; Teo, Chong-Gee

    2005-10-01

    Between 1996 and 2003, 186 cases of hepatitis E were serologically diagnosed. Of these, 17 (9%) were not associated with recent travel abroad. Patients were >55 years old (range, 56-82 years old) and tended to be male (76%). Two patients presented with fulminant hepatitis. A total of 129 (69%) cases were associated with recent travel to countries where hepatitis E virus (HEV) is hyperendemic. Compared with patients with travel-associated disease, patients with non-travel-associated disease were more likely to be older, living in coastal or estuarine areas, not of South Asian ethnicity, and infected by genotype 3 strains of HEV. The genotype 3 subgenomic nucleotide sequences were unique and closely related to those from British pigs. Patients infected by HEV indigenous to England and Wales tended to belong to a distinct demographic group, there were multiple sources of infection, and pigs might have been a viral reservoir.

  13. Serologic and Molecular Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus among School Children in East Java, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Lusida, Maria Inge; Amin, Mochamad; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2010-01-01

    Universal childhood hepatitis B vaccination was introduced in Indonesia in 1997; by 2008, coverage was estimated to be 78%. This study aimed to investigate the serologic status and virologic characteristics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) among the children in East Java. A total of 229 healthy children born during 1994–1999 were enrolled in this study. Overall, 3.1% were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 23.6% were positive for antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs). HBV DNA was detected in 5 of 222 HBsAg-negative carriers, which were suggested to be cases of occult HBV infection. A single amino substitution (T126I) in the S region was frequently found. HBV infection remains endemic, and the prevalence of anti-HBs remains insufficient among children in East Java, Indonesia. PMID:20595500

  14. Serologic and molecular characteristics of hepatitis B virus among school children in East Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Lusida, Maria Inge; Amin, Mochamad; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2010-07-01

    Universal childhood hepatitis B vaccination was introduced in Indonesia in 1997; by 2008, coverage was estimated to be 78%. This study aimed to investigate the serologic status and virologic characteristics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) among the children in East Java. A total of 229 healthy children born during 1994-1999 were enrolled in this study. Overall, 3.1% were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 23.6% were positive for antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs). HBV DNA was detected in 5 of 222 HBsAg-negative carriers, which were suggested to be cases of occult HBV infection. A single amino substitution (T126I) in the S region was frequently found. HBV infection remains endemic, and the prevalence of anti-HBs remains insufficient among children in East Java, Indonesia.

  15. Delta II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Delta II expendable launch vehicle with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), cooperative space X-ray astronomy mission between NASA, Germany and United Kingdom, was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on June 1, 1990.

  16. Molecular virology of chronic hepatitis B and C: parallels, contrasts and impact on drug development and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Delaney, William E

    2013-07-01

    Chronic infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are highly prevalent worldwide, causing significant liver disease and thus representing high unmet medical needs. Accordingly, substantial pharmaceutical and clinical research efforts have been made to develop and improve treatments for these viruses. While HBV and HCV are both hepatotropic viruses that can cause similar disease in chronically infected patients, they belong to different viral families. There are substantial differences in the molecular virology of HBV and HCV that have profound implications for therapeutic strategy. In particular, HBV has a long-lived nuclear form of its genome (covalently closed circular DNA) that is able to persist in the face of potent inhibition of viral replication. In contrast, HCV does not have a long-lived genome form and depends on active replication to maintain infection; HCV is therefore much more susceptible to eradication by potent antiviral agents. Additional differences between HBV and HCV with therapeutic implications include the size, structure and heterogeneity of their respective viral genomes. These factors influence the number of targets available for therapeutic intervention, response to therapy among viral genotypes and the emergence of viral resistance. Substantial progress has been made in treating each infection, but unique challenges remain. In this review, key differences in the molecular virology of hepatitis B and C will be presented, highlighting their impact on antiviral therapy (particularly with respect to direct-acting antivirals) and the challenges they present to the cure of each disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular temporal bone pathology: III. Genotyping of the deltaF508 deletion in the DNA of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wackym, P A; Kerner, M M; Grody, W W

    1998-08-01

    Genomic DNA from a single celloidin-embedded archival temporal bone section was used to identify a specific genetic mutation. The polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify and detect the deltaF508 deletion, a common molecular genetic defect in cystic fibrosis. This mutation, present in more than 70% of white patients and carriers with cystic fibrosis, results in the deletion of codon 508, which specifies the amino acid phenylalanine of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. When this technique was applied to archival specimens from four patients with cystic fibrosis, all expressed the carrier state of this defective gene. These data demonstrate the feasibility of identifying genetic mutations in archival temporal bone specimens.

  18. Which molecular features affect the intrinsic hepatic clearance rate of ionizable organic chemicals in fish?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a p...

  19. First report and molecular characterization of hepatitis E virus infection in renal transplant recipients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Passos, Ana Maria; Heringer, Tiago Pires; Medina-Pestana, José Osmar; Ferraz, Maria Lucia Gomes; Granato, Celso Francisco Hernandes

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute and chronic hepatitis in organ transplant recipients. Serological evidence for HEV infection has been discovered in various population groups in Brazil, and a single acute case has been confirmed. To date, however, no cases of HEV infection in immunocompromised patients have been reported in Brazil. This study aimed to identify and characterize hepatitis E cases in renal transplant recipients in Brazil. A retrospective study was performed on 96 serum samples from renal transplant recipients with unexplained liver enzymes elevation. Three confirmed cases of HEV infection were identified that lacked seroconversion to HEV IgG antibodies. The prevalence of HEV in these patients was 3.1%. Using a sequence analysis of a 304-nucleotide fragment within ORF2, the strains were classified as genotype 3 with a low percent identity to previously characterized strains. This is the first report of hepatitis E infection in renal transplant recipients in Brazil, and the data indicate that a novel genotype 3 subvariant may be present and that further investigation is necessary to characterize the circulating HEV strains. In this setting, HEV infection should be considered as a potential cause of abnormal liver tests of unknown origin. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Which molecular features affect the intrinsic hepatic clearance rate of ionizable organic chemicals in fish?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a p...

  1. Trigonelline attenuates hepatic complications and molecular alterations in high-fat high-fructose diet-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Nehal A; Ramadan, Amer; Erian, Emad Y; Saleh, Dalia O; Sedik, Ahmed A; Badawi, Manal; El Hotaby, Walid

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trigonelline (TRG) on the hepatic complications associated with high-fat high-fructose (HFHF) diet-induced insulin resistance (IR) in rats. IR was induced by giving a saturated fat diet and 10% fructose in drinking water to rats for 8 weeks. Insulin-resistant rats were orally treated with TRG (50 and 100 mg/kg), sitagliptin (SIT; 5 mg/kg), or a combination of TRG (50 mg/kg) and SIT (5 mg/kg) for 14 days. Liver homogenates were used for assessment of hepatic lipids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and inflammatory cytokines. Histopathological and DNA cytometry examinations were carried out for hepatic and pancreatic tissues. Hepatic tissues were examined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for assessment of any molecular changes. Results of the present study revealed that oral treatment of insulin-resistant rats with TRG or TRG in combination with SIT significantly decreased homeostatic model assessment of IR, hepatic lipids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the inflammatory cytokines. TRG or TRG in combination with SIT ameliorated the histopathological, DNA cytometry, and molecular alterations induced by a HFHF diet. Finally, it can be concluded that TRG has beneficial effects on the hepatic complications associated with IR due to its hypoglycemic effect and antioxidant potential.

  2. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus strains in a tertiary care health set up in north western India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mini Pritam; Majumdar, Manasi; Thapa, Babu Ram; Gupta, Puneet Kumar; Khurana, Jasmine; Budhathoki, Bimal; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis A virus usually causes acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in the paediatric age group with a recent shift in age distribution and disease manifestations like acute liver failure (ALF). This has been attributed to mutations in 5’non-translated region (5’NTR) which affects the viral multiplication. The present study was aimed to carry out the molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis A virus strains circulating in north western India. Methods: Serum samples from in patients and those attending out patient department of Pediatric Gastroenterology in a tertiary care hospital in north India during 2007-2011 with clinically suspected AVH were tested for anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM antibodies. Acute phase serum samples were subjected to nested PCR targeting the 5’NTR region followed by sequencing of the representative strains. Results: A total of 1334 samples were tested, 290 (21.7%) were positive for anti-HAV IgM antibody. Of these, 78 serum samples (< 7 days old) were subjected to PCR and 47.4% (37/78) samples showed the presence of HAV RNA. Children < 15 yr of age accounted for majority (94%) of cases with highest seropositivity during rainy season. Sequencing of 15 representative strains was carried out and the circulating genotype was found to be III A. The nucleotide sequences showed high homology among the strains with a variation ranging from 0.1-1 per cent over the years. An important substitution of G to A at 324 position was shown by both AVH and ALF strains. The cumulative substitution in AVH strains Vs ALF strains as compared to GBM, Indian and prototype strain in the 200-500 region of 5’ NTR was comparable. Interpretation & conclusion: Our results showed hepatitis A still a disease of children with III A as a circulating genotype in this region. The mutations at 5’NTR region warrant further analysis as these affect the structure of internal ribosomal entry site which is important for viral

  3. Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): molecular mechanisms and novel paradigms.

    PubMed

    Brechot, C; Kremsdorf, D; Soussan, P; Pineau, P; Dejean, A; Paterlini-Brechot, P; Tiollais, P

    2010-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (HBV) infection is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Most HCCs complicate the evolution of an active or inactive cirrhosis. However, some tumors occur on livers with minimal histological changes; the prevalence of such cases varies from one geographical region to the other, being much higher in the Southern half of Africa (around 40% of HCCs) than in Asia, America and Europe, where at least 90% of HCCs are associated in the cirrhosis. This heterogeneity is probably a reflection of different environmental and genetic factors. This review will summarise the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in HBV-related liver carcinogenesis. It will show in particular how viruses can be viewed as tools to discover and dissect new cellular pathways involved in cancer development and emphasize the potential synergistic effects between HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as between viral infections and other environmental factors, such as alcohol.

  4. Incidence and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis E Virus from Swine in Eastern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chuks Iweriebor, Benson; Nwodo, U. U.; Obi, Larry Chikwelu; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus-mediated infection is a serious public health concern in economically developing nations of the world. Globally, four major genotypes of HEV have been documented. Hepatitis E has been suggested to be zoonotic owing to the increase of evidence through various studies. Thus far, this paper reports on prevalence of hepatitis E virus among swine herd in selected communal and commercial farms in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. A total of 160 faecal samples were collected from swine herds in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities of Eastern Cape Province for the presence of HEV. Of the 160 faecal samples screened, only seven were positive (4.4%) for HEV. The nucleotide sequences analyses revealed the isolates as sharing 82% to 99% identities with other strains (KX896664, KX896665, KX896666, KX896667, KX896668, KX896669, and KX896670) from different regions of the world. We conclude that HEV is present among swine in the Eastern Cape Province, albeit in low incidence, and this does have public health implications. There is a need for maintenance of high hygienic standards in order to prevent human infections through swine faecal materials and appropriate cooking of pork is highly advised. PMID:28191016

  5. Incidence and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis E Virus from Swine in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Adelabu, Olusesan Adeyemi; Chuks Iweriebor, Benson; Nwodo, U U; Obi, Larry Chikwelu; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus-mediated infection is a serious public health concern in economically developing nations of the world. Globally, four major genotypes of HEV have been documented. Hepatitis E has been suggested to be zoonotic owing to the increase of evidence through various studies. Thus far, this paper reports on prevalence of hepatitis E virus among swine herd in selected communal and commercial farms in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. A total of 160 faecal samples were collected from swine herds in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities of Eastern Cape Province for the presence of HEV. Of the 160 faecal samples screened, only seven were positive (4.4%) for HEV. The nucleotide sequences analyses revealed the isolates as sharing 82% to 99% identities with other strains (KX896664, KX896665, KX896666, KX896667, KX896668, KX896669, and KX896670) from different regions of the world. We conclude that HEV is present among swine in the Eastern Cape Province, albeit in low incidence, and this does have public health implications. There is a need for maintenance of high hygienic standards in order to prevent human infections through swine faecal materials and appropriate cooking of pork is highly advised.

  6. Determination of the phosphorescence quantum yield of singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g ) in five different solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.; Seikel, K.; Brauer, H.D. )

    1989-06-01

    The quantum yield of singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} (v = 0) {yields} {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}} (v = O) phosphorescence was determined in acetonitrile, chloroform, carbon disulfide, carbon tetrachloride, and Freon 113 relative to the respective emission in benzene, using the known {sup 1}O{sub 2} phosphorescence quantum yield in benzene as standard. Quantum yields were not found to depend on sensitizer (dicyanoanthracene, rubicene, tetraphenylporphine) but to depend strongly on solvent. The {sup 1}O{sub 2} phosphorescence quantum yields are surprisingly large. The maximum value measured is Qp (Freon 113) = 0.15. The emission quantum yields correlate linearly with {sup 1}O{sub 2} lifetimes for all solvents, including benzene. Consequently the rate constant of {sup 1}O{sub 2} phosphorescence is independent of solvent. It amounts to k{sub p} = 1.3 s{sup {minus}1}. Thus the radiative rate constant is approximately 5000 times larger in liquid solution than for an isolated {sup 1}O{sub 2} molecule.

  7. Molecular diagnostics in the management of chronic hepatitis C: key considerations in the era of new antiviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tests that detect and/or quantify HCV RNA are important in the diagnosis and management of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) undergoing anti-viral therapy. The primary goal of anti-HCV therapy is to achieve a sustained virologic response (SVR) defined as "undetectable" Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA in the serum or plasma at 12 to 24 weeks following the end of treatment. HCV RNA viral load (VL) monitoring is used to guide treatment duration where decisions can be made on-therapy and to determine whether or not to stop therapy. In addition, clinicians determine treatment regimen and duration based on the HCV genotype (1-6) as well as the kinetics of HCV RNA levels. As direct acting antivirals (DAA) have revolutionized hepatitis C treatment, they have also lead to new HCV RNA VL result interpretations. Further, the clinical decisions were different for pegylated-interferon/ribavirin (PEGα/RBV)+ boceprevir or telaprevir-containing regimens approved in 2011 (e.g. one requiring an additional 4 week "lead-in" with PEGα/RBV), each having different HCV RNA values for futility rules, created complexity in clinical decisions. The future pegylated-interferon free DAA- regimens promise significantly improved cure rates along with fixed durations and simpler treatment rules. The intent of this article is to discuss the role of HCV RNA real-time PCR tests used in the management of CHC patients in the past and how this is likely to change in the era of interferon free DAA regimens. PMID:25236936

  8. Prevalence of hepatitis viruses in patients with acute hepatitis and characterization of the detected genotype 4 hepatitis E virus sequences in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Baasanjav, Nachin; Nyamkhuu, Dulmaa; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E is considered to be a worldwide public health problem. Although the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibodies in healthy individuals is noted to be 11%, no patients with acute hepatitis E have previously been identified in Mongolia. Three hundred two consecutive patients (183 males and 119 females; median age of 22.0 [Interquartile range: 18.3-25.0] years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis during 2012-2013 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. By serological and/or molecular approaches, 77 (25.5%), 93 (30.8%), 19 (6.3%), 48 (15.9%), and 12 (4.0%) of the patients were diagnosed with acute hepatitis of types A, B, C, D (superinfection of hepatitis delta virus on a background of chronic hepatitis B virus infection) and E, respectively, while the cause of hepatitis was unknown in the remaining 53 patients (17.5%). The 12 hepatitis E patients had no history of travel abroad in the 3 months before the onset of disease, and lived separately in fixed or movable houses with water supplied via pipe, tank or well, denying transmission from a common water supply. The 12 HEV isolates obtained from the patients showed high nucleotide identities of 99.7-100%, and a representative HEV isolate, MNE13-227, was closest to the Chinese isolates of genotype 4, with the highest identity of 97.3% in the 304-nt ORF2 sequence and 92.1% over the entire genome. The present study revealed the occurrence of autochthonous acute hepatitis E in Mongolia, caused by a monophyletic genotype 4 HEV strain.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of human hepatitis A virus defined by an antigen-capture polymerase chain reaction method.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R W; Siegl, G; Lemon, S M

    1990-01-01

    We describe an immunoaffinity-linked nucleic acid amplification system (antigen-capture/polymerase chain reaction, or AC/PCR) for detection of viruses in clinical specimens and its application to the study of the molecular epidemiology of a picornavirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV). Immunoaffinity capture of virus, synthesis of viral cDNA, and amplification of cDNA by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out sequentially in a single reaction vessel. This approach simplified sample preparation and enhanced the specificity of conventional PCR. AC/PCR detected less than one cell culture infectious unit of virus in 80 microliters of sample. Sequencing of AC/PCR reaction products from 34 virus strains demonstrated remarkable conservation at the nucleotide level among most strains but revealed hitherto unsuspected genetic diversity among human isolates. Epidemiologically related strains were identical or closely related in sequence. Virus strains recovered from epidemics of hepatitis A in the United States and Germany were identical in sequence, providing evidence for a previously unrecognized epidemiologic link between these outbreaks. Images PMID:2158093

  10. Predation on larval suckers in the Williamson River Delta revealed by molecular genetic assays—A pilot study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, Danielle M.; Ostberg, Carl O.; Burdick, Summer M.

    2016-06-13

    Predation of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) during larval egress to Upper Klamath Lake from the Williamson River is poorly understood but may be an important factor limiting recruitment into adult spawning populations. Native and non-native piscivores are abundant in nursery wetland habitat, but larval predation has not been directly studied for all species. Larvae lack hard body structures and digest rapidly in predator digestive systems. Therefore, traditional visual methods for diet analysis may fail to identify the extent of predation on larvae. The goals of this study were to (1) use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays developed for Lost River and shortnose suckers to assay predator stomach contents for sucker DNA, and (2) to assess our ability to use this technique to study predation. Predators were captured opportunistically during larval sucker egress. Concurrent feeding trials indicate that most predators—yellow perch (Perca flaverscens), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), blue chub (Gila coerulea), Klamath tui chub (Siphatales bicolor bicolor), Klamath Lake sculpin (Cottus princeps), slender sculpin (Cottus tenuis)—preyed on sucker larvae in the laboratory. However, sucker DNA was not detected in fathead minnow stomachs. Of the stomachs screened from fish captured in the Williamson River Delta, 15.6 percent of yellow perch contained sucker DNA. This study has demonstrated that the application of qPCR and SNP assays is effective for studying predation on larval suckers. We suggest that techniques associated with dissection or detection of sucker DNA from fathead minnow stomachs need improvement.

  11. Albumin dialysis with molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kobashi-Margáin, Ramón A; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan G; Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Angel A; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez Sánchez, Nahum

    2011-06-01

    Acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver diseases are major health issues worldwide, and most cases end with the need for liver transplantation. Up to 90% of the patients die waiting for an organ to be transplanted. Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome that usually accompanies liver failure and impacts greatly on the quality of life. The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a recently developed form of artificial liver support that functions on a base of albumin dialysis. It facilitates the dialysis of albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins, allowing the patient to survive and even improving some clinical features of liver failure. The following manuscript reviews the technical features of MARS operation and some of the clinical trials that analyze the efficacy of the system in the therapy of liver diseases.

  12. Serologic and molecular characteristics of hepatitis B virus infection in vaccinated schizophrenia patients in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiying; Yu, Lugang; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhu, Huijuan; Li, Yinghui; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Xinxin; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have indicated that the patients with psychiatric illness were at higher risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine in schizophrenia patients remains unclear. Between June 2014 and January 2015, 415 schizophrenia patients and 3,038 controls who had been routinely immunized as infants were recruited in the present study. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBsAb, and HBV DNA were detected with commercial methods according to the manufacturer's protocol. A 600-bp region of the S gene (region nt236-nt835) was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genotypes of isolated HBV were identified using phylogenetic analysis by the neighbor-joining algorithm in the software MEGA version 4.1. The seroprevalence of HBsAg in schizophrenia patients was 6.75%, which was significantly higher than 3.32% measured in controls. HBsAg prevalence was 7.94% in male schizophrenia patients and 5.47% in female schizophrenia patients, while it was only 4.04% in males and 2.08% in females in the control group. The HBsAb seroprevalence rate was 58.31% in schizophrenia patients and 59.94% in non-schizophrenia controls. Moreover, one HBV strain in the schizophrenia group presented I126S vaccine escape mutation (5.88%), while three HBV isolates showed Q129H, M133L, and G145R vaccine escape mutations in the control group (6.81%). Schizophrenia patients are at higher risk for HBV infection, even those who had received routine immunization. Therefore, a booster HB vaccination targeted at schizophrenia patients should be considered in the future.

  13. Molecular mimicry between Fc receptor and S peplomer protein of mouse hepatitis virus, bovine corona virus, and transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Oleszak, E L; Kuzmak, J; Hogue, B; Parr, R; Collisson, E W; Rodkey, L S; Leibowitz, J L

    1995-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated molecular mimicry between the S peplomer protein of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and Fc gamma R (Fc gamma R). A monoclonal antibody (MAb) to mouse Fc gamma R (2.4G2 anti-Fc gamma R MAb), purified rabbit immunoglobulin, but not their F(ab')2 fragments, as well as mouse and rat IgG, immunoprecipitated (1) recombinant S peplomer protein expressed by a vaccinia virus recombinant in human, rabbit, and mouse cells, and (2) natural S peplomer protein from cells infected with several strains of MHV and MHV escaped mutants. We report here results of studies documenting molecular mimicry between Fc gamma R and S peplomer protein of viruses representing three distinct antigenic subgroups of the Coronaviridae. We have shown a molecular mimicry between the S peplomer protein of bovine corona virus (BCV) and Fc gamma R. The 2.4G2 anti-Fc gamma R MAb, rabbit IgG, but not its F(ab')2 fragments, as well as homologous bovine serum, free of anti-BCV antibodies, immunoprecipitated S peplomer protein of BCV (Mebus strain). In contrast, we did not find molecular mimicry between S peplomer protein of human corona virus (HCV-OC43) and Fc gamma R. Although the OC43 virus belongs to the same antigenic group as MHV and BCV, MAb specific for human Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII and purified human IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 myeloma proteins did not immunoprecipitate the S peplomer protein from HCV-OC43-infected RD cells. In addition, we did demonstrate molecular mimicry between the S peplomer protein of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and Fc gamma R. TGEV belongs to the second antigenic subgroup of coronaviridae.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Hepatitis B and liver transplantation: molecular and clinical features that influence recurrence and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ghaziani, Tahereh; Sendi, Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Zamor, Philippe; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-10-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is estimated that about 350 million people throughout the world are chronically infected with HBV. Some of these people will develop hepatic cirrhosis with decompensation and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. For such patients, liver transplantation may be the only hope for cure or real improvement in quality and quantity of life. Formerly, due to rapidity of recurrence of HBV infection after liver transplantation, usually rapidly progressive, liver transplantation was considered to be contraindicated. This changed dramatically following the demonstration that hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG), could prevent recurrent HBV infection. HBIG has been the standard of care for the past two decades or so. Recently, with the advent of highly active inhibitors of the ribose nucleic acid polymerase of HBV (entecavir, tenofovir), there has been growing evidence that HBIG needs to be given for shorter lengths of time; indeed, it may no longer be necessary at all. In this review, we describe genetic variants of HBV and past, present, and future prophylaxis of HBV infection during and after liver transplantation. We have reviewed the extant medical literature on the subject of infection with the HBV, placing particular emphasis upon the prevention and treatment of recurrent HBV during and after liver transplantation. For the review, we searched PubMed for all papers on the subject of "hepatitis B virus AND liver transplantation". We describe some of the more clinically relevant and important genetic variations in the HBV. We also describe current practices at our medical centers, provide a summary and analysis of comparative costs for alternative strategies for prevention of recurrent HBV, and pose important still unanswered questions that are in need of answers during the next decade or two. We conclude that it is now rational and cost-effective to decrease and, perhaps, cease altogether

  15. Experimental chronic hepatitis B infection of neonatal tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis): A model to study molecular causes for susceptibility and disease progression to chronic hepatitis in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be an escalating global health problem. Feasible and effective animal models for HBV infection are the prerequisite for developing novel therapies for this disease. The tree shrew (Tupaia) is a small animal species evolutionary closely related to humans, and thus is permissive to certain human viral pathogens. Whether tree shrews could be chronically infected with HBV in vivo has been controversial for decades. Most published research has been reported on adult tree shrews, and only small numbers of HBV infected newborn tree shrews had been observed over short time periods. We investigated susceptibility of newborn tree shrews to experimental HBV infection as well as viral clearance over a protracted time period. Results Forty-six newborn tree shrews were inoculated with the sera from HBV-infected patients or tree shrews. Serum and liver samples of the inoculated animals were periodically collected and analyzed using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Southern blot, and immunohistochemistry. Six tree shrews were confirmed and four were suspected as chronically HBV-infected for more than 48 (up to 228) weeks after inoculation, including three that had been inoculated with serum from a confirmed HBV-infected tree shrew. Conclusions Outbred neonatal tree shrews can be long-term chronically infected with HBV at a frequency comparable to humans. The model resembles human disease where also a smaller proportion of infected individuals develop chronic HBV related disease. This model might enable genetic and immunologic investigations which would allow determination of underlying molecular causes favoring susceptibility for chronic HBV infection and disease establishment vs. viral clearance. PMID:22913805

  16. Serologic and Molecular Survey of Hepatitis E Virus in German Deer Populations.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Stephan; Hackl, Sybille S; Piepenschneider, Meike; Vina-Rodriguez, Ariel; Dremsek, Paul; Ulrich, Rainer G; Groschup, Martin H; Eiden, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen that is primarily transmitted by the fecal-oral route and causes a usually self-limiting acute viral hepatitis. The virus is endemic in developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America and is responsible for sporadic cases in industrialized countries. In western Europe, an increasing number of autochthonous cases have been associated with zoonotic transmissions of HEV from domestic and wild animals. In Germany, animal reservoirs for HEV have been mainly assigned to domestic pigs and wild boars. To investigate the potential role of deer as a reservoir of HEV, we surveyed HEV-specific antibodies and RNA in deer samples from geographic regions in Germany. We sampled red deer (Cervus elaphus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) during active surveillance in three forest districts in northern Hesse and southern Lower Saxony during 2011-12 and 2012-13, respectively. Additionally, archived samples of red, roe, and fallow deer (Dama dama), collected in 2000-01 in German national parks, were included in the study. Antibody prevalence ranged from 2-3.3% in red deer to 5.4-6.8% in roe deer. Viral RNA was detected in red deer and fallow deer at prevalences of 2.0-6.6% and 4.3%, respectively. The investigation confirmed the presence of HEV infections in three deer species in Germany. Red, roe, and fallow deer should be further monitored to assess their role as hosts and potential reservoirs of HEV in Germany.

  17. Molecular characterization of subgenotype A1 (subgroup Aa) of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kramvis, Anna; Kew, Michael C

    2007-07-01

    Subgenotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) were first recognized after a unique segment of genotype A was identified when sequencing the preS2/S region of southern African HBV isolates. Originally named subgroup A', subsequently called subgroup Aa (for Africa) or subgenotype A1, this subgenotype is found in South Africa, Malawi, Uganda, Tanzania, Somalia, Yemen, India, Nepal, the Philippines and Brazil. The relatively higher mean nucleotide divergence of subgenotype A1 suggests that it has been endemic and has a long evolutionary history in the populations where it prevails. Distinctive sequence characteristics could account for the high hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) negativity and low HBV DNA levels in carriers of this subgenotype. Substitutions or mutations can reduce HBeAg expression at three levels: (i) 1762T1764A atthe transcriptional level; (ii) substitutions at nt 1809-1812 at the translational level; and (iii) 1862T at the post-translational level. Co-existence of 1762T1764A and nt 1809-1812 mutations reduces HBeAg expression in an additive manner. In addition, subgenotype A1 has unique sequence alterations in the transcriptional regulatory elements and the polymerase coding region. The distinct sequence characteristics of subgenotype A1 may contribute to the 4.5-fold increased risk of heptocellular carcinoma in HBV carriers infected with genotype A, which is entirely attributable to subgenotype A1.

  18. Molecular pathways: hepatitis C virus, CXCL10, and the inflammatory road to liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J

    2013-03-15

    An estimated 170 million people worldwide are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is characterized histologically by a persistent immune and inflammatory response that fails to clear HCV from hepatocytes. This response is recruited to the liver, in part, by the chemokine CXCL10, the serum and intrahepatic levels of which have been inversely linked to the outcome of interferon-based therapies for hepatitis C. Bystander tissue damage from this ineffective response is thought to lead to increased hepatocyte turnover and the development of fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, CXCL10 is traditionally viewed as an orchestrator of the angiostatic and antitumor immune response. In this review, we will explore this duality and the pathways by which CXCL10 is produced by hepatocytes during HCV infection, its effects on resident and infiltrating immune cells, and how deregulation of these cell populations within the liver may lead to chronic liver inflammation. We will also discuss potential host-directed therapies to slow or reverse HCV-induced inflammation that leads to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCCs.

  19. Molecular virology of hepatitis B virus and targets for antiviral intervention.

    PubMed

    Glebe, Dieter; König, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The members of the viral family Hepadnaviridae comprise one of the smallest enveloped DNA viruses and cause acute and chronic infections in mammals and birds, leading to large virus and antigen loads in the blood. They have a restricted host range and depend on differentiated hepatocytes for replication. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the prototype of the Hepadnaviridae. HBV can persist in infected hepatocytes and has evolved elaborate strategies to evade the immune system. HBV replicates like HIV (family of Retroviridae) via reverse transcription. Drugs licensed for inhibition of HIV reverse transcriptase lower the viral load of chronic HBV patients, but they do not cure the infection. HBV genomes are archived in the nucleus of hepatocytes as episomal DNA before reverse transcription. In contrast, the RNA genome of HIV first needs reverse transcription before proviral integration within the host genome. Wild-type HBV remains relatively stable in chronic HBV patients during the immunotolerant state, but is able to evolve mutants rapidly upon selective pressure due to therapy or immune reactions. Current therapies for chronic hepatitis B are far from optimal. To extend therapeutic options, further studies on HBV and its interaction with the host are urgently needed. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Epidemiology and molecular characterisation of duck hepatitis A virus from different duck breeds in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Ahmed M; Selim, Abdullah A; Moursi, Mohamed K; Nasef, Soad A; Abdelwhab, E M

    2015-06-12

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) is an acute highly contagious disease of ducklings caused by three distinct serotypes of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the RNA family Picornaviridae, where serotype 1 is the most widespread serotype worldwide. To date, little if any is known about the prevalence and genetic characterisation of DHAV outside Asia. The current study describes surveillance on DHV in 46 commercial duck farms in Egypt with a history of high mortality in young ducklings from 3 to 15 day-old from 2012 to 2014. Clinical samples were examined by generic RT-PCR assays followed by partial sequence analysis of the 5'UTR, VP1 and 3D genes of the vaccine strain and 15 field viruses. The overall positive rate was 37% (n=17/46). All duck breeds (Pekin, Muscovy, Mallard and Green Winged) were susceptible to the disease with mortality ranged from 15% to 96.7%. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Egyptian strains cluster in the DHAV serotype 1 with Asian viruses and distinguishable from the vaccine strains. So far, this is the first report on the genetic characterisation of DHAV in Egypt. This study may be useful to better understand the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Basis of the Behavior of Hepatitis A Virus Exposed to High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrea, Lucía; Pérez-Rodríguez, Francisco J.; Costafreda, M. Isabel; Beguiristain, Nerea; Fuentes, Cristina; Aymerich, Teresa; Guix, Susana; Bosch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Food-borne hepatitis A outbreaks may be prevented by subjecting foods at risk of virus contamination to moderate treatments of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). A pretreatment promoting hepatitis A virus (HAV) capsid-folding changes enhances the virucidal effect of HHP, indicating that its efficacy depends on capsid conformation. HAV populations enriched in immature capsids (125S provirions) are more resistant to HHP, suggesting that mature capsids (150S virions) are more susceptible to this treatment. In addition, the monoclonal antibody (MAb) K24F2 epitope contained in the immunodominant site is a key factor for the resistance to HHP. Changes in capsid folding inducing a loss of recognition by MAb K24F2 render more susceptible conformations independently of the origin of such changes. Accordingly, codon usage-associated folding changes and changes stimulated by pH-dependent breathings, provided they confer a loss of recognition by MAb K24F2, induce a higher susceptibility to HHP. In conclusion, the resistance of HAV to HHP treatments may be explained by a low proportion of 150S particles combined with a good accessibility of the epitope contained in the immunodominant site close to the 5-fold axis. PMID:25107980

  2. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System Effectively Replaces Hepatic Function in Severe Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Hanish, Steven I; Stein, Deborah M; Scalea, Joseph R; Essien, Eno-Obong; Thurman, Paul; Hutson, William R; Bartlett, Stephen T; Barth, Rolf N; Scalea, Thomas M

    2017-10-01

    Patients with severe acute liver failure (ALF) have extreme physiologic dysfunction and often die if transplantation is not immediately available. Patients may be supported with MARS (Baxter International Inc., Deerfield, IL) until transplantation or spontaneous recovery occurs. We present the largest series in the United States of MARS therapy as temporary hepatic replacement for ALF. MARS was used to support patients with severe liver trauma (SLT), in ALF patients as a bridge to transplantation (BTT), and as definitive therapy for toxic ingestion or idiopathic liver failure (DT) in a level 1 trauma center and large transplant center. Patient demographics, etiology of ALF, and laboratory values were recorded. Endpoints were patient survival ± liver transplant and/or recovery of liver function. Twenty-seven patients with severe ALF received MARS therapy. Five patients with SLT had a 60% survival with recovery of liver and renal function. Thirteen patients received MARS as a BTT, of which 9 were transplanted with a 1-year survival of 78% (program overall survival 85% at 1 year). All 4 who were not transplanted expired. Nine patients with ALF from toxic ingestion received MARS as DT with liver recovery and survival in 67%. MARS therapy resulted in significant improvement in liver function, coagulation, incidence of encephalopathy, and creatinine. MARS therapy successfully replaced hepatic function in ALF allowing time for spontaneous recovery or transplantation. Spontaneous recovery was remarkably common if support can be sustained.

  3. The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis Delta Virus in HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Taheri, Mohammad; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Gholami, Mina; Lari, Mahmood Amini; Faramarzi, Hossein; Sarvari, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has shown that liver disease caused by hepatitis viruses can be more aggressive and severe in HIV infected subjects. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of HDV infection among HIV/HBV co-infected clients in Shiraz, southwest Iran. In this study, 178 patients co-infected with HBV and HIV individuals were enrolled. The diagnosis of HIV infection was documented based on serological assays. The demographic and complementary data were collected by a questionnaire. HBsAg and HDV Ab were detected by commercial quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also measured. The mean age of the participants was 37.4±7.4 years (range 22-63). 175 (98.4 %) patients were male and 3 (1.6 %) were female. Among 178 patients co-infected with HIV/HBV, 35 cases (19.7%, 95% CI: 14%-25%) were anti-HDV‏ positive and 143 (80.3%) were negative for anti-HDV. HDV exposure in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was associated with blood transfusion (P=0.002, OR: 14.3) and prison history (P=0.01, OR: 2.31) but not with age, marital status, unsafe sex contact, and injection drug abuse. Our data showed a relatively high prevalence of HDV infection in HIV infected population in Shiraz, Iran. The high frequency of HDV Ab in patients with blood transfusion and prison history reveals that HDV transmission occurs more frequently in the parental route than sexual contacts; therefore, blood screening for HDV diagnosis in the high-risk group is recommended. PMID:26379352

  4. Hepatitis B and concomitant hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chong Teik

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is becoming more common in Asia with prevalence becoming as common as Western countries. Concomitant Hepatitis B and hepatic steatosis is increasingly encountered in clinical practice. The interaction between the two concomitant conditions at both molecular level and clinical outcome remains to be explored. The present review is aimed at summarizing the existing literature on the complex interaction of the two-concomitant disease. PMID:28251117

  5. Molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas and Aeromonas isolates from catfish of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang Nam Kha; Van, Thi Thu Hao; Nguyen, Huu Thinh; Smooker, Peter M; Shimeta, Jeff; Coloe, Peter J

    2014-07-16

    A collection of 116 motile Pseudomonas spp. and 92 Aeromonas spp. isolated from 15 Vietnamese intensive catfish farms was analyzed to examine the molecular antibiotic resistance characteristics and the transferability of resistance markers within and between species. High levels of resistance to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, and nitrofurantoin were observed. The percentage of multiple drug resistance of Pseudomonas spp. and Aeromonas spp. isolates was 96.6% and 61.9%, respectively. The multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) index mean values of 0.457 and 0.293 of Pseudomonas and Aeromonas isolates, respectively, indicated that these isolates were exposed to high risk sources of contamination where antibiotics were commonly used. Approximately 33% of Pseudomonas spp. and 28% of Aeromonas spp. isolates from catfish contained class 1 integrons, but no class 2 integrons were detected. Several common resistance genes including aadA, dfrA and catB were harbored in class 1 integrons. Large plasmids (>55 kb) were frequently detected in 50% and 71.4% of the plasmids extracted from Pseudomonas and Aeromonas isolates, respectively. Conjugation and transformation experiments demonstrated the successful transfer of all or part of the resistance phenotypes of catfish isolates to the recipient strains, including laboratory strains and strains isolated from this study. These results highlight the likely role of catfish bacteria as a reservoir of antibiotic resistant, Gram-negative bacteria harboring a pool of mobile genetic elements that can readily be transferred intra- and interspecies. To our knowledge, this is the first report on molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance of bacteria isolated from catfish in Vietnam.

  6. Molecular virology of hepatitis B virus, sub-genotype C4 in northern Australian Indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, M; Davies, J; Yuen, L; Edwards, R; Sozzi, T; Jackson, K; Cowie, B; Tong, S; Davis, J; Locarnini, S

    2014-04-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a significant health burden from chronic hepatitis B infection; however, the strain of hepatitis B virus (HBV) found among Indigenous Australians has not been well characterized. Blood samples were collected from 65 Indigenous Australians with chronic HBV infection from across the Top End of Australia's Northern Territory. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV from these samples revealed that 100% of the isolates were genotype C, sub-genotype C4, expressing the serotype ayw3. This strain is a divergent group within the HBV/C genotype, and has only been described in Indigenous Australians. Evidence of recombination was suggested by discordant phylogenetic clustering of the C4 sequences when comparing the full genome to the surface region and confirmed by recombination analysis which showed the surface gene region to be most closely related to genotype J, while the remaining regions of the genome were most similar to genotype C sequences. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of multiple mutations that have been linked with more rapid liver disease progression and an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. These mutations were detected in the majority of sequences examined. Variants associated with vaccine failure were detected as the predominant viral quasi-species in 3/35 samples. In summary, the HBV C4 variant found in this population has a high potential to cause advanced liver disease and to escape vaccination programs. Further in vitro functional and natural history studies are warranted in order to determine the clinical and public health consequences of infection with the HBV C4 variant in these communities.

  7. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of the Hepatitis E Virus in Retail Pork Products Marketed in Canada.

    PubMed

    Mykytczuk, Oksana; Harlow, Jennifer; Bidawid, Sabah; Corneau, Nathalie; Nasheri, Neda

    2017-06-01

    Infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV) is very common worldwide. HEV causes acute viral hepatitis with approximately 20 million cases per year. While HEV genotypes 1 and 2 cause large waterborne and foodborne outbreaks with a significant mortality in developing countries, genotypes 3 and 4 are more prevalent in developed countries with transmission being mostly zoonotic. In North America and Europe, HEV has been increasingly detected in swine, and exposure to pigs and pork products is considered to be the primary source of infection. Therefore we set out to investigate the prevalence of HEV in retail pork products available in Canada, by screening meal-size portions of pork pâtés, raw pork sausages, and raw pork livers. The presence of the HEV genomes was determined by RT-PCR and viral RNA was quantified by digital droplet PCR. Overall, HEV was detected in 47% of the sampled pork pâtés and 10.5% of the sampled raw pork livers, but not in the sampled pork sausages, and sequencing confirmed that all HEV strains belonged to genotype 3. Further phylogenetic analysis revealed that except for one isolate that clusters with subtype 3d, all isolates belong to subtype 3a. Amino acid variations between the isolates were also observed in the sequenced capsid region. In conclusion, the prevalence of HEV in pâtés and raw pork livers observed in this study is in agreement with the current HEV distribution in pork products reported in other developed countries.

  8. Molecular Differences in Hepatic Metabolism between AA Broiler and Big Bone Chickens: A Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohua; Yue, Ying; Li, Jianke; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi; Yang, Aijun; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the metabolic differences in the livers of modern broilers and local chicken breeds is important for understanding their biological characteristics, and many proteomic changes in their livers are not well characterized. We therefore analyzed the hepatic protein profiles of a commercial breed, Arbor Acres (AA) broilers, and a local dual purpose breed, Big Bone chickens, using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-chip/electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 145 proteins were identified as having differential abundance in the two breeds at three growth stages. Among them, 49, 63 and 54 belonged to 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age, respectively. The higher abundance proteins in AA broilers were related to the energy production pathways suggesting enhanced energy metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. In contrast, the higher abundance proteins in Big Bone chickens showed enhanced lipid degradation, resulting in a reduction in the abdominal fat percentage. Along with the decrease in fat deposition, flavor substance synthesis in the meat of the Big Bone chickens may be improved by enhanced abundance of proteins involved in glycine metabolism. In addition, the identified proteins in nucleotide metabolism, antioxidants, cell structure, protein folding and transporters may be critically important for immune defense, gene transcription and other biological processes in the two breeds. These results indicate that selection pressure may have shaped the two lines differently resulting in different hepatic metabolic capacities and extensive metabolic differences in the liver. The results from this study may help provide the theoretical basis for chicken breeding. PMID:27760160

  9. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-β1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10μmol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-β1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10μmol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Differences in Hepatic Metabolism between AA Broiler and Big Bone Chickens: A Proteomic Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Aijuan; Chang, Wenhuan; Liu, Guohua; Yue, Ying; Li, Jianke; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi; Yang, Aijun; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the metabolic differences in the livers of modern broilers and local chicken breeds is important for understanding their biological characteristics, and many proteomic changes in their livers are not well characterized. We therefore analyzed the hepatic protein profiles of a commercial breed, Arbor Acres (AA) broilers, and a local dual purpose breed, Big Bone chickens, using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-chip/electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 145 proteins were identified as having differential abundance in the two breeds at three growth stages. Among them, 49, 63 and 54 belonged to 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age, respectively. The higher abundance proteins in AA broilers were related to the energy production pathways suggesting enhanced energy metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. In contrast, the higher abundance proteins in Big Bone chickens showed enhanced lipid degradation, resulting in a reduction in the abdominal fat percentage. Along with the decrease in fat deposition, flavor substance synthesis in the meat of the Big Bone chickens may be improved by enhanced abundance of proteins involved in glycine metabolism. In addition, the identified proteins in nucleotide metabolism, antioxidants, cell structure, protein folding and transporters may be critically important for immune defense, gene transcription and other biological processes in the two breeds. These results indicate that selection pressure may have shaped the two lines differently resulting in different hepatic metabolic capacities and extensive metabolic differences in the liver. The results from this study may help provide the theoretical basis for chicken breeding.

  11. Molecular characterization, distribution, and dynamics of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mónica Viviana Alvarado; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a frequent cause of acute and chronic hepatitis and a leading cause for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is classified in six major genotypes and more than 70 subtypes. In Colombian blood banks, serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using a third-generation ELISA. The aim of this study was to characterize the viral sequences in plasma of 184 volunteer blood donors who attended the "Banco Nacional de Sangre de la Cruz Roja Colombiana," Bogotá, Colombia. Three different HCV genomic regions were amplified by nested PCR. The first of these was a segment of 180 bp of the 5'UTR region to confirm the previous diagnosis by ELISA. From those that were positive to the 5'UTR region, two further segments were amplified for genotyping and subtyping by phylogenetic analysis: a segment of 380 bp from the NS5B region; and a segment of 391 bp from the E1 region. The distribution of HCV subtypes was: 1b (82.8%), 1a (5.7%), 2a (5.7%), 2b (2.8%), and 3a (2.8%). By applying Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, it was estimated that HCV-1b was introduced into Bogotá around 1950. Also, this subtype spread at an exponential rate between about 1970 to about 1990, after which transmission of HCV was reduced by anti-HCV testing of this population. Among Colombian blood donors, HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent genotype, especially in large urban conglomerates such as Bogotá, as is the case in other South American countries.

  12. Hepatitis C-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Epidemiology, molecular signature and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Arcaini, Luca; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    There is ample epidemiologic evidence for an association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). B-NHL subtypes most frequently associated with HCV are marginal zone lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The most convincing evidence for a causal relationship between HCV infection and lymphoma development is the observation of B-NHL regression after HCV eradication by antiviral therapy (AVT). In fact, for indolent HCV-associated B-NHL, first-line AVT instead of standard immune-chemotherapy might be considered. Molecular mechanisms of HCV-NHL development are still poorly understood. Three general theories have emerged to understand the HCV-induced lymphomagenesis: (1) continuous external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by viral antigens and consecutive proliferation; (2) HCV replication in B cells with oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular viral proteins; (3) permanent B-cell damage, e.g., mutation of tumor suppressor genes, caused by a transiently intracellular virus ("hit and run" theory). This review systematically summarizes the data on epidemiology, interventional studies, and molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated B-NHL. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated with MeHg exposure: deepening into the molecular mechanisms of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Susana; Ramos, Sonia; Madrid, Yolanda; Luque-Garcia, Jose L; Cámara, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MeHg toxicity and the way in which this molecule interacts with living organisms is a critical point since MeHg represents a well-known risk to ecosystems and human health. We used a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture in combination with SDS-PAGE and nanoflow LC-ESI-LTQ for analyzing the differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated to MeHg exposure. Seventy-eight proteins were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold. We identified a number of proteins involved in different essential biological processes including apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular trafficking and energy production. Among these proteins, we found several molecules whose de-regulation has been already related to MeHg exposure, thus confirming the usefulness of our discovery approach, and new ones that helped to gain a deeper insight into the biomolecular mechanisms related to MeHg-induced toxicity. Overexpression of several HSPs and the proteasome 26S subunit itself showed the proteasome system as a molecular target of toxic MeHg. As for the interaction networks, the top ranked was the nucleic acid metabolism, where many of the identified de-regulated proteins are involved.

  14. Molecular characterisation of fowl adenovirus type 7 isolated from poultry associated with inclusion body hepatitis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Niczyporuk, Jowita Samanta

    2017-02-03

    The fowl adenovirus field strain FAdV-JSN-5/10j (GenBank accession number KP879219) was isolated from the intestine of a 7-week-old chicken diagnosed with inclusion body hepatitis and simultaneously with Marek's disease, and for that reason, it was chosen for molecular study. It was identified as fowl adenovirus genotype 7 (species Fowl aviadenovirus E) based on nucleotide sequence analysis of the loop L1 region of the hexon gene. Nucleotide sequence alignment of this strain, FAdV-7 reference strains B-3A ATCC VR-832 (AF339922) and YR36 (AF508955), and eight additional FAdV-7 field strains confirmed its classification as FAdV-JS-5/10j and showed that these viruses are very similar to each other. Additionally, we described mutations and their influence on the amino acid sequence, nucleotide composition, and relative synonymous codon usage. Immunofluorescence of cell cultures infected with 10(4.5) TCID 50 per 0.1-ml dose of the FAdV-JSN-5/10j strain demonstrated the presence of a cytopathic effect. Infection of fowl with adenoviruses raises concerns for poultry production, and thus, the efficient detection of adenovirus infection is crucial. This is the first attempt to describe the molecular characteristics of FadV-7 strains isolated in Poland.

  15. Molecular genetics of 3beta-hydroxy-Delta5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase deficiency in 16 patients with loss of bile acid synthesis and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jeffrey B; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Gerhardt, Marie; Nazer, Hisham; Cresteil, Danièle; Heubi, James E; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Russell, David W

    2003-04-01

    The 3beta-hydroxy-Delta(5)-C(27)-steroid oxidoreductase (C(27) 3beta-HSD) is a membrane-bound enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum that catalyzes an early step in the synthesis of bile acids from cholesterol. Subjects with autosomal recessive mutations in the encoding gene, HSD3B7, on chromosome 16p11.2-12 fail to synthesize bile acids and develop a form of progressive liver disease characterized by cholestatic jaundice and malabsorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the gastrointestinal tract. The gene encoding the human C(27) 3beta-HSD enzyme was isolated previously, and a 2-bp deletion in exon 6 of HSD3B7 was identified in a well characterized subject with this disorder. Here, we report a molecular analysis of 15 additional patients from 13 kindreds with C(27) 3beta-HSD deficiency. Twelve different mutations were identified in the HSD3B7 gene on chromosome 16p11.2-12. Ten mutations were studied in detail and shown to cause complete loss of enzyme activity and, in two cases, alterations in the size or amount of the transcribed mRNA. Mutations were inherited in homozygous form in 13 subjects from 10 families and compound heterozygous form in four subjects from three families. We conclude that a diverse spectrum of mutations in the HSD3B7 gene underlies this rare form of neonatal cholestasis.

  16. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase-3 is a molecular target for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta in HepG2 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Zhou, Yue; Wu, Minhao; Liu, Jingwen

    2010-05-28

    ACSL3 is a member of the long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family that plays key roles in fatty acid metabolism in various tissues in an isozyme-specific manner. Our previous studies showed that ACSL3 was transcriptionally up-regulated by the cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) in HepG2 cells, accompanied by reduced cellular triglyceride content and enhanced beta-oxidation. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the OSM-induced activation of ACSL3 gene transcription in HepG2 cells. We showed that OSM treatment resulted in a coordinated elevation of mRNA levels of ACSL3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta). The effect of OSM on ACSL3 mRNA expression was inhibited by cellular depletion of PPARdelta. By utilizing a PPARdelta agonist, L165041, we demonstrated that activation of PPARdelta led to increases in ACSL3 promoter activity, mRNA level, and protein level in HepG2 cells. Analysis of the ACSL3 promoter sequence identified two imperfect PPAR-responsive elements (PPRE) located in the ACSL3 promoter region -944 to -915, relative to the transcription start site. The up-regulation of ACSL3 promoter activity by PPARdelta was abolished by deletion of this PPRE-containing region or mutation to disrupt the binding sites. Direct interactions of PPARdelta with ACSL3-PPRE sequences were demonstrated by gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Finally, we provided in vivo evidence showing that activation of PPARdelta by L165041 in hamsters increased ACSL3 mRNA and protein levels in the liver. These new findings define ACSL3 as a novel molecular target of PPARdelta in HepG2 cells and provide a regulatory mechanism for ACSL3 transcription in liver tissue.

  17. GB virus C/hepatitis G virus in serum and liver of patients with chronic C and non B non C hepatitis: molecular and immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Essa, Eman A; eI-Bendary, Amal; el-Kalla, Ferial S; el-Shourbagy, Safinaz H

    2006-01-01

    GB virus C/hepatitis G Virus (HGV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that is transmitted parenteraly. This study investigates GB virus C in 62 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and non B non C hepatitis (CNBNC). The viral E2 protein was examined in the sera of the patients (using western blott assay) while viral replication in the liver was examined by detecting the negative strand of HGV-RNA and its E2 protein in liver tissue using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining respectively. E2 protein was detected in 28% of patients with chronic hepatitis C and in 13.3% of patients with non B non C chronic hepatitis, while not detected in healthy blood donors (0%). HGV- E2 protein and the negative strand of HGV -RNA were detected in hepatocytes of only 3 out of the 13 examined liver biopsies from HGV infected patients (23%). The mean level of ALT in chronic HCV hepatitis patients who were +ve for HGV was significantly lower than those who were -ve for HGV. There was a significant difference between the mean value of HCV -RNA level by real time PCR in sera of hepatitis C positive patients with + ve HGV-E2 when compared with HCV patients with - ve HGV-E2 (p < 0.001). It is concluded that HGV co-infection may occur in some cases with CHC and CNBNC. Sites of replication, other than liver, are suggested as the virus was detected in liver tissue of only 23 % of cases inspite of its presence in their sera.

  18. Molecular metals based on 1,2,7,8-tetrahydrodicyclopenta[cd:lm]perylene and iodine, (CPP){sub 2}(I{sub 3}){sub 1-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, J. |; Santos, I.C.; Henriques, R.T.; Almeida, M.; Fourmigue, M.; Matias, P.; Veiros, L.F.; Duarte, M.T.; Alcacer, L.; Calhorda, M.J. |

    1994-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of molecular metals derived from 1,2,7,8-tetrahydrodicyclopenta[cd:lm]perylene (CPP) by partial oxidation with iodine and with general formula (CPP){sub 2}(I{sub 3}){sub 1-{delta}}, {delta} = 0-0.13, are reported. Single crystals, obtained either by electrocrystallization or by diffusion-controlled iodine oxidation of CPP, present two types of morphologies, elongated diamond or thinner needle-shaped crystals, both with a monoclinic cell, space group P2{sub 1}/a, a = 4.3757(9), b = 19.3681(11), c = 10.0860(11) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.050(8){degrees}, V = 846.4(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2. The structure of the diamond-shaped crystal was solved by X-ray diffraction to a final R(F) = 0.096, R{sub w}(F) = 0.069. It consists of regular stacks of CPP molecules along a with a 3.41 {angstrom} spacing and uncorrected one-dimensional chains of I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} located in channels between four CPP stacks corresponding to (CPP){sub 2}(I{sub 3}){sub 0.892}. The thin needle crystals have the same unit cell but an unspecified and slightly different iodine content. Band structure calculations in this structure by the extended Hueckel method indicate a one-dimensional conduction band 0.55 eV wide. These thin needle crystals present, at room temperature, an electrical conductivity along the a axis {alpha}{sub a}(RT) = 200 S/cm and thermopower S{sub a}(RT) = 30 {mu}V/K, while for the diamond-shaped crystals {alpha}{sub a}(RT) = 2 S/cm and S{sub a}(RT) = -8 {mu}V/K. These transport coefficients for both types of crystals indicate a metallic behavior from room temperature down to {approx_equal}63 K, where a metal-to-insular (M-I) transition takes place. EPR studies in single crystals show an almost isotropic line at g = 2.0044 and with a width of {approx_equal}6 G in the range 80-300 K and without significant differences between the two types of crystals. 53 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Imaging of hepatic toxicity of systemic therapy in a tertiary cancer centre: chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, molecular targeted therapies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alessandrino, F; Tirumani, S H; Krajewski, K M; Shinagare, A B; Jagannathan, J P; Ramaiya, N H; Di Salvo, D N

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the spectrum of hepatic toxicity seen in the oncology setting, in view of the different systemic therapies used in cancer patients. Drug-induced liver injury can manifest in various forms, and anti-neoplastic agents are associated with different types of hepatotoxicity. Although chemotherapy-induced liver injury can present as hepatitis, steatosis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, and chronic parenchymal damages, molecular targeted therapy-associated liver toxicity ranges from mild liver function test elevation to fulminant life-threatening acute liver failure. The recent arrival of immune checkpoint inhibitors in oncology has introduced a new range of immune-related adverse events, with differing mechanisms of liver toxicity and varied imaging presentation of liver injury. High-dose chemotherapy regimens for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation are associated with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Management of hepatic toxicity depends on the clinical scenario, the drug in use, and the severity of the findings. In this article, we will (1) present the most common types of oncological drugs associated with hepatic toxicity and associated liver injuries; (2) illustrate imaging findings of hepatic toxicities and the possible differential diagnosis; and (3) provide a guide for management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Molecular Basis of Drug Resistance against Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Keith P.; Ali, Akbar; Aydin, Cihan; Soumana, Djade; Özen, Ayşegül; Deveau, Laura M.; Silver, Casey; Cao, Hong; Newton, Alicia; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Huang, Wei; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 170 million people worldwide and is the leading cause of chronic liver diseases, including cirrhosis, liver failure, and liver cancer. Available antiviral therapies cause severe side effects and are effective only for a subset of patients, though treatment outcomes have recently been improved by the combination therapy now including boceprevir and telaprevir, which inhibit the viral NS3/4A protease. Despite extensive efforts to develop more potent next-generation protease inhibitors, however, the long-term efficacy of this drug class is challenged by the rapid emergence of resistance. Single-site mutations at protease residues R155, A156 and D168 confer resistance to nearly all inhibitors in clinical development. Thus, developing the next-generation of drugs that retain activity against a broader spectrum of resistant viral variants requires a comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of drug resistance. In this study, 16 high-resolution crystal structures of four representative protease inhibitors – telaprevir, danoprevir, vaniprevir and MK-5172 – in complex with the wild-type protease and three major drug-resistant variants R155K, A156T and D168A, reveal unique molecular underpinnings of resistance to each drug. The drugs exhibit differential susceptibilities to these protease variants in both enzymatic and antiviral assays. Telaprevir, danoprevir and vaniprevir interact directly with sites that confer resistance upon mutation, while MK-5172 interacts in a unique conformation with the catalytic triad. This novel mode of MK-5172 binding explains its retained potency against two multi-drug-resistant variants, R155K and D168A. These findings define the molecular basis of HCV N3/4A protease inhibitor resistance and provide potential strategies for designing robust therapies against this rapidly evolving virus. PMID:22910833

  1. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  3. Molecular evidence supporting the portal theory: a causative link between visceral adiposity and hepatic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Morvarid; Catalano, Karyn J; Ananthnarayan, Suchitra; Kim, Stella P; Van Citters, Gregg W; Dea, Melvin K; Bergman, Richard N

    2005-02-01

    The mechanism by which increased central adiposity causes hepatic insulin resistance is unclear. The "portal hypothesis" implicates increased lipolytic activity in the visceral fat and therefore increased delivery of free fatty acids (FFA) to the liver, ultimately leading to liver insulin resistance. To test the portal hypothesis at the transcriptional level, we studied expression of several genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in the fat-fed dog model with visceral adiposity vs. controls (n = 6). Tissue samples were obtained from dogs after 12 wk of either moderate fat (42% calories from fat; n = 6) or control diet (35% calories from fat). Northern blot analysis revealed an increase in the ratio of visceral to subcutaneous (v/s ratio) mRNA expression of both lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). In addition, the ratio for sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1 (SREBP-1) tended to be higher in fat-fed dogs, suggesting enhanced lipid accumulation in the visceral fat depot. The v/s ratio of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) increased significantly, implicating a higher rate of lipolysis in visceral adipose despite hyperinsulinemia in obese dogs. In fat-fed dogs, liver SREBP-1 expression was increased significantly, with a tendency for increased fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) expression. In addition, glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) increased significantly, consistent with enhanced gluconeogenesis. Liver triglyceride content was elevated 45% in fat-fed animals vs. controls. Moreover, insulin receptor binding was 50% lower in fat-fed dogs. Increased gene expression promoting lipid accumulation and lipolysis in visceral fat, as well as elevated rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme expression in the liver, is consistent with the portal theory. Further studies will need to be performed to determine whether FFA are involved directly in this pathway

  4. Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis A Virus: a New Classification Based on the Complete VP1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Cristina, Juan; Romero, Héctor; Perez-Bercof, Raoul; Casane, Didier; Colina, Rodney; Garcia, Laura; Vega, Ines; Glikman, Graciela; Romanowsky, Victor; Castello, Alejandro; Nicand, Elisabeth; Gassin, Michelle; Billaudel, Sylviane; Ferré, Virginie

    2002-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus in the genus Hepatovirus in the family Picornaviridae. So far, analysis of the genetic variability of HAV has been based on two discrete regions, the VP1/2A junction and the VP1 N terminus. In this report, we determined the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the complete VP1 gene of 81 strains from France, Kosovo, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay and compared them with the sequences of seven strains of HAV isolated elsewhere. Overall strain variation in the complete VP1 gene was found to be as high as 23.7% at the nucleotide level and 10.5% at the amino acid level. Different phylogenetic methods revealed that HAV sequences form five distinct and well-supported genetic lineages. Within these lineages, HAV sequences clustered by geographical origin only for European strains. The analysis of the complete VP1 gene allowed insight into the mode of evolution of HAV and revealed the emergence of a novel variant with a 15-amino-acid deletion located on the VP1 region where neutralization escape mutations were found. This could be the first antigenic variant of HAV so far identified. PMID:12186933

  5. Serologic and molecular survey for hepatitis E virus in wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, M; Nardini, R; Verin, R; Forzan, M; Poli, A; Tolari, F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of wild boar (Sus scrofa) as a reservoir for hepatitis E virus (HEV). Sixty-four blood and faecal samples collected from wild boar hunted in Central Italy in 2011-2012 were examined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RT-PCR analysis. Positive RT-PCR samples were further examined by nucleotide sequence determination and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. Thirty-six sera (56.2%) were positive for HEV-specific antibodies, and six (9.4%) faecal samples scored RT-PCR-positive results. Four animals were positive by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the detected wild boar-derived HEV sequences clustered within genotype 3, with similarity to sequences of human origin collected in a nearby area in 2012. Our data confirm that HEV is endemic in the wild boar population in the research area and that these wild animals could play an important role in the epidemiology of HEV infection.

  6. Molecular characterization of hepatitis c virus in multi-transfused Colombian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 170 million persons worldwide and is a public health problem. Considering that HCV is principally transmitted by exposure to infected blood, multi-transfused patients constitute one of the most important risk groups in developing countries. To explore the dynamics of this infection in Colombia, we performed a study to determine the genotypes of HCV in a cohort of multi-transfused patients. Results The serum samples from patients positive for anti-HCV were evaluated for HCV RNA by nested-PCR of the 5’untranslated region (5’UTR). Viral genotype was determined by RFLP and/or automated sequencing. HCV subtype 1b was found in eight cases (66.7%) and subtype 1a in two cases (16.7%); seven isolates of subtype 1b were obtained from patients who had received the first transfusion before 1986. Either genotypes 2b (8.3%) or 3a (8.3%) were found in the remaining positive specimens. Conclusions This is the first HCV genotyping study developed in multi-transfused patients in Colombia where HCV subtype 1b was the most prevalent. The mutation G235A in the 5’UTR of three isolates generated an additional restriction site and an RFLP pattern different from those previously described for genotype 1. PMID:23088845

  7. Molecular characterisation of hepatitis B virus in the resident Chinese population in Panama City

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexander Augusto; Zaldivar, Yamitzel; Hong, Chen Ch; Alvarado-Mora, Monica Viviana; Smith, Rebecca; Ortiz, Alma Y; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Cristina, Juan; Pascale, Juan Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of current hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines, it is estimated that 350 million individuals suffer from chronic HBV infection and more than 50% of these affected individuals live on the Asian continent. Panama is a country with a great diversity of foreign groups; the Chinese community is a large example of this phenomenon. There is an urgent need to perform studies that evaluate the prevalence and the genetic diversity of HBV in this community. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HBV and its genotypes and mutant variants in the Chinese population residing in Panama. In total, 320 subjects were enrolled in the study. Forty-two subjects (13.1%) were positive for HBsAg and HBV-DNA from 18 subjects revealed the presence of genotypes B2 and C1. Secondary mutations associated with drug resistance at positions rtV207L and rtN239T of the reverse transcriptase gene were identified. Additionally, the mutation pair A1762T/G1764A was found in three samples and the mutation G1896A was detected in an HBeAg-negative subject. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report high HBV prevalence rates in resident ethnic Chinese in Central America and the presence of genotypes B2 and C1 in this region. PMID:23903967

  8. Serologic and molecular survey for hepatitis E virus in wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, M.; Nardini, R.; Verin, R.; Forzan, M.; Poli, A.; Tolari, F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of wild boar (Sus scrofa) as a reservoir for hepatitis E virus (HEV). Sixty-four blood and faecal samples collected from wild boar hunted in Central Italy in 2011–2012 were examined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RT-PCR analysis. Positive RT-PCR samples were further examined by nucleotide sequence determination and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. Thirty-six sera (56.2%) were positive for HEV-specific antibodies, and six (9.4%) faecal samples scored RT-PCR-positive results. Four animals were positive by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the detected wild boar–derived HEV sequences clustered within genotype 3, with similarity to sequences of human origin collected in a nearby area in 2012. Our data confirm that HEV is endemic in the wild boar population in the research area and that these wild animals could play an important role in the epidemiology of HEV infection. PMID:26199731

  9. Molecular characterisation of hepatitis A virus strains from water sources in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Saïd, R; Wolfaardt, M; Taylor, M B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) strains found in selected South African (SA) surface waters were characterised to establish what HAV types are circulating in the environment, thus reflecting circulation in the surrounding communities. Surface water samples used for irrigation or domestic purposes, and water samples from the outflow of wastewater plants were collected from six provinces. Viruses were recovered from the samples using a glass wool adsorption-elution method and then further concentrated using polyethylene glycol/sodium chloride precipitation. After automated nucleic acid extraction, samples were analysed for HAV by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. HAV strains were genotyped by nucleotide sequence analysis of the capsid gene VP1 and the VP1/P2B junction. HAVs were detected in 76% (16/21) of the surface water samples and in 37% (19/51) of the samples from the wastewater plants. Strains were characterised from 32 of the 35 samples and classified within genotype IB. The presence of genotype IB in the water sources confirms human faecal contamination. Hence, these faecally-contaminated water sources may be a potential transmission route of HAV infection and a potential source of contamination of irrigated fresh produce in SA.

  10. Single-step PCR in molecular diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Farma, E; Boeri, E; Bettini, P; Repetto, C M; McDermott, J; Lillo, F B; Varnier, O E

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of two PCR systems and three PCR detection methods for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was evaluated in serum samples. A nested PCR was considered the reference assay and was compared with two single-step PCR methods: the first is based on the detection of PCR products by liquid hybridization with a 32P-end-labeled probe, and the second is the Roche Amplicor colorimetric assay using microwell plate hybridization with a specific nucleic acid probe. Using the Pelicheck HCV RNA Eurohep genotype 1 proficiency panel, our laboratory achieved medium-high levels of performance with all three methods. The highest sensitivity was, however, observed with the isotopic single-step PCR (ss-PCR) method. The analytical sensitivity of ss-PCR with isotopic detection and ss-PCR with colorimetric detection was identical to that of nested PCR, with a 100% result concordance. Comparison of ss-PCR with enzyme-linked immunosorbent and RIBA assays in the analysis of clinical samples showed a high concordance. ss-PCR methods appear more suitable for diagnostic application. Nevertheless, HCV RNA PCR cannot be considered a screening assay; it should be requested in the presence of reactive serology or specific clinical symptomatology with altered liver parameters, and it is a potential tool for the follow-up of patients with HCV infection. PMID:8940466

  11. Molecular characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 6 subtypes in Thai blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sistayanarain, Anchalee; Chaiwong, Suriya

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype is important for identifying effective antiviral therapy, evaluating pathogenic severity, and tracking transmission routes. In Thailand, HCV genotypes 3 and 1 are the most common. We have previously demonstrated an increasing appearance of genotype 6 in HCV infections in Thailand. However, only limited epidemiological data on genotype 6 in Thailand are available. This study aimed to characterize HCV genotype 6 among apparently healthy Thai blood donors. In total, 240 blood samples were collected from Phitsanulok Regional Blood Center, Phitsanulok, Thailand. RNA was reverse transcribed and amplified by the nested polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by direct sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis of core sequences. Amino acid polymorphism of various subtypes of HCV genotype 6 was investigated. Of the 240 samples, 192 were successfully sequenced for the core region and 84 were determined to be of HCV genotype 6 by phylogenetic analysis. The most prevalent HCV-6 subtypes were 6f > 6n > 6c > 6i. Amino acid sequences of the partial core region among these four subtypes differed by one to seven residues. For HCV-6, the subtype 6f was commonly found in Thai blood donors. Comparison of core protein from various HCV-6 subtypes showed substantial polymorphisms, which may form the basis of future studies using samples from patients with clear HCV histories. This feature can be applied to therapies tailored to particular genotype variants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  13. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases. PMID:27433800

  14. Molecular epidemiology and putative origin of hepatitis C virus in random volunteers from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Noemí; Oubiña, José Raúl; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Buti, María; Otero, Teresa; Gregori, Josep; García-Cehic, Damir; Camos, Silvia; Cubero, María; Casillas, Rosario; Guàrdia, Jaume; Esteban, Rafael; Quer, Josep

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the subtype prevalence and the phylogenetic relatedness of hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences obtained from the Argentine general population, a large cohort of individuals was analyzed. METHODS: Healthy Argentinian volunteers (n = 6251) from 12 provinces representing all geographical regions of the country were studied. All parents or legal guardians of individuals younger than 18 years provided informed written consent for participation. The corresponding written permission from all municipal authorities was obtained from each city or town where subjects were to be included. HCV RNA reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. The 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR) was used for RNA detection and initial genotype classification. The NS5B polymerase region, encompassing nt 8262-8610, was used for subtyping. RESULTS: An unexpectedly low prevalence of HCV infection in the general population (0.32%) was observed. Our data contrasted with previous studies that reported rates ranging from 1.5% to 2.5%, mainly performed in selected populations of blood donors or vulnerable groups. The latter values are in keeping with the prevalence reported by the 2007 Argentinian HCV Consensus (approximately 2%). HCV subtypes were distributed as follows: 1a (25%), 1b (25%), 2c (25%), 3a (5%), and 2j (5%). Two isolates ascribed either to genotype 1 (5%) or to genotype 3 (5%) by 5’UTR phylogenetic analysis could not be subtyped. Subtype 1a sequences comprised a highly homogeneous population and clustered with United States sequences. Genotype 1b sequences represented a heterogeneous population, suggesting that this genotype might have been introduced from different sources. Most subtype 2c sequences clustered close to the 2c reported from Italy and Southern France. CONCLUSION: HCV has a low prevalence of 0.32% in the studied general population of Argentina. The pattern of HCV introduction and transmission in

  15. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced interferon resistance.

    PubMed

    Qashqari, Hanadi; Al-Mars, Amany; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Maged; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the foremost causes of chronic liver disease affecting over 300 million globally. HCV contains a positive-stranded RNA of ~9600 nt and is surrounded by the 5' and 3'untranslated regions (UTR). The only successful treatment regimen includes interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. Like many other viruses, HCV has also evolved various mechanisms to circumvent the IFN response by blocking (1) downstream signaling actions via STAT1, STAT2, IRF9 and JAK-STAT pathways and (2) repertoire of IFN Stimulatory Genes (ISGs). Several studies have identified complex host demographic and genetic factors as well as viral genetic heterogeneity associated with outcomes of IFN therapy. The genetic predispositions of over 2000 ISGS may render the patients to become resistant, thus identification of such parameters within a subset of population are necessary for management corollary. The ability of various HCV genotypes to diminish IFN antiviral responses plays critical role in the establishment of chronic infection at the acute stage of infection, thus highlighting importance of the resistance in HCV treated groups. The recently defined role of viral protein such as C, E2, NS3/NS4 and NS5A proteins in inducing the IFN resistance are discussed in this article. How the viral and host genetic composition and epistatic connectivity among polymorphic genomic sites synchronizes the evolutionary IFN resistance trend remains under investigation. However, these signals may have the potential to be employed for accurate prediction of therapeutic outcomes. In this review article, we accentuate the significance of host and viral components in IFN resistance with the aim to determine the successful outcome in patients.

  16. Molecular analysis of hepatitis B virus "a" determinant in asymptomatic and symptomatic Mexican carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Tachiquín, Martha-Eugenia; Valdez-Salazar, Hilda-Alicia; Juárez-Barreto, Vicencio; Dehesa-Violante, Margarita; Torres, Javier; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma-Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA-containing virus with 4 genes, C, S, X and P. The S gene codes for the surface antigen (HBsAg), which contains the "a" determinant, the main region for induction of a protective humoral immune response. To compare the genotype and sequence of the "a" determinant between strains isolated from asymptomatic and symptomatic Mexican HBV carriers. Results 21 asymptomatic (blood donors) and 12 symptomatic (with clinical signs and with >1 year lamivudine treatment) HBV carriers were studied; all patients were positive for the HBsAg in serum. Viral load, genotypes, and subtypes were determined in plasma. A fragment of the S gene including the "a" determinant was PCR amplified and sequenced to determine genotype, subtype and to identify mutations. Mean viral load was 0.7965 × 104 copies/ml in asymptomatic carriers and 2.73 × 106 copies/ml in symptomatic patients. Genotypes H, C, and F were identified in asymptomatic individuals; whereas H was dominant in symptomatic patients. A fragment of 279 bp containing the "a" determinant was amplified from all 33 carriers and sequences aligned with S gene sequences in the GenBank. Mutations identified were Y100N, T126I, Q129H and N146K in the asymptomatic group, and F93I and A128V in the symptomatic group. Conclusion Differences in genotype and in mutations in the "a" determinant were found between strains from asymptomatic and symptomatic HBV Mexican carriers. PMID:17217533

  17. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases.

  18. Molecular identification of hepatitis B virus genotypes/subgenotypes: Revised classification hurdles and updated resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Kurbanov, Fuat; Van Ranst, Marc; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The clinical course of infections with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) substantially varies between individuals, as a consequence of a complex interplay between viral, host, environmental and other factors. Due to the high genetic variability of HBV, the virus can be categorized into different HBV genotypes and subgenotypes, which considerably differ with respect to geographical distribution, transmission routes, disease progression, responses to antiviral therapy or vaccination, and clinical outcome measures such as cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. However, HBV (sub)genotyping has caused some controversies in the past due to misclassifications and incorrect interpretations of different genotyping methods. Thus, an accurate, holistic and dynamic classification system is essential. In this review article, we aimed at highlighting potential pitfalls in genetic and phylogenetic analyses of HBV and suggest novel terms for HBV classification. Analyzing full-length genome sequences when classifying genotypes and subgenotypes is the foremost prerequisite of this classification system. Careful attention must be paid to all aspects of phylogenetic analysis, such as bootstrapping values and meeting the necessary thresholds for (sub)genotyping. Quasi-subgenotype refers to subgenotypes that were incorrectly suggested to be novel. As many of these strains were misclassified due to genetic differences resulting from recombination, we propose the term “recombino-subgenotype”. Moreover, immigration is an important confounding facet of global HBV distribution and substantially changes the geographic pattern of HBV (sub)genotypes. We therefore suggest the term “immigro-subgenotype” to distinguish exotic (sub)genotypes from native ones. We are strongly convinced that applying these two proposed terms in HBV classification will help harmonize this rapidly progressing field and allow for improved prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24966586

  19. Phenethyl amides as novel noncovalent inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease: discovery, initial SAR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Stefania; Koch, Uwe; Gerlach, Benjamin; Steinkühler, Christian; De Francesco, Raffaele; Altamura, Sergio; Matassa, Victor G; Narjes, Frank

    2003-01-30

    The discovery of novel, reversible and competitive tripeptide inhibitors of the Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A serine protease is described. These inhibitors are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal phenethyl amide group, which extends into the prime side of the enzyme. Initial SAR together with molecular modeling and data from site-directed mutagenesis suggest an interaction of the phenethyl amide group with Lys-136.

  20. Detection of antibody against antigen expressed by molecularly cloned hepatitis C virus cDNA: Application to diagnosis and blood screening for posttransfusion hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamura, Tatsuo; Saito, Izumu ); Katayama, Tohru ); Kikuchi, Shu; Tateda, Akira ); Houghton, M.; Choo, Quilim; Kuo, G. )

    1990-02-01

    A cDNA clone has been derived from the plasma of a chimpanzee with chronic non-A, non-B viral hepatits (NANBH). The authors have assayed for antibodies reacting with the encoded antigen in sera from posttransfusion hepatitis patients (643 samples from 23 patients) and their corresponding donors collected during the past 10 years in Japan. The antibody was detected in 15 out of 17 (88.2%) posttransfusion NANBH (PT-NANBH) patients whose sera over time displayed multiple alanine aminotransferase (ALT) peaks. In general, the antibody was detected after several peaks of serum ALT elevations and, once detected, it persisted for years. Of the 15 well-defined cases of PT-NANBH that showed multiple ALT peaks and hepatitis C virus seroconversions, 11 (73.3%) were shown to be transfused with at least one unit of blood positive for the antibody. The retrospective analysis showed that all tested donor blood found to be positive for the antibody had been transfused to recipients who afterwards developed NANBH. These data strongly suggest that the cloned cDNA originated from an etiological agent of NANBH termed the hepatitis C virus. Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that had the screening been done with the anti-hepatitis C virus assay, 11 out of 17 (64.7%) cases of chronic PT-NANBH and 1 out of 6 (16.6%) acute PT-NANBH would have been prevented.

  1. Genotype I of hepatitis B virus was found in east Xishuangbanna, China and molecular dynamics of HBV/I.

    PubMed

    Shen, T; Yan, X M; Liu, H X; Zhang, B X; Li, L; Zhang, J P; Wang, J L; Xiao, C J

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of data about the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Mengla, China; and no detailed analysis of the molecular evolution of genotype I in Asia. In this study, 909 serum samples from ethnic minority people in China were obtained. Serological assay and HBV S-gene amplification were carried out, and phylogenetic and evolutionary dynamics analysis of 62 HBV/I S-gene was performed. On this survey, 153 individuals were tested HBsAg-positive. Genotypes of S-gene were classified into three groups: C, B and I. Under the strict model and the relax model, the estimated evolutionary rates for HBV/I were 3.74 × 10(-4) and 6.93 × 10(-4) substitution/site/year, respectively. However, when the geographic origin was taken into account, the mean substitution rates were increased. Estimated time to most recent ancestor of genotype I varied from ~30 to ~70 years ago. The Bayesian sky plot showed a rapid spread of HBV/I at the end of 1980s. Peculiar nucleotides distributed were observed in the subgenotype I1/I2. In conclusion, higher prevalence of HBV infection was observed in Mengla county. Multifactors like timescale and spatial locations should be integrated to provide a better interpretation of the HBV/I evolutionary history in the region.

  2. [Development of extracorporeal blood purification methods: Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) for hepatic and renal function replacement].

    PubMed

    Marangoni, R

    2007-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) clears the blood from catabolites that either occur free in the plasma water (through dialysis), such as uremic toxins and ammonia, or are bound by albumin, such as hepatic toxins. The latter are transferred from the albumin in the blood to the albumin circulating in a closed loop where toxins are removed by adsorption on resins (charcoal and ion-exchange resin). The efficacy of this extracorporeal blood purification method in the treatment of acute or acute-on-chronic liver failure (also associated with renal failure) has been demonstrated in numerous studies. Fifty-one patients, 5 affected by acute liver failure and 46 by acute-onchronic liver failure (8 of them with additional renal failure) were treated with MARS. The results demonstrated that the method, which effectively removes ammonia, bilirubin, bile acids and uremic toxins, reduces the blood concentration of these molecules. It thereby improves the patient's clinical condition and biochemical parameters including cholinesterase, alkaline phosphatase and prothrombin activity, eliminating, in addition, the drug-refractory pruritus that is a very frequent symptom in cholestatic liver disease. These results agree with those reported in the literature concerning the efficacy of MARS in the replacement of the detoxifying function of kidneys and liver.

  3. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  4. Modulating the interaction of CXCR4 and CXCL12 by low-molecular-weight heparin inhibits hepatic metastasis of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lixin; Qiao, Haiquan; He, Changjun; Yang, Qian; Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sun, Xueying

    2012-04-01

    Liver metastasis is the major obstacle for prolonging the survival of colon cancer patients. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), a common drug for venous thromboembolism, has displayed beneficial effects in improving the survival of cancer patients, though the mechanism remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LMWH on hepatic metastasis of colon cancer and its underlying molecular mechanism by targeting the interaction of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 (formerly known as stromal cell-derived factor 1α, SDF-1α), as the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis has been shown to regulate the interaction of cancer cells and stroma. Experimental results revealed that LMWH (Enoxaparin, 3500-5500 Da) inhibited the CXCL12-stimulated proliferation, adhesion and colony formation of human colon cancer HCT-116 cells that highly expressed CXCR4. Interestingly, LMWH or an anti-CXCR4 blocking antibody diminished the migrating and invading abilities of HCT116 cells stimulated by the recombinant CXCL12 protein or liver homogenates which contained endogenous CXCL12 protein. Although LMWH did not significantly inhibit the growth of subcutaneous colon tumors, it significantly suppressed the formation of hepatic metastasis established by intrasplenic injection of colon cancer cells in nude Balb/c mice and also downregulated the expression of CXCL12 in hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells. The results suggest that LMWH inhibits the formation of hepatic metastasis of colon cancer by disrupting the interaction of CXCR4 and CXCL12, supporting that perioperative administration of LMWH may help to prevent the seeding and subsequent growth of hepatic metastases of colon cancer cells.

  5. [Dosing time based on molecular mechanism of biological clock of hepatic drug metabolic enzyme].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian circadian pacemaker stays in the paired suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Recent several studies reveal that the circadian rhythms of physiology and behavior are controlled by clock genes. In addition, the effectiveness and toxicity of many drugs vary depending on dosing time associated with 24-h rhythms of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes under the control of the circadian clock. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug, and is mainly biotransformed and eliminated as nontoxic conjugates with glucuronic acid and sulfuric acid. Only a small portion of the dose is mainly bioactivated by CYP2E1 to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a reactive toxic intermediate. For APAP overdose, glucuronidation and sulfation are saturated and the formation of NAPQI increases. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the chronotoxicity of APAP have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we have clarified that there was a significant dosing time-dependent difference in hepatotoxicity induced by APAP in mice. The mechanism may be related to the rhythmicity of CYP2E1 activity and GSH conjugation. In additon, we investigated whether the liver transcription factor hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) and clock genes undergoing astriking 24-h rhythm in mouse liver contribute to the 24-h regulation of CYP2E1 activity. A significant 24-h rhythmicity was demonstrated for CYP2E1 activity, protein levels and mRNA levels. HNF-1alpha and clock genes may contribute to produce the 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 mRNA levels. Metabolism by CYP and GSH conjugation are common metabolic pathways for many drugs such as APAP. These findings support the concept that choosing the most appropriate time of day to administer the drugs associated with metabolic rhythmicity such as CYP and GSH conjugation may reduce hepatotoxicity in experimental and clinical situations. 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 activity was controlled by HNF-1alpha and clock gene, in a

  6. Serum haptoglobin as a novel molecular biomarker predicting colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichao; Hu, Shusheng; Yu, Long; Guo, Chunguang; Sun, Lixin; Yang, Zhihua; Qi, Jun; Ran, Yuliang

    2016-06-01

    Early detection of liver metastasis is important for improving colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. Our previous studies showed haptoglobin was highly expressed in primary CRC tissues, especially in heterochronous metastatic cases. Here, we assessed the potential of serum haptoglobin (sHP) as a biomarker for early detection of CRC liver metastasis by evaluating the sHP in 475 CRC patients and 152 healthy volunteers. In the training set (250 cases), sHP level in CRC-M1 (1773.18 ± 690.25 ng/mL) were significantly increased as compared to in CRC-M0 (1544.37 ± 1497.65 ng/mL) or healthy (917.76 ± 571.59 ng/mL). And the high sHP level was correlated with poor survival. Logistic regression analysis revealed that sHP, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (sCEA) and serum carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (sCA19.9) level were the significant parameters for detecting liver metastasis. In leave-one-out-cross-validation, these three markers resulted in 89.1% sensitivity and 85.8% specificity for hepatic metastasis detection. In an independent test set (225 cases), receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of sHP in CRC liver metastasis showed an area under the curve of 0.735, with a sensitivity of 87.2% and a specificity of 59.9%. Combination of sHP, sCEA and sCA19.9 improved diagnostic accuracy to 0.880, with a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 87.8%. Silencing of HP by specific shRNA significantly inhibited the LOVO and SW620 cell invasion, and suppressed xenograft tumor invasive growth. In summary, these results demonstrate that sHP is associated with poor prognosis of CRC patients and that HP promotes colorectal cancer cell invasion. sHP combining with sCA19.9 and sCEA may be used as accurate predictors of CRC liver metastasis.

  7. Molecular models of NS3 protease variants of the Hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Nelson JF; Arcuri, Helen A; Bonalumi, Carlos E; de Souza, Fátima P; Mello, Isabel MVGC; Rahal, Paula; Pinho, João RR; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2005-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) currently infects approximately three percent of the world population. In view of the lack of vaccines against HCV, there is an urgent need for an efficient treatment of the disease by an effective antiviral drug. Rational drug design has not been the primary way for discovering major therapeutics. Nevertheless, there are reports of success in the development of inhibitor using a structure-based approach. One of the possible targets for drug development against HCV is the NS3 protease variants. Based on the three-dimensional structure of these variants we expect to identify new NS3 protease inhibitors. In order to speed up the modeling process all NS3 protease variant models were generated in a Beowulf cluster. The potential of the structural bioinformatics for development of new antiviral drugs is discussed. Results The atomic coordinates of crystallographic structure 1CU1 and 1DY9 were used as starting model for modeling of the NS3 protease variant structures. The NS3 protease variant structures are composed of six subdomains, which occur in sequence along the polypeptide chain. The protease domain exhibits the dual beta-barrel fold that is common among members of the chymotrypsin serine protease family. The helicase domain contains two structurally related beta-alpha-beta subdomains and a third subdomain of seven helices and three short beta strands. The latter domain is usually referred to as the helicase alpha-helical subdomain. The rmsd value of bond lengths and bond angles, the average G-factor and Verify 3D values are presented for NS3 protease variant structures. Conclusions This project increases the certainty that homology modeling is an useful tool in structural biology and that it can be very valuable in annotating genome sequence information and contributing to structural and functional genomics from virus. The structural models will be used to guide future efforts in the structure-based drug design of a new

  8. Molecular models of NS3 protease variants of the Hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Nelson J F; Arcuri, Helen A; Bonalumi, Carlos E; de Souza, Fátima P; Mello, Isabel M V G C; Rahal, Paula; Pinho, João R R; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2005-01-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) currently infects approximately three percent of the world population. In view of the lack of vaccines against HCV, there is an urgent need for an efficient treatment of the disease by an effective antiviral drug. Rational drug design has not been the primary way for discovering major therapeutics. Nevertheless, there are reports of success in the development of inhibitor using a structure-based approach. One of the possible targets for drug development against HCV is the NS3 protease variants. Based on the three-dimensional structure of these variants we expect to identify new NS3 protease inhibitors. In order to speed up the modeling process all NS3 protease variant models were generated in a Beowulf cluster. The potential of the structural bioinformatics for development of new antiviral drugs is discussed. The atomic coordinates of crystallographic structure 1CU1 and 1DY9 were used as starting model for modeling of the NS3 protease variant structures. The NS3 protease variant structures are composed of six subdomains, which occur in sequence along the polypeptide chain. The protease domain exhibits the dual beta-barrel fold that is common among members of the chymotrypsin serine protease family. The helicase domain contains two structurally related beta-alpha-beta subdomains and a third subdomain of seven helices and three short beta strands. The latter domain is usually referred to as the helicase alpha-helical subdomain. The rmsd value of bond lengths and bond angles, the average G-factor and Verify 3D values are presented for NS3 protease variant structures. This project increases the certainty that homology modeling is an useful tool in structural biology and that it can be very valuable in annotating genome sequence information and contributing to structural and functional genomics from virus. The structural models will be used to guide future efforts in the structure-based drug design of a new generation of NS3 protease variants

  9. A competitor DNA template for the molecular quantification of the hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Sidorkiewicz, Małgorzata; Bzorska, Aneta; Józwiak, Barbara; Jabłkowski, Maciej; Szemraj, Janusz; Lewandowska, Urszula

    2003-01-01

    The molecular determination of viral load in the serum represents the most valuable prognostic marker of HBV infection. In this paper, a new molecular assay for the quantitative measurement of HBV presence is described. It is based on PCR performing with a HBV-specific competitor DNA template. For the construction of the DNA template, a HBV DNA-originated 436 bp DNA fragment was modified by introducing a 110 bp deletion and cloned into pUC19. The resulting vector serves as the competitor DNA template in the competitive PCR. Post-PCR, the competitor DNA generates an amplified fragment of 306 bp; it could be easily distinguished from the product generated from the viral-originated DNA product (416 bp) when the same primers are used. The quantitative ratio between the two products enables the quantitative determination of viral load. The range of the HB-PCR assay is from 3 x 10(4)to 6 x 10(10) particles/ml. A serum HBV load determination performed by HB-PCR assay indicated a close correlation with the results of the Quantiplex HBV DNA assay (bDNA). The HB-PCR assay is cheap, reliable and easy to use in any laboratory working with PCR methods.

  10. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis A Virus from Tunisian Wastewater Treatment Plants with Different Secondary Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ouardani, Imen; Turki, Syrine; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the main causative agent of hepatitis infection associated with waterborne outbreaks worldwide. In Tunisia, there is no specific surveillance system for HAV and current secondary wastewater treatment processes are unable to remove viral particles, which present a potential public health problem. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of HAV in 271 raw and treated wastewater samples from five sewage treatment plants (STPs) during 13 months was performed. Moreover, the efficiency of three secondary wastewater treatment processes (conventional activated sludge, extended aeration, and oxidation ditch activated sludge) was evaluated. Data obtained demonstrated that HAV is endemic in Tunisia and circulates with high prevalence in both raw (66.9%) and treated (40.7%) wastewater. HAV circulates throughout the year in the coastal areas, with the highest rates found during summer and autumn, whereas in central Tunisia, high levels were shown in autumn and winter. Total virus removal was not achieved, since no difference in mean HAV loads was observed in effluents (6.0 × 103 genome copies [GC]/ml) and influents (2.7 × 103 GC/ml). The comparison of the HAV removal values of the three different wastewater treatment methods indicates that extended aeration and oxidation ditch activated sludge had better efficiency in removing viruses than conventional activated sludge did. Molecular characterization revealed that the vast majority of HAV strains belonged to subgenotype IA, with the cocirculation of subgenotype IB in wastewater treatment plants that collect tourism wastewater. IMPORTANCE This report provides important data on the incidence, behavior, seasonality, and genotype distribution of HAV in the environment in Tunisia, as well as the risk of infection derived from its occurrence in effluents due to inadequate wastewater treatment. In addition, these findings seem to confirm that the prevalence of HAV depends on socioeconomic level

  11. Molecular involvement of the pvt-1 locus in a gamma/delta T-cell leukemia bearing a variant t(8;14)(q24;q11) translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, M; Maziarz, R T; Aoki, K; Macintyre, E; Strominger, J L

    1992-01-01

    A highly malignant human T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta+ T-cell leukemia was shown to have a productive rearrangement of the TCR delta locus on one chromosome 14 and a novel t(8;14)(q24;q11) rearrangement involving the J delta 1 gene segment on the other chromosome 14. Chromosome walking coupled with pulsed-field gel electrophoretic (PFGE) analysis determined that the TCR J delta 1 gene fragment of the involved chromosome was relocated approximately 280 kb downstream of the c-myc proto-oncogene locus found on chromosome band 8q24. This rearrangement was reminiscent of the Burkitt's lymphoma variants that translocate to a region identified as the pvt-1 locus. Sequence comparison of the breakpoint junctions of interchromosomal rearrangements in T-cell leukemias involving the TCR delta-chain locus revealed novel signal-like sequence motifs, GCAGA(A/T)C and CCCA(C/G)GAC. These sequences were found on chromosome 8 at the 5' flanking site of the breakpoint junction of chromosome 8 in the TCR gamma/delta leukemic cells reported here and also on chromosome 1 in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying the t(1;14)(p32;q11) rearrangement. These results suggest that (i) during early stages of gamma delta T-cell ontogeny, the region 280 kb 3' of the c-myc proto-oncogene on chromosome 8 is fragile and accessible to the lymphoid recombination machinery and (ii) rearrangements to both 8q24 and 1p32 may be governed by novel sequence motifs and be subject to common enzymatic mechanisms. Images PMID:1406658

  12. Heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) and Sulfamoylbenzamide (SBA) Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Different Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zheng; Hu, Taishan; Zhou, Xue; Wildum, Steffen; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Xu, Zhiheng; Wu, Daitze; Mao, Yi; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yuan; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Zhisen; Tang, Guozhi; Najera, Isabel; Yang, Guang; Shen, Hong C.; Young, John A. T.; Qin, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) and sulfamoylbenzamide (SBA) are promising non-nucleos(t)ide HBV replication inhibitors. HAPs are known to promote core protein mis-assembly, but the molecular mechanism of abnormal assembly is still elusive. Likewise, the assembly status of core protein induced by SBA remains unknown. Here we show that SBA, unlike HAP, does not promote core protein mis-assembly. Interestingly, two reference compounds HAP_R01 and SBA_R01 bind to the same pocket at the dimer-dimer interface in the crystal structures of core protein Y132A hexamer. The striking difference lies in a unique hydrophobic subpocket that is occupied by the thiazole group of HAP_R01, but is unperturbed by SBA_R01. Photoaffinity labeling confirms the HAP_R01 binding pose at the dimer-dimer interface on capsid and suggests a new mechanism of HAP-induced mis-assembly. Based on the common features in crystal structures we predict that T33 mutations generate similar susceptibility changes to both compounds. In contrast, mutations at positions in close contact with HAP-specific groups (P25A, P25S, or V124F) only reduce susceptibility to HAP_R01, but not to SBA_R01. Thus, HAP and SBA are likely to have distinctive resistance profiles. Notably, P25S and V124F substitutions exist in low-abundance quasispecies in treatment-naïve patients, suggesting potential clinical relevance. PMID:28205569

  13. Using molecular features of xenobiotics to predict hepatic gene expression response.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Guy Haskin; Altman, Russ B

    2013-10-28

    Despite recent advances in molecular medicine and rational drug design, many drugs still fail because toxic effects arise at the cellular and tissue level. In order to better understand these effects, cellular assays can generate high-throughput measurements of gene expression changes induced by small molecules. However, our understanding of how the chemical features of small molecules influence gene expression is very limited. Therefore, we investigated the extent to which chemical features of small molecules can reliably be associated with significant changes in gene expression. Specifically, we analyzed the gene expression response of rat liver cells to 170 different drugs and searched for genes whose expression could be related to chemical features alone. Surprisingly, we can predict the up-regulation of 87 genes (increased expression of at least 1.5 times compared to controls). We show an average cross-validation predictive area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.7 or greater for each of these 87 genes. We applied our method to an external data set of rat liver gene expression response to a novel drug and achieved an AUROC of 0.7. We also validated our approach by predicting up-regulation of Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) in three drugs known to induce CYP1A2 that were not in our data set. Finally, a detailed analysis of the CYP1A2 predictor allowed us to identify which fragments made significant contributions to the predictive scores.

  14. Acute molecular markers of rodent hepatic carcinogenesis identified by transcription profiling.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Jeffrey A; Curtiss, Sandra W; Kolaja, Kyle L; Alden, Carl L; Blomme, Eric A G; Curtiss, William C; Davila, Julio C; Jackson, Carmen J; Bunch, Roderick T

    2004-04-01

    Currently, the only way to identify nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens is through long-term repeat dose studies such as the 2 year rodent carcinogenicity assay. Such assays are both time consuming and expensive and require large amounts of active pharmaceutical or chemical ingredients. Thus, the results of the 2 year assay are not known until very late in the discovery and development process for new pharmaceutical entities. Although in many cases nongenotoxic carcinogenicity in rodents is considered to be irrelevant for humans, a positive finding in a 2 year carcinogenicity assay may increase the number of studies to demonstrate the lack of relevance to humans, delay final submission and subsequent registration of a product, and may result in a "black box" carcinogenicity warning on the label. To develop early identifiers of carcinogenicity, we applied transcription profiling using several prototype rodent genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens, as well as two noncarcinogenic hepatotoxicants, in a 5 day repeat dose in vivo toxicology study. Fluorescent-labeled probes generated from liver mRNA prepared from male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with one of three dose levels of bemitradine, clofibrate, doxylamine, methapyrilene, phenobarbital, tamoxifen, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 4-acetylaminofluorene, or isoniazid were hybridized against rat cDNA microarrays. Correlation of the resulting data with an estimated carcinogenic potential of each compound and dose level identified several candidate molecular markers of rodent nongenotoxic carcinogenicity, including transforming growth factor-beta stimulated clone 22 and NAD(P)H cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase.

  15. Identification, molecular cloning, and analysis of full-length hepatitis C virus transmitted/founder genotypes 1, 3, and 4.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Mark B; Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Saeed, Mohsan; Andrus, Linda; Ding, Wenge; Jiang, Xinpei; Learn, Gerald H; von Schaewen, Markus; Wen, Jessica; Goepfert, Paul A; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M; Shaw, George M

    2015-02-24

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent replication of a complex mixture of viruses termed a "quasispecies." Transmission is generally associated with a stringent population bottleneck characterized by infection by limited numbers of "transmitted/founder" (T/F) viruses. Characterization of T/F genomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been integral to studies of transmission, immunopathogenesis, and vaccine development. Here, we describe the identification of complete T/F genomes of HCV by single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA from acutely infected subjects. A total of 2,739 single-genome-derived amplicons comprising 10,966,507 bp from 18 acute-phase and 11 chronically infected subjects were analyzed. Acute-phase sequences diversified essentially randomly, except for the poly(U/UC) tract, which was subject to polymerase slippage. Fourteen acute-phase subjects were productively infected by more than one genetically distinct virus, permitting assessment of recombination between replicating genomes. No evidence of recombination was found among 1,589 sequences analyzed. Envelope sequences of T/F genomes lacked transmission signatures that could distinguish them from chronic infection viruses. Among chronically infected subjects, higher nucleotide substitution rates were observed in the poly(U/UC) tract than in envelope hypervariable region 1. Fourteen full-length molecular clones with variable poly(U/UC) sequences corresponding to seven genotype 1a, 1b, 3a, and 4a T/F viruses were generated. Like most unadapted HCV clones, T/F genomes did not replicate efficiently in Huh 7.5 cells, indicating that additional cellular factors or viral adaptations are necessary for in vitro replication. Full-length T/F HCV genomes and their progeny provide unique insights into virus transmission, virus evolution, and virus-host interactions associated with immunopathogenesis. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 2% to 3% of the world

  16. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  17. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus in Mar del Plata city, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barbini, Luciana; Elizalde, Mercedes; Torres, Carolina; Campos, Rodolfo

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the current molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of HBV in Mar del Plata, an important Argentinean touristic city. The phylogenetic analysis of 29 HBV DNA positive serum samples showed that F1b was the predominant subgenotype (sgt, 62.1%), followed by sgt A2 (13.8%) and sgt F4, gt D and gt G (6.9% each). Among anti-HBc IgM positive samples, 75.0% were sgt F1b, followed by sgt F4 (12.5%), sgt A2 (6.25%) and sgt D (6.25%). Three recombinant full length genomes were found: two G/F1b (some of the first gt G detected in Argentina) and one F4/D2. The circulation of clinical important mutations in the city was described. Mutations at the HBsAg were detected in 34.5% of the analyzed samples, associated with laboratory diagnosis and antiviral treatment failures, immune escape and hepatocellular carcinoma. Most of the samples presented wild type BCP/PC sequences. Coalescence analysis for the most prevalent sgt F1b estimated that the diversification mainly occured during mid '90s and the tMRCA was estimated in 1987. Finally, the high presence of the autochthonous sgt F1b, associated with the anti-HBc IgM positive infection and its present-day diversification process, shows the strong impact of internal human migratory movements into the current population of Mar del Plata. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Tracing of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Isolates in Iran: A NS5B Phylogenetic Analysis with Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Najafi Tireh Shabankareh, Azar; Sharafi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity and classified into 7 genotypes and different subtypes. It heterogeneously distributed through various risk groups and geographical regions. A well-established phylogenetic relationship can simplify the tracing of HCV hierarchical strata into geographical regions. The current study aimed to find genetic phylogeny of subtypes 1a and 1b of HCV isolates based on NS5B nucleotide sequences in Iran and other members of Eastern Mediterranean regional office of world health organization, as well as other Middle Eastern countries, with a systematic review of available published and unpublished studies. Evidence Acquisition The phylogenetic analyses were performed based on the nucleotide sequences of NS5B gene of HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1), which were registered in the GenBank database. The literature review was performed in two steps: 1) searching studies evaluating the NS5B sequences of HCV-1, on PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science, and 2) Searching sequences of unpublished studies registered in the GenBank database. Results In this study, 442 sequences from HCV-1a and 232 from HCV-1b underwent phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of all sequences revealed different clusters in the phylogenetic trees. The results showed that the proportion of HCV-1a and -1b isolates from Iranian patients probably originated from domestic sources. Moreover, the HCV-1b isolates from Iranian patients may have similarities with the European ones. Conclusions In this study, phylogenetic reconstruction of HCV-1 sequences clearly indicated for molecular tracing and ancestral relationships of the HCV genotypes in Iran, and showed the likelihood of domestic origin for HCV-1a and various origin for HCV-1b. PMID:28123445

  19. Interactions between hepatitis B virus infection and exposure to aflatoxins in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma: a molecular epidemiological approach.

    PubMed

    Sylla, A; Diallo, M S; Castegnaro, J; Wild, C P

    1999-07-16

    Aflatoxins and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in high incidence areas for this cancer, namely southeast Asia and parts of Africa. There is evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models that the two factors can act synergistically to increase the risk of HCC. The cellular and molecular mechanism of the interaction between these two factors is as yet undefined. However, one possible mechanism attested to by studies in HBV transgenic mice is that chronic liver injury alters the expression of specific carcinogen metabolising enzymes thus modulating the binding of aflatoxin to DNA in hepatocytes. The high levels of aflatoxin exposure which occur in many areas of the world where chronic HBV infection is endemic indicate that measures to reduce aflatoxin exposure would contribute to reducing HCC incidence. In preliminary studies, Guinea-Conakry have established baseline data for the implementation of a community-based intervention study to evaluate the effectiveness of improved post-harvest processing and storage of the groundnut crop, a major source of aflatoxins. Aflatoxin-albumin adducts were measured in 423 sera from individuals living in the four natural geographic zones of Guinea. More than 95% of the serum samples were positive for this biomarker and highest exposures were found in Lower Guinea where groundnuts are consumed as a dietary staple. Variations in mean levels between villages within a geographic region did not vary greatly. HBV infection was endemic in all regions with an overall prevalence of 16.7% chronic carriers. Thus in this population both HBV vaccination and reduction in aflatoxin exposure would be beneficial in decreasing morbidity and mortality from liver disease.

  20. Algorithmic Approach to High-Throughput Molecular Screening for Alpha Interferon-Resistant Genotypes in Hepatitis C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sreevatsan, Srinand; Bookout, Jack B.; Ringpis, Fidel M.; Pottathil, Mridula R.; Marshall, David J.; De Arruda, Monika; Murvine, Christopher; Fors, Lance; Pottathil, Raveendran M.; Barathur, Raj R.

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the feasibility and validity of using Cleavase Fragment Length Polymorphism (CFLP) analysis as an alternative to DNA sequencing for high-throughput screening of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in a high-volume molecular pathology laboratory setting. By using a 244-bp amplicon from the 5′ untranslated region of the HCV genome, 61 clinical samples received for HCV reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were genotyped by this method. The genotype frequencies assigned by the CFLP method were 44.3% for type 1a, 26.2% for 1b, 13.1% for type 2b, and 5% type 3a. The results obtained by nucleotide sequence analysis provided 100% concordance with those obtained by CFLP analysis at the major genotype level, with resolvable differences as to subtype designations for five samples. CFLP analysis-derived HCV genotype frequencies also concurred with the national estimates (N. N. Zein et al., Ann. Intern. Med. 125:634–639, 1996). Reanalysis of 42 of these samples in parallel in a different research laboratory reproduced the CFLP fingerprints for 100% of the samples. Similarly, the major subtype designations for 19 samples subjected to different incubation temperature-time conditions were also 100% reproducible. Comparative cost analysis for genotyping of HCV by line probe assay, CFLP analysis, and automated DNA sequencing indicated that the average cost per amplicon was lowest for CFLP analysis, at $20 (direct costs). On the basis of these findings we propose that CFLP analysis is a robust, sensitive, specific, and an economical method for large-scale screening of HCV-infected patients for alpha interferon-resistant HCV genotypes. The paper describes an algorithm that uses as a reflex test the RT-PCR-based qualitative screening of samples for HCV detection and also addresses genotypes that are ambiguous. PMID:9650932

  1. Molecular characterization of occult hepatitis B virus infection in patients with end-stage liver disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Julio Cesar; Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Restrepo-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Hoyos, Sergio; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) occult infection (OBI) is a risk factor to be taken into account in transfusion, hemodialysis and organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize at the molecular level OBI cases in patients with end-stage liver disease. Sixty-six liver samples were obtained from patients with diagnosis of end-stage liver disease submitted to liver transplantation in Medellin (North West, Colombia). Samples obtained from patients who were negative for the surface antigen of HBV (n = 50) were tested for viral DNA detection by nested PCR for ORFs S, C, and X and confirmed by Southern-Blot. OBI cases were analyzed by sequencing the viral genome to determine the genotype and mutations; additionally, viral genome integration events were examined by the Alu-PCR technique. In five cases out of 50 patients (10%) the criteria for OBI was confirmed. HBV genotype F (subgenotypes F1 and F3), genotype A and genotype D were characterized in liver samples. Three integration events in chromosomes 5q14.1, 16p13 and 20q12 affecting Receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase T, Ras Protein Specific Guanine Nucleotide Releasing Factor 2, and the zinc finger 263 genes were identified in two OBI cases. Sequence analysis of the viral genome of the 5 OBI cases showed several punctual missense and nonsense mutations affecting ORFs S, P, Core and X. This is the first characterization of OBI in patients with end-stage liver disease in Colombia. The OBI cases were identified in patients with HCV infection or cryptogenic cirrhosis. The integration events (5q14.1, 16p13 and 20q12) described in this study have not been previously reported. Further studies are required to validate the role of mutations and integration events in OBI pathogenesis.

  2. Identification, Molecular Cloning, and Analysis of Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus Transmitted/Founder Genotypes 1, 3, and 4

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Mark B.; Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Saeed, Mohsan; Andrus, Linda; Ding, Wenge; Jiang, Xinpei; Learn, Gerald H.; von Schaewen, Markus; Wen, Jessica; Goepfert, Paul A.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent replication of a complex mixture of viruses termed a “quasispecies.” Transmission is generally associated with a stringent population bottleneck characterized by infection by limited numbers of “transmitted/founder” (T/F) viruses. Characterization of T/F genomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been integral to studies of transmission, immunopathogenesis, and vaccine development. Here, we describe the identification of complete T/F genomes of HCV by single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA from acutely infected subjects. A total of 2,739 single-genome-derived amplicons comprising 10,966,507 bp from 18 acute-phase and 11 chronically infected subjects were analyzed. Acute-phase sequences diversified essentially randomly, except for the poly(U/UC) tract, which was subject to polymerase slippage. Fourteen acute-phase subjects were productively infected by more than one genetically distinct virus, permitting assessment of recombination between replicating genomes. No evidence of recombination was found among 1,589 sequences analyzed. Envelope sequences of T/F genomes lacked transmission signatures that could distinguish them from chronic infection viruses. Among chronically infected subjects, higher nucleotide substitution rates were observed in the poly(U/UC) tract than in envelope hypervariable region 1. Fourteen full-length molecular clones with variable poly(U/UC) sequences corresponding to seven genotype 1a, 1b, 3a, and 4a T/F viruses were generated. Like most unadapted HCV clones, T/F genomes did not replicate efficiently in Huh 7.5 cells, indicating that additional cellular factors or viral adaptations are necessary for in vitro replication. Full-length T/F HCV genomes and their progeny provide unique insights into virus transmission, virus evolution, and virus-host interactions associated with immunopathogenesis. PMID:25714714

  3. Molecular characterization of occult hepatitis B virus infection in patients with end-stage liver disease in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Julio Cesar; Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Restrepo-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Hoyos, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) occult infection (OBI) is a risk factor to be taken into account in transfusion, hemodialysis and organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize at the molecular level OBI cases in patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods Sixty-six liver samples were obtained from patients with diagnosis of end-stage liver disease submitted to liver transplantation in Medellin (North West, Colombia). Samples obtained from patients who were negative for the surface antigen of HBV (n = 50) were tested for viral DNA detection by nested PCR for ORFs S, C, and X and confirmed by Southern-Blot. OBI cases were analyzed by sequencing the viral genome to determine the genotype and mutations; additionally, viral genome integration events were examined by the Alu-PCR technique. Results In five cases out of 50 patients (10%) the criteria for OBI was confirmed. HBV genotype F (subgenotypes F1 and F3), genotype A and genotype D were characterized in liver samples. Three integration events in chromosomes 5q14.1, 16p13 and 20q12 affecting Receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase T, Ras Protein Specific Guanine Nucleotide Releasing Factor 2, and the zinc finger 263 genes were identified in two OBI cases. Sequence analysis of the viral genome of the 5 OBI cases showed several punctual missense and nonsense mutations affecting ORFs S, P, Core and X. Conclusions This is the first characterization of OBI in patients with end-stage liver disease in Colombia. The OBI cases were identified in patients with HCV infection or cryptogenic cirrhosis. The integration events (5q14.1, 16p13 and 20q12) described in this study have not been previously reported. Further studies are required to validate the role of mutations and integration events in OBI pathogenesis. PMID:28686707

  4. Molecular Characterization of Pre-Core/Core and S Region of Hepatitis B Virus in Hemodialysis Patients With Occult Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarvand, Nasrin; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Rasti, Mojtaba; Neisi, Niloofar; Pouremamali, Amir; Teimoori, Ali; Shabani, Abdolnabi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is a major public health problem worldwide, which harbors potential risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission through blood transfusion and transplantation. OBI is characterized by the presence of HBV-DNA in the blood or liver tissue without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in the serum. An important cause of OBI is the occurrence of mutations in the HBV genome, especially in the S region. Objectives: The study aims to analyze mutations in S and pre-core/core regions of HBV-DNA in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: Sera of 216 hemodialysis patients were tested for HBsAg and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) by ELISA. Sera of patients that tested negative for HBsAg were evaluated by PCR for the detection of HBV-DNA in the S and pre-core/core regions. In total, six PCR products were sequenced, aligned, and compared with the HBV reference sequence. Amino acid deletion and nucleotide substitution were considered mutations in S and pre-core/core regions of HBV-DNA. Results: Among 216 patients, 203 (93.98%) and 175 (81.01%) sera samples tested negative for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively. Among all HBsAg-negative samples, six (2.9%) tested positive for HBV-DNA, including four (1.97%) for S and two (0.98%) for pre-core regions. All four (1.97%) samples that tested positive for the S region belonged to HBV-subtype awy. The amino acid sequence of all four samples showed the YMDD motif in position 204 (rtM204). There were three amino acid substitutions in the S region (T127P, P153L, and F170S) and one substitution in the RT region (Y135S). Moreover, two (0.98%) pre-core/core positive patients had an unexpected stop codon in position 1896. Conclusions: This study indicates that 2.9% of hemodialysis patients had OBI, which is considered as a major public health problem worldwide. Moreover, we observed three mutations in S region, including T127P, P153L, and F170S, which caused OBI. This study is first to

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype E: The First Molecular Characterization from an Imported Case in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Arreguín-Porras, Dulce María; Esteban-Valencia, María del Carmen; Corona-Valdespino, Estela; Falcón-Acosta, Jaime Israel; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna María; López-Martinez, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is currently a global public health problem. Here, we present the first characterization and complete genome sequence of a strain belonging to genotype E in Mexico, obtained from a foreign carrier with chronic infection. PMID:27034495

  6. The Delta 2 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  7. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  8. Deceased tissue donor serology and molecular testing for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses: a lack of cadaveric validated tests.

    PubMed

    Victer, Thayssa Neiva da Fonseca; Dos Santos, Cris Stéphany Rodrigues; Báo, Sônia Nair; Sampaio, Thatiane Lima

    2016-12-01

    Vital to patient safety is the accurate assessment and minimization of risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis C (HCV), and Hepatitis B (HBV) virus transmission by deceased donor organ and tissue transplantation. The pathogens are tested by serological kits based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chemiluminescence (CLIA) and eletrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) immunoassays. Organ transplantation is a highly successful life-saving treatment in Brazil, but the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency currently mandates that all deceased organ donors are screened for HIV, HCV and HBV following living donor policies. In this review, six ELISA (Wama(®), Bio-Rad(®), Biomerieux(®), DiaSorin(®), Acon Biotech(®) and Biokit(®)), three CLIA (Abbott(®), Siemens(®), Diasorin(®)) and one ECLIA (Roche(®)) were utilized for evaluating the effectiveness of those serological tests for deceased donors in Brazil according to manufacturer's guidelines. NAT for HIV, HCV and HBV can assist with detection of pre-seroconversion for those infections, and only Cobas(®) TaqScreen MPX(®) test, the Tigris System(®) Procleix Ultrio Assay(®) and the Bio-Manguinhos(®) HIV/HCV/HBV NAT are commercially available. Between all the tests, only the manufacturer Abbott(®) and Cobas(®) TaqScreen MPX(®) test are currently validated for cadaver samples.

  9. Epidemiology and molecular analysis of hepatitis A, B and C in a semi-urban and rural area of Crete.

    PubMed

    Drositis, I; Bertsias, A; Lionis, C; Kouroumalis, E

    2013-12-01

    An observational seroepidemiological study was carried out in a well-defined primary-care district on the island of Crete in order to determine the recent endemicity of viral hepatitis in Cretan-population. The setting consisted of a semi-urban group and a remote & rural group. Serum samples were collected from 876 subjects (437 males, 439 females) aged 15 years or above. Subjects were randomly selected from the permanent population of the area that consisted of 5705 individuals. The aim was to measure the prevalence of selected viral-hepatitis markers. Hepatitis B surface-antigen (HBsAg) was found positive in twenty-nine individuals, (3.3%). Antibodies to hepatitis B virus core-antigen (HBcAb) were detected in 287 subjects (32.8%) and antibodies to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) were detected in nineteen subjects (2.2%). Seropositivities for the semi-urban group were: 3.4%, 19.1%, 2.1% and 3.2%, 48.8%, 2.2% in remote & rural group respectively. Virtually, all subjects >45 years old were seropositive for antibodies to hepatitis A, whereas approximately 80% of those in the 15-44 age-group were found to be seropositive. A threefold increase in the HBV exposure and carrier proportion was found in Cretan native-population and in rural-areas compared to older studies carried out in other rural-populations of the island. It is still unknown whether the recent economic crisis or the demographic changes in Cretan-population contributed to these findings. HCV endemicity remains relatively constant, however an alteration of hepatitis C genotypes was observed. Exposure to HAV was found to be higher in remote and rural areas compared to semi-urban areas. © 2013.

  10. Serological and molecular epidemiological outcomes after two decades of universal infant hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination in Nunavut, Canada.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Chris; Minuk, Gerald Y; Uhanova, Julia; Baikie, Maureen; Wong, Thomas; Osiowy, Carla

    2017-08-16

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection within the Canadian Arctic is considered endemic (>2% prevalence). Within the Arctic region of Nunavut, a vaccination program targeted at newborn infants was initiated approximately 20years ago, along with interim grade school catch-up programs, with the result that individuals born after 1980 are presumed vaccinated. This study investigates the effectiveness of these programs and is the first seroepidemiological survey to determine HBV prevalence in Nunavut in the post-vaccination era. Anonymized serum specimens scheduled for destruction following medical testing were collected between April 2013 and April 2014 from individuals granting consent. Specimens were tested for HBV antibodies, surface antigen (HBsAg), and HBV DNA to perform molecular characterization. Four thousand eight hundred and two specimens (13% of the population) were collected, with a resulting median age of 29years (range 1week to 93years). The prevalence of antibody to the HBV core protein was 9.4%; however, a 10-fold decrease in the rate of HBV exposure was noted among those born after 1980 compared to those born before (1.8% vs. 19.8%, p<0.01). HBsAg positivity was primarily documented in individuals born before 1980 (2.5%), although cases still occurred among the vaccine age cohort (0.3%). HBV subgenotype B5 (previously B6) was the most prevalent genotype observed (81.8%) indicating persistence of locally acquired infection. Vaccine-based antibody as the sole serological marker was evident in the vaccine age cohort, although the rate of decay with increasing age was much greater than predicted (less than 10% in those aged 5-19years). Nearly two decades after the advent of HBV vaccination in Nunavut, HBV prevalence has decreased to 1.2%, indicating non-endemic prevalence. However, the persistence of infection and a lower than expected prevalence of vaccine-based immunity in the vaccine age cohort will require further investigation to understand the

  11. Genotyping and molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Makondo, Euphodia; Bell, Trevor G; Kramvis, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are hyperendemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The HBV genotypes prevailing in HIV-infected Africans are unknown. Our aim was to determine the HBV genotypes in HIV-infected participants and to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. From 71 HBV DNA(+ve) HIV-infected participants, 49 basic core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and 29 complete S regions were successfully sequenced. Following phylogenetic analysis of 29 specimens in the complete S region, 28 belonged to subgenotype A1 and one to D3. Mutations affecting HBeAg expression at the transcriptional (1762T1764A), translational (Kozak 1809-1812, initiation 1814-1816, G1896A with C1858T), or post translational levels (G1862T), were responsible for the high HBeAg-negativity observed. The G1862T mutation occurred only in subgenotype A1 isolates, which were found in one third (7/21) of HBsAg(-ve) participants, but in none of the 18 HBsAg(+ve) participants (p<0.05). Pre-S deletion mutants were detected in four HBsAg(+ve) and one HBsAg(-ve) participant/s. The following mutations occurred significantly more frequently in HBV isolated in this study than in strains of the same cluster of the phylogenetic tree: ps1F25L, ps1V88L/A; ps2Q10R, ps2 R48K/T, ps2A53V and sQ129R/H, sQ164A/V/G/D, sV168A and sS174N (p<0.05). ps1I48V/T occurred more frequently in females than males (p<0.05). Isolates with sV168A occurred more frequently in participants with viral loads >200 IU per ml (p<0.05) and only sS174N occurred more frequently in HBsAg(-ve) than in HBsAg(+ve) individuals (p<0.05). Prior to initiation of ART, ten percent, 3 of 29 isolates sequenced, had drug resistance mutations rtV173L, rtL180M+rtM204V and rtV214A, respectively. This study has provided important information on the molecular characteristics of HBV in HIV-infected southern Africans prior to ART initiation, which has important clinical relevance in the management of HBV/HIV co-infection in our unique

  12. Genotyping and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis B Virus from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Makondo, Euphodia; Bell, Trevor G.; Kramvis, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are hyperendemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The HBV genotypes prevailing in HIV-infected Africans are unknown. Our aim was to determine the HBV genotypes in HIV-infected participants and to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. From 71 HBV DNA+ve HIV-infected participants, 49 basic core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and 29 complete S regions were successfully sequenced. Following phylogenetic analysis of 29 specimens in the complete S region, 28 belonged to subgenotype A1 and one to D3. Mutations affecting HBeAg expression at the transcriptional (1762T1764A), translational (Kozak 1809–1812, initiation 1814–1816, G1896A with C1858T), or post translational levels (G1862T), were responsible for the high HBeAg-negativity observed. The G1862T mutation occurred only in subgenotype A1 isolates, which were found in one third (7/21) of HBsAg−ve participants, but in none of the 18 HBsAg+ve participants (p<0.05). Pre-S deletion mutants were detected in four HBsAg+ve and one HBsAg−ve participant/s. The following mutations occurred significantly more frequently in HBV isolated in this study than in strains of the same cluster of the phylogenetic tree: ps1F25L, ps1V88L/A; ps2Q10R, ps2 R48K/T, ps2A53V and sQ129R/H, sQ164A/V/G/D, sV168A and sS174N (p<0.05). ps1I48V/T occurred more frequently in females than males (p<0.05). Isolates with sV168A occurred more frequently in participants with viral loads >200 IU per ml (p<0.05) and only sS174N occurred more frequently in HBsAg−ve than in HBsAg+ve individuals (p<0.05). Prior to initiation of ART, ten percent, 3 of 29 isolates sequenced, had drug resistance mutations rtV173L, rtL180M+rtM204V and rtV214A, respectively. This study has provided important information on the molecular characteristics of HBV in HIV-infected southern Africans prior to ART initiation, which has important clinical relevance in the management of HBV/HIV co-infection in our unique setting

  13. Postprandial lysophospholipid suppresses hepatic fatty acid oxidation: the molecular link between group 1B phospholipase A2 and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Eric D.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Cash, James G.; Kuhel, David G.; Roja, Juan C.; Magness, Daniel P.; Jandacek, Ronald J.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hui, David Y.

    2010-01-01

    Decrease in fat catabolic rate on consuming a high-fat diet contributes to diet-induced obesity. This study used group 1B phospholipase A2 (Pla2g1b)-deficient mice, which are resistant to hyperglycemia, to test the hypothesis that Pla2g1b and its lipolytic product lysophospholipid suppress hepatic fat utilization and energy metabolism in promoting diet-induced obesity. The metabolic consequences of hypercaloric diet, including body weight gain, energy expenditure, and fatty acid oxidation, were compared between Pla2g1b+/+ and Pla2g1b−/− mice. The Pla2g1b−/− mice displayed normal energy balance when fed chow, but were resistant to obesity when challenged with a hypercaloric diet. Obesity resistance in Pla2g1b−/− mice is due to their ability to maintain elevated energy expenditure and core body temperature when subjected to hypercaloric diet, which was not observed in Pla2g1b+/+ mice. The Pla2g1b−/− mice also displayed increased postprandial hepatic fat utilization due to increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, PPAR-δ, PPAR-γ, cd36/Fat, and Ucp2, which coincided with reduced postprandial plasma lysophospholipid levels. Lysophospholipids produced by Pla2g1b hydrolysis suppress hepatic fat utilization and down-regulate energy expenditure, thereby preventing metabolically beneficial adaptation to a high-fat diet exposure in promoting diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.—Labonté, E. D., Pfluger, P. T., Cash, J. G., Kuhel, D. G., Rojas, J. C., Magness, D. P., Jandacek, R. J., Tschöp, M. H., Hui, D. Y. Postprandial lysophospholipid suppresses hepatic fatty acid oxidation: the molecular link between group 1B phospholipase A2 and diet-induced obesity. PMID:20215528

  14. Enhanced expression of rat hepatic CYP2B1/2B2 and 2E1 by pyridine: differential induction kinetics and molecular basis of expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Putt, D; Reddy, S; Hollenberg, P F; Novak, R F

    1993-11-01

    Expression of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B subfamily in rat and rabbit hepatic tissues after pyridine (PY) treatment has been examined, and the molecular basis for enhanced 2B1/2B2 expression has been determined. P450 expression was monitored using metabolic activity, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses, and the identity of the proteins was confirmed through N-terminus microsequence analysis. PY caused a dose-dependent elevation of hepatic CYP2B1/B2B levels in rats, which ranged from 4- to 22-fold over the dosing regimen of 100 to 400 mg PY/kg/day, for 3 days, respectively. PY at low dose failed to induce CYP2B in rabbit hepatic tissue, suggesting a species-dependent response in 2B expression. Anti-2B1 IgG addition to PY-induced microsomes inhibited benzphetamine N-demethylase activity by only approximately 15%, in sharp contrast to the approximately 73% inhibition observed for phenobarbital-induced microsomes, suggesting the induction of other form(s) of P450 having benzphetamine N-demethylase activity. Northern blot analysis revealed that PY treatment increased 2B1 and 2B2 poly(A)+ RNA levels approximately 69- and approximately 34-fold, respectively, whereas the 2E1 poly(A)+ RNA levels failed to increase. The results of this study show that PY induces CYP2B1/2B2 and that induction is species-dependent and kinetically distinguishable from 2E1 induction. Moreover, 2B1/2B2 induction occurs as a result of elevated mRNA levels associated with either transcriptional activation or mRNA stabilization, and it differs from the mechanism of hepatic 2E1 induction by PY.

  15. Molecular cloning and stress-dependent expression of a gene encoding Delta(12)-fatty acid desaturase in the Antarctic microalga Chlorella vulgaris NJ-7.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yandu; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Qingli; Li, Zhaoxin; Liu, Shaofang; Gan, Qinhua; Qin, Song

    2009-11-01

    The psychrotrophic Antarctic alga, Chlorella vulgaris NJ-7, grows under an extreme environment of low temperature and high salinity. In an effort to better understand the correlation between fatty acid metabolism and acclimation to Antarctic environment, we analyzed its fatty acid compositions. An extremely high amount of Delta(12) unsaturated fatty acids was identified which prompted us to speculate about the involvement of Delta(12) fatty acid desaturase in the process of acclimation. A full-length cDNA sequence, designated CvFAD2, was isolated from C. vulgaris NJ-7 via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RACE methods. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that the gene was homologous to known microsomal Delta(12)-FADs with the conserved histidine motifs. Heterologous expression in yeast was used to confirm the regioselectivity and the function of CvFAD2. Linoleic acid (18:2), normally not present in wild-type yeast cells, was detected in transformants of CvFAD2. The induction of CvFAD2 at an mRNA level under cold stress and high salinity is detected by real-time PCR. The results showed that both temperature and salinity motivated the upregulation of CvFAD2 expression. The accumulation of CvFAD2 increased 2.2-fold at 15 degrees C and 3.9-fold at 4 degrees C compared to the alga at 25 degrees C. Meanwhile a 1.7- and 8.5-fold increase at 3 and 6% NaCl was detected. These data suggest that CvFAD2 is the enzyme responsible for the Delta(12) fatty acids desaturation involved in the adaption to cold and high salinity for Antarctic C. vugaris NJ-7.

  16. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  17. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may want you to get the hepatitis B vaccine (and maybe the hepatitis A vaccine, too), if you don't already have these viruses. If you have hepatitis C, you are more likely to catch hepatitis A or hepatitis B, which would cause more damage to your liver. ...

  18. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Distinct Molecular Characteristics of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinomas from Very Early to Advanced Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stages.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fan-Yun; Wei, Xiao; Zhou, Kai; Hu, Wei; Kou, Yan-Bo; You, Hong-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is the fifth most common malignancy associated with high mortality. One of the risk factors for HCC is chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The treatment strategy for the disease is dependent on the stage of HCC, and the Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) staging system is used in most HCC cases. However, the molecular characteristics of HBV-related HCC in different BCLC stages are still unknown. Using GSE14520 microarray data from HBV-related HCC cases with BCLC stages from 0 (very early stage) to C (advanced stage) in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database, differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including common DEGs and unique DEGs in different BCLC stages, were identified. These DEGs were located on different chromosomes. The molecular functions and biology pathways of DEGs were identified by gene ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, and the interactome networks of DEGs were constructed using the NetVenn online tool. The results revealed that both common DEGs and stage-specific DEGs were associated with various molecular functions and were involved in special biological pathways. In addition, several hub genes were found in the interactome networks of DEGs. The identified DEGs and hub genes promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HBV-related HCC through the different BCLC stages, and might be used as staging biomarkers or molecular targets for the treatment of HCC with HBV infection.

  19. The delta opioid receptor tool box.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Pradhan, Amynah A

    2016-12-03

    In recent years, the delta opioid receptor has attracted increasing interest as a target for the treatment of chronic pain and emotional disorders. Due to their therapeutic potential, numerous tools have been developed to study the delta opioid receptor from both a molecular and a functional perspective. This review summarizes the most commonly available tools, with an emphasis on their use and limitations. Here, we describe (1) the cell-based assays used to study the delta opioid receptor. (2) The features of several delta opioid receptor ligands, including peptide and non-peptide drugs. (3) The existing approaches to detect delta opioid receptors in fixed tissue, and debates that surround these techniques. (4) Behavioral assays used to study the in vivo effects of delta opioid receptor agonists; including locomotor stimulation and convulsions that are induced by some ligands, but not others. (5) The characterization of genetically modified mice used specifically to study the delta opioid receptor. Overall, this review aims to provide a guideline for the use of these tools with the final goal of increasing our understanding of delta opioid receptor physiology.

  20. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated ...

  1. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... receive the hepatitis B vaccine. Since then, the rate of new hepatitis B infections has gone down ... 1 Asian Americans and African Americans have higher rates of chronic hepatitis B. 2 Many people in ...

  2. [Prevention of virus hepatitis A to E].

    PubMed

    Cornberg, M; Manns, M P

    2011-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis viruses can lead to acute hepatitis with the risk of developing liver failure. Chronic viral hepatitis may evolve into liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, prevention of viral hepatitis and its sequels is essential. Vaccination against hepatitis A is successful in almost all individuals. Protective antibodies maintain for at least 20 years. Booster vaccinations are not necessary. Since the introduction of hepatitis A vaccines, the incidence of new HAV-infections has declined significantly. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe and highly effective. Special populations such as dialysis patients or immunocompromised patients require special vaccine schedules. New vaccines with improved adjuvants are currently being tested in clinical trials. So far there is no hepatitis C vaccine on the horizon. Prophylaxis of HCV-infections relies primarily on hygiene measures. Early therapy of acute hepatitis C can prevent chronic hepatitis C. HDV-infection can only be established if HBsAg is present. Thus, prevention of hepatitis B or elimination of HBsAg means prevention of hepatitis delta. Hepatitis E vaccines have been evaluated in phase III studies. The development of HEV vaccines becomes more relevant since chronic HEV infections have been reported in immunosuppressed individuals.

  3. Morphology and Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatic Injury in Rats under Simulated Weightlessness and the Protective Effects of Resistance Training.

    PubMed

    Du, Fang; Ding, Ye; Zou, Jun; Li, Zhili; Tian, Jijing; She, Ruiping; Wang, Desheng; Wang, Huijuan; Lv, Dongqiang; Chang, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of long-term simulated weightlessness on liver morphology, enzymes, glycogen, and apoptosis related proteins by using two-month rat-tail suspension model (TS), and liver injury improvement by rat-tail suspension with resistance training model (TS&RT). Microscopically the livers of TS rats showed massive granular degeneration, chronic inflammation, and portal fibrosis. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling and loss of membrane integrity were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The similar, but milder, morphological changes were observed in the livers of TS&RT rats. Serum biochemistry analysis revealed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly higher (p<0.05) in TS rats than in controls. The levels of ALT and AST in TS&RT rats were slightly lower than in RT rats, but they were insignificantly higher than in controls. However, both TS and TS&RT rats had significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of serum glucose and hepatic glycogen than in controls. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, and active caspase-3 were higher in TS rats than in TS&RT and control rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) showed that TS rats had higher mRNA levels (P < 0.05) of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and caspase-12 transcription than in control rats; whereas mRNA expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were slightly higher in TS rats. TS&RT rats showed no significant differences of above 4 mRNAs compared with the control group. Our results demonstrated that long-term weightlessness caused hepatic injury, and may trigger hepatic apoptosis. Resistance training slightly improved hepatic damage.

  4. Morphology and Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatic Injury in Rats under Simulated Weightlessness and the Protective Effects of Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Li, Zhili; Tian, Jijing; She, Ruiping; Wang, Desheng; Wang, Huijuan; Lv, Dongqiang; Chang, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of long-term simulated weightlessness on liver morphology, enzymes, glycogen, and apoptosis related proteins by using two-month rat-tail suspension model (TS), and liver injury improvement by rat-tail suspension with resistance training model (TS&RT). Microscopically the livers of TS rats showed massive granular degeneration, chronic inflammation, and portal fibrosis. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling and loss of membrane integrity were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The similar, but milder, morphological changes were observed in the livers of TS&RT rats. Serum biochemistry analysis revealed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly higher (p<0.05) in TS rats than in controls. The levels of ALT and AST in TS&RT rats were slightly lower than in RT rats, but they were insignificantly higher than in controls. However, both TS and TS&RT rats had significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of serum glucose and hepatic glycogen than in controls. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, and active caspase-3 were higher in TS rats than in TS&RT and control rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) showed that TS rats had higher mRNA levels (P < 0.05) of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and caspase-12 transcription than in control rats; whereas mRNA expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were slightly higher in TS rats. TS&RT rats showed no significant differences of above 4 mRNAs compared with the control group. Our results demonstrated that long-term weightlessness caused hepatic injury, and may trigger hepatic apoptosis. Resistance training slightly improved hepatic damage. PMID:26000905

  5. A virus resonance light scattering sensor based on mussel-inspired molecularly imprinted polymers for high sensitive and high selective detection of Hepatitis A Virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Gong, Hang; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Cai, Changqun

    2017-01-15

    We described a novel resonance light scattering (RLS) sensor for the specific recognition of trace quantities of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV); the sensor was based on a mussel-inspired hepatitis molecularly imprinted polymer. As a recognition element, polydopamine (PDA)-coated totivirus-imprinted polymer was introduced on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles (virus-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs) using an efficient one-step synthesis method. The target virus was selectively captured by the imprinted polymer films, thereby increasing the RLS intensity. A simple fluorescence spectrophotometer was employed to measure the changes in the intensity. The enhanced RLS intensity (∆IRLS) was proportional to the concentration of HAV in the range of 0.04-6.0nmol∙L(-1), with a low limit of detection of 8.6pmol∙L(-1). The selectivity study confirmed that the resultant HAV-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs possessed high selectivity for HAV. The sensor was successfully applied for the direct detection of additional HAV from a 20,000-fold dilution of human serum. The proposed strategy is simple, eco-friendly, highly selective, and sensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in an HIV co-infected patient with reactivation of occult HBV infection following discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is characterized by HBV DNA persistence even though the pattern of serological markers indicates an otherwise resolved HBV infection. Although OBI is usually clinically silent, immunocompromised patients may experience reactivation of the liver disease. Case presentation We report the case of an individual with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and anti-HBV core antibody positivity, who experienced severe HBV reactivation after discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy (ART). HBV sequencing analysis showed a hepatitis B surface antigen escape mutant whose presence in an earlier sample excluded reinfection. Molecular sequencing showed some differences between two isolates collected at a 9-year interval, indicating HBV evolution. Resumption of ART containing an emtricitabine/tenofovir combination allowed control of plasma HBV DNA, which fell to undetectable levels. Conclusion This case stresses the ability of HBV to evolve continuously, even during occult infection, and the effectiveness of ART in controlling OBI reactivation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:22054111

  7. Treatment with oligonol, a low-molecular polyphenol derived from lychee fruit, attenuates diabetes-induced hepatic damage through regulation of oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jeong Sook; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako

    2011-10-01

    We have identified the effects of oligonol, a low-molecular polyphenol derived from lychee fruit, on oxidative stress and lipid metabolism in a type 2 diabetic model. Oligonol was orally administered at 10 or 20 mg per kg body weight per d for 8 weeks to db/db mice, and its effects were compared with those of the vehicle in db/db and m/m mice. Serum and hepatic biochemical factors, and protein and mRNA expression related to lipid metabolism were measured. In the oligonol-administered group, there were significant reductions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and the TAG and total cholesterol concentrations in both the serum and liver. Additionally, oligonol attenuated oxidative stress through the inhibition of advanced glycation endproduct formation and its receptor expression. Furthermore, augmented expressions of NF-κBp65 and inducible NO synthase were down-regulated to the levels of m/m mice in the group treated with oligonol at 20 mg/kg. Regarding lipid metabolism, lower hepatic lipid resulted from the down-regulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and its target gene of lipogenic enzymes in the liver of db/db mice. The present results suggest that oligonol has protective effects against ROS-related inflammation and excess lipid deposition in the type 2 diabetic liver.

  8. Deletion of the collagen-specific molecular chaperone Hsp47 causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kunito; Ushioda, Ryo; Ito, Shinya; Ikeda, Kazuo; Masago, Yusaku; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-06

    Chronic liver injury, often caused by alcoholism and viral hepatitis, causes liver fibrosis via the induction of collagen production. In liver fibrosis, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are activated and transform into myofibroblasts, which actively produce and secrete collagen into the extracellular matrix. Hsp47 (heat shock protein 47) is a collagen-specific molecular chaperone that is essential for the maturation and secretion of collagen. Here, we used the Cre-LoxP system to disrupt the Hsp47 gene in isolated HSCs from Hsp47 floxed mice. Immature type I procollagen accumulated and partially aggregated in Hsp47-KO HSCs. This accumulation was augmented when autophagy was inhibited, which induced expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible proteins BiP (immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein) and Grp94 (94-kDa glucose-regulated protein). The inhibition of autophagy in Hsp47-KO HSCs also induced CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein), which is an ER stress-induced transcription factor responsible for apoptosis. These data suggest that apoptosis is induced through ER stress by procollagen accumulation in Hsp47-KO HSCs when autophagy is inhibited. Thus, Hsp47 could be a promising therapeutic target in liver fibrosis.

  9. Multicentre study of prevalence of HBV-associated delta infection and liver disease in drug-addicts.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, G; Smedile, A; Gallo, L; Balbo, A; Ponzetto, A; Rizzetto, M

    1982-01-30

    To assess the epidemiological and pathogenic effects of infection with the hepatitis-B-virus (HBV)-associated delta agent in addicts who take drugs parenterally, 225 symptomless addicts from Italy and 261 addicts with HBsAg-positive hepatitis from Italy, Denmark, Switzerland, and Ireland were tested for delta antigen (delta-Ag) and its antibody (anti-delta) by radioimmunoassay. 79 liver biopsy specimens from HBsAg-positive addicts were also tested for intrahepatic delta-Ag by immunofluorescence. Anti-delta was found in 9 (27%) of 33 of the symptomless HBsAg-positive addicts, in 13 (8%) of 156 of those without HBsAg but with anti-HBs, and in none of those negative for HBV markers. The prevalence of serum delta-Ag or anti-delta among addicts with HBsAg-positive hepatitis was 64% (104/161) in Italy, 44% (8/18) in Denmark, 33% (11/33) in Switzerland, and 31% (15/49) in Ireland. 32 of the 79 (40%)liver biopsy specimens from HBsAg-positive addicts showed positive delta-Ag immunofluorescence. Delta infection occurring simultaneously with HBV infection is common and possibly a major cause of liver disease in drug addicts who receive drug parenterally. The spread of delta infection in drug-using communities is not confined to one country, and the drug habit may represent the major means by which delta agent spreads in areas of the Western world where this infection is not endemic.

  10. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the liver), liver cancer, and even death.Hepatitis A can cause varying symptoms, but most often causes fever, tiredness, ... important? The hepatitis B vaccine prevents infection with hepatitis B virus, which causes liver cancer. The hepatitis B virus is 100 ...

  11. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  12. [Recent acquisitions on viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Resti, M; Tucci, F; Vierucci, A

    1990-01-01

    In the last years the research on viral hepatitis let to better understand the biological, molecular, immunological and epidemiologic characteristics of the viruses that are responsible for hepatitis. The first studied virus was hepatitis B virus (HBv). The scientific attention is still, today, focused on that virus since new markers of infectivity and biological importance in early diagnosis and in disease evolution have been found. The most important result in the last years in the field of viral hepatitis has been, however, the identification of agents responsible for Non-A-Non-B hepatitis. Its epidemiology and clinical importance are discussed in the present paper. Virus C is the most important parenteral agent of NANB hepatitis. Its epidemiology in at risk populations and its role in post-transfusional and cryptogenetic hepatitis are here discussed. The research of new markers of HCV infection is today considered a main goal since the role of the only marker now available is still under discussion.

  13. A photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus for femtosecond time-resolved molecular dynamics with electron time-of-flight resolution of {sigma}=18 ps and energy resolution {delta}E/E=3.5%

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenborg, Arno; Roeterdink, Wim G.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2008-06-15

    We report on the construction and performance of a novel photoelectron-photoion coincidence machine in our laboratory in Amsterdam to measure the full three-dimensional momentum distribution of correlated electrons and ions in femtosecond time-resolved molecular beam experiments. We implemented sets of open electron and ion lenses to time stretch and velocity map the charged particles. Time switched voltages are operated on the particle lenses to enable optimal electric field strengths for velocity map focusing conditions of electrons and ions separately. The position and time sensitive detectors employ microchannel plates (MCPs) in front of delay line detectors. A special effort was made to obtain the time-of-flight (TOF) of the electrons at high temporal resolution using small pore (5 {mu}m) MCPs and implementing fast timing electronics. We measured the TOF distribution of the electrons under our typical coincidence field strengths with a temporal resolution down to {sigma}=18 ps. We observed that our electron coincidence detector has a timing resolution better than {sigma}=16 ps, which is mainly determined by the residual transit time spread of the MCPs. The typical electron energy resolution appears to be nearly laser bandwidth limited with a relative resolution of {delta}E{sub FWHM}/E=3.5% for electrons with kinetic energy near 2 eV. The mass resolution of the ion detector for ions measured in coincidence with electrons is about {delta}m{sub FWHM}/m=1/4150. The velocity map focusing of our extended source volume of particles, due to the overlap of the molecular beam with the laser beams, results in a parent ion spot on our detector focused down to {sigma}=115 {mu}m.

  14. Virtual screening of natural inhibitors to the predicted HBx protein structure of Hepatitis B Virus using molecular docking for identification of potential lead molecules for liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rajesh Kumar; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Taj, Gohar; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The HBx protein in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a potential target for anti-liver cancer molecules. Therefore, it is of interest to screen known natural compounds against the HBx protein using molecular docking. However, the structure of HBx is not yet known. Therefore, the predicted structure of HBx using threading in LOMET was used for docking against plant derived natural compounds (curcumin, oleanolic acid, resveratrol, bilobetin, luteoline, ellagic acid, betulinic acid and rutin) by Molegro Virtual Docker. The screening identified rutin with binding energy of -161.65 Kcal/mol. Thus, twenty derivatives of rutin were further designed and screened against HBx. These in silico experiments identified compounds rutin01 (-163.16 Kcal/mol) and rutin08 (- 165.76 Kcal/mol) for further consideration and downstream validation. PMID:25187683

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Same TCM Syndrome for Different Diseases and Different TCM Syndrome for Same Disease in Chronic Hepatitis B and Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhizhong; Yu, Shuhao; Guan, Yan; Li, Ying-Ya; Lu, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Hui; Su, Shi-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment is based on the traditional diagnose method to distinguish the TCM syndrome, not the disease. So there is a phenomenon in the relationship between TCM syndrome and disease, called Same TCM Syndrome for Different Diseases and Different TCM Syndrome for Same Disease. In this study, we demonstrated the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon using the microarray samples of liver-gallbladder dampness-heat syndrome (LGDHS) and liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome (LDSDS) in the chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis (LC). The results showed that the difference between CHB and LC was gene expression level and the difference between LGDHS and LDSDS was gene coexpression in the G-protein-coupled receptor protein-signaling pathway. Therein genes GPER, PTHR1, GPR173, and SSTR1 were coexpressed in LDSDS, but not in LGDHS. Either CHB or LC was divided into the alternative LGDHS and LDSDS by the gene correlation, which reveals the molecular feature of Different TCM Syndrome for Same Disease. The alternatives LGDHS and LDSDS were divided into either CHB or LC by the gene expression level, which reveals the molecular feature of Same TCM Syndrome for Different Diseases.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of different hepatitis C genotypes in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in jahrom city of iran.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi Hafez, Asghar; Baharlou, Rasoul; Mousavi Nasab, Seyed Dawood; Ahmadi Vasmehjani, Abbas; Shayestehpour, Mohammad; Joharinia, Negar; Ahmadi, Nayeb Ali

    2014-05-01

    The Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is considered essentially hepatotropic, yet the virus compartments have also been found in important extra hepatic sites. Detection of HCV RNA in extra hepatic reservoirs such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is important for determining disease progression and treatment effectiveness. The present study aimed to determine different HCV genotypes in patients' plasma and PBMC specimens, in Jahrom city of Iran. Blood samples of 137 patients with established HCV were collected at the Honari clinic. These patients were anti-HCV and plasma HCV RNA positive. After plasma RNA extraction and obtaining a pellet of approximately 3-5 × 10(6) PBMCs, Real-time PCR was performed, using specific-genotype primers. Finally, data analysis was done by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Subtype 3 was the most common genotype in plasma (57.7%) and PBMCs (51.1%). Subtype 1a was detected in 36.5% and 30.7% of plasma samples and PBMCs, respectively whereas subtype 4 was not detected in any of the cases. There was a genotype difference between plasma and PBMCs of 12.4% of patients. In four patients no genotype was detected in their plasma but genotype 3 was detected in the PBMCs. It is suggested that determination of the target genotype by plasma subtyping for choosing the proper antiviral therapy is essential but may result in therapy failure. HCV genotyping in PBMC samples, along with plasma specimens, might be more beneficial. Therefore determining the HCV genotype in PBMCs, before beginning the therapy is useful due to the possibility of occult infection detection.

  17. Hepatitis B and C virus infection among hemodialysis patients in Yogyakarta, Indonesia: Prevalence and molecular evidence for nosocomial transmission.

    PubMed

    Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Anggorowati, Nungki; Widasari, Dewiyani Indah; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Prasanto, Heru; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2013-08-01

    Hemodialysis patients are at an increased risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the prevalence of hepatitis viral infection and its genotype distribution among hemodialysis patients in Indonesia are unclear. In order to investigate these issues and the possibility of nosocomial transmission, 161 hemodialysis patients and 35 staff members at one of the hemodialysis unit in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, were tested for serological and virological markers of both viruses. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) was detected in 18 patients (11.2%) and in two staff members (5.7%). Anti-HCV was detected in 130 patients (80.7%) but not in any staff members. Occult HBV and HCV infection were detected in 21 (14.7%) and 4 (12.9%) patients, respectively. The overall prevalence rates of HBV and HCV infection among patients were 24.2% and 83.2%, respectively. HCV infection was independently associated with hemodialysis duration and the number of blood transfusions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 23 of 39 tested HBV strains (59%) were genotype B, 11 (28.2%) were genotype C, and 5 (12.8%) were genotype A. HCV genotype 1a was dominant (95%) among 100 tested HCV strains. Nosocomial transmission was suspected because the genotype distribution differed from that of the general population in Indonesia, and because the viral genomes of several strains were identical. These findings suggest that HBV and HCV infection is common among hemodialysis patients in Yogyakarta, and probably occurs through nosocomial infection. Implementation of strict infection-control programs is necessary in hemodialysis units in Indonesia.

  18. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A outbreak in the province of Rome, Lazio region, Italy, January-July 2013.

    PubMed

    Capobianchi, Maria R; Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Agrati, Chiara; Rianda, Alessia; Noto, Pasquale; Corpolongo, Angela; Cataldo, Maria Adriana; Rosati, Silvia; Zaccaro, Paola; Loffredo, Mariarosaria; Pompa, Maria Grazia; Girardi, Enrico; Scognamiglio, Paola; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    Reduced circulation of hepatitis A virus lead to an increase of susceptible individuals, and outbreaks occurred recently. In Northern Italy an outbreak is ongoing, attributed to a monophyletic genotype IA strain, with mixed frozen berries as probable source. From 01/01/2013 to 07/15/2013, 30 cases were diagnosed at National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy, representing about twice the number of cases in whole 2012. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that most, although not all, infections were attributable to the same monophyletic genotype IA strain identified in the contemporary Northern Italy outbreak. This strain is also very similar to previous isolates from Venezuela.

  19. Effects of Hypoxia Exposure on Hepatic Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) Expression in Atlantic Croaker: Molecular Mechanisms of CYP1A Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Saydur; Thomas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α) and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) are biomarkers of environmental exposure to hypoxia and organic xenobiotic chemicals that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, respectively. Many aquatic environments heavily contaminated with organic chemicals, such as harbors, are also hypoxic. Recently, we and other scientists reported HIF-α genes are upregulated by hypoxia exposure in aquatic organisms, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia regulation of CYP1A expression have not been investigated in teleost fishes. As a first step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia modulation of CYP1A expression in fish, we characterized CYP1A cDNA from croaker liver. Hypoxia exposure (dissolved oxygen, DO: 1.7 mg/L for 2 to 4 weeks) caused significant decreases in hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels compared to CYP1A levels in fish held in normoxic conditions. In vivo studies showed that the nitric oxide (NO)-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine, significantly decreased CYP1A expression in croaker livers, whereas the competitive inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, restored CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in hypoxia-exposed (1.7 mg DO/L for 4 weeks) fish. In vivo hypoxia exposure also markedly increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a cytokine), HIF-2α mRNA and endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein levels in croaker livers. Pharmacological treatment with vitamin E, an antioxidant, lowered the IL-1β, HIF-2α mRNA and eNOS protein levels in hypoxia-exposed fish and completely reversed the down-regulation of hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in response to hypoxia exposure. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced down-regulation of CYP1A is due to alterations of NO and oxidant status, and cellular IL-1β and HIF-α levels. Moreover, the present study provides the first evidence of a role for antioxidants in hepatic eNOS and IL-1β regulation in aquatic vertebrates during hypoxic stress. PMID:22815834

  20. Molecular basis for the direct inhibition of AP-1 DNA binding by 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Cañada, F Javier

    2003-12-19

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins may interfere with cellular functions by multiple mechanisms. The cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) has been reported to inhibit the activity of the transcription factor AP-1 in several experimental settings. We have explored the possibility of a direct interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with AP-1 proteins. Here we show that 15d-PGJ2 covalently modifies c-Jun and directly inhibits the DNA binding activity of AP-1. The modification of c-Jun occurs both in vitro and in intact cells as detected by labeling with biotinylated 15d-PGJ2 and mass spectrometry analysis. Attachment of the cyclopentenone prostaglandin occurs at cysteine 269, which is located in the c-Jun DNA binding domain. In addition, 15d-PGJ2 can promote the oligomerization of a fraction of c-Jun through the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds or 15d-PGJ2-bonded dimers. Our results identify a novel site of interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with the AP-1 activation pathway that may contribute to the complex effects of cyclopentenone prostaglandins on the cellular response to pro-inflammatory agents. They also show the first evidence for the induction of protein cross-linking by 15d-PGJ2.

  1. Connectivity in river deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, P.; Hiatt, M. R.; Sendrowski, A.

    2016-12-01

    Deltas host approximately half a billion people and are rich in ecosystem diversity and economic resources. However, human-induced activities and climatic shifts are significantly impacting deltas around the world; anthropogenic disturbance, natural subsidence, and eustatic sea-level rise are major causes of threat to deltas and in many cases have compromised their safety and sustainability, putting at risk the people that live on them. In this presentation, I will introduce a framework called Delta Connectome for studying connectivity in river deltas based on different representations of a delta as a network. Here connectivity indicates both physical connectivity (how different portions of the system interact with each other) as well as conceptual (pathways of process coupling). I will explore several network representations and show how quantifying connectivity can advance our understanding of system functioning and can be used to inform coastal management and restoration. From connectivity considerations, the delta emerges as a leaky network that evolves over time and is characterized by continuous exchanges of fluxes of matter, energy, and information. I will discuss the implications of connectivity on delta functioning, land growth, and potential for nutrient removal.

  2. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  3. A simple and inexpensive point-of-care test for hepatitis B surface antigen detection: serological and molecular evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gish, R G; Gutierrez, J A; Navarro-Cazarez, N; Giang, K; Adler, D; Tran, B; Locarnini, S; Hammond, R; Bowden, S

    2014-12-01

    Early identification of chronic hepatitis B is important for optimal disease management and prevention of transmission. Cost and lack of access to commercial hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) immunoassays can compromise the effectiveness of HBV screening in resource-limited settings and among marginalized populations. High-quality point-of-care (POC) testing may improve HBV diagnosis in these situations. Currently available POC HBsAg assays are often limited in sensitivity. We evaluated the NanoSign(®) HBs POC chromatographic immunoassay for its ability to detect HBsAg of different genotypes and with substitutions in the 'a' determinant. Thirty-seven serum samples from patients with HBV infection, covering HBV genotypes A-G, were assessed for HBsAg titre with the Roche Elecsys HBsAg II quantification assay and with the POC assay. The POC assay reliably detected HBsAg at a concentration of at least 50 IU/mL for all genotypes, and at lower concentrations for some genotypes. Eight samples with substitutions in the HBV 'a' determinant were reliably detected after a 1/100 dilution. The POC strips were used to screen serum samples from 297 individuals at risk for HBV in local clinical settings (health fairs and outreach events) in parallel with commercial laboratory HBsAg testing (Quest Diagnostics EIA). POC testing was 73.7% sensitive and 97.8% specific for detection of HBsAg. Although the POC test demonstrated high sensitivity over a range of genotypes, false negatives were frequent in a clinical setting. Nevertheless, the POC assay offers advantages for testing in both developed and resource-limited countries due to its low cost (0.50$) and immediately available results. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus in blood donors from Burkina Faso: Prevalence of quasi-subgenotype A3, genotype E, and mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Candotti, Daniel; Diarra, Birama; Bisseye, Cyrille; Tao, Issoufou; Pham Quang, Kei; Sanou, Mahamoudou; Laperche, Syria; Sanogo, Rokia; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-12-01

    Burkina Faso is a highly endemic area for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) which remains a major challenge for blood safety with >13% of candidate blood donors being chronically infected. However, little is known about the molecular epidemiology of the viral strains currently circulating. In this study, 99 HBV strains from HBsAg positive candidate blood donors in Ougadougou were genetically characterized by sequencing the pre-S/S region of the viral genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a 25% prevalence of HBV quasi-subgenotype A3 (A3QS ) co-circulating with the confirmed dominant HBV genotype E (72%). HBV/A3QS sequences formed a sub-cluster closely related to West-African sequences previously characterized, and showed a low intra-group genetic diversity (0.75%) suggesting a relatively recent spreading of HBV/A3QS strains in Burkina Faso. Low genetic diversity of genotype E strains compared to A3QS was confirmed. Mixed infections with the two genotypes were identified in 3% of the donors tested and contributed to artifacts during PCR amplification of the viral genome leading to erroneous apparent intergenotype recombinant sequences. While the co-circulation of two HBV genotypes in a restricted area may favor the emergence of intergenotype recombinant variants, strictly controlled molecular experimental procedures should be used to accurately characterize HBV circulating recombinant forms. J. Med. Virol. 88:2145-2156, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Molecular simulations illuminate the role of regulatory components of the RNA polymerase from the hepatitis C virus in influencing protein structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brittny C; Thorpe, Ian F

    2013-07-02

    The RNA polymerase (gene product NS5B) from the hepatitis C virus is responsible for replication of the viral genome and is a validated drug target for new therapeutic agents. NS5B has a structure resembling an open right hand (containing the fingers, palm, and thumb subdomains), a hydrophobic C-terminal region, and two magnesium ions coordinated in the palm domain. Biochemical data suggest that the magnesium ions provide structural stability and are directly involved in catalysis, while the C-terminus plays a regulatory role in NS5B function. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms by which these two features regulate polymerase activity remain unclear. To answer this question, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of NS5B variants with different C-terminal lengths in the presence or absence of magnesium ions to determine the impact on enzyme properties. We observed that metal binding increases both the magnitude and the degree of correlated enzyme motions. In contrast, we observed that the C-terminus restricts enzyme dynamics. Under certain conditions, our simulations revealed a fully closed conformation of NS5B that may facilitate de novo initiation of RNA replication. This knowledge is important because it fosters the development of a comprehensive description of RNA replication by NS5B and is relevant to understanding the functional properties of a broad class of related RNA polymerases such as 3D-pol from poliovirus. Ultimately, this information may also be pertinent to designing novel NS5B therapeutics.

  6. Autoimmune manifestations in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2013-01-01

    Infections by the viruses responsible for hepatitis B, C and D are accompanied by a number of immunopathological manifestations. A link between infection and autoimmunity is particularly well documented for the hepatitis C virus. Immunopathological manifestations range from production of autoantibodies to overt autoimmune disease, including thyroiditis and autoimmune hepatitis, and to immune-complex-mediated disorders, including cryoglobulinaemia, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. Several of these manifestations improve with successful antiviral treatment, directly incriminating the virus in their pathogenesis. Mechanisms considered responsible for hepatitis virus-related immunopathology, including molecular mimicry, impairment of regulatory T cells and activation of B lymphocytes, will be examined in this review.

  7. Hepatitis virus C infection, adipokines and hepatic steato-fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ciurtin, Coziana; Stoica, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is accompanied by various serum alterations that could explain its molecular impact on hepatic structure and metabolic homeostasis. Recently it has been shown that adipocytokines play a pivotal role in development of hepatic steato-fibrosis, different studies giving a support of the hypothesis that the balance of adipocytokine expression is a key regulator for the progression of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. The association between insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus genotypes and liver fibrosis stage foreshadowed that virus-induced insulin resistance may be a mechanism for fibrogenesis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The main importance of adipocytokine profile detection consists in the prediction of steatosis induction that has clinical relevance, being associated with advanced fibrosis and hyporesponsiveness to antiviral therapy.

  8. HEPATITIS VIRUS C INFECTION, ADIPOKINES AND HEPATIC STEATO–FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ciurtin, C

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is accompanied by various serum alterations that could explain its molecular impact on hepatic structure and metabolic homeostasis. Recently it has been shown that adipocytokines play a pivotal role in development of hepatic steato–fibrosis, different studies giving a support of the hypothesis that the balance of adipocytokine expression is a key regulator for the progression of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. The association between insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus genotypes and liver fibrosis stage foreshadowed that virus–induced insulin resistance may be a mechanism for fibrogenesis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The main importance of adipocytokine profile detection consists in the prediction of steatosis induction that has clinical relevance, being associated with advanced fibrosis and hyporesponsiveness to antiviral therapy. PMID:20108479

  9. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  10. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Causes This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference ... inflammation, or hepatitis, may occur along with other autoimmune diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid ...

  11. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  12. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics National ... with hepatitis B need to be on treatment. Choosing the right time for hepatitis B treatment is ...

  13. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  14. Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome (HHH) presenting with acute fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Mhanni, A A; Chan, A; Collison, M; Seifert, B; Lehotay, D C; Sokoro, Ah; Huynh, H Q; Greenberg, C R

    2008-03-01

    We report on two Aboriginal patients with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome. Both presented with acute hepatic failure with severe hypertransaminasemia and coagulopathy, prompting evaluation for emergent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of HHH syndrome was based on the presence of typical metabolic abnormalities. A protein-restricted diet and L-arginine or L-citrulline supplementation were immediately started, with rapid normalization of liver function test results and other biochemical abnormalities. Molecular analysis of the SLC25A15 gene showed that the two patients were homozygous for the common French Canadian mutation (F188Delta). The diagnosis of HHH syndrome should be considered in patients with unexplained fulminant hepatic failure. There does not appear to be a genotype-phenotype correlation for this presentation, inasmuch as the only other reported patient presenting with this picture had two different point mutations. Early identification and prompt treatment of these patients is crucial to avoid liver transplantation and can be life saving.

  15. Diagnosis of hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong Eun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health problems leading to severe liver disease such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV is a circular, partly double-stranded DNA virus with various serological markers: hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HBs, anti-HBc IgM and IgG, and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and anti-HBe. It is transmitted by sexual, parenteral and vertical route. One significant method to diminish the burden of this disease is timely diagnosis of acute, chronic and occult cases of HBV. First step of HBV diagnosis is achieved by using serological markers for detecting antigens and antibodies. In order to verify first step of diagnosis, to quantify viral load and to identify genotypes, quantitative or qualitative molecular tests are used. In this article, the serological and molecular tests for diagnosis of HBV infection will be reviewed. PMID:27761442

  16. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  17. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  18. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  19. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  20. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  1. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  2. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  3. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-10-13

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  4. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  5. Nonpeptidic delta (delta) opioid agonists and antagonists of the diarylmethylpiperazine class: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Calderon, Silvia N

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the selective delta (delta) opioid agonists SNC 80 and BW373U86, which possess a diarylmethylpiperazine structure unique among opioids, represented a major advance in the field of delta-opioid ligands. Extensive research has recently been performed to uncover the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of this class of ligands, thereby providing valuable tools for the pharmacological characterization of the delta opioid receptor. This review focuses on the SAR of this unique series of ligands, and provides an overview of the various chemical routes that have been developed and optimized through the years to allow the syntheses of these ligands on a multigram scale. The search for selective delta opioid agonists and antagonists, as well as for those with mixed opioid agonist properties with potential therapeutic value, continues. Several questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of diphenylmethylpiperazine derivatives and related analogs with opioid receptors and in particular with the delta opioid system still remain unanswered. Indeed, the development and pharmacological characterization of novel nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands remains an active area of research, as it may provide a better understanding of the role of this receptor in multiple disease states and disorders.

  6. Hepatitis viruses exploitation of host DNA methyltransferases functions.

    PubMed

    Pazienza, Valerio; Panebianco, Concetta; Andriulli, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Delta (HDV) infections are a global health burden. With different routes of infection and biology, HBV, HCV and HDV are capable to induce liver cirrhosis and cancer by impinging on epigenetic mechanisms altering host cell's pathways. In the present manuscript, we reviewed the published studies taking into account the relationship between the hepatitis viruses and the DNA methyltransferases proteins.

  7. Molecular characterization of woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2 and their expression in woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qi; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Qin; Li, Fanghui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Junzhong; Lu, Yinping; Liu, Jia; Wu, Jun; Zheng, Xin; Lu, Mengji; Wang, Baoju; Yang, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    IFI16 and AIM2 are important DNA sensors in antiviral immunity. To characterize these two molecules in a woodchuck model, which is widely used to study hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, we cloned and analyzed the complete coding sequences (CDSs) of woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2, and found that AIM2 was highly conserved in mammals, whereas the degree of sequence identity between woodchuck IFI16 and its mammalian orthologues was low. IFI16 and IFN-β were upregulated following VACV ds 70 mer transfection, while AIM2 and IL-1β were upregulated following poly (dA:dT) transfection, both in vitro and in vivo; IFI16-targeted siRNA decreased the transcription of IFI16 and IFN-β stimulated by VACV ds 70 mer, and AIM2 siRNA interference downregulated AIM2 and IL-1β transcripts stimulated by poly (dA:dT), in vitro, suggesting that woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2 may play pivotal roles in the DNA-mediated induction of IFN-β and IL-1β, respectively. IFI16 and AIM2 transcripts were upregulated in the liver and spleen following acute WHV infection, while IFI16 was downregulated in the liver following chronic infection, implying that IFI16 and AIM2 may be involved in WHV infection. These data provide the basis for the study of IFI16- and AIM2-mediated innate immunity using the woodchuck model. PMID:27354260

  8. Molecular characterization of woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2 and their expression in woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV).

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Qin; Li, Fanghui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Junzhong; Lu, Yinping; Liu, Jia; Wu, Jun; Zheng, Xin; Lu, Mengji; Wang, Baoju; Yang, Dongliang

    2016-06-29

    IFI16 and AIM2 are important DNA sensors in antiviral immunity. To characterize these two molecules in a woodchuck model, which is widely used to study hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, we cloned and analyzed the complete coding sequences (CDSs) of woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2, and found that AIM2 was highly conserved in mammals, whereas the degree of sequence identity between woodchuck IFI16 and its mammalian orthologues was low. IFI16 and IFN-β were upregulated following VACV ds 70 mer transfection, while AIM2 and IL-1β were upregulated following poly (dA:dT) transfection, both in vitro and in vivo; IFI16-targeted siRNA decreased the transcription of IFI16 and IFN-β stimulated by VACV ds 70 mer, and AIM2 siRNA interference downregulated AIM2 and IL-1β transcripts stimulated by poly (dA:dT), in vitro, suggesting that woodchuck IFI16 and AIM2 may play pivotal roles in the DNA-mediated induction of IFN-β and IL-1β, respectively. IFI16 and AIM2 transcripts were upregulated in the liver and spleen following acute WHV infection, while IFI16 was downregulated in the liver following chronic infection, implying that IFI16 and AIM2 may be involved in WHV infection. These data provide the basis for the study of IFI16- and AIM2-mediated innate immunity using the woodchuck model.

  9. An Effective Molecular Target Site in Hepatitis B Virus S Gene for Cas9 Cleavage and Mutational Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Guangze; Du, Xinying; Du, Juan; Zhan, Linsheng; Li, Peng; Yang, Chaojie; Qi, Lihua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoxia; Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Xu, Dongping; Tong, Yigang; Zhou, Yusen; Zhou, Jianjun; Sun, Yansong; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection remains incurable because HBV cccDNA can persist indefinitely in patients recovering from acute HBV infection. Given the incidence of HBV infection and the shortcomings of current therapeutic options, a novel antiviral strategy is urgently needed. To inactivate HBV replication and destroy the HBV genome, we employed genome editing tool CRISPR/Cas9. Specifically, we found a CRISPR/Cas9 system (gRNA-S4) that effectively targeted the HBsAg region and could suppress efficiently viral replication with minimal off-target effects and impact on cell viability. The mutation mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in HBV DNA both in a stable HBV-producing cell line and in HBV transgenic mice had been confirmed and evaluated using deep sequencing. In addition, we demonstrated the reduction of HBV replication was caused by the mutation of S4 site through three S4 region-mutated monoclonal cells. Besides, the gRNA-S4 system could also reduce serum surface-antigen levels by 99.91 ± 0.05% and lowered serum HBV DNA level below the negative threshold in the HBV hydrodynamics mouse model. Together, these findings indicate that the S4 region may be an ideal target for the development of innovative therapies against HBV infection using CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27570484

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease▿

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance. PMID:21507982

  12. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus isolates from Goiânia, Gioás, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fiaccadori, Fabíola Souza; Pereira, Maristela; Coelho, Alexandre Siqueira Guedes; Borges, Ana Maria Tavares; Parente, Juliana Alves; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Cardoso, Divina das Dôres de Paula

    2008-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is a public health problem worldwide and the virus has been classified into six genotypes. In Brazil, the only genotype that has been found is genotype I, predominately from subgenotype IA. Here, the HAV genotypes were analyzed of 18 isolates circulating between 1996-2001 in Goiânia, state of Goiás, Brazil. Viral RNA was extracted from 18 serum samples and amplified (RT-PCR/nested-PCR), followed by the genomic sequencing of the VP1/2A junction region of the HAV genome. Sequences of 168 nucleotides were compared and analyzed using the BLAST N, Clustal X and PAUP v. 4.10b programs. All samples were classified as genotype I, with 10 belonging to subgenotype IA and eight to subgenotype IB. The subgenotype IA isolates showed greater diversity than the subgenotype IB isolates at the nucleotide level. Elevated identity values were found between isolates obtained in this study and those from other regions of the world, including Brazil, highlighting the high conservation among different isolates of this virus. However, changes in the HAV subgenotype circulation could also be observed during the evaluated period.

  13. Molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus and a 9-year clinical profile in a patient infected with genotype I.

    PubMed

    Osiowy, Carla; Kaita, Kelly; Solar, Kaarina; Mendoza, Kenneth

    2010-05-01

    An unusual hepatitis B virus (HBV) variant, assigned provisionally to genotype I, was recently reported, characterized by an anomalous genotyping pattern and putative recombination; however, the natural history of this unusual strain is unknown. This study analyzed longitudinal sera collected over a 9-year period from a patient infected with this variant to investigate the clinical profile and intrahost viral evolution over time. The patient, who had immigrated to Canada in 1998 from Vietnam, was treated with lamivudine in 2000. Approximately 4-5 years following the withdrawal of lamivudine therapy, a genomic "shift" occurred coincident with ALT flares and increasing HBV viral load, resulting in numerous stable nucleotide substitutions within the core coding region, suggesting altered immune control that may provide a selective advantage to the virus. Analysis of quasispecies diversity over time demonstrated further this shift, with two sequence clusters associated with time points either prior to or following relapse observed, including increased diversity among quasispecies prior to relapse. In keeping with the complex nature of genotype I strains, majority population genomes had a mean genetic distance from genotype C of 7.6 +/- 0.1%, although large genomic segments lacked significant homology with any HBV genotype. Further study is needed to understand the evolutionary origin and natural history of infection with this unique HBV variant. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of in-house and commercial genotyping assays for molecular typing of hepatitis C virus in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lam, T H J; Cheng, R S; Lai, S T; Tsang, T Y; Cheng, V C C; Ho, S L; Yam, W C

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate genotyping assays for hepatitis C virus (HCV). An in-house nucleic acid sequencing method is performed in parallel with the Roche Linear Array HCV genotyping test on 73 HCV-positive (66 clinical samples and seven proficiency testing quality control samples) and 12 HCV-negative samples (11 clinical samples and one proficiency testing sample). The performance of the in-house method was comparable with that of the Roche assay (concordance rate: 89.4%). Discordant results included four mixed infections missed by the in-house method, two false-negatives with the Roche assay, and three discrepant results. The in-house method exhibited a higher resolution (subtype vs. genotype level) at a lower running cost (25% of the commercial assay). The in-house method was also used to genotype 375 HCV clinical isolates to determine the genotypic distribution of HCV in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2008. A total of 441 (52.8%) clinical isolates proved to be genotype 1, which shows a poorer response to interferon therapy. Genotype 6 was the next most common (32.0%). Prevalence of genotypes 2 and 3 was 7.7% and 6.6%, respectively, and prevalence of genotypes 4 and 5 was 0.9% and 0%, respectively. Although the in-house nucleic acid sequencing method failed to detect a few cases of mixed HCV infection, its high resolution and low running cost make it suitable for surveillance and outbreak investigation.

  15. Delta in Terra Cimmeria

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    This unnamed crater in northern Terra Cimmeria has a small channel that created a delta feature. Such features are important indicators of liquid water in Mars past as shown in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey.

  16. Enzyme system generation of singlet (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/) molecular oxygen observed directly by 1. 0-1. 8-. mu. m luminescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.U.

    1983-01-01

    The observation of a strong singlet molecular oxygen luminescence emission in the ir produced in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by the enzymes lactoperoxidase, catalase, and chloroperoxidase is reported. A mixture of H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O was used as a reaction media. The luminescence emission spectra of the lactoperoxidase/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and chloroperoxidase/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ were found to exhibit a single emission band at 1.28 ..mu..m for the former and three bands for the latter - a strong band at 1.30 ..mu..m and a possible weak band extending from the long-wavelength edge of the monochromator at 1.60 to 1.45 ..mu..m. The peak at 1.28 ..mu..m is absent in the catalase/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ spectrum, but the peak at 1.64 ..mu..m is very evident. The spectra are interpreted as indicating the generation of free singlet oxygen (peak at 1.28 and 1.30 ..mu..m) in the case of the first two enzymes/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ systems and the generation of predominately bound singlet molecular oxygen in the case of catalase/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  17. Viral hepatitis in hemodialysis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bernieh, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis outbreaks in hemodialysis (HD) patients and staff were reported in the late 1960s, and a number of hepatotropic viruses transmitted by blood and other body fluids have been identified. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) was the first significant hepatotropic virus to be identified in HD centers. HBV infection has been effectively controlled by active vaccination, screening of blood donors, the use of erythropoietin and segregation of HBV carriers. Hepatitis delta virus is a defective virus that can only infect HBV-positive individuals. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most significant cause of non-A, non-B hepatitis and is mainly transmitted by blood transfusion. The introduction in 1990 of routine screening of blood donors for HCV contributed significantly to the control of HCV transmission. An effective HCV vaccine remains an unsolved challenge; however, pegylation of interferon-alfa has made it possible to treat HCV-positive dialysis patients. Unexplained sporadic outbreaks of hepatitis by the mid-1990s prompted the discovery of hepatitis G virus, hepatitis GB virus C and the TT virus. The vigilant observation of guidelines on universal precaution and regular virologic testing are the cornerstones of the effective control of chronic hepatitis in the setting of HD. Major recent advances in the viral diagnosis technology and the development of new oral, direct-acting antiviral agents allow early diagnosis and better therapeutic response. The current update will review the recent developments, controversies and new treatment of viral hepatitis in HD patients. PMID:27847896

  18. Federal Funding in the Delta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.; Calhoun, Samuel D.

    2002-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi Delta region, especially the rural Delta, faces many economic challenges. The rural Delta has received much federal aid in basic income support and funding for human resource development, but less for community resource programs, which are important for economic development. Federal aid to the Delta is analyzed in terms of…

  19. A molecular epidemiological study of the hepatitis B virus in Thailand after 22 years of universal immunization.

    PubMed

    Yimnoi, Parichat; Posuwan, Nawarat; Wanlapakorn, Nasamon; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects an estimated two billion people worldwide. Since 1992, Thailand implemented universal HBV vaccination as part of the expanded program on immunization (EPI) for newborns. This study aims to compare genotypes and characterize HBV by assessing pre-S/S and basic core promoter (BCP)/precore (PC) mutations in populations born before and after EPI implementation. A nationwide serosurvey conducted in 2014 assessed the impact of universal HBV vaccination in Thailand. Two cohort groups were established based on whether they were born before or after 1992. HBV DNA was amplified from HBsAg positive samples by PCR and sequenced. HBV genotypes, pre-S/S regions, and BCP/PC mutations were characterized. From a total of 5,964 subjects, there were 2,805 (47.0%) and 3,159 (53.0%) individuals who were born before and after EPI implementation, respectively. The overall prevalence of HBsAg was 2.2%. The prevalence of HBsAg was significantly higher in the before EPI group (4.3%) than in the after EPI group (0.3%) (P < 0.001). HBV DNA was detected in 119 samples; 111 HBV-positive samples (93%) were genotype C (subgenotype C1). The "a" determinant mutation was only detected in the "before EPI" group. Twenty-two years after implementation of the EPI program, the HBV carrier rate is significantly reduced. The most prevalent genotype for the remaining HBV was C1. The "vaccine escape" mutant, especially the "a" determinant, was not detected after the launch of the EPI program, and the current HBV vaccine remains highly effective.

  20. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovey, J; Hershberger, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV),Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  1. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian.

    PubMed

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovy, Jan; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-07

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  2. Molecular characterization of the Hepatitis B virus genotypes in Colombia: a Bayesian inference on the genotype F.

    PubMed

    Alvarado Mora, Mónica Viviana; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutierrez, Maria Fernanda; Botelho, Livia; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a worldwide health problem affecting about 2 billion people and more than 350 million are chronic carriers of the virus. Nine HBV genotypes (A to I) have been described. The geographical distribution of HBV genotypes is not completely understood due to the limited number of samples from some parts of the world. One such example is Colombia, in which few studies have described the HBV genotypes. In this study, we characterized HBV genotypes in 143 HBsAg-positive volunteer blood donors from Colombia. A fragment of 1306 bp partially comprising HBsAg and the DNA polymerase coding regions (S/POL) was amplified and sequenced. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were conducted using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to obtain the maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree using BEAST v.1.5.3. Of all samples, 68 were positive and 52 were successfully sequenced. Genotype F was the most prevalent in this population (77%) - subgenotypes F3 (75%) and F1b (2%). Genotype G (7.7%) and subgenotype A2 (15.3%) were also found. Genotype G sequence analysis suggests distinct introductions of this genotype in the country. Furthermore, we estimated the time of the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for each HBV/F subgenotype and also for Colombian F3 sequences using two different datasets: (i) 77 sequences comprising 1306 bp of S/POL region and (ii) 283 sequences comprising 681 bp of S/POL region. We also used two other previously estimated evolutionary rates: (i) 2.60 × 10(-4)s/s/y and (ii) 1.5 × 10(-5)s/s/y. Here we report the HBV genotypes circulating in Colombia and estimated the TMRCA for the four different subgenotypes of genotype F.

  3. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  4. Low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a prospective phase II study.

    PubMed

    Forrest, D L; Thompson, K; Dorcas, V G; Couban, S H; Pierce, R

    2003-06-01

    We evaluated 40 patients undergoing high-dose chemo/radiotherapy (HDCT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (allogeneic (22), autologous (18)) to determine the safety and feasibility of administering low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) as hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) prophylaxis. Patients received a once daily subcutaneous injection of dalteparin 2500 anti-Xa i.u. commencing the day prior to starting HDCT, and continuing until day +30 post HSCT or hospital discharge, whichever came first. Dosage adjustments were made for patients developing renal failure. All bleeding episodes were recorded and graded and VOD was diagnosed and graded according to Seattle criteria. At 100 days of follow-up, the overall survival and probability of regimen-related mortality were 85 and 15%, respectively. Nine patients developed VOD. The probability of developing VOD post allogeneic and autologous HSCT was 28% (95% CI, 6-45) and 17% (95% CI, 0-32), respectively. VOD was graded as moderate (n=8) and severe (n=1). VOD resolved in all cases except for one patient who died secondary to severe VOD and multiorgan failure. Clinically significant bleeding episodes occurred in three patients; 24 patients developed minor bleeding not requiring specific therapy. All bleeding episodes resolved. These results suggest that LMWH for VOD prophylaxis is safe with a low incidence of serious bleeding events. Whether it is superior to unfractionated heparin, however, is unknown and should be addressed within the context of a randomized controlled trial.

  5. Stability, orientation and position preference of the stem region (residues 689-703) in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Jusoh, Siti Azma

    2013-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) play an important role in the virus assembly and initial entry into host cells. Conserved charged residues of the E2 transmembrane (TM) domain were shown to be responsible for the heterodimerization with envelope glycoprotein E1. Despite intensive research on both envelope glycoproteins, the structural information is still not fully understood. Recent findings have revealed that the stem (ST) region of E2 also functions in the initial stage of the viral life cycle. We have previously shown the effect of the conserved charged residues on the TM helix monomer of E2. Here, we extended the model of the TM domain by adding the adjacent ST segment. Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were performed for the E2 amphiphilic segment of the ST region connected to the putative TM domain (residues 683-746). Structural conformation and behavior are studied and compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-derived segment of E2 ( 2KQZ.pdb). We observed that the central helix of the ST region (residues 689 - 703) remained stable as a helix in-plane to the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the TM domain appeared to provide minimal contribution to the structural stability of the amphipathic region. This study also provides insight into the orientation and positional preferences of the ST segment with respect to the membrane lipid-water interface. PMID:24555044

  6. Molecular analysis of Hepatitis B virus sub-genotypes and incidence of preS1/preS2 region mutations in HBV-infected Egyptian patients from Mansoura.

    PubMed

    El-Mowafy, Mohammed; Elgaml, Abdelaziz; El-Mesery, Mohamed; Elegezy, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major causes of viral hepatitis worldwide. Despite the prevalence of HBV infection in Egypt, few studies have focused on sub-genotyping of the virus. Moreover, no studies are available regarding the mutational analysis of the preS1/preS2 region of the viral genome, or its impact on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in Egypt. In this study, we have analyzed the sub-genotypes and incidence of mutations in the preS1/preS2 region of HBV present in HBV-infected patients, from Mansoura city (located in the center of Nile Delta region of Egypt), via partial sequencing of this specific region. Moreover, we have investigated the impact of these mutations on HCC development by measuring serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level and abdominal ultrasound examination of the HBV-infected patients. According to our results, all samples were genotype D in which sub-genotype D1 was predominant. In addition, the results revealed mutations in the preS1/preS2 region, which could result in either immature preS1 protein or completely inhibit the translation of the preS2 protein. However, there was no incidence of HCC development in patients infected with mutated HBV in the preS1/preS2 region. In summary, for the first time our work has proved the predominance of sub-genotype D1 among HBV-infected Egyptian patients in Mansoura city, Nile Delta region, Egypt, and incidence of mutations in the preS1/preS2 region of HBV genome. This current study opens up research opportunities to discuss the impact of HBV mutations on the development of HCC in Egypt. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Molecular and structural changes related to hepatitis E virus antigen and its expression in testis inducing apoptosis in Mongolian gerbil model.

    PubMed

    Soomro, M H; Shi, R; She, R; Yang, Y; Wang, T; Wu, Q; Li, H; Hao, W

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been associated with a wide range of extrahepatic manifestations, so this study was designed to examine the effect and role of HEV on structural and molecular changes in the testicular tissues of Mongolian gerbils experimentally infected with swine HEV. HEV RNA was first detected in testis at 14 days post-inoculation and reached a peak between 28 and 42 days later with viral load between 3.12 and 6.23 logs/g by PCR assays. Changes including vacuolation, sloughing of germ cells, formation of multinuclear giant cells, degeneration, necrosis of tubules and damaged blood-testis barrier were observed through transmission electron microscopy. HEV ORF2 antigen was detected in the sperm cell cytoplasm along with decrease in relative protein of zonula occludens-1 through immunohistochemistry. HEV ORF3 antigen and ZO-1 protein were detectable by Western blotting. Lower (P<.05) serum testosterone and higher (P<.05) blood urea nitrogen level was observed in inoculated Mongolian gerbils. Likewise, increased (P<.05) germ cell apoptosis rate was detected with significant increased expression of Fas-L and Fas in HEV-inoculated groups at each time points. Up-regulation (P<.05 or P<.01) in mRNA level of Fas-L, Fas, Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 was observed in HEV RNA-positive testes. Our study demonstrated that after experimental inoculation, HEV can be detected in testis tissues and viral proteins produce structural and molecular changes that in turn disrupt the blood-testis barrier and induce germ cell apoptosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the hepatic erythropoietin expression during acute-phase response: a role for IL-6.

    PubMed

    Ramadori, Pierluigi; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2010-09-01

    The source of circulating erythropoietin (EPO), the mediators and the mechanisms involved in the upregulation of EPO gene expression during acute-phase reaction are still poorly understood. Acute-phase reaction was induced by either intramuscular turpentine oil (TO) or intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration into wild-type and interleukin (IL)-6 knockout (KO) mice. Animals were killed at different time points and blood, liver and muscle tissue were collected. Serum levels of EPO were measured by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay; liver and injured muscle samples were processed for RNA isolation and for protein analysis. EPO, hypoxia-inducible factors 1alpha and 2alpha (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha) mRNA were analyzed by RT-PCR and the protein levels were analyzed by western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha localization was performed through immunofluorescence staining. EPO, HIF-1 and HIF-2 gene and protein expression levels were also analyzed in isolated mouse hepatocytes after stimulation with IL-6. In the wild-type animals, EPO serum levels increased dramatically at 12 h after the insults together with the hepatic gene expression. In TO-treated animals, the EPO gene expression reached an 8.2-fold increase at 12 h, and in LPS-treated mice a similar induction was recorded at 6 h (about 4.5-fold increase). In the IL-6KO strain, the upregulation after the inflammatory stimuli was much lower (only 2.0-fold increase). A progressive upregulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha was detectable until 6 h after the insults, but only HIF-1alpha upregulation was reduced in IL-6KO mice. In isolated hepatocytes, stimulation with a single dose of IL-6 induced a nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha, in parallel with an increase of EPO mRNA. No effect on HIF-2alpha expression was found. IL-6 appears to be the main regulator of EPO gene expression and a major contributor for HIF-1alpha induction in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells

  9. Molecular differentiation and pathogenicity of Aviadenoviruses isolated during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Hilda W; Aitchison, Henry; Maartens, Louis H; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-11-05

    Fowl adenovirus (FAdV) is a member of the genus Aviadenovirus and causes a number of economically important poultry diseases. One of these diseases, inclusion body hepatitis (IBH), has a worldwide distribution and is characterised by acute mortality (5% - 20%) in production chickens. The disease was first described in the United States of America in 1963 and has also been reported in Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, France and Ireland, but until now, not in South Africa. Adenoviruses isolated from the first outbreak of IBH in South Africa were able to reproduce the disease in chicken embryo livers. The aim of the present study was to characterise the viruses and determine the pathogenicity of the FAdV strains responsible for the first reported case of IBH in South Africa. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the L1 loop region of the fowl adenovirus hexon gene using degenerate primer pair hexon A/B was used to identify the viruses that were isolated. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the amplification products was used for the differentiation of 14 isolates of fowl adenovirus. Sequencing of the PCR products followed by amino acid comparison and phylogenetic analysis using the L1 loop region of the hexon protein was done to determine the identity of the isolates. Amino acid sequences of the hexon genes of all the South African isolates were compared with those of reference strains representing FAdV species. Amino acid comparison of 12 South Africa field isolates to FAdV reference strains revealed a high sequence identity (> 93.33%) with reference strains T8-A and 764. Two of the isolates had high sequence identity (93.40%) with reference strains P7-A, C2B and SR48. Phylogenetic analysis of the L1 loop region of the hexon protein of all 14 South African isolates was consistent with their RFLP clusters. The mortality rates of embryos challenged with 106 egg infective doses (EID50) FAdV 2 were 80% - 87% and mortality rates for

  10. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  11. Characteristics of hepatitis viruses among Egyptian children with acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ahmed; Yano, Yoshihiko; El-Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis viral infection is hyperendemic in Egypt, western Asia and Africa. However, little is known about the status of hepatitis viruses among rural Egyptian children. Therefore, this study sought to examine the prevalence and characteristics of hepatitis viruses among symptomatic Egyptian children. Serological and molecular analyses of hepatitis viral infection were conducted in 33 children hospitalised at Mansoura University with symptomatic hepatic dysfunction (mean ± standard deviation age, 9.7±3.4 years; alanine aminotransferase level, 130±68 IU/ml). Eleven children (33%) were positive for anti-haemagglutination-IgM and were diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti‑hepatitis C virus (HCV) were detected in 9 (27%) and 7 (21%) children, respectively, indicating acute-on-chronic infection with hepatitis viruses. None of the children was positive for anti‑hepatitis B core antigen-IgM. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that all HBVs belonged to genotype D (subgenotype D1) and that HCV belonged to genotypes 4a and 1g. HBV-DNA was detected in 9 children (27%) in the pre-S/S region and in 16 children (48%) in the core promoter/precore region. The Y134F amino acid mutation in the 'α' determinant region was detected in all of the patients. The A1762T/G1764A double mutation, and the T1846A and G1896A single mutations were common in children with occult HBV infection. In conclusion, hepatitis viral infection, including acute-on-chronic infection with HCV and HBV, is common in Egyptian children hospitalised with acute hepatitis.

  12. Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-11

    As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad stripe running northwest to southeast. This image was acquired on May 24, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03497

  13. Turbulent heat exchanger {Delta}T and {Delta}P

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-12-31

    Optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) in turbulent flow heat exchangers are presented in three frameworks: as quantitatively defined by fluid properties, the value of energy and the cost of heat exchange surface (with a little help from a relationship between [power/mass] and heat transfer); as the energy cost for heat recovery (with the {Delta}T cost being about equal to the heat exchanger cost and the {Delta}P cost being about 1/3 as great); and as the second law lost work inherent in heat exchange (with the {Delta}T loss being {approximately}3 times the {Delta}T loss).

  14. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms of hepatitis C virus infection? Hepatitis C virus infection causes signs and symptoms similar to those of hepatitis B virus infection. It also can cause no symptoms. Unlike hepatitis B virus infection, most ...

  15. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  16. Molecular epidemiology of a hepatitis C virus epidemic in a haemodialysis unit: outbreak investigation and infection outcome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HCV is a leading cause of liver chronic diseases all over the world. In developed countries the highest prevalence of infection is reported among intravenous drug users and haemodialysis (HD) patients. The present report is to identify the pathway of HCV transmission during an outbreak of HCV infection in a privately run haemodialysis (HD) unit in Italy in 2005. Methods Dynamics of the outbreak and infection clinical outcomes were defined through an ambi-directional cohort study. Molecular epidemiology techniques were used to define the relationships between the viral variants infecting the patients and confirm the outbreak. Risk analysis and auditing procedures were carried out to define the transmission pathway(s). Results Of the 50 patients treated in the HD unit 5 were already anti-HCV positive and 13 became positive during the study period (AR = 28.9%). Phylogenic analysis identified that, all the molecularly characterized incident cases (10 out of 13), were infected with the same viral variant of one of the prevalent cases. The multivariate analysis and the auditing procedure disclosed a single event of multi-dose vials heparin contamination as the cause of transmission of the infection in 11 out of the 13 incident cases; 2 additional incident cases occurred possibly as a result of inappropriate risk management. Discussion More than 30% of all HCV infections in developed countries results from poor application of standard precautions during percutaneous procedures. Comprehensive strategy which included: educational programmes, periodical auditing on standard precaution, use of single-dose vials whenever possible, prospective surveillance for blood-borne infections (including a system of prompt notification) and risk assessment/management dedicated staff are the cornerstone to contain and prevent outbreaks in HD Conclusions The outbreak described should serve as a reminder to HD providers that patients undergoing dialysis are at risk for HCV

  17. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  18. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B is ... their exposures. Map 3-04. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among adults PDF Version (printable) ...

  19. Ganges River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ganges River forms an extensive delta where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. The delta is largely covered with a swamp forest known as the Sunderbans, which is home to the Royal Bengal Tiger. It is also home to most of Bangladesh, one of the world's most densely populated countries. Roughly 120 million people live on the Ganges Delta under threat of repeated catastrophic floods due to heavy runoff of meltwater from the Himalayas, and due to the intense rainfall during the monsoon season. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on February 28, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using green, infrared, and blue wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  20. Zambezi River Delta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    It drains a watershed that spans eight countries and nearly 1.6 million square kilometers 600,000 square miles. The Zambezi also Zambeze is the fourth largest river in Africa, and the largest east-flowing waterway. The Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this natural-color image of the Zambezi Delta on August 29, 2013. Sandbars and barrier spits stretch across the mouths of the delta, and suspended sediment extends tens of kilometers out into the sea. The sandy outflow turns the coastal waters to a milky blue-green compared to the deep blue of open water in the Indian Ocean. The Zambezi Delta includes 230 kilometers of coastline fronting 18,000 square kilometers (7,00 square miles) of swamps, floodplains, and even savannahs (inland). The area has long been prized by subsistence fishermen and farmers, who find fertile ground for crops like sugar and fertile waters for prawns and fish. Two species of endangered cranes and one of the largest concentration of buffalo in Africa -- among many other species of wildlife -- have found a haven in this internationally recognized wetland. However, the past six decades have brought great changes to the Zambezi Delta, which used to pour more water and sediment off of the continent. Hydropower dams upstream-most prominently, the Kariba and the Cahora Bassa-greatly reduce river flows during the wet season; they also trap sediments that would otherwise flow downstream. The result has been less water reaching the delta and the floodplains, which rely on pulses of nutrients and sediments from annual (and mostly benign) natural flooding. The change in the flow of the river affects freshwater availability and quality in the delta. Strong flows push fresh water further out into the sea and naturally keep most of a delta full of fresh (or mostly fresh) water. When that fresh flow eases, the wetlands become drier and more prone to fire. Salt water from the Indian Ocean also can penetrate further into the marsh

  1. The Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer was acquired on June 3, 2002. The fertile land along the Nile River supports lush green vegetation, amid the desert landscape. At its delta at the Mediterranean Sea, the Nile broadens into a large fan-shaped delta. All of Egypt's large cities fall along the Nile, which sustains life in a region of scant rainfall. At the point where the river widens into the delta, a grayish cluster of pixels marks the location of Cairo. To the east is the Sinai Peninsula, whose impermanent water courses create silvery streaks on the pale brown, arid landscape. At lower right is the Red Sea. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Adipocytokines and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Anania, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome pose significant risk for progression of many types of chronic illnesses, including liver disease. Hormones released from adipocytes, adipocytokines, associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, have been shown to control hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis is the final common pathway that can result in cirrhosis, and can ultimately require liver transplantation. Initially, two key adipocytokines, leptin and adiponectin, appeared to control many fundamental aspects of the cell and molecular biology related to hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Leptin appears to act as a profibrogenic molecule while adiponectin possesses strong-anti-fibrotic properties. In this review, we emphasize pertinent data associated with these, and recently discovered, adipocytokines that may drive or halt the fibrogenic response in the liver. PMID:25656826

  3. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  4. Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Recognition of Hepatitis C Virus Transmitted/Founder Variants by RIG-I Is Dependent on U-Core Length

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Marcotrigiano, Joe; Shaw, George M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs against hepatitis C virus (HCV), infection remains a major public health concern because DAA therapeutics do not prevent reinfection and patients can still progress to chronic liver disease. Chronic HCV infection is supported by a variety of viral immune evasion strategies, but, remarkably, 20% to 30% of acute infections spontaneously clear prior to development of adaptive immune responses, thus implicating innate immunity in resolving acute HCV infection. However, the virus-host interactions regulating acute infection are unknown. Transmission of HCV involves one or a few transmitted/founder (T/F) variants. In infected hepatocytes, the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) protein recognizes 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) of the HCV RNA and a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motif located within the 3′ untranslated region consisting of poly-U/UC. PAMP binding activates RIG-I to induce innate immune signaling and type 1 interferon antiviral defenses. HCV poly-U/UC sequences can differ in length and complexity, suggesting that PAMP diversity in T/F genomes could regulate innate immune control of acute HCV infection. Using 14 unique poly-U/UC sequences from HCV T/F genomes recovered from acute-infection patients, we tested whether RIG-I recognition and innate immune activation correlate with PAMP sequence characteristics. We show that T/F variants are recognized by RIG-I in a manner dependent on length of the U-core motif of the poly-U/UC PAMP and are recognized by RIG-I to induce innate immune responses that restrict acute infection. PAMP recognition of T/F HCV variants by RIG-I may therefore impart innate immune signaling and HCV restriction to impact acute-phase-to-chronic-phase transition. IMPORTANCE Recognition of nonself molecular patterns such as those seen with viral nucleic acids is an essential step in triggering the immune response to virus infection. Innate immunity is

  5. Grain challenge affects systemic and hepatic molecular biomarkers of inflammation, stress, and metabolic responses to a greater extent in Holstein than Jersey cows.

    PubMed

    Xu, T; Cardoso, F C; Pineda, A; Trevisi, E; Shen, X; Rosa, F; Osorio, J S; Loor, J J

    2017-08-30

    Long-term feeding of high-grain diets to dairy cows often results in systemic inflammation characterized by alterations in acute-phase proteins and other biomarkers, both in plasma and immune-responsive tissues like the liver. The molecular and systemic changes that characterize an acute grain feeding challenge remain unclear. The current study involved 6 Holstein and 6 Jersey cows in a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square. Periods (10 d) were divided into 4 stages (S): S1, d 1 to 3, served as baseline with total mixed ration (TMR) ad libitum; S2, d 4, served as restricted feeding, with cows offered 50% of the average daily intake observed in S1; S3, d 5, a grain challenge was performed, in which cows were fed a TMR ad libitum without (CON) or with an additional pellet wheat-barley (1:1; HIG) at 20% of dry matter intake top-dressed onto the TMR; S4, d 6 to 10, served as recovery during which cows were allowed ad libitum access to the TMR. Among the 28 biomarkers analyzed in blood 12 h after grain challenge on d 5, the concentrations of fatty acids and bilirubin increased in HIG Holstein but not Jersey cows. In Holsteins, feeding HIG also increased total protein and albumin while decreasing ceruloplasmin, myeloperoxidase, and alkaline phosphatase concentrations. At the molecular level, hepatic genes associated with inflammation (IL1B, IL6, TNF, TLR4, MYD88, and NFKB1) were upregulated in Holstein cows fed HIG versus CON. Despite such response, expression of the acute-phase proteins SAA and HP in Holsteins fed HIG compared with CON was markedly downregulated. In Holsteins fed HIG versus CON, the marked downregulation of SCD, ELOVL6, and MTTP along with upregulated CPT1A, ACOX1, and APOA5 indicated alterations in fatty acid and lipoprotein metabolism during grain challenge. Genes related to ketogenesis (HMGCS2 and ACAT1) were upregulated in Jerseys, and gluconeogenic genes (PDK4 and PCK1) were upregulated in Holstein cows fed HIG, suggesting alterations in ketone body and

  6. Hepatic Diacylglycerol-Associated Protein Kinase Cε Translocation Links Hepatic Steatosis to Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Humans.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Gilijamse, Pim W; Versteeg, Ruth I; Ackermans, Mariette T; Nederveen, Aart J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Romijn, Johannes A; Nieuwdorp, Max; Zhang, Dongyan; Samuel, Varman T; Vatner, Daniel F; Petersen, Kitt F; Shulman, Gerald I; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-06-06

    Hepatic lipid accumulation has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, but translational evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the relationship between liver fat and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity in 133 obese subjects. Although the presence of hepatic steatosis in obese subjects was associated with hepatic, adipose tissue, and peripheral insulin resistance, we found that intrahepatic triglycerides were not strictly sufficient or essential for hepatic insulin resistance. Thus, to examine the molecular mechanisms that link hepatic steatosis to hepatic insulin resistance, we comprehensively analyzed liver biopsies from a subset of 29 subjects. Here, hepatic cytosolic diacylglycerol content, but not hepatic ceramide content, was increased in subjects with hepatic insulin resistance. Moreover, cytosolic diacylglycerols were strongly associated with hepatic PKCε activation, as reflected by PKCε translocation to the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate the relevance of hepatic diacylglycerol-induced PKCε activation in the pathogenesis of NAFLD-associated hepatic insulin resistance in humans. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  8. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... MW, Sheffield JS. Prevention and management of viral hepatitis in pregnancy. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America . 2014;41(4):573–592. [4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chapter 9: Hepatitis A. In Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe S, eds. ...

  9. Lessons from KIPP Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maranto, Robert; Shuls, James V.

    2011-01-01

    KIPP Delta succeeds at its stated mission, probably because of its careful attention to culture building. What distinguishes this KIPP school is thoughtful work linking the daily processes of schooling to the goals of schooling, in this case success in college. Day to day tactics reflect broader themes: having a clear mission and hiring staff who…

  10. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  11. Delta Airlines LOFT training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J.

    1981-01-01

    A LOFT program was developed as part of the DC-9 training program which serves as a prototype for much of Delta's other aircraft training programs. The LOFT used differs little from the ideology presented in the Advisory Circular. Difficulty and experienced concerns regarding the effectiveness of LOFT as a complete training vehicle are explored.

  12. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of activated hepatic stellate cells with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide targeting integrin αvβ3 for staging liver fibrosis in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiyuan; Liu, Huanhuan; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhongyang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Dengbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the expression level of integrin αvβ3 on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different stages of liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rat model and the feasibility to stage liver fibrosis by using molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide modified ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO) specifically targeting integrin αvβ3. Materials and methods All experiments received approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 subjects each, and intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 for either 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Controls (n=10) received pure olive oil. The change in T2* relaxation rate (ΔR2*) pre- and postintravenous administration of RGD-USPIO or naked USPIO was measured by 3.0T clinical MRI and compared by one-way analysis of variance or the Student’s t-test. The relationship between expression level of integrin αvβ3 and liver fibrotic degree was evaluated by Spearman’s ranked correlation. Results Activated HSCs were confirmed to be the main cel