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Sample records for demencia frontotemporal resultados

  1. DIABETES MELLITUS COMO FACTOR DE RIESGO DE DEMENCIA EN LA POBLACIÓN ADULTA MAYOR MEXICANA

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Mejía-Arango; Clemente, y Zúñiga-Gil

    2012-01-01

    Introduccion La diabetes mellitus y las demencias constituyen dos problemas crecientes de salud entre la población adulta mayor del mundo y en particular de los paises en desarrollo. Hacen falta estudios longitudinales sobre el papel de la diabetes como factor de riesgo para demencia. Objetivo Determinar el riesgo de demencia en sujetos Mexicanos con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Materiales y Metodos Los sujetos diabéticos libres de demencia pertenecientes al Estudio Nacional de Salud y Envejecimiento en México fueron evaluados a los dos años de la línea de base. Se estudió el papel de los factores sociodemográficos, de otras comorbilidades y del tipo de tratamiento en la conversión a demencia. Resultados Durante la línea de base 749 sujetos (13.8%) tuvieron diabetes. El riesgo de desarrollar demencia en estos individuos fue el doble (RR, 2.08 IC 95%, 1.59–2.73). Se encontró un riesgo mayor en individuos de 80 años y más (RR 2.44 IC 95%, 1.46–4.08), en los hombres (RR, 2.25 IC 95%, 1.46–3.49) y en sujetos con nivel educativo menor de 7 años. El estar bajo tratamiento con insulina incrementó el riesgo de demencia (RR, 2.83, IC 95%, 1.58–5.06). Las otras comorbilidades que aumentaron el riesgo de demencia en los pacientes diabéticos fueron la hipertensión (RR, 2.75, IC 95%, 1.86–4.06) y la depresión (RR, 3.78, 95% IC 2.37–6.04). Conclusión Los sujetos con diabetes mellitus tienen un riesgo mayor de desarrollar demencia, La baja escolaridad y otras comorbilidades altamente prevalentes en la población Mexicana contribuyen a la asociación diabetes-demencia. PMID:21948010

  2. Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Olney, Nicholas T.; Spina, Salvatore; Miller, Bruce L.

    2017-01-01

    Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous disorder with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with multiple neuropathologic entities. Presently, the term FTD encompasses clinical disorders that include changes in behavior, language, executive control and often motor symptoms. The core FTD spectrum disorders include: behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD), nonfluent/agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), and semantic variant PPA (svPPA). Related FTD disorders include frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSP-S) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). In this chapter we will discuss the clinic presentation, diagnostic criteria, neuropathology, genetics and treatments of these disorders. PMID:28410663

  3. Diagnosing Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Corticobasal Syndrome; Progressive Supranuclear Palsy; Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia; Semantic Dementia; Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and/or Frontotemporal Dementia

  4. Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wicklund, M.R.; Mokri, B.; Drubach, D.A.; Boeve, B.F.; Parisi, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a relatively well-defined clinical syndrome. It is associated with frontal and temporal lobe structural/metabolic changes and pathologic findings of a neurodegenerative disease. We have been evaluating patients with clinical and imaging features partially consistent with bvFTD but with evidence also suggestive of brain sagging, which we refer to as frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome (FBSS). Methods: Retrospective medical chart review to identify all patients seen at our institution between 1996 and 2010, who had a clinical diagnosis of FTD and imaging evidence of brain sag. Results: Eight patients, 7 male and 1 female, were diagnosed with FBSS. The median age at symptom onset was 53 years. All patients had insidious onset and slow progression of behavioral and cognitive dysfunction accompanied by daytime somnolence and headache. Of the 5 patients with functional imaging, all showed evidence of hypometabolism of the frontotemporal regions. On brain MRI, all patients had evidence of brain sagging with distortion of the brainstem; 3 patients had diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement. CSF opening pressure was varied and CSF protein was mildly elevated. A definite site of CSF leak was not identified by myelogram or cisternography, except in one patient with a site highly suggestive of leak who subsequently underwent surgery confirming a CSF leak. In 2 patients with a neuropathologic examination, there was no evidence of a neurodegenerative disease. Conclusions: This case series demonstrates that FBSS may mimic typical bvFTD but should be recognized as an unusual presentation that is potentially treatable. PMID:21502595

  5. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous syndrome, characterized by progressive decline in behaviour or language associated with degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. While the seminal cases were described at the turn of the 20th century, FTLD has only recently been appreciated as a leading cause of dementia, particularly in patients presenting before the age of 65 years. Three distinct clinical variants of FTLD have been described: (i) behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, characterized by changes in behaviour and personality in association with frontal-predominant cortical degeneration; (ii) semantic dementia, a syndrome of progressive loss of knowledge about words and objects associated with anterior temporal neuronal loss; and (iii) progressive nonfluent aphasia, characterized by effortful language output, loss of grammar and motor speech deficits in the setting of left perisylvian cortical atrophy. The majority of pathologies associated with FTLD clinical syndromes include either tau-positive (FTLD-TAU) or TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive (FTLD-TDP) inclusion bodies. FTLD overlaps clinically and pathologically with the atypical parkinsonian disorders corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, and with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The majority of familial FTLD cases are caused by mutations in the genes encoding microtubule-associated protein tau (leading to FTLD-TAU) or progranulin (leading to FTLD-TDP). The clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of FTLD poses a significant diagnostic challenge, and in vivo prediction of underlying histopathology can be significantly improved by supplementing the clinical evaluation with genetic tests and emerging biological markers. Current pharmacotherapy for FTLD focuses on manipulating serotonergic or dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems to ameliorate behavioural or motor symptoms. However, recent advances in FTLD

  6. Frontotemporal Degeneration in a Child.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Tyler; Pascual, Juan M

    2017-07-01

    There is a predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes in certain cases of dementia in the adult, leading to the syndrome of frontotemporal dementia. However, this syndrome has seemed to elude the developing brain until now. We describe an example of apparently selective neurodegeneration of the frontal and temporal regions during development associated with some of the clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan features of canonical frontotemporal dementia in the adult. This patient does not have any of the common frontotemporal dementia-causing mutations or known progressive brain disorders of children. This patient illustrates that symptomatic, selective, and progressive vulnerability of the frontal and temporal lobes is not restricted to adulthood, expanding the phenotype of frontotemporal degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bradycardia in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Robles Bayón, A; Gude Sampedro, F; Torregrosa Quesada, J M

    2014-03-01

    Numerous regions of the brain, such as the medial frontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, insula, and amygdala, participate in the autonomic control of cardiovascular functions such as heart rate. The degenerative process in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) involves the listed anatomical structures and may therefore produce dysautonomic cardiovascular symptoms. To observe whether or not non-cardiogenic bradycardia was more frequent in a group of patients with FTD than in subjects with mild cognitive impairment or dementia of a different aetiology. Once patients with primary cardiac arrhythmia were excluded, we registered the heart rates of 258 patients with cognitive symptoms (36 with FTD, 22 with Alzheimer disease, 23 with vascular dementia, 10 with other dementias, and 167 with non-dementia cognitive impairment). Bradycardia (<60 beats/minute) was significantly more frequent in patients with FTD. This difference remained significant after excluding subjects undergoing treatment with a potentially bradycardic effect. Bradycardia was more prevalent in behavioural FTD cases than in cases of the aphasic variant, and we detected a trend toward higher frequency among patients with more pronounced right hemisphere atrophy. Moreover, mean systolic blood pressure in FTD patients was lower than in other participants, and systolic hypotension (<120 and <100mm Hg) was more prevalent. Bradycardia was more frequent in the FTD sample than in other patients with cognitive symptoms. Further investigations will be necessary before we may consider bradycardia to be a sign supporting diagnosis of FTD or its behavioural variant. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Lina; Mackenzie, Ian R; Förstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Diehl-Schmid, Janine

    2014-01-01

    The term frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) refers to a group of progressive brain diseases, which preferentially involve the frontal and temporal lobes. Depending on the primary site of atrophy, the clinical manifestation is dominated by behavior alterations or impairment of language. The onset of symptoms usually occurs before the age of 60 years, and the mean survival from diagnosis varies between 3 and 10 years. The prevalence is estimated at 15 per 100,000 in the population aged between 45 and 65 years, which is similar to the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in this age group. There are two major clinical subtypes, behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia. The neuropathology underlying the clinical syndromes is also heterogeneous. A common feature is the accumulation of certain neuronal proteins. Of these, the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), the transactive response DNA-binding protein, and the fused in sarcoma protein are most important. Approximately 10% to 30% of FTLD shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, with mutations in the genes for MAPT, progranulin (GRN), and in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) accounting for more than 80% of familial cases. Although significant advances have been made in recent years regarding diagnostic criteria, clinical assessment instruments, neuropsychological tests, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and brain imaging techniques, the clinical diagnosis remains a challenge. To date, there is no specific pharmacological treatment for FTLD. Some evidence has been provided for serotonin reuptake inhibitors to reduce behavioral disturbances. No large-scale or high-quality studies have been conducted to determine the efficacy of non-pharmacological treatment approaches in FTLD. In view of the limited treatment options, caregiver education and support is currently the most important component of the clinical management. PMID:24600223

  9. Mentalising music in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Downey, Laura E; Blezat, Alice; Nicholas, Jennifer; Omar, Rohani; Golden, Hannah L; Mahoney, Colin J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable recent interest, the biological basis and clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) pose unresolved problems. Mentalising (the cognitive capacity to interpret the behaviour of oneself and others in terms of mental states) is impaired as a prominent feature of bvFTD, consistent with involvement of brain regions including ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobes. Here, we investigated mentalising ability in a cohort of patients with bvFTD using a novel modality: music. We constructed a novel neuropsychological battery requiring attribution of affective mental or non-mental associations to musical stimuli. Mentalising performance of patients with bvFTD (n = 20) was assessed in relation to matched healthy control subjects (n = 20); patients also had a comprehensive assessment of behaviour and general neuropsychological functions. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance on the experimental tasks were investigated using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients showed impaired ability to attribute mental states but not non-mental characteristics to music, and this deficit correlated with performance on a standard test of social inference and with carer ratings of patients' empathic capacity, but not with other potentially relevant measures of general neuropsychological function. Mentalising performance in the bvFTD group was associated with grey matter changes in anterior temporal lobe and ventro-medial PFC. These findings suggest that music can represent surrogate mental states and the ability to construct such mental representations is impaired in bvFTD, with potential implications for our understanding of the biology of bvFTD and human social cognition more broadly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mentalising music in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Laura E.; Blezat, Alice; Nicholas, Jennifer; Omar, Rohani; Golden, Hannah L.; Mahoney, Colin J.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable recent interest, the biological basis and clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) pose unresolved problems. Mentalising (the cognitive capacity to interpret the behaviour of oneself and others in terms of mental states) is impaired as a prominent feature of bvFTD, consistent with involvement of brain regions including ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobes. Here, we investigated mentalising ability in a cohort of patients with bvFTD using a novel modality: music. We constructed a novel neuropsychological battery requiring attribution of affective mental or non-mental associations to musical stimuli. Mentalising performance of patients with bvFTD (n = 20) was assessed in relation to matched healthy control subjects (n = 20); patients also had a comprehensive assessment of behaviour and general neuropsychological functions. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance on the experimental tasks were investigated using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients showed impaired ability to attribute mental states but not non-mental characteristics to music, and this deficit correlated with performance on a standard test of social inference and with carer ratings of patients' empathic capacity, but not with other potentially relevant measures of general neuropsychological function. Mentalising performance in the bvFTD group was associated with grey matter changes in anterior temporal lobe and ventro-medial PFC. These findings suggest that music can represent surrogate mental states and the ability to construct such mental representations is impaired in bvFTD, with potential implications for our understanding of the biology of bvFTD and human social cognition more broadly. PMID:23107380

  11. Psychotic-Like Speech in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F; Carr, Andrew R; Paholpak, Pongsatorn

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) may result in psychotic-like speech without other psychotic features. The authors identified a bvFTD subgroup with pressure of speech, tangentiality, derailment, clanging/rhyming, and punning associated with the right anterior temporal atrophy and sparing of the left frontal lobe.

  12. ALS and Frontotemporal Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Achi, Eugene Y.; Rudnicki, Stacy A.

    2012-01-01

    Though once believed to be a disease that was limited to the motor system, it is now apparent that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be associated with cognitive changes in some patients. Changes are consistent with frontotemporal dysfunction, and may range from mild abnormalities only recognized with formal neuropsychological testing, to profound frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Executive function, behavior, and language are the most likely areas to be involved. Screening helpful in detecting abnormalities includes verbal or categorical fluency, behavioral inventories filled out by the caregiver, and evaluation for the presence of depression and pseudobulbar affect. Patients with cognitive dysfunction have shortened survival and may be less compliant with recommendations regarding use of feeding tubes and noninvasive ventilation. Evolving knowledge of genetic and pathological links between ALS and FTD has allowed us to better understand the overlapping spectrum of ALS and FTD. PMID:22919484

  13. Auditory conflict and congruence in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Agustus, Jennifer L; Hardy, Christopher J D; Russell, Lucy L; Brotherhood, Emilie V; Dick, Katrina M; Marshall, Charles R; Mummery, Catherine J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2017-09-01

    Impaired analysis of signal conflict and congruence may contribute to diverse socio-emotional symptoms in frontotemporal dementias, however the underlying mechanisms have not been defined. Here we addressed this issue in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 19) and semantic dementia (SD; n = 10) relative to healthy older individuals (n = 20). We created auditory scenes in which semantic and emotional congruity of constituent sounds were independently probed; associated tasks controlled for auditory perceptual similarity, scene parsing and semantic competence. Neuroanatomical correlates of auditory congruity processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Relative to healthy controls, both the bvFTD and SD groups had impaired semantic and emotional congruity processing (after taking auditory control task performance into account) and reduced affective integration of sounds into scenes. Grey matter correlates of auditory semantic congruity processing were identified in distributed regions encompassing prefrontal, parieto-temporal and insular areas and correlates of auditory emotional congruity in partly overlapping temporal, insular and striatal regions. Our findings suggest that decoding of auditory signal relatedness may probe a generic cognitive mechanism and neural architecture underpinning frontotemporal dementia syndromes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-01

    FTLD; Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP); Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD); Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD); PPA Syndrome; Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD); Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (svPPA); Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (nfvPPA); FTD With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FTD/ALS); Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Oligosymptomatic PSP (oPSP); Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS)

  15. Frontotemporal Dementia: Implications for Understanding Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Michel; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) comprises a group of behavioral, language, and movement disorders. On the basis of the nature of the characteristic protein inclusions, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be subdivided into the common FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP as well as the less common FTLD-FUS and FTLD-UPS. Approximately 10% of cases of FTD are inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner. Mutations in seven genes cause FTD, with those in tau (MAPT), chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), and progranulin (GRN) being the most common. Mutations in MAPT give rise to FTLD-tau and mutations in C9ORF72 and GRN to FTLD-TDP. The other four genes are transactive response–DNA binding protein-43 (TARDBP), fused in sarcoma (FUS), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B). Mutations in TARDBP and VCP give rise to FTLD-TDP, mutations in FUS to FTLD-FUS, and mutations in CHMP2B to FTLD-UPS. The discovery that mutations in MAPT cause neurodegeneration and dementia has important implications for understanding Alzheimer disease. PMID:22355793

  16. Flavour identification in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Omar, Rohani; Mahoney, Colin J; Buckley, Aisling H; Warren, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Deficits of flavour processing may be clinically important in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). To examine flavour processing in FTLD. We studied flavour identification prospectively in 25 patients with FTLD (12 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), eight with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), five with non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA)) and 17 healthy control subjects, using a new test based on cross-modal matching of flavours to words and pictures. All subjects completed a general neuropsychological assessment, and odour identification was also assessed using a modified University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test. Brain MRI volumes from the patient cohort were analysed using voxel-based morphometry to identify regional grey matter associations of flavour identification. Relative to the healthy control group, the bvFTD and svPPA subgroups showed significant (p<0.05) deficits of flavour identification and all three FTLD subgroups showed deficits of odour identification. Flavour identification performance did not differ significantly between the FTLD syndromic subgroups. Flavour identification performance in the combined FTLD cohort was significantly (p<0.05 after multiple comparisons correction) associated with grey matter volume in the left entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and temporal pole. Certain FTLD syndromes are associated with impaired flavour identification and this is underpinned by grey matter atrophy in an anteromedial temporal lobe network. These findings may have implications for our understanding of abnormal eating behaviour in these diseases.

  17. Clinicopathological correlations in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Perry, David C; Brown, Jesse A; Possin, Katherine L; Datta, Samir; Trujillo, Andrew; Radke, Anneliese; Karydas, Anna; Kornak, John; Sias, Ana C; Rabinovici, Gil D; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Boxer, Adam L; De May, Mary; Rankin, Katherine P; Sturm, Virginia E; Lee, Suzee E; Matthews, Brandy R; Kao, Aimee W; Vossel, Keith A; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Miller, Zachary A; Seo, Sang Won; Sidhu, Manu; Gaus, Stephanie E; Nana, Alissa L; Vargas, Jose Norberto S; Hwang, Ji-Hye L; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Brown, Alainna B; Huang, Eric J; Coppola, Giovanni; Rosen, Howard J; Geschwind, Daniel; Trojanowski, John Q; Grinberg, Lea T; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2017-12-01

    Accurately predicting the underlying neuropathological diagnosis in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) poses a daunting challenge for clinicians but will be critical for the success of disease-modifying therapies. We sought to improve pathological prediction by exploring clinicopathological correlations in a large bvFTD cohort. Among 438 patients in whom bvFTD was either the top or an alternative possible clinical diagnosis, 117 had available autopsy data, including 98 with a primary pathological diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), 15 with Alzheimer's disease, and four with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who lacked neurodegenerative disease-related pathology outside of the motor system. Patients with FTLD were distributed between FTLD-tau (34 patients: 10 corticobasal degeneration, nine progressive supranuclear palsy, eight Pick's disease, three frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism associated with chromosome 17, three unclassifiable tauopathy, and one argyrophilic grain disease); FTLD-TDP (55 patients: nine type A including one with motor neuron disease, 27 type B including 21 with motor neuron disease, eight type C with right temporal lobe presentations, and 11 unclassifiable including eight with motor neuron disease), FTLD-FUS (eight patients), and one patient with FTLD-ubiquitin proteasome system positive inclusions (FTLD-UPS) that stained negatively for tau, TDP-43, and FUS. Alzheimer's disease was uncommon (6%) among patients whose only top diagnosis during follow-up was bvFTD. Seventy-nine per cent of FTLD-tau, 86% of FTLD-TDP, and 88% of FTLD-FUS met at least 'possible' bvFTD diagnostic criteria at first presentation. The frequency of the six core bvFTD diagnostic features was similar in FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP, suggesting that these features alone cannot be used to separate patients by major molecular class. Voxel-based morphometry revealed that nearly all pathological subgroups and even individual

  18. Odour Identification in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Lorena; Loy, Clement T.; Hailstone, Julia; Warren, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Little information is available concerning olfactory processing in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We undertook a case-control study of olfactory processing in three male patients fulfilling clinical criteria for FTLD. Odour identification (semantic analysis) and odour discrimination (perceptual analysis) were investigated using tests adapted from the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test. General neuropsychometry and structural volumetric brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were also performed. The three patients with FTLD exhibited a disorder of olfactory processing with the characteristics of a predominantly semantic (odour identification) deficit. This olfactory deficit was more prominent in patients with greater involvement of the temporal lobes on MRI. Central deficits of odour identification may be more common in FTLD than previously recognised, and these deficits may assist in clinical characterisation. PMID:17380245

  19. [The neurochemistry and neuropharmacology of frontotemporal dementia].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Navarro, H; Jabbour-Wadih, T; Ayuso-Peralta, L; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J

    To review the neurochemical features and therapeutic options for frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The main neurochemical alterations in FTD are the serotoninergic and dopamine depletion. In contrast with Alzheimer's and diffuse Lewy bodies disease, there are not significant alterations of the cholinergic system. Cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism studies usually show hypoperfusion or hypometabolism, with predominant involvement of temporal and frontal cortices. There have been described some alterations related with oxidative stress and apoptosis, although its pathogenetic role in FTD is not well known. Treatment of FTD is not well established, because there are only a few studies with some drugs. The most studied drugs are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, however, despite the well-known serotoninergic deficiency described in FTD, the results are not conclusive. The main neurochemical alterations of FTD are serotoninergic and dopaminergic deficiencies. The treatment is not well established, although it should be theoretically ideal to use drugs which modulate these neurotransmitter systems.

  20. Emergence of artistic talent in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Miller, B L; Cummings, J; Mishkin, F; Boone, K; Prince, F; Ponton, M; Cotman, C

    1998-10-01

    To describe the clinical, neuropsychological, and imaging features of five patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) who acquired new artistic skills in the setting of dementia. Creativity in the setting of dementia has recently been reported. We describe five patients who became visual artists in the setting of FTD. Sixty-nine FTD patients were interviewed regarding visual abilities. Five became artists in the early stages of FTD. Their history, artistic process, neuropsychology, and anatomy are described. On SPECT or pathology, four of the five patients had the temporal variant of FTD in which anterior temporal lobes are involved but the dorsolateral frontal cortex is spared. Visual skills were spared but language and social skills were devastated. Loss of function in the anterior temporal lobes may lead to the "facilitation" of artistic skills. Patients with the temporal lobe variant of FTD offer a window into creativity.

  1. Observing conversational laughter in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Peter S; Simpson, Michaela; Gola, Kelly; Shdo, Suzanne M; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed an observational study of laughter during seminaturalistic conversations between patients with dementia and familial caregivers. Patients were diagnosed with (1) behavioural variant fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD), (2) right temporal variant frontotemporal dementia (rtFTD), (3) semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), (4) non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) or (5) early onset Alzheimer’s disease (eoAD). We hypothesised that those with bvFTD would laugh less in response to their own speech than other dementia groups or controls, while those with rtFTD would laugh less regardless of who was speaking. Methods Patients with bvFTD (n=39), svPPA (n=19), rtFTD (n=14), nfvPPA (n=16), eoAD (n=17) and healthy controls (n=156) were recorded (video and audio) while discussing a problem in their relationship with a healthy control companion. Using the audio track only, laughs were identified by trained coders and then further classed by an automated algorithm as occurring during or shortly after the participant’s own vocalisation (‘self’ context) or during or shortly after the partner’s vocalisation (‘partner’ context). Results Individuals with bvFTD, eoAD or rtFTD laughed less across both contexts of self and partner than the other groups. Those with bvFTD laughed less relative to their own speech compared with healthy controls. Those with nfvPPA laughed more in the partner context compared with healthy controls. Conclusions Laughter in response to one’s own vocalisations or those of a conversational partner may be a clinically useful measure in dementia diagnosis. PMID:28235777

  2. Observing conversational laughter in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Peter S; Simpson, Michaela; Gola, Kelly; Shdo, Suzanne M; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W

    2017-05-01

    We performed an observational study of laughter during seminaturalistic conversations between patients with dementia and familial caregivers. Patients were diagnosed with (1) behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), (2) right temporal variant frontotemporal dementia (rtFTD), (3) semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), (4) non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) or (5) early onset Alzheimer's disease (eoAD). We hypothesised that those with bvFTD would laugh less in response to their own speech than other dementia groups or controls, while those with rtFTD would laugh less regardless of who was speaking. Patients with bvFTD (n=39), svPPA (n=19), rtFTD (n=14), nfvPPA (n=16), eoAD (n=17) and healthy controls (n=156) were recorded (video and audio) while discussing a problem in their relationship with a healthy control companion. Using the audio track only, laughs were identified by trained coders and then further classed by an automated algorithm as occurring during or shortly after the participant's own vocalisation ('self' context) or during or shortly after the partner's vocalisation ('partner' context). Individuals with bvFTD, eoAD or rtFTD laughed less across both contexts of self and partner than the other groups. Those with bvFTD laughed less relative to their own speech comparedwith healthy controls. Those with nfvPPA laughed more in the partner context compared with healthy controls. Laughter in response to one's own vocalisations or those of a conversational partner may be a clinically useful measure in dementia diagnosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common than this estimate. FTDP-17 probably accounts for a small percentage of all cases of frontotemporal dementia. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: CHMP2B-related frontotemporal dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... CHMP2B -related frontotemporal dementia develop progressive problems with speech and language (aphasia). They may have trouble speaking, although they can often understand others' speech and written text. Affected individuals may also have ...

  5. Topiramate for Abnormal Eating Behaviour in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Singam, Colin; Walterfang, Mark; Mocellin, Ramon; Evans, Andrew; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Topiramate is a sulfamate-substituted monosaccharide anticonvulsant that is associated with anorexia and weight loss and has been used to treat binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa. This report describes a man with frontotemporal dementia, behavioural variant, associated with abnormal eating behaviour which appeared to respond to topiramate. We review the physiological basis of abnormal eating behaviour in frontotemporal dementia and explore possible mechanisms of action by which topiramate may modify eating behaviour in this condition. PMID:23548883

  6. Magnetoencephalography of frontotemporal dementia: spatiotemporally localized changes during semantic decisions

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Peter J.; Hodges, John R.; Rowe, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder with dysfunction and atrophy of the frontal lobes leading to changes in personality, behaviour, empathy, social conduct and insight, with relative preservation of language and memory. As novel treatments begin to emerge, biomarkers of frontotemporal dementia will become increasingly important, including functionally relevant neuroimaging indices of the neurophysiological basis of cognition. We used magnetoencephalography to examine behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia using a semantic decision task that elicits both frontal and temporal activity in healthy people. Twelve patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (age 50–75) and 16 matched controls made categorical semantic judgements about 400 pictures during continuous magnetoencephalography. Distributed source analysis was used to compare patients and controls. The patients had normal early responses to picture confrontation, indicating intact visual processing. However, a predominantly posterior set of regions including temporoparietal cortex showed reduced source activity 250–310 ms after stimulus onset, in proportion to behavioural measures of semantic association. In contrast, a left frontoparietal network showed reduced source activity at 550–650 ms, proportional to patients’ deficits in attention and orientation. This late deficit probably reflects impairment in the neural substrate of goal-oriented decision making. The results demonstrate behaviourally relevant neural correlates of semantic processing and decision making in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, and show for the first time that magnetoencephalography can be used to study cognitive systems in the context of frontotemporal dementia. PMID:21840892

  7. Quantifying the eating abnormalities in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Irish, Muireann; Kam, Jonathan; van Keizerswaard, Jolanda; Bartley, Lauren; Samaras, Katherine; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Presence of eating abnormalities is one of the core criteria for the diagnosis of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), yet their occurrence in other subtypes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and effect on metabolic health is not known. To define and quantify patterns of eating behavior and energy, sugar, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake, as well as indices of metabolic health in patients with bvFTD and semantic dementia (SD) compared with patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy control participants. Prospective case-controlled study involving patient and caregiver completion of surveys. Seventy-five participants with dementia (21 with bvFTD, 26 with SD, and 28 with AD) and 18 age- and education-matched healthy controls were recruited from FRONTIER, the FTD research clinic at Neuroscience Research Australia in Sydney. Caregivers of patients with FTD and AD completed validated questionnaires on appetite, eating behaviors, energy consumption, and dietary macronutrient composition. All participants completed surveys on hunger and satiety. Body mass index and weight measurements were prospectively collected. The bvFTD group had significant abnormalities in the domains of appetite (U = 111.0, z = 2.7, P = .007), eating habits (U = 69.5, z = 3.8, P = .001), food preferences (U = 57.0, z = 4.1, P = .001), swallowing (U = 109.0, z = 3.0, P = .003), and other oral behaviors (U = 141.0, z = 2.6, P = .009) compared with the AD group. The bvFTD and SD groups tended to have increased energy consumption. Compared with controls, the bvFTD group had significantly increased carbohydrate intake (251 vs 170 g/d; P = .05) and the SD group had significantly increased sugar intake (114 vs 76 g/d; P = .049). No significant differences in total fat or protein intake between the groups were found. Despite similar energy intake, the SD group had lower hunger and satiety scores compared with the bvFTD group. In contrast, hunger and satiety scores did not differ

  8. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Billy A; Frank, Mayu O; Jun, Jin; Martelly, Melissa T; Sadarangani, Tina; de Sales, Paloma Cesar

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to: (1) identify the characteristics of family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia, (2) explore the impact of providing care on family caregivers' health and well-being, and (3) identify coping strategies used by family caregivers. Frontotemporal dementia is thought to be the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia face unique challenges due to its early onset, behavioral symptoms, and slow progression of decline. However, there is a dearth of research evaluating the health and wellbeing of family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia. An integrative review was conducted using the Whittemore and Knafl methodology. An electronic search of the literature was conducted using four electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science. The Crowe Critical Appraisal tool was used to evaluate the quality of the selected articles. Findings of 11 articles informed this integrative review. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia identify behavioral disturbances as most troubling. Spouses and female caregivers experience greater caregiver burden, distress, increased rates of depression, as well as decreased sleep related to behavior disturbances. Though less explored, providing care to those with behavioral disturbances may also impact caregiver physical health. Additionally, female caregivers are most likely to employ coping strategies, most commonly, adaptation and reframing. Effective interventions to reduce family caregiver burden are poorly understood but family caregivers suggest education and internet-based support groups are most helpful. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia experience significant distress, which impacts their health and wellbeing. It is important for healthcare providers who care for patients with frontotemporal dementia to recognize the unique

  9. Quantitative neurohistological features of frontotemporal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Arnold, S E; Han, L Y; Clark, C M; Grossman, M; Trojanowski, J Q

    2000-01-01

    Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a neurodegenerative condition that has been principally associated with frontal lobe dementia. In this study, we compared neuropathological abnormalities in frontal, hippocampal, and calcarine cortices from patients assigned a diagnosis of FTD, normal elderly and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Densities of Nissl-stained neurons and lesions which were immunolabeled for tau, beta-amyloid (Abeta), alpha- and beta-synuclein, ubiquitin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD68 antigen were determined using computer-assisted, non-biased quantitative microscopy. We found that FTD frontal and hippocampal regions exhibited marked neuron loss, abundant ubiquitin-immunoreactive (ir) dystrophic neurites, GFAP-ir astrocytes, and CD68-ir microglia, while calcarine cortex was spared. No alpha- or beta-synuclein-ir lesions were observed, and neither the density of tau-ir neurofibrillary tangles nor that of Abeta-ir plaques in FTD exceeded normal controls. In addition, there were no neuropathological differences between FTD subjects who presented clinically with a frontal lobe dementia versus an AD-like dementia. These findings indicate that FTD is a category of neurodegnerative dementias with varying clinical presentations that is characterized by the progressive degeneration of select populations of cortical neurons. The molecular neurodegenerative mechanisms that lead to FTD remain to be elucidated.

  10. Frontotemporal Dementia in Eight Chinese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Steven Z.; Rosen, Howard J.; Azor, Virgina; Ong, Hilary; Tse, Marian M.; Lai, Ngan Betty; Hou, Craig E.; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Matthews, Brandy R.

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has rarely been reported in Chinese populations. There are many potential reasons for this, including possible hesitancy on the part of patients or families to bring FTD-related symptoms to medical attention. Here, we present data on eight Chinese individuals, all of whom met criteria for the behavioral variant of FTD or the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia. These patients presented for neurological evaluation at a relatively advanced stage. The mean MMSE score at initial presentation was 15. Behavioral symptoms were common and usually elicited during the medical history only after direct questioning. Delay in presentation was attributed to a variety of issues, including family disagreements about whether the symptoms represented a disease and lack of medical insurance. These cases illustrate that the symptoms of FTD in Chinese Americans are similar to those in Caucasians but various factors, some potentially culturally-relevant, may influence the likelihood and timing of clinical presentation for FTD, as well as other dementias. Additional study of FTD in diverse ethnic groups needs to address barriers to clinical presentation, including factors that may be culturally specific. PMID:23311888

  11. Therapeutic and diagnostic challenges for frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    D’Alton, Simon; Lewis, Jada

    2014-01-01

    In the search for therapeutic modifiers, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has traditionally been overshadowed by other conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A clinically and pathologically diverse condition, FTD has been galvanized by a number of recent discoveries such as novel genetic variants in familial and sporadic forms of disease and the identification of TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) as the defining constituent of inclusions in more than half of cases. In combination with an ever-expanding knowledge of the function and dysfunction of tau—a protein which is pathologically aggregated in the majority of the remaining cases—there exists a greater understanding of FTD than ever before. These advances may indicate potential approaches for the development of hypothetical therapeutics, but FTD remains highly complex and the roles of tau and TDP-43 in neurodegeneration are still wholly unclear. Here the challenges facing potential therapeutic strategies are discussed, which include sufficiently accurate disease diagnosis and sophisticated technology to deliver effective therapies. PMID:25191265

  12. Energy expenditure in frontotemporal dementia: a behavioural and imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Landin-Romero, Ramon; Collet, Tinh-Hai; van der Klaauw, Agatha A; Devenney, Emma; Henning, Elana; Kiernan, Matthew C; Piguet, Olivier; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hodges, John R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract See Finger (doi:10.1093/aww312) for a scientific commentary on this article. Abnormal eating behaviour and metabolic parameters including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and body mass index are increasingly recognized as important components of neurodegenerative disease and may contribute to survival. It has previously been established that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is associated with abnormal eating behaviour characterized by increased sweet preference. In this study, it was hypothesized that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia might also be associated with altered energy expenditure. A cohort of 19 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 13 with Alzheimer’s disease and 16 (age- and sex-matched) healthy control subjects were studied using Actiheart devices (CamNtech) to assess resting and stressed heart rate. Actiheart devices were fitted for 7 days to measure sleeping heart rate, activity levels, and resting, active and total energy expenditure. Using high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging the neural correlates of increased resting heart rate were investigated including cortical thickness and region of interest analyses. In behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, resting (P = 0.001), stressed (P = 0.037) and sleeping heart rate (P = 0.038) were increased compared to control subjects, and resting heart rate (P = 0.020) compared to Alzheimer disease patients. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia was associated with decreased activity levels compared to controls (P = 0.002) and increased resting energy expenditure (P = 0.045) and total energy expenditure (P = 0.035). Increased resting heart rate correlated with behavioural (Cambridge Behavioural Inventory) and cognitive measures (Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination). Increased resting heart rate in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia correlated with atrophy involving the mesial temporal cortex, insula, and amygdala

  13. Energy expenditure in frontotemporal dementia: a behavioural and imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Landin-Romero, Ramon; Collet, Tinh-Hai; van der Klaauw, Agatha A; Devenney, Emma; Henning, Elana; Kiernan, Matthew C; Piguet, Olivier; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hodges, John R

    2017-01-01

    SEE FINGER DOI101093/AWW312 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Abnormal eating behaviour and metabolic parameters including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and body mass index are increasingly recognized as important components of neurodegenerative disease and may contribute to survival. It has previously been established that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is associated with abnormal eating behaviour characterized by increased sweet preference. In this study, it was hypothesized that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia might also be associated with altered energy expenditure. A cohort of 19 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 13 with Alzheimer's disease and 16 (age- and sex-matched) healthy control subjects were studied using Actiheart devices (CamNtech) to assess resting and stressed heart rate. Actiheart devices were fitted for 7 days to measure sleeping heart rate, activity levels, and resting, active and total energy expenditure. Using high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging the neural correlates of increased resting heart rate were investigated including cortical thickness and region of interest analyses. In behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, resting (P = 0.001), stressed (P = 0.037) and sleeping heart rate (P = 0.038) were increased compared to control subjects, and resting heart rate (P = 0.020) compared to Alzheimer disease patients. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia was associated with decreased activity levels compared to controls (P = 0.002) and increased resting energy expenditure (P = 0.045) and total energy expenditure (P = 0.035). Increased resting heart rate correlated with behavioural (Cambridge Behavioural Inventory) and cognitive measures (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination). Increased resting heart rate in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia correlated with atrophy involving the mesial temporal cortex, insula, and amygdala, regions previously

  14. Primary empathy deficits in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Huepe, David; Torralva, Teresa; Fiorentino, Natalia; Richter, Fabian; Huepe-Artigas, Daniela; Ferrari, Jesica; Montañes, Patricia; Reyes, Pablo; Matallana, Diana; Vigliecca, Nora S; Decety, Jean; Ibanez, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Loss of empathy is an early central symptom and diagnostic criterion of the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Although changes in empathy are evident and strongly affect the social functioning of bvFTD patients, few studies have directly investigated this issue by means of experimental paradigms. The current study assessed multiple components of empathy (affective, cognitive and moral) in bvFTD patients. We also explored whether the loss of empathy constitutes a primary deficit of bvFTD or whether it is explained by impairments in executive functions (EF) or other social cognition domains. Thirty-seven bvFTD patients with early/mild stages of the disease and 30 healthy control participants were assessed with a task that involves the perception of intentional and accidental harm. Participants were also evaluated on emotion recognition, theory of mind (ToM), social norms knowledge and several EF domains. BvFTD patients presented deficits in affective, cognitive and moral aspects of empathy. However, empathic concern was the only aspect primarily affected in bvFTD that was neither related nor explained by deficits in EF or other social cognition domains. Deficits in the cognitive and moral aspects of empathy seem to depend on EF, emotion recognition and ToM. Our findings highlight the importance of using tasks depicting real-life social scenarios because of their greater sensitivity in the assessment of bvFTD. Moreover, our results contribute to the understanding of primary and intrinsic empathy deficits of bvFTD and have important theoretical and clinical implications.

  15. Primary empathy deficits in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Huepe, David; Torralva, Teresa; Fiorentino, Natalia; Richter, Fabian; Huepe-Artigas, Daniela; Ferrari, Jesica; Montañes, Patricia; Reyes, Pablo; Matallana, Diana; Vigliecca, Nora S.; Decety, Jean; Ibanez, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Loss of empathy is an early central symptom and diagnostic criterion of the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Although changes in empathy are evident and strongly affect the social functioning of bvFTD patients, few studies have directly investigated this issue by means of experimental paradigms. The current study assessed multiple components of empathy (affective, cognitive and moral) in bvFTD patients. We also explored whether the loss of empathy constitutes a primary deficit of bvFTD or whether it is explained by impairments in executive functions (EF) or other social cognition domains. Thirty-seven bvFTD patients with early/mild stages of the disease and 30 healthy control participants were assessed with a task that involves the perception of intentional and accidental harm. Participants were also evaluated on emotion recognition, theory of mind (ToM), social norms knowledge and several EF domains. BvFTD patients presented deficits in affective, cognitive and moral aspects of empathy. However, empathic concern was the only aspect primarily affected in bvFTD that was neither related nor explained by deficits in EF or other social cognition domains. Deficits in the cognitive and moral aspects of empathy seem to depend on EF, emotion recognition and ToM. Our findings highlight the importance of using tasks depicting real-life social scenarios because of their greater sensitivity in the assessment of bvFTD. Moreover, our results contribute to the understanding of primary and intrinsic empathy deficits of bvFTD and have important theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:25346685

  16. Characterizing Sexual Behavior in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Kaizik, Cassandra; Irish, Muireann; Mioshi, Eneida; Dermody, Nadene; Kiernan, Matthew C; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is characterized by a number of prominent behavioral changes. While FTD has been associated with the presence of aberrant or unusual sexual behaviors in a proportion of patients, few studies have formally investigated changes in sexual function in this disease. We aimed to systematically quantify changes in sexual behavior, including current symptoms and changes from prior diagnoses, in behavioral-variant (bvFTD) and semantic dementia (SD), compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Carers of 49 dementia patients (21 bvFTD, 11 SD, 17 AD) were interviewed using the Sexual Behavior and Intimacy Questionnaire (SIQ), a survey designed to assess changes in sexual function across multiple domains including initiating, level of affection, and aberrant or unusual sexual behavior. BvFTD patients show prominent hyposexual behavior including decreased affection, initiation, and response to advances by partners, and decreased frequency of sexual relations, compared to AD and to SD patients. The greatest changes in sexual behavior compared to pre-diagnoses were found in the bvFTD group with a 90-100% decrease in initiation, response, and frequency of sexual relations. Notably, aberrant or unusual sexual behavior was reported in a minority of bvFTD and SD patients and occurred in patients who also showed hyposexual behavior toward their partner. Overall loss of affection, reduced initiation of sexual activity, and responsiveness is an overwhelming feature of bvFTD. In contrast, aberrant or unusual sexual behavior is observed in the minority of bvFTD patients. The underlying pathophysiology of these changes likely reflects structural and functional changes in frontoinsular and limbic regions including the hypothalamus.

  17. FOXP2 Expression in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration-Tau.

    PubMed

    López-González, Irene; Palmeira, Andre; Aso, Ester; Carmona, Margarita; Fernandez, Liana; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-09-06

    FOXP2 is altered in a variety of language disorders. We found reduced mRNA and protein expression of FOXP2 in frontal cortex area 8 in Pick's disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau linked to P301L mutation presenting with language impairment in comparison with age-matched controls and cases with parkinsonian variant progressive supranuclear palsy. Foxp2 mRNA and protein are also reduced with disease progression in the somatosensory cortex in transgenic mice bearing the P301S mutation in MAPT when compared with wild-type littermates. Our findings support the presence of FOXP2 expression abnormalities in sporadic and familial frontotemporal degeneration tauopathies.

  18. Early vs late age at onset frontotemporal dementia and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Thibodeau, Marie-Pierre; Perry, David C; Hua, Alice; Sidhu, Manu; Sible, Isabel; Vargas, Jose Norberto S; Gaus, Stephanie E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rankin, Katherine D; Boxer, Adam L; Kramer, Joel H; Rosen, Howard J; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Grinberg, Lea T; Huang, Eric J; DeArmond, Stephen J; Trojanowski, John Q; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2018-03-20

    To examine clinicopathologic correlations in early vs late age at onset frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). All patients were clinically evaluated and prospectively diagnosed at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. Two consecutive series were included: (1) patients with a clinically diagnosed FTD syndrome who underwent autopsy (cohort 1) and (2) patients with a primary pathologic diagnosis of FTLD, regardless of the clinical syndrome (cohort 2). These series were divided by age at symptom onset (cutoff 65 years). In cohort 1, 48 (25.3%) were 65 years or older at symptom onset. Pathologic causes of behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) were similar in the early age at onset (EO) and late age at onset (LO) bvFTD groups. In corticobasal syndrome (CBS), however, the most common pathologic substrate differed according to age at onset: progressive supranuclear palsy (42.9%) in LO-CBS and Alzheimer disease (AD; 40.7%) in EO-CBS. In cohort 2, 57 (28.4%) were classified as LO-FTLD. Regarding FTLD major molecular classes, FTLD with transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa was most common in EO-FTLD (44.4%), whereas FTLD-tau (58.3%) was most common in LO-FTLD. Antemortem diagnosis of a non-FTD syndrome, usually AD-type dementia, was more frequent in LO-FTLD than EO-FTLD (19.3% vs 7.7%, p = 0.017). LO-FTLD was also associated with more prevalent comorbid pathologic changes. Of these, moderate to severe AD neuropathologic change and argyrophilic grain disease were overrepresented among patients who received an antemortem diagnosis of AD-type dementia. Patients with FTD and FTLD often develop symptoms after age 65, and age at onset represents an important consideration when making antemortem neuropathologic predictions. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. False Recognition in Lewy-Body Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boysson, C.; Belleville, S.; Phillips, N. A.; Johns, E. K.; Goupil, D.; Souchay, C.; Bouchard, R.; Chertkow, H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the false recognition phenomenon in persons with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and those with Lewy-body disease (LBD). Patients with LBD (n=10) or FTD (n=15) and their corresponding controls (n=30) were subjected to the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm to induce false recognition. Patients were…

  20. Clinical update on frontotemporal dementia: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Ramon; Scholes, Amelia; Walterfang, Mark; Looi, Jeffrey C L; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    To provide a clinical update for general psychiatrists on frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) using a selective narrative review of recent findings and advances in conceptualising, diagnosing and treating FTD. General psychiatrists can apply their skills to support patients, carers, GPs and allied health workers in comprehensive care of persons with FTD. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  1. Improving response inhibition systems in frontotemporal dementia with citalopram.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Laura E; Rittman, Timothy; Regenthal, Ralf; Robbins, Trevor W; Rowe, James B

    2015-07-01

    Disinhibition is a cardinal feature of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia, presenting as impulsive and impetuous behaviours that are often difficult to manage. The options for symptomatic treatments are limited, but a potential target for therapy is the restoration of serotonergic function, which is both deficient in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and closely associated with inhibitory control. Based on preclinical studies and psychopharmacological interventions in other disorders, we predicted that inhibition would be associated with the right inferior frontal gyrus and dependent on serotonin. Using magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography of a Go-NoGo paradigm, we investigated the neural basis of behavioural disinhibition in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on the neural systems for response inhibition. In a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled crossover design study, 12 patients received either a single 30 mg dose of citalopram or placebo. Twenty age-matched healthy controls underwent the same magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography protocol on one session without citalopram, providing normative data for this task. In the control group, successful NoGo trials evoked two established indices of successful response inhibition: the NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3. Both of these components were significantly attenuated by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Cortical sources associated with successful inhibition in control subjects were identified in the right inferior frontal gyrus and anterior temporal lobe, which have been strongly associated with behavioural inhibition in imaging and lesion studies. These sources were impaired by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Critically, citalopram enhanced the NoGo-P3 signal in patients, relative to placebo treatment, and increased the evoked response in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Voxel

  2. Improving response inhibition systems in frontotemporal dementia with citalopram

    PubMed Central

    Rittman, Timothy; Regenthal, Ralf; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition is a cardinal feature of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia, presenting as impulsive and impetuous behaviours that are often difficult to manage. The options for symptomatic treatments are limited, but a potential target for therapy is the restoration of serotonergic function, which is both deficient in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and closely associated with inhibitory control. Based on preclinical studies and psychopharmacological interventions in other disorders, we predicted that inhibition would be associated with the right inferior frontal gyrus and dependent on serotonin. Using magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography of a Go-NoGo paradigm, we investigated the neural basis of behavioural disinhibition in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on the neural systems for response inhibition. In a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled crossover design study, 12 patients received either a single 30 mg dose of citalopram or placebo. Twenty age-matched healthy controls underwent the same magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography protocol on one session without citalopram, providing normative data for this task. In the control group, successful NoGo trials evoked two established indices of successful response inhibition: the NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3. Both of these components were significantly attenuated by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Cortical sources associated with successful inhibition in control subjects were identified in the right inferior frontal gyrus and anterior temporal lobe, which have been strongly associated with behavioural inhibition in imaging and lesion studies. These sources were impaired by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Critically, citalopram enhanced the NoGo-P3 signal in patients, relative to placebo treatment, and increased the evoked response in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Voxel

  3. Insight in Frontotemporal Dementia: Conceptual Analysis and Empirical Evaluation of the Consensus Criterion ''Loss of Insight'' in Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Kathinka; Kilander, Lena; Lindau, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to suggest a new formulation of the core research diagnostic consensus criterion ''loss of insight'' in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Eight patients with FTD (diagnoses made by interviews, medical and neuropsychological examination, CT scan, and regional cerebral glucose metabolism measured by positron emission…

  4. SQSTM1 mutations in French patients with frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Guerreiro, Rita; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Bras, Jose; Nicolas, Gael; Gabelle, Audrey; Didic, Mira; De Septenville, Anne; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Lenglet, Timothée; Latouche, Morwena; Kabashi, Edor; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Hardy, John; Brice, Alexis

    2013-11-01

    Mutations in the SQSTM1 gene, coding for p62, are a cause of Paget disease of bone and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, SQSTM1 mutations were confirmed in ALS, and mutations were also identified in 3 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), suggesting a role for SQSTM1 in FTD. To evaluate the exact contribution of SQSTM1 to FTD and FTD with ALS (FTD-ALS) in an independent cohort of patients. A SQSTM1 mutation was first identified in a multiplex family with FTD by use of whole-exome sequencing. To evaluate the frequency of SQSTM1 mutations, we sequenced this gene in a cohort of patients with FTD or FTD-ALS, with no mutations in known FTD and ALS genes. Primary care or referral center. An overall cohort of 188 French patients, including 132 probands with FTD and 56 probands with FTD-ALS. Frequency of SQSTM1 mutations in patients with FTD or FTD-ALS; description of associated phenotypes. We identified 4 heterozygous missense mutations in 4 unrelated families with FTD; only 1 family had clinical symptoms of Paget disease of bone, and only 1 family had clinical symptoms of FTD-ALS, possibly owing to the low penetrance of some of the clinical manifestations. Although the frequency of the mutations is low in our series (4 of 188 patients [2%]), our results, similar to those already reported, support a direct pathogenic role of p62 in different types of FTD.

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Behavioral Issues in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Manoochehri, Masood; Huey, Edward D.

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is an umbrella term for several different disorders. In behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), patients show deterioration in cognition and social behavior. New diagnostic criteria proposed by the International Behavioral Variant FTD Consortium provide greater sensitivity in diagnosing bvFTD. Current pharmacological management of symptoms relies on medications borrowed from treating Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and psychiatric disorders. The evidence for using AD medications such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is questionable. Psychiatric medications can be helpful. Trazodone or SSRIs can have some efficacy in reducing disinhibition, repetitive behaviors, sexually inappropriate behaviors, and hyperorality. Small doses of atypical antipsychotics may be helpful in decreasing agitation and verbal outbursts. Non-pharmacological management includes caregiver education and support and behavioral interventions. While symptomatic treatments are likely to remain important behavior management tools, targeting the underlying pathology of bvFTD with disease-modifying agents will hopefully be the future of treatment. PMID:22847063

  6. The Relationship between Subclinical Asperger's Syndrome and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Midorikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims The existence of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD), including senile Asperger's syndrome (AS), has been proposed. However, there are no empirical case reports to support the proposal. In this report, we present 3 patients who showed symptoms of bv-FTD and demonstrated signs of autistic spectrum disorder, especially AS. Methods We evaluated 3 subjects using the diagnostic criteria for bv-FTD, and their caregivers retrospectively provided data to calculate the Autism-Spectrum Quotient, Japanese version [Wakabayashi et al.: Shinrigaku Kenkyu 2004;75:78–84]. We also compared these data with those obtained from 3 individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Results All 3 patients met the criteria for bv-FTD and had a higher Autism-Spectrum Quotient score than did comparable Alzheimer's disease subjects. Conclusion It is possible that some senile persons with frontotemporal lobar degeneration-like maladaptive behavior may suffer from subclinical AS. PMID:22719743

  7. Anatomic Correlates of Stereotypies in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Keith A.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2009-01-01

    Stereotypies are common in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) however the anatomical correlates of stereotypies are unknown. We therefore set out to compare patterns of grey matter volume loss in FTLD subjects with and without stereotypies. Subjects with a diagnosis of FTLD that met international consensus criteria were prospectively recruited and separated into those with and without stereotypies. MRI and cognitive measures were obtained and voxel-based morphometry was used to assess the patterns of grey matter volume loss in those with and without stereotypies, compared to a group of age-and gender-matched controls. Demographic and clinical features were similar between subjects with and without stereotypies. FTLD subjects with stereotypies had greater volume loss in the striatum compared to those without stereotypies. Those without stereotypies showed a more widespread and typical pattern of cortical frontotemporal loss. Stereotypies in FTLD are therefore associated with a greater proportion of striatal to cortical volume loss than those without stereotypies. PMID:17574708

  8. Two distinct subtypes of right temporal variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, K A.; Whitwell, J L.; Knopman, D S.; Boeve, B F.; Vemuri, P; Senjem, M L.; Parisi, J E.; Ivnik, R J.; Dickson, D W.; Petersen, R C.; Jack, C R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Right temporal frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an anatomic variant of FTD associated with relatively distinct behavioral and cognitive symptoms. We aimed to determine whether right temporal FTD is a homogeneous clinical, imaging, and pathologic/genetic entity. Methods: In this case-control study, 101 subjects with FTD were identified. Atlas-based parcellation generated temporal, frontal, and parietal grey matter volumes which were used to identify subjects with a right temporal dominant atrophy pattern. Clinical, neuropsychological, genetic, and neuropathologic features were reviewed. The subjects with right temporal FTD were grouped by initial clinical diagnosis and voxel-based morphometry was used to assess grey matter loss in the different groups, compared to controls, and each other. Results: We identified 20 subjects with right temporal FTD. Twelve had been initially diagnosed with behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD), and the other 8 with semantic dementia (SMD). Personality change and inappropriate behaviors were more frequent in the bvFTD group, while prosopagnosia, word-finding difficulties, comprehension problems, and topographagnosia were more frequent in the SMD group. The bvFTD group showed greater loss in frontal lobes than the SMD group. The SMD group showed greater fusiform loss than the bvFTD group. All 8 bvFTD subjects with pathologic/genetic diagnosis showed abnormalities in tau protein (7 with tau mutations), while all three SMD subjects with pathology showed abnormalities in TDP-43 (p = 0.006). Conclusions: We have identified 2 subtypes of right temporal variant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) allowing further differentiation of FTD subjects with underlying tau pathology from those with TDP-43 pathology. GLOSSARY ADPR = Alzheimer Disease Patient Registry; ADRC = Alzheimer Disease Research Center; bvFTD = behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia; CDR-SB = Clinical Dementia Rating Scale sum of boxes; FDR = False Discovery Rate; FTD

  9. The frontotemporal syndrome of ALS is associated with poor survival.

    PubMed

    Govaarts, Rosanne; Beeldman, Emma; Kampelmacher, Mike J; van Tol, Marie-Jose; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Kooi, Anneke J; Wijkstra, Peter J; Zijnen-Suyker, Marianne; Cobben, Nicolle A M; Schmand, Ben A; de Haan, Rob J; de Visser, Marianne; Raaphorst, Joost

    2016-12-01

    Thirty percent of ALS patients have a frontotemporal syndrome (FS), defined as behavioral changes or cognitive impairment. Despite previous studies, there are no firm conclusions on the effect of the FS on survival and the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in ALS. We examined the effect of the FS on survival and the start and duration of NIV in ALS. Behavioral changes were defined as >22 points on the ALS-Frontotemporal-Dementia-Questionnaire or ≥3 points on ≥2 items of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Cognitive impairment was defined as below the fifth percentile on ≥2 tests of executive function, memory or language. Classic ALS was defined as ALS without the frontotemporal syndrome. We performed survival analyses from symptom onset and time from NIV initiation, respectively, to death. The impact of the explanatory variables on survival and NIV initiation were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. We included 110 ALS patients (76 men) with a mean age of 62 years. Median survival time was 4.3 years (95 % CI 3.53-5.13). Forty-seven patients (43 %) had an FS. Factors associated with shorter survival were FS, bulbar onset, older age at onset, short time to diagnosis and a C9orf72 repeat expansion. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for the FS was 2.29 (95 % CI 1.44-3.65, p < 0.001) in a multivariate model. Patients with an FS had a shorter survival after NIV initiation (adjusted HR 2.70, 95 % CI 1.04-4.67, p = 0.04). In conclusion, there is an association between the frontotemporal syndrome and poor survival in ALS, which remains present after initiation of NIV.

  10. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies. © 2014 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Motor signatures of emotional reactivity in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Charles R; Hardy, Chris J D; Russell, Lucy L; Clark, Camilla N; Bond, Rebecca L; Dick, Katrina M; Brotherhood, Emilie V; Mummery, Cath J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Kilner, James M; Warren, Jason D

    2018-01-18

    Automatic motor mimicry is essential to the normal processing of perceived emotion, and disrupted automatic imitation might underpin socio-emotional deficits in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly the frontotemporal dementias. However, the pathophysiology of emotional reactivity in these diseases has not been elucidated. We studied facial electromyographic responses during emotion identification on viewing videos of dynamic facial expressions in 37 patients representing canonical frontotemporal dementia syndromes versus 21 healthy older individuals. Neuroanatomical associations of emotional expression identification accuracy and facial muscle reactivity were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Controls showed characteristic profiles of automatic imitation, and this response predicted correct emotion identification. Automatic imitation was reduced in the behavioural and right temporal variant groups, while the normal coupling between imitation and correct identification was lost in the right temporal and semantic variant groups. Grey matter correlates of emotion identification and imitation were delineated within a distributed network including primary visual and motor, prefrontal, insular, anterior temporal and temporo-occipital junctional areas, with common involvement of supplementary motor cortex across syndromes. Impaired emotional mimesis may be a core mechanism of disordered emotional signal understanding and reactivity in frontotemporal dementia, with implications for the development of novel physiological biomarkers of socio-emotional dysfunction in these diseases.

  12. SQSTM1 Mutations in French Patients With Frontotemporal Dementia or Frontotemporal Dementia With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Guerreiro, Rita; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Bras, Jose; Nicolas, Gael; Gabelle, Audrey; Didic, Mira; De Septenville, Anne; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Lenglet, Timothée; Latouche, Morwena; Kabashi, Edor; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Hardy, John; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Mutations in the SQSTM1 gene, coding for p62, are a cause of Paget disease of bone and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, SQSTM1 mutations were confirmed in ALS, and mutations were also identified in 3 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), suggesting a role for SQSTM1 in FTD. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the exact contribution of SQSTM1 to FTD and FTD with ALS (FTD-ALS) in an independent cohort of patients. DESIGN A SQSTM1 mutation was first identified in a multiplex family with FTD by use of whole-exome sequencing. To evaluate the frequency of SQSTM1 mutations, we sequenced this gene in a cohort of patients with FTD or FTD-ALS, with no mutations in known FTD and ALS genes. SETTING Primary care or referral center. PARTICIPANTS An overall cohort of 188 French patients, including 132 probands with FTD and 56 probands with FTD-ALS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Frequency of SQSTM1 mutations in patients with FTD or FTD-ALS; description of associated phenotypes. RESULTS We identified 4 heterozygous missense mutations in 4 unrelated families with FTD; only 1 family had clinical symptoms of Paget disease of bone, and only 1 family had clinical symptoms of FTD-ALS, possibly owing to the low penetrance of some of the clinical manifestations. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although the frequency of the mutations is low in our series (4 of 188 patients [2%]), our results, similar to those already reported, support a direct pathogenic role of p62 in different types of FTD. PMID:24042580

  13. Apathy and impulsivity in frontotemporal lobar degeneration syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Coyle-Gilchrist, Ian T. S.; Jones, P. Simon; Vázquez Rodríguez, Patricia; Wilcox, Alicia; Wehmann, Eileen; Dick, Katrina M.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Apathy and impulsivity are common and disabling consequences of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. They cause substantial carer distress, but their aetiology remains elusive. There are critical limitations to previous studies in this area including (i) the assessment of either apathy or impulsivity alone, despite their frequent co-existence; (ii) the assessment of behavioural changes within single diagnostic groups; and (iii) the use of limited sets of tasks or questions that relate to just one aspect of these multifactorial constructs. We proposed an alternative, dimensional approach that spans behavioural and language variants of frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome. This accommodates the commonalities of apathy and impulsivity across disorders and reveals their cognitive and anatomical bases. The ability to measure the components of apathy and impulsivity and their associated neural correlates across diagnostic groups would provide better novel targets for pharmacological manipulations, and facilitate new treatment strategies and strengthen translational models. We therefore sought to determine the neurocognitive components of apathy and impulsivity in frontotemporal lobar degeneration syndromes. The frequency and characteristics of apathy and impulsivity were determined by neuropsychological and behavioural assessments in 149 patients and 50 controls from the PIck’s disease and Progressive supranuclear palsy Prevalence and INcidence study (PiPPIN). We derived dimensions of apathy and impulsivity using principal component analysis and employed these in volumetric analyses of grey and white matter in a subset of 70 patients (progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 22; corticobasal syndrome, n = 13; behavioural variant, n = 14; primary progressive aphasias, n = 21) and 27 control subjects. Apathy and impulsivity were present across diagnostic groups, despite being criteria for behavioural variant frontotemporal

  14. Distinct behavioural profiles in frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, J; Bathgate, D; Varma, A; Blackshaw, A; Gibbons, Z; Neary, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test predictions that frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia give rise to distinct patterns of behavioural change.
METHODS—An informant based semistructured behavioural interview, covering the domains of basic and social emotions, social and personal behaviour, sensory behaviour, eating and oral behaviour, repetitive behaviours, rituals, and compulsions, was administered to carers of 41 patients with semantic dementia and with apathetic (FTD-A) and disinhibited (FTD-D) forms of frontotemporal dementia.
RESULTS—Consistent with prediction, emotional changes differentiated FTD from semantic dementia. Whereas lack of emotional response was pervasive in FTD, it was more selective in semantic dementia, affecting particularly the capacity to show fear. Social avoidance occurred more often in FTD and social seeking in semantic dementia. Patients with FTD showed reduced response to pain, whereas patients with semantic dementia more often showed exaggerated reactions to sensory stimuli. Gluttony and indiscriminate eating were characteristic of FTD, whereas patients with semantic dementia were more likely to exhibit food fads. Hyperorality, involving inedible objects, was unrelated to gluttony, indicating different underlying mechanisms. Repetitive behaviours were common in both FTD and semantic dementia, but had a more compulsive quality in semantic dementia. Behavioural differences were greater between semantic dementia and FTD-A than FTD-D. A logistic regression analysis indicated that emotional and repetitive, compulsive behaviours discriminated FTD from semantic dementia with 97% accuracy.
CONCLUSION—The findings confirm predictions regarding behavioural differences in frontotemporal and semantic dementia and point to differential roles of the frontal and temporal lobes in affect, social functioning, eating, and compulsive behaviour.

 PMID:11181853

  15. [An autopsied case of senile onset frontotemporal lobar degeneration].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Deguchi, Akira; Yoshida, Mari

    2011-06-01

    A Japanese male with no family history of neurological disease or dementia showed behavioral abnormalities including egocentric and antisocial behavior at the age of 80. Over the next few years, other psychiatric symptoms such as allotriophagy and stereotypical behavior were also observed and his abnormal behavior became a social problem. Neurological examination revealed no apparent motor abnormalities, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, or ataxia. Aphasia, including semantic dementia was not apparent. The severity of memory disturbance was relatively milder than his psychiatric symptoms. Daily living activities and conversational ability were relatively maintained until shortly before his death at the age of 86. The clinical diagnosis was Alzheimer disease. Autopsy revealed that the brain weighed 950 g; frontotemporal atrophy with lateral ventricular dilatation was apparent. Neuron loss, gliosis, and tissue rarefaction were recognized in the frontotemporal cortex, subiculum, transentorhinal cortex, amygdala, and insular cortex and were particularly noticeable in the superficial layer of the cortex. Many ubiquitin-positive/TDP-43 positive but tau-negative dystrophic neurites with a few neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions were widely observed. Neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions were also observed in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Although the spinal cord was not investigated, there was no apparent involvement of the motor neuron system. Small numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques were observed, corresponding to Braak stage II and CERAD stage B, respectively. Argyrophilic grains, Lewy bodies and Pick bodies were not observed. The patient was pathologically diagnosed with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive/TDP-43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP) and without motor neuron disease. No mutation was found in the TDP-43 gene. We considered the psychiatric symptoms and head CT findings of the present patient to be important observations

  16. Profiles of White Matter Tract Pathology in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Colin J; Ridgway, Gerard R; Malone, Ian B; Downey, Laura E; Beck, Jonathan; Kinnunen, Kirsi M; Schmitz, Nicole; Golden, Hannah L; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Schott, Jonathan M; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in improving clinical and neurobiological characterisation of frontotemporal dementia and in defining the role of brain network disintegration in its pathogenesis, information about white matter pathway alterations in frontotemporal dementia remains limited. Here we investigated white matter tract damage using an unbiased, template-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) protocol in a cohort of 27 patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) representing both major genetic and sporadic forms, in relation both to healthy individuals and to patients with Alzheimer's disease. Widespread white matter tract pathology was identified in the bvFTD group compared with both healthy controls and Alzheimer's disease group, with prominent involvement of uncinate fasciculus, cingulum bundle and corpus callosum. Relatively discrete and distinctive white matter profiles were associated with genetic subgroups of bvFTD associated with MAPT and C9ORF72 mutations. Comparing diffusivity metrics, optimal overall separation of the bvFTD group from the healthy control group was signalled using radial diffusivity, whereas optimal overall separation of the bvFTD group from the Alzheimer's disease group was signalled using fractional anisotropy. Comparing white matter changes with regional grey matter atrophy (delineated using voxel based morphometry) in the bvFTD cohort revealed co-localisation between modalities particularly in the anterior temporal lobe, however white matter changes extended widely beyond the zones of grey matter atrophy. Our findings demonstrate a distributed signature of white matter alterations that is likely to be core to the pathophysiology of bvFTD and further suggest that this signature is modulated by underlying molecular pathologies. PMID:24510641

  17. Genetic variability in CHMP2B and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Parastoo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Yuan, Wuxing; Grafman, Jordan; Tierney, Michael; Huey, Edward; Bell, Jason; Morris, Chris M; Kalaria, Rajesh N; van Rensburg, Susan J; Niehaus, Dana; Potocnik, Felix; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Salehi-Rad, Shabnam; Sato, Christine; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Hardy, John

    2006-01-01

    A nonsense/protein chain-terminating mutation in the CHMP2B gene has recently been reported as a cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the single large family known to show linkage to chromosome 3. Screening for mutations in this gene in a large series of FTD families and individual patients led to the identification of a protein-truncating mutation in 2 unaffected members of an Afrikaner family with FTD, but not in their affected relatives. The putative pathogenicity of CHMP2B mutations for dementia is discussed.

  18. Frontotemporal networks and behavioral symptoms in primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    D'Anna, Lucio; Mesulam, Marsel M; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Murphy, Declan; Wieneke, Christina; Martersteck, Adam; Cobia, Derin; Rogalski, Emily; Catani, Marco

    2016-04-12

    To determine if behavioral symptoms in patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) were associated with degeneration of a ventral frontotemporal network. We used diffusion tensor imaging tractography to quantify abnormalities of the uncinate fasciculus that connects the anterior temporal lobe and the ventrolateral frontal cortex. Two additional ventral tracts were studied: the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We also measured cortical thickness of anterior temporal and orbitofrontal regions interconnected by these tracts. Thirty-three patients with PPA and 26 healthy controls were recruited. In keeping with the PPA diagnosis, behavioral symptoms were distinctly less prominent than the language deficits. Although all 3 tracts had structural pathology as determined by tractography, significant correlations with scores on the Frontal Behavioral Inventory were found only for the uncinate fasciculus. Cortical atrophy of the orbitofrontal and anterior temporal lobe cortex was also correlated with these scores. Our findings indicate that damage to a frontotemporal network mediated by the uncinate fasciculus may underlie the emergence of behavioral symptoms in patients with PPA. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Frontotemporal networks and behavioral symptoms in primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, Marsel M.; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Murphy, Declan; Wieneke, Christina; Martersteck, Adam; Cobia, Derin; Rogalski, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine if behavioral symptoms in patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) were associated with degeneration of a ventral frontotemporal network. Methods: We used diffusion tensor imaging tractography to quantify abnormalities of the uncinate fasciculus that connects the anterior temporal lobe and the ventrolateral frontal cortex. Two additional ventral tracts were studied: the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We also measured cortical thickness of anterior temporal and orbitofrontal regions interconnected by these tracts. Thirty-three patients with PPA and 26 healthy controls were recruited. Results: In keeping with the PPA diagnosis, behavioral symptoms were distinctly less prominent than the language deficits. Although all 3 tracts had structural pathology as determined by tractography, significant correlations with scores on the Frontal Behavioral Inventory were found only for the uncinate fasciculus. Cortical atrophy of the orbitofrontal and anterior temporal lobe cortex was also correlated with these scores. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that damage to a frontotemporal network mediated by the uncinate fasciculus may underlie the emergence of behavioral symptoms in patients with PPA. PMID:26992858

  20. Core features of frontotemporal dementia recapitulated in progranulin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, N.; Dearborn, J.T.; Wozniak, D.F.; Cairns, N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is typified by behavioral and cognitive changes manifested as altered social comportment and impaired memory performance. To investigate the neurodegenerative consequences of progranulin gene (GRN) mutations, which cause an inherited form of FTD, we used previously generated progranulin knockout mice (Grn-/-). Specifically, we characterized two cohorts of early and later middle-age wild type and knockout mice using a battery of tests to assess neurological integrity and behavioral phenotypes analogous to FTD. The Grn-/- mice exhibited reduced social engagement and learning and memory deficits. Immunohistochemical approaches were used to demonstrate the presence of lesions characteristic of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with GRN mutation including ubiquitination, microgliosis, and reactive astrocytosis, the pathological substrate of FTD. Importantly, Grn-/- mice also have decreased overall survival compared to Grn+/+ mice. These data suggest that the Grn-/- mouse reproduces some core features of FTD with respect to behavior, pathology, and survival. This murine model may serve as a valuable in vivo model of FTLD with GRN mutation through which molecular mechanisms underlying the disease can be further dissected. PMID:21933710

  1. The Power of Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Screening Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Corey T.; Avants, Brian B.; Cook, Philip; Ungar, Lyle; Trojanowski, John Q.; Grossman, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease that can result from either frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) or Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. It is critical to establish statistically powerful biomarkers that can achieve substantial cost-savings and increase feasibility of clinical trials. We assessed three broad categories of neuroimaging methods to screen underlying FTLD and AD pathology in a clinical FTD series: global measures (e.g., ventricular volume), anatomical volumes of interest (VOIs) (e.g., hippocampus) using a standard atlas, and data-driven VOIs using Eigenanatomy. We evaluated clinical FTD patients (N=93) with cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter (GM) MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess whether they had underlying FTLD or AD pathology. Linear regression was performed to identify the optimal VOIs for each method in a training dataset and then we evaluated classification sensitivity and specificity in an independent test cohort. Power was evaluated by calculating minimum sample sizes (mSS) required in the test classification analyses for each model. The data-driven VOI analysis using a multimodal combination of GM MRI and DTI achieved the greatest classification accuracy (89% SENSITIVE; 89% SPECIFIC) and required a lower minimum sample size (N=26) relative to anatomical VOI and global measures. We conclude that a data-driven VOI approach employing Eigenanatomy provides more accurate classification, benefits from increased statistical power in unseen datasets, and therefore provides a robust method for screening underlying pathology in FTD patients for entry into clinical trials. PMID:24687814

  2. How preserved is episodic memory in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia?

    PubMed

    Hornberger, M; Piguet, O; Graham, A J; Nestor, P J; Hodges, J R

    2010-02-09

    Studies have shown variable memory performance in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Our study investigated whether this variability is due to the admixture of patients with true bvFTD and phenocopy patients. We also sought to compare performance of patients with bvFTD and patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We analyzed neuropsychological memory performance in patients with a clinical diagnosis of bvFTD divided into those who progressed (n = 50) and those who remained stable (n = 39), patients with AD (n = 64), and healthy controls (n = 64). Patients with progressive bvFTD were impaired on most memory tests to a similar level to that of patients with early AD. Findings from a subset of patients with progressive bvFTD with confirmed FTLD pathology (n = 10) corroborated these findings. By contrast, patients with phenocopy bvFTD performed significantly better than progressors and patients with AD. Logistic regression revealed that patients with bvFTD can be distinguished to a high degree (85%) on the immediate recall score of a word list learning test (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test). Our results provide evidence for an underlying memory deficit in "real" or progressive behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) similar to Alzheimer disease, though the groups differ in orientation scores, with patients with bvFTD being intact. Exclusion solely based on impaired neuropsychological memory performance can potentially lead to an underdiagnosis of FTD.

  3. Managing abnormal eating behaviours in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with topiramate.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Tsuno, Norifumi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Abnormal eating behaviours are specific to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and increase caregiver burden. Topiramate, an anticonvulsant, suppresses cravings for alcohol and other substances and is a potential treatment for binge eating. However, there are few reports on topiramate efficacy for abnormal eating behaviours in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients. We present three Japanese frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with abnormal eating behaviours. Topiramate was effective, especially for compulsive eating, in cases with distinct lobar atrophy, but not for all abnormal eating behaviours. © 2013 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2013 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  4. Neurocognitive differential diagnosis of dementing diseases: Alzheimer's Dementia, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Alyssa J; Parsons, Thomas D; McCue, Robert; Sellers, Alfred; Burns, William J

    2006-11-01

    Similarities in presentation of Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder, pose differential diagnosis challenges. The current study identifies specific neuropsychological patterns of scores for Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder. Neuropsychological domains directly assessed in the study included: immediate memory, delayed memory, confrontational naming, verbal fluency, attention, concentration, and executive functioning. The results reveal specific neuropsychological comparative profiles for Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder. The identification of these profiles will assist in the differential diagnosis of these disorders and aid in patient treatment.

  5. Robust Resilience of the Frontotemporal Syntax System to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Samu, Dávid; Davis, Simon W.; Geerligs, Linda; Mustafa, Abdur; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2016-01-01

    Brain function is thought to become less specialized with age. However, this view is largely based on findings of increased activation during tasks that fail to separate task-related processes (e.g., attention, decision making) from the cognitive process under examination. Here we take a systems-level approach to separate processes specific to language comprehension from those related to general task demands and to examine age differences in functional connectivity both within and between those systems. A large population-based sample (N = 111; 22–87 years) from the Cambridge Centre for Aging and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) was scanned using functional MRI during two versions of an experiment: a natural listening version in which participants simply listened to spoken sentences and an explicit task version in which they rated the acceptability of the same sentences. Independent components analysis across the combined data from both versions showed that although task-free language comprehension activates only the auditory and frontotemporal (FTN) syntax networks, performing a simple task with the same sentences recruits several additional networks. Remarkably, functionality of the critical FTN is maintained across age groups, showing no difference in within-network connectivity or responsivity to syntactic processing demands despite gray matter loss and reduced connectivity to task-related networks. We found no evidence for reduced specialization or compensation with age. Overt task performance was maintained across the lifespan and performance in older, but not younger, adults related to crystallized knowledge, suggesting that decreased between-network connectivity may be compensated for by older adults' richer knowledge base. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding spoken language requires the rapid integration of information at many different levels of analysis. Given the complexity and speed of this process, it is remarkably well preserved with age. Although previous

  6. What are the different initial presentations of frontotemporal dementia?

    PubMed

    Chow, Tiffany W

    2011-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) symptoms at the beginning of illness are in either the realm of behavioral disturbance or in language disruption, also known as aphasia. Based on specific constellations of behavioral change or characteristics of the aphasia, physicians can anticipate the type of protein that is abnormal in the brain. Family history rich with similar instances of illness can further guide the cause of illness in an individual. Knowing the type of protein abnormality (proteinopathy) from among the three most common in FTD (tau, TDP-43, or fused in sarcoma) can help treating clinicians to advise families on the future course of illness and future clinical drug trials that would be most applicable to each patient.

  7. Caregiver Burden in Frontotemporal Degeneration and Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Nicole; Schupf, Nicole; Grafman, Jordan; Huey, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Caregiver stress is often a serious problem when caring for a patient with frontal lobe dysfunction. Methods A total of 102 caregivers of both patients with frontotemporal degeneration and corticobasal syndrome completed the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe) and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI). To analyze the association between apathy or disinhibition (or both) and caregiver burden, the effects of the total FrSBe and the apathy and disinhibition subscales of the FrSBE on the total ZBI score were assessed with logistic regressions and t tests. Results Total FrSBE score and the apathy FrSBE subscore predicted caregiver burden. Apathy occurred without disinhibition, and the two occurred together, but disinhibition without apathy was very rare. Conclusions Disinhibition without apathy occurred very rarely. Apathy was more associated with caregiver burden than disinhibition. PMID:24022248

  8. Molecular Pathways Bridging Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zanardini, Roberta; Ciani, Miriam; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The overlap of symptoms between neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases has been reported. Neuropsychiatric alterations are commonly observed in dementia, especially in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), which is the most common clinical FTD subtype. At the same time, psychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia (SCZ), can display symptoms of dementia, including features of frontal dysfunction with relative sparing of memory. In the present review, we discuss common molecular features in these pathologies with a special focus on FTD. Molecules like Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and progranulin are linked to the pathophysiology of both neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. In these brain-associated illnesses, the presence of disease-associated variants in BDNF and progranulin (GRN) genes cause a reduction of circulating proteins levels, through alterations in proteins expression or secretion. For these reasons, we believe that prevention and therapy of psychiatric and neurological disorders could be achieved enhancing both BDNF and progranulin levels thanks to drug discovery efforts. PMID:26869919

  9. Functional correlates of musical and visual ability in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Miller, B L; Boone, K; Cummings, J L; Read, S L; Mishkin, F

    2000-05-01

    The emergence of new skills in the setting of dementia suggests that loss of function in one brain area can release new functions elsewhere. To characterise 12 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) who acquired, or sustained, new musical or visual abilities despite progression of their dementia. Twelve patients with FTD who acquired or maintained musical or artistic ability were compared with 46 patients with FTD in whom new or sustained ability was absent. The group with musical or visual ability performed better on visual, but worse on verbal tasks than did the other patients with FTD. Nine had asymmetrical left anterior dysfunction. Nine showed the temporal lobe variant of FTD. Loss of function in the left anterior temporal lobe may lead to facilitation of artistic or musical skills. Patients with the left-sided temporal lobe variant of FTD offer an unexpected window into the neurological mediation of visual and musical talents.

  10. Diagnosis and management of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Peter S; Miller, Bruce L

    2014-04-01

    Frontotemporal dementia was documented over a century ago. The last decade, however, has seen substantial changes in our conceptions of this increasingly recognized disorder. Different clinical variants have been delineated, the most common of which is the behavioral variant (bvFTD). Updated diagnostic criteria have been established. New histopathological findings and genetic etiologies have been discovered. Research continues to uncover molecular mechanisms by which abnormal proteins accumulate in degenerating brain tissue. Novel neuroimaging techniques suggest that functional networks are diminished in bvFTD that might be relevant to empathy and social behavior. Despite rapid advances in our understanding of bvFTD, the disease is still under-recognized and commonly misdiagnosed. The result is inappropriate patient care. Recognizing the various presentations of bvFTD and its histological and genetic subtypes might further diagnosis, treatment, and research. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Peter; Miller, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was documented over a century ago. The last decade, however, has seen substantial changes in our conceptions of this increasingly recognized disorder. Different clinical variants have been delineated, the most common of which is the behavioral variant (bvFTD). Updated diagnostic criteria have been established. New histopathological findings and genetic etiologies have been discovered. Research continues to uncover molecular mechanisms by which abnormal proteins accumulate in degenerating brain tissue. Novel neuroimaging techniques suggest that functional networks are diminished in bvFTD that may be relevant to empathy and social behavior. Despite rapid advances in our understanding of bvFTD, the disease is still under-recognized and commonly misdiagnosed. The result is inappropriate patient care. Recognizing the various presentations of bvFTD and its histological and genetic subtypes may further diagnosis, treatment and research. PMID:24315411

  12. Frontotemporal Dementia Selectively Impairs Transitive Reasoning About Familiar Spatial Environments

    PubMed Central

    Vartanian, Oshin; Goel, Vinod; Tierney, Michael; Huey, Edward D.; Grafman, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    Although patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are known to exhibit a wide range of cognitive and personality difficulties, some evidence suggests that there may be a degree of selectivity in their reasoning impairments. Based on a recent review of the neuroimaging literature on reasoning, the authors hypothesized that the presence or absence of familiar content may have a selective impact on the reasoning abilities of patients with FTD. Specifically, the authors predicted that patients with frontalvariant FTD would be more impaired when reasoning about transitive arguments involving familiar spatial environments than when reasoning about identical logical arguments involving unfamiliar spatial environments. As predicted, patients with FTD were less accurate than normal controls only when the content of arguments involved familiar spatial environments. These results indicate a degree of selectivity in the cognitive deficits of this patient population and suggest that the frontal-temporal lobe system may play a necessary role in reasoning about familiar material. PMID:19702415

  13. Common Molecular Pathways in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Jochen H; Hyman, Tony; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are age-related neurodegenerative diseases in which predominantly motor neurons and cerebral cortex neurons, respectively, are affected. Several novel ALS and FTD disease genes have been recently discovered, pointing toward a few overarching pathways in ALS/FTD pathogenesis. Nevertheless, a precise picture of how various cellular processes cause neuronal death, or how different routes leading to ALS and FTD are functionally connected is just emerging. Moreover, how the most recent milestone findings in the ALS/FTD field might lead to improved diagnosis and treatment is actively being explored. We highlight some of the most exciting recent topics in the field, which could potentially facilitate the identification of further links between the pathogenic ALS/FTD pathways related to autophagy, vesicle trafficking, and RNA metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The unique predisposition to criminal violations in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    Brain disorders can lead to criminal violations. Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are particularly prone to sociopathic behavior while retaining knowledge of their acts and of moral and conventional rules. This report describes four FTD patients who committed criminal violations in the presence of clear consciousness and sufficiently intact cognition. They understood the nature of their acts and the potential consequences, but did not feel sufficiently concerned to be deterred. FTD involves a unique pathologic combination affecting the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, with altered moral feelings, right anterior temporal loss of emotional empathy, and orbitofrontal changes with disinhibited, compulsive behavior. These case histories and the literature indicate that those with right temporal FTD retain the capacity to tell right from wrong but have the slow and insidious loss of the capacity for moral rationality. Patients with early FTD present a challenge to the criminal justice system to consider alterations in moral cognition before ascribing criminal responsibility.

  15. Processing emotion from abstract art in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam H.; Carton, Amelia M.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Jaisin, Kankamol; Marshall, Charles R.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract art may signal emotions independently of a biological or social carrier: it might therefore constitute a test case for defining brain mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and the impact of disease states on those mechanisms. This is potentially of particular relevance to diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum. These diseases are often led by emotional impairment despite retained or enhanced artistic interest in at least some patients. However, the processing of emotion from art has not been studied systematically in FTLD. Here we addressed this issue using a novel emotional valence matching task on abstract paintings in patients representing major syndromes of FTLD (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, n=11; sematic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), n=7; nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), n=6) relative to healthy older individuals (n=39). Performance on art emotion valence matching was compared between groups taking account of perceptual matching performance and assessed in relation to facial emotion matching using customised control tasks. Neuroanatomical correlates of art emotion processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain MR images. All patient groups had a deficit of art emotion processing relative to healthy controls; there were no significant interactions between syndromic group and emotion modality. Poorer art emotion valence matching performance was associated with reduced grey matter volume in right lateral occopitotemporal cortex in proximity to regions previously implicated in the processing of dynamic visual signals. Our findings suggest that abstract art may be a useful model system for investigating mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and aesthetic processing in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26748236

  16. Frontotemporal white matter changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Sharon; Goldstein, Laura H; Suckling, John; Ng, Virginia; Simmons, Andy; Chitnis, Xavier; Atkins, Louise; Williams, Steve C R; Leigh, P N

    2005-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction can occur in some patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who are not suffering from dementia. The most striking and consistent cognitive deficit has been found using tests of verbal fluency. ALS patients with verbal fluency deficits have shown functional imaging abnormalities predominantly in frontotemporal regions using positron emission tomography (PET). This study used automated volumetric voxel-based analysis of grey and white matter densities of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to explore the underlying pattern of structural cerebral change in nondemented ALS patients with verbal fluency deficits. Two groups of ALS patients, defined by the presence or absence of cognitive impairment on the basis of the Written Verbal Fluency Test (ALSi, cognitively impaired, n=11; ALSu, cognitively unimpaired n=12) were compared with healthy age matched controls (n=12). A comparison of the ALSi group with controls revealed significantly (p<0.002) reduced white matter volume in extensive motor and non-motor regions, including regions corresponding to frontotemporal association fibres. These patients demonstrated a corresponding cognitive profile of executive and memory dysfunction. Less extensive white matter reductions were revealed in the comparison of the ALSu and control groups in regions corresponding to frontal association fibres. White matter volumes were also found to correlate with performance on memory tests. There were no significant reductions in grey matter volume in the comparison of either patient group with controls. The structural white matter abnormalities in frontal and temporal regions revealed here may underlie the cognitive and functional imaging abnormalities previously reported in non-demented ALS patients. The results also suggest that extra-motor structural abnormalities may be present in ALS patients with no evidence of cognitive change. The findings support the hypothesis of a continuum of extra

  17. Processing emotion from abstract art in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miriam H; Carton, Amelia M; Hardy, Christopher J; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Fletcher, Phillip D; Jaisin, Kankamol; Marshall, Charles R; Henley, Susie M D; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2016-01-29

    art may signal emotions independently of a biological or social carrier: it might therefore constitute a test case for defining brain mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and the impact of disease states on those mechanisms. This is potentially of particular relevance to diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum. These diseases are often led by emotional impairment despite retained or enhanced artistic interest in at least some patients. However, the processing of emotion from art has not been studied systematically in FTLD. Here we addressed this issue using a novel emotional valence matching task on abstract paintings in patients representing major syndromes of FTLD (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, n=11; sematic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), n=7; nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), n=6) relative to healthy older individuals (n=39). Performance on art emotion valence matching was compared between groups taking account of perceptual matching performance and assessed in relation to facial emotion matching using customised control tasks. Neuroanatomical correlates of art emotion processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain MR images. All patient groups had a deficit of art emotion processing relative to healthy controls; there were no significant interactions between syndromic group and emotion modality. Poorer art emotion valence matching performance was associated with reduced grey matter volume in right lateral occopitotemporal cortex in proximity to regions previously implicated in the processing of dynamic visual signals. Our findings suggest that abstract art may be a useful model system for investigating mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and aesthetic processing in neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. First Symptoms and Neurocognitive Correlates of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-García, Hernando; Reyes, Pablo; García, Adolfo; Baéz, Sandra; Martinez, Angela; Santacruz, José Manuel; Slachevsky, Andrea; Sigman, Mariano; Matallana, Diana; Ibañez, Agustín

    2016-10-04

    Previous works highlight the neurocognitive differences between apathetic and disinhibited clinical presentations of the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). However, little is known regarding how the early presentation (i.e., first symptom) is associated to the neurocognitive correlates of the disease's clinical presentation at future stages of disease. We analyzed the neurocognitive correlates of patients with bvFTD who debuted with apathy or disinhibition as first symptom of disease. We evaluated the neuropsychological, clinical, and neuroanatomical (3T structural images) correlates in a group of healthy controls (n = 30) and two groups of bvFTD patients (presented with apathy [AbvFTD, n = 18] or disinhibition [DbvFTD, n = 16]). To differentiate groups according to first symptoms, we used multivariate analyses. The first symptom in patients described the evolution of the disease. AbvFTD and DbvFTD patients showed increased brain atrophy and increased levels of disinhibition and apathy, respectively. Whole brain analyzes in AbvFTD revealed atrophy in the frontal, insular, and temporal areas. DbvFTD, in turn, presented atrophy in the prefrontal regions, temporoparietal junction, insula, and temporoparietal region. Increased atrophy in DbvFTD patients (compared to AbvFTD) was observed in frontotemporal regions. Multivariate analyses confirmed that a set of brain areas including right orbitofrontal, right dorsolateral prefrontal, and left caudate were enough to distinguish the patients' subgroups.∥Conclusion: First symptom in bvFTD patients described the neurocognitive impairments after around three years of disease, playing an important role in the early detection, disease tracking, and neuroanatomical specification of bvFTD, as well as in future research on potential disease-modifying treatments.

  19. Abnormal network connectivity in frontotemporal dementia: evidence for prefrontal isolation.

    PubMed

    Farb, Norman A S; Grady, Cheryl L; Strother, Stephen; Tang-Wai, David F; Masellis, Mario; Black, Sandra; Freedman, Morris; Pollock, Bruce G; Campbell, Karen L; Hasher, Lynn; Chow, Tiffany W

    2013-01-01

    Degraded social function, disinhibition, and stereotypy are defining characteristics of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), manifesting in both the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and semantic dementia (SD) subtypes. Recent neuroimaging research also associates FTD with alterations in the brain's intrinsic connectivity networks. The present study explored the relationship between neural network connectivity and specific behavioral symptoms in FTD. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed to investigate neural network changes in bvFTD and SD. We used independent components analysis (ICA) to examine changes in frontolimbic network connectivity, as well as several metrics of local network strength, such as the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations, regional homogeneity, and seed-based functional connectivity. For each analysis, we compared each FTD subgroup to healthy controls, characterizing general and subtype-unique network changes. The relationship between abnormal connectivity in FTD and behavior disturbances was explored. Across multiple analytic approaches, both bvFTD and SD were associated with disrupted frontolimbic connectivity and elevated local connectivity within the prefrontal cortex. Even after controlling for structural atrophy, prefrontal hyperconnectivity was robustly associated with apathy scores. Frontolimbic disconnection was associated with lower disinhibition scores, suggesting that abnormal frontolimbic connectivity contributes to positive symptoms in dementia. Unique to bvFTD, stereotypy was associated with elevated default network connectivity in the right angular gyrus. The behavioral variant was also associated with marginally higher apathy scores and a more diffuse pattern of prefrontal hyperconnectivity than SD. The present findings support a theory of FTD as a disorder of frontolimbic disconnection leading to unconstrained prefrontal connectivity. Prefrontal hyperconnectivity may

  20. CSF neurofilament concentration reflects disease severity in frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scherling, Carole S.; Hall, Tracey; Berisha, Flora; Klepac, Kristen; Karydas, Anna; Coppola, Giovanni; Kramer, Joel H.; Rabinovici, Gil; Ahlijanian, Michael; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William; Grinberg, Lea T.; Rosen, Howard; Meredith, Jere; Boxer, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentration is elevated in neurological disorders including frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). We investigated the clinical correlates of elevated CSF NfL levels in FTD. Methods CSF NfL, amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), tau and phosphorylated tau (ptau) concentrations were compared in 47 normal controls (NC), 8 asymptomatic gene carriers (NC2) of FTD-causing mutations, 79 FTD (45 behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD], 18 progressive nonfluent aphasia [PNFA], 16 semantic dementia [SD]), 22 progressive supranuclear palsy, 50 Alzheimer’s disease, 6 Parkinson’s disease and 17 corticobasal syndrome patients. Correlations between CSF analyte levels were performed with neuropsychological measures and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale sum of boxes (CDRsb). Voxel-based morphometry of structural MR images determined the relationship between brain volume and CSF NfL. Results Mean CSF NfL concentrations were higher in bvFTD, SD and PNFA than other groups. NfL in NC2 was similar to NC. CSF NfL, but not other CSF measures, correlated with CDRsb and neuropsychological measures in FTD, and not in other diagnostic groups. Analyses in two independent FTD cohorts and a group of autopsy verified or biomarker enriched cases confirmed the larger group analysis. In FTD, gray and white matter volume negatively correlated with CSF NfL concentration, such that individuals with highest NfL levels exhibited the most atrophy. Interpretation CSF NfL is elevated in symptomatic FTD and correlates with disease severity. This measurement may be a useful surrogate endpoint of disease severity in FTD clinical trials. Longitudinal studies of CSF NfL in FTD are warranted. PMID:24242746

  1. Sensitivity of revised diagnostic criteria for the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, John R.; Knopman, David; Mendez, Mario F.; Kramer, Joel H.; Neuhaus, John; van Swieten, John C.; Seelaar, Harro; Dopper, Elise G. P.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Hillis, Argye E.; Josephs, Keith A.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Kertesz, Andrew; Seeley, William W.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Johnson, Julene K.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria-Luisa; Rosen, Howard; Prioleau-Latham, Caroline E.; Lee, Albert; Kipps, Christopher M.; Lillo, Patricia; Piguet, Olivier; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Rossor, Martin N.; Warren, Jason D.; Fox, Nick C.; Galasko, Douglas; Salmon, David P.; Black, Sandra E.; Mesulam, Marsel; Weintraub, Sandra; Dickerson, Brad C.; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Pasquier, Florence; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Chow, Tiffany W.; Manes, Facundo; Grafman, Jordan; Cappa, Stefano F.; Freedman, Morris; Grossman, Murray; Miller, Bruce L.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the recent literature and collective experience, an international consortium developed revised guidelines for the diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. The validation process retrospectively reviewed clinical records and compared the sensitivity of proposed and earlier criteria in a multi-site sample of patients with pathologically verified frontotemporal lobar degeneration. According to the revised criteria, ‘possible’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia requires three of six clinically discriminating features (disinhibition, apathy/inertia, loss of sympathy/empathy, perseverative/compulsive behaviours, hyperorality and dysexecutive neuropsychological profile). ‘Probable’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia adds functional disability and characteristic neuroimaging, while behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia ‘with definite frontotemporal lobar degeneration’ requires histopathological confirmation or a pathogenic mutation. Sixteen brain banks contributed cases meeting histopathological criteria for frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or vascular dementia at presentation. Cases with predominant primary progressive aphasia or extra-pyramidal syndromes were excluded. In these autopsy-confirmed cases, an experienced neurologist or psychiatrist ascertained clinical features necessary for making a diagnosis according to previous and proposed criteria at presentation. Of 137 cases where features were available for both proposed and previously established criteria, 118 (86%) met ‘possible’ criteria, and 104 (76%) met criteria for ‘probable’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. In contrast, 72 cases (53%) met previously established criteria for the syndrome (P < 0.001 for comparison with ‘possible’ and ‘probable’ criteria). Patients who failed to meet revised

  2. Assessment of Iron Deposition in the Brain in Frontotemporal Dementia and Its Correlation with Behavioral Traits.

    PubMed

    Sheelakumari, R; Kesavadas, C; Varghese, T; Sreedharan, R M; Thomas, B; Verghese, J; Mathuranath, P S

    2017-10-01

    Brain iron deposition has been implicated as a major culprit in the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. However, the quantitative assessment of iron in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia brains has not been performed, to our knowledge. The aim of our study was to investigate the characteristic iron levels in the frontotemporal dementia subtypes using susceptibility-weighted imaging and report its association with behavioral profiles. This prospective study included 46 patients with frontotemporal dementia (34 with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and 12 with primary progressive aphasia) and 34 age-matched healthy controls. We performed behavioral and neuropsychological assessment in all the subjects. The quantitative iron load was determined on SWI in the superior frontal gyrus and temporal pole, precentral gyrus, basal ganglia, anterior cingulate, frontal white matter, head and body of the hippocampus, red nucleus, substantia nigra, insula, and dentate nucleus. A linear regression analysis was performed to correlate iron content and behavioral scores in patients. The iron content of the bilateral superior frontal and temporal gyri, anterior cingulate, putamen, right hemispheric precentral gyrus, insula, hippocampus, and red nucleus was higher in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia than in controls. Patients with primary progressive aphasia had increased iron levels in the left superior temporal gyrus. In addition, right superior frontal gyrus iron deposition discriminated behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia from primary progressive aphasia. A strong positive association was found between apathy and iron content in the superior frontal gyrus and disinhibition and iron content in the putamen. Quantitative assessment of iron deposition with SWI may serve as a new biomarker in the diagnostic work-up of frontotemporal dementia and help distinguish frontotemporal dementia subtypes. © 2017

  3. Discrete Neural Correlates for the Recognition of Negative Emotions: Insights from Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kumfor, Fiona; Irish, Muireann; Hodges, John R.; Piguet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia have pervasive changes in emotion recognition and social cognition, yet the neural changes underlying these emotion processing deficits remain unclear. The multimodal system model of emotion proposes that basic emotions are dependent on distinct brain regions, which undergo significant pathological changes in frontotemporal dementia. As such, this syndrome may provide important insight into the impact of neural network degeneration upon the innate ability to recognise emotions. This study used voxel-based morphometry to identify discrete neural correlates involved in the recognition of basic emotions (anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise and happiness) in frontotemporal dementia. Forty frontotemporal dementia patients (18 behavioural-variant, 11 semantic dementia, 11 progressive nonfluent aphasia) and 27 healthy controls were tested on two facial emotion recognition tasks: The Ekman 60 and Ekman Caricatures. Although each frontotemporal dementia group showed impaired recognition of negative emotions, distinct associations between emotion-specific task performance and changes in grey matter intensity emerged. Fear recognition was associated with the right amygdala; disgust recognition with the left insula; anger recognition with the left middle and superior temporal gyrus; and sadness recognition with the left subcallosal cingulate, indicating that discrete neural substrates are necessary for emotion recognition in frontotemporal dementia. The erosion of emotion-specific neural networks in neurodegenerative disorders may produce distinct profiles of performance that are relevant to understanding the neurobiological basis of emotion processing. PMID:23805313

  4. Screening UBQLN-2 in French frontotemporal lobar degeneration and frontotemporal lobar degeneration-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Pariente, Jérémie; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-08-01

    The ubiquilin-2 gene (UBQLN-2) is the only amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related gene mapping on the X chromosome. Mutations in the PXX domain of UBQLN-2 have been first described in ALS patients with a mutational frequency of 2.6% in familial ALS cases with no evidence of male-to-male transmission. Different populations have been further tested with mutations largely distributed in the gene and lower frequency of positive cases. To determine the genetic contribution of UBQLN-2 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and FTLD-ALS, we screened a cohort of 136 French patients, identifying a missense variant (c.1006A>G; p.T336A) in 1 FTLD patient whose biological relevance to disease is questionable. We conclude that UBQLN-2 mutations related to ALS/FTLD are extremely rare in French FTLD and FTLD-ALS patients and should not be analyzed systematically. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Music Recognition in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Julene K; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Brambati, Simona M; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Janata, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare music recognition in patients with frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, Alzheimer disease, and controls and to evaluate the relationship between music recognition and brain volume. Background Recognition of familiar music depends on several levels of processing. There are few studies about how patients with dementia recognize familiar music. Methods Subjects were administered tasks that assess pitch and melody discrimination, detection of pitch errors in familiar melodies, and naming of familiar melodies. Results There were no group differences on pitch and melody discrimination tasks. However, patients with semantic dementia had considerable difficulty naming familiar melodies and also scored the lowest when asked to identify pitch errors in the same melodies. Naming familiar melodies, but not other music tasks, was strongly related to measures of semantic memory. Voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain MRI showed that difficulty in naming songs was associated with the bilateral temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus, whereas difficulty in identifying pitch errors in familiar melodies correlated with primarily the right temporal lobe. Conclusions The results support a view that the anterior temporal lobes play a role in familiar melody recognition, and that musical functions are affected differentially across forms of dementia. PMID:21617528

  6. Neuroanatomical profiles of personality change in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Colin J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Omar, Rohani; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D

    2011-05-01

    The neurobiological basis of personality is poorly understood. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) frequently presents with complex behavioural changes, and therefore potentially provides a disease model in which to investigate brain substrates of personality. To assess neuroanatomical correlates of personality change in a cohort of individuals with FTLD using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Thirty consecutive individuals fulfilling consensus criteria for FTLD were assessed. Each participant's carer completed a Big Five Inventory (BFI) questionnaire on five key personality traits; for each trait, a change score was derived based on current compared with estimated premorbid characteristics. All participants underwent volumetric brain magnetic resonance imaging. A VBM analysis was implemented regressing change score for each trait against regional grey matter volume across the FTLD group. The FTLD group showed a significant decline in extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness and an increase in neuroticism. Change in particular personality traits was associated with overlapping profiles of grey matter loss in more anterior cortical areas and relative preservation of grey matter in more posterior areas; the most robust neuroanatomical correlate was identified for reduced conscientiousness in the region of the posterior superior temporal gyrus. Quantitative measures of personality change in FTLD can be correlated with changes in regional grey matter. The neuroanatomical profiles for particular personality traits overlap brain circuits previously implicated in aspects of social cognition and suggest that dysfunction at the level of distributed cortical networks underpins personality change in FTLD.

  7. Dynamic frontotemporal systems process space and time in working memory

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jenna N.; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Endestad, Tor; Larsson, Pål G.; Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Meling, Torstein R.; Lin, Jack J.; Knight, Robert T.

    2018-01-01

    How do we rapidly process incoming streams of information in working memory, a cognitive mechanism central to human behavior? Dominant views of working memory focus on the prefrontal cortex (PFC), but human hippocampal recordings provide a neurophysiological signature distinct from the PFC. Are these regions independent, or do they interact in the service of working memory? We addressed this core issue in behavior by recording directly from frontotemporal sites in humans performing a visuospatial working memory task that operationalizes the types of identity and spatiotemporal information we encounter every day. Theta band oscillations drove bidirectional interactions between the PFC and medial temporal lobe (MTL; including the hippocampus). MTL theta oscillations directed the PFC preferentially during the processing of spatiotemporal information, while PFC theta oscillations directed the MTL for all types of information being processed in working memory. These findings reveal an MTL theta mechanism for processing space and time and a domain-general PFC theta mechanism, providing evidence that rapid, dynamic MTL–PFC interactions underlie working memory for everyday experiences. PMID:29601574

  8. Perception of emotion in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lavenu, I; Pasquier, F; Lebert, F; Petit, H; Van der Linden, M

    1999-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second cause of degenerative dementia. Behavioral changes occur before the cognitive decline and remain the major feature. A poor perception of emotion could account for some behavioral symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of emotion in patients with FTD and to compare it with that of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Fifty subjects performed the tests: 20 patients with probable AD, 18 patients with FTD, and 12 matched controls. The two patient groups did not differ in age, sex, severity of dementia, duration of the disease, and language tests. Subjects had to recognize and point out the name of one of seven basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, surprise, and contempt) on a set of 28 faces presented on slides. The three groups were equally able to distinguish a face displaying affect from one not displaying affect. Naming of emotion was worse in patients with FTD than in patients with AD (correct answers 46% vs. 62%; p = 0.0006) who did not differ significantly from controls (72%). Anger, sadness, and disgust were less recognized in FTD than in AD patients who did not differ from controls, whereas fear and contempt were poorly recognized in both groups of patients compared with controls. These findings argue for different neural substrates underlying the recognition of various basic emotions. Behavioral disorders in FTD may be partly due to an impaired interpretation of the emotional environment.

  9. Degradation of cognitive timing mechanisms in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Susie M.D.; Downey, Laura E.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Kinnunen, Kirsi M.; Golden, Hannah L.; Buckley, Aisling; Mahoney, Colin J.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined motor timing in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which manifests as progressive deterioration in social, behavioural and cognitive functions. Twenty-patients fulfilling consensus clinical criteria for behavioural variant FTD (bvFTD), 11 patients fulfilling consensus clinical criteria for semantic-variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), four patients fulfilling criteria for nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (naPPA), eight patients fulfilling criteria for Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), and 31 controls were assessed on both an externally- and self-paced finger-tapping task requiring maintenance of a regular, 1500 ms beat over 50 taps. Grey and white matter correlates of deficits in motor timing were examined using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). bvFTD patients exhibited significant deficits in aspects of both externally- and self-paced tapping. Increased mean inter-response interval (faster than target tap time) in the self-paced task was associated with reduced grey matter volume in the cerebellum bilaterally, right middle temporal gyrus, and with increased axial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus, regions and tracts which have been suggested to be involved in a subcortical–cortical network of structures underlying timing abilities. This suggests that such structures can be affected in bvFTD, and that impaired motor timing may underlie some characteristics of the bvFTD phenotype. PMID:25447066

  10. False-belief understanding in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Duque, Diego; Baird, Jodie A; Black, Sandra E

    2009-05-01

    The ability to understand other people's behavior in terms of mental states, such as beliefs, desires, and intentions, is central to social interaction. It has been argued that the interpersonal problems of patients with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD-b) are due to a dysfunction of that system. We used first- and second-order false-belief tasks to assess theory-of-mind reasoning in a group of patients with FTD-b and a cognitively matched group of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both patient groups were equally impaired relative to a healthy elderly group in the cognitively demanding second-order false-belief tasks, revealing that cognitive demands are an important factor in false-belief task performance. Both patient groups reached ceiling performance in the first-order false-belief tasks with minimal cognitive demands, despite the striking difference in their social graces. These results suggest that a conceptual deficit in theory of mind-as measured by the false-belief task-is not at the core of the differences between FTD-b and AD.

  11. Longitudinal cognitive biomarkers predicting symptom onset in presymptomatic frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Jiskoot, Lize C; Panman, Jessica L; van Asseldonk, Lauren; Franzen, Sanne; Meeter, Lieke H H; Donker Kaat, Laura; van der Ende, Emma L; Dopper, Elise G P; Timman, Reinier; van Minkelen, Rick; van Swieten, John C; van den Berg, Esther; Papma, Janne M

    2018-06-01

    We performed 4-year follow-up neuropsychological assessment to investigate cognitive decline and the prognostic abilities from presymptomatic to symptomatic familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Presymptomatic MAPT (n = 15) and GRN mutation carriers (n = 31), and healthy controls (n = 39) underwent neuropsychological assessment every 2 years. Eight mutation carriers (5 MAPT, 3 GRN) became symptomatic. We investigated cognitive decline with multilevel regression modeling; the prognostic performance was assessed with ROC analyses and stepwise logistic regression. MAPT converters declined on language, attention, executive function, social cognition, and memory, and GRN converters declined on attention and executive function (p < 0.05). Cognitive decline in ScreeLing phonology (p = 0.046) and letter fluency (p = 0.046) were predictive for conversion to non-fluent variant PPA, and decline on categorical fluency (p = 0.025) for an underlying MAPT mutation. Using longitudinal neuropsychological assessment, we detected a mutation-specific pattern of cognitive decline, potentially suggesting prognostic value of neuropsychological trajectories in conversion to symptomatic FTD.

  12. An investigation of moral judgement in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F; Anderson, Eric; Shapira, Jill S

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the basis of disturbed moral judgment in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD is characterized by difficulty in modulating social behavior. Patients lack social propriety and may perform sociopathic acts. In addition, FTD patients often lack empathy for others. These findings suggest alterations in the nature of morality in patients with FTD. We administered an inventory of moral knowledge and two moral dilemmas to 26 patients with the frontal variant of FTD, 26 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and 26 normal control subjects. The FTD patients met Consensus Criteria for FTD and had corroborative frontal abnormalities on functional neuroimaging. The FTD and AD patients were comparably impaired on dementia measures. All these groups showed the retention of knowledge for moral behavior and the ability to make "impersonal" moral judgments. In contrast, the FTD patients were impaired in their ability to make immediate, emotionally based moral judgments compared with the patients with AD and the normal control subjects. These findings are consistent with an attenuation of the automatic emotional identification with others that is part of the innate moral sense. Such a disturbance may result from neurodegenerative disease affecting the ventromedial frontal cortex.

  13. Functional neuroimaging and presenting psychiatric features in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, M F; McMurtray, A; Chen, A K; Shapira, J S; Mishkin, F; Miller, B L

    2006-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a behavioural syndrome caused by degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. Behavioural disturbances include psychiatric features. Whether patients with FTD present with psychiatric features varies with the initial neuroanatomical variability of FTD. Objective To identify presenting psychiatric changes not part of diagnostic criteria of FTD and contrast them with the degree of hemispheric asymmetry and frontal and temporal hypoperfusion on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Methods 74 patients who met consensus criteria for FTD were evaluated at a two year follow up. All had brain SPECT on initial presentation. Results of an FTD psychiatric checklist were contrasted with ratings of regional hypoperfusion. Results The regions of predominant hypoperfusion did not correlate with differences on FTD demographic variables but were associated with presenting psychiatric features. Dysthymia and anxiety were associated with right temporal hypoperfusion. “Moria” or frivolous behaviour also occurred with temporal lobe changes, especially on the right. The only significant frontal lobe feature was the presence of a peculiar physical bearing in association with right frontal hypoperfusion. Conclusions Patients with FTD may present with psychiatric changes distinct from the behavioural diagnostic criteria for this disorder. Early temporal involvement is associated with frivolous behaviour and right temporal involvement is associated with emotional disturbances. In contrast, those with right frontal disease may present with alterations in non‐verbal behaviour. PMID:16043457

  14. Progranulin mutation causes frontotemporal dementia in the Swedish Karolinska family.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Rosvall, Lina; Brohede, Jesper; Axelman, Karin; Björk, Behnosh F; Nennesmo, Inger; Robins, Tiina; Graff, Caroline

    2008-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive impairment, language dysfunction, and/or changes in personality. Recently it has been shown that progranulin (GRN) mutations can cause FTD as well as other neurodegenerative phenotypes. DNA from 30 family members, of whom seven were diagnosed with FTD, in the Karolinska family was available for GRN sequencing. Fibroblast cell mRNA from one affected family member and six control individuals was available for relative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to investigate the effect of the mutation. Furthermore, the cDNA of an affected individual was sequenced. Clinical and neuropathologic findings of a previously undescribed family branch are presented. A frameshift mutation in GRN (g.102delC) was detected in all affected family members and absent in four unaffected family members older than 70 years. Real-time polymerase chain reaction data showed an approximately 50% reduction of GRN fibroblast mRNA in an affected individual. The mutated mRNA transcripts were undetectable by cDNA sequencing. Segregation and RNA analyses showed that the g.102delC mutation, previously reported, causes FTD in the Karolinska family. Our findings add further support to the significance of GRN in FTD etiology and the presence of modifying genes, which emphasize the need for further studies into the mechanisms of clinical heterogeneity. However, the results already call for attention to the complexity of predictive genetic testing of GRN mutations.

  15. The CERAD Neuropsychological Battery in Patients with Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haanpää, Ramona M.; Suhonen, Noora-Maria; Hartikainen, Päivi; Koivisto, Anne M.; Moilanen, Virpi; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Hänninen, Tuomo; Remes, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is based on neuropsychological examination in addition to clinical symptoms and brain imaging. There is no simple, validated, cognitive tool available in screening for FTLD. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-NB) was originally devised to identify the early cognitive changes related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our aim was to investigate the utility of the CERAD-NB in FTLD. Methods Patients with FTLD (n = 95) and AD (n = 90) were assessed with the CERAD-NB, Trail Making Test parts A and B and single-letter Phonemic Fluency. Results FTLD patients were more severely impaired in the Verbal Fluency subtest in the CERAD-NB and Trail Making Test part A compared to AD patients. In addition, AD patients were more impaired in memory subtests compared to FTLD patients. Conclusion The CERAD-NB may be a useful tool in screening for FTLD. Impaired performance in Verbal Fluency with moderately well-preserved Delayed Recall and Memory Tests may help in identifying patients with probable FTLD and discriminating FTLD from AD. Adding the Trail Making Test to the battery might enhance its value as a screening instrument for FTLD. PMID:25999981

  16. Dissociable executive functions in behavioral variant frontotemporal and Alzheimer dementias

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, Dana; Rankin, Katherine P.; Smith, Glenn E.; Boxer, Adam L.; Wood, Kristie; Hanna, Sherrie M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine which aspects of executive functions are most affected in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and best differentiate this syndrome from Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: We compared executive functions in 22 patients diagnosed with bvFTD, 26 with AD, and 31 neurologically healthy controls using a conceptually driven and comprehensive battery of executive function tests, the NIH EXAMINER battery (http://examiner.ucsf.edu). Results: The bvFTD and the AD patients were similarly impaired compared with controls on tests of working memory, category fluency, and attention, but the patients with bvFTD showed significantly more severe impairments than the patients with AD on tests of letter fluency, antisaccade accuracy, social decision-making, and social behavior. Discriminant function analysis with jackknifed cross-validation classified the bvFTD and AD patient groups with 73% accuracy. Conclusions: Executive function assessment can support bvFTD diagnosis when measures are carefully selected to emphasize frontally specific functions. PMID:23658382

  17. Hippocampal sclerosis dementia: an amnesic variant of frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Onyike, Chiadi U.; Pletnikova, Olga; Sloane, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Campbell; Troncoso, Juan C.; Rabins, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe characteristics of hippocampal sclerosis dementia. METHODS Convenience sample of Hippocampal sclerosis dementia (HSD) recruited from the Johns Hopkins University Brain Resource Center. Twenty-four cases with post-mortem pathological diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis dementia were reviewed for clinical characterization. RESULTS The cases showed atrophy and neuronal loss localized to the hippocampus, amygdala and entorrhinal cortex. The majority (79.2%) had amnesia at illness onset, and many (54.2%) showed abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. Nearly 42% presented with an amnesic state, and 37.5% presented with amnesia plus abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. All eventually developed a behavioral or psychiatric disorder. Disorientation, executive dysfunction, aphasia, agnosia and apraxia were uncommon at onset. Alzheimer disease (AD) was the initial clinical diagnosis in 89% and the final clinical diagnosis in 75%. Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was uncommon (seen in 8%). CONCLUSION HSD shows pathological characteristics of FTD and clinical features that mimic AD and overlap with FTD. The findings, placed in the context of earlier work, support the proposition that HSD belongs to the FTD family, where it may be identified as an amnesic variant. PMID:24363834

  18. A Scale of Socioemotional Dysfunction in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Barsuglia, Joseph P.; Kaiser, Natalie C.; Wilkins, Stacy Schantz; Joshi, Aditi; Barrows, Robin J.; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Panchal, Hemali Vijay; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Mather, Michelle J.; Mendez, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Early social dysfunction is a hallmark symptom of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD); however, validated measures for assessing social deficits in dementia are needed. The purpose of the current study was to examine the utility of a novel informant-based measure of social impairment, the Socioemotional Dysfunction Scale (SDS) in early-onset dementia. Sixteen bvFTD and 18 early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD) participants received standard clinical neuropsychological measures and neuroimaging. Caregiver informants were administered the SDS. Individuals with bvFTD exhibited greater social dysfunction on the SDS compared with the EOAD group; t(32) = 6.32, p < .001. The scale demonstrated preliminary evidence for discriminating these frequently misdiagnosed groups (area under the curve = 0.920, p = <.001) and internal consistency α = 0.977. The SDS demonstrated initial evidence as an effective measure for detecting abnormal social behavior and discriminating bvFTD from EOAD. Future validation is recommended in larger and more diverse patient groups. PMID:25331776

  19. Dyslexia susceptibility genes influence brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Paternicó, Donata; Premi, Enrico; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Bonomi, Elisa; Gualeni, Vera; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether variations within genes specifically associated with dyslexia, namely KIAA0319, DCDC2, and CNTNAP2, were associated with greater damage of language-related regions in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in particular. A total of 118 patients with FTD, 84 with the behavioral variant of FTD (bvFTD) and 34 with PPA, underwent neuropsychological examination, genetic analyses, and brain MRI. KIAA0319 rs17243157 G/A, DCDC2 rs793842 A/G, and CNTNAP2 rs17236239 A/G genetic variations were assessed. Patients were grouped according to clinical phenotype and genotype status (GA/AA or GG). Gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) differences were assessed by voxel-based morphometry and structural intercorrelation pattern analyses. Patients carrying KIAA0319 A* (GA or AA) showed greater GM and WM atrophy in the left middle and inferior temporal gyri, as compared with KIAA0319 GG (p < 0.001). The effect of KIAA0319 polymorphism was mainly reported in patients with PPA. In patients with PPA carrying at-risk polymorphism, temporal damage led to loss of interhemispheric and intrahemispheric GM and WM structural association. No effect of DCDC2 and CNTNAP2 was found. Genes involved in dyslexia susceptibility, such as KIAA0319, result in language network vulnerability in FTD, and in PPA in particular.

  20. Episodic Memory and Regional Atrophy in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Söderlund, Hedvig; Black, Sandra E.; Miller, Bruce L.; Freedman, Morris; Levine, Brian

    2008-01-01

    It has been unclear to what extent memory is affected in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Since patients usually have atrophy in regions implicated in memory function, the frontal and/or temporal lobes, one would expect some memory impairment, and that the degree of atrophy in these regions would be inversely related to memory function. The purposes of this study were 1) to assess episodic memory function in FTLD, and more specifically patients' ability to episodically re-experience an event, and determine its source; 2) to examine whether memory performance is related to quantified regional brain atrophy. FTLD patients (n=18) and healthy comparison subjects (n=14) were assessed with cued recall, recognition, “remember/know” (self-reported re-experiencing) and source recall, at 30 min and 24 hr after encoding. Regional gray matter volumes were assessed with high resolution structural MRI concurrently to testing. Patients performed worse than comparison subjects on all memory measures. Gray matter volume in the left medial temporal lobe was positively correlated with recognition, re-experiencing, and source recall. Gray matter volume in the left posterior temporal lobe correlated significantly with recognition, at 30 min and 24 hr, and with source recall at 30 min. Estimated familiarity at 30 min was positively correlated with gray matter volume in the left inferior parietal lobe. In summary, episodic memory deficits in FTLD may be more common than previously thought, particularly in patients with left medial and posterior temporal atrophy. PMID:17888461

  1. Recent advances in the molecular genetics of frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, E; Michelerio, A; D'Agata, F; Gentile, Salvatore; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    The term frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) describes a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders associated with deposition of misfolded proteins in the frontal and temporal lobes. Up to 40% of FTLD patients reports a family history of neurodegeneration, and approximately 1/3 of familial cases shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance of the phenotype. Over the past two decades, several causative and susceptibility genes for FTLD have been discovered, supporting the notion that genetic factors are important contributors to the disease processes. Genetic variants in three genes, MAPT, GRN and C9orf72, account for about half of familial FTLD cases. In addition, rare defects in the CHMP2B, VCP, TARDBP, SQSTM1, FUS, UBQLN, OPTN, TREM2, CHCHD10 and TBK1 genes have been described. Additional genes are expected to be found in near future. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in the molecular genetics of the FTLD spectrum and to discuss implications for genetic counseling.

  2. Use of antidementia drugs in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    López-Pousa, Secundino; Calvó-Perxas, Laia; Lejarreta, Saioa; Cullell, Marta; Meléndez, Rosa; Hernández, Erélido; Bisbe, Josep; Perkal, Héctor; Manzano, Anna; Roig, Anna Maria; Turró-Garriga, Oriol; Vilalta-Franch, Joan; Garre-Olmo, Josep

    2012-06-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) are not efficacious to treat frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The British Association for Psychopharmacology recommends avoiding the use of AChEI and memantine in patients with FTLD. Cross-sectional design using 1092 cases with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 64 cases with FTLD registered by the Registry of Dementias of Girona. Bivariate analyses were performed, and binary logistic regressions were used to detect variables associated with antidementia drugs consumption. The AChEIs were consumed by 57.6% and 42.2% of the patients with AD and FTLD, respectively. Memantine was used by 17.2% and 10.9% of patients with AD and FTLD, respectively. Binary logistic regressions yielded no associations with antidementia drugs consumption. There is a discrepancy regarding clinical practice and the recommendations based upon clinical evidence. The increased central nervous system drug use detected in FTLD requires multicentric studies aiming at finding the best means to treat these patients.

  3. Diagnosing, monitoring and managing behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Piguet, Olivier; Kumfor, Fiona; Hodges, John

    2017-09-02

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is characterised by insidious changes in personality and interpersonal conduct that reflect progressive disintegration of the neural circuits involved in social cognition, emotion regulation, motivation and decision making. The underlying pathology is heterogeneous and classified according to the presence of intraneuronal inclusions of tau, TDP-43 or, occasionally, fused in sarcoma proteins. Biomarkers to detect these histopathological changes in life are increasingly important with the development of disease-modifying drugs. A number of gene abnormalities have been identified, the most common being an expansion in the C9orf72 gene, which together account for most familial cases. The 2011 international consensus criteria propose three levels of diagnostic certainty: possible, probable and definite. Detailed history taking from family members to elicit behavioural features underpins the diagnostic process, with support from neuropsychological testing designed to detect impairment in decision making, emotion processing and social cognition. Brain imaging is important for increasing the level of diagnosis certainty over time. Carer education and support remain of paramount importance.

  4. Distinct anatomical subtypes of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia: a cluster analysis study.

    PubMed

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Przybelski, Scott A; Weigand, Stephen D; Ivnik, Robert J; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Shiung, Maria M; Boeve, Bradley F; Knopman, David S; Parisi, Joseph E; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2009-11-01

    The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by changes in personality and behaviour. It is typically associated with frontal lobe atrophy, although patterns of atrophy are heterogeneous. The objective of this study was to examine case-by-case variability in patterns of grey matter atrophy in subjects with the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia and to investigate whether behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia can be divided into distinct anatomical subtypes. Sixty-six subjects that fulfilled clinical criteria for a diagnosis of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia with a volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scan were identified. Grey matter volumes were obtained for 26 regions of interest, covering frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, striatum, insula and supplemental motor area, using the automated anatomical labelling atlas. Regional volumes were divided by total grey matter volume. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis using Ward's clustering linkage method was performed to cluster the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia subjects into different anatomical clusters. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess patterns of grey matter loss in each identified cluster of subjects compared to an age and gender-matched control group at P < 0.05 (family-wise error corrected). We identified four potentially useful clusters with distinct patterns of grey matter loss, which we posit represent anatomical subtypes of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia. Two of these subtypes were associated with temporal lobe volume loss, with one subtype showing loss restricted to temporal lobe regions (temporal-dominant subtype) and the other showing grey matter loss in the temporal lobes as well as frontal and parietal lobes (temporofrontoparietal subtype). Another two subtypes were characterized by a large amount of frontal lobe volume loss, with one

  5. Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease: retrospective differentiation using information from informants.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, R; Snowden, J S; Craufurd, D

    1995-01-01

    The study examined the feasibility of differentiating frontotemporal dementia from Alzheimer's disease on the basis of retrospective historical information obtained from relatives of patients. A structured questionnaire was devised of patients' symptoms, with emphasis on those cognitive and neuropsychiatric features found in earlier prospective clinical studies to distinguish the two conditions. The questionnaire was given to close relatives of deceased patients in whom the diagnosis of non-Alzheimer's frontotemporal degeneration of Alzheimer's disease had been verified at necropsy. The interviewer had no previous contact or knowledge of those patients, nor clinical experience of patients with frontotemporal dementia. The questionnaire elicited a distinct profile of responses for the two diagnostic groups with emphasis on early personality change, unconcern, and socially inappropriate behaviour in frontotemporal dementia and disturbance in memory and topographical orientation prominent in patients with Alzheimer's disease. A scoring system separated out individual patients with frontotemporal dementia from those with Alzheimer's disease. It is concluded that it is possible to obtain useful information about the precise pattern of dementia from informants even many years after the patient's death. The questionnaire provides the foundation of a diagnostic instrument for use in family history studies of dementia. PMID:7608712

  6. Timing and significance of pathological features in C9orf72 expansion-associated frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Vatsavayai, Sarat C; Yoon, Soo Jin; Gardner, Raquel C; Gendron, Tania F; Vargas, Jose Norberto S; Trujillo, Andrew; Pribadi, Mochtar; Phillips, Joanna J; Gaus, Stephanie E; Hixson, John D; Garcia, Paul A; Rabinovici, Gil D; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Petrucelli, Leonard; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2016-01-01

    See Scaber and Talbot (doi:10.1093/aww264) for a scientific commentary on this article. A GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9orf72 leads to frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Diverse pathological features have been identified, and their disease relevance remains much debated. Here, we describe two illuminating patients with frontotemporal dementia due to the C9orf72 repeat expansion. Case 1 was a 65-year-old female with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia accompanied by focal degeneration in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, and medial pulvinar thalamus. At autopsy, widespread RNA foci and dipeptide repeat protein inclusions were observed, but TDP-43 pathology was nearly absent, even in degenerating brain regions. Case 2 was a 74-year-old female with atypical frontotemporal dementia–motor neuron disease who underwent temporal lobe resection for epilepsy 5 years prior to her first frontotemporal dementia symptoms. Archival surgical resection tissue contained RNA foci, dipeptide repeat protein inclusions, and loss of nuclear TDP-43 but no TDP-43 inclusions despite florid TDP-43 inclusions at autopsy 8 years after first symptoms. These findings suggest that C9orf72-specific phenomena may impact brain structure and function and emerge before first symptoms and TDP-43 aggregation. PMID:27797809

  7. Restoring neuronal progranulin reverses deficits in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Arrant, Andrew E; Filiano, Anthony J; Unger, Daniel E; Young, Allen H; Roberson, Erik D

    2017-05-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in progranulin (GRN), a secreted glycoprotein expressed by neurons and microglia, are a common autosomal dominant cause of frontotemporal dementia, a neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by disrupted social and emotional behaviour. GRN mutations are thought to cause frontotemporal dementia through progranulin haploinsufficiency, therefore, boosting progranulin expression from the intact allele is a rational treatment strategy. However, this approach has not been tested in an animal model of frontotemporal dementia and it is unclear if boosting progranulin could correct pre-existing deficits. Here, we show that adeno-associated virus-driven expression of progranulin in the medial prefrontal cortex reverses social dominance deficits in Grn+/- mice, an animal model of frontotemporal dementia due to GRN mutations. Adeno-associated virus-progranulin also corrected lysosomal abnormalities in Grn+/- mice. The adeno-associated virus-progranulin vector only transduced neurons, suggesting that restoring neuronal progranulin is sufficient to correct deficits in Grn+/- mice. To further test the role of neuronal progranulin in the development of frontotemporal dementia-related deficits, we generated two neuronal progranulin-deficient mouse lines using CaMKII-Cre and Nestin-Cre. Measuring progranulin levels in these lines indicated that most brain progranulin is derived from neurons. Both neuronal progranulin-deficient lines developed social dominance deficits similar to those in global Grn+/- mice, showing that neuronal progranulin deficiency is sufficient to disrupt social behaviour. These data support the concept of progranulin-boosting therapies for frontotemporal dementia and highlight an important role for neuron-derived progranulin in maintaining normal social function. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Restoring neuronal progranulin reverses deficits in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Arrant, Andrew E.; Filiano, Anthony J.; Unger, Daniel E.; Young, Allen H.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in progranulin (GRN), a secreted glycoprotein expressed by neurons and microglia, are a common autosomal dominant cause of frontotemporal dementia, a neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by disrupted social and emotional behaviour. GRN mutations are thought to cause frontotemporal dementia through progranulin haploinsufficiency, therefore, boosting progranulin expression from the intact allele is a rational treatment strategy. However, this approach has not been tested in an animal model of frontotemporal dementia and it is unclear if boosting progranulin could correct pre-existing deficits. Here, we show that adeno-associated virus-driven expression of progranulin in the medial prefrontal cortex reverses social dominance deficits in Grn+/– mice, an animal model of frontotemporal dementia due to GRN mutations. Adeno-associated virus-progranulin also corrected lysosomal abnormalities in Grn+/– mice. The adeno-associated virus-progranulin vector only transduced neurons, suggesting that restoring neuronal progranulin is sufficient to correct deficits in Grn+/– mice. To further test the role of neuronal progranulin in the development of frontotemporal dementia-related deficits, we generated two neuronal progranulin-deficient mouse lines using CaMKII-Cre and Nestin-Cre. Measuring progranulin levels in these lines indicated that most brain progranulin is derived from neurons. Both neuronal progranulin-deficient lines developed social dominance deficits similar to those in global Grn+/– mice, showing that neuronal progranulin deficiency is sufficient to disrupt social behaviour. These data support the concept of progranulin-boosting therapies for frontotemporal dementia and highlight an important role for neuron-derived progranulin in maintaining normal social function. PMID:28379303

  9. The social and economic burden of frontotemporal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Galvin, James E; Howard, David H; Denny, Sharon S; Dickinson, Susan; Tatton, Nadine

    2017-11-14

    To quantify the socioeconomic burden of frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) compared to previously published data for Alzheimer disease (AD). A 250-item internet survey was administered to primary caregivers of patients with behavioral-variant FTD (bvFTD), primary progressive aphasia, FTD with motor neuron disease, corticobasal syndrome, or progressive supranuclear palsy. The survey included validated scales for disease staging, behavior, activities of daily living, caregiver burden, and health economics, as well as investigator-designed questions to capture patient and caregiver experience with FTD. The entire survey was completed by 674 of 956 respondents (70.5%). Direct costs (2016 US dollars) equaled $47,916 and indirect costs $71,737, for a total annual per-patient cost of $119,654, nearly 2 times higher than reported costs for AD. Patients ≥65 years of age, with later stages of disease, and with bvFTD correlated with higher direct costs, while patients <65 years of age and men were associated with higher indirect costs. An FTD diagnosis produced a mean decrease in household income from $75,000 to $99,000 12 months before diagnosis to $50,000 to $59,999 12 months after diagnosis, resulting from lost days of work and early departure from the workforce. The economic burden of FTD is substantial. Counting productivity-related costs, per-patient costs for FTD appear to be greater than per-patient costs reported for AD. There is a need for biomarkers for accurate and timely diagnosis, effective treatments, and services to reduce this socioeconomic burden. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation distinguishes Alzheimer disease from frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Benussi, Alberto; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Dell'Era, Valentina; Cosseddu, Maura; Alberici, Antonella; Caratozzolo, Salvatore; Cotelli, Maria Sofia; Micheli, Anna; Rozzini, Luca; Depari, Alessandro; Flammini, Alessandra; Ponzo, Viviana; Martorana, Alessandro; Caltagirone, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo; Borroni, Barbara

    2017-08-15

    To determine whether a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) multiparadigm approach can be used to distinguish Alzheimer disease (AD) from frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Paired-pulse TMS was used to investigate short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (ICF), long-interval intracortical inhibition, and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) to measure the activity of different intracortical circuits in patients with AD, patients with FTD, and healthy controls (HC). The primary outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of TMS measures, derived from receiver operating curve analysis. A total of 175 participants met the inclusion criteria. We diagnosed 79 patients with AD, 64 patients with FTD, and 32 HC. We found that while patients with AD are characterized by a specific impairment of SAI, FTD shows a remarkable dysfunction of SICI-ICF intracortical circuits. With the use of the best indexes, TMS differentiated FTD from AD with a sensitivity of 91.8% and specificity of 88.6%, AD from HC with a sensitivity of 84.8% and specificity of 90.6%, and FTD from HC with a sensitivity of 90.2% and specificity of 78.1%. These results were confirmed in patients with mild disease. TMS is a noninvasive procedure that reliably distinguishes AD from FTD and HC and, if these findings are replicated in larger studies, could represent a useful additional diagnostic tool for clinical practice. This study provides Class III evidence that TMS measures can distinguish patients with AD from those with FTD. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. The social and economic burden of frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Howard, David H.; Denny, Sharon S.; Dickinson, Susan; Tatton, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the socioeconomic burden of frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) compared to previously published data for Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: A 250-item internet survey was administered to primary caregivers of patients with behavioral-variant FTD (bvFTD), primary progressive aphasia, FTD with motor neuron disease, corticobasal syndrome, or progressive supranuclear palsy. The survey included validated scales for disease staging, behavior, activities of daily living, caregiver burden, and health economics, as well as investigator-designed questions to capture patient and caregiver experience with FTD. Results: The entire survey was completed by 674 of 956 respondents (70.5%). Direct costs (2016 US dollars) equaled $47,916 and indirect costs $71,737, for a total annual per-patient cost of $119,654, nearly 2 times higher than reported costs for AD. Patients ≥65 years of age, with later stages of disease, and with bvFTD correlated with higher direct costs, while patients <65 years of age and men were associated with higher indirect costs. An FTD diagnosis produced a mean decrease in household income from $75,000 to $99,000 12 months before diagnosis to $50,000 to $59,999 12 months after diagnosis, resulting from lost days of work and early departure from the workforce. Conclusions: The economic burden of FTD is substantial. Counting productivity-related costs, per-patient costs for FTD appear to be greater than per-patient costs reported for AD. There is a need for biomarkers for accurate and timely diagnosis, effective treatments, and services to reduce this socioeconomic burden. PMID:28978658

  12. Double dissociation of social functioning in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Katherine P.; Kramer, Joel H.; Mychack, Paula; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to characterize changes in social functioning in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have failed to elicit clear dissociation between frontal and temporal variants of the disease based on behavioral measures. Methods This study obtained premorbid and current first-degree relative ratings using an established measure of interpersonal functioning, the Interpersonal Adjectives Scales, to measure personality change in 16 patients with frontal variant (FLV) and 13 with temporal variant (TLV) FTD, and in a control group of 16 patients with AD. Results All three groups showed significant change over time in multiple domains, including increased introversion (FG) and submissiveness (HI). However, patients with both FTD subtypes evidenced significantly greater increases in overall interpersonal pathology vector length [VL] than did patients with AD, who remained within the normal range on all scores. Patients with FLV showed a 2 SD increase in submissiveness (HI), but their cold-heartedness (DE) change scores were not significantly different from those of patients with AD. Conversely, the TLV cold-heartedness (DE) score increased 2 SD compared to minimal change for the AD and FLV groups, yet change in submissiveness (HI) did not differentiate between AD and TLV groups. Conclusions The Interpersonal Adjectives Scales differentiated both FTD groups from patients with AD on the basis of both degree and direction of personality change. Also, the two subtypes of FTD showed distinctly different patterns of change in social functioning: patients with temporal variant shifted toward severe interpersonal coldness with mild loss of dominance, whereas patients with frontal variant showed the opposite pattern. PMID:12552042

  13. Reward deficits in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia include insensitivity to negative stimuli.

    PubMed

    Perry, David C; Datta, Samir; Sturm, Virginia E; Wood, Kristie A; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H; Rosen, Howard J

    2017-12-01

    During reward processing individuals weigh positive and negative features of a stimulus to determine whether they will pursue or avoid it. Though patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia display changes in their pursuit of rewards, such as food, alcohol, money, and sex, the basis for these shifts is not clearly established. In particular, it is unknown whether patients' behaviour results from excessive focus on rewards, insensitivity to punishment, or to dysfunction in a particular stage of reward processing, such as anticipation, consumption, or action selection. Our goal was to determine the nature of the reward deficit in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and its underlying anatomy. We devised a series of tasks involving pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral olfactory stimuli, designed to separate distinct phases of reward processing. In a group of 25 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and 21 control subjects, diagnosis by valence interactions revealed that patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia rated unpleasant odours as less aversive than did controls and displayed lower skin conductance responses when anticipating an upcoming aversive odour. Subjective pleasantness ratings and skin conductance responses did not differ between behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and controls for pleasant or neutral smells. In a task designed to measure the effort subjects would expend to smell or avoid smelling a stimulus, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia were less motivated, and therefore less successful than control subjects, at avoiding what they preferred not to smell, but had equivalent success at obtaining stimuli they found rewarding. Voxel-based morphometry of patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia revealed that the inability to subjectively differentiate the valence of pleasant and unpleasant odours correlated with atrophy in right ventral mid

  14. [Reconciliating neurology and psychiatry: The prototypical case of frontotemporal dementia].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, J; Sarazin, M

    2017-10-01

    Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) in its behavioral variant (bvFTD) is probably one of the conditions that best illustrates the links between psychiatry and neurology. It is indeed admitted that between a third and half of patients with this condition, especially in early-onset forms, receive an initial diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) and are then referred to a psychiatric ward. BvFTD can thus be considered a neurological disorder with a psychiatric presentation. Among psychiatric symptoms reported in this disease, psychotic symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, especially of persecution), which have long been underestimated in bvFTD and are not part of the current diagnostic criteria, are present in about 20% of cases and may be inaugural. They are particularly common in the genetic forms related to a mutation in the C9orf72 gene (up to 50%), and to a lesser extent in the GRN gene (up to 25%). C9orf72 gene mutation is often associated with a family history of dementia or motor neuron disease but also of psychiatric disorders. It has also been described in sporadic presentation forms. Sometimes, the moderate degree of brain atrophy on MRI described in patients carrying this mutation may complicate the differential diagnosis with late-onset psychiatric diseases. In the present article, we underline the importance of considering that psychiatric - especially psychotic - symptoms are not rare in bvFTD, which should lead to a revision of the diagnostic criteria of this disease by taking greater account of this fact. We also propose a diagnostic chart, based on concerted evaluation by neurologists and psychiatrists for cases of atypical psychiatric symptoms (late-onset or pharmacoresistant troubles) leading to consider the possibility of a neurological disorder, in order to shed a new light on these difficult clinical situations. In the field of research, bvFTD may constitute a model to explore the neural basis of certain

  15. Criminal behavior in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, Madeleine; Naasan, Georges; Temlett, Julia; Perry, David C; Rankin, Katherine P; Merrilees, Jennifer; Grinberg, Lea T; Seeley, William W; Englund, Elisabet; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases can cause dysfunction of neural structures involved in judgment, executive function, emotional processing, sexual behavior, violence, and self-awareness. Such dysfunctions can lead to antisocial and criminal behavior that appears for the first time in the adult or middle-aged individual or even later in life. To investigate the frequency and type of criminal behavior among patients with a diagnosed dementing disorder. We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 2397 patients who were seen at the University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center between 1999 and 2012, including 545 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), 171 patients with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 89 patients with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 30 patients with Huntington disease. Patient notes containing specific keywords denoting criminal behavior were reviewed. Data were stratified by criminal behavior type and diagnostic groups. Frequencies of criminal behavior and χ² statistics were calculated. Of the 2397 patients studied, 204 (8.5%) had a history of criminal behavior that emerged during their illness. Of the major diagnostic groups, 42 of 545 patients (7.7%) with AD, 64 of 171 patients (37.4%) with bvFTD, 24 of 89 patients (27.0%) with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 6 of 30 patients (20%) with Huntington disease exhibited criminal behavior. A total of 14% of patients with bvFTD were statistically significantly more likely to present with criminal behavior compared with 2% of patients with AD (P < .001) and 6.4% were statistically significantly more likely to exhibit violence compared with 2% of patients with AD (P = .003). Common manifestations of criminal behavior in the bvFTD group included theft, traffic violations, sexual advances, trespassing, and public urination in contrast with those in the AD group, who commonly committed traffic violations, often

  16. Criminal Behavior in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liljegren, Madeleine; Naasan, Georges; Temlett, Julia; Perry, David C.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Merrilees, Jennifer; Grinberg, Lea T.; Seeley, William W.; Englund, Elisabet; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-01-01

    Importance Neurodegenerative diseases can cause dysfunction of neural structures involved in judgment, executive function, emotional processing, sexual behavior, violence, and self-awareness. Such dysfunctions can lead to antisocial and criminal behavior that appears for the first time in the adult or middle-aged individual or even later in life. Objective To investigate the frequency and type of criminal behavior among patients with a diagnosed dementing disorder. Design, Setting, and Participants We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 2397 patients who were seen at the University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center between 1999 and 2012, including 545 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), 171 patients with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 89 patients with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 30 patients with Huntington disease. Patient notes containing specific keywords denoting criminal behavior were reviewed. Data were stratified by criminal behavior type and diagnostic groups. Main Outcomes and Measures Frequencies of criminal behavior and χ2 statistics were calculated. Results Of the 2397 patients studied, 204 (8.5%) had a history of criminal behavior that emerged during their illness. Of the major diagnostic groups, 42 of 545 patients (7.7%) with AD, 64 of 171 patients (37.4%) with bvFTD, 24 of 89 patients (27.0%) with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 6 of 30 patients (20%) with Huntington disease exhibited criminal behavior. A total of 14% of patients with bvFTD were statistically significantly more likely to present with criminal behavior compared with 2% of patients with AD (P < .001) and 6.4% were statistically significantly more likely to exhibit violence compared with 2% of patients with AD (P = .003). Common manifestations of criminal behavior in the bvFTD group included theft, traffic violations, sexual advances, trespassing, and public urination in contrast

  17. Verb Agreements during On-Line Sentence Processing in Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, C.C.; Grossman, M.

    2005-01-01

    An on-line ''word detection'' paradigm was used to assess the comprehension of thematic and transitive verb agreements during sentence processing in individuals diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD, n=15) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD, n=14). AD, FTD, and control participants (n=17) were asked to listen for a word in a sentence.…

  18. Anatomical correlates of reward-seeking behaviours in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Virginia E.; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.; Rosen, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is characterized by abnormal responses to primary reward stimuli such as food, sex and intoxicants, suggesting abnormal functioning of brain circuitry mediating reward processing. The goal of this analysis was to determine whether abnormalities in reward-seeking behaviour in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia are correlated with atrophy in regions known to mediate reward processing. Review of case histories in 103 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia identified overeating or increased sweet food preference in 80 (78%), new or increased alcohol or drug use in 27 (26%), and hypersexuality in 17 (17%). For each patient, a primary reward-seeking score of 0–3 was created with 1 point given for each target behaviour (increased seeking of food, drugs, or sex). Voxel-based morphometry performed in 91 patients with available imaging revealed that right ventral putamen and pallidum atrophy correlated with higher reward-seeking scores. Each of the reward-related behaviours involved partially overlapping right hemisphere reward circuit regions including putamen, globus pallidus, insula and thalamus. These findings indicate that in some patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, low volume of subcortical reward-related structures is associated with increased pursuit of primary rewards, which may be a product of increased thalamocortical feedback. PMID:24740987

  19. Oculomotor Function in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Related Disorders and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, Siobhan; Matlin, Alisa; Hellmuth, Joanna; Schenk, Ana K.; Johnson, Julene K.; Rosen, Howard; Dean, David; Kramer, Joel; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Bruce L.; Lisberger, Stephen G.; Boxer, Adam L.

    2008-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often overlaps clinically with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), both of which have prominent eye movement abnormalities. To investigate the ability of oculomotor performance to differentiate between FTLD, Alzheimer's disease, CBS and PSP, saccades and smooth pursuit were…

  20. Motor Speech Phenotypes of Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, and Progressive Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Matthew L.; Brodtmann, Amy; Darby, David; Vogel, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to create a comprehensive review of speech impairment in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive apraxia of speech in order to identify the most effective measures for diagnosis and monitoring, and to elucidate associations between speech and neuroimaging. Method: Speech and…

  1. Occupation Attributes Relate to Location of Atrophy in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spreng, R. N.; Rosen, H. J.; Strother, S.; Chow, T. W.; Diehl-Schmid, J.; Freedman, M.; Graff-Radford, N. R.; Hodges, J. R.; Lipton, A. M.; Mendez, M. F.; Morelli, S. A.; Black, S. E.; Miller, B. L.; Levine, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often presents with asymmetric atrophy. We assessed whether premorbid occupations in FTLD patients were associated with these hemispheric asymmetries. In a multi-center chart review of 588 patients, occupation information was related to location of tissue loss or dysfunction. Patients with atrophy…

  2. Problems Inhibiting Attentional Capture by Irrelevant Stimuli in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquard, Ambre; Lacomblez, Lucette; Derouesne, Christian; Sieroff, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We studied the role of the frontal lobes in orienting spatial attention and inhibiting attentional capture by goal-irrelevant stimuli, using a spatial cueing method in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Two blocks of trials were presented, one with non-predictive cues and the other with counter-predictive cues. FTD patients showed a…

  3. Changes in the Frontotemporal Cortex and Cognitive Correlates in First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Galve, Leticia; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A.M.; Altmann, Daniel R.; Price, Gary; Chu, Elvina M.; Leeson, Verity C.; Lobo, Antonio; Barker, Gareth J.; Barnes, Thomas R.E.; Joyce, Eileen M.; Ron, María A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Loss of cortical volume in frontotemporal regions has been reported in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives. Cortical area and thickness are determined by different genetic processes, and measuring these parameters separately may clarify disturbances in corticogenesis relevant to schizophrenia. Our study also explored clinical and cognitive correlates of these parameters. Methods Thirty-seven patients with first-episode psychosis (34 schizophrenia, 3 schizoaffective disorder) and 38 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex took part in the study. Imaging was performed on an magnetic resonance imaging 1.5-T scanner. Area and thickness of the frontotemporal cortex were measured using a surface-based morphometry method (Freesurfer). All subjects underwent neuropsychologic testing that included measures of premorbid and current IQ, working and verbal memory, and executive function. Results Reductions in cortical area, more marked in the temporal cortex, were present in patients. Overall frontotemporal cortical thickness did not differ between groups, although regional thinning of the right superior temporal region was observed in patients. There was a significant association of both premorbid IQ and IQ at disease onset with area, but not thickness, of the frontotemporal cortex, and working memory span was associated with area of the frontal cortex. These associations remained significant when only patients with schizophrenia were considered. Conclusions Our results suggest an early disruption of corticogenesis in schizophrenia, although the effect of subsequent environmental factors cannot be excluded. In addition, cortical abnormalities are subject to regional variations and differ from those present in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20452574

  4. The Functional Organisation of the Fronto-Temporal Language System: Evidence from Syntactic and Semantic Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Jennifer M.; Longe, Olivia A.; Randall, Billi; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2010-01-01

    Spoken language comprehension is known to involve a large left-dominant network of fronto-temporal brain regions, but there is still little consensus about how the syntactic and semantic aspects of language are processed within this network. In an fMRI study, volunteers heard spoken sentences that contained either syntactic or semantic ambiguities…

  5. Frontotemporal dementia with the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion: clinical, neuroanatomical and neuropathological features

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Colin J.; Beck, Jon; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Mok, Kin; Shakespeare, Tim; Yeatman, Tom; Warrington, Elizabeth K.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Fox, Nick C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Hardy, John; Collinge, John; Revesz, Tamas; Mead, Simon

    2012-01-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in the C9ORF72 gene has recently been identified as a major cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration and motor neuron disease, including cases previously identified as linked to chromosome 9. Here we present a detailed retrospective clinical, neuroimaging and histopathological analysis of a C9ORF72 mutation case series in relation to other forms of genetically determined frontotemporal lobar degeneration ascertained at a specialist centre. Eighteen probands (19 cases in total) were identified, representing 35% of frontotemporal lobar degeneration cases with identified mutations, 36% of cases with clinical evidence of motor neuron disease and 7% of the entire cohort. Thirty-three per cent of these C9ORF72 cases had no identified relevant family history. Families showed wide variation in clinical onset (43–68 years) and duration (1.7–22 years). The most common presenting syndrome (comprising a half of cases) was behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, however, there was substantial clinical heterogeneity across the C9ORF72 mutation cohort. Sixty per cent of cases developed clinical features consistent with motor neuron disease during the period of follow-up. Anxiety and agitation and memory impairment were prominent features (between a half to two-thirds of cases), and dominant parietal dysfunction was also frequent. Affected individuals showed variable magnetic resonance imaging findings; however, relative to healthy controls, the group as a whole showed extensive thinning of frontal, temporal and parietal cortices, subcortical grey matter atrophy including thalamus and cerebellum and involvement of long intrahemispheric, commissural and corticospinal tracts. The neuroimaging profile of the C9ORF72 expansion was significantly more symmetrical than progranulin mutations with significantly less temporal lobe involvement than microtubule-associated protein tau mutations. Neuropathological examination in six cases

  6. My belief or yours? Differential theory of mind deficits in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Le Bouc, Raphaël; Lenfant, Pierre; Delbeuck, Xavier; Ravasi, Laura; Lebert, Florence; Semah, Franck; Pasquier, Florence

    2012-10-01

    Theory of mind reasoning-the ability to understand someone else's mental states, such as beliefs, intentions and desires-is crucial in social interaction. It has been suggested that a theory of mind deficit may account for some of the abnormalities in interpersonal behaviour that characterize patients affected by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. However, there are conflicting reports as to whether understanding someone else's mind is a key difference between behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and other neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Literature data on the relationship between theory of mind abilities and executive functions are also contradictory. These disparities may be due to underestimation of the fractionation within theory of mind components. A recent theoretical framework suggests that taking someone else's mental perspective requires two distinct processes: inferring someone else's belief and inhibiting one's own belief, with involvement of the temporoparietal and right frontal cortices, respectively. Therefore, we performed a neuropsychological and neuroimaging study to investigate the hypothesis whereby distinct cognitive deficits could impair theory of mind reasoning in patients with Alzheimer's disease and patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. We used a three-option false belief task to assess theory of mind components in 11 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 12 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 20 healthy elderly control subjects. The patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and those with Alzheimer's disease were matched for age, gender, education and global cognitive impairment. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging was used to investigate neural correlates of theory of mind reasoning deficits. Performance in the three-option false belief task revealed differential impairments in the components of theory of mind

  7. Music therapy modulates fronto-temporal activity in rest-EEG in depressed clients.

    PubMed

    Fachner, Jörg; Gold, Christian; Erkkilä, Jaakko

    2013-04-01

    Fronto-temporal areas process shared elements of speech and music. Improvisational psychodynamic music therapy (MT) utilizes verbal and musical reflection on emotions and images arising from clinical improvisation. Music listening is shifting frontal alpha asymmetries (FAA) in depression, and increases frontal midline theta (FMT). In a two-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 79 depressed clients (with comorbid anxiety), we compared standard care (SC) versus MT added to SC at intake and after 3 months. We found that MT significantly reduced depression and anxiety symptoms. The purpose of this study is to test whether or not MT has an impact on anterior fronto-temporal resting state alpha and theta oscillations. Correlations between anterior EEG, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A), power spectral analysis (topography, means, asymmetry) and normative EEG database comparisons were explored. After 3 month of MT, lasting changes in resting EEG were observed, i.e., significant absolute power increases at left fronto-temporal alpha, but most distinct for theta (also at left fronto-central and right temporoparietal leads). MT differed to SC at F7-F8 (z scored FAA, p < .03) and T3-T4 (theta, p < .005) asymmetry scores, pointing towards decreased relative left-sided brain activity after MT; pre/post increased FMT and decreased HADS-A scores (r = .42, p < .05) indicate reduced anxiety after MT. Verbal reflection and improvising on emotions in MT may induce neural reorganization in fronto-temporal areas. Alpha and theta changes in fronto-temporal and temporoparietal areas indicate MT action and treatment effects on cortical activity in depression, suggesting an impact of MT on anxiety reduction.

  8. Late onset bipolar disorder and frontotemporal dementia with mutation in progranulin gene: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Elisa; Vacca, Alessandro; Gallone, Salvatore; Govone, Flora; Zucca, Milena; Gai, Annalisa; Ferrero, Patrizia; Fenoglio, Pierpaola; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Rainero, Innocenzo

    2017-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic psychiatric illness characterised by fluctuation in mood state, with a relapsing and remitting course. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with the most frequent phenotype being behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Here, we report the case of an Italian male presenting with late-onset bipolar disorder that developed into bvFTD over time, carrying a mutation in the GRN gene. Interestingly, the patient carried the c.1639 C > T variant in the GRN gene, resulting in a R547C substitution. Our case report further corroborates the notion that, in addition to FTD, progranulin may be involved in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder type 1, and suggests to screen patients with late-onset bipolar disorder for GRN mutations.

  9. Headache of a diagnosis: frontotemporal pain and inflammation associated with osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Tacon, Lyndal J; Parkinson, Jonathon F; Hudson, Bernard J; Brewer, Janice M; Little, Nicholas S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J

    2008-11-17

    A 62-year-old woman presented with left frontotemporal pain, scalp tenderness and raised levels of inflammatory markers. Temporal arteritis was considered likely, and symptoms resolved with prednisone therapy. This delayed diagnostic bone biopsy until a soft tissue abscess formed, and Pott's puffy tumour associated with Prevotella osteomyelitis of the frontal bone was diagnosed. This case highlights the value of early histopathological examination, and is a reminder of a condition seen frequently in the pre-antibiotic era.

  10. Humour processing in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Downey, Laura E.; Woollacott, Ione O.; Golden, Hannah L.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Humour is a complex cognitive and emotional construct that is vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, notably the frontotemporal lobar degenerations. However, humour processing in these diseases has been little studied. Here we assessed humour processing in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 22, mean age 67 years, four female) and semantic dementia (n = 11, mean age 67 years, five female) relative to healthy individuals (n = 21, mean age 66 years, 11 female), using a joint cognitive and neuroanatomical approach. We created a novel neuropsychological test requiring a decision about the humorous intent of nonverbal cartoons, in which we manipulated orthogonally humour content and familiarity of depicted scenarios. Structural neuroanatomical correlates of humour detection were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Assessing performance in a signal detection framework and after adjusting for standard measures of cognitive function, both patient groups showed impaired accuracy of humour detection in familiar and novel scenarios relative to healthy older controls (p < .001). Patient groups showed similar overall performance profiles; however the behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia group alone showed a significant advantage for detection of humour in familiar relative to novel scenarios (p = .045), suggesting that the behavioural variant syndrome may lead to particular difficulty decoding novel situations for humour, while semantic dementia produces a more general deficit of humour detection that extends to stock comedic situations. Humour detection accuracy was associated with grey matter volume in a distributed network including temporo-parietal junctional and anterior superior temporal cortices, with predominantly left-sided correlates of processing humour in familiar scenarios and right-sided correlates of processing novel humour. The findings quantify deficits of core cognitive operations underpinning humour

  11. Art and the brain: the influence of frontotemporal dementia on an accomplished artist.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Howard, Sara M; Miller, Bruce L

    2003-05-27

    A talented artist developed a progressive aphasia syndrome associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). As her disease progressed, language and executive skills declined, but her paintings became freer and more original. She demonstrates that artistic development can occur in the setting of language-dominant types of FTD. The study of artistic development in the setting of FTD suggests that language is not required for, and may even inhibit, certain types of visual creativity.

  12. Factors Underpinning Caregiver Burden in Frontotemporal Dementia Differ in Spouses and their Children

    PubMed Central

    Kaizik, Cassandra; Caga, Jashelle; Camino, Julieta; O’Connor, Claire M.; McKinnon, Colleen; Oyebode, Jan R.; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R.; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this observational study were to (1) compare spousal and child caregiver burden; (2) compare co-resident and live-out child caregiver burden; and (3) investigate factors influencing spousal and child caregiver burden. Data was collected from 90 caregivers of people with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) recruited from the Frontotemporal Dementia Research Group (Frontier) at Neuroscience Research, Australia. Of this caregiver group, 43 were spousal caregivers and 47 were child caregivers. Caregiver burden and emotional state were evaluated using the short Zarit Burden Interview and the short version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. The Social Network Index was applied to ascertain the social network of the caregiver, while the Intimate Bond Measure was used to evaluate the current quality of the relationship between the caregiver and the person with dementia. The Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale was used to assess severity of dementia. Spousal and child caregivers experienced similar levels of burden, depression, anxiety, and stress, regardless of disease severity. Co-resident child caregivers had smaller social networks and greater burden than live-out caregivers. Dementia severity was key in spousal caregiver burden, whereas caregiver depression was most important in child caregiver burden. Child and spousal caregivers of individuals with FTD share similar levels of burden, influenced by different factors. Future interventions need to account for these differences. PMID:28106550

  13. Activation of the right fronto-temporal cortex during maternal facial recognition in young infants.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Jakob; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Olson, Linus; Printz, Gordana; Bartocci, Marco

    2008-09-01

    Within the first days of life infants can already recognize their mother. This ability is based on several sensory mechanisms and increases during the first year of life, having its most crucial phase between 6 and 9 months when cortical circuits develop. The underlying cortical structures that are involved in this process are still unknown. Herein we report how the prefrontal cortices of healthy 6- to 9-month-old infants react to the sight of their mother's faces compared to that of an unknown female face. Concentrations of oxygenated haemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxygenated haemoglobin [HHb] were measured using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in both fronto-temporal and occipital areas on the right side during the exposure to maternal and unfamiliar faces. The infants exhibited a distinct and significantly higher activation-related haemodynamic response in the right fronto-temporal cortex following exposure to the image of their mother's face, [HbO2] (0.75 micromol/L, p < 0.001), as compared to that of an unknown face (0.25 micromol/L, p < 0.001). Event-related haemodynamic changes, suggesting cortical activation, in response to the sight of human faces were detected in 6- to 9-month old children. The right fronto-temporal cortex appears to be involved in face recognition processes at this age.

  14. Examining frontotemporal connectivity and rTMS in healthy controls: implications for auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gromann, Paula M; Tracy, Derek K; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Krabbendam, Lydia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to have clinically beneficial effects in altering the perception of auditory hallucinations (AH) in patients with schizophrenia. However, the mode of action is not clear. Recent neuroimaging findings indicate that rTMS has the potential to induce not only local effects but also changes in remote, functionally connected brain regions. Frontotemporal dysconnectivity has been proposed as a mechanism leading to psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. The current study examines functional connectivity between temporal and frontal brain regions after rTMS and the implications for AH in schizophrenia. A connectivity analysis was conducted on the fMRI data of 11 healthy controls receiving rTMS, compared with 11 matched subjects receiving sham TMS, to the temporoparietal junction, before engaging in a task associated with robust frontotemporal activation. Compared to the control group, the rTMS group showed an altered frontotemporal connectivity with stronger connectivity between the right temporoparietal cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the angular gyrus. This finding provides preliminary evidence for the hypothesis that normalizing the functional connectivity between the temporoparietal and frontal brain regions may underlie the therapeutic effect of rTMS on AH in schizophrenia.

  15. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - frontotemporal spectrum disorder (ALS-FTSD): Revised diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Strong, Michael J; Abrahams, Sharon; Goldstein, Laura H; Woolley, Susan; Mclaughlin, Paula; Snowden, Julie; Mioshi, Eneida; Roberts-South, Angie; Benatar, Michael; HortobáGyi, Tibor; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Silani, Vincenzo; Ince, Paul G; Turner, Martin R

    2017-05-01

    This article presents the revised consensus criteria for the diagnosis of frontotemporal dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) based on an international research workshop on frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and ALS held in London, Canada in June 2015. Since the publication of the Strong criteria, there have been considerable advances in the understanding of the neuropsychological profile of patients with ALS. Not only is the breadth and depth of neuropsychological findings broader than previously recognised - - including deficits in social cognition and language - but mixed deficits may also occur. Evidence now shows that the neuropsychological deficits in ALS are extremely heterogeneous, affecting over 50% of persons with ALS. When present, these deficits significantly and adversely impact patient survival. It is the recognition of this clinical heterogeneity in association with neuroimaging, genetic and neuropathological advances that has led to the current re-conceptualisation that neuropsychological deficits in ALS fall along a spectrum. These revised consensus criteria expand upon those of 2009 and embrace the concept of the frontotemporal spectrum disorder of ALS (ALS-FTSD).

  16. Right Frontotemporal Cortex Mediates the Relationship between Cognitive Insight and Subjective Quality of Life in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Itakura, Masashi; Ohtachi, Hiroaki; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Kaneko, Koichi

    2018-01-01

    Although prior studies identified a relationship between cognitive insight and subjective quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia, the brain regions mediating this relationship remain unknown. Recent studies have shown that the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may be particularly important for cognitive insight in individuals with schizophrenia. Here, we examined whether frontotemporal function mediates the relationship between cognitive insight and QOL in 64 participants, including 32 patients with schizophrenia and 32 healthy controls. Cognitive insight was measured using the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS), while participants’ subjective QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-form Health Survey. Frontotemporal function was evaluated during a verbal fluency task using multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy. Consistent with previous findings, we found that frontotemporal function was impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Interestingly, our data also revealed that the right ventrolateral PFC and the right anterior part of the temporal cortex significantly mediated the relationship between the self-reflectiveness (SR) subscale of the BCIS and subjective QOL. These findings suggest that cognitive insight, particularly SR, is associated with subjective QOL in patients with schizophrenia via right frontotemporal function. The findings of this study provide important insight into a QOL model of schizophrenia, which may guide the development of cost-effective interventions that target frontotemporal function in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:29456514

  17. Right Frontotemporal Cortex Mediates the Relationship between Cognitive Insight and Subjective Quality of Life in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Itakura, Masashi; Ohtachi, Hiroaki; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Kaneko, Koichi

    2018-01-01

    Although prior studies identified a relationship between cognitive insight and subjective quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia, the brain regions mediating this relationship remain unknown. Recent studies have shown that the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may be particularly important for cognitive insight in individuals with schizophrenia. Here, we examined whether frontotemporal function mediates the relationship between cognitive insight and QOL in 64 participants, including 32 patients with schizophrenia and 32 healthy controls. Cognitive insight was measured using the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS), while participants' subjective QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-form Health Survey. Frontotemporal function was evaluated during a verbal fluency task using multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy. Consistent with previous findings, we found that frontotemporal function was impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Interestingly, our data also revealed that the right ventrolateral PFC and the right anterior part of the temporal cortex significantly mediated the relationship between the self-reflectiveness (SR) subscale of the BCIS and subjective QOL. These findings suggest that cognitive insight, particularly SR, is associated with subjective QOL in patients with schizophrenia via right frontotemporal function. The findings of this study provide important insight into a QOL model of schizophrenia, which may guide the development of cost-effective interventions that target frontotemporal function in patients with schizophrenia.

  18. [The interactive neuroanatomical simulation and practical application of frontotemporal transsylvian exposure in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Czigléczki, Gábor; Papal, Zsolt; Preul, Mark C; Banczerowski, Péter

    2014-11-30

    There is an increased need for new digital education tools in neurosurgical training. Illustrated textbooks offer anatomic and technical reference but do not substitute hands-on experience provided by surgery or cadaver dissection. Due to limited availability of cadaver dissections the need for development of simulation tools has been augmented. We explored simulation technology for producing virtual reality-like reconstructions of simulated surgical approaches on cadaver. Practical application of the simulation tool has been presented through frontotemporal transsylvian exposure. The dissections were performed on two cadaveric heads. Arteries and veins were prepared and injected with colorful silicon rubber. The heads were rigidly fixed in Mayfield headholder. A robotic microscope with two digital cameras in inverted cone method of image acquisition was used to capture images around a pivot point in several phases of dissections. Multilayered, high-resolution images have been built into interactive 4D environment by custom developed software. We have developed the simulation module of the frontotemporal transsylvian approach. The virtual specimens can be rotated or tilted to any selected angles and examined from different surgical perspectives at any stage of dissections. Important surgical issues such as appropriate head positioning or surgical maneuvers to expose deep situated neuroanatomic structures can be simulated and studied by using the module. The simulation module of the frontotemporal transsylvian exposure helps to examine effect of head positioning on the visibility of deep situated neuroanatomic structures and study surgical maneuvers required to achieve optimal exposure of deep situated anatomic structures. The simulation program is a powerful tool to study issues of preoperative planning and well suited for neurosurgical training.

  19. Impact of DNA testing for early-onset familial Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Steinbart, E J; Smith, C O; Poorkaj, P; Bird, T D

    2001-11-01

    DNA testing of persons at risk for hereditary, degenerative neurologic diseases is relatively new. Only anecdotal reports of such testing in familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) exist, and little is know about the personal and social impact of such testing. In a descriptive, observational study, individuals at 50% risk for autosomal dominant, early-onset FAD or frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 underwent DNA testing for the genetic mutations previously identified in affected family members. Individuals were followed up for (1/2) to 3 years and were interviewed regarding attitudes toward the testing process and the impact of the results. Twenty-one (8.4%) of 251 persons at risk for FAD or frontotemporal dementia requested genetic testing. The most common reasons for requesting testing were concern about early symptoms of dementia, financial or family planning, and relief from anxiety. Twelve individuals had positive DNA test results, and 6 of these had early symptoms of dementia; 8 had negative results; and 1 has not yet received results. Of 14 asymptomatic individuals completing testing, 13 believed the testing was beneficial. Two persons reported moderate anxiety and 1 reported moderate depression. As expected, persons with negative test results had happier experiences overall, but even they had to deal with ongoing anxiety and depression. Thus far, there have been no psychiatric hospitalizations, suicide attempts, or denials of insurance. Genetic testing in early-onset FAD and frontotemporal dementia can be completed successfully. Most individuals demonstrate effective coping skills and find the testing to be beneficial, but long-term effects remain unknown.

  20. Family history of frontotemporal lobar degeneration in Asia--an international multi-center research.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Ryuji; Ghosh, Amitabha; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Dominguez, Jacqueline; Ong, Paulus Anam; Dutt, Aparna; Liu, Yi-Chien; Tanaka, Hibiki; Ikeda, Manabu

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies in western countries have shown that about 30%-50% of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) have a positive family history, whereas the few epidemiological studies on FTLD done in Asia reported much lower frequencies. It is not clear the reason why the frequencies of FTLD with positive family history were lower in Asia. Furthermore, these findings were not from studies focused on family history. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct further studies on the family history of FTLD in Asia. This international multi-center research aims to investigate the family histories in patients with FTLD and related neurodegenerative diseases such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal syndrome (CBS), and motor neuron diseases in a larger Asian cohort. Participants were collected from five countries: India, Indonesia, Japan, Taiwan, and Philippines. All patients were diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PA), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (FTD/MND), PSP, and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) according to international consensus criteria. Family histories of FTLD and related neurodegenerative diseases were investigated in each patient. Ninety-one patients were included in this study. Forty-two patients were diagnosed to have bvFTD, two patients had FTD/MND, 22 had SD, 15 had PA, one had PA/CBS, five had CBS and four patients had PSP. Family history of any FTLD spectrum disorder was reported in 9.5% in bvFTD patients but in none of the SD or PA. In contrast to patients of the western countries, few Asian FTLD patients have positive family histories of dementia.

  1. White matter tract signatures of impaired social cognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Laura E.; Mahoney, Colin J.; Buckley, Aisling H.; Golden, Hannah L.; Henley, Susie M.; Schmitz, Nicole; Schott, Jonathan M.; Simpson, Ivor J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Impairments of social cognition are often leading features in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and likely to reflect large-scale brain network disintegration. However, the neuroanatomical basis of impaired social cognition in FTLD and the role of white matter connections have not been defined. Here we assessed social cognition in a cohort of patients representing two core syndromes of FTLD, behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 29) and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA; n = 15), relative to healthy older individuals (n = 37) using two components of the Awareness of Social Inference Test, canonical emotion identification and sarcasm identification. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to derive white matter tract correlates of social cognition performance and compared with the distribution of grey matter atrophy on voxel-based morphometry. The bvFTD and svPPA groups showed comparably severe deficits for identification of canonical emotions and sarcasm, and these deficits were correlated with distributed and overlapping white matter tract alterations particularly affecting frontotemporal connections in the right cerebral hemisphere. The most robust DTI associations were identified in white matter tracts linking cognitive and evaluative processing with emotional responses: anterior thalamic radiation, fornix (emotion identification) and uncinate fasciculus (sarcasm identification). DTI associations of impaired social cognition were more consistent than corresponding grey matter associations. These findings delineate a brain network substrate for the social impairment that characterises FTLD syndromes. The findings further suggest that DTI can generate sensitive and functionally relevant indexes of white matter damage in FTLD, with potential to transcend conventional syndrome boundaries. PMID:26236629

  2. The tailored activity program (TAP) to address behavioral disturbances in frontotemporal dementia: a feasibility and pilot study.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Claire M; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Low, Lee-Fay; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Gitlin, Laura N; Piguet, Olivier; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-10-15

    To explore the feasibility of implementing the Tailored Activity Program with a cohort of people with frontotemporal dementia and their carers (dyads). The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves working collaboratively with family carers and prescribes personalized activities for behavioral management in people with dementia. Twenty dyads randomized into the study (Tailored Activity Program: n = 9; Control: n = 11) were assessed at baseline and 4-months. Qualitative analyzes evaluated feasibility and acceptability of the program for the frontotemporal dementia cohort, and quantitative analyzes (linear mixed model analyzes, Spearman's rho correlations) measured the impact of the program on the dyads. The Tailored Activity Program was an acceptable intervention for the frontotemporal dementia dyads. Qualitative analyses identified five themes: "carer perceived benefits", "carer readiness to change", "strategies used by carer to engage person with dementia", "barriers to the Tailored Activity Program uptake/implementation", and "person with dementia engagement". Quantitative outcomes showed an overall reduction of behavioral symptoms (F 18.34  = 8.073, p = 0.011) and maintenance of functional performance in the person with dementia (F 18.03  = 0.375, p = 0.548). This study demonstrates the potential for using an activity-based intervention such as the Tailored Activity Program in frontotemporal dementia. Service providers should recognize that while people with frontotemporal dementia present with challenging issues, tailored therapies may support their function and reduce their behavioral symptoms. Implications for rehabilitation The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves prescribing personalized activities for behavioral management in dementia. The Tailored Activity Program is an acceptable and feasible intervention approach to address some of the

  3. Fair play: social norm compliance failures in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Claire; Bertoux, Maxime; Irish, Muireann; Shine, James M; Wong, Stephanie; Spiliopoulos, Leonidas; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to social norms is compromised in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Functional neuroimaging studies have investigated social norm compliance in healthy individuals, leading to the identification of a network of fronto-subcortical regions that underpins this ability. However, there is a lack of corroborative evidence from human lesion models investigating the structural anatomy of norm compliance across this fronto-subcortical network. To address this, we developed a neuroeconomic task to investigate social norm compliance in a neurodegenerative lesion model: behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, a condition characterized by gross social dysfunction. The task assessed norm compliance across three behaviours that are well-studied in the neuroeconomics literature: fairness, prosocial and punishing behaviours. We administered our novel version of the Ultimatum Game in 22 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and 22 age-matched controls, to assess how decision-making behaviour was modulated in response to (i) fairness of monetary offers; and (ii) social context of monetary offers designed to produce either prosocial or punishing behaviours. Voxel-based morphometry was used to characterize patterns of grey matter atrophy associated with task performance. Acceptance rates between patients and controls were equivalent when only fairness was manipulated. However, patients were impaired in modulating their decisions in response to social contextual information. Patients' performance in the punishment condition was consistent with a reduced tendency to engage in punishment; this was associated with decreased grey matter volume in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus. In the prosocial condition, patients' performance suggested a reduced expression of prosocial behaviour, associated with decreased grey matter in the anterior insula, lateral orbitofrontal

  4. Frontotemporal Functional Connectivity and Executive Functions Contribute to Episodic Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Blankenship, Tashauna L.; O'Neill, Meagan; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Diana, Rachel A.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2016-01-01

    The contributions of hemispheric-specific electrophysiology (electroencephalogram or EEG) and independent executive functions (inhibitory control, working memory, cognitive flexibility) to episodic memory performance were examined using abstract paintings. Right hemisphere frontotemporal functional connectivity during encoding and retrieval, measured via EEG alpha coherence, statistically predicted performance on recency but not recognition judgments for the abstract paintings. Theta coherence, however, did not predict performance. Likewise, cognitive flexibility statistically predicted performance on recency judgments, but not recognition. These findings suggest that recognition and recency operate via separate electrophysiological and executive mechanisms. PMID:27388478

  5. Assessment of socioemotional processes facilitates the distinction between frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Narme, Pauline; Mouras, Harold; Roussel, Martine; Devendeville, Agnès; Godefroy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We explored the value of a battery of socioemotional tasks for differentiating between frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with FTLD (n = 13) or AD (n = 13) and healthy controls (n = 26) underwent a neuropsychological assessment and the socioemotional battery (an empathy questionnaire, an emotion recognition task, and theory of mind tasks). Socioemotional processes were markedly impaired in FTLD but relatively unaffected in mild AD. The computed Socioemotional Index discriminated more accurately between FTLD from AD than behavioral and executive assessments did. Furthermore, impairments in socioemotional processes were correlated with indifference to others.

  6. Techniques for Preservation of the Frontotemporal Branch of Facial Nerve during Orbitozygomatic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Background During orbitozygomatic (OZ) approaches, the frontotemporal branch (FTB) of the facial nerve is exposed to injury if proper measures are not taken. This article describes in detail the nuances of the two most common techniques (interfascial and subfascial dissection). Design The FTB of the facial nerve was dissected and followed in its tissue planes on fresh-frozen cadaver heads. The interfascial and subfascial dissections were performed, and every step was photographed and examined. Results The interfascial dissection is safe to be started from the most anterior part of the superior temporal line and followed to the root of the zygoma. The dissection is continued on the deep temporalis fascia (DTF), and the interfascial fat pad is elevated. With the subfascial dissection, both the superficial temporalis fascia and the DTF are elevated. The interfascial dissection exposes the zygomatic arch directly, whereas the subfascial dissection requires an additional cut on the DTF to expose the zygomatic arch. Proper subperiosteal dissection on the zygomatic arch is another important step in FTB preservation. Conclusion Detailed understanding of the complex relationship of the tissue planes in the frontotemporal region is needed to perform OZ exposures safely. PMID:26225300

  7. The Use of Profanity During Letter Fluency Tasks in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ringman, John M.; Kwon, Eunice; Flores, Deborah L.; Rotko, Carol; Mendez, Mario F.; Lu, Po

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the production of profanity during letter fluency testing distinguishes frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Background Alterations in language and social behavior typify FTD spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, in can be difficult to distinguish pathologically-defined frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) from AD clinically. Assessing verbal fluency by having patients generate as many words as they can beginning with specific letters in a given period of time can yield diverse information of diagnostic utility. Method Words produced during FAS letter fluency testing were reviewed and instances of the use of "f*ck", "*ss", and "sh*t" and other words felt to be inappropriate were sought. The frequency of these words was compared between clinically diagnosed FTD and AD patients using chi-square tests. Results We found that 6/32 (18.8%) patients with FTD generated the word "f*ck" during the "F" trial as opposed to none of 38 patients with AD (p = 0.007). Patients who said "f*ck" had diagnoses of either behavioral variant FTD (3/15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (2/8), or semantic dementia (1/3). Conclusions Though the specific neuropathology in these cases is uncertain, generation of "f*ck" during letter fluency testing appears to have utility in differentiating FTD from AD. PMID:20829665

  8. Right Fronto-Temporal EEG can Differentiate the Affective Responses to Award-Winning Advertisements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Regina W Y; Huarng, Shy-Peih; Chuang, Shang-Wen

    2018-04-01

    Affective engineering aims to improve service/product design by translating the customer's psychological feelings. Award-winning advertisements (AAs) were selected on the basis of the professional standards that consider creativity as a prerequisite. However, it is unknown if AA is related to satisfactory advertising performance among customers or only to the experts' viewpoints towards the advertisements. This issue in the field of affective engineering and design merits in-depth evaluation. We recruited 30 subjects and performed an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment while watching AAs and non-AAs (NAAs). The event-related potential (ERP) data showed that AAs evoked larger positive potentials 250-1400 [Formula: see text]ms after stimulus onset, particularly in the right fronto-temporal regions. The behavioral results were consistent with the professional recognition given to AAs by experts. The perceived levels of creativity and "product-like" quality were higher for the AAs than for the NAAs. Event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) analysis further revealed statistically significant differences in the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma band activity in the right fronto-temporal regions between the AAs and NAAs. Our results confirm that EEG features from the time/frequency domains can differentiate affective responses to AAs at a neural circuit level, and provide scientific evidence to support the identification of AAs.

  9. The structural neuroanatomy of music emotion recognition: Evidence from frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Rohani; Henley, Susie M.D.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Hailstone, Julia C.; Gordon, Elizabeth; Sauter, Disa A.; Frost, Chris; Scott, Sophie K.; Warren, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite growing clinical and neurobiological interest in the brain mechanisms that process emotion in music, these mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) frequently exhibit clinical syndromes that illustrate the effects of breakdown in emotional and social functioning. Here we investigated the neuroanatomical substrate for recognition of musical emotion in a cohort of 26 patients with FTLD (16 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, bvFTD, 10 with semantic dementia, SemD) using voxel-based morphometry. On neuropsychological evaluation, patients with FTLD showed deficient recognition of canonical emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) from music as well as faces and voices compared with healthy control subjects. Impaired recognition of emotions from music was specifically associated with grey matter loss in a distributed cerebral network including insula, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, anterior temporal and more posterior temporal and parietal cortices, amygdala and the subcortical mesolimbic system. This network constitutes an essential brain substrate for recognition of musical emotion that overlaps with brain regions previously implicated in coding emotional value, behavioural context, conceptual knowledge and theory of mind. Musical emotion recognition may probe the interface of these processes, delineating a profile of brain damage that is essential for the abstraction of complex social emotions. PMID:21385617

  10. Comparing moral judgments of patients with frontotemporal dementia and frontal stroke.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Couto, Blas; Torralva, Teresa; Sposato, Luciano A; Huepe, David; Montañes, Patricia; Reyes, Pablo; Matallana, Diana; Vigliecca, Nora S; Slachevsky, Andrea; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2014-09-01

    Several clinical reports have stated that patients with prefrontal lesions or patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia share social cognition impairments. Moral reasoning is impaired in both conditions but there have been few investigations that directly compare this domain in the 2 groups. This work compared the moral judgments of these patient groups using a task designed to disentangle the contributions of intentions and outcomes in moral judgment. For both disorders, patients judged scenarios where the protagonists believed that they would cause harm but did not as being more permissible than the control group. Moreover, patients with frontotemporal dementia judged harmful outcomes in the absence of harmful intentions as less permissible than the control participants. There were no differences between the 2 conditions. Both disorders involved impairments in integrating intention and outcome information for moral judgment. This study was the first, to our knowledge, to directly compare a social cognition domain in 2 frontal pathologies with different etiology. Our results highlighted the importance of comparing patients with vascular lesions and patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Current Role for Biomarkers in Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Sheikh-Bahaei, Nasim; Sajjadi, Seyed Ahmad; Pierce, Aimee L

    2017-11-14

    Purpose of review Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia can often be diagnosed accurately with careful clinical history, cognitive testing, neurological examination, and structural brain MRI. However, there are certain circumstances wherein detection of specific biomarkers of neurodegeneration or underlying AD pathology will impact the clinical diagnosis or treatment plan. We will review the currently available biomarkers for AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and discuss their clinical importance. Recent findings With the advent of 18 F-labeled tracers that bind amyloid plaques, amyloid PET is now clinically available for the detection of amyloid pathology and to aid in a biomarker-supported diagnosis of AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD. It is not yet possible to test for the specific FTD pathologies (tau or TDP-43); however, a diagnosis of FTD may be "imaging supported" based upon specific MRI or FDG-PET findings. Cerebrospinal fluid measures of amyloid-beta, total-tau, and phospho-tau are clinically available and allow detection of both of the cardinal pathologies of AD: amyloid and tau pathology. Summary It is appropriate to pursue biomarker testing in cases of MCI and dementia when there remains diagnostic uncertainty and the result will impact diagnosis or treatment. Practically speaking, due to the rising prevalence of amyloid positivity with advancing age, measurement of biomarkers in cases of MCI and dementia is most helpful in early-onset patients, patients with atypical clinical presentations, or when considering referral for AD clinical trials.

  12. Are we comparing frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease patients with the right measures?

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Mariel B; Liang, Li-Jung; Jimenez, Elvira E; Mather, Michelle J; Mendez, Mario F

    2016-09-01

    Clinical research studies of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) often use Alzheimer disease (AD) as a comparison group for control of dementia variables, using tests of cognitive function to match the groups. These two dementia syndromes, however, are very different in clinical manifestations, and the comparable severity of these dementias may not be reflected by commonly used cognitive scales such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). We evaluated different measures of dementia severity and symptoms among 20 people with bvFTD compared to 24 with early-onset AD. Despite similar ages, disease-duration, education, and cognitive performance on two tests of cognitive function, the MMSE and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the bvFTD participants, compared to the AD participants, were significantly more impaired on other measures of disease severity, including function (Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ)), neuropsychiatric symptoms (Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI)), and global dementia stage (Clinical Dementia Rating Scales (CDRs)). However, when we adjusted for the frontotemporal lobar degeneration-CDR (FTLD-CDR) in the analyses, the two dementia groups were comparable across all measures despite significant differences on the cognitive scales. We found tests of cognitive functions (MMSE and MoCA) to be insufficient measures for ensuring comparability between bvFTD and AD groups. In clinical studies, the FTLD-CDR, which includes additional language and behavior items, may be a better overall way to match bvFTD and AD groups on dementia severity.

  13. Difficulties in detecting behavioral symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration across cultures.

    PubMed

    Papatriantafyllou, John D; Viskontas, Indre V; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Miller, Bruce L; Pavlic, Danijela; Bingol, Ayse; Yener, Gorsev

    2009-01-01

    Cross-cultural studies of neurodegenerative disorders are especially important when the disease in question is difficult to diagnose, particularly if symptoms of the illness include behavioral disturbances that may be interpreted differently in different cultures. One such disease is frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), an early-age-of-onset dementia that disproportionately affects social behavior. We report the demographic and neuropsychologic characteristics of more than 300 patients diagnosed with FTLD in the United States, Greece, and Turkey. We find that patients with the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are diagnosed at an earlier age and report earlier symptom onset in the United States than in Greece or Turkey. Furthermore, neuropsychologic measures indicate that at diagnosis, FTD patients in the United States are less impaired than patients in Greece and Turkey. Patients with FTD in Greece and Turkey are diagnosed later in the disease, presumably because their behavioral symptoms are not easily detected by the medical system in these countries. Our study underscores the need to create culturally appropriate indices of the behavioral symptoms of FTLD, so that patients may be diagnosed and treated at an earlier stage.

  14. Behavioral Interventions for Enhancing Life Participation in behavioral variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Kortte, Kathleen B.; Rogalski, Emily J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are clinical syndromes under the umbrella term “frontotemporal dementia (FTD)” and are caused by a neurodegenerative disease with an onset most typically in the productive years of adulthood. The cognitive and behavioral impairments associated with FTD interfere with the successful engagement in typical life roles, such as parenting, working, and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. There are currently no treatments to stop or slow the degenerative process and there are only very limited medication options for the management of the cognitive-behavioral symptoms. However, alternative, non-pharmacological interventions may offer significant benefit to the quality of life of the diagnosed individual. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the approaches available through neurorehabilitation and community-based services that facilitate successful engagement in life activities and promote optimal quality of life for the individuals and families living with FTD. It is hoped that as medical providers become more familiar with behavioral interventions, referrals for services will increase thereby allowing individuals with FTD and their caregivers to learn ways to adapt, adjust, and participate in life to the fullest despite the impairments from this progressive disease. PMID:23611353

  15. Enhancing caregivers' understanding of dementia and tailoring activities in frontotemporal dementia: two case studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Claire M; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Gitlin, Laura N; Piguet, Olivier; Mioshi, Eneida

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the intervention process and results of the Tailored Activities Program (TAP) in two people diagnosed with Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). TAP is an occupational therapy (OT) community-based intervention program that prescribes personalised activities to reduce difficult behaviours of dementia. The OT works with carers over a 4-month period (assessment, activity prescription and generalisation of strategies). Study measures were collected (blind researcher) pre- and post-intervention: cognition, functional disability, behavioural symptoms and Caregiver Confidence and Vigilance. A 51-year-old woman with behavioural-variant FTD could consistently engage in more activities post-intervention, with scores indicating improvements to behaviour, function and caregiver confidence. A 63-year-old man with semantic variant FTD engaged well in the prescribed activities, with scores reflecting reduced carer distress regarding challenging behaviours and improved caregiver vigilance. TAP is efficacious in FTD, allowing for differences in approach for FTD subtype, where behavioural symptoms are very severe and pervasive. The Tailored Activities Program is an intervention which can be tailored to account for unique behavioural and language profiles inherent across frontotemporal dementia (FTD) subtypes. Maintaining a flexible approach when applying an intervention in FTD allows for tailoring to individual case variability within FTD subtypes.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of FTDC criteria for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jennifer M; Gall, Claire; Thompson, Jennifer C; Richardson, Anna M T; Neary, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Pal, Piyali; Mann, David M A; Snowden, Julie S; Jones, Matthew

    2013-05-14

    We aimed to assess sensitivity and specificity of the updated criteria for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) based on a large autopsy-confirmed cohort of patients with dementia. Two hundred thirty-nine consecutive pathologically confirmed dementia patients, clinically assessed in a specialist cognitive unit were identified. Patients with predominant aphasia, motor disorders, or insufficient clinical information were excluded. Frontotemporal Dementia Consensus criteria were applied to anonymized clinical data taken from patients' initial assessment by raters who were blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnosis. The final study cohort comprised 156 patients with predominantly early-onset dementia. The updated criteria for possible bvFTD had a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 82%. Probable bvFTD criteria had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 95%. False positives were predominantly patients with presenile Alzheimer disease. Revised diagnostic criteria show encouragingly high sensitivity and specificity when applied to patients with early-onset dementia. They therefore provide a useful tool both for specialist researchers and general clinicians. There is a need for further prospective studies of sensitivity and specificity involving a broader spectrum of patients with dementia.

  17. [Inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yukiko

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the VCP gene. VCP encodes a well-conserved multifunctional protein, valosin containing protein (VCP), which has important roles in protein quality control via proteasome and autophagy, protein aggregation, quality control of mitochondria, cell proliferation, and so on. Clinically, muscle weakness is the most common symptom of which disease onset is around 40 years. Affected muscles are variable, and the patients are sometimes diagnosed as limb girdle muscular dystrophy or GNE myopathy. Muscle pathology shows characteristic features including cytoplasmic/nuclear inclusions, rimmed vacuoles, and disorganized myofibrills, together with neurogenic changes. Paget's disease of bone is reported to be observed in a half of the patients around the age of 40 years, but less common in Japanese patients. Frontotemporal dementia is seen around one third of the patients which appears nearly 10 years later than muscle or bone disease. In addition to cognitive dysfunctions, motor neuron involvement and cerebellar signs were also seen in our series. IBMPFD is not so rare disease as previously thought, but complicate clinical findings may make its diagnosis difficult.

  18. Dissociation between controlled and automatic processes in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Collette, Fabienne; Van der Linden, Martial; Salmon, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A decline of cognitive functioning affecting several cognitive domains was frequently reported in patients with frontotemporal dementia. We were interested in determining if these deficits can be interpreted as reflecting an impairment of controlled cognitive processes by using an assessment tool specifically developed to explore the distinction between automatic and controlled processes, namely the process dissociation procedure (PDP) developed by Jacoby. The PDP was applied to a word stem completion task to determine the contribution of automatic and controlled processes to episodic memory performance and was administered to a group of 12 patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD) and 20 control subjects (CS). Bv-FTD patients obtained a lower performance than CS for the estimates of controlled processes, but no group differences was observed for estimates of automatic processes. The between-groups comparison of the estimates of controlled and automatic processes showed a larger contribution of automatic processes to performance in bv-FTD, while a slightly more important contribution of controlled processes was observed in control subjects. These results are clearly indicative of an alteration of controlled memory processes in bv-FTD.

  19. Are we comparing frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease patients with the right measures?

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Mariel B.; Liang, Li-Jung; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Mather, Michelle J.; Mendez, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical research studies of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) often use Alzheimer disease (AD) as a comparison group for control of dementia variables, using tests of cognitive function to match the groups. These two dementia syndromes, however, are very different in clinical manifestations, and the comparable severity of these dementias may not be reflected by commonly used cognitive scales such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Methods We evaluated different measures of dementia severity and symptoms among 20 people with bvFTD compared to 24 with early-onset AD. Results Despite similar ages, disease-duration, education, and cognitive performance on two tests of cognitive function, the MMSE and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the bvFTD participants, compared to the AD participants, were significantly more impaired on other measures of disease severity, including function (Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ)), neuropsychiatric symptoms (Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI)), and global dementia stage (Clinical Dementia Rating Scales (CDRs)). However, when we adjusted for the frontotemporal lobar degeneration-CDR (FTLD-CDR) in the analyses, the two dementia groups were comparable across all measures despite significant differences on the cognitive scales. Conclusion We found tests of cognitive functions (MMSE and MoCA) to be insufficient measures for ensuring comparability between bvFTD and AD groups. In clinical studies, the FTLD-CDR, which includes additional language and behavior items, may be a better overall way to match bvFTD and AD groups on dementia severity. PMID:27079571

  20. Behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia: a review of key symptoms.

    PubMed

    Laforce, Robert

    2013-12-01

    While recent advances in the development of neuroimaging and molecular biomarkers for studying neurodegenerative conditions have revolutionized the field, dementia remains a clinical diagnosis. No component of the diagnostic process is more crucial than obtaining a good history. Getting to know the first manifestations of the disease, tracking their evolution and functional impact, combined with a targeted neurological examination, further guides differential diagnosis. This paper summarizes the key symptoms of the behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is characterized by severe changes in behavior and personality such as disinhibition, apathy, loss of empathy, or stereotypic behavior, leading to a loss of social competence. Executive functions are impaired, while memory and visuospatial skills are relatively better preserved. By contrast, the language variants or primary progressive aphasias (PPAs) are marked by prominent language disturbances that can be subclassified into a non-fluent/agrammatic variant (naPPA), a semantic variant (svPPA), and a logopenic variant (lvPPA). Although combined characterization of clinical, imaging, biological and genetic biomarkers is essential to establish a detailed diagnosis of such heterogeneous conditions, the author emphasizes the importance of accurate recognition of key symptoms that can lead to better identification of underlying neuropathology and appropriate treatment approaches.

  1. Rate of Hanger Reflex Occurrence: Unexpected Head Rotation on Fronto-temporal Head Compression

    PubMed Central

    ASAHI, Takashi; SATO, Michi; KAJIMOTO, Hiroyuki; KOH, Masaki; KASHIWAZAKI, Daina; KURODA, Satoshi

    When the head is encircled with a wire clothes hanger and the unilateral fronto-temporal region is compressed, the head rotates unexpectedly. As the mechanism is unclear, however, we have temporarily named this phenomenon as the “hanger reflex.” We previously reported a case wherein this phenomenon was applied to treat cervical dystonia. Because little is known about this phenomenon, we determined how often this phenomenon is observed in healthy subjects. Study participants were 120 healthy Japanese adults (60 men and 60 women) aged 19–65 years. A wire clothes hanger was applied to each subject’s head. The longer side of the hanger was attached over the volunteer’s fronto-temporal regions on both sides of the head in succession (i.e., two applications per volunteer). We evaluated whether the subjects felt the sensation of head rotation by using a questionnaire. The sensation of head rotation was observed in 95.8% of subjects. There were five non-responders (4.2%). In 85.4% of the trials, head rotation was observed in the direction that coincided with the side compressed by the hanger. There were no differences in responses between genders. The incident rate of the hanger reflex was remarkably high and most likely represents a prevalent phenomenon in humans. The mechanism underlying the reflex remains unknown. Further research should be performed to elucidate the underlying causes of the hanger reflex, which represents a potential treatment for cervical dystonia. PMID:26119894

  2. Co-Occurrence of Language and Behavioural Change in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jennifer M; Jones, Matthew; Gall, Claire; Richardson, Anna M T; Neary, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Pal, Piyali; Mann, David M A; Snowden, Julie S; Thompson, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the co-occurrence of language and behavioural impairment in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum pathology. Eighty-one dementia patients with pathological confirmation of FTLD were identified. Anonymized clinical records from patients' first assessment were rated for language and behavioural features from frontotemporal dementia consensus criteria, primary progressive aphasia (PPA) criteria and 1998 FTLD criteria. Over 90% of patients with FTLD pathology exhibited a combination of at least one behavioural and one language feature. Changes in language, in particular, were commonly accompanied by behavioural change. Notably, the majority of patients who displayed language features characteristic of semantic variant PPA exhibited 'early perseverative, stereotyped or compulsive/ritualistic behaviour'. Moreover, 'executive/generation deficits with relative sparing of memory and visuospatial functions' occurred in most patients with core features of non-fluent variant PPA. Behavioural and language symptoms frequently co-occur in patients with FTLD pathology. Current classifications, which separate behavioural and language syndromes, do not reflect this co-occurrence.

  3. Novel VCP mutations in inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Watts, G D J; Thomasova, D; Ramdeen, S K; Fulchiero, E C; Mehta, S G; Drachman, D A; Weihl, C C; Jamrozik, Z; Kwiecinski, H; Kaminska, A; Kimonis, V E

    2007-11-01

    Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD, OMIM 167320) has recently been attributed to eight missense mutations in valosin-containing protein (VCP). We report novel VCP mutations N387H and L198W in six individuals from two families who presented with proximal muscle weakness at a mean age of diagnosis of 40 years, most losing the ability to walk within a few years of onset. Electromyographic studies in four individuals were suggestive of 'myopathic' changes, and neuropathic pattern was identified in one individual in family 1. Muscle biopsy in four individuals showed myopathic changes characterized by variable fiber size, two individuals showing rimmed vacuoles and IBM-type cytoplasmic inclusions in muscle fibers, and electron microscopy in one individual revealing abundant intranuclear inclusions. Frontotemporal dementia associated with characteristic behavioral changes including short-term memory loss, language difficulty, and antisocial behavior was observed in three individuals at a mean age of 47 years. Detailed brain pathology in one individual showed cortical degenerative changes, most severe in the temporal lobe and hippocampus. Abundant ubiquitin-positive tau-, alpha-synuclein-, polyglutamine repeat-negative neuronal intranuclear inclusions and only rare intracytoplasmic VCP positive inclusions were seen. These new mutations may cause structural changes in VCP and provide some insight into the functional effects of pathogenic mutations.

  4. Towards affordable biomarkers of frontotemporal dementia: A classification study via network's information sharing.

    PubMed

    Dottori, Martin; Sedeño, Lucas; Martorell Caro, Miguel; Alifano, Florencia; Hesse, Eugenia; Mikulan, Ezequiel; García, Adolfo M; Ruiz-Tagle, Amparo; Lillo, Patricia; Slachevsky, Andrea; Serrano, Cecilia; Fraiman, Daniel; Ibanez, Agustin

    2017-06-19

    Developing effective and affordable biomarkers for dementias is critical given the difficulty to achieve early diagnosis. In this sense, electroencephalographic (EEG) methods offer promising alternatives due to their low cost, portability, and growing robustness. Here, we relied on EEG signals and a novel information-sharing method to study resting-state connectivity in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and controls. To evaluate the specificity of our results, we also tested Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The classification power of the ensuing connectivity patterns was evaluated through a supervised classification algorithm (support vector machine). In addition, we compared the classification power yielded by (i) functional connectivity, (ii) relevant neuropsychological tests, and (iii) a combination of both. BvFTD patients exhibited a specific pattern of hypoconnectivity in mid-range frontotemporal links, which showed no alterations in AD patients. These functional connectivity alterations in bvFTD were replicated with a low-density EEG setting (20 electrodes). Moreover, while neuropsychological tests yielded acceptable discrimination between bvFTD and controls, the addition of connectivity results improved classification power. Finally, classification between bvFTD and AD patients was better when based on connectivity than on neuropsychological measures. Taken together, such findings underscore the relevance of EEG measures as potential biomarker signatures for clinical settings.

  5. The structural neuroanatomy of music emotion recognition: evidence from frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Omar, Rohani; Henley, Susie M D; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Hailstone, Julia C; Gordon, Elizabeth; Sauter, Disa A; Frost, Chris; Scott, Sophie K; Warren, Jason D

    2011-06-01

    Despite growing clinical and neurobiological interest in the brain mechanisms that process emotion in music, these mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) frequently exhibit clinical syndromes that illustrate the effects of breakdown in emotional and social functioning. Here we investigated the neuroanatomical substrate for recognition of musical emotion in a cohort of 26 patients with FTLD (16 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, bvFTD, 10 with semantic dementia, SemD) using voxel-based morphometry. On neuropsychological evaluation, patients with FTLD showed deficient recognition of canonical emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) from music as well as faces and voices compared with healthy control subjects. Impaired recognition of emotions from music was specifically associated with grey matter loss in a distributed cerebral network including insula, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, anterior temporal and more posterior temporal and parietal cortices, amygdala and the subcortical mesolimbic system. This network constitutes an essential brain substrate for recognition of musical emotion that overlaps with brain regions previously implicated in coding emotional value, behavioural context, conceptual knowledge and theory of mind. Musical emotion recognition may probe the interface of these processes, delineating a profile of brain damage that is essential for the abstraction of complex social emotions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Telephone based cognitive-behavioral screening for frontotemporal changes in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Georgia; Gennings, Chris; Hupf, Jonathan; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Murphy, Jennifer; Goetz, Raymond R; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    Our objective was to establish a valid and reliable battery of measures to evaluate frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in patients with ALS over the telephone. Thirty-one subjects were administered either in-person or by telephone-based screening followed by the opposite mode of testing two weeks later, using a modified version of the UCSF Cognitive Screening Battery. Equivalence testing was performed for in-person and telephone based tests. The standard ALS Cognitive Behavioral Screen (ALS-CBS) showed statistical equivalence at the 5% significance level compared to a revised phone version of the ALS-CBS. In addition, the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) and Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS) were also found to be equivalent at the 5% and 10% significance level, respectively. Similarly, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the well-established Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) were also statistically equivalent. Equivalence could not be claimed for the ALS-Frontal Behavioral Inventory (ALS-FBI) caregiver interview and the Written Verbal Fluency Index (WVFI). In conclusion, our study suggests that telephone-based versions of the ALS-CBS, COWAT, and CNS-LS may offer clinicians valid tools to detect frontotemporal changes in the ALS population. Development of telephone based cognitive testing for ALS could become an integral resource for population based research in the future.

  7. Distinct Neuroanatomical Substrates and Cognitive Mechanisms of Figure Copy Performance in Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Possin, Katherine L.; Laluz, Victor R.; Alcantar, Oscar Z.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2011-01-01

    Figure copy is the most common method of visual spatial assessment in dementia evaluations, but performance on this test may be multifactorial. We examined the neuroanatomical substrates of figure copy performance in 46 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 48 patients with the behavioral variant of Frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). A group of…

  8. Cortical connectivity in fronto-temporal focal epilepsy from EEG analysis: A study via graph theory.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Curcio, Giuseppe; Della Marca, Giacomo; Vollono, Catello; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Bramanti, Placido; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2015-06-01

    It is believed that effective connectivity and optimal network structure are essential for proper information processing in the brain. Indeed, functional abnormalities of the brain are found to be associated with pathological changes in connectivity and network structures. The aim of the present study was to explore the interictal network properties of EEG signals from temporal lobe structures in the context of fronto-temporal lobe epilepsy. To complete this aim, the graph characteristics of the EEG data of 17 patients suffering from focal epilepsy of the fronto-temporal type, recorded during interictal periods, were examined and compared in terms of the affected versus the unaffected hemispheres. EEG connectivity analysis was performed using eLORETA software in 15 fronto-temporal regions (Brodmann Areas BAs 8, 9, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22, 37, 38, 41, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47) on both affected and unaffected hemispheres. The evaluation of the graph analysis parameters, such as 'global' (characteristic path length) and 'local' connectivity (clustering coefficient) showed a statistically significant interaction among side (affected and unaffected hemisphere) and Band (delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma). Duncan post hoc testing showed an increase of the path length in the alpha band in the affected hemisphere with respect to the unaffected one, as evaluated by an inter-hemispheric marker. The affected hemisphere also showed higher values of local connectivity in the alpha band. In general, an increase of local and global graph theory parameters in the alpha band was found in the affected hemisphere. It was also demonstrated that these effects were more evident in drug-free patients than in those undergoing pharmacological therapy. The increased measures in the affected hemisphere of both functional local segregation and global integration could result from the combination of overlapping mechanisms, including reactive neuroplastic changes seeking to maintain constant integration

  9. Autobiographical memory and patterns of brain atrophy in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Margaret C; Nica, Elena I; Sengdy, Pheth; Kovacevic, Natasa; Moscovitch, Morris; Freedman, Morris; Miller, Bruce L; Black, Sandra E; Levine, Brian

    2008-10-01

    Autobiographical memory paradigms have been increasingly used to study the behavioral and neuroanatomical correlates of human remote memory. Although there are numerous functional neuroimaging studies on this topic, relatively few studies of patient samples exist, with heterogeneity of results owing to methodological variability. In this study, fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), a form of dementia affecting regions crucial to autobiographical memory, was used as a model of autobiographical memory loss. We emphasized the separation of episodic (recollection of specific event, perceptual, and mental state information) from semantic (factual information unspecific in time and place) autobiographical memory, derived from a reliable method for scoring transcribed autobiographical protocols, the Autobiographical Interview [Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689, 2002]. Patients with the fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and mixed fronto-temporal and semantic dementia (FTD/SD) variants of FTLD were impaired at reconstructing episodically rich autobiographical memories across the lifespan, with FTD/SD patients generating an excess of generic semantic autobiographical information. Patients with progressive nonfluent aphasia were mildly impaired for episodic autobiographical memory, but this impairment was eliminated with the provision of structured cueing, likely reflecting relatively intact medial-temporal lobe function, whereas the same cueing failed to bolster the FTD and FTD/SD patients' performance relative to that of matched comparison subjects. The pattern of episodic, but not semantic, autobiographical impairment was enhanced with disease progression on 1- to 2-year follow-up testing in a subset of patients, supplementing the cross-sectional evidence for specificity of episodic autobiographical impairment with longitudinal

  10. Dinámica de objetos transplutonianos: resultados preliminares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, S.; Brizuela, H.; Roig, F.; Varela, O.

    Se presentan los resultados de una integración numérica de las ecuaciones de movimiento para objetos transplutonianos. Se han calculado los tiempos de Lyapunov para esos objetos y se analiza el comportamiento dinámico de los mismos.

  11. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor protein regulates the penetrance of frontotemporal lobar degeneration in progranulin mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ghidoni, Roberta; Flocco, Rosa; Paterlini, Anna; Glionna, Michela; Caruana, Loredana; Tonoli, Elisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Benussi, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that mutations in the gene encoding for progranulin (GRN) cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and other neurodegenerative diseases leading to dementia has brought renewed interest in progranulin and its functions in the central nervous system. Full length progranulin is preserved from cleavage by secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), one of the smallest serine protease inhibitor circulating in plasma. Herein, we investigated the relationship between circulating SLPI and progranulin in affected and unaffected subjects belonging to 26 Italian pedigrees carrying GRN null mutations. In GRN null mutation carriers, we demonstrated: i) an increase of circulating SLPI levels in affected subjects; ii) an age-related upregulation of the serine-protease inhibitor in response to lifetime progranulin shortage; and iii) a delay in the age of onset in subjects with the highest SLPI protein levels. The study of SLPI and its relation to progranulin suggests the existence of unexpected molecular players in progranulin-associated neurodegeneration.

  12. TREM2 mutations are rare in a French cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Dayan, Sarah; Godard, Chloé; Van Bortel, Inge; De Septenville, Anne; Ciura, Sorana; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-10-01

    Homozygous mutations in TREM2 have been recently identified by exome sequencing in families presenting with frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-like phenotype. No study has evaluated the exact frequency of TREM2 mutations in cohorts of FTD patients so far. We sequenced TREM2 in 175 patients with pure FTD, mostly French, to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. No disease-causing mutation was identified in 175 individuals from the French cohort of FTD patients. We did not identify the polymorphism p.R47H (rs75932628), strongly associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that TREM2 mutations are extremely rare in patients with pure FTD, although further investigation in larger populations is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: revisiting one of the first case reports with neuropathology examination

    PubMed Central

    Nitrini, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of dementia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was only widely recognized in the late 20th century. Hitherto, it was believed that dementia was a rare event due to the fortuitous association with other diseases. In 1924, Kostantin Nikolaevich Tretiakoff and Moacyr de Freitas Amorim reported a case of dementia with features of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) that preceded the motor signs of ALS. Neuropathological examination confirmed ALS and found no signs of other dementia-causing diseases. The authors hypothesized that dementia was part of ALS and recommended the search for signs of involvement of motor neurons in cases of dementia with an ill-defined clinical picture, a practice currently accepted in the investigation of cases of FTD. This was one of the first descriptions of dementia preceding the motor impairments of ALS and was published in Portuguese and French in Memórias do Hospício de Juquery. PMID:29213884

  14. Friedrich Nietzsche's mental illness--general paralysis of the insane vs. frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Orth, M; Trimble, M R

    2006-12-01

    For a long time it was thought that Nietzsche suffered from general paralysis of the insane (GPI). However, this diagnosis has been questioned recently, and alternative diagnoses have been proposed. We have charted Friedrich Nietzsche's final fatal illness, and viewed the differential diagnosis in the light of recent neurological understandings of dementia syndromes. It is unclear that Nietzsche ever had syphilis. He lacked progressive motor and other neurological features of a progressive syphilitic central nervous system (CNS) infection and lived at least 12 years following the onset of his CNS signs, which would be extremely rare for patients with untreated GPI. Finally, his flourish of productivity in 1888 would be quite uncharacteristic of GPI, but in keeping with reports of burgeoning creativity at some point in the progression of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We suggest that Nietzsche did not have GPI, but died from a chronic dementia, namely FTD.

  15. Dominant hemisphere lateralization of cortical parasympathetic control as revealed by frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Christine C.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Zhou, Juan; Gennatas, Efstathios D.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Hua, Alice Y.; Crawford, Richard; Stables, Lara; Kramer, Joel H.; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W.; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.

    2016-01-01

    The brain continuously influences and perceives the physiological condition of the body. Related cortical representations have been proposed to shape emotional experience and guide behavior. Although previous studies have identified brain regions recruited during autonomic processing, neurological lesion studies have yet to delineate the regions critical for maintaining autonomic outflow. Even greater controversy surrounds hemispheric lateralization along the parasympathetic–sympathetic axis. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), featuring progressive and often asymmetric degeneration that includes the frontoinsular and cingulate cortices, provides a unique lesion model for elucidating brain structures that control autonomic tone. Here, we show that bvFTD is associated with reduced baseline cardiac vagal tone and that this reduction correlates with left-lateralized functional and structural frontoinsular and cingulate cortex deficits and with reduced agreeableness. Our results suggest that networked brain regions in the dominant hemisphere are critical for maintaining an adaptive level of baseline parasympathetic outflow. PMID:27071080

  16. Bilingualism delays the onset of behavioral but not aphasic forms of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Alladi, Suvarna; Bak, Thomas H; Shailaja, Mekala; Gollahalli, Divyaraj; Rajan, Amulya; Surampudi, Bapiraju; Hornberger, Michael; Duggirala, Vasanta; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kaul, Subhash

    2017-05-01

    Bilingualism has been found to delay onset of dementia and this has been attributed to an advantage in executive control in bilinguals. However, the relationship between bilingualism and cognition is complex, with costs as well as benefits to language functions. To further explore the cognitive consequences of bilingualism, the study used Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, to examine whether bilingualism modifies the age at onset of behavioral and language variants of Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) differently. Case records of 193 patients presenting with FTD (121 of them bilingual) were examined and the age at onset of the first symptoms were compared between monolinguals and bilinguals. A significant effect of bilingualism delaying the age at onset of dementia was found in behavioral variant FTD (5.7 years) but not in progressive nonfluent aphasia (0.7 years), semantic dementia (0.5 years), corticobasal syndrome (0.4 years), progressive supranuclear palsy (4.3 years) and FTD-motor neuron disease (3 years). On dividing all patients predominantly behavioral and predominantly aphasic groups, age at onset in the bilingual behavioral group (62.6) was over 6 years higher than in the monolingual patients (56.5, p=0.006), while there was no difference in the aphasic FTD group (60.9 vs. 60.6 years, p=0.851). The bilingual effect on age of bvFTD onset was shown independently of other potential confounding factors such as education, gender, occupation, and urban vs rural dwelling of subjects. To conclude, bilingualism delays the age at onset in the behavioral but not in the aphasic variants of FTD. The results are in line with similar findings based on research in stroke and with the current views of the interaction between bilingualism and cognition, pointing to advantages in executive functions and disadvantages in lexical tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. C9ORF72 repeat expansion in Australian and Spanish frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Dobson-Stone, Carol; Hallupp, Marianne; Loy, Clement T; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Haan, Eric; Sue, Carolyn M; Panegyres, Peter K; Razquin, Cristina; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Rene, Ramon; Gascon, Jordi; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Schmoll, Birgit; Volk, Alexander E; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Pastor, Pau; Kwok, John B J

    2013-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has been established as a common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the minimum repeat number necessary for disease pathogenesis is not known. The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in two FTD patient collections (one Australian and one Spanish, combined n = 190), to examine C9ORF72 expansion allele length in a subset of FTD patients, and to examine C9ORF72 allele length in 'non-expansion' patients (those with <30 repeats). The C9ORF72 repeat expansion was detected in 5-17% of patients (21-41% of familial FTD patients). For one family, the expansion was present in the proband but absent in the mother, who was diagnosed with dementia at age 68. No association was found between C9ORF72 non-expanded allele length and age of onset and in the Spanish sample mean allele length was shorter in cases than in controls. Southern blotting analysis revealed that one of the nine 'expansion-positive' patients examined, who had neuropathologically confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology, harboured an 'intermediate' allele with a mean size of only ∼65 repeats. Our study indicates that the C9ORF72 repeat expansion accounts for a significant proportion of Australian and Spanish FTD cases. However, C9ORF72 allele length does not influence the age at onset of 'non-expansion' FTD patients in the series examined. Expansion of the C9ORF72 allele to as little as ∼65 repeats may be sufficient to cause disease.

  18. C9ORF72 Repeat Expansion in Australian and Spanish Frontotemporal Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobson-Stone, Carol; Hallupp, Marianne; Loy, Clement T.; Thompson, Elizabeth M.; Haan, Eric; Sue, Carolyn M.; Panegyres, Peter K.; Razquin, Cristina; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Rene, Ramon; Gascon, Jordi; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Schmoll, Birgit; Volk, Alexander E.; Brooks, William S.; Schofield, Peter R.; Pastor, Pau; Kwok, John B. J.

    2013-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has been established as a common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the minimum repeat number necessary for disease pathogenesis is not known. The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in two FTD patient collections (one Australian and one Spanish, combined n = 190), to examine C9ORF72 expansion allele length in a subset of FTD patients, and to examine C9ORF72 allele length in ‘non-expansion’ patients (those with <30 repeats). The C9ORF72 repeat expansion was detected in 5–17% of patients (21–41% of familial FTD patients). For one family, the expansion was present in the proband but absent in the mother, who was diagnosed with dementia at age 68. No association was found between C9ORF72 non-expanded allele length and age of onset and in the Spanish sample mean allele length was shorter in cases than in controls. Southern blotting analysis revealed that one of the nine ‘expansion-positive’ patients examined, who had neuropathologically confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology, harboured an ‘intermediate’ allele with a mean size of only ∼65 repeats. Our study indicates that the C9ORF72 repeat expansion accounts for a significant proportion of Australian and Spanish FTD cases. However, C9ORF72 allele length does not influence the age at onset of ‘non-expansion’ FTD patients in the series examined. Expansion of the C9ORF72 allele to as little as ∼65 repeats may be sufficient to cause disease. PMID:23437264

  19. Virtual reality for the assessment of frontotemporal dementia, a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F; Joshi, Aditi; Jimenez, Elvira

    2015-03-01

    Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a non-Alzheimer dementia characterized by difficulty in documenting social-emotional changes. Few investigations have used virtual reality (VR) for documentation and rehabilitation of non-Alzheimer dementias. Five bvFTD patients underwent insight interviews while immersed in a virtual environment. They were interviewed by avatars, their answers were recorded, and their heart rates were monitored. They were asked to give ratings of their stress immediately at the beginning and at the end of the session. The patients tolerated the head-mounted display and VR without nausea or disorientation, heart rate changes, or worsening stress ratings. Their insight responses were comparable to real world interviews. All bvFTD patients showed their presence in the VR environment as they moved their heads to face and respond to each avatar's questions. The bvFTD patients tended to greater verbal elaboration of answers with larger mean length of utterances compared to their real world interviews. VR is feasible and well-tolerated in bvFTD. These patients may have VR responses comparable to real world performance and they may display a presence in the virtual environment which could even facilitate assessment. Further research can explore the promise of VR for the evaluation and rehabilitation of dementias beyond Alzheimer's disease. Implications for Rehabilitation Clinicians need effective evaluation and rehabilitation strategies for dementia, a neurological syndrome of epidemic proportions and a leading cause of disability. Memory and cognitive deficits are the major disabilities and targets for rehabilitation in Alzheimer's disease, the most common dementia. In contrast, social and emotional disturbances are the major disabilities and targets for rehabilitation in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), an incompletely understood non-Alzheimer dementia. Virtual reality is a technology that holds great promise for

  20. The behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) syndrome in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Lanata, Serggio C; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this article is to critically discuss the syndromic overlap that exists between early behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)—the most common clinical syndrome associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)—and several primary psychiatric disorders. We begin by summarising the current state of knowledge regarding FTLD, including the recent discovery of FTLD-causative genetic mutations. Clinicopathological correlations in FTLD are subsequently discussed, while emphasising that clinical syndromes of FTD are dictated by the distribution of FTLD pathology in the brain. We then review a large number of cases with suspected and confirmed bvFTD that had previously been diagnosed with a primary psychiatric disorder. The clinical and neuroscientific implications of this overlap are discussed, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis for clinical and therapeutic reasons. We propose that largely due to the paucity of biomarkers for primary psychiatric disorders, and the limited use of FTLD-related biomarkers by psychiatrists at present, it is very difficult to separate patients with early bvFTD from those with primary psychiatric disorders based on clinical grounds. Furthermore, specific limitations of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) 5 criteria for bvFTD may inadvertently discourage recognition of bvFTD in mental health settings. Clinically, more research is needed to develop tools that allow early differentiation of bvFTD from primary psychiatric disease, as bvFTD therapies will likely be most effective in the earliest stages of disease. From a neuroscience perspective, we argue that bvFTD provides an excellent paradigm for investigating the neural basis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26216940

  1. Characterization of Movement Disorder Phenomenology in Genetically Proven, Familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Masellis, Mario; Khoo, Edwin; Shah, Binit B; Fisman, David; Lang, Anthony E; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in granulin (PGRN) and tau (MAPT), and hexanucleotide repeat expansions near the C9orf72 genes are the most prevalent genetic causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although behavior, language and movement presentations are common, the relationship between genetic subgroup and movement disorder phenomenology is unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature characterizing the spectrum and prevalence of movement disorders in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Electronic databases were searched using terms related to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and movement disorders. Articles were included when cases had a proven genetic cause. Study-specific prevalence estimates for clinical features were transformed using Freeman-Tukey arcsine transformation, allowing for pooled estimates of prevalence to be generated using random-effects models. The mean age at onset was earlier in those with MAPT mutations compared to PGRN (p<0.001) and C9orf72 (p = 0.024). 66.5% of subjects had an initial non-movement presentation that was most likely a behavioral syndrome (35.7%). At any point during the disease, parkinsonism was the most common movement syndrome reported in 79.8% followed by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSPS) and corticobasal (CBS) syndromes in 12.2% and 10.7%, respectively. The prevalence of movement disorder as initial presentation was higher in MAPT subjects (35.8%) compared to PGRN subjects (10.1). In those with a non-movement presentation, language disorder was more common in PGRN subjects (18.7%) compared to MAPT subjects (5.4%). This represents the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of movement disorder phenomenology in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Standardized prospective collection of clinical information in conjunction with genetic characterization will be crucial for accurate clinico-genetic correlation.

  2. Characterization of Movement Disorder Phenomenology in Genetically Proven, Familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Masellis, Mario; Khoo, Edwin; Shah, Binit B.; Fisman, David; Lang, Anthony E.; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in granulin (PGRN) and tau (MAPT), and hexanucleotide repeat expansions near the C9orf72 genes are the most prevalent genetic causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although behavior, language and movement presentations are common, the relationship between genetic subgroup and movement disorder phenomenology is unclear. Objective We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature characterizing the spectrum and prevalence of movement disorders in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Methods Electronic databases were searched using terms related to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and movement disorders. Articles were included when cases had a proven genetic cause. Study-specific prevalence estimates for clinical features were transformed using Freeman-Tukey arcsine transformation, allowing for pooled estimates of prevalence to be generated using random-effects models. Results The mean age at onset was earlier in those with MAPT mutations compared to PGRN (p<0.001) and C9orf72 (p = 0.024). 66.5% of subjects had an initial non-movement presentation that was most likely a behavioral syndrome (35.7%). At any point during the disease, parkinsonism was the most common movement syndrome reported in 79.8% followed by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSPS) and corticobasal (CBS) syndromes in 12.2% and 10.7%, respectively. The prevalence of movement disorder as initial presentation was higher in MAPT subjects (35.8%) compared to PGRN subjects (10.1). In those with a non-movement presentation, language disorder was more common in PGRN subjects (18.7%) compared to MAPT subjects (5.4%). Summary This represents the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of movement disorder phenomenology in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Standardized prospective collection of clinical information in conjunction with genetic characterization will be crucial for accurate clinico-genetic correlation. PMID:27100392

  3. Pathological Heterogeneity of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with Ubiquitin-Positive Inclusions Delineated by Ubiquitin Immunohistochemistry and Novel Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sampathu, Deepak M.; Neumann, Manuela; Kwong, Linda K.; Chou, Thomas T.; Micsenyi, Matthew; Truax, Adam; Bruce, Jennifer; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U) is a common neuropathological subtype of frontotemporal dementia. Although this subtype of frontotemporal dementia is defined by the presence of ubiquitin-positive but tau- and α-synuclein-negative inclusions, it is unclear whether all cases of FTLD-U have the same underlying pathogenesis. Examination of tissue sections from FTLD-U brains stained with anti-ubiquitin antibodies revealed heterogeneity in the morphological characteristics of pathological inclusions among subsets of cases. Three types of FTLD-U were delineated based on morphology and distribution of ubiquitin-positive inclusions. To address the hypothesis that FTLD-U is pathologically heterogeneous, novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated by immunization of mice with high molecular mass (Mr > 250 kd) insoluble material prepared by biochemical fractionation of FTLD-U brains. Novel mAbs were identified that immunolabeled all of the ubiquitin-positive inclusions in one subset of FTLD-U cases, whereas other mAbs stained the ubiquitin-positive inclusions in a second subset of cases. These novel mAbs did not stain inclusions in other neurodegenerative disorders, including tauopathies and α-synucleinopathies. Therefore, ubiquitin immunohistochemistry and the immunostaining properties of the novel mAbs generated here suggest that FTLD-U is pathologically he-terogeneous. Identification of the disease proteins recognized by these mAbs will further advance understanding of molecular substrates of FTLD-U neurodegenerative pathways. PMID:17003490

  4. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and applicability of the Brazilian version of the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS)

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Silva, Thais Bento; Bahia, Valéria Santoro; Carvalho, Viviane Amaral; Guimarães, Henrique Cerqueira; Caramelli, Paulo; Balthazar, Márcio; Damasceno, Benito; Bottino, Cássio Machado de Campos; Brucki, Sônia Maria Dozzi; Mioshi, Eneida; Nitrini, Ricardo; Yassuda, Mônica Sanches

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Staging scales for dementia have been devised for grading Alzheimer's disease (AD) but do not include the specific symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). OBJECTIVE To translate and adapt the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS) to Brazilian Portuguese. METHODS The cross-cultural adaptation process consisted of the following steps: translation, back-translation (prepared by independent translators), discussion with specialists, and development of a final version after minor adjustments. A pilot application was carried out with 12 patients diagnosed with bvFTD and 11 with AD, matched for disease severity (CDR=1.0). The evaluation protocol included: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Executive Interview (EXIT-25), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS) and Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR). RESULTS The Brazilian version of the FTD-FRS seemed appropriate for use in this country. Preliminary results revealed greater levels of disability in bvFTD than in AD patients (bvFTD: 25% mild, 50% moderate and 25% severe; AD: 36.36% mild, 63.64% moderate). It appears that the CDR underrates disease severity in bvFTD since a relevant proportion of patients rated as having mild dementia (CDR=1.0) in fact had moderate or severe levels of disability according to the FTD-FRS. CONCLUSION The Brazilian version of the FTD-FRS seems suitable to aid staging and determining disease progression. PMID:29213863

  5. Longitudinal white matter change in frontotemporal dementia subtypes and sporadic late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Fanny M; Marx, Gabe; Cobigo, Yann; Staffaroni, Adam M; Kornak, John; Tosun, Duygu; Boxer, Adam L; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of white matter microstructure has been demonstrated in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In preparation for clinical trials, ongoing studies are investigating the utility of longitudinal brain imaging for quantification of disease progression. To date only one study has examined sample size calculations based on longitudinal changes in white matter integrity in FTLD. To quantify longitudinal changes in white matter microstructural integrity in the three canonical subtypes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). 60 patients with clinical diagnoses of FTD, including 27 with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 14 with non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), and 19 with semantic variant PPA (svPPA), as well as 19 patients with AD and 69 healthy controls were studied. We used a voxel-wise approach to calculate annual rate of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in each group using two time points approximately one year apart. Mean rates of change in FA and MD in 48 atlas-based regions-of-interest, as well as global measures of cognitive function were used to calculate sample sizes for clinical trials (80% power, alpha of 5%). All FTD groups showed statistically significant baseline and longitudinal white matter degeneration, with predominant involvement of frontal tracts in the bvFTD group, frontal and temporal tracts in the PPA groups and posterior tracts in the AD group. Longitudinal change in MD yielded a larger number of regions with sample sizes below 100 participants per therapeutic arm in comparison with FA. SvPPA had the smallest sample size based on change in MD in the fornix (n = 41 participants per study arm to detect a 40% effect of drug), and nfvPPA and AD had their smallest sample sizes based on rate of change in MD within the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (n = 49 for nfvPPA, and n = 23 for AD). Bv

  6. Distinct subtypes of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia based on patterns of network degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Kamalini G; Rankin, Katherine P; Pressman, Peter S; Perry, David C; Lobach, Iryna V; Seeley, William W; Coppola, Giovanni; Karydas, Anna M; Grinberg, Lea T; Shany-Ur, Tal; Lee, Suzee E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Boxer, Adam L; Miller, Zachary A; Chiong, Winston; DeMay, Mary; Kramer, Joel H; Possin, Katherine L; Sturm, Virginia E; Bettcher, Brianne M; Neylan, Michael; Zackey, Diana D; Nguyen, Lauren A; Ketelle, Robin; Block, Nikolas; Wu, Teresa Q; Dallich, Alison; Russek, Natanya; Caplan, Alyssa; Geschwind, Daniel H; Vossel, Keith A; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    Importance Clearer delineation of the phenotypic heterogeneity within behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) will help uncover underlying biological mechanisms, and will improve clinicians’ ability to predict disease course and design targeted management strategies. Objective To identify subtypes of bvFTD syndrome based on distinctive patterns of atrophy defined by selective vulnerability of specific functional networks targeted in bvFTD, using statistical classification approaches. Design, Setting and Participants In this retrospective observational study, 104 patients meeting the Frontotemporal Dementia Consortium consensus criteria for bvFTD were evaluated at the Memory and Aging Center of Department of Neurology at University of California, San Francisco. Patients underwent a multidisciplinary clinical evaluation, including clinical demographics, genetic testing, symptom evaluation, neurological exam, neuropsychological bedside testing, and socioemotional assessments. Ninety patients underwent structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging at their earliest evaluation at the memory clinic. From each patients’ structural imaging, the mean volumes of 18 regions of interest (ROI) comprising the functional networks specifically vulnerable in bvFTD, including the ‘salience network’ (SN), with key nodes in the frontoinsula and pregenual anterior cingulate, and the ‘semantic appraisal network’ (SAN) anchored in the anterior temporal lobe and subgenual cingulate, were estimated. Principal component and cluster analyses of ROI volumes were used to identify patient clusters with anatomically distinct atrophy patterns. Main Outcome Measures We evaluated brain morphology and other clinical features including presenting symptoms, neurologic exam signs, neuropsychological performance, rate of dementia progression, and socioemotional function in each patient cluster. Results We identified four subgroups of bvFTD patients with distinct anatomic patterns of

  7. Genetic and Clinical Features of Progranulin-Associated Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Hu, William; Greene, Robert; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Bing, Shaoxu; Grossman, Murray; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Weiner, Myron F.; White, Charles L.; Brooks, William S.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Kril, Jillian J.; Gearing, Marla; Beach, Thomas G.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M.; Snowden, Julie; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Seelaar, Harro; Murrell, Jill R.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Grafman, Jordan; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Woltjer, Randall L.; Mesulam, Marsel; Bigio, Eileen; Lladó, Albert; Miller, Bruce L.; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Moreno, Fermin; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.; Feldman, Howard H.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Cruts, Marc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Bird, Thomas D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Goate, Allison; Frosch, Matthew P.; Riederer, Peter F.; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Lee, Virginia M. Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the relative frequency of unique mutations and their associated characteristics in 97 individuals with mutations in progranulin (GRN), an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Participants and Design A 46-site International Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Collaboration was formed to collect cases of FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein of 43-kDa (TDP-43)–positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). We identified 97 individuals with FTLD-TDP with pathogenic GRN mutations (GRN+ FTLD-TDP), assessed their genetic and clinical characteristics, and compared them with 453 patients with FTLD-TDP in which GRN mutations were excluded (GRN− FTLD-TDP). No patients were known to be related. Neuropathologic characteristics were confirmed as FTLD-TDP in 79 of the 97 GRN+ FTLDTDP cases and all of the GRN− FTLD-TDP cases. Results Age at onset of FTLD was younger in patients with GRN+ FTLD-TDP vs GRN− FTLD-TDP (median, 58.0 vs 61.0 years; P<.001), as was age at death (median, 65.5 vs 69.0 years; P<.001). Concomitant motor neuron disease was much less common in GRN+ FTLDTDP vs GRN− FTLD-TDP (5.4% vs 26.3%; P<.001). Fifty different GRN mutations were observed, including 2 novel mutations: c.139delG (p.D47TfsX7) and c.378C>A (p.C126X). The 2 most common GRN mutations were c.1477C>T (p.R493X, found in 18 patients, representing 18.6% of GRN cases) and c.26C>A (p.A9D, found in 6 patients, representing 6.2% of cases). Patients with the c.1477C>T mutation shared a haplotype on chromosome 17; clinically, they resembled patients with other GRN mutations. Patients with the c.26C>A mutation appeared to have a younger age at onset of FTLD and at death and more parkinsonian features than those with other GRN mutations. Conclusion GRN+ FTLD-TDP differs in key features from GRN− FTLD-TDP. PMID:21482928

  8. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia patients do not succumb to the Allais paradox.

    PubMed

    Bertoux, Maxime; Cova, Florian; Pessiglione, Mathias; Hsu, Ming; Dubois, Bruno; Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    The Allais Paradox represents one of the earliest empirical challenges to normative models of decision-making, and suggests that choices in one part of a gamble may depend on the possible outcome in another, independent, part of the gamble-a violation of the so-called "independence axiom." To account for Allaisian behavior, one well-known class of models propose that individuals' choices are influenced not only by possible outcomes resulting from one's choices, but also the anticipation of regret for foregone options. Here we test the regret hypothesis using a population of patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a clinical population known to present ventromedial prefrontal cortex dysfunctions and associated with impaired regret processing in previous studies of decision-making. Compared to matched controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, we found a striking diminution of Allaisian behavior among bvFTD patients. These results are consistent with the regret hypothesis and furthermore suggest a crucial role for prefrontal regions in choices that typically stands in contradiction with a basic axiom of rational decision-making.

  9. The established and emerging roles of astrocytes and microglia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Radford, Rowan A; Morsch, Marco; Rayner, Stephanie L; Cole, Nicholas J; Pountney, Dean L; Chung, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two progressive, fatal neurodegenerative syndromes with considerable clinical, genetic and pathological overlap. Clinical symptoms of FTD can be seen in ALS patients and vice versa. Recent genetic discoveries conclusively link the two diseases, and several common molecular players have been identified (TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72). The definitive etiologies of ALS and FTD are currently unknown and both disorders lack a cure. Glia, specifically astrocytes and microglia are heavily implicated in the onset and progression of neurodegeneration witnessed in ALS and FTD. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of microglia and astrocytes involved in ALS and FTD, highlighting their recent implications in neuroinflammation, alterations in waste clearance involving phagocytosis and the newly described glymphatic system, and vascular abnormalities. Elucidating the precise mechanisms of how astrocytes and microglia are involved in ALS and FTD will be crucial in characterizing these two disorders and may represent more effective interventions for disease progression and treatment options in the future.

  10. Reduced frequency of T lymphocytes expressing CTLA-4 in frontotemporal dementia compared to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Torres, Karen C; Lima, Giselle S; Fiamoncini, Carolina M; Mapa, Filipe C; Pereira, Patricia A; Rezende, Vitor B; Martins, Luiza C; Bicalho, Maria A; Moraes, Edgar N; Reis, Helton J; Teixeira, Antonio L; Romano-Silva, Marco A

    2014-01-03

    Studies suggest that inflammation is involved in the neurodegenerative cascade of dementias. Immunological mechanisms may be part of the pathophysiological process in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but up till now only vague evidence of such mechanisms has been presented. The B7- CD28/CTLA-4 pathway is an important immunological signaling pathway involved in modulation of T cell activation. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of molecules associated with co-stimulatory signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of FTD to Alzheimer disease (AD) and control groups. Our results confirm the previous demonstrated increased expression of CD80 in CD14+ Alzheimer patients T cells but show, for the first time, a reduction in the expression of CTLA-4 in CD4+ FTD cells. As CTLA-4 is the most potent negative regulators of T-cell activation we speculated that peripheral T lymphocytes in FTD are more activated and this could be involved in the neurodegeneration observed in this dementia. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cognitive control during audiovisual working memory engages frontotemporal theta-band interactions.

    PubMed

    Daume, Jonathan; Graetz, Sebastian; Gruber, Thomas; Engel, Andreas K; Friese, Uwe

    2017-10-03

    Working memory (WM) maintenance of sensory information has been associated with enhanced cross-frequency coupling between the phase of low frequencies and the amplitude of high frequencies, particularly in medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions. It has been suggested that these WM maintenance processes are controlled by areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) via frontotemporal phase synchronisation in low frequency bands. Here, we investigated whether enhanced cognitive control during audiovisual WM as compared to visual WM alone is associated with increased low-frequency phase synchronisation between sensory areas maintaining WM content and areas from PFC. Using magnetoencephalography, we recorded neural oscillatory activity from healthy human participants engaged in an audiovisual delayed-match-to-sample task. We observed that regions from MTL, which showed enhanced theta-beta phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) during the WM delay window, exhibited stronger phase synchronisation within the theta-band (4-7 Hz) to areas from lateral PFC during audiovisual WM as compared to visual WM alone. Moreover, MTL areas also showed enhanced phase synchronisation to temporooccipital areas in the beta-band (20-32 Hz). Our results provide further evidence that a combination of long-range phase synchronisation and local PAC might constitute a mechanism for neuronal communication between distant brain regions and across frequencies during WM maintenance.

  12. ADNP: in search for molecular mechanisms and innovative therapeutic strategies for frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gozes, Illana; Ivashko-Pachima, Yanina

    2015-01-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is deregulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in schizophrenia and mutated in autism. In mice, ADNP is essential for brain formation and ADNP haploinsufficiency is associated with cognitive and social deficits and tauopathy. Tauopathy, a major pathology in AD, is also found in ~45% of frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). Tau transcript, a product of a single gene, undergoes alternative splicing. Tau splicing seems to be altered in FTD brain. In transgenic mice overexpressing a mutated tau in the cerebral cortex, significant increases in ADNP transcript expression were observed in the cerebral cortex of young transgenic mice (~disease onset) and a marked decrease with aging as compared to control littermates. ADNP is a member of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex also associated with alternative splicing, including tau transcript splicing. Further cellular interactions of ADNP include association with microtubules, with tau being a microtubule—associated protein. NAP (davundetide), a novel drug candidate derived from ADNP, increases ADNP-microtubule association and protects against tauopathy and cognitive deficiencies in mice. Although, NAP did not provide protection in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a pure tauopathy, it increased cognitive scores in amnestic mild cognitively impaired patients and protected functional activity in schizophrenia patients. This mini-review focuses on ADNP in the context of FTD and tau/microtubules and proposes NAP as a novel drug target for future clinical evaluations. PMID:26578950

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sandra; Zhang, Zhijun; Coppola, Giovanni; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Karydas, Anna; Geschwind, Michael D.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Gao, Fuying; Gianni, Davide; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Farese, Robert V.; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel GRN mutation (PGRN S116X). In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X iPSCs, the levels of intracellular and secreted progranulin were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of progranulin haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the PI3K and MAPK pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by progranulin expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with progranulin deficiency and provide a new model for studying progranulin-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies. PMID:23063362

  14. Dissociation of Frontotemporal Dementia–Related Deficits and Neuroinflammation in Progranulin Haploinsufficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Filiano, Anthony J.; Martens, Lauren Herl; Young, Allen H.; Warmus, Brian A.; Zhou, Ping; Diaz-Ramirez, Grisell; Jiao, Jian; Zhang, Zhijun; Huang, Eric J.; Gao, Fen-Biao; Farese, Robert V.; Roberson, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disease with hallmark deficits in social and emotional function. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in GRN, the progranulin gene, are a common genetic cause of the disorder, but the mechanisms by which progranulin haploinsufficiency causes neuronal dysfunction in FTD are unclear. Homozygous progranulin knockout (Grn−/−) mice have been studied as a model of this disorder and show behavioral deficits and a neuroinflammatory phenotype with robust microglial activation. However, homozygous GRN mutations causing complete progranulin deficiency were recently shown to cause a different neurological disorder, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, suggesting that the total absence of progranulin may have effects distinct from those of haploinsufficiency. Here, we studied progranulin heterozygous (Grn+/−) mice, which model progranulin haploinsufficiency. We found that Grn+/− mice developed age-dependent social and emotional deficits potentially relevant to FTD. However, unlike Grn−/− mice, behavioral deficits in Grn+/− mice occurred in the absence of gliosis or increased expression of tumor necrosis factor–α. Instead, we found neuronal abnormalities in the amygdala, an area of selective vulnerability in FTD, in Grn+/− mice. Our findings indicate that FTD-related deficits due to progranulin haploinsufficiency can develop in the absence of detectable gliosis and neuroinflammation, thereby dissociating microglial activation from functional deficits and suggesting an important effect of progranulin deficiency on neurons. PMID:23516300

  15. Dissociation of frontotemporal dementia-related deficits and neuroinflammation in progranulin haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Filiano, Anthony J; Martens, Lauren Herl; Young, Allen H; Warmus, Brian A; Zhou, Ping; Diaz-Ramirez, Grisell; Jiao, Jian; Zhang, Zhijun; Huang, Eric J; Gao, Fen-Biao; Farese, Robert V; Roberson, Erik D

    2013-03-20

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disease with hallmark deficits in social and emotional function. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in GRN, the progranulin gene, are a common genetic cause of the disorder, but the mechanisms by which progranulin haploinsufficiency causes neuronal dysfunction in FTD are unclear. Homozygous progranulin knock-out (Grn(-/-)) mice have been studied as a model of this disorder and show behavioral deficits and a neuroinflammatory phenotype with robust microglial activation. However, homozygous GRN mutations causing complete progranulin deficiency were recently shown to cause a different neurological disorder, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, suggesting that the total absence of progranulin may have effects distinct from those of haploinsufficiency. Here, we studied progranulin heterozygous (Grn(+/-)) mice, which model progranulin haploinsufficiency. We found that Grn(+/-) mice developed age-dependent social and emotional deficits potentially relevant to FTD. However, unlike Grn(-/-) mice, behavioral deficits in Grn(+/-) mice occurred in the absence of gliosis or increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-α. Instead, we found neuronal abnormalities in the amygdala, an area of selective vulnerability in FTD, in Grn(+/-) mice. Our findings indicate that FTD-related deficits resulting from progranulin haploinsufficiency can develop in the absence of detectable gliosis and neuroinflammation, thereby dissociating microglial activation from functional deficits and suggesting an important effect of progranulin deficiency on neurons.

  16. Decision-making in frontotemporal dementia: clinical, theoretical and legal implications.

    PubMed

    Manes, Facundo; Torralva, Teresa; Ibáñez, Agustín; Roca, María; Bekinschtein, Tristán; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is characterized by progressive changes in personality and social interaction, loss of empathy, disinhibition and impulsivity, most of which generally precede the onset of cognitive deficits. In this study, we investigated decision-making cognition in a group of patients with an early bvFTD diagnosis whose standard neuropsychological performance was within normal range for all variables. The Iowa Gambling Task was administered to this group of early bvFTD patients, to a group of early bvFTD patients who had shown impaired performance on the classical neuropsychological battery and to healthy controls. Decision-making was impaired in both bvFTD patient groups, whether they had shown impaired or normal performance in the classical neuropsychological evaluation. Patients with early bvFTD may perform normally on standard cognitive tests, and yet develop severe deficits in judgment and decision-making. In many current legal systems, early bvFTD patients showing preserved cognitive functioning who commit unlawful acts run the risk of not being able to plead insane or not guilty on the grounds of diminished responsibility beyond reasonable doubt. This represents a unique legal and ethical dilemma. Our findings have important implications for medicolegal decisions relating to capacity and culpability, and regarding the philosophical concept of 'free will'. 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Differences in quantitative EEG between frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease as revealed by LORETA.

    PubMed

    Nishida, K; Yoshimura, M; Isotani, T; Yoshida, T; Kitaura, Y; Saito, A; Mii, H; Kato, M; Takekita, Y; Suwa, A; Morita, S; Kinoshita, T

    2011-09-01

    To determine the electrophysiological characteristics of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and the distinction with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed analyses of global field power (GFP) which is a measure of whole brain electric field strength, and EEG neuroimaging analyses with sLORETA (standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography), in the mild stages of FTD (n = 19; mean age = 68.11 ± 7.77) and AD (n = 19; mean age = 69.42 ± 9.57) patients, and normal control (NC) subjects (n = 22; mean age = 66.13 ± 6.02). In the GFP analysis, significant group effects were observed in the delta (1.5-6.0 Hz), alpha1 (8.5-10.0 Hz), and beta1 (12.5-18.0 Hz) bands. In sLORETA analysis, differences in activity were observed in the alpha1 band (NC > FTD) in the orbital frontal and temporal lobe, in the delta band (AD>NC) in widespread areas including the frontal lobe, and in the beta1 band (FTD > AD) in the parietal lobe and sensorimotor area. Differential patterns of brain regions and EEG frequency bands were observed between the FTD and AD groups in terms of pathological activity. FTD and AD patients in the early stages displayed different patterns in the cortical localization of oscillatory activity across different frequency bands. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding Emotions in Frontotemporal Dementia: The Explicit and Implicit Emotional Cue Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Balconi, Michela; Cotelli, Maria; Brambilla, Michela; Manenti, Rosa; Cosseddu, Maura; Premi, Enrico; Gasparotti, Roberto; Zanetti, Orazio; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant deficits in emotion recognition among individuals along the frontotemporal dementia (FTD) spectrum. The basis of emotional impairment is still poorly understood and explicit (emotion appraisal) and implicit (autonomic system activity) responses have not been carefully evaluated. We investigated explicit evaluation of emotions by testing valence and arousal using self-report measures and we also assessed automatic responses to emotional cues, using autonomic measures (skin conductance response and heart rate). 16 behavioral variant FTD and 12 agrammatic variants of primary progressive aphasia patients were included. The performance of these patients was compared to a group of 14 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 20 healthy controls. Each subject was required to observe and evaluate affective pictures while autonomic parameters were recorded. FTD patients preserved a functional general competency in terms of valence (correct positive versus negative attribution) and arousal (correct dichotomy between high versus low arousal category) distinction. These patients showed significant changes in autonomic implicit response compared to the other groups. The mismatch between explicit and implicit responsiveness to emotional cues was found both in behavioral variant FTD and in agrammatic variants of primary progressive aphasia. Emotional responsiveness was related to the severity of behavioral abnormalities as measured by the Frontal Behavioral Inventory and associated with atrophy of the left putamen. The present findings indicate that FTD patients are able to explicitly "appraise" the emotion, but they cannot implicitly "feel" the emotion. This mismatch between the two levels may help explain the general emotional behavior impairment found in these patients.

  19. Ventral Fronto-Temporal Pathway Supporting Cognitive Control of Episodic Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Barredo, Jennifer; Öztekin, Ilke; Badre, David

    2015-01-01

    Achieving our goals often requires guiding access to relevant information from memory. Such goal-directed retrieval requires interactions between systems supporting cognitive control, including ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), and those supporting declarative memory, such as the medial temporal lobes (MTL). However, the pathways by which VLPFC interacts with MTL during retrieval are underspecified. Prior neuroanatomical evidence suggests that a polysynaptic ventral fronto-temporal pathway may support VLPFC–MTL interactions. To test this hypothesis, human participants were scanned using fMRI during performance of a source-monitoring task. The strength of source information was varied via repetition during encoding. Single encoding events should produce a weaker memory trace, thus recovering source information about these items should demand greater cognitive control. Results demonstrated that cortical targets along the ventral path—anterior VLPFC, temporal pole, anterior parahippocampus, and hippocampus—exhibited increases in univariate BOLD response correlated with increases in controlled retrieval demand, independent of factors related to response selection. Further, a functional connectivity analysis indicated that these regions functionally couple and are distinguishable from a dorsal pathway related to response selection demands. These data support a ventral retrieval pathway linking PFC and MTL. PMID:24177990

  20. TDP-43 pathology in primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia with pathologic Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manjari; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; White, Charles L.; Johnson, Nancy; Rademaker, Alfred; Weitner, Bing Bing; Deng, Han-Xiang; Dubner, Steven D.; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marsel

    2010-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) can be associated with a variety of neuropathologic diagnoses at autopsy. Thirty percent of cases have Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology, most often in the usual distribution, which defies principles of brain–behavior organization, in that aphasia is not symptomatic of limbic disease. The present study investigated whether concomitant TDP-43 pathology could resolve the lack of clinicoanatomic concordance. In this paper, 16 cases of clinical PPA and 10 cases of primarily non-aphasic frontotemporal dementia (FTD), all with AD pathology, were investigated to determine whether their atypical clinical phenotypes reflected the presence of additional TDP-43 pathology. A comparison group consisted of 27 cases of pathologic AD with the typical amnestic clinical phenotype of probable AD. Concomitant TDP-43 pathology was discovered in only three of the FTD and PPA but in more than half of the typical amnestic clinical phenotypes. Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) was closely associated with TDP-43 pathology when all groups were combined for analysis. Therefore, the clinical phenotypes of PPA and FTD in cases with pathologic AD are only rarely associated with TDP-43 proteinopathy. Furthermore, medial temporal TDP-43 pathology is more tightly linked to HS than to clinical phenotype. These findings challenge the current notions about clinicopathologic correlation, especially about the role of multiple pathologies. PMID:20361198

  1. Comparative Study of Subcortical Atrophy in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Dementia with Extrapyramidal Signs

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Vieira, Renata Teles; Paes, Flávia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Rocha, Nuno B. F; Budde, Henning; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : To investigate the severity of subcortical atrophy in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) without extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and dementia with EPS. In addition, we aim to verify if there is correlation between demographic and clinical characteristics and subcortical atrophy in the groups. Methodology : The sample was composed of 21 patients with dementia and EPS as well as 19 patients with FTD without EPS. A linear assessment was conducted in order to identify the degree of subcortical atrophy (i.e., bifrontal index - BFI) using MRI. Moreover, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) were used to investigate clinical aspects. Results : It was verified that patients with dementia and EPS was older than the patients with FTD (p=0.01). The severity of cognitive deficits was associated with BFI, as well as the dementia severity in the EPS group. Conclusion : FTD group presented mean BFI scores above the cutoff for normal elderly population, indicating the presence of subcortical atrophy in this group. Mean BFI was higher (although not statistically significant) in FTD group than in dementia with EPS, which can suggest at least that subcortical pathology in FTD may be as important as in the dementia with EPS group. Subcortical atrophy is a good biological marker for cognitive deterioration in FTD and in dementia with EPS. PMID:25870648

  2. Impairment of prosocial sentiments is associated with frontopolar and septal damage in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Moll, Jorge; Zahn, Roland; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Bramati, Ivanei E; Krueger, Frank; Tura, Bernardo; Cavanagh, Alyson L; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-15

    Poets and philosophers have long acknowledged moral sentiments as key motivators of human social behavior. Prosocial sentiments, which include guilt, pity and embarrassment, enable us to care about others and to be concerned about our mistakes. Functional imaging studies have implicated frontopolar, ventromedial frontal and basal forebrain regions in the experience of prosocial sentiments. Patients with lesions of the frontopolar and ventromedial frontal areas were observed to behave inappropriately and less prosocially, which could be attributed to a generalized emotional blunting. Direct experimental evidence for brain regions distinctively associated with moral sentiment impairments is lacking, however. We investigated this issue in patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, a disorder in which early and selective impairments of social conduct are consistently observed. Using a novel moral sentiment task, we show that the degree of impairment of prosocial sentiments is associated with the degree of damage to frontopolar cortex and septal area, as assessed with 18-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography, an established measure of neurodegenerative damage. This effect was dissociable from impairment of other-critical feelings (anger and disgust), which was in turn associated with dorsomedial prefrontal and amygdala dysfunction. Our findings suggest a critical role of the frontopolar cortex and septal region in enabling prosocial sentiments, a fundamental component of moral conscience. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Integration of Intention and Outcome for Moral Judgment in Frontotemporal Dementia: Brain Structural Signatures.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Kanske, Philipp; Matallana, Diana; Montañes, Patricia; Reyes, Pablo; Slachevsky, Andrea; Matus, Cristian; Vigliecca, Nora Silvana; Torralva, Teresa; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment has been proposed to rely on a distributed brain network. This function is impaired in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a condition involving damage to some regions of this network. However, no studies have investigated moral judgment in bvFTD via structural neuroimaging. We compared the performance of 21 bvFTD patients and 19 controls on a moral judgment task involving scenarios that discriminate between the contributions of intentions and outcomes. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess (a) the atrophy pattern in bvFTD patients, (b) associations between gray matter (GM) volume and moral judgments, and (c) structural differences between bvFTD subgroups (patients with relatively preserved moral judgment and patients with severer moral judgment impairments). Patients judged attempted harm as more permissible and accidental harm as less permissible than controls. The groups' performance on accidental harm was associated with GM volume in the precuneus. In controls, it was al- so associated with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC). Also, both groups' performance on attempted harm was associated with GM volume in the temporoparietal junction. Patients exhibiting worse performance displayed smaller GM volumes in the precuneus and temporal pole. Results suggest that moral judgment abnormalities in bvFTD are associated with impaired integration of intentions and outcomes, which depends on an extended brain network. In bvFTD, moral judgment seems to critically depend on areas beyond the VMPFC. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Person-Based Versus Generalized Impulsivity Disinhibition in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Carr, Andrew R; Barsuglia, Joseph P; Barrows, Robin J; Jimenez, Elvira; Lee, Grace J; Mendez, Mario F

    2016-09-19

    While much disinhibition in dementia results from generalized impulsivity, in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) disinhibition may also result from impaired social cognition. To deconstruct disinhibition and its neural correlates in bvFTD vs. early-onset Alzheimer's disease (eAD). Caregivers of 16 bvFTD and 21 matched-eAD patients completed the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale disinhibition items. The disinhibition items were further categorized into (1) "person-based" subscale which predominantly associated with violating social propriety and personal boundary and (2) "generalized-impulsivity" subscale which included nonspecific impulsive acts. Subscale scores were correlated with grey matter volumes from tensor-based morphometry on magnetic resonance images. In comparison to the eAD patients, the bvFTD patients developed greater person-based disinhibition (P < 0.001) but comparable generalized impulsivity. Severity of person-based disinhibition significantly correlated with the left anterior superior temporal sulcus (STS), and generalized-impulsivity correlated with the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the left anterior temporal lobe (aTL). Person-based disinhibition was predominant in bvFTD and correlated with the left STS. In both dementia, violations of social propriety and personal boundaries involved fronto-parieto-temporal network of Theory of Mind, whereas nonspecific disinhibition involved the OFC and aTL. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Quantitative Balance and Gait Measurement in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Diseases: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Velayutham, Selva Ganapathy; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Bharath, Srikala; Shankar, Ravi Girikamatha

    2017-01-01

    Alzhiemers disease and Frontotemporal dementia are common neurodegenerative dementias with a wide prevalence. Falls are a common cause of morbidity in these patients. Identifying subclinical involvement of these parameters might serve as a tool in differential analysis of these distinct parameters involved in these conditions and also help in planning preventive strategies to prevent falls. Eight patients in age and gender matched patients in each group were compared with normal controls. Standardizes methods of gait and balance aseesment were done in all persons. Results revealed subclinical involvement of gait and balancesin all groups specially during divided attention. The parameters were significantly more affected in patients. Patients with AD and FTD had involement of over all ambulation index balance more affected in AD patients FTD patients showed step cycle, stride length abnormalities. There is balance and gait involvement in normal ageing as well as patients with AD and FTD. The pattern of involvement in AD correlates with WHERE pathway involvement and FTD with frontal subcortical circuits involvement. Identification the differential patterns of involvement in subclinical stage might help to differentiate normal ageing and the different types of cortical dementias. This could serve as an additional biomarker and also assist in initiating appropriate training methods to prevent future falls.

  6. Difficulties in detecting behavioral symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration across cultures

    PubMed Central

    Papatriantafyllou, J. D.; Viskontas, I. V.; Papageorgiou, S.G.; Miller, B. L.; Pavlic, D.; Bingol, A.; Yener, G.

    2009-01-01

    Cross-cultural studies of neurodegenerative disorders are especially important when the disease in question is difficult to diagnose, particularly if symptoms of the illness include behavioral disturbances that may be interpreted differently in different cultures. One such disease is frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), an early-age-of-onset dementia that disproportionately affects social behavior. We report the demographic and neuropsychological characteristics of more than 300 patients diagnosed with FTLD in the United States (US), Greece and Turkey. We find that patients with the frontal variant of FTLD (FTD) are diagnosed at an earlier age and report earlier symptom onset in the US, than in Greece or Turkey. Furthermore, neuropsychological measures indicate that at diagnosis, FTD patients in the US are less impaired than patients in Greece and Turkey. Patients with FTD in Greece and Turkey are diagnosed later in the disease, presumably because their behavioral symptoms are not easily detected by the medical system in these countries. Our study underscores the need to create culturally-appropriate indices of the behavioral symptoms of FTLD, so that patients may be diagnosed and treated at an earlier stage. PMID:18695586

  7. Behavioral phenomenology in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and late-life depression: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Swartz, J R; Miller, B L; Lesser, I M; Booth, R; Darby, A; Wohl, M; Benson, D F

    1997-04-01

    Often patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and late-life depression can be difficult to differentiate clinically. Although subtle cognitive distinctions exist between these disorders, noncognitive behavioral phenomenology may provide additional discriminating power. In 19 subjects with AD, 19 with FTD, 16 with late-life psychotic depression (LLPD), and 19 with late-life nonpsychotic depression (LLNPD), noncognitive behavioral symptoms were quantified retrospectively using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and compared using both a one-way ANOVA and a multivariate stepwise discriminant analysis, which utilized a jackknife procedure. The FTD group showed the highest mean total SCAN score, while the AD group showed the lowest. ANOVA showed significant differences in the mean total SCAN scores between the four diagnostic groups (P < .0001). With the discriminant analysis, the four disorders demonstrated different clusters of behavioral abnormalities and were differentiated by these symptoms (P < .0001). A subset of 14 SCAN item group symptoms was identified that collectively classified the following percentages of subjects in each diagnostic category: AD 94.7%, FTD 100%, LLPD 87.5%, and LLNPD 100%. These results indicate that AD, FTD, LLPD, and LLNPD were distinguished retrospectively by the SCAN without using cognitive data. Better definition of the longitudinal course of noncognitive behavioral symptoms in different dementias and psychiatric disorders will be valuable both for diagnosis and to help define behavioral syndromes that are associated with selective neuroanatomic and neurochemical brain pathology.

  8. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA): validation study for frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandra; Simões, Mário R; Alves, Lara; Duro, Diana; Santana, Isabel

    2012-09-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a brief instrument developed for the screening of milder forms of cognitive impairment, having surpassed the well-known limitations of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The aim of the present study was to validate the MoCA as a cognitive screening test for behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD) by examining its psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy. Three matched subgroups of participants were considered: bv-FTD (n = 50), Alzheimer disease (n = 50), and a control group of healthy adults (n = 50). Compared with the MMSE, the MoCA demonstrated consistently superior psychometric properties and discriminant capacity, providing comprehensive information about the patients' cognitive profiles. The diagnostic accuracy of MoCA for bv-FTD was extremely high (area under the curve AUC [MoCA] = 0.934, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.866-.974; AUC [MMSE] = 0.772, 95% CI = 0.677-0.850). With a cutoff below 17 points, the MoCA results for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and classification accuracy were significantly superior to those of the MMSE. The MoCA is a sensitive and accurate instrument for screening the patients with bv-FTD and represents a better option than the MMSE.

  9. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20–50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  11. Performance of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration on artistic tasks: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Anauate, Maria Cristina; Bahia, Valéria Santoro; Nitrini, Ricardo; Radanovic, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have addressed visuospatial and executive skills in artistic activities in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the performance of FTLD patients compared to controls on two artistic tasks. Four FTLD patients with mean age of 57 (8.7) years and schooling of 12.2 (4.5) years plus 10 controls with mean age of 62.9 (8.6) years and schooling of 12.3 (4.6) years, were assessed using the Lowenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) and by a three-stage artistic protocol including visual observation, copying and collage, based on a Sisley painting. FTLD patients had lower scores than controls on Visuospatial Perception, Copy, Collage, Examiner's Observation, and Total, showing distinct patterns of performance according to FTLD sub-type: semantic PPA, nonfluent PPA and bvFTD. FTLD patients presented impairment in the visuospatial and executive skills required to perform artistic tasks. We demonstrated that the application of the instrument as a complimentary method for assessing cognitive skills in this group of patients is possible. Further studies addressing larger and more homogeneous samples of FTLD patients as well as other dementias are warranted.

  12. Impairment of prosocial sentiments is associated with frontopolar and septal damage in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Jorge; Zahn, Roland; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Krueger, Frank; Tura, Bernardo; Cavanagh, Alyson L.; Grafman, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    Poets and philosophers have long acknowledged moral sentiments as key motivators of human social behavior. Prosocial sentiments, which include guilt, pity and embarrassment, enable us to care about others and to be concerned about our mistakes. Functional imaging studies have implicated frontopolar, ventromedial frontal and basal forebrain regions in the experience of prosocial sentiments. Patients with lesions of the frontopolar and ventromedial frontal areas were observed to behave inappropriately and less prosocially, which could be attributed to a generalized emotional blunting. Direct experimental evidence for brain regions distinctively associated with moral sentiment impairments is lacking, however. We investigated this issue in patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, a disorder in which early and selective impairments of social conduct are consistently observed. Using a novel moral sentiment task, we show that the degree of impairment of prosocial sentiments is associated with the degree of damage to frontopolar cortex and septal area, as assessed with 18-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography, an established measure of neurodegenerative damage. This effect was dissociable from impairment of other-critical feelings (anger and disgust), which was in turn associated with dorsomedial prefrontal and amygdala dysfunction. Our findings suggest a critical role of the frontopolar cortex and septal region in enabling prosocial sentiments, a fundamental component of moral conscience. PMID:20728544

  13. Executive and social-cognitive determinants of environmental dependency syndrome in behavioral frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Emma C; Lagarde, Julien; Hahn, Valérie; Guichart-Gomez, Elodie; Sarazin, Marie; Hornberger, Michael; Bertoux, Maxime

    2018-05-01

    Environmental dependency syndrome (EDS), including utilization (UB) and imitation (IB) behaviors, is often reported in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). These behaviors are commonly attributed to executive dysfunction. However, inconsistent associations between EDS and poor executive performance has led to an alternative "social hypothesis," instead implicating patients' misinterpretation of the examiner's intention. We investigated the possible explanatory cognitive mechanisms of EDS in bvFTD by relating UB and IB to performance on tests of executive functioning and theory of mind (ToM). This study analyzed retrospective data of 32 bvFTD patients. Data included scores of UB and IB, various executive measures, and ToM assessment using the faux pas test, from which we extracted a mental attribution score. Of the patients, 15.6% and 40.6% exhibited UB and IB, respectively. We conducted an automatic linear modeling analysis with executive and mental attribution measures as predictor variables, and UB and IB sequentially considered as target variables. ToM mental attribution score, visual abstraction and flexibility measures from the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and motor sequence performance significantly (corrected ps < .05) predicted IB. No executive or ToM measures significantly predicted UB. These findings reveal a complex interaction between executive dysfunction and mental attribution deficits influencing the prevalence of EDS in bvFTD. Further investigation is required to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. FDG-PET improves accuracy in distinguishing frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, Norman L; Heidebrink, Judith L; Clark, Christopher M; Jagust, William J; Arnold, Steven E; Barbas, Nancy R; DeCarli, Charles S; Turner, R Scott; Koeppe, Robert A; Higdon, Roger; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2007-10-01

    Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) currently relies on a clinical history and examination, but positron emission tomography with [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) shows different patterns of hypometabolism in these disorders that might aid differential diagnosis. Six dementia experts with variable FDG-PET experience made independent, forced choice, diagnostic decisions in 45 patients with pathologically confirmed AD (n = 31) or FTD (n = 14) using five separate methods: (1) review of clinical summaries, (2) a diagnostic checklist alone, (3) summary and checklist, (4) transaxial FDG-PET scans and (5) FDG-PET stereotactic surface projection (SSP) metabolic and statistical maps. In addition, we evaluated the effect of the sequential review of a clinical summary followed by SSP. Visual interpretation of SSP images was superior to clinical assessment and had the best inter-rater reliability (mean kappa = 0.78) and diagnostic accuracy (89.6%). It also had the highest specificity (97.6%) and sensitivity (86%), and positive likelihood ratio for FTD (36.5). The addition of FDG-PET to clinical summaries increased diagnostic accuracy and confidence for both AD and FTD. It was particularly helpful when raters were uncertain in their clinical diagnosis. Visual interpretation of FDG-PET after brief training is more reliable and accurate in distinguishing FTD from AD than clinical methods alone. FDG-PET adds important information that appropriately increases diagnostic confidence, even among experienced dementia specialists.

  15. Evidence of semantic processing impairments in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Katheryn A Q; Grossman, Murray

    2017-12-01

    Category-specific impairments caused by brain damage can provide important insights into how semantic concepts are organized in the brain. Recent research has demonstrated that disease to sensory and motor cortices can impair perceptual feature knowledge important to the representation of semantic concepts. This evidence supports the grounded cognition theory of semantics, the view that lexical knowledge is partially grounded in perceptual experience and that sensory and motor regions support semantic representations. Less well understood, however, is how heteromodal semantic hubs work to integrate and process semantic information. Although the majority of semantic research to date has focused on how sensory cortical areas are important for the representation of semantic features, new research explores how semantic memory is affected by neurodegeneration in regions important for semantic processing. Here, we review studies that demonstrate impairments to abstract noun knowledge in behavioural variant frontotemporal degeneration (bvFTD) and to action verb knowledge in Parkinson's disease, and discuss how these deficits relate to disease of the semantic selection network. Findings demonstrate that semantic selection processes are supported by the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and basal ganglia, and that disease to these regions in bvFTD and Parkinson's disease can lead to categorical impairments for abstract nouns and action verbs, respectively.

  16. Motor Speech Phenotypes of Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, and Progressive Apraxia of Speech.

    PubMed

    Poole, Matthew L; Brodtmann, Amy; Darby, David; Vogel, Adam P

    2017-04-14

    Our purpose was to create a comprehensive review of speech impairment in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive apraxia of speech in order to identify the most effective measures for diagnosis and monitoring, and to elucidate associations between speech and neuroimaging. Speech and neuroimaging data described in studies of FTD and PPA were systematically reviewed. A meta-analysis was conducted for speech measures that were used consistently in multiple studies. The methods and nomenclature used to describe speech in these disorders varied between studies. Our meta-analysis identified 3 speech measures which differentiate variants or healthy control-group participants (e.g., nonfluent and logopenic variants of PPA from all other groups, behavioral-variant FTD from a control group). Deficits within the frontal-lobe speech networks are linked to motor speech profiles of the nonfluent variant of PPA and progressive apraxia of speech. Motor speech impairment is rarely reported in semantic and logopenic variants of PPA. Limited data are available on motor speech impairment in the behavioral variant of FTD. Our review identified several measures of speech which may assist with diagnosis and classification, and consolidated the brain-behavior associations relating to speech in FTD, PPA, and progressive apraxia of speech.

  17. TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus identifies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Glenda M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kril, Jillian J; Mito, Remika; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; McCann, Heather; Bartley, Lauren; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Kwok, John B J; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Tan, Rachel H

    2016-07-15

    The hypoglossal nucleus was recently identified as a key brain region in which the presence of TDP-43 pathology could accurately discriminate TDP-43 proteinopathy cases with clinical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of the present study was to assess the hypoglossal nucleus in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and determine whether TDP-43 in this region is associated with clinical ALS. Twenty-nine cases with neuropathological FTLD-TDP and clinical bvFTD that had not been previously assessed for hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology were included in this study. Of these 29 cases, 41% (n=12) had a dual diagnosis of bvFTD-ALS at presentation, all 100% (n=12) of which demonstrated hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Of the 59% (n=17) cohort that presented with pure bvFTD, 35% (n=6) were identified with hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Review of the case files of all pure bvFTD cases revealed evidence of possible or probable ALS in 5 of the 6 hypoglossal-positive cases (83%) towards the end of disease, and this was absent from all cases without such pathology. In conclusion, the present study validates grading the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus for the pathological identification of bvFTD cases with clinical ALS, and extends this to include the identification of cases with possible ALS at end-stage. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein Quality Control and the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Frontotemporal Dementia Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Shahheydari, Hamideh; Ragagnin, Audrey; Walker, Adam K.; Toth, Reka P.; Vidal, Marta; Jagaraj, Cyril J.; Perri, Emma R.; Konopka, Anna; Sultana, Jessica M.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    Protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, has an important regulatory role in cellular function. Protein quality control mechanisms, including protein folding and protein degradation processes, have a crucial function in post-mitotic neurons. Cellular protein quality control relies on multiple strategies, including molecular chaperones, autophagy, the ubiquitin proteasome system, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) and the formation of stress granules (SGs), to regulate proteostasis. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the presence of misfolded protein aggregates, implying that protein quality control mechanisms are dysfunctional in these conditions. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative diseases that are now recognized to overlap clinically and pathologically, forming a continuous disease spectrum. In this review article, we detail the evidence for dysregulation of protein quality control mechanisms across the whole ALS-FTD continuum, by discussing the major proteins implicated in ALS and/or FTD. We also discuss possible ways in which protein quality mechanisms could be targeted therapeutically in these disorders and highlight promising protein quality control-based therapeutics for clinical trials. PMID:28539871

  19. Amygdala atrophy affects emotion-related activity in face-responsive regions in frontotemporal degeneration.

    PubMed

    De Winter, François-Laurent; Van den Stock, Jan; de Gelder, Beatrice; Peeters, Ronald; Jastorff, Jan; Sunaert, Stefan; Vanduffel, Wim; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    In the healthy brain, modulatory influences from the amygdala commonly explain enhanced activation in face-responsive areas by emotional facial expressions relative to neutral expressions. In the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) facial emotion recognition is impaired and has been associated with atrophy of the amygdala. By combining structural and functional MRI in 19 patients with bvFTD and 20 controls we investigated the neural effects of emotion in face-responsive cortex and its relationship with amygdalar gray matter (GM) volume in neurodegeneration. Voxel-based morphometry revealed decreased GM volume in anterior medio-temporal regions including amygdala in patients compared to controls. During fMRI, we presented dynamic facial expressions (fear and chewing) and their spatiotemporally scrambled versions. We found enhanced activation for fearful compared to neutral faces in ventral temporal cortex and superior temporal sulcus in controls, but not in patients. In the bvFTD group left amygdalar GM volume correlated positively with emotion-related activity in left fusiform face area (FFA). This correlation was amygdala-specific and driven by GM in superficial and basolateral (BLA) subnuclei, consistent with reported amygdalar-cortical networks. The data suggests that anterior medio-temporal atrophy in bvFTD affects emotion processing in distant posterior areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in a greek frontotemporal dementia cohort.

    PubMed

    Kartanou, Chrisoula; Karadima, Georgia; Koutsis, Georgios; Breza, Marianthi; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Paraskevas, George P; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Panas, Marios

    2018-02-01

    The C9orf72 repeat expansion is a common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in European populations. A previous study has reported a high frequency of the expansion in Greek ALS. However, no data have been reported on the frequency of the expansion in Greek FTD. Currently, we investigated the frequency of the C9orfF72 expansion in a well-characterized cohort of 64 Greek FTD patients. We detected the C9orf72 repeat expansion in 9.3% of cases. Overall, 27.7% of familial and 2.2% of sporadic cases were expansion-positive. Five out of 6 cases had a diagnosis of behavioral variant FTD. All expansion-positive cases had fairly typical FTD presentations. Clinical features included motor neuron disease, Parkinsonism and hallucinations. We conclude that the overall frequency of C9orf72-positive cases in Greek FTD is high, comparable to Greek ALS, similar to some Western European, but significantly higher than some Mediterranean FTD populations.

  1. Prospective Memory Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Clinical and Neural Correlates.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Nadene; Hornberger, Michael; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Irish, Muireann

    2016-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) refers to a future-oriented form of memory in which the individual must remember to execute an intended action either at a future point in time (Time-based) or in response to a specific event (Event-based). Lapses in PM are commonly exhibited in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), however, the neurocognitive mechanisms driving these deficits remain unknown. To investigate the clinical and neural correlates of Time- and Event-based PM disruption in AD and the behavioral-variant FTD (bvFTD). Twelve AD, 12 bvFTD, and 12 healthy older Control participants completed a modified version of the Cambridge Prospective Memory test, which examines Time- and Event-based aspects of PM. All participants completed a standard neuropsychological assessment and underwent whole-brain structural MRI. AD and bvFTD patients displayed striking impairments across Time- and Event-based PM relative to Controls, however, Time-based PM was disproportionately affected in the AD group. Episodic memory dysfunction and hippocampal atrophy were found to correlate strongly with PM integrity in both patient groups, however, dissociable neural substrates were also evident for PM performance across dementia syndromes. Our study reveals the multifaceted nature of PM dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders, and suggests common and dissociable neurocognitive mechanisms, which subtend these deficits in each patient group. Future studies of PM disturbance in dementia syndromes will be crucial for the development of successful interventions to improve functional independence in the patient's daily life.

  2. Clinical stabilisation with lacosamide of mood disorder comorbid with PTSD and fronto-temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Ilaria; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; De Filippis, Sergio

    2017-08-23

    Mood disorders are often complicated by comorbidity with epilepsy. Anxiety and personality disorders may worsen prognosis and treatment outcome. Lacosamide has been recently introduced as adjunctive treatment for partial epilepsy. Its mechanism consists of selective slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, thus promoting an extended stabilisation of cell membranes. Antiepileptic drugs have been largely used since the 1950s in psychiatry as mood stabilisers due to their membrane stabilising and anti-kindling effects. Like lithium, antiepileptic drugs are first choice treatment for Bipolar and Cyclothymic Disorders. We tested the efficacy of the most recent antiepileptic medication, lacosamide, in a patient with simultaneously occurring cyclothymic disorder, severe post-traumatic stress disorder, and fronto-temporal epilepsy. Lacosamide was titrated up to 200 mg/day, added on ongoing 750 mg/day lithium, 15 mg/day oral aripiprazole then switched to 400 mg/month long-acting aripiprazole, and 2 mg/day N-desmethyldiazepam. We observed EEG normalisation one month later, along with reduced anxiety and an additive effect to lithium-induced stabilisation of mood fluctuations since the second week of lacosamide addition. Further studies with this drug in the bipolar spectrum are warranted.

  3. Longitudinal patterns of semantic and episodic memory in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sharon X; Libon, David J; Wang, Xingmei; Massimo, Lauren; Moore, Peachie; Vesely, Luisa; Khan, Alea; Chatterjee, Anjan; Coslett, H Branch; Hurtig, Howard I; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Grossman, Murray

    2010-03-01

    The longitudinal assessment of episodic and semantic memory was obtained from 236 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 128) and with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, n = 108), including patients with a social comportment/dysexecutive (SOC/EXEC) disorder, progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SemD), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). At the initial assessment, AD patients obtained a lower score on the delayed free recall test than other patients. Longitudinal analyses for delayed free recall found converging performance, with all patients reaching the same level of impairment as AD patients. On the initial evaluation for delayed recognition, AD patients also obtained lower scores than other groups. Longitudinal analyses for delayed recognition test performance found that AD patients consistently produced lower scores than other groups and no convergence between AD and other dementia groups was seen. For semantic memory, there were no initial between-group differences. However, longitudinal analyses for semantic memory revealed group differences over illness duration, with worse performance for SemD versus AD, PNFA, SOC/EXEC, and CBS patients. These data suggest the presence of specific longitudinal patterns of impairment for episodic and semantic memory in AD and FTLD patients suggesting that all forms of dementia do not necessarily converge into a single phenotype.

  4. Levels-of-Processing Effect on Frontotemporal Function in Schizophrenia During Word Encoding and Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ragland, J. Daniel; Gur, Ruben C.; Valdez, Jeffrey N.; Loughead, James; Elliott, Mark; Kohler, Christian; Kanes, Stephen; Siegel, Steven J.; Moelter, Stephen T.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with schizophrenia improve episodic memory accuracy when given organizational strategies through levels-of-processing paradigms. This study tested if improvement is accompanied by normalized frontotemporal function. Method Event-related blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activation during shallow (perceptual) and deep (semantic) word encoding and recognition in 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 healthy comparison subjects. Results Despite slower and less accurate overall word classification, the patients showed normal levels-of-processing effects, with faster and more accurate recognition of deeply processed words. These effects were accompanied by left ventrolateral prefrontal activation during encoding in both groups, although the thalamus, hippocampus, and lingual gyrus were overactivated in the patients. During word recognition, the patients showed overactivation in the left frontal pole and had a less robust right prefrontal response. Conclusions Evidence of normal levels-of-processing effects and left prefrontal activation suggests that patients with schizophrenia can form and maintain semantic representations when they are provided with organizational cues and can improve their word encoding and retrieval. Areas of overactivation suggest residual inefficiencies. Nevertheless, the effect of teaching organizational strategies on episodic memory and brain function is a worthwhile topic for future interventional studies. PMID:16199830

  5. Distinct Clinical Features and Outcomes in Motor Neuron Disease Associated with Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Vicente, Elena; Turon-Sans, Janina; Gelpi, Ellen; Clarimón, Jordi; Borrego-Écija, Sergi; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Illán-Gala, Ignacio; Lleó, Alberto; Illa, Isabel; Blesa, Rafael; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Rojas-García, Ricard

    2018-06-08

    To determine the motor phenotype and outcome in a clinically ascertained group of patients with motor neuron disease (MND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). This is an observational retrospective clinical study of patients fulfilling the clinical criteria for MND-FTD. A contemporary series of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) without dementia were included for comparison. Demographic, clinical, genetic, and neuropathological data were collected. A descriptive and comparative data analysis was performed. We identified 22 patients with MND-FTD. Selective distal upper limb muscle weakness and atrophy with non-significant lower limb weakness during follow-up was the most frequent motor pattern, present in 18 patients - in 15 of them associated with severe dysphagia. Aspiration pneumonia was the most common cause of death (12/19; 63%) despite gastrostomy. One-third of the patients did not develop upper motor neuron dysfunction. When compared to classic ALS without dementia (n = 162), these features were significantly different. A neuro-pathological examination was performed on 7 patients, and it confirmed the presence of MND with TDP43 protein aggregates in all patients. The MND-FTD patients frequently displayed a distinctive motor pattern characterized by weakness and atrophy in distal upper limb muscles and dysphagia, with no or little spreading to other regions. These features may help to define specific subgroups of patients, which is important with regard to clinical management, outcome, and research. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia: advanced disease stages and death. A step to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Diehl-Schmid, J; Richard-Devantoy, S; Grimmer, T; Förstl, H; Jox, R

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the living and care situation in advanced behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), to describe symptoms and findings in advanced bvFTD, and to evaluate somatic comorbidities and circumstances of death. Standardized interviews were conducted with family caregivers of 83 patients with bvFTD. Forty-four percent of the patients were already deceased at the time of the interview. At the time of the interview or death, respectively, 47% of the patients lived in a nursing home. The median time between symptom onset and nursing home admission was 5.0 ± 5.5 years. In moderate and severe dementia stages almost all patients suffered from severe disabilities including impairment of language, gait, swallowing, and of the ability to care for themselves. Sixteen percent of the patients had got enteral tube feeding. Comorbid somatic diseases were diagnosed in 46% of the patients. Twenty-three percent of the deceased patients had been admitted into a hospital before death. Cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease, mostly pneumonia, were the most frequent causes of death. Advanced bvFTD is characterized by severe cognitive impairment and physical disabilities. BvFTD leads to a premature death. Our findings stress the importance of strategies that maximize patient comfort in advanced disease stages and allow for a peaceful death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Behavioral and autonomic reactivity to moral dilemmas in frontotemporal dementia versus Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sylvia S; Navarrete, Carlos David; Perfecto, Sean E; Carr, Andrew R; Jimenez, Elvira E; Mendez, Mario F

    2017-08-01

    The personal/impersonal distinction of moral decision-making postulates intuitive emotional responses from medial frontal activity and rational evaluation from lateral frontal activity. This model can be analyzed in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disorder characterized by impaired emotional intuitions, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) involvement, and relative sparing of lateral frontal regions. Moral dilemmas were presented to 10 bvFTD, 11 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 9 healthy control (HC) participants while recording skin conductance responses, a measure of emotional arousal. We evaluated their personal versus impersonal conflict, subjective discomfort, and adherence to social norms. Replicating prior work, bvFTD participants were more willing to harm in the personal, but not the impersonal, dilemma compared to AD and HC groups. BvFTD participants had lower arousal and less of an increase in conflict on the personal versus the impersonal dilemma, in contrast to increased arousal and conflict for the AD and HC groups. Furthermore, bvFTD participants verbalized less discomfort, a correlate of low adherence to social norms. These findings support impaired emotional reactions to moral dilemmas in bvFTD and vmPFC lesions and the personal/impersonal model. It suggests a reversion to utilitarian-like considerations when emotional intuition is impaired in the brain.

  8. A longitudinal study of behavior in frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Davidson, Wilda; Kertesz, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the construct validity of the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI) and to describe the evolution of the behavioral abnormalities of the behavioral and aphasic presentations of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) by means of a 3-year longitudinal study. The FBI is a standardized behavioral questionnaire useful in the diagnosis and quantification of the personality and behavior disorder FTD. Patients who had three consecutive yearly assessments with the FBI were selected, 12 with the behavioral variant of FTD (FTD-bv) and 14 with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). FBI scores rose as the disease progressed in both the FTD-bv and PPA groups over the 3 years of testing. Initial mean FBI scores of the FTD-bv group were above the cutoff for FTD as established for this diagnosis with previous standardization. By the third year, the mean FBI score of PPA patients was also above the established cutoff for FTD. The outcome of the study demonstrates that the FBI is sensitive to changes in behavior and personality in both variants of FTD. The FBI can be used to describe the evolution of symptoms and the course of the illness of Pick complex patients who present initially with FTD-bv or who present with PPA and subsequently develop the behavioral disorder.

  9. Behavioral disturbances differentiate frontotemporal lobar degeneration subtypes and Alzheimer's disease: evidence from the Frontal Behavioral Inventory.

    PubMed

    Konstantinopoulou, Eleni; Aretouli, Eleni; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Karacostas, Dimitrios; Kosmidis, Mary H

    2013-09-01

    Behavioral assessment is useful for the diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We explored the ability of the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI) to discriminate between patients with distinct subtypes of FTLD and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as the influence of demographic variables on FBI scores. The FBI was administered to the caregivers of 87 patients diagnosed with FTLD [64 behavioral variant FTLD, 19 aphasic variant FTLD (primary progressive aphasia), and 4 motor/extrapyramidal variant (corticobasal syndrome)] and 30 patients with AD. Patients with AD were older than patients with FTLD. The two groups did not differ with respect to duration of illness, level of education, or sex ratio. Age significantly predicted disinhibited positive behaviors, such as perseverations and irritability, whereas education did not contribute to FBI ratings. Classification accuracy for the discrimination of AD and mixed FTLD groups was 81%. Moreover, 88.3% and 83.7% accuracy was achieved for the discrimination of AD and behavioral variant FTLD, and AD and primary progressive aphasia groups, respectively. The Total Negative subscale of the FBI, which summarizes the presence of deficit (negative) behaviors, was the best discriminator. A cut-off score of 17 provided 83% sensitivity and 98% specificity in distinguishing between FTLD and AD patients. The FBI is a sensitive and specific tool for the differential diagnosis of FTLD from AD. The optimal cut-off point for the detection of FTLD patients was lower than that initially proposed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Prospective evaluation of behavioral scales in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Volteau, Christelle; Jaulin, Philippe; Lacomblez, Lucette; Damier, Philippe; Thomas-Anterion, Catherine; Vercelletto, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI) are widely used in patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Yet, few data are available on the long-term relevance of these scales. Based on a bvFTD population that participated in the Memantine Clinical Trial (NCT00200538), we studied the evolution and correlation between scores obtained on behavioral scales (NPI and FBI), cognitive scales [Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS)] and a burden scale [Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI)]. The assessments were performed at 1 year in 41 patients and at 2 years in 23 patients who agreed to participate in this open-label study. The 2-year scores obtained on the FBI were significantly higher than the scores at inclusion while those obtained on the NPI did not change. There were significant correlations between the FBI, and the MDRS and MMSE, especially regarding the negative items. The ZBI correlated with behavioral scales at all stages for positive items. This study based on a large population shows that the FBI is a better tool than the NPI for the long-term assessment of bvFTD patients. Moreover, the FBI allows a distinction to be made between behavioral disturbances that involve cognitive functions from those which have an important impact on caregiver burden. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The Frontal Behavioural Inventory (Italian version) differentiates frontotemporal lobar degeneration variants from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alberici, A; Geroldi, C; Cotelli, M; Adorni, A; Calabria, M; Rossi, G; Borroni, B; Padovani, A; Zanetti, O; Kertesz, A

    2007-04-01

    The objective was to evaluate the construct validity of the Italian version of the Frontal Behavioural Inventory (FBI) and its usefulness in the differential diagnosis of dementias. Standard criteria were used in the clinical diagnosis of dementias in 83 patients and 33 agematched healthy volunteers. The FBI scale was translated from English into Italian language and back-translated. Cronbach's alpha, inter-rater and test-retest reliability, FBI convergent validity and discriminant analysis were calculated. FBI profile was compared between patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The FBI showed a high internal consistency and inter-rater reliability and it distinguished normal behavioural conditions from those presented in FTLD or AD. An 86.8% diagnostic accuracy was calculated by the discriminant analysis, selecting only age at disease onset and FBI, and particularly distinguishing behavioural variants within the FTLD spectrum. FTLD patients showed a characteristic behavioural profile. The FBI might be a reliable and useful diagnostic tool for dementias in clinical practice.

  12. Diminished self-conscious emotional responding in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Virginia E; Ascher, Elizabeth A; Miller, Bruce L; Levenson, Robert W

    2008-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a neurodegenerative disease that dramatically alters social and emotional behavior. Recent work has suggested that self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment) may be particularly vulnerable to disruption in this disease. Self-conscious emotions require the ability to monitor the self in relation to others. These abilities are thought to be subserved by brain regions (e.g., medial prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and insula) that are particularly vulnerable to damage in FTLD. This study examined emotional responding (expressive behavior, peripheral physiology, and subjective experience) in 24 FTLD patients and 16 cognitively normal control participants using a karaoke task known to elicit self-conscious emotion reliably and a nonemotional control task (isometric handgrip). Results indicated that FTLD patients showed diminished self-conscious emotional behavior (embarrassment and amusement) and diminished physiological responding while watching themselves singing. No differences were found between patients and controls in the nonemotional control task. These findings offer evidence of marked disruption of self-conscious emotional responding in FTLD. Diminished self-conscious emotional responding likely contributes significantly to social inappropriateness and other behavioral abnormalities in FTLD. 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Diminished Self-Conscious Emotional Responding in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Virginia E.; Ascher, Elizabeth A.; Miller, Bruce L.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a neurodegenerative disease that dramatically alters social and emotional behavior. Recent work has suggested that self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment) may be particularly vulnerable to disruption in this disease. Self-conscious emotions require the ability to monitor the self in relation to others. These abilities are thought to be subserved by brain regions (e.g., medial prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and insula) that are particularly vulnerable to damage in FTLD. This study examined emotional responding (expressive behavior, peripheral physiology, and subjective experience) in 24 FTLD patients and 16 cognitively normal control participants using a karaoke task known to elicit self-conscious emotion reliably and a nonemotional control task (isometric handgrip). Results indicated that FTLD patients showed diminished self-conscious emotional behavior (embarrassment and amusement) and diminished physiological responding while watching themselves singing. No differences were found between patients and controls in the nonemotional control task. These findings offer evidence of marked disruption of self-conscious emotional responding in FTLD. Diminished self-conscious emotional responding likely contributes significantly to social inappropriateness and other behavioral abnormalities in FTLD. PMID:19102597

  14. Neurocognitive similarities between severe chronic schizophrenia and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui-Minn; Stolwyk, Rene; Neath, Joanna; Kelso, Wendy; Walterfang, Mark; Mocellin, Ramon; Pantelis, Christos; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2015-02-28

    This study focuses on a group of patients with chronic schizophrenia who have a more severe form of the disorder, as indicated by socio-functional decline, treatment resistance, and recurrent hospitalisation. Previous research has suggested that the pattern and severity of cognitive deficits in people with severe chronic schizophrenia is similar to that observed in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). In the current study, we compared neurocognitive performance in 16 cognitive domains in 7 inpatients with severe chronic schizophrenia, 13 community-dwelling outpatients with chronic schizophrenia, 12 patients with bvFTD, and 18 healthy controls. Our findings revealed more similar cognitive profiles between the schizophrenia inpatient and bvFTD groups compared to the schizophrenia outpatient group, who outperformed the former groups. The current results provide preliminary evidence for a distinct schizophrenia subgroup, distinguishable from other chronic schizophrenia patients by poorer clinical and functional status, who have levels of cognitive impairment comparable to those seen in bvFTD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. How much do physicians in Latin America know about behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia?

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Flichtentrei, Daniel; Manes, Facundo

    2011-11-01

    Diagnosis of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) can be especially challenging during the early stages for several reasons, including the fact that (a) behavioral disturbances in bvFTD can mimic the symptomatic profile of psychiatric disorders; (b) neuropsychological performance may be relatively spared; and (c) changes in structural neuroimaging may go undetected. Most frequently, bvFTD is not included as part of medical or residency training outside the field of cognitive neurology. The present study aimed at examining bvFTD-related practices concerning academic and professional training, diagnosis, and treatment across Latin America. We surveyed the academic and professional aspects of clinical practice related to bvFTD of 596 physicians from different fields throughout the continent. We discuss several aspects concerning Latin American physicians' training on dementia and bvFTD, the way in which they approach the differential diagnosis of bvFTD, and their most frequent strategies for the treatment of this condition. We conclude that information about bvFTD deserves more attention in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in Latin America, and that understanding clinical practices related to FTD can help design more efficient training programs for physicians in this and other world regions.

  16. Language, Executive Function and Social Cognition in the Diagnosis of Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Harciarek, Michał; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) represents a spectrum of non-Alzheimer’s degenerative conditions associated with focal atrophy of the frontal and/or temporal lobes. Frontal and temporal regions of the brain have been shown to be strongly involved in executive function, social cognition and language processing and, thus, deficits in these domains are frequently seen in patients with FTD or may even be hallmarks of a specific FTD subtype ( i.e., relatively selective and progressive language impairment in primary progressive aphasia). In this review, we have attempted to delineate how language, executive function, and social cognition may contribute to the diagnosis of FTD syndromes, namely the behavioral variant FTD as well as the language variants of FTD including the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA): non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic, and logopenic. This review also addresses the extent to which deficits in these cognitive areas contribute to the differential diagnosis of FTD versus AD. Finally, early clinical determinants of pathology are briefly discussed and contemporary challenges to the diagnosis of FTD are presented. PMID:23611348

  17. Emotional quotient in frontotemporal dementia vs. Alzheimer's disease: the role of socioemotional agnosia.

    PubMed

    Carr, Andrew R; Samimi, Mersal S; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Jimenez, Elvira E; Mendez, Mario F

    2017-01-01

    Socioemotional dysfunction distinguishes behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from other dementias. Patients with bvFTD not only have early social impairment and emotional blunting, but they also have agnosia of their socioemotional dysfunction. To investigate the relationship between agnosia and dysfunction, we assessed self-knowledge of socioemotional dysfunction with an emotional quotient (EQ) scale administered to 12 patients with bvFTD and a comparison group of 12 age-matched patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and compared these self-ratings to caregiver ratings of social dysfunction and emotional blunting. The bvFTD patients self-rated as having higher EQs than the AD patients, particularly higher self-ratings of their Social Skills, an EQ subscale which correlated with increased emotional blunting. On within-groups analysis, the bvFTD patients' high self-ratings of their EQ Appraisal of Emotions correlated with increased socioemotional dysfunction, whereas all of the AD patients' self-ratings correlated appropriately with their degree of dysfunction. Large socioemotional agnosia scores (EQ minus function) distinguishes bvFTD from AD. Additionally, in bvFTD, agnosia specifically for their ability to appreciate others' emotions correlates with the degree of socioemotional dysfunction, suggesting a role for socioemotional agnosia in increasing socioemotional dysfunction.

  18. The prevalence of depressive symptoms in frontotemporal dementia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Trisha; Sepehry, Amir A; Jacova, Claudia; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia and is associated with poorer outcomes; however, less is known about the impact of depression on frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of diagnostic methods and the prevalence of depressive symptoms in FTD. PubMed, EMBASE and PsychINFO were queried for 'depression' and/or 'depressive mood' in behavioral- and language-variant FTD. The prevalence and diagnosis of depressive symptoms were extracted from relevant studies and the results pooled using a random-effects model. We included 29 studies in this meta-analysis, with sample sizes ranging from 3 to 73 (n = 870). The omnibus estimated event rate of depressed mood was 0.334 (33%; 95% CI: 0.268-0.407). Symptoms were most commonly assessed via standardized neuropsychiatric rating scales, with other methods including subjective caregiver reports and chart reviews. The study results were heterogeneous due to the variability in diagnostic methods. Depressive symptoms similar to those in other dementias are commonly detected in FTD. However, the diagnostic methods are heterogeneous, and symptoms of depression often overlap with manifestations of FTD. Having a standardized diagnostic approach to depression in FTD will greatly facilitate future research in this area.

  19. The established and emerging roles of astrocytes and microglia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Rowan A.; Morsch, Marco; Rayner, Stephanie L.; Cole, Nicholas J.; Pountney, Dean L.; Chung, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two progressive, fatal neurodegenerative syndromes with considerable clinical, genetic and pathological overlap. Clinical symptoms of FTD can be seen in ALS patients and vice versa. Recent genetic discoveries conclusively link the two diseases, and several common molecular players have been identified (TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72). The definitive etiologies of ALS and FTD are currently unknown and both disorders lack a cure. Glia, specifically astrocytes and microglia are heavily implicated in the onset and progression of neurodegeneration witnessed in ALS and FTD. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of microglia and astrocytes involved in ALS and FTD, highlighting their recent implications in neuroinflammation, alterations in waste clearance involving phagocytosis and the newly described glymphatic system, and vascular abnormalities. Elucidating the precise mechanisms of how astrocytes and microglia are involved in ALS and FTD will be crucial in characterizing these two disorders and may represent more effective interventions for disease progression and treatment options in the future. PMID:26578880

  20. Update on Recent Molecular and Genetic Advances in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Eileen H.

    2009-01-01

    Great strides have been made in the last 2 years in the field of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), particularly with respect to the genetics and molecular biology of FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions. It is now clear that most cases of familial FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions have mutations in the progranulin gene, located on chromosome 17. It is also clear that most ubiquitinated inclusions in FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions are composed primarily of TAR DNA-binding protein-43. Thus, FTLDs can be separated into 2 major groups (i.e. tauopathies and ubiquitinopathies), and most of the ubiquitinopathies can now be defined as TAR DNA-binding protein-43 proteinopathies. Many of the familial FTLDs are linked to chromosome 17, including both the familial tauopathies and the familial TAR DNA-binding protein-43 proteinopathies with progranulin mutations. This review highlights the neuropathologic features and the most important discoveries of the last 2 years and places these findings into the historical context of FTLD. PMID:18596549

  1. Impaired recognition of body expressions in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Van den Stock, Jan; De Winter, François-Laurent; de Gelder, Beatrice; Rangarajan, Janaki Raman; Cypers, Gert; Maes, Frederik; Sunaert, Stefan; Goffin, Karolien; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Progressive deterioration of social cognition and emotion processing are core symptoms of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Here we investigate whether bvFTD is also associated with impaired recognition of static (Experiment 1) and dynamic (Experiment 2) bodily expressions. In addition, we compared body expression processing with processing of static (Experiment 3) and dynamic (Experiment 4) facial expressions, as well as with face identity processing (Experiment 5). The results reveal that bvFTD is associated with impaired recognition of static and dynamic bodily and facial expressions, while identity processing was intact. No differential impairments were observed regarding motion (static vs. dynamic) or category (body vs. face). Within the bvFTD group, we observed a significant partial correlation between body and face expression recognition, when controlling for performance on the identity task. Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analysis revealed that body emotion recognition was positively associated with gray matter volume in a region of the inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis/triangularis). The results are in line with a supramodal emotion recognition deficit in bvFTD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Balance and Gait Measurement in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Diseases: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Velayutham, Selva Ganapathy; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Bharath, Srikala; Shankar, Ravi Girikamatha

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Alzhiemers disease and Frontotemporal dementia are common neurodegenerative dementias with a wide prevalence. Falls are a common cause of morbidity in these patients. Identifying subclinical involvement of these parameters might serve as a tool in differential analysis of these distinct parameters involved in these conditions and also help in planning preventive strategies to prevent falls. Patients and Methods: Eight patients in age and gender matched patients in each group were compared with normal controls. Standardizes methods of gait and balance aseesment were done in all persons. Results: Results revealed subclinical involvement of gait and balancesin all groups specially during divided attention. The parameters were significantly more affected in patients. Patients with AD and FTD had involement of over all ambulation index balance more affected in AD patients FTD patients showed step cycle, stride length abnormalities. Discussion: There is balance and gait involvement in normal ageing as well as patients with AD and FTD. The pattern of involvement in AD correlates with WHERE pathway involvement and FTD with frontal subcortical circuits involvement. Conclusion: Identification the differential patterns of involvement in subclinical stage might help to differentiate normal ageing and the different types of cortical dementias. This could serve as an additional biomarker and also assist in initiating appropriate training methods to prevent future falls. PMID:28515555

  3. Interrater reliability of the new criteria for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Lamarre, Amanda K; Rascovsky, Katya; Bostrom, Alan; Toofanian, Parnian; Wilkins, Sarah; Sha, Sharon J; Perry, David C; Miller, Zachary A; Naasan, Georges; Laforce, Robert; Hagen, Jayne; Takada, Leonel T; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Kang, Gail; Galasko, Douglas; Salmon, David P; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Kaur, Berneet; Olichney, John M; Quitania Park, Lovingly; Mendez, Mario F; Tsai, Po-Heng; Teng, Edmond; Dickerson, Bradford Clark; Domoto-Reilly, Kimiko; McGinnis, Scott; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2013-05-21

    To evaluate the interrater reliability of the new International Behavioural Variant FTD Criteria Consortium (FTDC) criteria for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Twenty standardized clinical case modules were developed for patients with a range of neurodegenerative diagnoses, including bvFTD, primary progressive aphasia (nonfluent, semantic, and logopenic variant), Alzheimer disease, and Lewy body dementia. Eighteen blinded raters reviewed the modules and 1) rated the presence or absence of core diagnostic features for the FTDC criteria, and 2) provided an overall diagnostic rating. Interrater reliability was determined by κ statistics for multiple raters with categorical ratings. The mean κ value for diagnostic agreement was 0.81 for possible bvFTD and 0.82 for probable bvFTD ("almost perfect agreement"). Interrater reliability for 4 of the 6 core features had "substantial" agreement (behavioral disinhibition, perseverative/compulsive, sympathy/empathy, hyperorality; κ = 0.61-0.80), whereas 2 had "moderate" agreement (apathy/inertia, neuropsychological; κ = 0.41-0.6). Clinician years of experience did not significantly influence rater accuracy. The FTDC criteria show promise for improving the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of clinicians and researchers. As disease-altering therapies are developed, accurate differential diagnosis between bvFTD and other neurodegenerative diseases will become increasingly important.

  4. Judgments about moral responsibility and determinism in patients with behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia: still compatibilists.

    PubMed

    Cova, Florian; Bertoux, Maxime; Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha; Dubois, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    Do laypeople think that moral responsibility is compatible with determinism? Recently, philosophers and psychologists trying to answer this question have found contradictory results: while some experiments reveal people to have compatibilist intuitions, others suggest that people could in fact be incompatibilist. To account for this contradictory answers, Nichols and Knobe (2007) have advanced a 'performance error model' according to which people are genuine incompatibilist that are sometimes biased to give compatibilist answers by emotional reactions. To test for this hypothesis, we investigated intuitions about determinism and moral responsibility in patients suffering from behavioural frontotemporal dementia. Patients suffering from bvFTD have impoverished emotional reaction. Thus, the 'performance error model' should predict that bvFTD patients will give less compatibilist answers. However, we found that bvFTD patients give answers quite similar to subjects in control group and were mostly compatibilist. Thus, we conclude that the 'performance error model' should be abandoned in favour of other available model that best fit our data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Levels-of-processing effect on frontotemporal function in schizophrenia during word encoding and recognition.

    PubMed

    Ragland, J Daniel; Gur, Ruben C; Valdez, Jeffrey N; Loughead, James; Elliott, Mark; Kohler, Christian; Kanes, Stephen; Siegel, Steven J; Moelter, Stephen T; Gur, Raquel E

    2005-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia improve episodic memory accuracy when given organizational strategies through levels-of-processing paradigms. This study tested if improvement is accompanied by normalized frontotemporal function. Event-related blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activation during shallow (perceptual) and deep (semantic) word encoding and recognition in 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 healthy comparison subjects. Despite slower and less accurate overall word classification, the patients showed normal levels-of-processing effects, with faster and more accurate recognition of deeply processed words. These effects were accompanied by left ventrolateral prefrontal activation during encoding in both groups, although the thalamus, hippocampus, and lingual gyrus were overactivated in the patients. During word recognition, the patients showed overactivation in the left frontal pole and had a less robust right prefrontal response. Evidence of normal levels-of-processing effects and left prefrontal activation suggests that patients with schizophrenia can form and maintain semantic representations when they are provided with organizational cues and can improve their word encoding and retrieval. Areas of overactivation suggest residual inefficiencies. Nevertheless, the effect of teaching organizational strategies on episodic memory and brain function is a worthwhile topic for future interventional studies.

  6. Performance of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration on artistic tasks: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Anauate, Maria Cristina; Bahia, Valéria Santoro; Nitrini, Ricardo; Radanovic, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have addressed visuospatial and executive skills in artistic activities in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective To investigate the performance of FTLD patients compared to controls on two artistic tasks. Methods Four FTLD patients with mean age of 57 (8.7) years and schooling of 12.2 (4.5) years plus 10 controls with mean age of 62.9 (8.6) years and schooling of 12.3 (4.6) years, were assessed using the Lowenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) and by a three-stage artistic protocol including visual observation, copying and collage, based on a Sisley painting. Results FTLD patients had lower scores than controls on Visuospatial Perception, Copy, Collage, Examiner's Observation, and Total, showing distinct patterns of performance according to FTLD sub-type: semantic PPA, nonfluent PPA and bvFTD. Conclusion FTLD patients presented impairment in the visuospatial and executive skills required to perform artistic tasks. We demonstrated that the application of the instrument as a complimentary method for assessing cognitive skills in this group of patients is possible. Further studies addressing larger and more homogeneous samples of FTLD patients as well as other dementias are warranted. PMID:29213882

  7. Common and unique gray matter correlates of episodic memory dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding the integrity of episodic memory in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Recent converging evidence suggests that episodic memory in progressive cases of bvFTD is compromised to the same extent as in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying neural substrates of these episodic memory deficits, however, likely differ contingent on dementia type. In this study we sought to elucidate the neural substrates of episodic memory performance, across recall and recognition tasks, in both patient groups using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We predicted that episodic memory dysfunction would be apparent in both patient groups but would relate to divergent patterns of neural atrophy specific to each dementia type. We assessed episodic memory, across verbal and visual domains, in 19 bvFTD, 18 AD patients, and 19 age- and education-matched controls. Behaviorally, patient groups were indistinguishable for immediate and delayed recall, across verbal and visual domains. Whole-brain VBM analyses revealed regions commonly implicated in episodic retrieval across groups, namely the right temporal pole, right frontal lobe, left paracingulate gyrus, and right anterior hippocampus. Divergent neural networks specific to each group were also identified. Whereas a widespread network including posterior regions such as the posterior cingulate cortex, parietal and occipital cortices was exclusively implicated in AD, the frontal and anterior temporal lobes underpinned the episodic memory deficits in bvFTD. Our results point to distinct neural changes underlying episodic memory decline specific to each dementia syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effectiveness of zigzag Incision and 1.5-Layer method for frontotemporal craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Noriaki; Kimura, Toshikazu; Kohmura, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this era of minimally invasive treatment, it is important to make operative scars as inconspicuous as possible, and there is a great deal of room for improvement in daily practice. Zigzag incision with coronal incision has been described mainly in the field of plastic surgery, and its applicability for skin incision in general neurosurgery has not been reported. Methods: Zigzag incision with 1.5-layer method was applied to 14 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm between April 2011 and August 2012. A questionnaire survey was administered among patients with unruptured aneurysm using SF-36v2 since April 2010. The results were compared between patients with zigzag incision and a previous cohort with traditional incision. Results: There were no cases of complications associated with the operative wound. In the questionnaire survey, all parameters tended to be better in the patients with zigzag incision, and role social component score (RCS) was significantly higher in the zigzag group than in the traditional incision group (P =0.0436). Conclusion: Zigzag incision using the 1.5-layer method with frontotemporal craniotomy seems to represent an improvement over the conventional curvilinear incision with regard to cosmetic outcome and RCS. PMID:24991472

  9. Using the Disease State Fingerprint Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Ruiz, Miguel Ángel; Hall, Anette; Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Husso, Minna; Hänninen, Tuomo; Vanninen, Ritva; Liu, Yawu; Hallikainen, Merja; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Remes, Anne M.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Soininen, Hilkka; Hartikainen, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease State Index (DSI) and its visualization, Disease State Fingerprint (DSF), form a computer-assisted clinical decision making tool that combines patient data and compares them with cases with known outcomes. Aims To investigate the ability of the DSI to diagnose frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods The study cohort consisted of 38 patients with FTD, 57 with AD and 22 controls. Autopsy verification of FTD with TDP-43 positive pathology was available for 14 and AD pathology for 12 cases. We utilized data from neuropsychological tests, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and the APOE genotype. The DSI classification results were calculated with a combination of leave-one-out cross-validation and bootstrapping. A DSF visualization of a FTD patient is presented as an example. Results The DSI distinguishes controls from FTD (area under the receiver-operator curve, AUC = 0.99) and AD (AUC = 1.00) very well and achieves a good differential diagnosis between AD and FTD (AUC = 0.89). In subsamples of autopsy-confirmed cases (AUC = 0.97) and clinically diagnosed cases (AUC = 0.94), differential diagnosis of AD and FTD performs very well. Conclusions DSI is a promising computer-assisted biomarker approach for aiding in the diagnostic process of dementing diseases. Here, DSI separates controls from dementia and differentiates between AD and FTD. PMID:27703465

  10. Resultados do desenvolvimento de um propulsor à plasma no Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, I. S.; Ferreira, J. L.

    2003-08-01

    Uma das partes mais importantes de um satélite é o controle de atitude do mesmo. E se tratando de um satélite científico, a atenção para este sistema deve ser redobrada. Uma possibilidade atraente para executar esta tarefa é a propulsão elétrica. Aqui, mostraremos resultados obtidos pelo propulsor à plasma PHALL-01, desenvolvido na Universidade de Brasília entre 2000 e 2003. Este é derivado do propulsor russo SPT-100 (Stationary Plasma Thruster), mas com o emprego inovador de um arranjo de imãs permanentes como fonte do campo magnético, este último o agente da aceleração do plasma. Esta alteração foi motivada pelo objetivo de que o mesmo operasse com o mínimo de potência elétrica. A partir da formulação teórica do mecanismo de aceleração, tendo como base as equações da magnetohidrodinâmica, pode-se obter vínculos sob os quais o propulsor pudesse ser construído. O mais forte destes é o que dita a topologia do campo magnético. Sendo assim, foram realizadas simulações computacionais, que definiram a geometria do propulsor. Após construído, este foi diagnosticado usando-se sondas de Langmuir e analisadores de energia. Como resultados, obtivemos a distribuição espacial da temperatura, densidade e potencial do plasma, bem como a distribuição angular do feixe produzido pelo mesmo em vários regimes de operação. O espectro de energia do feixe de plasma também foi medido, indicando íons de até 560eV. Combinando estes resultados, calculou-se o empuxo do propulsor: 84mN; e o impulso específico: 1083s. Estes demonstram que o mesmo estará qualificado, num futuro próximo, para o emprego no controle de atitude de satélites científicos, ou até mesmo como parte do conjunto propulsor primário, responsáveis pela transferência de órbitas.

  11. Utility of behavioral versus cognitive measures in differentiating between subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Gottesman, Rebecca; Newhart, Melissa; Chang, Shannon; Ken, Lynda; Hillis, Argye E

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that a modified version of the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI-mod), along with a few cognitive tests, would be clinically useful in distinguishing between clinically defined Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD): frontotemporal dementia (dysexecutive type), progressive nonfluent aphasia, and semantic dementia. We studied 80 patients who were diagnosed with AD (n = 30) or FTLD (n = 50), on the basis of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, imaging, neurological examination, and history. We found significant between-group differences on the FBI-mod, two subtests of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (verbal learning and delayed recall), and the Trail Making Test Part B (one measure of 'executive functioning'). AD was characterized by relatively severe impairment in verbal learning, delayed recall, and executive functioning, with relatively normal scores on the FBI-mod. Frontotemporal dementia was characterized by relatively severe impairment on the FBI-mod and executive functioning in the absence of severe impairment in verbal learning and recall. Progressive nonfluent aphasia was characterized by severe impairment in executive functioning with relatively normal scores on verbal learning and recall and FBI-mod. Finally, semantic dementia was characterized by relatively severe deficits in delayed recall, but relatively normal performance on new learning, executive functioning, and on FBI-mod. Discriminant function analysis confirmed that the FBI-mod, in conjunction with the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Trail Making Test Part B categorized the majority of patients as subtypes of FTLD or AD in the same way as a full neuropsychological battery, neurological examination, complete history, and imaging. These tests may be useful for efficient clinical diagnosis, although progressive nonfluent aphasia and semantic dementia are likely to be best distinguished by language tests not included

  12. Distinct patterns of brain atrophy in Genetic Frontotemporal Dementia Initiative (GENFI) cohort revealed by visual rating scales.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Basilico, Paola; Arighi, Andrea; Bocchetta, Martina; Dick, Katrina M; Cash, David M; Harding, Sophie; Mercurio, Matteo; Fenoglio, Chiara; Pietroboni, Anna M; Ghezzi, Laura; van Swieten, John; Borroni, Barbara; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Masellis, Mario; Tartaglia, Maria C; Rowe, James B; Graff, Caroline; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Laforce, Robert; Finger, Elizabeth; Sorbi, Sandro; Scarpini, Elio; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Galimberti, Daniela

    2018-05-24

    In patients with frontotemporal dementia, it has been shown that brain atrophy occurs earliest in the anterior cingulate, insula and frontal lobes. We used visual rating scales to investigate whether identifying atrophy in these areas may be helpful in distinguishing symptomatic patients carrying different causal mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (GRN) and chromosome 9 open reading frame (C9ORF72) genes. We also analysed asymptomatic carriers to see whether it was possible to visually identify brain atrophy before the appearance of symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging of 343 subjects (63 symptomatic mutation carriers, 132 presymptomatic mutation carriers and 148 control subjects) from the Genetic Frontotemporal Dementia Initiative study were analysed by two trained raters using a protocol of six visual rating scales that identified atrophy in key regions of the brain (orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate, frontoinsula, anterior and medial temporal lobes and posterior cortical areas). Intra- and interrater agreement were greater than 0.73 for all the scales. Voxel-based morphometric analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between the visual rating scale scores and grey matter atrophy in the same region for each of the scales. Typical patterns of atrophy were identified: symmetric anterior and medial temporal lobe involvement for MAPT, asymmetric frontal and parietal loss for GRN, and a more widespread pattern for C9ORF72. Presymptomatic MAPT carriers showed greater atrophy in the medial temporal region than control subjects, but the visual rating scales could not identify presymptomatic atrophy in GRN or C9ORF72 carriers. These simple-to-use and reproducible scales may be useful tools in the clinical setting for the discrimination of different mutations of frontotemporal dementia, and they may even help to identify atrophy prior to onset in those with MAPT mutations.

  13. Amygdala TDP-43 Pathology in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Motor Neuron Disease.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Takahiro; Seilhean, Danielle; Le Ber, Isabelle; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Uchihara, Toshiki; Duyckaerts, Charles

    2017-09-01

    TDP-43-positive inclusions are present in the amygdala in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and motor neuron disease (MND) including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Behavioral abnormalities, one of the chief symptoms of FTLD, could be, at least partly, related to amygdala pathology. We examined TDP-43 inclusions in the amygdala of patients with sporadic FTLD/MND (sFTLD/MND), FTLD/MND with mutation of the C9ORF72 (FTLD/MND-C9) and FTLD with mutation of the progranulin (FTLD-GRN). TDP-43 inclusions were common in each one of these subtypes, which can otherwise be distinguished on topographical and genetic grounds. Conventional and immunological stainings were performed and we quantified the numerical density of inclusions on a regional basis. TDP-43 inclusions in amygdala could be seen in 10 out of 26 sFTLD/MND cases, 5 out of 9 FTLD/MND-C9 cases, and all 4 FTLD-GRN cases. Their numerical density was lower in FTLD/MND-C9 than in sFTLD/MND and FTLD-GRN. TDP-43 inclusions were more numerous in the ventral region of the basolateral nucleus group in all subtypes. This contrast was apparent in sporadic and C9-mutated FTLD/MND, while it was less evident in FTLD-GRN. Such differences in subregional involvement of amygdala may be related to the region-specific neuronal connections that are differentially affected in FTLD/MND and FTLD-GRN. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Affective mentalizing and brain activity at rest in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Silvia P; Canessa, Nicola; Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Crespi, Chiara; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Falini, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F

    2015-01-01

    bvFTD patients display an impairment in the attribution of cognitive and affective states to others, reflecting GM atrophy in brain regions associated with social cognition, such as amygdala, superior temporal cortex and posterior insula. Distinctive patterns of abnormal brain functioning at rest have been reported in bvFTD, but their relationship with defective attribution of affective states has not been investigated. To investigate the relationship among resting-state brain activity, gray matter (GM) atrophy and the attribution of mental states in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal degeneration (bvFTD). We compared 12 bvFTD patients with 30 age- and education-matched healthy controls on a) performance in a task requiring the attribution of affective vs. cognitive mental states; b) metrics of resting-state activity in known functional networks; and c) the relationship between task-performances and resting-state metrics. In addition, we assessed a connection between abnormal resting-state metrics and GM atrophy. Compared with controls, bvFTD patients showed a reduction of intra-network coherent activity in several components, as well as decreased strength of activation in networks related to attentional processing. Anomalous resting-state activity involved networks which also displayed a significant reduction of GM density. In patients, compared with controls, higher affective mentalizing performance correlated with stronger functional connectivity between medial prefrontal sectors of the default-mode and attentional/performance monitoring networks, as well as with increased coherent activity in components of the executive, sensorimotor and fronto-limbic networks. Some of the observed effects may reflect specific compensatory mechanisms for the atrophic changes involving regions in charge of affective mentalizing. The analysis of specific resting-state networks thus highlights an intermediate level of analysis between abnormal brain structure and impaired

  15. Affective mentalizing and brain activity at rest in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Caminiti, Silvia P.; Canessa, Nicola; Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Crespi, Chiara; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Falini, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F.

    2015-01-01

    Background bvFTD patients display an impairment in the attribution of cognitive and affective states to others, reflecting GM atrophy in brain regions associated with social cognition, such as amygdala, superior temporal cortex and posterior insula. Distinctive patterns of abnormal brain functioning at rest have been reported in bvFTD, but their relationship with defective attribution of affective states has not been investigated. Objective To investigate the relationship among resting-state brain activity, gray matter (GM) atrophy and the attribution of mental states in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal degeneration (bvFTD). Methods We compared 12 bvFTD patients with 30 age- and education-matched healthy controls on a) performance in a task requiring the attribution of affective vs. cognitive mental states; b) metrics of resting-state activity in known functional networks; and c) the relationship between task-performances and resting-state metrics. In addition, we assessed a connection between abnormal resting-state metrics and GM atrophy. Results Compared with controls, bvFTD patients showed a reduction of intra-network coherent activity in several components, as well as decreased strength of activation in networks related to attentional processing. Anomalous resting-state activity involved networks which also displayed a significant reduction of GM density. In patients, compared with controls, higher affective mentalizing performance correlated with stronger functional connectivity between medial prefrontal sectors of the default-mode and attentional/performance monitoring networks, as well as with increased coherent activity in components of the executive, sensorimotor and fronto-limbic networks. Conclusions Some of the observed effects may reflect specific compensatory mechanisms for the atrophic changes involving regions in charge of affective mentalizing. The analysis of specific resting-state networks thus highlights an intermediate level of

  16. A Longitudinal Study on Resting State Functional Connectivity in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hafkemeijer, Anne; Möller, Christiane; Dopper, Elise G P; Jiskoot, Lize C; van den Berg-Huysmans, Annette A; van Swieten, John C; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Vrenken, Hugo; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. We applied longitudinal resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to delineate functional brain connections relevant for disease progression and diagnostic accuracy. We used two-center resting state fMRI data of 20 AD patients (65.1±8.0 years), 12 bvFTD patients (64.7±5.4 years), and 22 control subjects (63.8±5.0 years) at baseline and 1.8-year follow-up. We used whole-network and voxel-based network-to-region analyses to study group differences in functional connectivity at baseline and follow-up, and longitudinal changes in connectivity within and between groups. At baseline, connectivity between paracingulate gyrus and executive control network, between cuneal cortex and medial visual network, and between paracingulate gyrus and salience network was higher in AD compared with controls. These differences were also present after 1.8 years. At follow-up, connectivity between angular gyrus and right frontoparietal network, and between paracingulate gyrus and default mode network was lower in bvFTD compared with controls, and lower compared with AD between anterior cingulate gyrus and executive control network, and between lateral occipital cortex and medial visual network. Over time, connectivity decreased in AD between precuneus and right frontoparietal network and in bvFTD between inferior frontal gyrus and left frontoparietal network. Longitudinal changes in connectivity between supramarginal gyrus and right frontoparietal network differ between both patient groups and controls. We found disease-specific brain regions with longitudinal connectivity changes. This suggests the potential of longitudinal resting state fMRI to delineate regions relevant for disease progression and for diagnostic accuracy, although no group differences in longitudinal changes in the direct comparison of AD and bvFTD were found.

  17. SOME IS NOT ENOUGH: QUANTIFIER COMPREHENSION IN CORTICOBASAL SYNDROME AND BEHAVIORAL VARIANT FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brianna; Gross, Rachel; Clark, Robin; Dreyfuss, Michael; Boller, Ashley; Camp, Emily; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Avants, Brian; McMillan, Corey; Grossman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Quantifiers are very common in everyday speech, but we know little about their cognitive basis or neural representation. The present study examined comprehension of three classes of quantifiers that depend on different cognitive components in patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases. Patients evaluated the truth-value of a sentence containing a quantifier relative to a picture illustrating a small number of familiar objects, and performance was related to MRI grey matter atrophy using voxel-based morphometry. We found that patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of Cardinal Quantifiers (e.g. “At least three birds are on the branch”), due in part to their deficit in quantity knowledge. MRI analyses related this deficit to temporal-parietal atrophy found in CBS/PCA. We also found that patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of Logical Quantifiers (e.g. “Some the birds are on the branch”), associated with a simple form of perceptual logic, and this correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This deficit was related to disease in rostral prefrontal cortex in bvFTD. These patients were also impaired in their comprehension of Majority Quantifiers (e.g. “At least half of the birds are on the branch”), and this too was correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This was related to disease in the basal ganglia interrupting a frontal-striatal loop critical for executive functioning. These findings suggest that a large-scale frontal-parietal neural network plays a crucial role in quantifier comprehension, and that comprehension of specific classes of quantifiers may be selectively impaired in patients with focal neurodegenerative conditions in these areas. PMID:21930136

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Progranulin, but Not Serum Progranulin, Is Reduced in GRN-Negative Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Carlo; Gillardon, Frank; Deuschle, Christian; Hobert, Markus A; Jansen, Iris E; Metzger, Florian G; Heutink, Peter; Gasser, Thomas; Maetzler, Walter; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Synofzik, Matthis

    2017-01-01

    Reduced progranulin levels are a hallmark of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN). However, alterations of central nervous progranulin expression also occur in neurodegenerative disorders unrelated to GRN mutations, such as Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesised that central nervous progranulin levels are also reduced in GRN-negative FTD. Progranulin levels were determined in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum in 75 subjects (37 FTD patients and 38 controls). All FTD patients were assessed by whole-exome sequencing for GRN mutations, yielding a target cohort of 34 patients without pathogenic mutations in GRN (GRN-negative cohort) and 3 GRN mutation carriers (2 LoF variants and 1 novel missense variant). Not only the GRN mutation carriers but also the GRN-negative patients showed decreased CSF levels of progranulin (serum levels in GRN-negative patients were normal). The decreased CSF progranulin levels were unrelated to patients' increased CSF levels of total tau, possibly indicating different destructive neuronal processes within FTD neurodegeneration. The patient with the novel GRN missense variant (c.1117C>T, p.P373S) showed substantially decreased CSF levels of progranulin, comparable to the 2 patients with GRN LoF mutations, suggesting a pathogenic effect of this missense variant. Our results indicate that central nervous progranulin reduction is not restricted to the relatively rare cases of FTD caused by GRN LoF mutations, but also contributes to the more common GRN-negative forms of FTD. Central nervous progranulin reduction might reflect a partially distinct pathogenic mechanism underlying FTD neurodegeneration and is not directly linked to tau alterations. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Diagnostic value of cerebrospinal fluid tau, neurofilament, and progranulin in definite frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Joery; Bjerke, Maria; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Goeman, Johan; De Vil, Bart; Sieben, Anne; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2018-03-20

    We explored the diagnostic performance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in allowing differentiation between frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as between FTLD pathological subtypes. CSF levels of routine AD biomarkers (phosphorylated tau (p-tau 181 ), total tau (t-tau), and amyloid-beta (Aβ) 1-42 ) and neurofilament proteins, as well as progranulin levels in both CSF and serum were quantified in definite FTLD (n = 46), clinical AD (n = 45), and cognitively healthy controls (n = 20). FTLD subgroups were defined by genetic carrier status and/or postmortem neuropathological confirmation (FTLD-TDP: n = 34, including FTLD-C9orf72: n = 19 and FTLD-GRN: n = 9; FTLD-tau: n = 10). GRN mutation carriers had significantly lower progranulin levels compared to other FTLD patients, AD, and controls. Both t-tau and p-tau 181 were normal in FTLD patients, even in FTLD-tau. Aβ 1-42 levels were very variable in FTLD. Neurofilament light chain (Nf-L) was significantly higher in FTLD compared with AD and controls. The reference logistic regression model based on the established AD biomarkers could be improved by the inclusion of CSF Nf-L, which was also important for the differentiation between FTLD and controls. Within the FTLD cohort, no significant differences were found between FTLD-TDP and FTLD-tau, but GRN mutation carriers had higher t-tau and Nf-L levels than C9orf72 mutation carriers and FTLD-tau patients. There is an added value for Nf-L in the differential diagnosis of FTLD. Progranulin levels in CSF depend on mutation status, and GRN mutation carriers seem to be affected by more severe neurodegeneration.

  20. Functional connectivity and microstructural white matter changes in phenocopy frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Meijboom, R; Steketee, R M E; de Koning, I; Osse, R J; Jiskoot, L C; de Jong, F J; van der Lugt, A; van Swieten, J C; Smits, M

    2017-04-01

    Phenocopy frontotemporal dementia (phFTD) is a rare and poorly understood clinical syndrome. PhFTD shows core behavioural variant FTD (bvFTD) symptoms without associated cognitive deficits and brain abnormalities on conventional MRI and without progression. In contrast to phFTD, functional connectivity and white matter (WM) microstructural abnormalities have been observed in bvFTD. We hypothesise that phFTD belongs to the same disease spectrum as bvFTD and investigated whether functional connectivity and microstructural WM changes similar to bvFTD are present in phFTD. Seven phFTD patients without progression or alternative psychiatric diagnosis, 12 bvFTD patients and 17 controls underwent resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Default mode network (DMN) connectivity and WM measures were compared between groups. PhFTD showed subtly increased DMN connectivity and subtle microstructural changes in frontal WM tracts. BvFTD showed abnormalities in similar regions as phFTD, but had lower increased DMN connectivity and more extensive microstructural WM changes. Our findings can be interpreted as neuropathological changes in phFTD and are in support of the hypothesis that phFTD and bvFTD may belong to the same disease spectrum. Advanced MRI techniques, objectively identifying brain abnormalities, would therefore be potentially suited to improve the diagnosis of phFTD. • PhFTD shows brain abnormalities that are similar to bvFTD. • PhFTD shows increased functional connectivity in the parietal default mode network. • PhFTD shows microstructural white matter abnormalities in the frontal lobe. • We hypothesise phFTD and bvFTD may belong to the same disease spectrum.

  1. Association of GSK3B With Alzheimer Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Barbara A. J.; Bertram, Lars; Miller, Bruce L.; Mullin, Kristina; Weintraub, Sandra; Johnson, Nancy; Bigio, Eileen H.; Mesulam, Marsel; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Jackson, George R.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Levey, Allan I.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Deposits of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau are a hallmark of several dementias, including Alzheimer disease (AD), and about 10% of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) cases are caused by mutations in the tau gene. As a known tau kinase, GSK3B is a promising candidate gene in the remaining cases of FTD and in AD, for which tau mutations have not been found. Objective To examine the promoter of GSK3B and all 12 exons, including the surrounding intronic sequence, in patients with FTD, patients with AD, and aged healthy subjects to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with disease. Design, Setting, and Participants Single-nucleotide polymorphism frequency was examined in a case-control cohort of 48 patients with probable AD, 102 patients with FTD, 38 patients with primary progressive aphasia, and 85 aged healthy subjects. Results were followed up in 2 independent AD family samples consisting of 437 multiplex families with AD (National Institute of Mental Health Genetics Initiative AD Study) or 150 sibships discordant for AD (Consortium on Alzheimer’s Genetics Study). Results Several rare sequence variants in GSK3B were identified in the case-control study. An intronic polymorphism (IVS2−68G>A) occurred at more than twice the frequency among patients with FTD (10.8%) and patients with AD (14.6%) than in aged healthy subjects (4.1%). The polymorphism showed association with disease in both follow-up samples independently, although only the Consortium on Alzheimer’s Genetics sample showed the same direction of association as the case-control sample. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that a gene known to be involved in tau phosphorylation, GSK3B, is associated with risk for primary neurodegenerative dementias. This supports previous work in animal models suggesting that such genes are therapeutic targets. PMID:18852354

  2. Bidirectional nucleolar dysfunction in C9orf72 frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mizielinska, Sarah; Ridler, Charlotte E; Balendra, Rubika; Thoeng, Annora; Woodling, Nathan S; Grässer, Friedrich A; Plagnol, Vincent; Lashley, Tammaryn; Partridge, Linda; Isaacs, Adrian M

    2017-04-18

    An intronic GGGGCC expansion in C9orf72 is the most common known cause of both frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat expansion leads to the generation of sense and antisense repeat RNA aggregates and dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, generated by repeat-associated non-ATG translation. The arginine-rich DPR proteins poly(glycine-arginine or GR) and poly(proline-arginine or PR) are potently neurotoxic and can localise to the nucleolus when expressed in cells, resulting in enlarged nucleoli with disrupted functionality. Furthermore, GGGGCC repeat RNA can bind nucleolar proteins in vitro. However, the relevance of nucleolar stress is unclear, as the arginine-rich DPR proteins do not localise to the nucleolus in C9orf72-associated FTLD/ALS (C9FTLD/ALS) patient brain. We measured nucleolar size in C9FTLD frontal cortex neurons using a three-dimensional, volumetric approach. Intriguingly, we found that C9FTLD brain exhibited bidirectional nucleolar stress. C9FTLD neuronal nucleoli were significantly smaller than control neuronal nucleoli. However, within C9FTLD brains, neurons containing poly(GR) inclusions had significantly larger nucleolar volumes than neurons without poly(GR) inclusions. In addition, expression of poly(GR) in adult Drosophila neurons led to significantly enlarged nucleoli. A small but significant increase in nucleolar volume was also observed in C9FTLD frontal cortex neurons containing GGGGCC repeat-containing RNA foci. These data show that nucleolar abnormalities are a consistent feature of C9FTLD brain, but that diverse pathomechanisms are at play, involving both DPR protein and repeat RNA toxicity.

  3. Emotion recognition in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A new film-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Goodkind, Madeleine S; Sturm, Virginia E; Ascher, Elizabeth A; Shdo, Suzanne M; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P; Levenson, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Deficits in recognizing others' emotions are reported in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most previous emotion recognition studies have required participants to identify emotional expressions in photographs. This type of assessment differs from real-world emotion recognition in important ways: Images are static rather than dynamic, include only 1 modality of emotional information (i.e., visual information), and are presented absent a social context. Additionally, existing emotion recognition batteries typically include multiple negative emotions, but only 1 positive emotion (i.e., happiness) and no self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment). We present initial results using a new task for assessing emotion recognition that was developed to address these limitations. In this task, respondents view a series of short film clips and are asked to identify the main characters' emotions. The task assesses multiple negative, positive, and self-conscious emotions based on information that is multimodal, dynamic, and socially embedded. We evaluate this approach in a sample of patients with bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. Results indicate that patients with bvFTD have emotion recognition deficits in all 3 categories of emotion compared to the other groups. These deficits were especially pronounced for negative and self-conscious emotions. Emotion recognition in this sample of patients with AD was indistinguishable from controls. These findings underscore the utility of this approach to assessing emotion recognition and suggest that previous findings that recognition of positive emotion was preserved in dementia patients may have resulted from the limited sampling of positive emotion in traditional tests. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Strategic value-directed learning and memory in Alzheimer's disease and behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephanie; Irish, Muireann; Savage, Greg; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael

    2018-02-12

    In healthy adults, the ability to prioritize learning of highly valued information is supported by executive functions and enhances subsequent memory retrieval for this information. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), marked deficits are evident in learning and memory, presenting in the context of executive dysfunction. It is unclear whether these patients show a typical memory bias for higher valued stimuli. We administered a value-directed word-list learning task to AD (n = 10) and bvFTD (n = 21) patients and age-matched healthy controls (n = 22). Each word was assigned a low, medium or high point value, and participants were instructed to maximize the number of points earned across three learning trials. Participants' memory for the words was assessed on a delayed recall trial, followed by a recognition test for the words and corresponding point values. Relative to controls, both patient groups showed poorer overall learning, delayed recall and recognition. Despite these impairments, patients with AD preferentially recalled high-value words on learning trials and showed significant value-directed enhancement of recognition memory for the words and points. Conversely, bvFTD patients did not prioritize recall of high-value words during learning trials, and this reduced selectivity was related to inhibitory dysfunction. Nonetheless, bvFTD patients showed value-directed enhancement of recognition memory for the point values, suggesting a mismatch between memory of high-value information and the ability to apply this in a motivationally salient context. Our findings demonstrate that value-directed enhancement of memory may persist to some degree in patients with dementia, despite pronounced deficits in learning and memory. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Comparing the driving behaviours of individuals with frontotemporal lobar degeneration and those with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fujito, Ryoko; Kamimura, Naoto; Ikeda, Manabu; Koyama, Asuka; Shimodera, Shinji; Morinobu, Shigeru; Inoue, Shimpei

    2016-01-01

    Assessing driving aptitude in dementia patients is critically important for both patient and public safety. However, there have been only a few reports on the driving behaviours and accident risk of patients with dementia, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Therefore, we compared the characteristics of driving behaviours in patients with FTLD and those with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The subjects were 28 FTLD and 67 AD patients who visited the Department of Psychiatry, Kochi Medical School Hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews with their families and caregivers about traffic accident history and changes in patient driving behaviours after dementia onset and then compared the findings between the two groups. Overall changes in driving behaviours were reported in 89% (25/28) and 76% (51/67) of the FTLD and AD patients, respectively (P = 0.17). In the FTLD group, difficulty in judging inter-vehicle distances, ignoring road signs and traffic signals, and distraction were reported in 50% (14/28), 61% (17/28), and 50% (14/28) of patients, respectively, and 75% (21/28) patients had caused a traffic accident after dementia onset. The risk of causing an accident was higher in the FTLD group than in the AD group (odds ratio = 10.4, 95% confidence interval = 3.7-29.1). In addition, the mean duration between dementia onset and a traffic accident was 1.35 years in the FTLD group compared with 3.0 years in the AD group (P < 0.01). Patients with FTLD were more likely to show dangerous driving behaviours than those with AD, and the risk of causing a traffic accident may be higher in patients with FTLD from an early disease stage. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  6. Psychiatric symptoms in preclinical behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cheran, Gayathri; Silverman, Hannah; Manoochehri, Masood; Goldman, Jill; Lee, Seonjoo; Wu, Liwen; Cines, Sarah; Fallon, Emer; Kelly, Brendan Desmond; Olszewska, Diana Angelika; Heidebrink, Judith; Shair, Sarah; Campbell, Stephen; Paulson, Henry; Lynch, Timothy; Cosentino, Stephanie; Huey, Edward D

    2018-05-01

    To characterise psychiatric symptoms in preclinical and early behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a neurodegenerative disorder whose symptoms overlap with and are often mistaken for psychiatric illness. The present study reports findings from a systematic, global, prospective evaluation of psychiatric symptoms in 12 preclinical carriers of pathogenic MAPT mutations, not yet meeting bvFTD diagnostic criteria, and 46 familial non-carrier controls. Current psychiatric symptoms, informant-reported symptoms and lifetime prevalence of psychiatric disorders were assessed with The Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. Fisher exact test was used to compare carriers and non-carriers' lifetime prevalence of six DSM-IV disorders: major depressive disorder, panic attacks, alcohol abuse, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and depressive disorder not otherwise specified. Other DSM-IV disorders had insufficient prevalence across our sample for between-group comparisons, but are reported. Non-carriers had greater prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders than has been reported for a general reference population. Preclinical carriers had lower lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders than non-carriers, except for depressive disorder not otherwise specified, an atypical syndrome comprising clinically significant depressive symptoms which fail to meet criteria for major depressive disorder. Findings suggest that early psychiatric symptoms of emergent bvFTD may manifest as emotional blunting or mood changes not cleanly conforming to criteria for a DSM-defined mood disorder. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Disrupted rich club network in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Daianu, Madelaine; Mezher, Adam; Mendez, Mario F.; Jahanshad, Neda; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    In network analysis, the so-called ‘rich club’ describes the core areas of the brain that are more densely interconnected among themselves than expected by chance, and has been identified as a fundamental aspect of the human brain connectome. This is the first in-depth diffusion imaging study to investigate the rich club along with other organizational changes in the brain's anatomical network in behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and a matched cohort with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). Our study sheds light on how bvFTD and EOAD affect connectivity of white matter fiber pathways in the brain, revealing differences and commonalities in the connectome among the dementias. To analyze the breakdown in connectivity, we studied 3 groups: 20 bvFTD, 23 EOAD and 37 healthy elderly controls. All participants were scanned with diffusion-weighted MRI, and based on whole-brain probabilistic tractography and cortical parcellations, we analyzed the rich club of the brain's connectivity network. This revealed distinct patterns of disruption in both forms of dementia. In the connectome, we detected less disruption overall in EOAD than in bvFTD (False Discovery Rate (FDR) critical Pperm=5.7×10−3, 10,000 permutations), with more involvement of richly interconnected areas of the brain (chi-squared PΧ2=1.4×10−4) – predominantly posterior cognitive alterations. In bvFTD, we found a greater spread of disruption including the rich club (FDR critical Pperm=6×10−4), but especially more peripheral alterations (PΧ2=6.5×10−3), particularly in medial frontal areas of the brain, in line with the known behavioral socioemotional deficits seen in these patients. PMID:26678225

  8. Damage to Left Frontal Regulatory Circuits Produces Greater Positive Emotional Reactivity in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Virginia E.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Eckart, Janet A.; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Positive emotions foster social relationships and motivate thought and action. Dysregulation of positive emotion may give rise to debilitating clinical symptomatology such as mania, risk-taking, and disinhibition. Neuroanatomically, there is extensive evidence that the left hemisphere of the brain, and the left frontal lobe in particular, plays an important role in positive emotion generation. Although prior studies have found that left frontal injury decreases positive emotion, it is not clear whether selective damage to left frontal emotion regulatory systems can actually increase positive emotion. We measured happiness reactivity in 96 patients with frontotemporal dementia, a neurodegenerative disease that targets emotion-relevant neural systems and causes alterations in positive emotion (i.e., euphoria and jocularity), and in 34 healthy controls. Participants watched a film clip designed to elicit happiness and a comparison film clip designed to elicit sadness while their facial behavior, physiological reactivity, and self-reported emotional experience were monitored. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that atrophy in predominantly left hemisphere fronto-striatal emotion regulation systems including left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior insula, and striatum (pFWE < .05) was associated with greater happiness facial behavior during the film. Atrophy in left anterior insula and bilateral frontopolar cortex was also associated with higher cardiovascular reactivity (i.e., heart rate and blood pressure) but not self-reported positive emotional experience during the happy film (p< .005, uncorrected). No regions emerged as being associated with greater sadness reactivity, which suggests that left-lateralized fronto-striatal atrophy is selectively associated with happiness dysregulation. Whereas previous models have proposed that left frontal injury decreases positive emotional responding, we argue that selective

  9. Fronto-temporal interactions are functionally relevant for semantic control in language processing.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Max; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Klingbeil, Julian; Stockert, Anika; Wrede, Katrin; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Eickhoff, Simon B; Classen, Joseph; Saur, Dorothee

    2017-01-01

    Semantic cognition, i.e. processing of meaning is based on semantic representations and their controlled retrieval. Semantic control has been shown to be implemented in a network that consists of left inferior frontal (IFG), and anterior and posterior middle temporal gyri (a/pMTG). We aimed to disrupt semantic control processes with continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) over left IFG and pMTG and to study whether behavioral effects are moderated by induced alterations in resting-state functional connectivity. To this end, we applied real cTBS over left IFG and left pMTG as well as sham stimulation on 20 healthy participants in a within-subject design. Stimulation was followed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and a semantic priming paradigm. Resting-state functional connectivity of regions of interest in left IFG, pMTG and aMTG revealed highly interconnected left-lateralized fronto-temporal networks representing the semantic system. We did not find any significant direct modulation of either task performance or resting-state functional connectivity by effective cTBS. However, after sham cTBS, functional connectivity between IFG and pMTG correlated with task performance under high semantic control demands in the semantic priming paradigm. These findings provide evidence for the functional relevance of interactions between IFG and pMTG for semantic control processes. This interaction was functionally less relevant after cTBS over aIFG which might be interpretable in terms of an indirect disruptive effect of cTBS.

  10. Korsakoff Syndrome in Non-alcoholic Psychiatric Patients. Variable Cognitive Presentation and Impaired Frontotemporal Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Kurki, Timo; Paju, Janina; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vataja, Risto; Ilonen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are greatly underdiagnosed. There are very few reported cases of neuropsychologically documented non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data are scarce. Methods: We report clinical characteristics and neuropsychological as well as radiological findings from three psychiatric patients (one woman and two men) with a history of probable undiagnosed non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent chronic memory problems. Results: All patients had abnormal neuropsychological test results, predominantly in memory. Thus, the neuropsychological findings were compatible with Korsakoff syndrome. However, the neuropsychological findings were not uniform. The impairment of delayed verbal memory of the first patient was evident only when the results of the memory tests were compared to her general cognitive level. In addition, the logical memory test and the verbal working memory test were abnormal, but the word list memory test was normal. The second patient had impaired attention and psychomotor speed in addition to impaired memory. In the third patient, the word list memory test was abnormal, but the logical memory test was normal. All patients had intrusions in the neuropsychological examination. Executive functions were preserved, except for planning and foresight, which were impaired in two patients. Conventional MRI examination was normal. DTI showed reduced fractional anisotropy values in the uncinate fasciculus in two patients, and in the corpus callosum and in the subgenual cingulum in one patient. Conclusions: Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome can have diverse neuropsychological findings. This may partly explain its marked underdiagnosis. Therefore, a strong index of suspicion is needed. The presence of intrusions in the neuropsychological examination supports the diagnosis. Damage in frontotemporal white matter tracts, particularly in the uncinate

  11. The attribution of animacy and agency in frontotemporal dementia versus Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sylvia S; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Daianu, Madelaine; Deutsch, Mariel B; Riedel, Brandalyn C; Carr, Andrew R; Jimenez, Elvira E; Mather, Michelle M; Thompson, Paul M; Mendez, Mario F

    2017-07-01

    Impaired attribution of animacy (state of living or being sentient) and of agency (capability of intrinsically-driven action) may underlie social behavior disturbances in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). We presented the Heider and Simmel film of moving geometric shapes to 11 bvFTD patients, 11 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and 12 healthy controls (HCs) and rated their recorded verbal responses for animacy attribution and agency attribution. All participants had skin conductance (SC) continuously recorded while viewing the film, and all dementia participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for regions of interest. The bvFTD patients, but not the AD patients, were impaired in animacy attribution, compared to the HCs. In contrast, both bvFTD and AD groups were impaired in agency attribution, compared to the HCs, and only the HCs had increasing SC responsiveness during viewing of the film. On MRI analysis of cortical thicknesses, animacy scores significantly correlated across groups with the right pars orbitalis and opercularis; agency scores with the left inferior and superior parietal cortices and the supramarginal gyrus; and both scores with the left cingulate isthmus involved in visuospatial context. These findings suggest that bvFTD is specifically associated with impaired animacy attribution from right inferior frontal atrophy. In contrast, both dementias may have impaired agency attribution from left parietal cortical atrophy and absent SC increases during the film, a sympathetic indicator of attribution of a social "story" to the moving shapes. These findings clarify disease-related changes in social attribution and corroborate the neuroanatomical origins of animacy and agency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of TDP-43 Oligomers in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration–TDP

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Patricia F.; Chen, Yun-Ru; Liu, Xiao-Bo; DeCarli, Charles; Seeley, William W.; Jin, Lee-Way

    2016-01-01

    Objective The proteinaceous inclusions in TDP-43 proteinopathies such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-TDP are made of high–molecular-weight aggregates of TDP-43. These aggregates have not been classified as amyloids, as prior amyloid staining results were not conclusive. Here we used a specific TDP-43 amyloid oligomer antibody called TDP-O to determine the presence and abundance of TDP-43 oligomers among different subtypes of FTLD-TDP as well as in hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which represents a non-FTLD pathology with TDP-43 inclusions. Methods Postmortem tissue from the hippocampus and anterior orbital gyrus from 54 prospectively assessed and diagnosed subjects was used for immunostaining with TDP-O. Electron microscopy was used to assess the subcellular locations of TDP-O–decorated structures. Results TDP-43 inclusions staining with TDP-O were present in FTLD-TDP and were most conspicuous for FTLD-TDP type C, the subtype seen in most patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia. TDP-O immunoreactivity was absent in the hippocampus of HS patients despite abundant TDP-43 inclusions. Ultrastructurally, TDP-43 oligomers resided in granular or tubular structures, frequently in close proximity to, but not within, neuronal lysosomes. Interpretation TDP-43 forms amyloid oligomers in the human brain, which may cause neurotoxicity in a manner similar to other amyloid oligomers. Oligomer formation may contribute to the conformational heterogeneity of TDP-43 aggregates and mark the different properties of TDP-43 inclusions between FTLD-TDP and HS. PMID:25921485

  13. Shared genetic risk between corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Karch, Celeste M.; Fan, Chun C.; Bonham, Luke W.; Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa; Kim, Jungsu; Wang, Yunpeng; Höglinger, Günter U.; Muller, Ulrich; Ferrari, Raffaele; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo; Sugrue, Leo P.; Hess, Christopher P.; Barkovich, A. James; Boxer, Adam L.; Seeley, William W.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Schmansky, Nicholas J.; Fischl, Bruce; Hyman, Bradley T.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.; Desikan, Rahul S.

    2017-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by tau inclusions in neurons and glia (tauopathies). Although clinical, pathological and genetic evidence suggests overlapping pathobiology between CBD, PSP, and FTD, the relationship between these disorders is still not well understood. Using summary statistics (odds ratios and p-values) from large genome-wide association studies (total n = 14,286 cases and controls) and recently established genetic methods, we investigated the genetic overlap between CBD and PSP and CBD and FTD. We found up to 800-fold enrichment of genetic risk in CBD across different levels of significance for PSP or FTD. In addition to NSF (tagging the MAPT H1 haplotype), we observed that SNPs in or near MOBP, CXCR4, EGFR, and GLDC showed significant genetic overlap between CBD and PSP, whereas only SNPs tagging the MAPT haplotype overlapped between CBD and FTD. The risk alleles of the shared SNPs were associated with expression changes in cis-genes. Evaluating transcriptome levels across adult human brains, we found a unique neuroanatomic gene expression signature for each of the five overlapping gene loci (omnibus ANOVA p < 2.0 × 10−16). Functionally, we found that these shared risk genes were associated with protein interaction and gene co-expression networks and showed enrichment for several neurodevelopmental pathways. Our findings suggest: i) novel genetic overlap between CBD and PSP beyond the MAPT locus; ii) strong ties between CBD and FTD through the MAPT clade, and; iii) unique combinations of overlapping genes that may, in part, influence selective regional or neuronal vulnerability observed in specific tauopathies. PMID:28271184

  14. Structural Anatomical Investigation of Long-Term Memory Deficit in Behavioral Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Bertoux, Maxime; Flanagan, Emma C; Hobbs, Matthew; Ruiz-Tagle, Amparo; Delgado, Carolina; Miranda, Marcelo; Ibáñez, Agustín; Slachevsky, Andrea; Hornberger, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Although a growing body of work has shown that behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) could present with severe amnesia in approximately half of cases, memory assessment is currently the clinical standard to distinguish bvFTD from Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, the concept of "relatively preserved episodic memory" in bvFTD remains the basis of its clinical distinction from AD and a criterion for bvFTD's diagnosis. This view is supported by the idea that bvFTD is not characterized by genuine amnesia and hippocampal degeneration, by contrast to AD. In this multicenter study, we aimed to investigate the neural correlates of memory performance in bvFTD as assessed by the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT). Imaging explorations followed a two-step procedure, first relying on a visual rating of atrophy of 35 bvFTD and 34 AD patients' MRI, contrasted with 29 controls; and then using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in a subset of bvFTD patients. Results showed that 43% of bvFTD patients presented with a genuine amnesia. Data-driven analysis on visual rating data showed that, in bvFTD, memory recall & storage performances were significantly predicted by atrophy in rostral prefrontal and hippocampal/perihippocampal regions, similar to mild AD. VBM results in bvFTD (pFWE<0.05) showed similar prefrontal and hippocampal regions in addition to striatal and lateral temporal involvement. Our findings showed the involvement of prefrontal as well as medial/lateral temporal atrophy in memory deficits of bvFTD patients. This contradicts the common view that only frontal deficits explain memory impairment in this disease and plead for an updated view on memory dysfunctions in bvFTD.

  15. Orbitofrontal and limbic signatures of empathic concern and intentional harm in the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Morales, Juan P; Slachevsky, Andrea; Torralva, Teresa; Matus, Cristian; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Perceiving and evaluating intentional harms in an interpersonal context engages both cognitive and emotional domains. This process involves inference of intentions, moral judgment, and, crucially, empathy towards others' suffering. This latter skill is notably impaired in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). However, the relationship between regional brain atrophy in bvFTD and deficits in the above-mentioned abilities is not well understood. The present study investigated how gray matter (GM) atrophy in bvFTD patients correlates with the perception and evaluation of harmful actions (attribution of intentionality, evaluation of harmful behavior, empathic concern, and moral judgment). First, we compared the behavioral performance of 26 bvFTD patients and 23 healthy controls on an experimental task (ET) indexing intentionality, empathy, and moral cognition during evaluation of harmful actions. Second, we compared GM volume in patients and controls using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Third, we examined brain regions where atrophy might be associated with specific impairments in the patient group. Finally, we explored whether the patients' deficits in intentionality comprehension and empathic concern could be partially explained by regional GM atrophy or impairments in other relevant factors, such as executive functions (EFs). In bvFTD patients, atrophy of limbic structures (amygdala and anterior paracingulate cortex--APC) was related to impairments in intentionality comprehension, while atrophy of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) was associated with empathic concern deficits. Intentionality comprehension impairments were predicted by EFs and orbitofrontal atrophy predicted deficits in empathic concern. Thus, although the perception and evaluation of harmful actions are variously compromised in bvFTD, deficits in empathic concern may be central to this syndrome as they are associated with one of the earliest atrophied region. More generally, our results

  16. Profiling Speech and Pausing in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)

    PubMed Central

    Yunusova, Yana; Graham, Naida L.; Shellikeri, Sanjana; Phuong, Kent; Kulkarni, Madhura; Rochon, Elizabeth; Tang-Wai, David F.; Chow, Tiffany W.; Black, Sandra E.; Zinman, Lorne H.; Green, Jordan R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examines reading aloud in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and those with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in order to determine whether differences in patterns of speaking and pausing exist between patients with primary motor vs. primary cognitive-linguistic deficits, and in contrast to healthy controls. Design 136 participants were included in the study: 33 controls, 85 patients with ALS, and 18 patients with either the behavioural variant of FTD (FTD-BV) or progressive nonfluent aphasia (FTD-PNFA). Participants with ALS were further divided into 4 non-overlapping subgroups—mild, respiratory, bulbar (with oral-motor deficit) and bulbar-respiratory—based on the presence and severity of motor bulbar or respiratory signs. All participants read a passage aloud. Custom-made software was used to perform speech and pause analyses, and this provided measures of speaking and articulatory rates, duration of speech, and number and duration of pauses. These measures were statistically compared in different subgroups of patients. Results The results revealed clear differences between patient groups and healthy controls on the passage reading task. A speech-based motor function measure (i.e., articulatory rate) was able to distinguish patients with bulbar ALS or FTD-PNFA from those with respiratory ALS or FTD-BV. Distinguishing the disordered groups proved challenging based on the pausing measures. Conclusions and Relevance This study demonstrated the use of speech measures in the identification of those with an oral-motor deficit, and showed the usefulness of performing a relatively simple reading test to assess speech versus pause behaviors across the ALS—FTD disease continuum. The findings also suggest that motor speech assessment should be performed as part of the diagnostic workup for patients with FTD. PMID:26789001

  17. Memantine in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A multicenter, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.; Knopman, David S.; Kaufer, Daniel I.; Grossman, Murray; Onyike, Chiadi; Graf-Radford, Neill; Mendez, Mario; Kerwin, Diana; Lerner, Alan; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Koestler, Mary; Shapira, Jill; Sullivan, Kathryn; Klepac, Kristen; Lipowski, Kristine; Ullah, Jerin; Fields, Scott; Kramer, Joel H.; Merrilees, Jennifer; Neuhaus, John; Mesulam, M. Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Memantine has been used off-label to treat frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD). A previous 26 week open label study suggested a transient, modest benefit on neuropsychiatric symptoms as measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Methods We performed a randomized, parallel group, double blind, placebo controlled trial of 20 mg memantine taken orally daily for 26 weeks in FTD. Participants met Neary criteria for behavioral variant (bvFTD) or semantic dementia (SD) and had characteristic brain atrophy. Use of cholinesterase inhibitors was prohibited. The objective of the study was to determine whether memantine is an effective treatment for FTD. Individuals were randomized to memantine or matched placebo tablets in blocks of two and four. Primary endpoints were the change in total NPI score and Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) scores after 26 weeks. Secondary outcomes included a neuropsychological battery, and other cognitive, global and activity of daily living measures. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00545974 Findings 100 subjects were screened, 81 were randomized, 5 (6%) discontinued and 76 completed all visits. Enrollment numbers were lower than planned due to many subjects’ preference to take memantine or cholinesterase inhibitors off-label rather than participate in a clinical trial. 39 memantine and 42 placebo subjects entered the primary intent to treat analysis. There was no effect of memantine treatment on either the NPI (mean difference [MD] 2.2, 95%CI: −3.9, 8.3, p = 0.47) or CGIC (MD 0, 95%CI: −0.4, 0.4, p = 0.90) after 26 weeks of treatment. Memantine was generally well tolerated, however there were more frequent cognitive adverse events in the memantine group. Interpretation There was no benefit of memantine treatment in bvFTD or SD. These data do not support memantine use in FTD. Funding Forest Research Institute PMID:23290598

  18. Parsing cognitive and emotional empathy deficits for negative and positive stimuli in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lindsay D; Mitchell, Derek G V; Dziobek, Isabel; MacKinley, Julia; Coleman, Kristy; Rankin, Katherine P; Finger, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy primarily affecting social cognition and emotion, including loss of empathy. Many consider empathy to be a multidimensional construct, including cognitive empathy (the ability to adopt and understand another's perspective) and emotional empathy (the capacity to share another's emotional experience). Cognitive and emotional empathy deficits have been associated with bvFTD; however, little is known regarding the performance of patients with bvFTD on behavioural measures of emotional empathy, and whether empathic responses differ for negative versus positive stimuli. 24 patients with bvFTD and 24 healthy controls completed the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET; Dziobek et al., 2008), a performance-based task that taps both cognitive and emotional facets of empathy, and allows for the discrimination of responses to negative versus positive realistic images. MET scores were also compared with caregiver ratings of patient behaviour on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, which assesses patients' everyday demonstrations of perspective taking and empathic concern. Patients with bvFTD were less accurate than controls at inferring mental states for negative and positive stimuli. They also demonstrated lower levels of shared emotional experience, more positive emotional reactions, and diminished arousal to negative social stimuli relative to controls. Patients showed reduced emotional reactions to negative non-social stimuli as well. Lastly, the MET and IRI measures of emotional empathy were found to be significantly correlated within the bvFTD group. The results suggest that patients with bvFTD show a global deficit in cognitive empathy, and deficient emotional empathy for negative, but not positive, experiences. Further, a generalized emotional processing impairment for negative stimuli was observed, which could contribute to the

  19. Dissociation in Rating Negative Facial Emotions between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isabelle; Piguet, Olivier; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Riedl, Lina; Beck, Johannes; Leyhe, Thomas; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Berres, Manfred; Monsch, Andreas U; Sollberger, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) such as executive dysfunction, apathy, and impaired empathic abilities are also observed in major depressive disorder (MDD). This may contribute to the reason why early stage bvFTD is often misdiagnosed as MDD. New assessment tools are thus needed to improve early diagnosis of bvFTD. Although emotion processing is affected in bvFTD and MDD, growing evidence indicates that the pattern of emotion processing deficits varies between the two disorders. As such, emotion processing paradigms have substantial potentials to distinguish bvFTD from MDD. The current study compared 25 patients with bvFTD, 21 patients with MDD, 21 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, and 31 healthy participants on a novel facial emotion intensity rating task. Stimuli comprised morphed faces from the Ekman and Friesen stimulus set containing faces of each sex with two different degrees of emotion intensity for each of the six basic emotions. Analyses of covariance uncovered a significant dissociation between bvFTD and MDD patients in rating the intensity of negative emotions overall (i.e., bvFTD patients underrated negative emotions overall, whereas MDD patients overrated negative emotions overall compared with healthy participants). In contrast, AD dementia patients rated negative emotions similarly to healthy participants, suggesting no impact of cognitive deficits on rating facial emotions. By strongly differentiating bvFTD and MDDpatients through negative facial emotions, this sensitive and short rating task might help improve the early diagnosis of bvFTD. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  20. Facial Emotion Recognition Performance Differentiates Between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isabelle; Piguet, Olivier; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Riedl, Lina; Beck, Johannes; Leyhe, Thomas; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Kressig, Reto W; Berres, Manfred; Monsch, Andreas U; Sollberger, Marc

    Misdiagnosis of early behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) with major depressive disorder (MDD) is not uncommon due to overlapping symptoms. The aim of this study was to improve the discrimination between these disorders using a novel facial emotion perception task. In this prospective cohort study (July 2013-March 2016), we compared 25 patients meeting Rascovsky diagnostic criteria for bvFTD, 20 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD, 21 patients meeting McKhann diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease dementia, and 31 healthy participants on a novel emotion intensity rating task comprising morphed low-intensity facial stimuli. Participants were asked to rate the intensity of morphed faces on the congruent basic emotion (eg, rating on sadness when sad face is shown) and on the 5 incongruent basic emotions (eg, rating on each of the other basic emotions when sad face is shown). While bvFTD patients underrated congruent emotions (P < .01), they also overrated incongruent emotions (P < .001), resulting in confusion of facial emotions. In contrast, MDD patients overrated congruent negative facial emotions (P < .001), but not incongruent facial emotions. Accordingly, ratings of congruent and incongruent emotions highly discriminated between bvFTD and MDD patients, ranging from area under the curve (AUC) = 93% to AUC = 98%. Further, an almost complete discrimination (AUC = 99%) was achieved by contrasting the 2 rating types. In contrast, Alzheimer's disease dementia patients perceived emotions similarly to healthy participants, indicating no impact of cognitive impairment on rating scores. Our congruent and incongruent facial emotion intensity rating task allows a detailed assessment of facial emotion perception in patient populations. By using this simple task, we achieved an almost complete discrimination between bvFTD and MDD, potentially helping improve the diagnostic certainty in early bvFTD. © Copyright 2018 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. False Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease-Disinhibition or Amnesia?

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Emma C; Wong, Stephanie; Dutt, Aparna; Tu, Sicong; Bertoux, Maxime; Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Rao, Sulakshana; Hodges, John R; Ghosh, Amitabha; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory recall processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) can be similarly impaired, whereas recognition performance is more variable. A potential reason for this variability could be false-positive errors made on recognition trials and whether these errors are due to amnesia per se or a general over-endorsement of recognition items regardless of memory. The current study addressed this issue by analysing recognition performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 39 bvFTD, 77 AD and 61 control participants from two centers (India, Australia), as well as disinhibition assessed using the Hayling test. Whereas both AD and bvFTD patients were comparably impaired on delayed recall, bvFTD patients showed intact recognition performance in terms of the number of correct hits. However, both patient groups endorsed significantly more false-positives than controls, and bvFTD and AD patients scored equally poorly on a sensitivity index (correct hits-false-positives). Furthermore, measures of disinhibition were significantly associated with false positives in both groups, with a stronger relationship with false-positives in bvFTD. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed similar neural correlates of false positive endorsement across bvFTD and AD, with both patient groups showing involvement of prefrontal and Papez circuitry regions, such as medial temporal and thalamic regions, and a DTI analysis detected an emerging but non-significant trend between false positives and decreased fornix integrity in bvFTD only. These findings suggest that false-positive errors on recognition tests relate to similar mechanisms in bvFTD and AD, reflecting deficits in episodic memory processes and disinhibition. These findings highlight that current memory tests are not sufficient to accurately distinguish between bvFTD and AD patients.

  2. Lost and forgotten? Orientation versus memory in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Yew, Belinda; Alladi, Suvarna; Shailaja, Mekala; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that significant memory problems are not specific to Alzheimer's disease (AD) but can be also observed in other neurodegenerative conditions, such as behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). We investigated whether orientation (spatial & temporal) information is a better diagnostic marker for AD compared to memory and whether their atrophy correlates of orientation and memory differ. A large sample (n = 190) of AD patients (n = 73), bvFTD patients (n = 54), and healthy controls (n = 63) underwent testing. A subset of the patients (n = 72) underwent structural imaging using voxel-based morphometry analysis of magnetic resonance brain imaging. Orientation and memory scores from the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination showed that AD patients had impaired orientation and memory, while bvFTD patients performing at control level for orientation but had impaired memory. A logistic regression showed that 78% of patients could be classified on the basis of orientation and memory scores alone at clinic presentation. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was conducted using orientation and memory scores as covariates, which showed that the neural correlates for orientation and memory also dissociated with posterior hippocampus cortex being related to orientation in AD, while the anterior hippocampus was associated with memory performance in the AD and bvFTD patients. Orientation and memory measures discriminate AD and bvFTD to a high degree and tap into different hippocampal regions. Disorientation and posterior hippocampus appears therefore specific to AD and will allow clinicians to discriminate AD patients from other neurodegenerative conditions with similar memory deficits at clinic presentation.

  3. Atypical, slowly progressive behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Baber K.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Takada, Leonel T.; Sha, Sharon J.; Rutherford, Nicola. J.; Fong, Jamie C.; Karydas, Anna; Wu, Teresa; Ketelle, Robin; Baker, Matt C.; Hernandez, Mariely-Dejesus; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Rademakers, Rosa; Lee, Suzee E.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Seeley, William; Rankin, Katherine P.; Boxer, Adam L.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some patients meeting behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) diagnostic criteria progress slowly and plateau at mild symptom severity. Such patients have mild neuropsychological and functional impairments, lack characteristic bvFTD brain atrophy, and have thus been referred to as bvFTD “phenocopies” or slowly progressive (bvFTD-SP). The few patients with bvFTD-SP that have been studied at autopsy have found no evidence of FTD pathology, suggesting that bvFTD-SP is neuropathologically distinct from other forms of FTD. Here, we describe two patients with bvFTD-SP with chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) hexanucleotide expansions. Methods Three hundred and eighty-four patients with FTD clinical spectrum and Alzheimer’s disease diagnoses were screened for C9ORF72 expansion. Two bvFTD-SP mutation carriers were identified. Neuropsychological and functional data, as well as brain atrophy patterns assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), were compared with 44 patients with sporadic bvFTD and 85 healthy controls. Results Both patients were age 48 at baseline and met possible bvFTD criteria. In the first patient, VBM revealed thalamic and posterior insula atrophy. Over seven years, his neuropsychological performance and brain atrophy remained stable. In the second patient, VBM revealed cortical atrophy with subtle frontal and insular volume loss. Over two years, her neuropsychological and functional scores as well as brain atrophy remained stable. Conclusions C9ORF72 mutations can present with a bvFTD-SP phenotype. Some bvFTD-SP patients may have neurodegenerative pathology, and C9ORF72 mutations should be considered in patients with bvFTD-SP and a family history of dementia or motor neuron disease. PMID:22399793

  4. Poor creativity in frontotemporal dementia: a window into the neural bases of the creative mind.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Volle, Emmanuelle; Bertoux, Maxime; Czernecki, Virginie; Funkiewiez, Aurélie; Allali, Gilles; Leroy, Baptiste; Sarazin, Marie; Habert, Marie-Odile; Dubois, Bruno; Kas, Aurélie; Levy, Richard

    2010-11-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) supports functions critical for creative thinking. Damage to the PFC is expected to impair creativity. Yet, previous works suggested the emergence of artistic talent in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which was interpreted as increased creativity. We designed a study in patients with frontal variant (fv) of FTLD in order to verify whether: (1) creativity is impaired after frontal degeneration, (2) poor creativity is associated with frontal dysfunctions, and (3) poor creativity is related to hypoperfusion in specific PFC regions. Three groups of subjects were enrolled in the study: fvFTLD patients (n=17), non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (n=12) and healthy controls (n=17). Participants performed a standardized test of creativity, the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) and tests assessing frontal functions. Brain perfusion was correlated to fvFTLD patients' performance in the TTCT. Patients with fvFTLD were strongly impaired in all dimensions of the TTCT, compared to PD patients and controls. Disinhibited and perseverative responses were observed only in fvFTLD patients, leading to "pseudo-creative" responses. Poor creativity was positively correlated with several frontal tests. Poor creativity was also correlated with prefrontal hypoperfusion, particularly in the frontal pole. Poor creativity is associated with fvFTLD. The results also suggest that the integrity of the PFC (in particular frontopolar) is strongly associated with creative thinking. The emergence of artistic talent in patients with fvFTLD is explained by the release of involuntary behaviors, rather than by the development of creative thinking. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Emotion Recognition in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: A New Film-Based Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Goodkind, Madeleine S.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Ascher, Elizabeth A.; Shdo, Suzanne M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in recognizing others' emotions are reported in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most previous emotion recognition studies have required participants to identify emotional expressions in photographs. This type of assessment differs from real-world emotion recognition in important ways: Images are static rather than dynamic, include only 1 modality of emotional information (i.e., visual information), and are presented absent a social context. Additionally, existing emotion recognition batteries typically include multiple negative emotions, but only 1 positive emotion (i.e., happiness) and no self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment). We present initial results using a new task for assessing emotion recognition that was developed to address these limitations. In this task, respondents view a series of short film clips and are asked to identify the main characters' emotions. The task assesses multiple negative, positive, and self-conscious emotions based on information that is multimodal, dynamic, and socially embedded. We evaluate this approach in a sample of patients with bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. Results indicate that patients with bvFTD have emotion recognition deficits in all 3 categories of emotion compared to the other groups. These deficits were especially pronounced for negative and self-conscious emotions. Emotion recognition in this sample of patients with AD was indistinguishable from controls. These findings underscore the utility of this approach to assessing emotion recognition and suggest that previous findings that recognition of positive emotion was preserved in dementia patients may have resulted from the limited sampling of positive emotion in traditional tests. PMID:26010574

  6. Motor speech signature of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia: Refining the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Adam P; Poole, Matthew L; Pemberton, Hugh; Caverlé, Marja W J; Boonstra, Frederique M C; Low, Essie; Darby, David; Brodtmann, Amy

    2017-08-22

    To provide a comprehensive description of motor speech function in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Forty-eight individuals (24 bvFTD and 24 age- and sex-matched healthy controls) provided speech samples. These varied in complexity and thus cognitive demand. Their language was assessed using the Progressive Aphasia Language Scale and verbal fluency tasks. Speech was analyzed perceptually to describe the nature of deficits and acoustically to quantify differences between patients with bvFTD and healthy controls. Cortical thickness and subcortical volume derived from MRI scans were correlated with speech outcomes in patients with bvFTD. Speech of affected individuals was significantly different from that of healthy controls. The speech signature of patients with bvFTD is characterized by a reduced rate (75%) and accuracy (65%) on alternating syllable production tasks, and prosodic deficits including reduced speech rate (45%), prolonged intervals (54%), and use of short phrases (41%). Groups differed on acoustic measures derived from the reading, unprepared monologue, and diadochokinetic tasks but not the days of the week or sustained vowel tasks. Variability of silence length was associated with cortical thickness of the inferior frontal gyrus and insula and speech rate with the precentral gyrus. One in 8 patients presented with moderate speech timing deficits with a further two-thirds rated as mild or subclinical. Subtle but measurable deficits in prosody are common in bvFTD and should be considered during disease management. Language function correlated with speech timing measures derived from the unprepared monologue only. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Meta-analytic Review of Memory Impairment in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Poos, Jackie M; Jiskoot, Lize C; Papma, Janne M; van Swieten, John C; van den Berg, Esther

    2018-03-19

    A meta-analysis of the extent, nature and pattern of memory performance in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Multiple observational studies have challenged the relative sparing of memory in bvFTD as stated in the current diagnostic criteria. We performed a meta-analytic review covering the period 1967 to February 2017 of case-control studies on episodic memory in bvFTD versus control participants (16 studies, 383 patients, 603 control participants), and patients with bvFTD versus those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (20 studies, 452 bvFTD, 874 AD). Differences between both verbal and non-verbal working memory, episodic memory learning and recall, and recognition memory were examined. Data were extracted from the papers and combined into a common metric measure of effect, Hedges' d. Patients with bvFTD show large deficits in memory performance compared to controls (Hedges' d -1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] [-1.23, -0.95]), but perform significantly better than patients with AD (Hedges' d 0.85; 95% CI [0.69, 1.03]). Learning and recall tests differentiate best between patients with bvFTD and AD (p<.01). There is 37-62% overlap in test scores between the two groups. This study points to memory disorders in patients with bvFTD, with performance at an intermediate level between controls and patients with AD. This indicates that, instead of being an exclusion criterion for bvFTD diagnosis, memory deficits should be regarded as a potential integral part of the clinical spectrum. (JINS, 2018, 24, 1-13).

  8. Korsakoff Syndrome in Non-alcoholic Psychiatric Patients. Variable Cognitive Presentation and Impaired Frontotemporal Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Kurki, Timo; Paju, Janina; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G.; Vataja, Risto; Ilonen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are greatly underdiagnosed. There are very few reported cases of neuropsychologically documented non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data are scarce. Methods: We report clinical characteristics and neuropsychological as well as radiological findings from three psychiatric patients (one woman and two men) with a history of probable undiagnosed non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent chronic memory problems. Results: All patients had abnormal neuropsychological test results, predominantly in memory. Thus, the neuropsychological findings were compatible with Korsakoff syndrome. However, the neuropsychological findings were not uniform. The impairment of delayed verbal memory of the first patient was evident only when the results of the memory tests were compared to her general cognitive level. In addition, the logical memory test and the verbal working memory test were abnormal, but the word list memory test was normal. The second patient had impaired attention and psychomotor speed in addition to impaired memory. In the third patient, the word list memory test was abnormal, but the logical memory test was normal. All patients had intrusions in the neuropsychological examination. Executive functions were preserved, except for planning and foresight, which were impaired in two patients. Conventional MRI examination was normal. DTI showed reduced fractional anisotropy values in the uncinate fasciculus in two patients, and in the corpus callosum and in the subgenual cingulum in one patient. Conclusions: Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome can have diverse neuropsychological findings. This may partly explain its marked underdiagnosis. Therefore, a strong index of suspicion is needed. The presence of intrusions in the neuropsychological examination supports the diagnosis. Damage in frontotemporal white matter tracts, particularly in the uncinate

  9. Sigma nonopioid intracellular receptor 1 mutations cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration-motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Luty, Agnes A; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Loy, Clement T; Coupland, Kirsten G; Karlström, Helena; Sobow, Tomasz; Tchorzewska, Joanna; Maruszak, Aleksandra; Barcikowska, Maria; Panegyres, Peter K; Zekanowski, Cezary; Brooks, William S; Williams, Kelly L; Blair, Ian P; Mather, Karen A; Sachdev, Perminder S; Halliday, Glenda M; Schofield, Peter R

    2010-11-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the most common cause of early-onset dementia. Pathological ubiquitinated inclusion bodies observed in FTLD and motor neuron disease (MND) comprise trans-activating response element (TAR) DNA binding protein (TDP-43) and/or fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein. Our objective was to identify the causative gene in an FTLD-MND pedigree with no mutations in known dementia genes. A mutation screen of candidate genes, luciferase assays, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to identify the biological role of the putative mutation. Neuropathological characterization of affected individuals and western blot studies of cell lines were performed to identify the pathological mechanism of the mutation. We identified a nonpolymorphic mutation (c.672*51G>T) in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the Sigma nonopioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) gene in affected individuals from the FTLD-MND pedigree. The c.672*51G>T mutation increased gene expression by 1.4-fold, corresponding with a significant 1.5-fold to 2-fold change in the SIGMAR1 transcript or Sigma-1 protein in lymphocyte or brain tissue. Brains of SIGMAR1 mutation carriers displayed a unique pathology with cytoplasmic inclusions immunopositive for either TDP-43 or FUS but not Sigma-1. Overexpression of SIGMAR1 shunted TDP-43 and FUS from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by 2.3-fold and 5.2-fold, respectively. Treatment of cells with Sigma-1 ligands significantly altered translocation of TDP-43 by up to 2-fold. SIGMAR1 is a causative gene for familial FTLD-MND with a unique neuropathology that differs from other FTLD and MND cases. Our findings also suggest Sigma-1 drugs as potential treatments for the TDP-43/FUS proteinopathies.

  10. Combined fulminant frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with an I113T SOD1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan S; Katzberg, Hans D; Woolley, Susan C; Marklund, Stefan L; Andersen, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    Mutations in the gene for superoxide dismutase type 1 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but are not thought to be associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). A lack of detailed case reports is one reason, among others, for this skepticism. This case report comments on a patient with familial ALS caused by I113T mutation in the SOD1 gene presenting with progressive cognitive and behavioral decline two years before developing progressive motor degeneration. In conclusion, this case provides evidence that SOD1 mutations can be associated with FTD.

  11. Cognitive reserve and TMEM106B genotype modulate brain damage in presymptomatic frontotemporal dementia: a GENFI study

    PubMed Central

    Premi, Enrico; Grassi, Mario; van Swieten, John; Galimberti, Daniela; Graff, Caroline; Masellis, Mario; Tartaglia, Carmela; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Rowe, James B.; Laforce Jr, Robert; Finger, Elizabeth; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Sorbi, Sandro; Gazzina, Stefano; Cosseddu, Maura; Archetti, Silvana; Gasparotti, Roberto; Manes, Marta; Alberici, Antonella; Cardoso, Manuel J.; Bocchetta, Martina; Cash, David M.; Ourselin, Sebastian; Padovani, Alessandro; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Frontotemporal dementia is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with around a third of cases having autosomal dominant inheritance. There is wide variability in phenotype even within affected families, raising questions about the determinants of the progression of disease and age at onset. It has been recently demonstrated that cognitive reserve, as measured by years of formal schooling, can counteract the ongoing pathological process. The TMEM106B genotype has also been found to be a modifier of the age at disease onset in frontotemporal dementia patients with TDP-43 pathology. This study therefore aimed to elucidate the modulating effect of environment (i.e. cognitive reserve as measured by educational attainment) and genetic background (i.e. TMEM106B polymorphism, rs1990622 T/C) on grey matter volume in a large cohort of presymptomatic subjects bearing frontotemporal dementia-related pathogenic mutations. Two hundred and thirty-one participants from the GENFI study were included: 108 presymptomatic MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72 mutation carriers and 123 non-carriers. For each subject, cortical and subcortical grey matter volumes were generated using a parcellation of the volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. TMEM106B genotyping was carried out, and years of education recorded. First, we obtained a composite measure of grey matter volume by graph-Laplacian principal component analysis, and then fitted a linear mixed-effect interaction model, considering the role of (i) genetic status; (ii) educational attainment; and (iii) TMEM106B genotype on grey matter volume. The presence of a mutation was associated with a lower grey matter volume (P = 0.002), even in presymptomatic subjects. Education directly affected grey matter volume in all the samples (P = 0.02) with lower education attainment being associated with lower volumes. TMEM106B genotype did not influence grey matter volume directly on its own but in mutation carriers it

  12. An Italian family with inclusion-body myopathy and frontotemporal dementia due to mutation in the VCP gene.

    PubMed

    Gidaro, Teresa; Modoni, Anna; Sabatelli, Mario; Tasca, Giorgio; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2008-01-01

    Mutations of the valosin-containing protein gene (VCP) are responsible for autosomal-dominant hereditary inclusion-body myopathy associated with frontotemporal dementia and Paget's disease of bone. We identified the p.R155C missense mutation in the VCP gene segregating in an Italian family with three affected siblings, two of whom had a progressive myopathy associated with dementia, whereas one exhibited a progressive myopathy and preclinical signs of Paget's disease of bone. Our study demonstrates that VCP mutations are found in patients of Italian background and may lead to a variable clinical phenotype even within the same kinship.

  13. Frontotemporal dementia: evidence for impairment of ascending serotoninergic but not noradrenergic innervation. Immunocytochemical and quantitative study using a graph method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Schmitt, H P

    2001-03-01

    A graph method was employed to analyze the spatial neuronal patterns of nuclear grays of the pontine tegmentum with ascending aminergic projections to the forebrain in 12 cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The nuclear grays examined were the nucleus centralis superior (NCS), a part of the nucleus raphae dorsalis (NRD), and the locus coeruleus (LC). The results were compared with 30 cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 35 non-demented controls. In addition to the graph evaluations, neuronal cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were stained by silver impregnation and ubiquitin (Ub) and tau immunohistochemistry. The FTD cases showed a significant, 40%, decline in number of neurons in the NCS and NRD, while the LC was spared. The magnitude of neuronal loss matched that of AD where, by contrast, the LC was also severely changed. Amyloid deposition and Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles occurred in the aminergic nuclei almost exclusively in AD and, to a minor extent, in some aged controls. No cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were found in the aminergic nuclei of the FTD cases. However, 6 cases had Ub-positive but tau-negative neuronal inclusions in the hippocampal dentate fascia and in layer 2 of the prefrontal isocortex, and 3 showed clinical and histological signs of motor neuron disease. Our results suggest that the serotoninergic raphe nuclei with ascending projections to the forebrain, but not the LC, become directly or indirectly involved in frontotemporal dementia both with and without motor neuron disease.

  14. Behavioral and activities of daily living inventories in the diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahia, Valéria Santoro; da Silva, Mari-Nilva Maia; Viana, Rene; Smid, Jerusa; Damin, Antonio Eduardo; Radanovic, Márcia; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is often challenging. Objectives To verify the usefulness of behavioral and activities of daily living inventories in the differential diagnosis between FTLD and AD. Methods Caregivers of 12 patients with FTLD (nine with frontotemporal dementia, two with semantic dementia and one with progressive non-fluent aphasia) and of 12 patients with probable AD were interviewed. The Brazilian version of the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI) and Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD ) were used. Results The mean of the MMSE score was 12.4±10.7for patients with FTLD and 11.9±6.2for patients with AD (p=0.93). Mean scores on the DAD were 33.7±27.7in patients with FTLD and 55.6±29.7in patients with AD (p=0.06), while for the FBI they were 42.6±10.0for FTLD and 16.7±11.7for AD (p<0.01). Conclusions In this study, FBI was found to be a helpful tool for the differential diagnosis between FTLD and AD. Although the DAD was not useful in differential diagnosis in our sample we believe it to be important for measuring the severity of the disease through quantitative and qualitative assessment of functional deficits of the patients. PMID:29213552

  15. Role of Frontotemporal Fiber Tract Integrity in Task-Switching Performance of Healthy Controls and Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kucukboyaci, N. Erkut; Girard, H.M.; Hagler, D.J.; Kuperman, J.; Tecoma, E.S.; Iragui, V.J.; Halgren, E.; McDonald, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationships among frontotemporal fiber tract compromise and task-switching performance in healthy controls and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on 30 controls and 32 patients with TLE (15 left TLE). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated for four fiber tracts [uncinate fasciculus (UncF), arcuate fasciculus (ArcF), dorsal cingulum (CING), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF)]. Participants completed the Trail Making Test-B (TMT-B) and Verbal Fluency Category Switching (VFCS) test. Multivariate analyses of variances (MANOVAs) were performed to investigate group differences in fiber FA and set-shifting performances. Canonical correlations were used to examine the overall patterns of structural-cognitive relationships and were followed by within-group bivariate correlations. We found a significant canonical correlation between fiber FA and task-switching performance. In controls, TMT-B correlated with left IFOF, whereas VFCS correlated with FA of left ArcF and left UncF. These correlations were not significant in patients with TLE. We report significant correlations between frontotemporal fiber tract integrity and set-shifting performance in healthy controls that appear to be absent or attenuated in patients with TLE. These findings suggest a breakdown of typical structure-function relationships in TLE that may reflect aberrant developmental or degenerative processes. PMID:22014246

  16. A Brazilian family with hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Fanganiello, R D; Kimonis, V E; Côrte, C C; Nitrini, R; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2011-04-01

    Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is a progressive and usually misdiagnosed autosomal dominant disorder. It is clinically characterized by a triad of features: proximal and distal myopathy, early onset Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It is caused by missense mutations in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene. We describe here the clinical and molecular findings of the first Brazilian family identified with IBMPFD. Progressive myopathy affecting the limb girdles was detected by clinical examination followed by muscle biopsy and creatine kinase measurement. PDB was suggested after anatomopathological bone examination and FTD was diagnosed by clinical, neuropsychological and language evaluations. Brain magnetic resonance revealed severe atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes, including the hippocampi. A R93C mutation in VCP was detected by direct sequencing screening in subject W (age 62) and in his mother. Four more individuals diagnosed with "dementia" were reported in this family. We also present a comprehensive genotype-phenotype correlation analysis of mutations in VCP in 182 patients from 29 families described in the literature and show that while IBM is a conspicuously penetrant symptom, PDB has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the AAAD1 domain and FTD has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the Junction (L1-D1) domain. Furthermore, the R93C mutation is likely to be associated with the penetrance of all the clinical symptoms of the triad.

  17. Telephone-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Screening for Frontotemporal Changes in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Georgia; Gennings, Chris; Hupf, Jonathan; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Murphy, Jennifer; Goetz, Raymond R.; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To establish a valid and reliable battery of measures to evaluate frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in patients with ALS over the phone. Methods Thirty-one subjects were administered either in-person or telephone-based screening followed by the opposite mode of testing two weeks later, using a modified version of the UCSF Cognitive Screening Battery. Results Equivalence testing was performed for in-person and telephone-based tests. The standard ALS Cognitive Behavioral Screen (ALS-CBS) showed statistical equivalence at the 5% significance level when compared to a revised phone-version of the ALS-CBS. In addition, the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) and Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS) were also found to be equivalent at the 5% and 10% significance level respectively. Similarly, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the well-established Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) were also statistically equivalent. Equivalence could not be claimed for the ALS-Frontal Behavioral Inventory (ALS-FBI) caregiver interview and the Written Verbal Fluency Index (WVFI). Conclusions Our study suggests that telephone-based versions of the ALS-CBS, COWAT, and CNS-LS may offer clinicians valid tools to detect frontotemporal changes in the ALS population. Development of telephone-based cognitive testing for ALS could become an integral resource for population-based research in the future. PMID:27121545

  18. An investigation of care-based vs. rule-based morality in frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Carr, Andrew R; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Daianu, Madelaine; Fong, Sylvia S; Mather, Michelle; Jimenez, Elvira E; Thompson, Paul; Mendez, Mario F

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral changes in dementia, especially behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), may result in alterations in moral reasoning. Investigators have not clarified whether these alterations reflect differential impairment of care-based vs. rule-based moral behavior. This study investigated 18 bvFTD patients, 22 early onset Alzheimer's disease (eAD) patients, and 20 healthy age-matched controls on care-based and rule-based items from the Moral Behavioral Inventory and the Social Norms Questionnaire, neuropsychological measures, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) regions of interest. There were significant group differences with the bvFTD patients rating care-based morality transgressions less severely than the eAD group and rule-based moral behavioral transgressions more severely than controls. Across groups, higher care-based morality ratings correlated with phonemic fluency on neuropsychological tests, whereas higher rule-based morality ratings correlated with increased difficulty set-shifting and learning new rules to tasks. On neuroimaging, severe care-based reasoning correlated with cortical volume in right anterior temporal lobe, and rule-based reasoning correlated with decreased cortical volume in the right orbitofrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that frontotemporal disease decreases care-based morality and facilitates rule-based morality possibly from disturbed contextual abstraction and set-shifting. Future research can examine whether frontal lobe disorders and bvFTD result in a shift from empathic morality to the strong adherence to conventional rules. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A Single-Centre, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil Topical Foam in Frontotemporal and Vertex Androgenetic Alopecia in Men.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Kathrin; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kottner, Jan; Stroux, Andrea; Canfield, Douglas; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    5% minoxidil formulations twice daily are effective in treating vertex male androgenetic alopecia (AGA); however, efficacy and safety data in frontotemporal regions are lacking. To assess the efficacy of 5% minoxidil topical foam (5% MTF) in the frontotemporal region of male AGA patients after 24 weeks of treatment compared to placebo treatment and to the vertex region. Seventy males with moderate AGA applied 5% MTF or placebo foam (plaTF) twice daily for 24 weeks in frontotemporal and vertex regions. Target area non-vellus hair count (TAHC) was the primary end point. Frontotemporal and vertex TAHC and target area cumulative non-vellus hair width (TAHW) showed similar responses to 5% MTF with significant increases up to week 16 compared to baseline (p < 0.001). After 24 weeks of treatment, frontotemporal TAHW increased significantly in the 5% MTF group compared to the plaTF group (p = 0.017), while TAHC showed a similar non-significant increase from baseline in both regions. At 24 weeks, 5% MTF users rated a significant improvement in scalp coverage for the frontotemporal (p = 0.016) and vertex areas (p = 0.027). 5% MTF twice a day promotes hair density and width in both frontotemporal and vertex regions in men with moderate stages of AGA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [False recognition of faces associated with fronto-temporal dementia with prosopagnosia].

    PubMed

    Verstichel, P

    2005-09-01

    The association of prosopagnosia and false recognition of faces is unusual and contributes to our understanding of the generation of facial familiarity. A 67-year-old man with a left prefrontal traumatic lesion, developed a temporal variety of fronto-temporal dementia (semantic dementia) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cerebral imagery demonstrated a bilateral, temporal anterior atrophy predominating in the right hemisphere. The main cognitive signs consisted in severe difficulties to recognize faces of familiar people (prosopagnosia), associated with systematic false recognition of unfamiliar people. Neuropsychological testing indicated that the prosopagnosia probably resulted from the association of an associative/mnemonic mechanism (inability to activate the Face Recognition Units (FRU) from the visual input) and a semantic mechanism (degradation of semantic/biographical information or deconnexion between FRU and this information). At the early stage of the disease, the patient could activate residual semantic information about individuals from their names, but after a 4-year course, he failed to do so. This worsening could be attributed to the extension of the degenerative lesions to the left temporal lobe. Familiar and unfamiliar faces triggered a marked feeling of knowing. False recognition concerned all the unfamiliar faces, and the patient claimed spontaneously that they corresponded to actors, but he could not provide any additional information about their specific identities. The coexistence of prosopagnosia and false recognition suggests the existence of different interconnected systems processing face recognition, one intended to identification of individuals, and the other producing the sense of familiarity. Dysfunctions at different stages of one or the other of these two processes could result in distortions in the feeling of knowing. From this case and others reported in literature, we propose to complete the classical model of face processing

  1. Enhanced Positive Emotional Reactivity Undermines Empathy in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Alice Y; Sible, Isabel J; Perry, David C; Rankin, Katherine P; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J; Sturm, Virginia E

    2018-01-01

    Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by profound changes in emotions and empathy. Although most patients with bvFTD become less sensitive to negative emotional cues, some patients become more sensitive to positive emotional stimuli. We investigated whether dysregulated positive emotions in bvFTD undermine empathy by making it difficult for patients to share (emotional empathy), recognize (cognitive empathy), and respond (real-world empathy) to emotions in others. Fifty-one participants (26 patients with bvFTD and 25 healthy controls) viewed photographs of neutral, positive, negative, and self-conscious emotional faces and then identified the emotions displayed in the photographs. We used facial electromyography to measure automatic, sub-visible activity in two facial muscles during the task: Zygomaticus major ( ZM ), which is active during positive emotional reactions (i.e., smiling), and Corrugator supercilii ( CS ), which is active during negative emotional reactions (i.e., frowning). Participants rated their baseline positive and negative emotional experience before the task, and informants rated participants' real-world empathic behavior on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. The majority of participants also underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. A mixed effects model found a significant diagnosis X trial interaction: patients with bvFTD showed greater ZM reactivity to neutral, negative (disgust and surprise), self-conscious (proud), and positive (happy) faces than healthy controls. There was no main effect of diagnosis or diagnosis X trial interaction on CS reactivity. Compared to healthy controls, patients with bvFTD had impaired emotion recognition. Multiple regression analyses revealed that greater ZM reactivity predicted worse negative emotion recognition and worse real-world empathy. At baseline, positive emotional experience was higher in bvFTD than healthy controls and also predicted

  2. Frontotemporal dysregulation of the SNARE protein interactome is associated with faster cognitive decline in old age.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Miguel, Alfredo; Jones, Andrea A; Sawada, Ken; Barr, Alasdair M; Bayer, Thomas A; Falkai, Peter; Leurgans, Sue E; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Honer, William G

    2018-06-01

    variables were associated with different cognitive domains. In addition, linear mixed effect models of global cognitive decline estimated that both 150-kDa SNARE levels and CPLX1/CPLX2 ratio were associated with better cognition and less decline over time. The results are consistent with previous studies reporting that synapse dysfunction (i.e. dysplasticity) may be initiated early, and relatively independent of neuropathology-driven synapse loss. Frontotemporal dysregulation of the GABAergic/glutamatergic stimuli might be a target for future drug development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Data-driven regions of interest for longitudinal change in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pankov, Aleksandr; Binney, Richard J; Staffaroni, Adam M; Kornak, John; Attygalle, Suneth; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W; Kramer, Joel H; Dickerson, Bradford C; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    Current research is investigating the potential utility of longitudinal measurement of brain structure as a marker of drug effect in clinical trials for neurodegenerative disease. Recent studies in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have shown that measurement of change in empirically derived regions of interest (ROIs) allows more reliable measurement of change over time compared with regions chosen a-priori based on known effects of AD on brain anatomy. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder for which there are no approved treatments. The goal of this study was to identify an empirical ROI that maximizes the effect size for the annual rate of brain atrophy in FTLD compared with healthy age matched controls, and to estimate the effect size and associated power estimates for a theoretical study that would use change within this ROI as an outcome measure. Eighty six patients with FTLD were studied, including 43 who were imaged twice at 1.5 T and 43 at 3 T, along with 105 controls (37 imaged at 1.5 T and 67 at 3 T). Empirically-derived maps of change were generated separately for each field strength and included the bilateral insula, dorsolateral, medial and orbital frontal, basal ganglia and lateral and inferior temporal regions. The extent of regions included in the 3 T map was larger than that in the 1.5 T map. At both field strengths, the effect sizes for imaging were larger than for any clinical measures. At 3 T, the effect size for longitudinal change measured within the empirically derived ROI was larger than the effect sizes derived from frontal lobe, temporal lobe or whole brain ROIs. The effect size derived from the data-driven 1.5 T map was smaller than at 3 T, and was not larger than the effect size derived from a-priori ROIs. It was estimated that measurement of longitudinal change using 1.5 T MR systems requires approximately a 3-fold increase in sample size to obtain effect sizes equivalent to those seen at

  4. Frontotemporal dementia: insights into the biological underpinnings of disease through gene co-expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Forabosco, Paola; Vandrovcova, Jana; Botía, Juan A; Guelfi, Sebastian; Warren, Jason D; Momeni, Parastoo; Weale, Michael E; Ryten, Mina; Hardy, John

    2016-02-24

    In frontotemporal dementia (FTD) there is a critical lack in the understanding of biological and molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis. The heterogeneous genetic features associated with FTD suggest that multiple disease-mechanisms are likely to contribute to the development of this neurodegenerative condition. We here present a systems biology approach with the scope of i) shedding light on the biological processes potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of FTD and ii) identifying novel potential risk factors for FTD. We performed a gene co-expression network analysis of microarray expression data from 101 individuals without neurodegenerative diseases to explore regional-specific co-expression patterns in the frontal and temporal cortices for 12 genes (MAPT, GRN, CHMP2B, CTSC, HLA-DRA, TMEM106B, C9orf72, VCP, UBQLN2, OPTN, TARDBP and FUS) associated with FTD and we then carried out gene set enrichment and pathway analyses, and investigated known protein-protein interactors (PPIs) of FTD-genes products. Gene co-expression networks revealed that several FTD-genes (such as MAPT and GRN, CTSC and HLA-DRA, TMEM106B, and C9orf72, VCP, UBQLN2 and OPTN) were clustering in modules of relevance in the frontal and temporal cortices. Functional annotation and pathway analyses of such modules indicated enrichment for: i) DNA metabolism, i.e. transcription regulation, DNA protection and chromatin remodelling (MAPT and GRN modules); ii) immune and lysosomal processes (CTSC and HLA-DRA modules), and; iii) protein meta/catabolism (C9orf72, VCP, UBQLN2 and OPTN, and TMEM106B modules). PPI analysis supported the results of the functional annotation and pathway analyses. This work further characterizes known FTD-genes and elaborates on their biological relevance to disease: not only do we indicate likely impacted regional-specific biological processes driven by FTD-genes containing modules, but also do we suggest novel potential risk factors among the FTD

  5. Perception of emotion on faces in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lavenu, I; Pasquier, F

    2005-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by behavioural disorders that suggest abnormalities of emotional processing. In a previous study, we showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and with FTD were equally able to distinguish a face displaying affect from one not displaying affect. However, recognition of emotion was worse in patients with FTD than in patients with AD who did not differ significantly from controls. The aim of this study was to follow up the perception of emotions on faces in these patients. The poor perception of emotion could worsen differently in AD and in FTD, with the progression of atrophy of the amygdala, the anterior temporal cortex and the orbital frontal cortex, structures that are components of the brain's emotional processing systems. Patients with AD or with FTD had to recognise and point out the name of one of seven basic emotions (anger, disgust, happiness, fear, sadness, surprise and contempt) on a set of 28 faces presented on slides at the first visit and 3 years later. Thirty-seven patients (AD = 19, FTD = 18) performed the tests initially. The two patient groups did not differ for age, sex and duration of the disease. During the follow-up, 12 patients died, 4 patients refused to perform the tests and 8 could not be tested because of the severity of the disease. Finally, 7 patients with AD and 6 patients with FTD performed the two tests at a mean delay of 40 months. All patients with AD had worse results at follow-up on the perception of emotion despite the prescription of inhibitors of cholinesterase in all patients and of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in 4 patients. As a whole, patients with FTD had better results in the second than in the first assessment (however, 3 of them had worse results) independently of the prescription of trazodone (n = 2), other SSRIs (n = 2), or the absence of treatment (n = 2), and of possible cognitive change. Recognition of emotion on

  6. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Bartley, Lauren; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haan, Eric; Hernández, Isabel; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Forloni, Gianluigi; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Waldö, Maria Landqvist; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mann, David M A; Grafman, Jordan; Morris, Christopher M; Attems, Johannes; Griffiths, Timothy D; McKeith, Ian G; Thomas, Alan J; Pietrini, P; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Baborie, Atik; Jaros, Evelyn; Tierney, Michael C; Pastor, Pau; Razquin, Cristina; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Alonso, Elena; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kurz, Alexander; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Rowe, James B; Schlachetzki, J C M; Uphill, James; Collinge, John; Mead, S; Danek, Adrian; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowsk, John Q; van der Zee, Julie; Deschamps, William; Van Langenhove, Tim; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cappa, Stefano F; Le Ber, Isabelle; Hannequin, Didier; Golfier, Véronique; Vercelletto, Martine; Brice, Alexis; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Mayhaus, Manuel; Ibach, Bernd; Gasparoni, Gilles; Pichler, Sabrina; Gu, Wei; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Morris, Huw R; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Snowden, Julie S; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alexander; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Cupidi, Chiara; Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Conidi, Maria Elena; Smirne, Nicoletta; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Dickson, Dennis W; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Knopman, David; Josephs, Keith A; Boeve, Bradley F; Parisi, Joseph E; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Karydas, Anna M; Rosen, Howard; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise G P; Seelaar, Harro; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL; Scheltens, Philip; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Capozzo, Rosa; Novelli, Valeria; Puca, Annibale A; Franceschi, M; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Sorrentino, Paolo; Kristiansen, Mark; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Graff, Caroline; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin, Adeline; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes—MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72—have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. Methods We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. All participants had European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10−8) and suggestive single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Findings We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10−8) that encompassed the HLA locus at 6p21.3 in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC, for the behavioural FTD subtype. Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data suggested that these loci might affect expression and methylation incis. Interpretation Our findings suggest that immune system processes (link to 6p21.3) and possibly lysosomal and autophagy pathways (link to 11q14) are potentially involved in FTD. Our findings need to be replicated to better define the association of the newly identified loci with disease and possibly to shed light on the pathomechanisms contributing to FTD. Funding The National Institute of

  7. What's in a Name: Voxel-Based Morphometric Analyses of MRI and Naming Difficulty in Alzheimer's Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey; Moore, Peachie; Ding, Lijun; Glosser, Guila; Work, Melissa; Gee, James

    2004-01-01

    Confrontation naming is impaired in neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Some behavioural observations suggest a common source of impaired naming across these patient groups, while others find partially unique patterns of naming difficulty. We hypothesized…

  8. Self-Awareness and Self-Monitoring of Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia and Probable Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Sarah; Weintraub, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Lack of insight is a core diagnostic criterion for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and is believed to be intact in the early stages of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). In other neurological conditions, symptom-specific insight has been noted, with behavioral symptoms appearing especially vulnerable to reduced insight.…

  9. Comparison of extent of tau pathology in patients with frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), frontotemporal lobar degeneration with Pick bodies and early onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shiarli, A-M; Jennings, R; Shi, J; Bailey, K; Davidson, Y; Tian, J; Bigio, E H; Ghetti, B; Murrell, J R; Delisle, M B; Mirra, S; Crain, B; Zolo, P; Arima, K; Iseki, E; Murayama, S; Kretzschmar, H; Neumann, M; Lippa, C; Halliday, G; Mackenzie, J; Khan, N; Ravid, R; Dickson, D; Wszolek, Z; Iwatsubo, T; Pickering-Brown, S M; Mann, D M A

    2006-08-01

    In order to gain insight into the pathogenesis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the mean tau load in frontal cortex was compared in 34 patients with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) with 12 different mutations in the tau gene (MAPT), 11 patients with sporadic FTLD with Pick bodies and 25 patients with early onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). Tau load was determined, as percentage of tissue occupied by stained product, by image analysis of immunohistochemically stained sections using the phospho-dependent antibodies AT8, AT100 and AT180. With AT8 and AT180 antibodies, the amount of tau was significantly (P < 0.001 in each instance) less than that in EOAD for both FTDP-17 (8.5% and 10.0% respectively) and sporadic FTLD with Pick bodies (16.1% and 10.0% respectively). With AT100, the amount of tau detected in FTDP-17 was 54% (P < 0.001) of that detected in EOAD, but no tau was detected in sporadic FTLD with Pick bodies using this particular antibody. The amount of insoluble tau deposited within the brain in FTDP-17 did not depend in any systematic way upon where the MAPT mutation was topographically located within the gene, or on the physiological or structural change generated by the mutation, regardless of which anti-tau antibody was used. Not only does the amount of tau deposited in the brain differ between the three disorders, but the pattern of phosphorylation of tau also varies according to disease. These findings raise important questions relating to the role of aggregated tau in neurodegeneration - whether this represents an adaptive response which promotes the survival of neurones, or whether it is a detrimental change that directly, or indirectly, brings about the demize of the affected cell.

  10. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Bartley, Lauren; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haan, Eric; Hernández, Isabel; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Forloni, Gianluigi; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Waldö, Maria Landqvist; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mann, David M A; Grafman, Jordan; Morris, Christopher M; Attems, Johannes; Griffiths, Timothy D; McKeith, Ian G; Thomas, Alan J; Pietrini, P; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Baborie, Atik; Jaros, Evelyn; Tierney, Michael C; Pastor, Pau; Razquin, Cristina; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Alonso, Elena; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kurz, Alexander; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Rowe, James B; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Uphill, James; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon; Danek, Adrian; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q; van der Zee, Julie; Deschamps, William; Van Langenhove, Tim; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cappa, Stefano F; Le Ber, Isabelle; Hannequin, Didier; Golfier, Véronique; Vercelletto, Martine; Brice, Alexis; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Mayhaus, Manuel; Ibach, Bernd; Gasparoni, Gilles; Pichler, Sabrina; Gu, Wei; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Morris, Huw R; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Snowden, Julie S; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alexander; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Cupidi, Chiara; Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Conidi, Maria Elena; Smirne, Nicoletta; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Dickson, Dennis W; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Knopman, David; Josephs, Keith A; Boeve, Bradley F; Parisi, Joseph E; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Karydas, Anna M; Rosen, Howard; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise G P; Seelaar, Harro; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Scheltens, Philip; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Capozzo, Rosa; Novelli, Valeria; Puca, Annibale A; Franceschi, Massimo; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Sorrentino, Paolo; Kristiansen, Mark; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Graff, Caroline; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin, Adeline; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2014-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72--have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. To reduce genetic heterogeneity, all participants were of European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10(-8)) single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10(-8)). Combined (joint) analyses of discovery and replication phases showed genome-wide significant association at 6p21.3, HLA locus (immune system), for rs9268877 (p=1·05 × 10(-8); odds ratio=1·204 [95% CI 1·11-1·30]), rs9268856 (p=5·51 × 10(-9); 0·809 [0·76-0·86]) and rs1980493 (p value=1·57 × 10(-8), 0·775 [0·69-0·86]) in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC (the transcripts of which are related to lysosomal biology), for the behavioural FTD subtype for which joint analyses showed suggestive association for rs302668 (p=2·44 × 10(-7); 0·814 [0·71-0·92]). Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data

  11. Immune-related genetic enrichment in frontotemporal dementia: An analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Broce, Iris; Karch, Celeste M; Wen, Natalie; Fan, Chun C; Wang, Yunpeng; Tan, Chin Hong; Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A; Höglinger, Günter U; Muller, Ulrich; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo; Hess, Christopher P; Dillon, William P; Miller, Zachary A; Bonham, Luke W; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H; Veldink, Jan H; Ferrari, Raffaele; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Miller, Bruce L; Andreassen, Ole A; Dale, Anders M; Desikan, Rahul S; Sugrue, Leo P

    2018-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that immune-mediated dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Although genetic studies have shown that immune-associated loci are associated with increased FTD risk, a systematic investigation of genetic overlap between immune-mediated diseases and the spectrum of FTD-related disorders has not been performed. Using large genome-wide association studies (GWASs) (total n = 192,886 cases and controls) and recently developed tools to quantify genetic overlap/pleiotropy, we systematically identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) jointly associated with FTD-related disorders-namely, FTD, corticobasal degeneration (CBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-and 1 or more immune-mediated diseases including Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis (UC), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease (CeD), and psoriasis. We found up to 270-fold genetic enrichment between FTD and RA, up to 160-fold genetic enrichment between FTD and UC, up to 180-fold genetic enrichment between FTD and T1D, and up to 175-fold genetic enrichment between FTD and CeD. In contrast, for CBD and PSP, only 1 of the 6 immune-mediated diseases produced genetic enrichment comparable to that seen for FTD, with up to 150-fold genetic enrichment between CBD and CeD and up to 180-fold enrichment between PSP and RA. Further, we found minimal enrichment between ALS and the immune-mediated diseases tested, with the highest levels of enrichment between ALS and RA (up to 20-fold). For FTD, at a conjunction false discovery rate < 0.05 and after excluding SNPs in linkage disequilibrium, we found that 8 of the 15 identified loci mapped to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on Chromosome (Chr) 6. We also found novel candidate FTD susceptibility loci within LRRK2 (leucine rich repeat kinase 2), TBKBP1 (TBK1 binding protein 1), and PGBD5 (piggyBac transposable element

  12. Increased subjective experience of non-target emotions in patients with frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hua; Lwi, Sandy J.; Hua, Alice Y.; Haase, Claudia M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Although laboratory procedures are designed to produce specific emotions, participants often experience mixed emotions (i.e., target and non-target emotions). We examined non-target emotions in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), other neurodegenerative diseases, and healthy controls. Participants watched film clips designed to produce three target emotions. Subjective experience of non-target emotions was assessed and emotional facial expressions were coded. Compared to patients with other neurodegenerative diseases and healthy controls, FTD patients reported more positive and negative non-target emotions, whereas AD patients reported more positive non-target emotions. There were no group differences in facial expressions of non-target emotions. We interpret these findings as reflecting deficits in processing interoceptive and contextual information resulting from neurodegeneration in brain regions critical for creating subjective emotional experience. PMID:29457053

  13. The Use of Stem Cells to Model Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia: From Basic Research to Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Erin C; Mehler, Vera J; Nishimura, Agnes L

    2016-01-01

    In recent years several genes have linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as a spectrum disease; however little is known about what triggers their onset. With the ability to generate patient specific stem cell lines from somatic cells, it is possible to model disease without the need to transfect cells with exogenous DNA. These pluripotent stem cells have opened new avenues for identification of disease phenotypes and their relation to specific molecular pathways. Thus, as never before, compounds with potential applications for regenerative medicine can be specifically tailored in patient derived cultures. In this review, we discuss how patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used to model ALS and FTD and the most recent drug screening targets for these diseases. We also discuss how an iPSC bank would improve the quality of the available cell lines and how it would increase knowledge about the ALS/FTD disease spectrum.

  14. Invited review: Frontotemporal dementia caused by microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) mutations: a chameleon for neuropathology and neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, B; Oblak, A L; Boeve, B F; Johnson, K A; Dickerson, B C; Goedert, M

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary frontotemporal dementia associated with mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is a protean disorder. Three neuropathologic subtypes can be recognized, based on the presence of inclusions made of tau isoforms with three and four repeats, predominantly three repeats and mostly four repeats. This is relevant for establishing a correlation between structural magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography using tracers specific for aggregated tau. Longitudinal studies will be essential to determine the evolution of anatomical alterations from the asymptomatic stage to the various phases of disease following the onset of symptoms. © 2014 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Neuropathological Society.

  15. C9ORF72 G4C2-repeat expansion and frontotemporal dementia first reported case in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernández Suarez, M; Surace, Ezequiel; Harris, P; Tapajoz, F; Sevlever, G; Allegri, R; Russo, G N

    2016-06-01

    We present a female patient aged 51 who developed behavioral disorders followed by cognitive impairment over 3 years. Neuropsychological, neuropsychiatric, and radiological features suggested a probable behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). A family history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism suggested the hexanucleotide repeat expansion G4C2 in C9ORF72 . We set up a two-step genotyping algorithm for the detection of the expansion using fragment-length analysis polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and repeat-primed PCR with fluorescent primers. We confirmed the presence of an expanded G4C2 allele in the patient. This represents the first documented case of bvFTD due to a C9ORF72 expansion in Argentina.

  16. Memory Test Performance on Analogous Verbal and Nonverbal Memory Tests in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Baldock, Deanna; Miller, Justin B; Leger, Gabriel C; Banks, Sarah Jane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) typically have initial deficits in language or changes in personality, while the defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is memory impairment. Neuropsychological findings in the two diseases tend to differ, but can be confounded by verbal impairment in FTD impacting performance on memory tests in these patients. Twenty-seven patients with FTD and 102 patients with AD underwent a neuropsychological assessment before diagnosis. By utilizing analogous versions of a verbal and nonverbal memory test, we demonstrated differences in these two modalities between AD and FTD. Better differentiation between AD and FTD is found in a nonverbal memory test, possibly because it eliminates the confounding variable of language deficits found in patients with FTD. These results highlight the importance of nonverbal learning tests with multiple learning trials in diagnostic testing.

  17. Alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control is linked to attenuated brain responses in right fronto-temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Gabriela; Guevara, Alvaro; Marxen, Michael; Neumann, Maike; Jünger, Elisabeth; Kobiella, Andrea; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Schwarz, Daniel; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Smolka, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background A self-enhancing loop between impaired inhibitory control under alcohol and alcohol consumption has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying dysfunctional drinking in susceptible people. However, the neural underpinnings of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control are widely unknown. Methods We measured inhibitory control in fifty young adults with a stop-signal task (SST) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a single-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, all participants performed the SST once under alcohol with a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 0.6 g/kg, and once under placebo. In addition, alcohol consumption was assessed using a free-access alcohol self-administration (ASA) paradigm in the same participants. Results Inhibitory control was robustly decreased under alcohol compared to placebo indicated by longer stop-signal reaction times (SSRTs). On the neural level, impaired inhibitory control under alcohol was associated with attenuated brain responses in the right fronto-temporal portion of the inhibition network that supports the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals, and subsequent updating of action plans from response execution to inhibition. Furthermore, the extent of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control predicted free-access alcohol consumption. Conclusion We suggest that during inhibitory control alcohol affects cognitive processes preceding actual motor inhibition. Under alcohol, decreased brain responses in right fronto-temporal areas might slow down the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans which leads to impaired inhibitory control. In turn, pronounced alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control may enhance alcohol consumption in young adults which might promote future alcohol problems. PMID:24560581

  18. Adaptation and validation of a Spanish-language version of the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS).

    PubMed

    Turró-Garriga, O; Hermoso Contreras, C; Olives Cladera, J; Mioshi, E; Pelegrín Valero, C; Olivera Pueyo, J; Garre-Olmo, J; Sánchez-Valle, R

    2017-06-01

    The Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS) is a tool designed to aid with clinical staging and assessment of the progression of frontotemporal dementia (FTD-FRS). Present a multicentre adaptation and validation study of a Spanish version of the FRS. The adapted version was created using 2 translation-back translation processes (English to Spanish, Spanish to English) and verified by the scale's original authors. We validated the adapted version in a sample of consecutive patients diagnosed with FTD. The procedure included evaluating internal consistency, testing unidimensionality with the Rasch model, analysing construct validity and discriminant validity, and calculating the degree of agreement between the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR) and FTD-FRS for FTD cases. The study included 60 patients with DFT. The mean score on the FRS was 12.1 points (SD=6.5; range, 2-25) with inter-group differences (F=120.3; df=3; P<.001). Cronbach's alpha was 0.897 and principal component analysis of residuals delivered an acceptable eigenvalue for 5 contrasts (1.6-2.7) and 36.1% raw variance. FRS was correlated with the Mini-mental State Examination (r=0.572; P<.001) and functional capacity (DAD; r=0.790; P<.001). FTD-FRS also showed a significant correlation with CDR (r=-0.641; P<.001), but we did observe variability in the severity levels; cases appeared to be less severe according to the CDR than when measured with the FTD-FRS (kappa=0.055). This process of validating the Spanish translation of the FTD-FRS yielded satisfactory results for validity and unidimensionality (severity) in the assessment of patients with FTD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Does HIV-1/AIDS-associated frontotemporal neuropathology following perinatal infection influence the development of moral behaviour?

    PubMed

    Gericke, G S

    2008-01-01

    While HIV encephalopathy and the AIDS dementia complex are considered hallmark neurologic manifestations of HIV-1 infection, increasing evidence of a continuum of nervous system involvement indicates the existence of an unrecognized number of individuals with milder, mostly cognitive and/or behavioural effects. Questions are raised whether HIV-related frontotemporal neuropathology during critical developmental stages could affect development of the brain networks documented to be involved in moral decisions, and whether this could contribute to the phenomenon of delinquency in an unknown percentage of the current generation of approximately 18-25 year old survivors of early childhood or vertically acquired HIV infection. Carefully planned and executed long term, prospective controlled studies using environmental, clinical, neurological, behavioural, genetic, immune and functional neuroimaging correlates would be required to elucidate whether HIV-specific neuropathology could indeed act as an independent risk factor for the development of a frontotemporal sociopathy syndrome. If such an association is proven, the accelerated development of neurospecific therapies should be a priority, especially for clinically and immunologically stable HIV-infected children. It may be necessary to institute such treatment as early as possible in perinatally infected cases, and maybe even during intrauterine life if HIV-1 is demonstrated to also act as a neurobehavioural teratogen for the developing fetal brain. It may, however, prove to be difficult to separate primary neurobiological from environmental factors, since the epigenetic effects on the host genome of retroviral insertion influencing behavioural gene expression characteristics, and altered gene expression following early life stresses may involve overlapping neurodevelopmental gene regulatory networks. In the meantime it remains necessary to prevent or ameliorate frequent neuropsychiatric morbidity from whatever causes.

  20. Development of a selective left-hemispheric fronto-temporal network for processing syntactic complexity in language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yaqiong; Friederici, Angela D; Margulies, Daniel S; Brauer, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The development of language comprehension abilities in childhood is closely related to the maturation of the brain, especially the ability to process syntactically complex sentences. Recent studies proposed that the fronto-temporal connection within left perisylvian regions, supporting the processing of syntactically complex sentences, is still immature at preschool age. In the current study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from typically developing 5-year-old children and adults to shed further light on the brain functional development. Children additionally performed a behavioral syntactic comprehension test outside the scanner. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations was analyzed in order to identify the functional correlation networks of language-relevant brain regions. Results showed an intrahemispheric correlation between left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) in adults, whereas an interhemispheric correlation between left IFG and its right-hemispheric homolog was predominant in children. Correlation analysis between resting-state functional connectivity and sentence processing performance in 5-year-olds revealed that local connectivity within the left IFG is associated with competence of processing syntactically simple canonical sentences, while long-range connectivity between IFG and pSTS in left hemisphere is associated with competence of processing syntactically relatively more complex non-canonical sentences. The present developmental data suggest that a selective left fronto-temporal connectivity network for processing complex syntax is already in functional connection at the age of 5 years when measured in a non-task situation. The correlational findings provide new insight into the relationship between intrinsic functional connectivity and syntactic language abilities in preschool children. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  1. Right Limbic FDG-PET Hypometabolism Correlates with Emotion Recognition and Attribution in Probable Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Lettieri, Giada; Crespi, Chiara; Gianolli, Luigi; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a rare disease mainly affecting the social brain. FDG-PET fronto-temporal hypometabolism is a supportive feature for the diagnosis. It may also provide specific functional metabolic signatures for altered socio-emotional processing. In this study, we evaluated the emotion recognition and attribution deficits and FDG-PET cerebral metabolic patterns at the group and individual levels in a sample of sporadic bvFTD patients, exploring the cognitive-functional correlations. Seventeen probable mild bvFTD patients (10 male and 7 female; age 67.8±9.9) were administered standardized and validated version of social cognition tasks assessing the recognition of basic emotions and the attribution of emotions and intentions (i.e., Ekman 60-Faces test-Ek60F and Story-based Empathy task-SET). FDG-PET was analysed using an optimized voxel-based SPM method at the single-subject and group levels. Severe deficits of emotion recognition and processing characterized the bvFTD condition. At the group level, metabolic dysfunction in the right amygdala, temporal pole, and middle cingulate cortex was highly correlated to the emotional recognition and attribution performances. At the single-subject level, however, heterogeneous impairments of social cognition tasks emerged, and different metabolic patterns, involving limbic structures and prefrontal cortices, were also observed. The derangement of a right limbic network is associated with altered socio-emotional processing in bvFTD patients, but different hypometabolic FDG-PET patterns and heterogeneous performances on social tasks at an individual level exist. PMID:26513651

  2. Alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control is linked to attenuated brain responses in right fronto-temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gan, Gabriela; Guevara, Alvaro; Marxen, Michael; Neumann, Maike; Jünger, Elisabeth; Kobiella, Andrea; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Schwarz, Daniel; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-11-01

    A self-enhancing loop between impaired inhibitory control under alcohol and alcohol consumption has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying dysfunctional drinking in susceptible people. However, the neural underpinnings of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control are widely unknown. We measured inhibitory control in 50 young adults with a stop-signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In a single-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, all participants performed the stop-signal task once under alcohol with a breath alcohol concentration of .6 g/kg and once under placebo. In addition, alcohol consumption was assessed with a free-access alcohol self-administration paradigm in the same participants. Inhibitory control was robustly decreased under alcohol compared with placebo, indicated by longer stop-signal reaction times. On the neural level, impaired inhibitory control under alcohol was associated with attenuated brain responses in the right fronto-temporal portion of the inhibition network that supports the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans from response execution to inhibition. Furthermore, the extent of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control predicted free-access alcohol consumption. We suggest that during inhibitory control alcohol affects cognitive processes preceding actual motor inhibition. Under alcohol, decreased brain responses in right fronto-temporal areas might slow down the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans, which leads to impaired inhibitory control. In turn, pronounced alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control might enhance alcohol consumption in young adults, which might promote future alcohol problems. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Concurrent white and gray matter degeneration of disease-specific networks in early-stage Alzheimer's disease and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Rebecca M E; Meijboom, Rozanna; de Groot, Marius; Bron, Esther E; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Lugt, Aad; van Swieten, John C; Smits, Marion

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates regional coherence between white matter (WM) microstructure and gray matter (GM) volume and perfusion measures in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) using a correlational approach. WM-GM coherence, compared with controls, was stronger between cingulum WM and frontotemporal GM in AD, and temporoparietal GM in bvFTD. In addition, in AD compared with controls, coherence was stronger between inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus WM microstructure and occipital GM perfusion. In this first study assessing regional WM-GM coherence in AD and bvFTD, we show that WM microstructure and GM volume and perfusion measures are coherent, particularly in regions implicated in AD and bvFTD pathology. This indicates concurrent degeneration in disease-specific networks. Our methodology allows for the detection of incipient abnormalities that go undetected in conventional between-group analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel GRN Mutation (GRN c.708+6_+9delTGAG) in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with TDP-43-positive Inclusions: Clinicopathologic Report of 6 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bit-Ivan, Esther N.; Suh, Eunran; Shim, H-S; Weintraub, Sandra; Hyman, Bradley T.; Arnold, Steven E.; McCarty-Wood, Elisabeth; Van Deerlin, Viviana M.; Schneider, Julie A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Baker, Matt C.; Rademakers, Rosa; Mesulam, Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the underlying pathology that is most often linked to the clinical diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), is rapidly increasing. Mutations in 7 known genes (MAPT, GRN, C9orf72, VCP, CHMP2B, and rarely TARDBP and FUS) are associated with FTD and the pathologic classification of FTLD has recently been modified to reflect these discoveries. Mutations in one of these genes (GRN), which encodes progranulin, have been implicated in up to one quarter of FTLD cases with TAR DNA-binding protein 43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP); there currently are more than 60 known pathogenic mutations of the gene. We present the clinical, pathologic, and genetic findings of 6 cases from 4 families, 5 of which were shown to have a novel GRN c.708+6_+9delTGAG mutation. PMID:24709683

  5. In vivo axonal transport deficits in a mouse model of fronto-temporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Tabassum; Ali, Yousuf O.; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Jang, Ming-Kuei; Lu, Hui-Chen; Pautler, Robia G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Axonal transport is vital for neurons and deficits in this process have been previously reported in a few mouse models of Alzheimer's disease prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles. However, it remains to be determined whether axonal transport is defective prior to the onset of neurodegeneration. The rTg4510 mouse, a fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17) tauopathy model, over-express tau-P301L mutation found in familial forms of FTDP-17, in the forebrain driven by the calcium–calmodulin kinase II promoter. This mouse model exhibits tau pathology, neurodegeneration in the forebrain, and associated behavioral deficits beginning at 4–5 months of age. Animal model rTg4510 transgenic mice were used in these studies. Mice were given 2 μL of MnCl2 in each nostril 1 h prior to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Following MnCl2 nasal lavage, mice were imaged using Manganese enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI) Protocol with TE = 8.5 ms, TR = 504 ms, FOV = 3.0 cm, matrix size = 128 × 128 × 128, number of cycles = 15 with each cycle taking approximately 2 min, 9 s, and 24 ms using Paravision software (BrukerBioSpin, Billerica, MA). During imaging, body temperature was maintained at 37.0 °C using an animal heating system (SA Instruments, Stony Brook, NY). Data analysis Resulting images were analyzed using Paravision software. Regions of interest (ROI) within the olfactory neuronal layer (ONL) and the water phantom consisting of one pixel (ONL) and 9 pixels (water) were selected and copied across each of the 15 cycles. Signal intensities (SI) of ONL and water phantom ROIs were measured. SI values obtained for ONL were then normalized the water phantom SI values. The correlation between normalized signal intensity in the ONL and time were assessed using Prism (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA). Results Using the MEMRI technique on 1.5, 3, 5, and 10-month old rTg4510 mice and littermate controls, we found

  6. In vivo axonal transport deficits in a mouse model of fronto-temporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Majid, Tabassum; Ali, Yousuf O; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Jang, Ming-Kuei; Lu, Hui-Chen; Pautler, Robia G

    2014-01-01

    Axonal transport is vital for neurons and deficits in this process have been previously reported in a few mouse models of Alzheimer's disease prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles. However, it remains to be determined whether axonal transport is defective prior to the onset of neurodegeneration. The rTg4510 mouse, a fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17) tauopathy model, over-express tau-P301L mutation found in familial forms of FTDP-17, in the forebrain driven by the calcium-calmodulin kinase II promoter. This mouse model exhibits tau pathology, neurodegeneration in the forebrain, and associated behavioral deficits beginning at 4-5 months of age. rTg4510 transgenic mice were used in these studies. Mice were given 2 μL of MnCl2 in each nostril 1 h prior to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Following MnCl2 nasal lavage, mice were imaged using Manganese enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI) Protocol with TE = 8.5 ms, TR = 504 ms, FOV = 3.0 cm, matrix size = 128 × 128 × 128, number of cycles = 15 with each cycle taking approximately 2 min, 9 s, and 24 ms using Paravision software (BrukerBioSpin, Billerica, MA). During imaging, body temperature was maintained at 37.0 °C using an animal heating system (SA Instruments, Stony Brook, NY). Resulting images were analyzed using Paravision software. Regions of interest (ROI) within the olfactory neuronal layer (ONL) and the water phantom consisting of one pixel (ONL) and 9 pixels (water) were selected and copied across each of the 15 cycles. Signal intensities (SI) of ONL and water phantom ROIs were measured. SI values obtained for ONL were then normalized the water phantom SI values. The correlation between normalized signal intensity in the ONL and time were assessed using Prism (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA). Using the MEMRI technique on 1.5, 3, 5, and 10-month old rTg4510 mice and littermate controls, we found significant axonal transport deficits present in

  7. Effect of minoxidil topical foam on frontotemporal and vertex androgenetic alopecia in men: a 104-week open-label clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kanti, V; Hillmann, K; Kottner, J; Stroux, A; Canfield, D; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2016-07-01

    Topical minoxidil formulations have been shown to be effective in treating androgenetic alopecia (AGA) for 12 months. Efficacy and safety in both frontotemporal and vertex regions over longer application periods have not been studied so far. To evaluate the effect of 5% minoxidil topical foam (5% MTF) in the frontotemporal and vertex areas in patients with moderate AGA over 104 weeks. An 80-week, open-label extension phase was performed, following a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men with AGA grade IIIvertex to VI. Group 1 (n = 22) received ongoing 5% MTF for 104 weeks, Group 2 (n = 23) received placebo topical foam (plaTF) until week 24, followed by 5% MTF until week 104 during the extension phase. Frontotemporal and vertex target area non-vellus hair counts (f-TAHC, v-TAHC) and cumulative hair width (f-TAHW, v-TAHW) were assessed at baseline and at weeks 24, 52, 76 and 104. In Group 1, f-TAHW and f-TAHC showed a statistically significant increase from baseline to week 52 and week 76, respectively, returning to values comparable to baseline at week 104. No significant differences were found between baseline and week 104 in v-TAHC in Group 1 as well as f-TAHC, v-TAHC, f-TAHW and v-TAHW values in Group 2. 5% MTF is effective in stabilizing hair density, hair width and scalp coverage in both frontotemporal and vertex areas over an application period of 104 weeks, while showing a good safety and tolerability profile with a low rate of irritant contact dermatitis. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Spatio-temporal source cluster analysis reveals fronto-temporal auditory change processing differences within a shared autistic and schizotypal trait phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ford, Talitha C; Woods, Will; Crewther, David P

    2017-01-01

    Social Disorganisation (SD) is a shared autistic and schizotypal phenotype that is present in the subclinical population. Auditory processing deficits, particularly in mismatch negativity/field (MMN/F) have been reported across both spectrum disorders. This study investigates differences in MMN/F cortical spatio-temporal source activity between higher and lower quintiles of the SD spectrum. Sixteen low (9 female) and 19 high (9 female) SD subclinical adults (18-40years) underwent magnetoencephalography (MEG) during an MMF paradigm where standard tones (50ms) were interrupted by infrequent duration deviants (100ms). Spatio-temporal source cluster analysis with permutation testing revealed no difference between the groups in source activation to the standard tone. To the deviant tone however, there was significantly reduced right hemisphere fronto-temporal and insular cortex activation for the high SD group ( p = 0.038). The MMF, as a product of the cortical response to the deviant minus that to the standard, did not differ significantly between the high and low Social Disorganisation groups. These data demonstrate a deficit in right fronto-temporal processing of an auditory change for those with more of the shared SD phenotype, indicating that right fronto-temporal auditory processing may be associated with psychosocial functioning.

  9. R47H TREM2 variant increases risk of typical early-onset Alzheimer’s disease but not of prion or frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    CF, Slattery; J, Beck; L, Harper; G, Adamson; Z, Abdi; J, Uphill; T, Campbell; R, Druyeh; CJ, Mahoney; JD, Rohrer; J, Kenny; J, Lowe; KK, Leung; J, Barnes; SL, Clegg; M, Blair; JM, Nicholas; RJ, Guerreiro; JB, Rowe; C, Ponto; I, Zerr; H, Kretzschmar; P, Gambetti; SJ, Crutch; JD, Warren; MN, Rossor; NC, Fox; J, Collinge; JM, Schott; S, Mead

    2015-01-01

    Background Rare TREM2 variants are significant risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Methods We used next generation sequencing of the whole gene (n=700), exon 2 Sanger sequencing (n=2634), p.R47H genotyping (n=3518) and genome wide association study imputation (n=13048) to determine whether TREM2 variants are risk factors or phenotypic modifiers in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (n=1002), frontotemporal dementia (n=358), sporadic (n=2500) and variant (n=115) Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Results We confirm only p.R47H as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (OR=2.19; 95%CI=1.04-4.51; P=0.03). p.R47H does not significantly alter risk for frontotemporal dementia (OR=0.81), variant or sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (OR=1.06 95%CI=0.66-1.69) in our cohorts. Individuals with p.R47H associated Alzheimer’s (n=12) had significantly earlier symptom onset than individuals with no TREM2 variants (n=551) (55.2years vs. 61.7years, P=0.02). We note that heterozygous p.R47H Alzheimer’s disease is memory led and otherwise indistinguishable from “typical” sporadic Alzheimer’s. Conclusion We find p.R47H is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, but not frontotemporal dementia or prion disease. PMID:25160042

  10. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration and social behaviour: Dissociation between the knowledge of its consequences and its conceptual meaning.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Roland; Green, Sophie; Beaumont, Helen; Burns, Alistair; Moll, Jorge; Caine, Diana; Gerhard, Alexander; Hoffman, Paul; Shaw, Benjamin; Grafman, Jordan; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2017-08-01

    Inappropriate social behaviour is an early symptom of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in both behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and semantic dementia (SD) subtypes. Knowledge of social behaviour is essential for appropriate social conduct. The superior anterior temporal lobe (ATL) has been identified as one key neural component for the conceptual knowledge of social behaviour, but it is unknown whether this is dissociable from knowledge of the consequences of social behaviour. Here, we used a newly-developed test of knowledge about long-term and short-term consequences of social behaviour to investigate its impairment in patients with FTLD relative to a previously-developed test of social conceptual knowledge. We included 19 healthy elderly control participants and 19 consecutive patients with features of bvFTD or SD and defined dissociations as performance differences between tasks for each patient (Bonferroni-corrected p < .05). Knowledge of long-term consequences was selectively impaired relative to short-term consequences in five patients and the reverse dissociation occurred in one patient. Six patients showed a selective impairment of social concepts relative to long-term consequences with the reverse dissociation occurring in one patient. These results corroborate the hypothesis that knowledge of long-term consequences of social behaviour is dissociable from knowledge of short-term consequences, as well as of social conceptual knowledge. Confirming our hypothesis, we found that patients with more marked grey matter (GM) volume loss in frontopolar relative to right superior ATL regions of interest exhibited poorer knowledge of the long-term consequences of social behaviour relative to the knowledge of its conceptual meaning and vice versa (n = 15). These findings support the hypothesis that frontopolar and ATL regions represent distinct aspects of social knowledge. This suggests that rather than being unable to suppress urges to

  11. Progranulin Gene Therapy Improves Lysosomal Dysfunction and Microglial Pathology Associated with Frontotemporal Dementia and Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Arrant, Andrew E; Onyilo, Vincent C; Unger, Daniel E; Roberson, Erik D

    2018-02-28

    Loss-of-function mutations in progranulin, a lysosomal glycoprotein, cause neurodegenerative disease. Progranulin haploinsufficiency causes frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and complete progranulin deficiency causes CLN11 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Progranulin replacement is a rational therapeutic strategy for these disorders, but there are critical unresolved mechanistic questions about a progranulin gene therapy approach, including its potential to reverse existing pathology. Here, we address these issues using an AAV vector (AAV- Grn ) to deliver progranulin in Grn -/- mice (both male and female), which model aspects of NCL and FTD pathology, developing lysosomal dysfunction, lipofuscinosis, and microgliosis. We first tested whether AAV- Grn could improve preexisting pathology. Even with treatment after onset of pathology, AAV- Grn reduced lipofuscinosis in several brain regions of Grn -/- mice. AAV- Grn also reduced microgliosis in brain regions distant from the injection site. AAV-expressed progranulin was only detected in neurons, not in microglia, indicating that the microglial activation in progranulin deficiency can be improved by targeting neurons and thus may be driven at least in part by neuronal dysfunction. Even areas with sparse transduction and almost undetectable progranulin showed improvement, indicating that low-level replacement may be sufficiently effective. The beneficial effects of AAV- Grn did not require progranulin binding to sortilin. Finally, we tested whether AAV- Grn improved lysosomal function. AAV-derived progranulin was delivered to the lysosome, ameliorated the accumulation of LAMP-1 in Grn -/- mice, and corrected abnormal cathepsin D activity. These data shed light on progranulin biology and support progranulin-boosting therapies for NCL and FTD due to GRN mutations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Heterozygous loss-of-function progranulin ( GRN ) mutations cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and homozygous mutations cause neuronal

  12. Value-based modulation of memory encoding involves strategic engagement of fronto-temporal semantic processing regions

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael S.; Rissman, Jesse; Suthana, Nanthia A.; Castel, Alan D.; Knowlton, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of prior fMRI studies have focused on the ways in which the midbrain dopaminergic reward system co-activates with hippocampus to potentiate memory for valuable items. However, another means by which people could selectively remember more valuable to-be-remembered items is to be selective in their use of effective but effortful encoding strategies. To broadly examine the neural mechanisms of value on subsequent memory, we used fMRI to examine how differences in brain activity at encoding as a function of value relate to subsequent free recall for words. Each word was preceded by an arbitrarily assigned point value, and participants went through multiple study-test cycles with feedback on their point total at the end of each list, allowing for sculpting of cognitive strategies. We examined the correlation between value-related modulation of brain activity and participants’ selectivity index, a measure of how close participants were to their optimal point total given the number of items recalled. Greater selectivity scores were associated with greater differences in activation of semantic processing regions, including left inferior frontal gyrus and left posterior lateral temporal cortex, during encoding of high-value words relative to low-value words. Although we also observed value-related modulation within midbrain and ventral striatal reward regions, our fronto-temporal findings suggest that strategic engagement of deep semantic processing may be an important mechanism for selectively encoding valuable items. PMID:24683066

  13. Frontotemporal correlates of impulsivity and machine learning in retired professional athletes with a history of multiple concussions.

    PubMed

    Goswami, R; Dufort, P; Tartaglia, M C; Green, R E; Crawley, A; Tator, C H; Wennberg, R; Mikulis, D J; Keightley, M; Davis, Karen D

    2016-05-01

    The frontotemporal cortical network is associated with behaviours such as impulsivity and aggression. The health of the uncinate fasciculus (UF) that connects the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) with the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) may be a crucial determinant of behavioural regulation. Behavioural changes can emerge after repeated concussion and thus we used MRI to examine the UF and connected gray matter as it relates to impulsivity and aggression in retired professional football players who had sustained multiple concussions. Behaviourally, athletes had faster reaction times and an increased error rate on a go/no-go task, and increased aggression and mania compared to controls. MRI revealed that the athletes had (1) cortical thinning of the ATL, (2) negative correlations of OFC thickness with aggression and task errors, indicative of impulsivity, (3) negative correlations of UF axial diffusivity with error rates and aggression, and (4) elevated resting-state functional connectivity between the ATL and OFC. Using machine learning, we found that UF diffusion imaging differentiates athletes from healthy controls with significant classifiers based on UF mean and radial diffusivity showing 79-84 % sensitivity and specificity, and 0.8 areas under the ROC curves. The spatial pattern of classifier weights revealed hot spots at the orbitofrontal and temporal ends of the UF. These data implicate the UF system in the pathological outcomes of repeated concussion as they relate to impulsive behaviour. Furthermore, a support vector machine has potential utility in the general assessment and diagnosis of brain abnormalities following concussion.

  14. Medical Management of Frontotemporal Dementias: The Importance of the Caregiver in Symptom Assessment and Guidance of Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are no currently Food and Drug Administration-approved or proven off-label treatments for the frontotemporal dementias (FTD). Clinicians, care-givers, and patients struggle regularly to find therapeutic regimens that can alleviate the problematic behavioral and cognitive symptoms associated with these devastating conditions. Success is “hit or miss” and the lessons learned are largely anecdotal to date. Drug discovery in this area has been largely hampered by the heterogeneous clinical presentations and pathological phenotypes of disease that represent significant obstacles to progress in this area. Biologically, plausible treatment strategies include the use of antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor and monoamine oxidase inhibitors), acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, stimulants, antihypertensives, and agents that may ameliorate the symptoms of parkinsonism, pseudobulbar affect, and motor neuron disease that can often coexist with FTD. These medications all carry potential risks as well as possible benefits for the person suffering from FTD, and a clear understanding of these factors is critical in selecting an appropriate therapeutic regimen to maximize cognition and daily functions, reduce behavioral symptoms, and alleviate caregiver burden in an individual patient. The role of the caregiver in tracking and reporting of symptoms and the effects of individual therapeutic interventions is pivotal in this process. This manuscript highlights the importance of establishing an effective therapeutic partnership between the physician and caregiver in the medical management of the person suffering from FTD. PMID:21647712

  15. Unconventional features of C9ORF72 expanded repeat in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Vatovec, Sabina; Kovanda, Anja; Rogelj, Boris

    2014-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are devastating neurodegenerative diseases that form two ends of a complex disease spectrum. Aggregation of RNA binding proteins is one of the hallmark pathologic features of ALS and FTDL and suggests perturbance of the RNA metabolism in their etiology. Recent identification of the disease-associated expansions of the intronic hexanucleotide repeat GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene further substantiates the case for RNA involvement. The expanded repeat, which has turned out to be the single most common genetic cause of ALS and FTLD, may enable the formation of complex DNA and RNA structures, changes in RNA transcription, and processing and formation of toxic RNA foci, which may sequester and inactivate RNA binding proteins. Additionally, the transcribed expanded repeat can undergo repeat-associated non-ATG-initiated translation resulting in accumulation of a series of dipeptide repeat proteins. Understanding the basis of the proposed mechanisms and shared pathways, as well as interactions with known key proteins such as TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) are needed to clarify the pathology of ALS and/or FTLD, and make possible steps toward therapy development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inter-relation between "classic" motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia: neuropsychological and single photon emission computed tomography study.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, P R; Goulding, P J; Lloyd, J J; Snowden, J S; Neary, D; Testa, H J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between "classic" motor neuron disease (cMND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), using neuropsychological evaluation and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Psychological tests assessing language, perceptuospatial, memory, and "frontal lobe" functions were given to patients with cMND and test scores were compared with those of normal control subjects. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT was performed on patients with cMND, FTD and motor neuron disease (FTD/MND), FTD alone, and normal control subjects. Regional cerebral blood flow indices (rCBFi) were determined in 36 cortical regions, and differences between grouped rCBFi data were investigated by canonical discriminant analysis. There were significant group differences in the scores of picture sequencing and token tests in patients with cMND compared with normal controls. Regional CBFi data showed frontal and anterior temporal reductions in patients with cMND compared with normal controls. A similar pattern of SPECT abnormality was seen in patients with FTD/MND and FTD alone, but to a more pronounced degree than in patients with cMND. Neuropsychological and SPECT findings in cMND, FTD/MND, and FTD showed a common pattern of cerebral involvement, most pronounced in the second two conditions. It is suggested that cMND, FTD/MND, and FTD represent a clinical range of a pathological continuum. Images PMID:7745399

  17. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid increases progranulin production in iPSC-derived cortical neurons of frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the granulin (GRN) gene cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) due to progranulin haploinsufficiency. Compounds that can increase progranulin production and secretion may be considered as potential therapeutic drugs; however, very few of them have been directly tested on human cortical neurons. To this end, we differentiated 9 induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from a control subject, a sporadic FTD case and an FTD patient with progranulin S116X mutation. Treatment with 1 μM suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, increased the production of progranulin in cortical neurons of all subjects at both the mRNA and protein levels without affecting their viability. Microarray analysis revealed that SAHA treatment not only reversed some gene expression changes caused by progranulin haploinsufficiency but also caused massive alterations in the overall transcriptome. Thus, histone deacetylase inhibitors may be considered as therapeutic drugs for GRN mutation carriers. However, this class of drugs also causes drastic changes in overall gene expression in human cortical neurons and their side effects and potential impacts on other pathways should be carefully evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Missense mutation in GRN gene affecting RNA splicing and plasma progranulin level in a family affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Luzzi, Simona; Colleoni, Lara; Corbetta, Paola; Baldinelli, Sara; Fiori, Chiara; Girelli, Francesca; Silvestrini, Mauro; Caroppo, Paola; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Rossi, Giacomina

    2017-06-01

    Gene coding for progranulin, GRN, is a major gene linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration. While most of pathogenic GRN mutations are null mutations leading to haploinsufficiency, GRN missense mutations do not have an obvious pathogenicity, and only a few have been revealed to act through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as cytoplasmic missorting, protein degradation, and abnormal cleavage by elastase. The aim of this study was to disclose the pathogenetic mechanisms of the GRN A199V missense mutation, which was previously reported not to alter physiological progranulin features but was associated with a reduced plasma progranulin level. After investigating the family pedigree, we performed genetic and biochemical analysis on its members and performed RNA expression studies. We found that the mutation segregates with the disease and discovered that its pathogenic feature is the alteration of GRN mRNA splicing, actually leading to haploinsufficiency. Thus, when facing with a missense GRN mutation, its pathogenetic effects should be investigated, especially if associated with low plasma progranulin levels, to determine its nature of either benign polymorphism or pathogenic mutation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Murine knockin model for progranulin-deficient frontotemporal dementia with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi A.; Zhang, Jiasheng; Devireddy, Swathi; Zhou, Ping; Karydas, Anna M.; Xu, Xialian; Miller, Bruce L.; Rigo, Frank; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2018-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in individuals under age 60 and has no treatment or cure. Because many cases of FTD result from GRN nonsense mutations, an animal model for this type of mutation is highly desirable for understanding pathogenesis and testing therapies. Here, we generated and characterized GrnR493X knockin mice, which model the most common human GRN mutation, a premature stop codon at arginine 493 (R493X). Homozygous GrnR493X mice have markedly reduced Grn mRNA levels, lack detectable progranulin protein, and phenocopy Grn knockout mice, with CNS microgliosis, cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulation, reduced synaptic density, lipofuscinosis, hyperinflammatory macrophages, excessive grooming behavior, and reduced survival. Inhibition of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) by genetic, pharmacological, or antisense oligonucleotide-based approaches showed that NMD contributes to the reduced mRNA levels in GrnR493X mice and cell lines and in fibroblasts from patients containing the GRNR493X mutation. Moreover, the expressed truncated R493X mutant protein was functional in several assays in progranulin-deficient cells. Together, these findings establish a murine model for in vivo testing of NMD inhibition or other therapies as potential approaches for treating progranulin deficiency caused by the R493X mutation. PMID:29511098

  20. Murine knockin model for progranulin-deficient frontotemporal dementia with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew D; Nguyen, Thi A; Zhang, Jiasheng; Devireddy, Swathi; Zhou, Ping; Karydas, Anna M; Xu, Xialian; Miller, Bruce L; Rigo, Frank; Ferguson, Shawn M; Huang, Eric J; Walther, Tobias C; Farese, Robert V

    2018-03-20

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in individuals under age 60 and has no treatment or cure. Because many cases of FTD result from GRN nonsense mutations, an animal model for this type of mutation is highly desirable for understanding pathogenesis and testing therapies. Here, we generated and characterized Grn R493X knockin mice, which model the most common human GRN mutation, a premature stop codon at arginine 493 (R493X). Homozygous Grn R493X mice have markedly reduced Grn mRNA levels, lack detectable progranulin protein, and phenocopy Grn knockout mice, with CNS microgliosis, cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulation, reduced synaptic density, lipofuscinosis, hyperinflammatory macrophages, excessive grooming behavior, and reduced survival. Inhibition of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) by genetic, pharmacological, or antisense oligonucleotide-based approaches showed that NMD contributes to the reduced mRNA levels in Grn R493X mice and cell lines and in fibroblasts from patients containing the GRN R493X mutation. Moreover, the expressed truncated R493X mutant protein was functional in several assays in progranulin-deficient cells. Together, these findings establish a murine model for in vivo testing of NMD inhibition or other therapies as potential approaches for treating progranulin deficiency caused by the R493X mutation. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  1. Atrophy in distinct corticolimbic networks in frontotemporal dementia relates to social impairments measured using the Social Impairment Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Bickart, Kevin C; Brickhouse, Michael; Negreira, Alyson; Sapolsky, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) often exhibit prominent, early and progressive impairments in social behaviour. We developed the Social Impairment Rating Scale (SIRS), rated by a clinician after a structured interview, which grades the types and severity of social behavioural symptoms in seven domains. In 20 FTD patients, we used the SIRS to study the anatomic basis of social impairments. In support of hypotheses generated from a prior study of healthy adults, we found that the relative magnitude of brain atrophy in three partially dissociable corticolimbic networks anchored in the amygdala predicted the severity of distinct social impairments measured using the SIRS. Patients with the greatest atrophy in a mesolimbic, reward-related (affiliation) network exhibited the most severe socioemotional detachment, whereas patients with the greatest atrophy in an interoceptive, pain-related (aversion) network exhibited the most severe lack of social apprehension. Patients with the greatest atrophy in a perceptual network exhibited the most severe lack of awareness or understanding of others’ social and emotional behaviour. Our findings underscore observations that FTD is associated with heterogeneous social symptoms that can be understood in a refined manner by measuring impairments in component processes subserved by dissociable neural networks. Furthermore, these findings support the validity of the SIRS as an instrument to measure the social symptoms of patients with FTD. Ultimately, we hope it will be useful as a longitudinal outcome measure in natural history studies and in clinical trials of putative interventions to improve social functioning. PMID:24133285

  2. Family caregivers of individuals with frontotemporal dementia: examining the relationship between coping and caregiver physical and mental health.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cindy C; Wallhagen, Margaret I

    2014-01-01

    To identify strategies to assist family caregivers of individuals with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in dealing with their caregiving demands, nurses must understand these family members' unique needs and how they currently deal with their demands. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coping and caregiver physical and mental health among FTD family caregivers. Participants were primary caregivers of individuals with FTD (with behavioral symptoms) living at home (N = 61). A small positive association was noted between problem-focused coping and caregiver physical health (r = 0.29, p < 0.05), and a small but nonsignificant positive correlation was noted between emotion-focused coping and caregiver mental health (r = 0.21, p = 0.10). However, multiple regression analysis showed that emotion-focused coping (β = 0.46, p < 0.05) made a statistically significant, unique contribution to caregiver mental health and explained approximately 14% of its variance. These findings support the potential value of emotion-focused coping strategies when dealing with behavioral symptoms manifested by individuals with FTD. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Intracellular Proteolysis of Progranulin Generates Stable, Lysosomal Granulins that Are Haploinsufficient in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia Caused by GRN Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Georgia; Deng, Qiudong

    2017-01-01

    Homozygous or heterozygous mutations in the GRN gene, encoding progranulin (PGRN), cause neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD), respectively. NCL and FTD are characterized by lysosome dysfunction and neurodegeneration, indicating PGRN is important for lysosome homeostasis in the brain. PGRN is trafficked to the lysosome where its functional role is unknown. PGRN can be cleaved into seven 6-kDa proteins called granulins (GRNs); however, little is known about how GRNs are produced or if levels of GRNs are altered in FTD-GRN mutation carriers. Here, we report the identification and characterization of antibodies that reliably detect several human GRNs by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry. Using these tools, we find that endogenous GRNs are present within multiple cell lines and are constitutively produced. Further, extracellular PGRN is endocytosed and rapidly processed into stable GRNs within lysosomes. Processing of PGRN into GRNs is conserved between humans and mice and is modulated by sortilin expression and mediated by cysteine proteases (i.e. cathpesin L). Induced lysosome dysfunction caused by alkalizing agents or increased expression of transmembrane protein 106B (TMEM106B) inhibit processing of PGRN into GRNs. Finally, we find that multiple GRNs are haploinsufficient in primary fibroblasts and cortical brain tissue from FTD-GRN patients. Taken together, our findings raise the interesting possibility that GRNs carry out critical lysosomal functions and that loss of GRNs should be explored as an initiating factor in lysosomal dysfunction and neurodegeneration caused by GRN mutations. PMID:28828399

  4. Detection and Differentiation of Frontotemporal Dementia and Related Disorders From Alzheimer Disease Using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kristy K L; Coleman, Brenda L; MacKinley, Julia D; Pasternak, Stephen H; Finger, Elizabeth C

    2016-01-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a cognitive screening tool used by practitioners worldwide. The efficacy of the MoCA for screening frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and related disorders is unknown. The objectives were: (1) to determine whether the MoCA detects cognitive impairment (CI) in FTD subjects; (2) to determine whether Alzheimer disease (AD) and FTD subtypes and related disorders can be parsed using the MoCA; and (3) describe longitudinal MoCA performance by subtype. We extracted demographic and testing data from a database of patients referred to a cognitive neurology clinic who met criteria for probable AD or FTD (N=192). Logistic regression was used to determine whether dementia subtypes were associated with overall scores, subscores, or combinations of subscores on the MoCA. Initial MoCA results demonstrated CI in the majority of FTD subjects (87%). FTD subjects (N=94) performed better than AD subjects (N=98) on the MoCA (mean scores: 18.1 vs. 16.3; P=0.02). Subscores parsed many, but not all subtypes. FTD subjects had a larger decline on the MoCA within 13 to 36 months than AD subjects (P=0.02). The results indicate that the MoCA is a useful tool to identify and track progression of CI in FTD. Further, the data informs future research on scoring models for the MoCA to enhance cognitive screening and detection of FTD patients.

  5. Value-based modulation of memory encoding involves strategic engagement of fronto-temporal semantic processing regions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael S; Rissman, Jesse; Suthana, Nanthia A; Castel, Alan D; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2014-06-01

    A number of prior fMRI studies have focused on the ways in which the midbrain dopaminergic reward system coactivates with hippocampus to potentiate memory for valuable items. However, another means by which people could selectively remember more valuable to-be-remembered items is to be selective in their use of effective but effortful encoding strategies. To broadly examine the neural mechanisms of value on subsequent memory, we used fMRI to assess how differences in brain activity at encoding as a function of value relate to subsequent free recall for words. Each word was preceded by an arbitrarily assigned point value, and participants went through multiple study-test cycles with feedback on their point total at the end of each list, allowing for sculpting of cognitive strategies. We examined the correlation between value-related modulation of brain activity and participants' selectivity index, which measures how close participants were to their optimal point total, given the number of items recalled. Greater selectivity scores were associated with greater differences in the activation of semantic processing regions, including left inferior frontal gyrus and left posterior lateral temporal cortex, during the encoding of high-value words relative to low-value words. Although we also observed value-related modulation within midbrain and ventral striatal reward regions, our fronto-temporal findings suggest that strategic engagement of deep semantic processing may be an important mechanism for selectively encoding valuable items.

  6. Rich club network analysis shows distinct patterns of disruption in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Villalon-Reina, Julio E.; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Joshi, Aditi; Barsuglia, Joseph; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can reveal the underlying organizational patterns of the human brain, described as complex networks of densely interlinked regions. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla whole-brain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants – 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal (bvFTD) dementia, 19 with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Based on whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We examined how bvFTD and EOAD disrupt the weighted ‘rich club’ – a network property where high-degree network nodes are more interconnected than expected by chance. bvFTD disrupts both the nodal and global organization of the network in both low- and high-degree regions of the brain. EOAD targets the global connectivity of the brain, mainly affecting the fiber density of high-degree (highly connected) regions that form the rich club network. These rich club analyses suggest distinct patterns of disruptions among different forms of dementia. PMID:26161050

  7. Is the emotion recognition deficit associated with frontotemporal dementia caused by selective inattention to diagnostic facial features?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lindsay D; Virani, Karim; Finger, Elizabeth C; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severely impaired social and emotional behaviour, including emotion recognition deficits. Though fear recognition impairments seen in particular neurological and developmental disorders can be ameliorated by reallocating attention to critical facial features, the possibility that similar benefits can be conferred to patients with FTD has yet to be explored. In the current study, we examined the impact of presenting distinct regions of the face (whole face, eyes-only, and eyes-removed) on the ability to recognize expressions of anger, fear, disgust, and happiness in 24 patients with FTD and 24 healthy controls. A recognition deficit was demonstrated across emotions by patients with FTD relative to controls. Crucially, removal of diagnostic facial features resulted in an appropriate decline in performance for both groups; furthermore, patients with FTD demonstrated a lack of disproportionate improvement in emotion recognition accuracy as a result of isolating critical facial features relative to controls. Thus, unlike some neurological and developmental disorders featuring amygdala dysfunction, the emotion recognition deficit observed in FTD is not likely driven by selective inattention to critical facial features. Patients with FTD also mislabelled negative facial expressions as happy more often than controls, providing further evidence for abnormalities in the representation of positive affect in FTD. This work suggests that the emotional expression recognition deficit associated with FTD is unlikely to be rectified by adjusting selective attention to diagnostic features, as has proven useful in other select disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The frontal-anatomic specificity of design fluency repetitions and their diagnostic relevance for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Possin, Katherine L; Chester, Serana K; Laluz, Victor; Bostrom, Alan; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2012-09-01

    On tests of design fluency, an examinee draws as many different designs as possible in a specified time limit while avoiding repetition. The neuroanatomical substrates and diagnostic group differences of design fluency repetition errors and total correct scores were examined in 110 individuals diagnosed with dementia, 53 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 37 neurologically healthy controls. The errors correlated significantly with volumes in the right and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the right and left superior frontal gyrus, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the right striatum, but did not correlate with volumes in any parietal or temporal lobe regions. Regression analyses indicated that the lateral OFC may be particularly crucial for preventing these errors, even after excluding patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from the analysis. Total correct correlated more diffusely with volumes in the right and left frontal and parietal cortex, the right temporal cortex, and the right striatum and thalamus. Patients diagnosed with bvFTD made significantly more repetition errors than patients diagnosed with MCI, Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, or corticobasal syndrome. In contrast, total correct design scores did not differentiate the dementia patients. These results highlight the frontal-anatomic specificity of design fluency repetitions. In addition, the results indicate that the propensity to make these errors supports the diagnosis of bvFTD. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1-11).

  9. Episodic Memory in Alzheimer Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Dementia With Lewy Bodies/Parkinson Disease Dementia: Disentangling Retrieval From Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Economou, Alexandra; Routsis, Christopher; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G

    2016-01-01

    Differences in episodic memory performance in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)/Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) are inconsistent and task dependent. The inconsistencies may be attributed to the different tasks drawing on different memory processes. Few studies have examined episodic memory impairment in the above groups using memory tests that facilitate encoding, to distinguish memory deficits due to impairment of specific processes. We examined the memory performance of 106 AD patients, 51 FTD patients, 26 DLB/PDD patients, and 37 controls using the Five-Words Test, a 5-item memory test that facilitates encoding. The patient groups did not differ in modified Mini Mental State Examination scores. AD patients scored lowest on the Five-Words Test overall, and showed the greatest reduction from immediate total recall to delayed free recall relative to the other 2 groups, consistent with a predominantly consolidation deficit. DLB/PDD patients showed the largest improvement from delayed free to delayed total recall relative to the other 2 groups, consistent with a predominantly retrieval deficit. Deficits in both consolidation and retrieval underlie the memory impairment of the patients, to different extents, and contribute to the theoretical understanding of the nature of the memory impairment of the patient groups.

  10. Souvenaid reduces behavioral deficits and improves social cognition skills in frontotemporal dementia: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Matteo; Serrati, Carlo; Guida, Silvia; Mattei, Chiara; Abate, Lucia; Massucco, Davide; Sassos, Davide; Amore, Mario; Krueger, Frank; Cocito, Leonardo; Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Souvenaid™ is a nutraceutical compound thought to positively enhance synaptic function. In line with this mechanism of action, Souvenaid™ has been shown to improve cognitive function in subjects with mild Alzheimer's disease in randomized clinical trials. To date, however, the potential of Souvenaid™ to improve cognitive functioning in subjects with other neurodegenerative conditions also characterized by synaptic loss has not been explored. To evaluate the impact of Souvenaid™ on executive functions, social cognition and behavioral disturbances in subjects with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD). Twenty-six subjects with bv-FTD were enrolled in the study and randomized to Souvenaid™ (125 ml/day) or placebo groups. After 12 weeks, subjects were switched between the two groups. All subjects, blinded to treatment, underwent clinical and cognitive evaluations at enrollment, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks. Treatment with Souvenaid™ was associated with a significant reduction of behavioral symptoms and an increase in Theory of Mind skills compared to placebo, which both returned to baseline when Souvenaid™ was discontinued. Souvenaid™ did not have an effect on executive functions. Our results provide evidence of the potential of Souvenaid™ therapy for the treatment of behavioral disturbances and social cognition skills in FTD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Facial Emotion Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Comparison With Alzheimer Disease and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Bora, Emre; Velakoulis, Dennis; Walterfang, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Behavioral disturbances and lack of empathy are distinctive clinical features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in comparison to Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this meta-analytic review was to compare facial emotion recognition performances of bvFTD with healthy controls and AD. The current meta-analysis included a total of 19 studies and involved comparisons of 288 individuals with bvFTD and 329 healthy controls and 162 bvFTD and 147 patients with AD. Facial emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to the healthy controls (d = 1.81) and AD (d = 1.23). In bvFTD, recognition of negative emotions, especially anger (d = 1.48) and disgust (d = 1.41), were severely impaired. Emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to AD in all emotions other than happiness. Impairment of emotion recognition is a relatively specific feature of bvFTD. Routine assessment of social-cognitive abilities including emotion recognition can be helpful in better differentiating between cortical dementias such as bvFTD and AD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Frontotemporal hypoactivity during a reality monitoring paradigm is associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, Christian; Endestad, Tor; Sigvartsen, Niels Petter B; Server, Andres; Bolstad, Ingeborg; Johansson, Mikael; Andreassen, Ole A; Jensen, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    Impaired monitoring of internally generated information has been proposed to be one component in the development and maintenance of delusions. The present study investigated the neural correlates underlying the monitoring processes and whether they were associated with delusions. Twenty healthy controls and 19 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were administrated a reality monitoring paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging. During encoding participants were instructed to associate a statement with either a presented (viewed condition) or an imagined picture (imagined condition). During the monitoring session in the scanner, participants were presented with old and new statements and their task was to identify whether a given statement was associated with the viewed condition, imagined condition, or if it was new. Patients showed significantly reduced accuracy in the imagined condition with performance negatively associated with degree of delusions. This was accompanied with reduced activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left hippocampus in the patient group. The severity of delusions was negatively correlated with the blood-oxygenation-level dependent response in the left hippocampus. The results suggest that weakened monitoring is associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and that this may be mediated by a frontotemporal dysfunction.

  13. The Accuracy of INECO Frontal Screening in the Diagnosis of Executive Dysfunction in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Valéria S; Cecchini, Mário A; Cassimiro, Luciana; Viana, Rene; Lima-Silva, Thais B; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Carvalho, Viviane Amaral; Guimarães, Henrique C; Caramelli, Paulo; Balthazar, Márcio L F; Damasceno, Benito; Brucki, Sônia M D; Nitrini, Ricardo; Yassuda, Mônica S

    2018-05-04

    Executive dysfunction is a common symptom in neurodegenerative disorders and is in need of easy-to-apply screening tools that might identify it. The aims of the present study were to examine some of the psychometric characteristics of the Brazilian version of the INECO frontal screening (IFS), and to investigate its accuracy to diagnose executive dysfunction in dementia and its accuracy to differentiate Alzheimer disease (AD) from the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Patients diagnosed with bvFTD (n=18) and AD (n=20), and 15 healthy controls completed a neuropsychological battery, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, the Clinical Dementia Rating, and the IFS. The IFS had acceptable internal consistency (α=0.714) and was significantly correlated with general cognitive measures and with neuropsychological tests. The IFS had adequate accuracy to differentiate patients with dementia from healthy controls (AUC=0.768, cutoff=19.75, sensitivity=0.80, specificity=0.63), but low accuracy to differentiate bvFTD from AD (AUC=0.594, cutoff=16.75, sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.600). The present study suggested that the IFS may be used to screen for executive dysfunction in dementia. Nonetheless, it should be used with caution in the differential diagnosis between AD and bvFTD.

  14. Conceptualizing neuropsychiatric diseases with multimodal data-driven meta-analyses – The case of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Matthias L.; Laird, Angela R.; Chwiesko, Caroline; Deuschl, Christine; Schneider, Else; Bzdok, Danilo; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Neumann, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Uniform coordinate systems in neuroimaging research have enabled comprehensive systematic and quantitative meta-analyses. Such approaches are particularly relevant for neuropsychiatric diseases, the understanding of their symptoms, prediction and treatment. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a common neurodegenerative syndrome, is characterized by deep alterations in behavior and personality. Investigating this ‘nexopathy’ elucidates the healthy social and emotional brain. Methods Here, we combine three multimodal meta-analyses approaches – anatomical & activation likelihood estimates and behavioral domain profiles – to identify neural correlates of bvFTD in 417 patients and 406 control subjects and to extract mental functions associated with this disease by meta-analyzing functional activation studies in the comprehensive probabilistic functional brain atlas of the BrainMap database. Results The analyses identify the frontomedian cortex, basal ganglia, anterior insulae and thalamus as most relevant hubs, with a regional dissociation between atrophy and hypometabolism. Neural networks affected by bvFTD were associated with emotion and reward processing, empathy and executive functions (mainly inhibition), suggesting these functions as core domains affected by the disease and finally leading to its clinical symptoms. In contrast, changes in theory of mind or mentalizing abilities seem to be secondary phenomena of executive dysfunctions. Conclusions The study creates a novel conceptual framework to understand neuropsychiatric diseases by powerful data-driven meta-analytic approaches that shall be extended to the whole neuropsychiatric spectrum in the future. PMID:24763126

  15. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration related proteins induce only subtle memory-related deficits when bilaterally overexpressed in the dorsal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Robert D.; Wang, David B.; Cain, Cooper D.; Schrott, Lisa M.; Ramirez, Julio J.; King, Michael A.; Klein, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a neurodegenerative disease that involves cognitive decline and dementia. To model the hippocampal neurodegeneration and memory-related behavioral impairment that occurs in FTLD and other tau and TDP-43 proteinopathy diseases, we used an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector to induce bilateral expression of either microtubule-associated protein tau or transactive response DNA binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) in adult rat dorsal hippocampus. Human wild-type forms of tau or TDP-43 were expressed. The vectors/doses were designed for moderate expression levels within neurons. Rats were evaluated for acquisition and retention in the Morris water task over 12 weeks after gene transfer. Neither vector altered acquisition performance compared to controls. In measurements of retention, there was impairment in the TDP-43 group. Histological examination revealed specific loss of dentate gyrus granule cells and concomitant gliosis proximal to the injection site in the TDP-43 group, with shrinkage of the dorsal hippocampus. Despite specific tau pathology, the tau gene transfer surprisingly did not cause obvious neuronal loss or behavioral impairment. The data demonstrate that TDP-43 produced mild behavioral impairment and hippocampal neurodegeneration in rats, whereas tau did not. The models could be of value for studying mechanisms of FTLD and other diseases with tau and TDP-43 pathology in the hippocampus including Alzheimer's disease, with relevance to early stage mild impairment. PMID:22177996

  16. A novel frameshift GRN mutation results in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with a distinct clinical phenotype in two siblings: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Miura, Takeshi; Mezaki, Naomi; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-09-15

    Progranulin gene (GRN) mutations are major causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. To date, 68 pathogenic GRN mutations have been identified. However, very few of these mutations have been reported in Asians. Moreover, some GRN mutations manifest with familial phenotypic heterogeneity. Here, we present a novel GRN mutation resulting in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with a distinct clinical phenotype, and we review reports of GRN mutations associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity. We describe the case of a 74-year-old woman with left frontotemporal lobe atrophy who presented with progressive anarthria and non-fluent aphasia. Her brother had been diagnosed with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) with right-hand limb-kinetic apraxia, aphasia, and a similar pattern of brain atrophy. Laboratory blood examinations did not reveal abnormalities that could have caused cognitive dysfunction. In the cerebrospinal fluid, cell counts and protein concentrations were within normal ranges, and concentrations of tau protein and phosphorylated tau protein were also normal. Since similar familial cases due to mutation of GRN and microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) were reported, we performed genetic analysis. No pathological mutations of MAPT were identified, but we identified a novel GRN frameshift mutation (c.1118_1119delCCinsG: p.Pro373ArgX37) that resulted in progranulin haploinsufficiency. This is the first report of a GRN mutation associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity in Japan. Literature review of GRN mutations associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity revealed no tendency of mutation sites. The role of progranulin has been reported in this and other neurodegenerative diseases, and the analysis of GRN mutations may lead to the discovery of a new therapeutic target.

  17. Phosphorylation of Threonine 175 Tau in the Induction of Tau Pathology in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-Frontotemporal Spectrum Disorder (ALS-FTSD). A Review.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, Alexander J; Hintermayer, Matthew A; Strong, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Approximately 50-60% of all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) will develop a deficit of frontotemporal function, ranging from frontotemporal dementia (FTD) to one or more deficits of neuropsychological, speech or language function which are collectively known as the frontotemporal spectrum disorders of ALS (ALS-FTSD). While the neuropathology underlying these disorders is most consistent with a widespread alteration in the metabolism of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), in both ALS with cognitive impairment (ALSci) and ALS with FTD (ALS-FTD; also known as MND-FTD) there is evidence for alterations in the metabolism of the microtubule associated protein tau. This alteration in tau metabolism is characterized by pathological phosphorylation at residue Thr 175 (pThr 175 tau) which in vitro is associated with activation of GSK3β (pTyr 216 GSK3β), phosphorylation of Thr 231 tau, and the formation of cytoplasmic inclusions with increased rates of cell death. This putative pathway of pThr 175 induction of pThr 231 and the formation of pathogenic tau inclusions has been recently shown to span a broad range of tauopathies, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and CTE in association with ALS (CTE-ALS). This pathway can be experimentally triggered through a moderate traumatic brain injury, suggesting that it is a primary neuropathological event and not secondary to a more widespread neuronal dysfunction. In this review, we discuss the neuropathological underpinnings of the postulate that ALS is associated with a tauopathy which manifests as a FTSD, and examine possible mechanisms by which phosphorylation at Thr 175 tau is induced. We hypothesize that this might lead to an unfolding of the hairpin structure of tau, activation of GSK3β and pathological tau fibril formation through the induction of cis -Thr 231 tau conformers. A potential role of TDP-43 acting synergistically with pathological tau metabolism is proposed.

  18. Establishing robust cognitive dimensions for characterization and differentiation of patients with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, frontotemporal dementia and depression.

    PubMed

    Beck, Irene R; Schmid, Nicole S; Berres, Manfred; Monsch, Andreas U

    2014-06-01

    The diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia requires detailed neuropsychological examinations. These examinations typically yield a large number of outcome variables, which may complicate the interpretation and communication of results. The purposes of this study were the following: (i) to reduce a large data set of interrelated neuropsychological variables to a smaller number of cognitive dimensions; (ii) to create a common metric for these dimensions (z-scores); and (iii) to study the ability of the cognitive dimensions to distinguish between groups of patients with different types of cognitive impairment. We tested 1646 patients with different forms of dementia or with a major depression with a standard (n = 632) or, if cognitively less affected, a challenging neuropsychological battery (n = 1014). To identify the underlying cognitive dimensions of the two test batteries, maximum likelihood factor analyses with a promax rotation were conducted. To interpret the sum scores of the factors as standard scores, we divided them by the standard deviation of a cognitively healthy sample (n = 1145). The factor analyses yielded seven factors for each test battery. The cognitive dimensions in both test batteries distinguished patients with different forms of dementia (MCI, Alzheimer's dementia or frontotemporal dementia) and patients with major depression. Furthermore, patients with stable MCI could be separated from patients with progressing MCI. Discriminant analyses with an independent new sample of patients (n = 306) revealed that the new dimension scores distinguished new samples of patients with MCI from patients with Alzheimer's dementia with high accuracy. These findings suggest that these cognitive dimensions may benefit neuropsychological diagnostics. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Establishing robust cognitive dimensions for characterization and differentiation of patients with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, frontotemporal dementia and depression

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Irene R; Schmid, Nicole S; Berres, Manfred; Monsch, Andreas U

    2014-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia requires detailed neuropsychological examinations. These examinations typically yield a large number of outcome variables, which may complicate the interpretation and communication of results. The purposes of this study were the following: (i) to reduce a large data set of interrelated neuropsychological variables to a smaller number of cognitive dimensions; (ii) to create a common metric for these dimensions (z-scores); and (iii) to study the ability of the cognitive dimensions to distinguish between groups of patients with different types of cognitive impairment. Methods We tested 1646 patients with different forms of dementia or with a major depression with a standard (n = 632) or, if cognitively less affected, a challenging neuropsychological battery (n = 1014). To identify the underlying cognitive dimensions of the two test batteries, maximum likelihood factor analyses with a promax rotation were conducted. To interpret the sum scores of the factors as standard scores, we divided them by the standard deviation of a cognitively healthy sample (n = 1145). Results The factor analyses yielded seven factors for each test battery. The cognitive dimensions in both test batteries distinguished patients with different forms of dementia (MCI, Alzheimer's dementia or frontotemporal dementia) and patients with major depression. Furthermore, patients with stable MCI could be separated from patients with progressing MCI. Discriminant analyses with an independent new sample of patients (n = 306) revealed that the new dimension scores distinguished new samples of patients with MCI from patients with Alzheimer's dementia with high accuracy. Conclusion These findings suggest that these cognitive dimensions may benefit neuropsychological diagnostics. PMID:24227657

  20. MicroRNA-29b Regulates the Expression Level of Human Progranulin, a Secreted Glycoprotein Implicated in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian; Herl, Lauren D.; Farese, Robert V.; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2010-01-01

    Progranulin deficiency is thought to cause some forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a major early-onset age-dependent neurodegenerative disease. How progranulin (PGRN) expression is regulated is largely unknown. We identified an evolutionarily conserved binding site for microRNA-29b (miR-29b) in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the human PGRN (hPGRN) mRNA. miR-29b downregulates the expression of luciferase through hPGRN or mouse PGRN (mPGRN) 3′UTRs, and the regulation was abolished by mutations in the miR-29b binding site. To examine the direct effect of manipulating endogenous miR-29b on hPGRN expression, we established a stable NIH3T3 cell line that expresses hPGRN under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. Ectopic expression of miR-29b decreased hPGRN expression at the both mRNA and protein levels. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous miR-29b with locked nucleic acid increased the production and secretion of hPGRN in NIH3T3 cells. Endogenous hPGRN in HEK 293 cells was also regulated by miR-29b. These findings identify miR-29b as a novel posttranscriptional regulator of PGRN expression, raising the possibility that miR-29b or other miRNAs might be targeted therapeutically to increase hPGRN levels in some FTD patients. PMID:20479936

  1. Neuropathologic features of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions visualized with ubiquitin-binding protein p62 immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pikkarainen, Maria; Hartikainen, Päivi; Alafuzoff, Irina

    2008-04-01

    Genetic, clinical, and neuropathologic heterogeneity have been observed in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin (Ubq)-positive inclusions (FTLD-U) and FTLD-U with motor neuron disease. Here, the distribution and morphologic features of neuronal and glial inclusions in the brains of 20 FTLD-U and 2 FTLD-U/motor neuron disease cases were assessed using immunohistochemistry for Ubq-binding protein p62. Eighteen cases displayed TAR DNA-binding protein 43-immunoreactive lesions and were classified as Types 3 (neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and neurites; 72%), 2 (primarily neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions; 17%), or 1 (primarily neurites; 11%) FTLD-U. The distribution of p62-immunoreactivity varied considerably in each type. Of 4 unclassifiable cases, 2 displayed p62-immunoreactive lesions suggestive of FTLD-U with a mutation in the charged multivesicular body protein 2B gene; 1 suggested basophilic inclusion body disease, and 1 was of a type not previously described. By immunohistochemistry for Ubq-binding protein p62, the distribution of abnormalities was wider than expected; in approximately half of the cases, there were p62-positive but TAR DNA-binding protein 43-negative inclusions in the cerebellum, a region not previously considered to be affected. In other regions, TAR DNA-binding protein 43-, Ubq-, and Ubq-binding protein p62 labeling of inclusions was variable. Whether variations in inclusion morphologies, immunoreactivity, and topographic distribution are due to methodologic factors, different stages of inclusion and disease evolution, different disease entities or biologic modifications of the same disease are presently unclear.

  2. Social Cognition Deficits: The Key to Discriminate Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia from Alzheimer's Disease Regardless of Amnesia?

    PubMed

    Bertoux, Maxime; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; O'Callaghan, Claire; Greve, Andrea; Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Relative sparing of episodic memory is a diagnostic criterion of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). However, increasing evidence suggests that bvFTD patients can show episodic memory deficits at a similar level as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Social cognition tasks have been proposed to distinguish bvFTD, but no study to date has explored the utility of such tasks for the diagnosis of amnestic bvFTD. Here, we contrasted social cognition performance of amnestic and non-amnestic bvFTD from AD, with a subgroup having confirmed in vivo pathology markers. Ninety-six participants (38 bvFTD and 28 AD patients as well as 30 controls) performed the short Social-cognition and Emotional Assessment (mini-SEA). BvFTD patients were divided into amnestic versus non-amnestic presentation using the validated Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT) assessing episodic memory. As expected, the accuracy of the FCSRT to distinguish the overall bvFTD group from AD was low (69.7% ) with ∼50% of bvFTD patients being amnestic. By contrast, the diagnostic accuracy of the mini-SEA was high (87.9% ). When bvFTD patients were split on the level of amnesia, mini-SEA diagnostic accuracy remained high (85.1% ) for amnestic bvFTD versus AD and increased to very high (93.9% ) for non-amnestic bvFTD versus AD. Social cognition deficits can distinguish bvFTD and AD regardless of amnesia to a high degree and provide a simple way to distinguish both diseases at presentation. These findings have clear implications for the diagnostic criteria of bvFTD. They suggest that the emphasis should be on social cognition deficits with episodic memory deficits not being a helpful diagnostic criterion in bvFTD.

  3. All Is Not Lost: Positive Behaviors in Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Akira; Leyton, Cristian E; Foxe, David; Landin-Romero, Ramon; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2016-09-06

    Anecdotal evidence indicates that some patients with dementia exhibit novel or increased positive behaviors, such as painting or singing, after the disease onset. Due to the lack of objective measures, however, the frequency and nature of these changes has not been formally investigated. This study aimed to systematically identify changes in these behaviors in the two most common younger-onset dementia syndromes: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Sixty-three caregivers of patients with dementia (32 caregivers of AD patients and 31 caregivers of bvFTD patients) participated in the study. Caregivers rated the presence and frequency of positive and negative behavior changes after the onset of dementia using the Hypersensory and Social/Emotional Scale (HSS) questionnaire, focusing on three domains: sensory processing, cognitive skills, and social/emotional processing. Six composites scores were obtained reflecting these three domains (two composite scores for each domain). Differences across scores and ratios of increased and decreased behaviors were analyzed between AD and bvFTD, at different disease severity levels. After disease onset, significant changes in the sensory processing domain were observed across disease severity levels, particularly in AD. Composite scores of the other domains did not change significantly. Importantly, however, some novel or increased positive behaviors were present in between 10% (Music activities) and 70% (Hypersensitivity) of AD and bvFTD patients, regardless of disease severity. We provide the first systematic investigation of positive behaviors in AD and bvFTD. The newly developed HSS questionnaire is a valid measure to characterize changes and progression of positive behaviors in patients with dementia.

  4. Can cognitive assessment really discriminate early stages of Alzheimer's and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia at initial clinical presentation?

    PubMed

    Reul, Sophia; Lohmann, Hubertus; Wiendl, Heinz; Duning, Thomas; Johnen, Andreas

    2017-08-09

    Neuropsychological testing is considered crucial for differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). In-depth neuropsychological assessment revealed specific dysfunctions in the two dementia syndromes. However, a significant overlap of cognitive impairments exists in early disease stages. We questioned whether a standard neuropsychological assessment at initial clinical presentation can delineate patients with AD versus bvFTD. In a retrospective approach, we evaluated and compared how cognitive profiles assessed at initial clinical presentation predicted the diagnosis of later verified AD (n = 43) and bvFTD (n = 26). Additionally, the neuropsychological standard domains memory, language, visuospatial skills, executive functions, praxis and social cognition were subjected to stepwise discriminant analysis to compare their differential contribution to diagnosis. Regardless of diagnosis, a percentage of patients presented with major deterioration in a wide range of cognitive domains when compared with age-matched normative data. Only few significant differences were detected on the group level: Patients with AD were relatively more impaired in the verbal recall, verbal recognition, figure copy, and surprisingly in the executive subdomains, set shifting and processing speed whereas bvFTD was characterised by more deficits in imitation of face postures. A combination of tests for verbal recall, imitation of limb and face postures, and figure copy showed the greatest discriminatory power. Our results imply that the contribution of a standard neuropsychological assessment is limited for differential diagnosis of AD and bvFTD at initial presentation. In contrast to current clinical guidelines, executive functions are neither particularly nor exclusively impaired in patients with bvFTD when assessed within a standard clinical neuropsychological test battery. The significant overlap of bvFTD and AD

  5. A Novel MAPT Mutation, G55R, in a Frontotemporal Dementia Patient Leads to Altered Tau Function

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Elmer; Barczak, Anna; Chodakowska-Żebrowska, Małgorzata; Barcikowska, Maria; Feinstein, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Over two dozen mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule associated protein tau cause a variety of neurodegenerative dementias known as tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), PSP, CBD and Pick's disease. The vast majority of these mutations map to the C-terminal region of tau possessing microtubule assembly and microtubule dynamics regulatory activities as well as the ability to promote pathological tau aggregation. Here, we describe a novel and non-conservative tau mutation (G55R) mapping to an alternatively spliced exon encoding part of the N-terminal region of the protein in a patient with the behavioral variant of FTD. Although less well understood than the C-terminal region of tau, the N-terminal region can influence both MT mediated effects as well as tau aggregation. The mutation changes an uncharged glycine to a basic arginine in the midst of a highly conserved and very acidic region. In vitro, 4-repeat G55R tau nucleates microtubule assembly more effectively than wild-type 4-repeat tau; surprisingly, this effect is tau isoform specific and is not observed in a 3-repeat G55R tau versus 3-repeat wild-type tau comparison. In contrast, the G55R mutation has no effect upon the abilities of tau to regulate MT growing and shortening dynamics or to aggregate. Additionally, the mutation has no effect upon kinesin translocation in a microtubule gliding assay. Together, (i) we have identified a novel tau mutation mapping to a mutation deficient region of the protein in a bvFTD patient, and (ii) the G55R mutation affects the ability of tau to nucleate microtubule assembly in vitro in a 4-repeat tau isoform specific manner. This altered capability could markedly affect in vivo microtubule function and neuronal cell biology. We consider G55R to be a candidate mutation for bvFTD since additional criteria required to establish causality are not yet available for assessment. PMID:24086739

  6. Ugly aesthetic perception associated with emotional changes in experience of art by behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Bretonnière, Cédric; Evrard, Christelle; Rocher, Laetitia; Mazzietti, Audric; Koenig, Olivier; Vercelletto, Martine; Derkinderen, Pascal; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    The aesthetic experience through art is a window into the study of emotions. Patients with behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) have early alteration of emotional processing. A new appreciation of art has been reported in some of these patients. We designed a computerized task using 32 abstract paintings that allowed us to investigate the integrity of patients' emotions when viewing the artwork. We evaluated both conscious and explicit appraisal of emotions [aesthetic judgment (beautiful/ugly), emotional relevance (affected or not by the painting), emotional valence (pleasant/unpleasant), emotional reaction (adjective choice) and arousal] and unconscious processing. Fifteen bvFTD patients and 15 healthy controls were included. BvFTD patients reported that they were "little touched" by the paintings. Aesthetic judgment was very different between the two groups: the paintings were considered ugly (negative aesthetic bias) and unpleasant (negative emotional bias) more often by the patients than by controls. Valence and aesthetic judgments correlated in both groups. In addition, there was a positive bias in the implicit task and for explicit emotional responses. Patients frequently chose the word "sad" and rarely expressed themselves with such adjectives as "happy". Our results suggest that bvFTD patients can give an aesthetic judgment, but present abstraction difficulties, as spectators, resulting from impairments in the cognitive processes involved. They also have difficulties in terms of emotional processes with the loss of the ability to feel the emotion per se (i.e., to feel an emotion faced with art) linked to behaviour assessment. This cognitive approach allows us to better understand which spectators are bvFTD patients and to show interactions between emotions and behavioural disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Trehalose upregulates progranulin expression in human and mouse models of GRN haploinsufficiency: a novel therapeutic lead to treat frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Holler, Christopher J; Taylor, Georgia; McEachin, Zachary T; Deng, Qiudong; Watkins, William J; Hudson, Kathryn; Easley, Charles A; Hu, William T; Hales, Chadwick M; Rossoll, Wilfried; Bassell, Gary J; Kukar, Thomas

    2016-06-24

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted growth factor important for neuronal survival and may do so, in part, by regulating lysosome homeostasis. Mutations in the PGRN gene (GRN) are a common cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and lead to disease through PGRN haploinsufficiency. Additionally, complete loss of PGRN in humans leads to neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), a lysosomal storage disease. Importantly, Grn-/- mouse models recapitulate pathogenic lysosomal features of NCL. Further, GRN variants that decrease PGRN expression increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Together these findings demonstrate that insufficient PGRN predisposes neurons to degeneration. Therefore, compounds that increase PGRN levels are potential therapeutics for multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we performed a cell-based screen of a library of known autophagy-lysosome modulators and identified multiple novel activators of a human GRN promoter reporter including several common mTOR inhibitors and an mTOR-independent activator of autophagy, trehalose. Secondary cellular screens identified trehalose, a natural disaccharide, as the most promising lead compound because it increased endogenous PGRN in all cell lines tested and has multiple reported neuroprotective properties. Trehalose dose-dependently increased GRN mRNA as well as intracellular and secreted PGRN in both mouse and human cell lines and this effect was independent of the transcription factor EB (TFEB). Moreover, trehalose rescued PGRN deficiency in human fibroblasts and neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from GRN mutation carriers. Finally, oral administration of trehalose to Grn haploinsufficient mice significantly increased PGRN expression in the brain. This work reports several novel autophagy-lysosome modulators that enhance PGRN expression and identifies trehalose as a promising therapeutic for raising PGRN levels to treat

  8. Frontotemporal dementia with Pick-type histology associated with Q336R mutation in the tau gene.

    PubMed

    Pickering-Brown, S M; Baker, M; Nonaka, T; Ikeda, K; Sharma, S; Mackenzie, J; Simpson, S A; Moore, J W; Snowden, J S; de Silva, R; Revesz, T; Hasegawa, M; Hutton, M; Mann, D M A

    2004-06-01

    In this report, we describe the clinical and neuropathological features of a case of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD), with onset at 58 years of age and disease duration of 10 years, associated with a novel mutation, Q336R, in the tau gene (tau). In vitro studies concerning the properties of tau proteins bearing this mutation, with respect to microtubule assembly and tau filament aggregation, are reported. Clinically, the patient showed alterations in memory, language and executive functions and marked behavioural change consistent with FTD, although the extent of memory impairment was more than is characteristic of FTD. At autopsy, there was degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes associated with the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins in swollen (Pick) cells and intraneuronal inclusions (Pick bodies). By immunohistochemistry, the Pick bodies contained both 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau proteins although, because no fresh tissues were available for analysis, the exact isoform composition of the aggregated tau proteins could not be determined. Neurons within frontal cortex contained neurofibrillary tangle-like structures, comprising both straight and twisted tubules, or Pick bodies in which the filaments were short and randomly orientated. In vitro, and in common with other tau missense mutations, Q336R caused an increase in tau fibrillogenesis. However, in contrast to most other tau missense mutations, Q336R increased, not decreased, the ability of mutant tau to promote microtubule assembly. Nonetheless, this latter functional change may likewise be detrimental to neuronal function by inducing a compensatory phosphorylation that may yield increased intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau species that are also liable to fibrillize. We believe the mutation is indeed pathogenic and disease causing and not simply a coincidental rare and benign polymorphism. Since this mutation is segregating with the FTD clinical and neuropathological phenotype, it has

  9. Spatio-temporal and kinematic gait analysis in patients with Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease through 3D motion capture.

    PubMed

    Rucco, Rosaria; Agosti, Valeria; Jacini, Francesca; Sorrentino, Pierpaolo; Varriale, Pasquale; De Stefano, Manuela; Milan, Graziella; Montella, Patrizia; Sorrentino, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant of Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD) are characterized respectively by atrophy in the medial temporal lobe with memory loss and prefrontal and anterior temporal degeneration with dysexecutive syndrome. In this study, we hypothesized that specific gait patterns are induced by either frontal or temporal degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we studied the gait pattern in bvFTD (23) and AD (22) patients in single and dual task ("motor" and "cognitive") conditions. To detect subtle alterations, we performed motion analysis estimating both spatio-temporal parameters and joint excursions. In the single task condition, the bvFTD group was more unstable and slower compared to healthy subjects, while only two stability parameters were compromised in the AD group. During the motor dual task, both velocity and stability parameters worsened further in the bvFTD group. In the same experimental conditions, AD patients showed a significantly lower speed and stride length than healthy subjects. During the cognitive dual task, a further impairment of velocity and stability parameters was observed in the bvFTD group. Interestingly, during the cognitive dual task, the gait performance of the AD group markedly deteriorated, as documented by the impairment of more indices of velocity and stability. Finally, the kinematic data of thigh, knee, and ankle were more helpful in revealing gait impairment than the spatio-temporal parameters alone. In conclusion, our data showed that the dysexecutive syndrome induces specific gait alterations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the gait worsens in the AD patients when the cognitive resources are stressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Modified Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI-mod) for Patients with Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Alzheimer's Disease, and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, Noora-Maria; Hallikainen, Ilona; Hänninen, Tuomo; Jokelainen, Jari; Krüger, Johanna; Hall, Anette; Pikkarainen, Maria; Soininen, Hilkka; Remes, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    While behavioral symptoms are both early and prevalent features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), they can be present in other types of dementia as well, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and even mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI) was specifically developed to capture the behavioral and personality changes in bvFTD; it has also been modified into a self-administered caregiver questionnaire (FBI-mod). We examined the utility of the FBI-mod in differentiating bvFTD (n = 26), primary progressive aphasia (PPA) (n = 7), AD (n = 53), and MCI (n = 50) patients, and investigated how the FBI-mod may be associated with neuropsychological measures. The bvFTD patients scored significantly higher as compared to all other patient groups on the FBI-mod Total (p < 0.005), Negative (p < 0.005), and Positive (p < 0.01) scores. The cut-off point for the FBI-mod Total score that best discriminated the bvFTD and AD patients in our sample was 16, thus substantially lower than reported for the original FBI. For the bvFTD group, only mild correlations emerged between the FBI-mod and the cognitive measures. However, significant correlations between the FBI-mod and depressive symptoms as measured by the BDI-II were found for bvFTD. This suggests that while behavioral symptoms appear independent from cognitive deficits in bvFTD, they may nevertheless be interrelated with depressive symptoms. We conclude that the FBI-mod is an easily administered behavioral scale that can aid in differential diagnosis of bvFTD and should be used in clinical practice. The FBI-mod may further be considered as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  11. Dignity in people with frontotemporal dementia and similar disorders - a qualitative study of the perspective of family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sagbakken, Mette; Nåden, Dagfinn; Ulstein, Ingun; Kvaal, Kari; Langhammer, Birgitta; Rognstad, May-Karin

    2017-06-23

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) constitutes on average 10-15% of dementia in younger persons (≤65 years old), but can also affect older people. These patients demonstrate a decline in social conduct, and/or language aphasias, apathy, and loss of insight that is gradual and progressive. Preservation of dignity seems to be highly relevant both before and after admission to different types of institutionalized care, but the research is scant. From the perspective of close relatives, this study aims to develop knowledge related to dignified or undignified care of patients with FTD and similar conditions. A qualitative, descriptive, and explorative design were employed to address the aims of this study. We interviewed nine relatives of people with FTD and similar conditions living in nursing homes, and two relatives of people living at home but attending day center 5 days a week. Relatives described the transition from being a close relative to someone who had little influence or knowledge of what constituted the care and the daily life of their loved ones. According to relatives' descriptions, patients are deprived of dignity in various ways: through limited interaction with peers and close relatives, limited confirmation of identity through staff who know them well, lack of possibilities for making autonomous decisions or entertaining meaningful roles or activities. Examples provided from the day care centres show how dignity is maintained through identity-strengthening activities conducted in different places, under various kinds of supervision and care, and together with people representing different roles and functions. Maintaining a link with the world outside the institution, through closer cooperation between the institution and family members, and/or by the use of day care centres, seems to facilitate prevention of many of the factors that may threaten dignified care.

  12. Using the revised diagnostic criteria for frontotemporal dementia in India: evidence of an advanced and florid disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amitabha; Dutt, Aparna; Ghosh, Madhura; Bhargava, Pallavi; Rao, Sulakshana

    2013-01-01

    The International Consortium (FTDC) that revised the diagnostic criteria for behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) did not have an Asian representation. Whether the revised criteria are equally useful in the early detection of Asian bvFTD patients therefore remains largely unexplored. Earlier studies have indicated differences in clinical manifestations in Indian and other Asian bvFTD patients when compared to western groups. There is an urgent need for clarification, given the projected exponential rise in dementia in these countries and the imminent clinical trials on bvFTD. To assess how Indian bvFTD patients fulfil the FTDC criteria, hypothesizing that our patients might present differently early in the illness. In a hospital-based retrospective observational study, we assessed 48 probable bvFTD patients, diagnosed according to the FTDC criteria, for the speed with which these criteria were fulfilled, the frequency of individual symptoms and their order of appearance during the illness. Most of our patients presented with moderate to severe dementia, in spite of having relatively short onset to diagnosis times. Patients on average took 1.4 years from onset to meet the FTDC criteria, with 90% of them presenting with four or more symptoms at diagnosis. Disinhibition was the commonest symptom and the first symptom in most patients. With most patients presenting with advanced and florid disease, the FTDC criteria have little additional impact in early identification of bvFTD in India. Modifying the criteria further could allow detection of Indian patients early enough for their inclusion in future clinical trials.

  13. C9orf72 and RAB7L1 regulate vesicle trafficking in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Manzano, Raquel; Lee, Yi; Dafinca, Ruxandra; Aoki, Misako; Douglas, Andrew G L; Varela, Miguel A; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Scaber, Jakub; Barbagallo, Paola; Vader, Pieter; Mäger, Imre; Ezzat, Kariem; Turner, Martin R; Ito, Naoki; Gasco, Samanta; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; El Andaloussi, Samir; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Talbot, Kevin; Wood, Matthew J A

    2017-04-01

    A non-coding hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of the C9orf72 gene is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (C9ALS/FTD), however, the precise molecular mechanism by which the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion directs C9ALS/FTD pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report a novel disease mechanism arising due to the interaction of C9ORF72 with the RAB7L1 GTPase to regulate vesicle trafficking. Endogenous interaction between C9ORF72 and RAB7L1 was confirmed in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion led to haploinsufficiency resulting in severely defective intracellular and extracellular vesicle trafficking and a dysfunctional trans-Golgi network phenotype in patient-derived fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons. Genetic ablation of RAB7L1or C9orf72 in SH-SY5Y cells recapitulated the findings in C9ALS/FTD fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell neurons. When C9ORF72 was overexpressed or antisense oligonucleotides were targeted to the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion to upregulate normal variant 1 transcript levels, the defective vesicle trafficking and dysfunctional trans-Golgi network phenotypes were reversed, suggesting that both loss- and gain-of-function mechanisms play a role in disease pathogenesis. In conclusion, we have identified a novel mechanism for C9ALS/FTD pathogenesis highlighting the molecular regulation of intracellular and extracellular vesicle trafficking as an important pathway in C9ALS/FTD pathogenesis. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Episodic Memory Dysfunction in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: A Clinical And FDG-PET Study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Matarrubia, Marta; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Valles-Salgado, María; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Episodic memory disturbance is still considered as an exclusion criterion for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), but growing evidence suggests that memory can be impaired. Our main purposes were to assess episodic memory in a group of bvFTD patients comparatively with Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and analyze the relationship between episodic memory and brain metabolism measured using positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Twenty-six bvFTD, 29 AD, and 24 healthy controls were included. Episodic memory was assessed by the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT), which controls for effective encoding and measures memory consolidation processing. All participants underwent FDG-PET brain scans to provide data for voxel-based brain mapping analysis. Half of bvFTD patients had a deficit of total, free delayed, and total free delayed recall as severe as AD patients (amnestic-FTD). The other half had FCSRT scores similar to controls (non-amnestic-FTD). Imaging analyses revealed that amnestic-FTD showed bilateral lower metabolism than non-amnestic-FTD in anterior parahippocampal and inferior temporal gyri. Additionally, FCSRT total and total delayed scores were inversely correlated with parahippocampal metabolism in both bvFTD and AD. Besides, bvFTD showed an inverse association among FCSRT and inferior temporal metabolism. Our findings support that bvFTD could present a genuine amnesia affecting storage and consolidation abilities, which involves structures implicated in the Papez circuit, as occurs in AD, and also inferior temporal regions. These results contribute to understanding the mechanisms underpinning memory dysfunction in bvFTD, and may be relevant to further revisions of the current diagnostic criteria.

  15. Brain structural correlates of executive and social cognition profiles in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and elderly bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Pinasco, Clara; Roca, María; Ferrari, Jesica; Couto, Blas; García-Cordero, Indira; Ibañez, Agustín; Cruz, Francy; Reyes, Pablo; Matallana, Diana; Manes, Facundo; Cetcovich, Marcelo; Torralva, Teresa

    2017-02-17

    An early stage of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) often displays a mix of behavioral disturbances and personality changes hindering a differential diagnosis from elderly bipolar disorder (BD), making this process a big challenge. However, no studies have compared these pathologies from neuropsychological and neuroanatomical perspectives. The aim of the present study was to compare the executive functions (EF) and social cognition profiles as well as the structural neuroimaging of bvFTD and elderly patients with BD. First, we compared the executive and social cognition performances of 16 bvFTD patients, 13 BD patients and 22 healthy controls. Second, we compared grey matter volumes in both groups of patients and controls using voxel-based morphometry. Lastly, we examined the brain regions where atrophy might be associated with specific impairments in bvFTD and BD patients. Compared to controls, bvFTD patients showed deficits in working memory, abstraction capacity, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, verbal fluency and theory of mind (ToM). Patients with BD showed lower performance than controls in terms of abstraction capacity and verbal inhibitory control. In bvFTD patients, atrophy of frontal, temporal and insular cortices was related to EF deficits. Atrophy of the amygdala, the hippocampus, the parahippocampal gyrus, the putamen, the insula, the precuneus, the right temporo-parietal junction and superior temporal pole was associated to ToM impairments. No significant associations between atrophy and EF performance were observed in BD patients. BvFTD patients showed greater EF and ToM deficits than BD patients. Moreover, compared to BD, bvFTD patients exhibited a significant decrease in GM volume in frontal, temporal and parietal regions. Our results provide the first comparison of EF, social cognition and neuroanatomical profiles of bvFTD and elderly BD patients. These findings shed light on differential diagnosis of these disorders and

  16. Is blue light, cryptochrome in the eye, and magnetite in the brain involved in the development of frontotemporal dementia and other diseases?

    PubMed

    Størmer, Fredrik C

    2015-04-01

    When cryptochrome in the retina is exposed to blue light, it undergo series of complicated chemical reactions. One of these intermediates has magnetic properties. It could be a link between the magnetic stage of cryptochrome in the retina and magnetite in the brain. A disturbance in this system could be involved in the development of frontotemporal dementia and other mental disturbances like Alzheimer's disease. There could also be a link between circadian rhythms and memory dysfunction connected to schizophrenia, type 2 diabetes, and blue light. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduced C9orf72 protein levels in frontal cortex of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration brain with the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Waite, Adrian J; Bäumer, Dirk; East, Simon; Neal, James; Morris, Huw R; Ansorge, Olaf; Blake, Derek J

    2014-07-01

    An intronic G(4)C(2) hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Several mechanisms including RNA toxicity, repeat-associated non-AUG translation mediated dipeptide protein aggregates, and haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder. The aims of this study were to compare the use of two different Southern blot probes for detection of repeat expansions in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathological cohort and to determine the levels of C9orf72 transcript variants and protein isoforms in patients versus control subjects. Our Southern blot studies identified smaller repeat expansions (250-1800 bp) that were only detectable with the flanking probe highlighting the potential for divergent results using different Southern blotting protocols that could complicate genotype-phenotype correlation studies. Further, we characterize a new C9orf72 antibody and show for the first time decreased C9orf72 protein levels in the frontal cortex from patients with a pathological hexanucleotide repeat expansion. These data suggest that a reduction in C9orf72 protein may be a consequence of the disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Portuguese family with the co-occurrence of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotypes due to progranulin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria R; Macário, Maria C; Ramos, Lina; Baldeiras, Inês; Ribeiro, Maria H; Santana, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    We and others have reported heterozygous progranulin mutations as an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It has been identified a complete progranulin deficiency because of a homozygous mutation in a sibling pair with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Here, we describe the first case of NCL caused by a homozygous progranulin mutation segregating in a family with neuropathological confirmed FTLD. In this FTLD-NCL family, we detail the clinical phenotype, neuropsychological evaluation and imaging data of our proband harboring a homozygous mutation, c.900_901dupGT, with serum progranulin level (<6 ng/mL). Symptoms included rapidly progressive visual deficit, slightly dysarthria, and cerebellar ataxia. The electroretinogram confirmed a severe attenuation of rod and cone responses compatible with retinal dystrophy diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging showed severe global cerebellar atrophy. In contrast, heterozygous relatives presented behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and some also developed extrapyramidal features compatible with corticobasal syndrome. Our findings suggest the importance of assessing serum progranulin levels in suspected recessive adult-onset NCL cases. Overall, a more holistic neurologic intervention is needed to guarantee a proper genetic counseling in cases like the present family where two distinct phenotypes are generated according to the individuals' mutation state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlated patterns of neuropsychological and behavioral symptoms in frontal variant of Alzheimer disease and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia: a comparative case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhou, Yu-Ying; Lu, Da; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hui-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Although the neuropathologic changes and diagnostic criteria for the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) are well-established, the clinical symptoms vary largely. Symptomatically, frontal variant of AD (fv-AD) presents very similarly to behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), which creates major challenges for differential diagnosis. Here, we report two patients who present with progressive cognitive impairment, early and prominent behavioral features, and significant frontotemporal lobe atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, consistent with an initial diagnosis of probable bvFTD. However, multimodal functional neuroimaging revealed neuropathological data consistent with a diagnosis of probable AD for one patient (pathology distributed in the frontal lobes) and a diagnosis of probable bvFTD for the other patient (hypometabolism in the bilateral frontal lobes). In addition, the fv-AD patient presented with greater executive impairment and milder behavioral symptoms relative to the bvFTD patient. These cases highlight that recognition of these atypical syndromes using detailed neuropsychological tests, biomarkers, and multimodal neuroimaging will lead to greater accuracy in diagnosis and patient management.

  20. Decreased integrity of the fronto-temporal fibers of the left inferior occipito-frontal fasciculus associated with auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oestreich, Lena K L; McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Whitford, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have been proposed to result from altered connectivity between frontal speech production regions and temporal speech perception regions. Whilst the dorsal language pathway, serviced by the arcuate fasciculus, has been extensively studied in relation to AVH, the ventral language pathway, serviced by the inferior occipito-frontal fasciculus (IOFF) has been rarely studied in relation to AVH. This study examined whether structural changes in anatomically defined subregions of the IOFF were associated with AVH in patients with schizophrenia. Diffusion tensor imaging scans and clinical data were obtained from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank for 113 schizophrenia patients, of whom 39 had lifetime experience of AVH (18 had current AVH, 21 had remitted AVH), 74 had no lifetime experience of AVH, and 40 healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with a lifetime experience of AVH exhibited reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in the fronto-temporal fibers of the left IOFF compared to both healthy controls and schizophrenia patients without AVH. In contrast, structural abnormalities in the temporal and occipital regions of the IOFF were observed bilaterally in both patient groups, relative to the healthy controls. These results suggest that while changes in the structural integrity of the bilateral IOFF are associated with schizophrenia per se, integrity reductions in the fronto-temporal fibers of the left IOFF may be specifically associated with AVH.

  1. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, gene deregulation in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and frontal cortex area 8: implications in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-Benito, Pol; Moreno, Jesús; Aso, Ester; Povedano, Mónica; Ferrer, Isidro

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptome arrays identifies 747 genes differentially expressed in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and 2,300 genes differentially expressed in frontal cortex area 8 in a single group of typical sALS cases without frontotemporal dementia compared with age-matched controls. Main up-regulated clusters in the anterior horn are related to inflammation and apoptosis; down-regulated clusters are linked to axoneme structures and protein synthesis. In contrast, up-regulated gene clusters in frontal cortex area 8 involve neurotransmission, synaptic proteins and vesicle trafficking, whereas main down-regulated genes cluster into oligodendrocyte function and myelin-related proteins. RT-qPCR validates the expression of 58 of 66 assessed genes from different clusters. The present results: a. reveal regional differences in de-regulated gene expression between the anterior horn of the spinal cord and frontal cortex area 8 in the same individuals suffering from sALS; b. validate and extend our knowledge about the complexity of the inflammatory response in the anterior horn of the spinal cord; and c. identify for the first time extensive gene up-regulation of neurotransmission and synaptic-related genes, together with significant down-regulation of oligodendrocyte- and myelin-related genes, as important contributors to the pathogenesis of frontal cortex alterations in the sALS/frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum complex at stages with no apparent cognitive impairment. PMID:28283675

  2. Face shape and face identity processing in behavioral variant fronto-temporal dementia: A specific deficit for familiarity and name recognition of famous faces.

    PubMed

    De Winter, François-Laurent; Timmers, Dorien; de Gelder, Beatrice; Van Orshoven, Marc; Vieren, Marleen; Bouckaert, Miriam; Cypers, Gert; Caekebeke, Jo; Van de Vliet, Laura; Goffin, Karolien; Van Laere, Koen; Sunaert, Stefan; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Van den Stock, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in face processing have been described in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD), primarily regarding the recognition of facial expressions. Less is known about face shape and face identity processing. Here we used a hierarchical strategy targeting face shape and face identity recognition in bvFTD and matched healthy controls. Participants performed 3 psychophysical experiments targeting face shape detection (Experiment 1), unfamiliar face identity matching (Experiment 2), familiarity categorization and famous face-name matching (Experiment 3). The results revealed group differences only in Experiment 3, with a deficit in the bvFTD group for both familiarity categorization and famous face-name matching. Voxel-based morphometry regression analyses in the bvFTD group revealed an association between grey matter volume of the left ventral anterior temporal lobe and familiarity recognition, while face-name matching correlated with grey matter volume of the bilateral ventral anterior temporal lobes. Subsequently, we quantified familiarity-specific and name-specific recognition deficits as the sum of the celebrities of which respectively only the name or only the familiarity was accurately recognized. Both indices were associated with grey matter volume of the bilateral anterior temporal cortices. These findings extent previous results by documenting the involvement of the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in familiarity detection and the right ATL in name recognition deficits in fronto-temporal lobar degeneration.

  3. An Investigation of Care-Based vs. Rule-Based Morality in Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Andrew R.; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Daianu, Madelaine; Fong, Sylvia S.; Mather, Michelle; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul; Mendez, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral changes in dementia, especially behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), may result in alterations in moral reasoning. Investigators have not clarified whether these alterations reflect differential impairment of care-based vs. rule-based moral behavior. This study investigated 18 bvFTD patients, 22 early onset Alzheimer’s disease (eAD) patients, and 20 healthy age-matched controls on care-based and rule-based items from the Moral Behavioral Inventory and the Social Norms Questionnaire, neuropsychological measures, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) regions of interest. There were significant group differences with the bvFTD patients rating care-based morality transgressions less severely than the eAD group and rule-based moral behavioral transgressions more severely than controls. Across groups, higher care-based morality ratings correlated with phonemic fluency on neuropsychological tests, whereas higher rule-based morality ratings correlated with increased difficulty set-shifting and learning new rules to tasks. On neuroimaging, severe care-based reasoning correlated with cortical volume in right anterior temporal lobe, and rule-based reasoning correlated with decreased cortical volume in the right orbitofrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that frontotemporal disease decreases care-based morality and facilitates rule-based morality possibly from disturbed contextual abstraction and set-shifting. Future research can examine whether frontal lobe disorders and bvFTD result in a shift from empathic morality to the strong adherence to conventional rules. PMID:26432341

  4. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  5. Alzheimer Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Automatic Classification Based on Cortical Atrophy for Single-Subject Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Möller, Christiane; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Versteeg, Adriaan; Tijms, Betty; de Munck, Jan C; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Swieten, John; Dopper, Elise; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Wink, Alle Meije

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of an image-based classifier to distinguish between Alzheimer disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in individual patients by using gray matter (GM) density maps computed from standard T1-weighted structural images obtained with multiple imagers and with independent training and prediction data. Materials and Methods The local institutional review board approved the study. Eighty-four patients with AD, 51 patients with bvFTD, and 94 control subjects were divided into independent training (n = 115) and prediction (n = 114) sets with identical diagnosis and imager type distributions. Training of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier used diagnostic status and GM density maps and produced voxelwise discrimination maps. Discriminant function analysis was used to estimate suitability of the extracted weights for single-subject classification in the prediction set. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated for image-based classifiers and neuropsychological z scores. Results Training accuracy of the SVM was 85% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 72% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 79% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD (P ≤ .029). Single-subject diagnosis in the prediction set when using the discrimination maps yielded accuracies of 88% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 85% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 82% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD, with a good to excellent AUC (range, 0.81-0.95; P ≤ .001). Machine learning-based categorization of AD versus bvFTD based on GM density maps outperforms classification based on neuropsychological test results. Conclusion The SVM can be used in single-subject discrimination and can help the clinician arrive at a diagnosis. The SVM can be used to distinguish disease-specific GM patterns in patients with AD

  6. Differential Neurotoxicity Related to Tetracycline Transactivator and TDP-43 Expression in Conditional TDP-43 Mouse Model of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, L; Shahidehpour, R; Kim, G; Keegan, J; Sadleir, K R; Russell, T; Csernansky, J; Mesulam, M; Vassar, R J; Wang, L; Dong, H; Geula, C

    2018-05-28

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is among the most prevalent dementias of early-onset. Pathologically, FTLD presents with tauopathy or TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathy. A biallelic mouse model of FTLD was produced on a mix FVB/129SVE background overexpressing wild-type human TDP-43 (hTDP-43) employing tetracycline transactivator (tTA), a system widely used in mouse models of neurological disorders. tTA activates hTDP-43 which is placed downstream of the tetracycline response element (TRE). The original study on this transgenic mouse found hippocampal degeneration following hTDP-43 expression, but did not account for independent effects of tTA protein. Here, we initially analyzed the neurotoxic effects of tTA in post-weaning age mice of either sex using immunostaining and area measurements of select brain regions. We observed tTA-dependent toxicity selectively in the hippocampus affecting the dentate gyrus significantly more than CA fields, whereas hTDP-43-dependent toxicity in bigenic mice occurred in most other cortical regions. Atrophy was associated with inflammation, activation of caspase-3 and loss of neurons. The atrophy associated with tTA expression was rescuable by tetracycline analog, doxycycline in the diet. MRI studies corroborated the patterns of atrophy. tTA-induced degeneration was strain-dependent and was rescued by moving the transgene onto a congenic C57BL/6 background. Despite significant hippocampal atrophy, behavioral tests in bigenic mice revealed no hippocampally mediated memory impairment. Significant atrophy in most cortical areas due solely to TDP-43 expression indicates that this mouse model remains useful for providing critical insight into co-occurrence of TDP-43 pathology, neurodegeneration and behavioral deficits in FTLD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The tTA expression system has been widely used in mice to model neurological disorders. The technique allows investigators to reversibly turn on or off disease causing

  7. Comparison of arterial spin labeling registration strategies in the multi-center GENetic frontotemporal dementia initiative (GENFI).

    PubMed

    Mutsaerts, Henri J M M; Petr, Jan; Thomas, David L; De Vita, Enrico; Cash, David M; van Osch, Matthias J P; Golay, Xavier; Groot, Paul F C; Ourselin, Sebastien; van Swieten, John; Laforce, Robert; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Borroni, Barbara; Galimberti, Daniela; Rowe, James B; Graff, Caroline; Pizzini, Francesca B; Finger, Elizabeth; Sorbi, Sandro; Castelo Branco, Miguel; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Masellis, Mario; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2018-01-01

    To compare registration strategies to align arterial spin labeling (ASL) with 3D T1-weighted (T1w) images, with the goal of reducing the between-subject variability of cerebral blood flow (CBF) images. Multi-center 3T ASL data were collected at eight sites with four different sequences in the multi-center GENetic Frontotemporal dementia Initiative (GENFI) study. In a total of 48 healthy controls, we compared the following image registration options: (I) which images to use for registration (perfusion-weighted images [PWI] to the segmented gray matter (GM) probability map (pGM) (CBF-pGM) or M0 to T1w (M0-T1w); (II) which transformation to use (rigid-body or non-rigid); and (III) whether to mask or not (no masking, M0-based FMRIB software library Brain Extraction Tool [BET] masking). In addition to visual comparison, we quantified image similarity using the Pearson correlation coefficient (CC), and used the Mann-Whitney U rank sum test. CBF-pGM outperformed M0-T1w (CC improvement 47.2% ± 22.0%; P < 0.001), and the non-rigid transformation outperformed rigid-body (20.6% ± 5.3%; P < 0.001). Masking only improved the M0-T1w rigid-body registration (14.5% ± 15.5%; P = 0.007). The choice of image registration strategy impacts ASL group analyses. The non-rigid transformation is promising but requires validation. CBF-pGM rigid-body registration without masking can be used as a default strategy. In patients with expansive perfusion deficits, M0-T1w may outperform CBF-pGM in sequences with high effective spatial resolution. BET-masking only improves M0-T1w registration when the M0 image has sufficient contrast. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:131-140. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Frontotemporal Dementias: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Have questions from the start? Call AFTD’s toll-free HelpLine at 866-507-7222 , or contact us by email at info@theaftd.org . For Persons Diagnosed AFTD holds a monthly online support group using the internet video platform Zoom. Contact the HelpLine at 866- ...

  9. Frontotemporal Dementia (Pick's Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... repetitive or compulsive behavior, and decreased energy and motivation. The second type primarily features symptoms of language ... repetitive or compulsive behavior, and decreased energy and motivation. The second type primarily features symptoms of language ...

  10. TDP-43 is a component of ubiquitin-positive tau-negative inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tetsuaki; Hasegawa, Masato; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2006-12-22

    Ubiquitin-positive tau-negative neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites are common pathological features in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with or without symptoms of motor neuron disease and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, we have identified a TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), a nuclear factor that functions in regulating transcription and alternative splicing, as a component of these structures in FTLD. Furthermore, skein-like inclusions, neuronal intranuclear inclusions, and glial inclusions in the spinal cord of ALS patients are also positive for TDP-43. Dephosphorylation treatment of the sarkosyl insoluble fraction has shown that abnormal phosphorylation takesmore » place in accumulated TDP-43. The common occurrence of intracellular accumulations of TDP-43 supports the hypothesis that these disorders represent a clinicopathological entity of a single disease, and suggests that they can be newly classified as a proteinopathy of TDP-43.« less

  11. The physiological and pathological biophysics of phase separation and gelation of RNA binding proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    St George-Hyslop, Peter; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Miyashita, Akinori; Phillips, Emma C; Qamar, Seema; Randle, Suzanne J; Wang, GuoZhen

    2018-04-30

    Many RNA binding proteins, including FUS, contain moderately repetitive, low complexity, intrinsically disordered domains. These sequence motifs have recently been found to underpin reversible liquid: liquid phase separation and gelation of these proteins, permitting them to reversibly transition from a monodispersed state to liquid droplet- or hydrogel-like states. This function allows the proteins to serve as scaffolds for the formation of reversible membraneless intracellular organelles such as nucleoli, stress granules and neuronal transport granules. Using FUS as an example, this review examines the biophysics of this physiological process, and reports on how mutations and changes in post-translational state alter phase behaviour, and lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in patients with "multisystem proteinopathy" and frontotemporal lobar degeneration phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Bortel, Inge; Nicolas, Gael; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Camuzat, Agnès; Wallon, David; De Septenville, Anne; Latouche, Morwena; Lattante, Serena; Kabashi, Edor; Jornea, Ludmila; Hannequin, Didier; Brice, Alexis

    2014-04-01

    hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations have been recently identified by exome sequencing in three families presenting with multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a rare complex phenotype associating frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy (IBM), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). No study has evaluated the exact frequency of these genes in cohorts of MSP or FTD patients so far. We sequenced both genes in 17 patients with MSP phenotypes, and in 60 patients with FTLD and FTLD-ALS to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of these disorders. No disease-causing mutation was identified. We conclude that hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in MSP and FTLD spectrum of diseases, although further investigations in larger populations are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutations in the PFN1 gene are not a common cause in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration in France.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are 2 adult onset neurological disorders with overlapping symptoms and clinical characteristics. It is well established that they share a common pathologic and genetic background. Recently, mutations in profilin 1 gene (PFN1) have been identified in patients with familial ALS, suggesting a role for this gene in the pathogenesis of the disease. Based on this, we hypothesized that mutations in PFN1 might also contribute to FTLD disease. We studied a French cohort of 165 ALS/FTLD patients, without finding any variant. We conclude that mutations in PFN1 are not a common cause for ALS/FTLD in France. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Unclassified cases of behavioral variant of major frontotemporal neurocognitive disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Koji; Hattori, Hideyuki

    2014-04-01

    In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), the behavioral variant of major frontotemporal neurocognitive disorder (bvFT-NCD) is subclassified into "probable bvFT-NCD" or "possible bvFT-NCD." When genetic evidence is unavailable, cases without clinical neuroimaging are subclassified into "possible bvFT-NCD," whereas cases whose clinical images show the typical characteristics are subclassified into "probable bvFT-NCD." Thus, the cases that meet the diagnostic criteria of bvFT-NCD based on their symptoms, but lack the neuroimaging characteristics, fall between the two categories of probable and possible bvFT-NCD. These cases herein are defined as "unclassified bvFT-NCD," and the present study aims at considering an appropriate diagnostic approach to such cases, that is, whether unclassified bvFT-NCD should be included in bvFT-NCD as a third subcategory, or whether it should be classified into diseases other than bvFT-NCD. All patients who presented at the Department of Psychiatry of the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology with suspicion of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia between 1 May 2011 and 30 April 2013 were retrospectively rediagnosed based on the DSM-5 criteria. A total of 16 cases met the criteria of bvFT-NCD, and among them, eight cases corresponded to unclassified bvFT-NCD. From a cross-sectional and clinical perspective, all eight cases of unclassified bvFT-NCD fulfilled the symptomatic criteria for bvFT-NCD, although the possibilities of Alzheimer's disease and other mental disorders could not be ruled out completely. To establish clinical diagnostic criteria for unclassified bvFT-NCD, accumulation of cases and evidence will be required along with longitudinal observation using various diagnostic technologies and post-mortem examination. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Differential Hemispheric Predilection of Microstructural White Matter and Functional Connectivity Abnormalities between Respectively Semantic and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Meijboom, Rozanna; Steketee, Rebecca M E; Ham, Leontine S; van der Lugt, Aad; van Swieten, John C; Smits, Marion

    2017-01-01

    Semantic dementia (SD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), subtypes of frontotemporal dementia, are characterized by distinct clinical symptoms and neuroimaging features, with predominant left temporal grey matter (GM) atrophy in SD and bilateral or right frontal GM atrophy in bvFTD. Such differential hemispheric predilection may also be reflected by other neuroimaging features, such as brain connectivity. This study investigated white matter (WM) microstructure and functional connectivity differences between SD and bvFTD, focusing on the hemispheric predilection of these differences. Eight SD and 12 bvFTD patients, and 17 controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging and resting state functional MRI at 3T. Whole-brain WM microstructure was assessed to determine distinct WM tracts affected in SD and bvFTD. For these tracts, diffusivity measures and lateralization indices were calculated. Functional connectivity was established for GM regions affected in early stage SD or bvFTD. Results of a direct comparison between SD and bvFTD are reported. Whole-brain WM microstructure abnormalities were more pronounced in the left hemisphere in SD and bilaterally- with a slight predilection for the right- in bvFTD. Lateralization of tract-specific abnormalities was seen in SD only, toward the left hemisphere. Functional connectivity of disease-specific regions was mainly decreased bilaterally in SD and in the right hemisphere in bvFTD. SD and bvFTD show WM microstructure and functional connectivity abnormalities in different regions, that are respectively more pronounced in the left hemisphere in SD and in the right hemisphere in bvFTD. This indicates differential hemispheric predilection of brain connectivity abnormalities between SD and bvFTD.

  16. Resultados del relevamiento de HI en el Cielo Austral: 3. Relevamiento de Nubes de Alta Velocidad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morras, R.; Bajaja, E.; Arnal, E. M.; Pöppel, W. G. L.

    Los resultados del relevamiento de HI del Hemisferio Austral fueron reprocesados con el fin de incrementar su sensibilidad. Así, se utilizó esta nueva base de datos con el fin de obtener un nuevo relevamiento de Nubes de Alta Velocidad en el cielo austral. El ruido r.m.s. alcanzado es de 0.015-0.020 K, con una resolución espectral de 8 km/seg. El cubrimiento espacial del relevamiento mejora en un factor 16 al realizado por Bajaja et al (1985).

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow single photon emission computed tomography for detection of Frontotemporal dementia in people with suspected dementia.

    PubMed

    Archer, Hilary A; Smailagic, Nadja; John, Christeena; Holmes, Robin B; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Coulthard, Elizabeth J; Cullum, Sarah

    2015-06-23

    In the UK, dementia affects 5% of the population aged over 65 years and 25% of those over 85 years. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) represents one subtype and is thought to account for up to 16% of all degenerative dementias. Although the core of the diagnostic process in dementia rests firmly on clinical and cognitive assessments, a wide range of investigations are available to aid diagnosis.Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an established clinical tool that uses an intravenously injected radiolabelled tracer to map blood flow in the brain. In FTD the characteristic pattern seen is hypoperfusion of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. This pattern of blood flow is different to patterns seen in other subtypes of dementia and so can be used to differentiate FTD.It has been proposed that a diagnosis of FTD, (particularly early stage), should be made not only on the basis of clinical criteria but using a combination of other diagnostic findings, including rCBF SPECT. However, more extensive testing comes at a financial cost, and with a potential risk to patient safety and comfort. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of rCBF SPECT for diagnosing FTD in populations with suspected dementia in secondary/tertiary healthcare settings and in the differential diagnosis of FTD from other dementia subtypes. Our search strategy used two concepts: (a) the index test and (b) the condition of interest. We searched citation databases, including MEDLINE (Ovid SP), EMBASE (Ovid SP), BIOSIS (Ovid SP), Web of Science Core Collection (ISI Web of Science), PsycINFO (Ovid SP), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) and LILACS (Bireme), using structured search strategies appropriate for each database. In addition we searched specialised sources of diagnostic test accuracy studies and reviews including: MEDION (Universities of Maastricht and Leuven), DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects) and HTA (Health Technology Assessment) database

  18. Neuropsychological Testing in Pathologically Verified Alzheimer Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia: How Well Do the Uniform Data Set Measures Differentiate Between Diseases?

    PubMed

    Ritter, Aaron R; Leger, Gabriel C; Miller, Justin B; Banks, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    Differences in cognition between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are well described in clinical cohorts, but have rarely been confirmed in studies with pathologic verification. For emerging therapeutics to succeed, determining underlying pathology early in the disease course is increasingly important. Neuropsychological evaluation is an important component of the diagnostic workup for AD and FTD. Patients with FTD are thought to have greater deficits in language and executive function while patients with AD are more likely to have deficits in memory. To determine if performance on initial cognitive testing can reliably distinguish between patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and AD neuropathology. In addition, are there other factors of the neuropsychological assessment that can be used to enhance the accuracy of underlying pathology? Using a logistic regression we retrospectively compared neurocognitive performance on initial evaluation of 106 patients with pathologically verified FTLD (pvFTLD), with 558 pathologically verified AD (pvAD) patients from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center using data from the Uniform Data Set (UDS) and the neuropathology data set. As expected, pvFTLD patients were younger, demonstrated better memory performance, and had more neuropsychiatric symptoms than pvAD patients. Other results were less predictable: pvFTLD patients performed better on one test of executive function (trail making test part B) but worse on another (digit span backward). Performance on language testing did not strongly distinguish the 2 groups. To determine what factors led to a misdiagnosis of AD in patients with FTLD, we further analyzed a small group of pvFTLD patients. These patients demonstrated older age and lower Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire counts compared with accurately diagnosed cases. Other than memory, numerical scores of neurocognitive performance on the UDS are of limited value in

  19. Espectroscopia infravermelha de núcleos ativos de galáxias: resultados adicionais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ardila, A.; Viegas, S.; Pastoria, M. G.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos resultados parciais de um levantamento espectroscópico na região do infravermelho próximo (NIR) realizado em 30 núcleos ativos de galáxias (AGN), incluindo vários objetos selecionados do catálogo PG com z de até 0.55. O objetivo é estudar a natureza do contínuo observado e as condições físicas do gas emissor. Todas as fontes de tipo 1 apresentam uma mudança na inclinação do contínuo na região de 1.2mm, associada ao término da contribuição do contínuo emitido pelo AGN e ao início da contribuição do contínuo emitido pela poeira quente atribuída ao tórus que rodeia a fonte central. O índice espectral associado à segunda contribuição varia apreciavelmente de objeto para objeto. Este resultado é comparado com distribuições espectrais de energia preditas por modelos de toroides para testar a validez do modelo unificado. A partir das linhas de FeII observado nos espectros deriva-se, pela primeira vez nessa região espectral, um template empírico de FeII para estudar a intensidade e a origem dessa emissão. A intensidade do FeII é estudada em conjunto com aquela da região visível e comparada às predições de modelos teóricos que incluem fluorescência de Lya, excitação colisional e auto-fluorescência como mecanismos dominantes de exitação. Encontra-se que os dois primeiros processos dominam na formação do espectro de FeII observado. Indicadores de avermelhamento, entre eles Brg/Pab, Pab/Pag, Pab/Pad e [FeII] 1.257/1.644 mm são utilizados para mapear a distribuição de poeira nas regiões emissoras de linhas. Encontra-se valores de extinção Av~3 associados ao último indicador e valores significativamente menores (Av~1.5) para os restantes, o que sugere que o [FeII] se forma em uma região separada da maior parte do gás emissor de linhas estreitas.

  20. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a real-time PCR study.

    PubMed

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment.Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p < 0.05), although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment.This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded.

  1. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A Real-time PCR study.

    PubMed

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-10-26

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment. Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p<0.05) , although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment. This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded. © 2013.

  2. No mutations in hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2B1 in Dutch patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, and inclusion body myopathy.

    PubMed

    Seelen, Meinie; Visser, Anne E; Overste, Daniel J; Kim, Hong J; Palud, A; Wong, Tsz H; van Swieten, John C; Scheltens, Philip; Voermans, Nicol C; Baas, Frank; de Jong, J M B V; van der Kooi, Anneke J; de Visser, Marianne; Veldink, Jan H; Taylor, J Paul; Van Es, Michael A; van den Berg, Leonard H

    2014-08-01

    Inclusion body myopathy (IBM) associated with Paget disease of the bone, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sometimes called IBMPFD/ALS or multi system proteinopathy, is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of muscle, brain, motor neurons, and bone with prominent TDP-43 pathology. Recently, 2 novel genes for multi system proteinopathy were discovered; heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and A2B1. Subsequently, a mutation in hnRNPA1 was also identified in a pedigree with autosomal dominant familial ALS. The genetic evidence for ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases is still insufficient. We therefore sequenced the prion-like domain of these genes in 135 familial ALS, 1084 sporadic ALS, 68 familial FTD, 74 sporadic FTD, and 31 sporadic IBM patients in a Dutch population. We did not identify any mutations in these genes in our cohorts. Mutations in hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2B1 prove to be a rare cause of ALS, FTD, and IBM in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alzheimer neuropathology without frontotemporal lobar degeneration hallmarks (TAR DNA-binding protein 43 inclusions) in missense progranulin mutation Cys139Arg.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, Veronica; Rossi, Giacomina; Maderna, Emanuela; Kovacs, Gabor G; Piccoli, Elena; Caroppo, Paola; Cacciatore, Francesca; Spinello, Sonia; Grisoli, Marina; Sozzi, Giuliano; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    Null mutations in progranulin gene (GRN) reduce the progranulin production resulting in haploinsufficiency and are tightly associated with tau-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein 43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). Missense mutations of GRN were also identified, but their effects are not completely clear, in particular unanswered is the question of what neuropathology they elicit, also considering that their occurrence has been reported in patients with typical clinical features of Alzheimer disease. They describe two fraternal twins carrying the missense GRN Cys139Arg mutation affected by late-onset dementia and we report the neuropathological study of one of them. Both patients were examined by neuroimaging, neuropsychological assessment and genetic analysis of GRN and other genes associated with dementia. The brain of one was obtained at autopsy and examined neuropathologically. One sister presented clinical and MRI features leading to the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. The other underwent autopsy and the brain showed neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease with abundant Aβ-amyloid deposition and Braak stage V of neurofibrillary pathology, in the absence of the hallmark lesions of FTLD-TDP. Their findings may contribute to better clarify the role of progranulin in neurodegenerative diseases indicating that some GRN mutations, in particular missense ones, may act as strong risk factor for Alzheimer disease rather than induce FTLD-TDP. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  4. The L266V tau mutation is associated with frontotemporal dementia and Pick-like 3R and 4R tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Marion; Grujic, Zoran M; Baker, Matt; Demirci, Serpil; Guillozet, Angela L; Sweet, Alison P; Herzog, Laura L; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M-Marsel; LaPointe, Nichole E; Gamblin, T C; Berry, Robert W; Binder, Lester I; de Silva, Rohan; Lees, Andrew; Espinoza, Marisol; Davies, Peter; Grover, Andrew; Sahara, Naruhiko; Ishizawa, Takashi; Dickson, Dennis; Yen, Shu-Hui; Hutton, Michael; Bigio, Eileen H

    2003-10-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive frontotemporal dementia presenting at age 33 years. At autopsy there was severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. Tau-positive Pick bodies, which ultrastructurally were composed of straight filaments, were present, accompanied by severe neuronal loss and gliosis. RD3, a tau antibody specific for the three-repeat (3R) isoforms, labeled the Pick bodies. ET3, a four-repeat (4R) isoform-specific tau antibody, did not label Pick bodies, but highlighted rare astrocytes, and threads in white matter bundles in the corpus striatum. Analysis of the tau gene revealed an L266V mutation in exon 9. Analysis of brain tissue from this case revealed elevated levels of exon 10+ tau RNA and soluble 4R tau. However, both 3R and 4R isoforms were present in sarkosyl-insoluble tau fractions with a predominance of the shortest 3R isoform. The L266V mutation is associated with decreased rate and extent of tau-induced microtubule assembly, and a 3R isoform-specific increase in tau self assembly as measured by an in vitro assay. Combined, these data indicate that L266V is a pathogenic tau mutation that is associated with Pick-like pathology. In addition, the results of the RD3 and ET3 immunostains clearly explain for the first time the presence of both 3R and 4R tau isoforms in preparations of insoluble tau from some Pick's disease cases.

  5. Phenotypic variability within the inclusion body spectrum of basophilic inclusion body disease and neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease in frontotemporal lobar degenerations with FUS-positive inclusions.

    PubMed

    Gelpi, Ellen; Lladó, Albert; Clarimón, Jordi; Rey, Maria Jesús; Rivera, Rosa Maria; Ezquerra, Mario; Antonell, Anna; Navarro-Otano, Judith; Ribalta, Teresa; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Pérez, Anna; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2012-09-01

    Basophilic inclusion body disease and neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID) are rare diseases included among frontotemporal lobar degenerations with FUS-positive inclusions (FTLD-FUS). We report clinical and pathologic features of 2 new patients and reevaluate neuropathologic characteristics of 2 previously described cases, including an early-onset case of basophilic inclusion body disease (aged 38 years) with a 5-year disease course and abundant FUS-positive inclusion bodies and 3 NIFID cases. One NIFID case (aged 37 years) presented with early-onset psychiatric disturbances and rapidly progressive cognitive decline. Two NIFID cases had later onset (aged 64 years and 70 years) and complex neurologic deficits. Postmortem neuropathologic studies in late-onset NIFID cases disclosed α-internexin-positive "hyaline conglomerate"-type inclusions that were positive with 1 commercial anti-FUS antibody directed to residues 200 and 250, but these were negative to amino acids 90 and 220 of human FUS. Early-onset NIFID had similar inclusions that were positive with both commercial anti-FUS antibodies. Genetic testing performed on all cases revealed no FUS gene mutations. These findings indicate that phenotypic variability in NIFID, including clinical manifestations and particular neuropathologic findings, may be related to the age at onset and individual differences in the evolution of lesions.

  6. Defining the association of TMEM106B variants among frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with GRN mutations and C9orf72 repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Galimberti, Daniela; Serpente, Maria; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Camuzat, Agnès; Clot, Fabienne; Fenoglio, Chiara; Scarpini, Elio; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2014-11-01

    TMEM106B was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD) with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa inclusions. It has been reported that variants in this gene are genetic modifiers of the disease and that this association is stronger in patients carrying a GRN mutation or a pathogenic expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM106B polymorphisms in cohorts of FTD and FTD with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients from France and Italy. Patients carrying the C9orf72 expansion (n = 145) and patients with GRN mutations (n = 76) were compared with a group of FTD patients (n = 384) negative for mutations and to a group of healthy controls (n = 552). In our cohorts, the presence of the C9orf72 expansion did not correlate with TMEM106B genotypes but the association was very strong in individuals with pathogenic GRN mutations (p = 9.54 × 10(-6)). Our data suggest that TMEM106B genotypes differ in FTD patient cohorts and strengthen the protective role of TMEM106B in GRN carriers. Further studies are needed to determine whether TMEM106B polymorphisms are associated with other genetic causes for FTD, including C9orf72 repeat expansions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutation Frequency of the Major Frontotemporal Dementia Genes, MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 in a Turkish Cohort of Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    Guven, Gamze; Lohmann, Ebba; Bras, Jose; Gibbs, J Raphael; Gurvit, Hakan; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Just, Walter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    'Microtubule-associated protein tau' (MAPT), 'granulin' (GRN) and 'chromosome 9 open reading frame72' (C9ORF72) gene mutations are the major known genetic causes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies suggest that mutations in these genes may also be associated with other forms of dementia. Therefore we investigated whether MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 gene mutations are major contributors to dementia in a random, unselected Turkish cohort of dementia patients. A combination of whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing and fragment analysis/Southern blot was performed in order to identify pathogenic mutations and novel variants in these genes as well as other FTD-related genes such as the 'charged multivesicular body protein 2B' (CHMP2B), the 'FUS RNA binding protein' (FUS), the 'TAR DNA binding protein' (TARDBP), the 'sequestosome1' (SQSTM1), and the 'valosin containing protein' (VCP). We determined one pathogenic MAPT mutation (c.1906C>T, p.P636L) and one novel missense variant (c.38A>G, p.D13G). In GRN we identified a probably pathogenic TGAG deletion in the splice donor site of exon 6. Three patients were found to carry the GGGGCC expansions in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. In summary, a complete screening for mutations in MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 genes revealed a frequency of 5.4% of pathogenic mutations in a random cohort of 93 Turkish index patients with dementia.

  8. Assessment of free and cued recall in Alzheimer's disease and vascular and frontotemporal dementia with 24-item Grober and Buschke test.

    PubMed

    Cerciello, Milena; Isella, Valeria; Proserpi, Alice; Papagno, Costanza

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the most common forms of dementia. It is well known that memory deficits in AD are different from those in VaD and FTD, especially with respect to cued recall. The aim of this clinical study was to compare the memory performance in 15 AD, 10 VaD and 9 FTD patients and 20 normal controls by means of a 24-item Grober-Buschke test [8]. The patients' groups were comparable in terms of severity of dementia. We considered free and total recall (free plus cued) both in immediate and delayed recall and computed an Index of Sensitivity to Cueing (ISC) [8] for immediate and delayed trials. We assessed whether cued recall predicted the subsequent free recall across our patients' groups. We found that AD patients recalled fewer items from the beginning and were less sensitive to cueing supporting the hypothesis that memory disorders in AD depend on encoding and storage deficit. In immediate recall VaD and FTD showed a similar memory performance and a stronger sensitivity to cueing than AD, suggesting that memory disorders in these patients are due to a difficulty in spontaneously implementing efficient retrieval strategies. However, we found a lower ISC in the delayed recall compared to the immediate trials in VaD than FTD due to a higher forgetting in VaD.

  9. Tower of London test: a comparison between conventional statistic approach and modelling based on artificial neural network in differentiating fronto-temporal dementia from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Massimo; Caffarra, Paolo; Savarè, Rita; Cerutti, Renata; Grossi, Enzo

    2011-01-01

    The early differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from frontotemporal dementia (FTD) may be difficult. The Tower of London (ToL), thought to assess executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial working memory, could help in this purpose. Twentytwo Dementia Centers consecutively recruited patients with early FTD or AD. ToL performances of these groups were analyzed using both the conventional statistical approaches and the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) modelling. Ninety-four non aphasic FTD and 160 AD patients were recruited. ToL Accuracy Score (AS) significantly (p < 0.05) differentiated FTD from AD patients. However, the discriminant validity of AS checked by ROC curve analysis, yielded no significant results in terms of sensitivity and specificity (AUC 0.63). The performances of the 12 Success Subscores (SS) together with age, gender and schooling years were entered into advanced ANNs developed by Semeion Institute. The best ANNs were selected and submitted to ROC curves. The non-linear model was able to discriminate FTD from AD with an average AUC for 7 independent trials of 0.82. The use of hidden information contained in the different items of ToL and the non linear processing of the data through ANNs allows a high discrimination between FTD and AD in individual patients.

  10. DISRUPTION OF LARGE-SCALE NEURAL NETWORKS IN NON-FLUENT/AGRAMMATIC VARIANT PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE APHASIA ASSOCIATED WITH FRONTOTEMPORAL DEGENERATION PATHOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Murray; Powers, John; Ash, Sherry; McMillan, Corey; Burkholder, Lisa; Irwin, David; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    Non-fluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (naPPA) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition most prominently associated with slowed, effortful speech. A clinical imaging marker of naPPA is disease centered in the left inferior frontal lobe. We used multimodal imaging to assess large-scale neural networks underlying effortful expression in 15 patients with sporadic naPPA due to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum pathology. Effortful speech in these patients is related in part to impaired grammatical processing, and to phonologic speech errors. Gray matter (GM) imaging shows frontal and anterior-superior temporal atrophy, most prominently in the left hemisphere. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals reduced fractional anisotropy in several white matter (WM) tracts mediating projections between left frontal and other GM regions. Regression analyses suggest disruption of three large-scale GM-WM neural networks in naPPA that support fluent, grammatical expression. These findings emphasize the role of large-scale neural networks in language, and demonstrate associated language deficits in naPPA. PMID:23218686

  11. Trichotillomania Ranging from “Ritual to Illness” and as a Rare Clinical Manifestation of Frontotemporal Dementia: Review of Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Telang, Ashay Vivek; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami

    2018-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the most common form of dementia in the younger age group and often exists with comorbid obsessions and compulsions in up to 80% of the patients. Trichotillomania or compulsive “hair-pulling” disorder is a rare manifestation of FTD and is a poorly evaluated symptom in this condition. The release of “grooming functions” due to frontal disinhibition is often attributed to the evolutionary perspective; however, recent findings also implicate the role of neurotransmitter dysfunction. Trichotillomania is currently classified under obsessive and compulsive behavioral spectrum disorders and is often encountered in the younger population with research evidence of response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), antipsychotics, and newer drugs such as N-acetyl cysteine. The role of behavioral therapy also has robust evidence in trichotillomania. We herewith report the case of a middle-aged male patient who presented with features of personality change and behavioral problems in terms of anger, agitation, and disinhibitory behavior who on detailed clinical evaluation and radiological assessment had features consistent with behavioral variant of FTD along with compulsive “hair plucking” behavior which responded minimally with SSRIs. FTD can have features of trichotillomania which is an often overlooked and relatively uncommon manifestation of dementias. Treatment options such as N-acetyl cysteine and behavioral therapy could have potential utility in this degenerative condition hitherto at an earlier stage. PMID:29769783

  12. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  13. Caregiver Burden in Semantic Dementia with Right- and Left-Sided Predominant Cerebral Atrophy and in Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Asuka; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Ichimi, Naoko; Takasaki, Akihiro; Matsushita, Masateru; Ishikawa, Tomohisa; Tanaka, Hibiki; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Ikeda, Manabu

    2018-01-01

    Caregiver burden is a serious concern for family caregivers of dementia patients, but its nature is unclear in patients with semantic dementia (SD). This study aimed to clarify caregiver burden for right- (R > L) and left-sided (L > R) predominant SD versus behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) patients. Using the Japanese version of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, we examined caregiver burden and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in 43 first-visit outpatient/family caregiver dyads (bvFTD, 20 dyads; SD [L > R], 13 dyads; SD [R > L], 10 dyads). We found a significant difference in ZBI score between the 3 diagnostic groups. Post hoc tests revealed a significantly higher ZBI score in the bvFTD than in the SD (L > R) group. The ZBI scores in the SD (L > R) and SD (R > L) groups were not significantly different, although the effect size was large. Caregiver burden was significantly correlated with BPSD scores in all groups and was correlated with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living decline in the bvFTD and SD (R > L) groups. Caregiver burden was highest in the bvFTD group, comparatively high in the SD (R > L) group, and lowest in the SD (L > R) group. Adequate support and intervention for caregivers should be tailored to differences in caregiver burden between these patient groups.

  14. One size does not fit all: face emotion processing impairments in semantic dementia, behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease are mediated by distinct cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurie A; Hsieh, Sharpley; Lah, Suncica; Savage, Sharon; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia (both behavioural variant [bvFTD] and semantic dementia [SD]) as well as those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show deficits on tests of face emotion processing, yet the mechanisms underlying these deficits have rarely been explored. We compared groups of patients with bvFTD (n = 17), SD (n = 12) or AD (n = 20) to an age- and education-matched group of healthy control subjects (n = 36) on three face emotion processing tasks (Ekman 60, Emotion Matching and Emotion Selection) and found that all three patient groups were similarly impaired. Analyses of covariance employed to partial out the influences of language and perceptual impairments, which frequently co-occur in these patients, provided evidence of different underlying cognitive mechanisms. These analyses revealed that language impairments explained the original poor scores obtained by the SD patients on the Ekman 60 and Emotion Selection tasks, which involve verbal labels. Perceptual deficits contributed to Emotion Matching performance in the bvFTD and AD patients. Importantly, all groups remained impaired on one task or more following these analyses, denoting a primary emotion processing disturbance in these dementia syndromes. These findings highlight the multifactorial nature of emotion processing deficits in patients with dementia.

  15. Self-Awareness and Self-Monitoring of Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia and Probable Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Sarah; Weintraub, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Lack of insight is a core diagnostic criterion for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and is believed to be intact in the early stages of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). In other neurological conditions, symptom-specific insight has been noted, with behavioral symptoms appearing especially vulnerable to reduced insight. Different components of insight, self-awareness and self-monitoring, are also often considered separate phenomena. The current study compared insight in patients with PPA, bvFTD, and probable Alzheimer’s disease (PrAD) and a group of cognitively intact control subjects. Additionally, differences in insight for the domains primarily affected by the three types of dementia, namely, Behavior, Naming, and Memory, were assessed, and self-awareness and self-monitoring were compared. A total of 55 participants were enrolled. Participants were asked to complete self-estimate scales demonstrating their perceived ability immediately prior to, and immediately following a test in each domain of interest. Results indicated that PPA and normal control groups performed very similarly on control (Weight and Eyesight) and cognitive domains, whereas bvFTD and PrAD patients were unable to accurately assess Memory. All three diagnostic groups failed to accurately assess their behavioral symptoms, suggesting that this domain is vulnerable to loss of insight across diagnoses. Naming ability, in contrast, was either accurately assessed or underestimated in all groups. Finally, there were no notable differences between self-awareness and self-monitoring, potential explanations for this are examined. PMID:18194832

  16. Moral processing deficit in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia is associated with facial emotion recognition and brain changes in default mode and salience network areas.

    PubMed

    Van den Stock, Jan; Stam, Daphne; De Winter, François-Laurent; Mantini, Dante; Szmrecsanyi, Benedikt; Van Laere, Koen; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2017-12-01

    Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is associated with abnormal emotion recognition and moral processing. We assessed emotion detection, discrimination, matching, selection, and categorization as well as judgments of nonmoral, moral impersonal, moral personal low- and high-conflict scenarios. bvFTD patients gave more utilitarian responses on low-conflict personal moral dilemmas. There was a significant correlation between a facial emotion processing measure derived through principal component analysis and utilitarian responses on low-conflict personal scenarios in the bvFTD group (controlling for MMSE-score and syntactic abilities). Voxel-based morphometric multiple regression analysis in the bvFTD group revealed a significant association between the proportion of utilitarian responses on personal low-conflict dilemmas and gray matter volume in ventromedial prefrontal areas ( p height  < .0001). In addition, there was a correlation between utilitarian responses on low-conflict personal scenarios in the bvFTD group and resting-state fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) in the anterior insula ( p height  < .005). The results underscore the importance of emotions in moral cognition and suggest a common basis for deficits in both abilities, possibly related to reduced experience of emotional sensations. At the neural level abnormal moral cognition in bvFTD is related to structural integrity of the medial prefrontal cortex and functional characteristics of the anterior insula. The present findings provide a common basis for emotion recognition and moral reasoning and link them with areas in the default mode and salience network.

  17. Intact protein analysis of ubiquitin in cerebrospinal fluid by multiple reaction monitoring reveals differences in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; von Arnim, Christine A F; Straub, Sarah; Nagl, Magdalena; Feneberg, Emily; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Ludolph, Albert C; Otto, Markus

    2014-11-07

    The impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is thought to be an early event in neurodegeneration, and monitoring UPS alterations might serve as a disease biomarker. Our aim was to establish an alternate method to antibody-based assays for the selective measurement of free monoubiquitin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Free monoubiquitin was measured with liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Parkinson's disease (PD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The LC-MS/MS method showed excellent intra- and interassay precision (4.4-7.4% and 4.9-10.3%) and accuracy (100-107% and 100-106%). CSF ubiquitin concentration was increased compared with that of controls (33.0 ± 9.7 ng/mL) in AD (47.5 ± 13.1 ng/mL, p < 0.05) and CJD patients (171.5 ± 103.5 ng/mL, p < 0.001) but not in other neurodegenerative diseases. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis of AD vs control patients revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.832, and the specificity and sensitivity were 75 and 75%, respectively. ROC analysis of AD and FTLD patients yielded an AUC of 0.776, and the specificity and sensitivity were 53 and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, our LC-MS/MS method may facilitate ubiquitin determination to a broader community and might help to discriminate AD, CJD, and FTLD patients.

  18. Novel marker for the onset of frontotemporal dementia: early increase in activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) in the face of Tau mutation.

    PubMed

    Schirer, Yulie; Malishkevich, Anna; Ophir, Yotam; Lewis, Jada; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2014-01-01

    Tauopathy, a major pathology in Alzheimer's disease, is also found in ~50% of frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). Tau transcript, a product of a single gene, undergoes alternative splicing to yield 6 protein species, each with either 3 or 4 microtubule binding repeat domains (tau 3R or 4R, associated with dynamic and stable microtubules, respectively). While the healthy human brain shows a 1/1 ratio of tau 3R/4R, this ratio may be dramatically changed in the FTD brain. We have previously discovered that activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is essential for brain formation in the mouse, with ADNP+/- mice exhibiting tauopathy, age-driven neurodegeneration and behavioral deficits. Here, in transgenic mice overexpressing a mutated tau 4R species, in the cerebral cortex but not in the cerebellum, we showed significantly increased ADNP expression (~3-fold transcripts) in the cerebral cortex of young transgenic mice (~disease onset), but not in the cerebellum, as compared to control littermates. The transgene-age-related increased ADNP expression paralleled augmented dynamic tau 3R transcript level compared to control littermates. Blocking mutated tau 4R transgene expression resulted in normalization of ADNP and tau 3R expression. ADNP was previously shown to be a member of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Here, Brahma (Brm), a component of the SWI/SNF complex regulating alternative splicing, showed a similar developmental expression pattern to ADNP. Immunoprecipitations further suggested Brm-ADNP interaction coupled to ADNP - polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB)-associated splicing factor (PSF)-binding, with PSF being a direct regulator of tau transcript splicing. It should be noted that although we have shown a correlation between levels of ADNP and tau isoform expression three months of age, we are not presenting evidence of a direct link between the two. Future research into ADNP/tau relations is warranted.

  19. Combined Socio-Behavioral Evaluation Improves the Differential Diagnosis Between the Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: In Search of Neuropsychological Markers.

    PubMed

    Dodich, Alessandra; Cerami, Chiara; Cappa, Stefano F; Marcone, Alessandra; Golzi, Valeria; Zamboni, Michele; Giusti, Maria Cristina; Iannaccone, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Current diagnostic criteria for behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and typical Alzheimer's disease (AD) include a differential pattern of neuropsychological impairments (episodic memory deficit in typical AD and dysexecutive syndrome in bvFTD). There is, however, large evidence of a frequent overlap in neuropsychological features, making the differential diagnosis extremely difficult. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of different cognitive and neurobehavioral markers in bvFTD and AD patient groups. We included 95 dementia patients with a clinical and biomarker evidence of bvFTD (n = 48) or typical AD (n = 47) pathology. A clinical 2-year follow-up confirmed clinical classification. Performances at basic cognitive tasks (memory, executive functions, visuo-spatial, language) as well as social cognition skills and neurobehavioral profiles have been recorded. A stepwise logistic regression model compared the neuropsychological profiles between groups and assessed the accuracy of cognitive and neurobehavioral markers in discriminating bvFTD from AD. Statistical comparison between patient groups proved social cognition and episodic memory impairments as main cognitive signatures of bvFTD and AD neuropsychological profiles, respectively. Only half of bvFTD patients showed attentive/executive deficits, questioning their role as cognitive marker of bvFTD. Notably, the large majority of bvFTD sample (i.e., 70%) poorly performed at delayed recall tasks. Logistic regression analysis identified social cognition performances, Frontal Behavioral Inventory and Mini-Mental State Examination scores as the best combination in distinguishing bvFTD from AD. Social cognition tasks and socio-behavioral questionnaires are recommended in clinical settings to improve the accuracy of early diagnosis of bvFTD.

  20. In silico analysis of SIGMAR1 variant (rs4879809) segregating in a consanguineous Pakistani family showing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without frontotemporal lobar dementia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Ahmad, Arsalan; Raza, Syed Irfan; Amar, Ali; Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Attya; John, Peter; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis. It has been found to be associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In the present study, we have described homozygosity mapping and gene sequencing in a consanguineous autosomal recessive Pakistani family showing non-juvenile ALS without signs of FTLD. Gene mapping was carried out in all recruited family members using microsatellite markers, and linkage was established with sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) gene at chromosome 9p13.2. Gene sequencing of SIGMAR1 revealed a novel 3'-UTR nucleotide variation c.672*31A>G (rs4879809) segregating with disease in this family. The C9ORF72 repeat region in intron 1, previously implicated in a related phenotype, was excluded through linkage, and further confirmation of exclusion was obtained by amplifying intron 1 of C9ORF72 with multiple primers in affected individuals and controls. In silico analysis was carried out to explore the possible role of 3'-UTR variant of SIGMAR1 in ALS. The Regulatory RNA motif and Element Finder program revealed disturbance in miRNA (hsa-miR-1205) binding site due to this variation. ESEFinder analysis showed new SRSF1 and SRSF1-IgM-BRCA1 binding sites with significant scores due to this variation. Our results indicate that the 3'-UTR SIGMAR1 variant c.672*31A>G may have a role in the pathogenesis of ALS in this family.

  1. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging is a key Alzheimer's disease mimic: clinical-pathologic correlations and comparisons with both alzheimer's disease and non-tauopathic frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, Willa D; Monsell, Sarah E; Schmitt, Frederick A; Kukull, Walter A; Nelson, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) neuropathology was observed in more than 15% of aged individuals in prior studies. However, much remains unknown about the clinical correlates of HS-Aging pathology or the association(s) between HS-Aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) pathology. Clinical and comorbid pathological features linked to HS-Aging pathology were analyzed using National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) data. From autopsy data extending back to 1990 (n = 9,817 participants), the neuropathological diagnoses were evaluated from American AD Centers (ADCs). Among participants who died between 2005-2012 (n = 1,422), additional analyses identified clinical and pathological features associated with HS-Aging pathology. We also compared cognitive testing and longevity outcomes between HS-Aging cases and a subsample with non-tauopathy FTLD (n = 210). Reporting of HS-Aging pathology increased dramatically among ADCs in recent years, to nearly 20% of autopsies in 2012. Participants with relatively "pure" HS-Aging pathology were often diagnosed clinically as having probable (68%) or possible (15%) AD. However, the co-occurrence of HS-Aging pathology and AD neuropathology (AD-NP) did not indicate any pattern of correlation between the two pathologies. Compared with other pathologies, participants with HS-Aging pathology had higher overall cognitive/functional ability (versus AD-NP) and verbal fluency (versus both AD-NP and FTLD) but similar episodic memory impairment at one clinic visit 2-5 years prior to death. Patients with HS-Aging live considerably longer than patients with non-tauopathy FTLD. We conclude that the manifestations of HS-Aging, increasingly recognized in recent years, probably indicate a separate disease process of direct relevance to patient care, dementia research, and clinical trials.

  2. Single Subject Classification of Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Using Anatomical, Diffusion Tensor, and Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouts, Mark J R J; Möller, Christiane; Hafkemeijer, Anne; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Vrenken, Hugo; Wink, Alle Meije; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Schouten, Tijn M; de Vos, Frank; Feis, Rogier A; van der Grond, Jeroen; de Rooij, Mark; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2018-01-01

    Overlapping clinical symptoms often complicate differential diagnosis between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals disease specific structural and functional differences that aid in differentiating AD from bvFTD patients. However, the benefit of combining structural and functional connectivity measures to-on a subject-basis-differentiate these dementia-types is not yet known. Anatomical, diffusion tensor (DTI), and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) of 30 patients with early stage AD, 23 with bvFTD, and 35 control subjects were collected and used to calculate measures of structural and functional tissue status. All measures were used separately or selectively combined as predictors for training an elastic net regression classifier. Each classifier's ability to accurately distinguish dementia-types was quantified by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Highest AUC values for AD and bvFTD discrimination were obtained when mean diffusivity, full correlations between rs-fMRI-derived independent components, and fractional anisotropy (FA) were combined (0.811). Similarly, combining gray matter density (GMD), FA, and rs-fMRI correlations resulted in highest AUC of 0.922 for control and bvFTD classifications. This, however, was not observed for control and AD differentiations. Classifications with GMD (0.940) and a GMD and DTI combination (0.941) resulted in similar AUC values (p = 0.41). Combining functional and structural connectivity measures improve dementia-type differentiations and may contribute to more accurate and substantiated differential diagnosis of AD and bvFTD patients. Imaging protocols for differential diagnosis may benefit from also including DTI and rs-fMRI.

  3. A novel network analysis approach reveals DNA damage, oxidative stress and calcium/cAMP homeostasis-associated biomarkers in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Graziano, Francesca; Novelli, Valeria; Rossi, Giacomina; Galimberti, Daniela; Rainero, Innocenzo; Benussi, Luisa; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bruni, Amalia C.; Cusi, Daniele; Salvi, Erika; Borroni, Barbara; Grassi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) is the form of neurodegenerative dementia with the highest prevalence after Alzheimer’s disease, equally distributed in men and women. It includes several variants, generally characterized by behavioural instability and language impairments. Although few mendelian genes (MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72) have been associated to the FTD phenotype, in most cases there is only evidence of multiple risk loci with relatively small effect size. To date, there are no comprehensive studies describing FTD at molecular level, highlighting possible genetic interactions and signalling pathways at the origin FTD-associated neurodegeneration. In this study, we designed a broad FTD genetic interaction map of the Italian population, through a novel network-based approach modelled on the concepts of disease-relevance and interaction perturbation, combining Steiner tree search and Structural Equation Model (SEM) analysis. Our results show a strong connection between Calcium/cAMP metabolism, oxidative stress-induced Serine/Threonine kinases activation, and postsynaptic membrane potentiation, suggesting a possible combination of neuronal damage and loss of neuroprotection, leading to cell death. In our model, Calcium/cAMP homeostasis and energetic metabolism impairments are primary causes of loss of neuroprotection and neural cell damage, respectively. Secondly, the altered postsynaptic membrane potentiation, due to the activation of stress-induced Serine/Threonine kinases, leads to neurodegeneration. Our study investigates the molecular underpinnings of these processes, evidencing key genes and gene interactions that may account for a significant fraction of unexplained FTD aetiology. We emphasized the key molecular actors in these processes, proposing them as novel FTD biomarkers that could be crucial for further epidemiological and molecular studies. PMID:29020091

  4. Quantitative verification of the keyhole concept: a comparison of area of exposure in the parasellar region via supraorbital keyhole, frontotemporal pterional, and supraorbital approaches.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng-Mao; Noguchi, Akio; Dogan, Aclan; Anderson, Gregory J; Hsu, Frank P K; McMenomey, Sean O; Delashaw, Johnny B

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to determine if the "keyhole concept," proposed by Perneczky's group, can be verified quantitatively. Fourteen (3 bilateral and 8 unilateral) sides of embalmed latex-injected cadaveric heads were dissected via 3 sequential craniotomy approaches: supraorbital keyhole, frontotemporal pterional, and supraorbital. Three-dimensional cartesian coordinates were recorded using a stereotactic localizer. The orthocenter of the ipsilateral anterior clinoid process, the posterior clinoid process, and the contralateral anterior clinoid process are expressed as a center point (the apex). Seven vectors project from the apex to their corresponding target points in a radiating manner on the parasellar skull base. Each 2 neighboring vectors border what could be considered a triangle, and the total area of the 7 triangles sharing the same apex was geometrically expressed as the area of exposure in the parasellar region. Values are expressed as the mean ± SD (mm(2)). The total area of exposure was as follows: supraorbital keyhole 1733.1 ± 336.0, pterional 1699.3 ± 361.9, and supraorbital 1691.4 ± 342.4. The area of exposure on the contralateral side was as follows: supraorbital keyhole 602.2 ± 194.7, pterional 595.2 ± 228.0, and supraorbital 553.3 ± 227.2. The supraorbital keyhole skull flap was 2.0 cm(2), and the skull flap size ratio was 1:5:6.5 (supraorbital keyhole/pterional/supraorbital). The area of exposure of the parasellar region through the smaller supraorbital keyhole approach is as adequate as the larger pterional and supraorbital approaches. The keyhole concept can be verified quantitatively as follows: 1) a wide area of exposure on the skull base can be obtained through a small keyhole skull opening, and 2) the side opposite the opening can also be visualized.

  5. The role of 18F-FP-CIT PET in differentiation of progressive supranuclear palsy and frontotemporal dementia in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Han Soo; Chung, Seok Jong; Kim, Soo-Jong; Oh, Jung Su; Kim, Jae Seung; Ye, Byoung Seok; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2018-05-04

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the pattern of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability could differentiate between progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the first few years of the disease. We enrolled patients who had Parkinsonism and frontal dysfunction and/or language deficit, visited the clinic within 2 years of the onset of symptoms, and had been followed-up for longer than 5 years; thus resulting in 26 patients with PSP and 24 patients with FTD. By quantitatively analyzing N-(3-[ 18 F]fluoropropyl)-2β-carbon ethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane PET, we compared the pattern of DAT availability at the time of the baseline evaluation between the two groups. The discriminatory power of variables including DAT activity and clinical parameters was investigated by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses. Additionally, we analyzed the correlation between striatal subregional DAT availability and cognitive profiles. Patients with PSP and FTD had significantly lower DAT availability than normal controls in the whole striatum and in each striatal subregion. When comparing the two groups, DAT availability was significantly lower in patients with PSP than those with FTD in all striatal subregions. The PSP and FTD groups had generally similar subregional patterns of DAT activity in terms of the anteroposterior and ventrodorsal gradients and asymmetry, except for a different preferential involvement in the caudate. The ROC analysis showed that the DAT activity of the whole striatum had an excellent discriminatory power relative to Parkinsonism or neurocognitive profiles. Correlation analysis showed that verbal memory was significantly correlated with DAT availability in the whole striatum and the putaminal subregion only in patients with PSP. DAT scans have prognostic value in determining whether patients with Parkinsonism and behavioral and/or language dysfunction will develop features of PSP or

  6. Uncovering the Neural Bases of Cognitive and Affective Empathy Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease and the Behavioral-Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Nadene; Wong, Stephanie; Ahmed, Rebekah; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Irish, Muireann

    2016-05-30

    Loss of empathy is a core presenting feature of the behavioral-variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), resulting in socioemotional difficulties and behavioral transgressions. In contrast, interpersonal functioning remains relatively intact in Alzheimer's disease (AD), despite marked cognitive decline. The neural substrates mediating these patterns of loss and sparing in social functioning remain unclear, yet are relevant for our understanding of the social brain. We investigated cognitive versus affective aspects of empathy using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) in 25 AD and 24 bvFTD patients and contrasted their performance with 22 age- and education-matched controls. Cognitive empathy was comparably compromised in AD and bvFTD, whereas affective empathy was impaired exclusively in bvFTD. While controlling for overall cognitive dysfunction ameliorated perspective-taking deficits in AD, empathy loss persisted across cognitive and affective domains in bvFTD. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed divergent neural substrates of empathy loss in each patient group. Perspective-taking deficits correlated with predominantly left-sided temporoparietal atrophy in AD, whereas widespread bilateral frontoinsular, temporal, parietal, and occipital atrophy was implicated in bvFTD. Reduced empathic concern in bvFTD was associated with atrophy in the left orbitofrontal, inferior frontal, and insular cortices, and the bilateral mid-cingulate gyrus. Our findings suggest that social cognitive deficits in AD arise largely as a consequence of global cognitive dysfunction, rather than a loss of empathy per se. In contrast, loss of empathy in bvFTD reflects the deterioration of a distributed network of frontoinsular and temporal structures that appear crucial for monitoring and processing social information.

  7. Simultaneous PET-MRI Studies of the Concordance of Atrophy and Hypometabolism in Syndromic Variants of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia: An Extended Case Series.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Kuven K; Perani, Daniela; Minati, Ludovico; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Pennycook, Frank; Dickson, John C; Barnes, Anna; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Michopoulou, Sofia; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Good, Catriona; Fallanca, Federico; Vanoli, Emilia Giovanna; Ell, Peter J; Chan, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous PET-MRI is used to compare patterns of cerebral hypometabolism and atrophy in six different dementia syndromes. The primary objective was to conduct an initial exploratory study regarding the concordance of atrophy and hypometabolism in syndromic variants of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The secondary objective was to determine the effect of image analysis methods on determination of atrophy and hypometabolism. PET and MRI data were acquired simultaneously on 24 subjects with six variants of AD and FTD (n = 4 per group). Atrophy was rated visually and also quantified with measures of cortical thickness. Hypometabolism was rated visually and also quantified using atlas- and SPM-based approaches. Concordance was measured using weighted Cohen's kappa. Atrophy-hypometabolism concordance differed markedly between patient groups; kappa scores ranged from 0.13 (nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia, nfvPPA) to 0.49 (posterior cortical variant of AD, PCA). Heterogeneity was also observed within groups; the confidence intervals of kappa scores ranging from 0-0.25 for PCA to 0.29-0.61 for nfvPPA. More widespread MRI and PET changes were identified using quantitative methods than on visual rating. The marked differences in concordance identified in this initial study may reflect differences in the molecular pathologies underlying AD and FTD syndromic variants but also operational differences in the methods used to diagnose these syndromes. The superior ability of quantitative methodologies to detect changes on PET and MRI, if confirmed on larger cohorts, may favor their usage over qualitative visual inspection in future clinical diagnostic practice.

  8. Cognitive and anatomic double dissociation in the representation of concrete and abstract words in semantic variant and behavioral variant frontotemporal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Katheryn A Q; York, Collin; Bauer, Laura; Grossman, Murray

    2016-04-01

    We examine the anatomic basis for abstract and concrete lexical representations in semantic memory by assessing patients with focal neurodegenerative disease. Prior evidence from healthy adult studies suggests that there may be an anatomical dissociation between abstract and concrete representations: abstract words more strongly activate the left inferior frontal gyrus relative to concrete words, while concrete words more strongly activate left anterior-inferior temporal regions. However, this double dissociation has not been directly examined. We test this dissociation in two patient groups with focal cortical atrophy in each of these regions, the behavioral variant of Frontotemporal Degeneration (bvFTD) and the semantic variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia (svPPA). We administered an associativity judgment task for abstract and concrete words, where subjects select which of two words is best associated with a given target word. Both bvFTD and svPPA patients were significantly impaired in their overall performance compared to controls. While controls treated concrete and abstract words equally, we found a category-specific double dissociation in patients' judgments: bvFTD patients showed a concreteness effect (CE), with significantly worse performance for abstract compared to concrete words, while svPPA patients showed reversal of the CE, with significantly worse performance for concrete over abstract words. Regression analyses also revealed an anatomic double dissociation: The CE is associated with inferior frontal atrophy in bvFTD, while reversal of the CE is associated with left anterior-inferior temporal atrophy in svPPA. These results support a cognitive and anatomic model of semantic memory organization where abstract and concrete representations are supported by dissociable neuroanatomic substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Social influence on associative learning: double dissociation in high-functioning autism, early-stage behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kéri, Szabolcs

    2014-05-01

    Most of our learning activity takes place in a social context. I examined how social interactions influence associative learning in neurodegenerative diseases and atypical neurodevelopmental conditions primarily characterised by social cognitive and memory dysfunctions. Participants were individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA, n = 18), early-stage behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 16) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 20). The leading symptoms in HFA and bvFTD were social and behavioural dysfunctions, whereas AD was characterised by memory deficits. Participants received three versions of a paired associates learning task. In the game with boxes test, objects were hidden in six candy boxes placed in different locations on the computer screen. In the game with faces, each box was labelled by a photo of a person. In the real-life version of the game, participants played with real persons. Individuals with HFA and bvFTD performed well in the computer games, but failed on the task including real persons. In contrast, in patients with early-stage AD, social interactions boosted paired associates learning up to the level of healthy control volunteers. Worse performance in the real life game was associated with less successful recognition of complex emotions and mental states in the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. Spatial span did not affect the results. When social cognition is impaired, but memory systems are less compromised (HFA and bvFTD), real-life interactions disrupt associative learning; when disease process impairs memory systems but social cognition is relatively intact (early-stage AD), social interactions have a beneficial effect on learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging is a key Alzheimer's disease mimic: clinical-pathologic correlations and comparisons with both Alzheimer's disease and non-tauopathic frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brenowitz, Willa D.; Monsell, Sarah E.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Kukull, Walter A.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) neuropathology was observed in more than 15% of aged individuals in prior studies. However, much remains unknown about the clinical correlates of HS-Aging pathology or the association(s) between HS-Aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) pathology. Clinical and comorbid pathological features linked to HS-Aging pathology were analyzed using National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) data. From autopsy data extending back to 1990 (N=9,817 participants), the neuropathologic diagnoses were evaluated from American AD Centers (ADCs). Among participants who died between 2005-2012 (N=1,422), additional analyses identified clinical and pathological features associated with HS-Aging pathology. We also compared cognitive testing and longevity outcomes between HS-Aging cases and a subsample with non-tauopathy FTLD (N=210). Reporting of HS pathology increased dramatically among ADCs in recent years, to nearly 20% of autopsies in 2012. Participants with relatively “pure” HS-Aging pathology were often diagnosed clinically as having probable (68%) or possible (15%) AD. However, the co-occurrence of HS-Aging pathology and AD neuropathology (AD-NP) did not indicate any pattern of correlation between the two pathologies. Compared other pathologies, participants with HS-Aging pathology had higher overall cognitive/functional ability (versus AD-NP) and verbal fluency (versus both AD-NP and FTLD) but similar episodic memory impairment at one clinic visit 2 -5 years prior to death. Patients with HS-Aging live considerably longer than patients with non-tauopathy FTLD. We conclude that the manifestations of HS-Aging, increasingly recognized in recent years, probably indicate a separate disease process of direct relevance to patient care, dementia research, and clinical trials. PMID:24270205

  11. Longitudinal characterization of two siblings with frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 associated with the S305N tau mutation.

    PubMed

    Boeve, Bradley F; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W; Waclawik, Andrew J; Murrell, Jill R; Hermann, Bruce; Jack, Clifford R; Shiung, Maria M; Smith, Glenn E; Nair, Anil R; Lindor, Noralane; Koppikar, Vinaya; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2005-04-01

    The background to this study began with the reporting of two Japanese kindreds with the S305N tau mutation. Although the pathological findings in the autopsied cases were well characterized, only limited ante-mortem data were presented. In this study, longitudinal characterization was carried out in two siblings of European ancestry found to have frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) through comprehensive neurobehavioural examinations and other scales at approximate 6-month intervals. Scales included the Mini-Mental State Examination, Short Test of Mental Status, modified motor subtest of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, detailed neuropsychological testing, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Changes in whole-brain volume and ventricular volume were measured from serial MRI studies. All members of the kindred underwent molecular genetic analyses to elucidate the mechanism of inheritance. The missense mutation in tau, S305N, was detected in the proband (onset age 30), who has undergone serial evaluations for almost 4 years. Her older sister (onset age 36) was subsequently found to have the same mutation, and has undergone serial evaluations for 2 years. This mutation is absent in both parents and the only other sibling, and non-paternity was excluded by additional analyses. The siblings have exhibited cognitive and behavioural features typical of FTDP-17, which have proved challenging to manage despite aggressive pharmacological and behavioural therapies. The proband's sister has demonstrated an atypical profile of impairment on neuropsychological testing. Both siblings have developed striking atrophy of the anterior part of temporal lobes and moderate atrophy of the dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortical regions, which in both cases is relatively symmetrical. The annualized changes in whole-brain volume and ventricular volume, respectively, were -35.2 ml/year (3.23% decrease per year) and +20.75 ml/year (16

  12. TMEM106B, the risk gene for frontotemporal dementia, is regulated by the miRNA-132/212 cluster and affects progranulin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.; Unger, Travis L.; Gallagher, Michael D.; Bill, Emily; Kwong, Linda K.; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Busch, Johanna I.; Akle, Sebastian; Grossman, Murray; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with no available treatments. Mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN) causing impaired production or secretion of progranulin are a common Mendelian cause of FTLD-TDP; additionally, common variants at chromosome 7p21 in the uncharacterized gene TMEM106B were recently linked by genome-wide association to FTLD-TDP with and without GRN mutations. Here we show that TMEM106B is neuronally expressed in postmortem human brain tissue, and that expression levels are increased in FTLD-TDP brain. Furthermore, using an unbiased, microarray-based screen of over 800 microRNAs, we identify microRNA-132 as the top microRNA differentiating FTLD-TDP and control brains, with <50% normal expression levels of three members of the microRNA-132 cluster (microRNA-132, microRNA-132*, and microRNA-212) in disease. Computational analyses, corroborated empirically, demonstrate that the top mRNA target of both microRNA-132 and microRNA-212 is TMEM106B; both microRNAs repress TMEM106B expression through shared microRNA-132/212 binding sites in the TMEM106B 3’UTR. Increasing TMEM106B expression to model disease results in enlargement and poor acidification of endo-lysosomes, as well as impairment of mannose-6-phosphate-receptor trafficking. Finally, endogenous neuronal TMEM106B co-localizes with progranulin in late endo-lysosomes, and TMEM106B over-expression increases intracellular levels of progranulin. Thus, TMEM106B is an FTLD-TDP risk gene, with microRNA-132/212 depression as an event which can lead to aberrant over-expression of TMEM106B, which in turn alters progranulin pathways. Evidence for this pathogenic cascade includes the striking convergence of two independent, genomic-scale screens on a microRNA:mRNA regulatory pair. Our findings open novel directions for elucidating miRNA-based therapies in FTLD-TDP. PMID:22895706

  13. Frequency of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Majounie, Elisa; Renton, Alan E; Mok, Kin; Dopper, Elise G P; Waite, Adrian; Rollinson, Sara; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; van Swieten, John C; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Johnson, Janel O; Sendtner, Michael; Pamphlett, Roger; Orrell, Richard W; Mead, Simon; Sidle, Katie C; Houlden, Henry; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Morrison, Karen E; Pall, Hardev; Talbot, Kevin; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G; Arepalli, Sampath; Sabatelli, Mario; Mora, Gabriele; Corbo, Massimo; Giannini, Fabio; Calvo, Andrea; Englund, Elisabet; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Remes, Anne M; Laaksovirta, Hannu; McCluskey, Leo; Trojanowski, John Q; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Nalls, Michael A; Drory, Vivian E; Lu, Chin-Song; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Tsuji, Shoji; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Drepper, Carsten; Williams,