Science.gov

Sample records for demonstrates reduced availability

  1. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  2. 40 CFR 1042.815 - Demonstrating availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... available remanufacturing systems. A new remanufacturing system is considered to be available 120 days after... conventionally, divided by the projected amount that PM emissions will be reduced over the engine's useful life...) Incremental operating costs over one useful life period. (iv) Other costs (such as shipping). (2) Calculate...

  3. 40 CFR 1042.815 - Demonstrating availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... available remanufacturing systems. A new remanufacturing system is considered to be available 120 days after... conventionally, divided by the projected amount that PM emissions will be reduced over the engine's useful life...) Incremental operating costs over one useful life period. (iv) Other costs (such as shipping). (2) Calculate...

  4. 40 CFR 1042.815 - Demonstrating availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 1042.815 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES AND VESSELS Special Provisions for Remanufactured Marine Engines § 1042.815 Demonstrating availability. (a) A...

  5. 40 CFR 1042.815 - Demonstrating availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 1042.815 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES AND VESSELS Special Provisions for Remanufactured Marine Engines § 1042.815 Demonstrating availability. (a) A...

  6. 40 CFR 1042.815 - Demonstrating availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1042.815 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES AND VESSELS Special Provisions for Remanufactured Marine Engines § 1042.815 Demonstrating availability. (a) A...

  7. Demonstrating Absorption Spectra Using Commercially Available Incandescent Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.

    In introductory astronomy courses, I typically introduce the three types of spectra: continuous, absorption line, and emission line. It is standard practice to use an ordinary incandescent light bulb to demonstrate the production of a continuous spectrum, and gas discharge tubes to demonstrate the production of an emission line spectrum. The concept of an absorption spectrum is more difficult for students to grasp. A variety of commercially available light bulbs can be used to demonstrate absorption spectra. Here I discuss the use of specialty incandescent light bulbs to demonstrate the phenomenon of absorption of the continuous spectrum produced by a hot tungsten filament. The bulbs examined include the GE Reveal bulb, yellow anti-insect lights, colored party bulbs, and an incandescent "black light" bulb. The bulbs can be used in a lecture or laboratory setting.

  8. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes-Briones, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-06-15

    Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs) (18 antipsychotic treated and 7 antipsychotic free) were compared with 18 age-matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one positron emission tomography scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR on the high resolution research tomography scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of positron emission tomography data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [(11)C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. SCZs showed significantly (p = .02) lower composite [(11)C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d = .73). [(11)C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps < .05) lower in SCZs in the amygdala, caudate, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and insula. Composite [11]OMAR VT was HCs > antipsychotic treated SZCs > antipsychotic free SZCs. Furthermore, composite [(11)C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs than SCZ smokers (n = 11) and SCZ nonsmokers (n = 14). CB1R availability is lower in male SCZ subjects compared with HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability In Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. METHODS Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs), 18 antipsychotic treated [SCZ-MED] and 7 antipsychotic free [SCZ-UNMED]) were compared to 18 age- matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [11C]OMAR on the High Resolution Research Tomography (HRRT) scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of PET data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [11C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. RESULTS SCZs showed significantly (p =0.02) lower composite [11C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d= 0.73). [11C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps <0.05) lower in SCZs in the amygdala, caudate, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and insula. Composite [11C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs> SCZ-MED>SCZ-UNMED. Furthermore, composite [11C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs> SCZ smokers (n=11) > SCZ non-smokers (n=14). CONCLUSIONS CB1R availability is lower in males SCZs compared to HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. PMID:26432420

  10. Clinically Available Medicines Demonstrating Anti-Toxoplasma Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Andrew J.; Zach, Sydney J.; Wang, Xiaofang; Larson, Joshua J.; Judge, Abigail K.; Davis, Lisa A.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite of humans and other mammals, including livestock and companion animals. While chemotherapeutic regimens, including pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine regimens, ameliorate acute or recrudescent disease such as toxoplasmic encephalitis or ocular toxoplasmosis, these drugs are often toxic to the host. Moreover, no approved options are available to treat infected women who are pregnant. Lastly, no drug regimen has shown the ability to eradicate the chronic stage of infection, which is characterized by chemoresistant intracellular cysts that persist for the life of the host. In an effort to promote additional chemotherapeutic options, we now evaluate clinically available drugs that have shown efficacy in disease models but which lack clinical case reports. Ideally, less-toxic treatments for the acute disease can be identified and developed, with an additional goal of cyst clearance from human and animal hosts. PMID:26392504

  11. Demonstration of reduced-order urban scale building energy models

    DOE PAGES

    Heidarinejad, Mohammad; Mattise, Nicholas; Dahlhausen, Matthew; ...

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate a developed framework to rapidly create urban scale reduced-order building energy models using a systematic summary of the simplifications required for the representation of building exterior and thermal zones. These urban scale reduced-order models rely on the contribution of influential variables to the internal, external, and system thermal loads. OpenStudio Application Programming Interface (API) serves as a tool to automate the process of model creation and demonstrate the developed framework. The results of this study show that the accuracy of the developed reduced-order building energy models varies only up to 10% withmore » the selection of different thermal zones. In addition, to assess complexity of the developed reduced-order building energy models, this study develops a novel framework to quantify complexity of the building energy models. Consequently, this study empowers the building energy modelers to quantify their building energy model systematically in order to report the model complexity alongside the building energy model accuracy. An exhaustive analysis on four university campuses suggests that the urban neighborhood buildings lend themselves to simplified typical shapes. Specifically, building energy modelers can utilize the developed typical shapes to represent more than 80% of the U.S. buildings documented in the CBECS database. One main benefits of this developed framework is the opportunity for different models including airflow and solar radiation models to share the same exterior representation, allowing a unifying exchange data. Altogether, the results of this study have implications for a large-scale modeling of buildings in support of urban energy consumption analyses or assessment of a large number of alternative solutions in support of retrofit decision-making in the building industry.« less

  12. Court ruling demonstrates ACA's power to reduce future medical expenses.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Leslie M

    2016-04-01

    Industry insiders who handle litigation involving catastrophic injury cases have eagerly awaited the first rulings to address the impact, if any, of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), often referred to as Obamacare, on claims for future damages. Before the ACA, it was uncertain whether injured individuals would have health insurance to cover ever-growing health care costs in the future. Consequently, in most jurisdictions, the applicable rule of law has prevented the argument that future damages should be reduced because of the availability of health insurance. Because of this, damages have remained essentially unrebutted, and the law has permitted such unrebutted damage projections to be calculated into the future. These projections, primarily in the form of life care plans, are generally the single largest financial component of damage claims. Such plans often project massive expenses that can drive equally massive jury verdicts. © 2016 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  13. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). Any new source... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection of...

  14. 40 CFR 450.24 - New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). Any new source... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New source performance standards reflecting the best available demonstrated control technology (NSPS). 450.24 Section 450.24 Protection of...

  15. 77 FR 14029 - Rental Assistance Demonstration: Notice of Web Availability and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Rental Assistance Demonstration: Notice of Web Availability and Request for Comments... the subject properties. This notice announces that HUD has posted on its Web site a demonstration... immediately available to the public. Comments submitted electronically through the www.regulations.gov Web...

  16. High nitrogen availability reduces polyphenol content in Sphagnum peat.

    PubMed

    Bragazza, Luca; Freeman, Chris

    2007-05-15

    Peat mosses of the genus Sphagnum constitute the bulk of living and dead biomass in bogs. These plants contain peculiar polyphenols which hamper litter peat decomposition through their inhibitory activity on microbial breakdown. In the light of the increasing availability of biologically active nitrogen in natural ecosystems, litter derived from Sphagnum mosses is an ideal substrate to test the potential effects of increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition on polyphenol content in litter peat. To this aim, we measured total nitrogen and soluble polyphenol concentration in Sphagnum litter peat collected in 11 European bogs under a chronic gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results demonstrate that increasing nitrogen concentration in Sphagnum litter, as a consequence of increased exogenous nitrogen availability, is accompanied by a decreasing concentration of polyphenols. This inverse relationship is consistent with reports that in Sphagnum mosses, polyphenol and protein biosynthesis compete for the same precursor. Our observation of modified Sphagnum litter chemistry under chronic nitrogen eutrophication has implications in the context of the global carbon balance, because a lower content of decay-inhibiting polyphenols would accelerate litter peat decomposition.

  17. Demonstration of Reduced Gas Pressure in a Centrifugal Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Fred; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple demonstration that shows the change in molecular density and the reduction in pressure of air in a centrifugal field. Uses two circular disks with the same radius and rotating with the same angular velocity, in loose mutual contact, around their symmetry axis. (GA)

  18. Demonstration of Reduced Gas Pressure in a Centrifugal Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Fred; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple demonstration that shows the change in molecular density and the reduction in pressure of air in a centrifugal field. Uses two circular disks with the same radius and rotating with the same angular velocity, in loose mutual contact, around their symmetry axis. (GA)

  19. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  20. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  1. 78 FR 65747 - Notice of Funding Availability for Accelerated Innovation Deployment Demonstration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Funding Availability for Accelerated Innovation Deployment... funding for Accelerated Innovation Deployment (AID) Demonstration authorized within the Technology and Innovation Deployment Program (TIDP) under the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21...

  2. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, A.B.; Skone, S.S.; Rodenhizer, D.G.; Marusich, M.V. )

    1990-10-01

    This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project. Final design availability assessment. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mulvihill, R.J.; Reny, D.A.; Geumlek, J.M.; Purohit, G.P.

    1983-02-01

    An availability assessment of the principal systems of the Heber Geothermal Power Plant has been carried out based on the final issue of the process descriptions, process flow diagrams, and the approved for design P and IDs prepared by Fluor Power Services, Inc. (FPS). The principal systems are those which contribute most to plant unavailability. The plant equivalent availability, considering forced and deferred corrective maintenance outages, was computed using a 91 state Markov model to represent the 29 principal system failure configurations and their significant combinations. The failure configurations and associated failure and repair rates were defined from system/subsystem availability assessments that were conducted using the availability assessments based on the EPRI GO methodology and availability block diagram models. The availability and unavailability ranking of the systems and major equipment is presented.

  4. The potency of fluvoxamine to reduce ethanol self-administration decreases with concurrent availability of food.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Lamb, Richard J

    2012-04-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine reduces responding for ethanol at lower doses than responding for food when each is available in separate components or separate groups of rats. However, when both are available concurrently and deliveries earned per session are equal, this apparent selectivity inverts and food-maintained behavior is more sensitive than ethanol-maintained behavior to rate-decreasing effects of fluvoxamine. Here, we investigated further the impact that concurrent access to both food and ethanol has on the potency of fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine (5.6-17.8 mg/kg) potency was assessed under conditions in which food and ethanol were available concurrently and response rates were equal [average variable intervals (VIs) 405 and 14 s for food and ethanol, respectively], as well as when density of food delivery was increased (average VI 60 s for food and VI 14 s for ethanol). The potency of fluvoxamine was also determined when only ethanol was available (food extinction and average VI 14 s for ethanol) and under multiple VIs (VI 30 s for food and ethanol) wherein either food or ethanol was the only programmed reinforcement available during each component. Fluvoxamine was less potent at decreasing ethanol self-administration when food was available concurrently {ED50 [95% confidence limit (CL): 8.2 (6.5-10.3) and 10.7 (7.9-14.4)]} versus when ethanol was available in isolation [ED50: 4.0 (2.7-5.9) and 5.1 (4.3-6.0)]. Effects on food were similar under each condition in which food was available. The results demonstrate that the potency of fluvoxamine in reducing ethanol-maintained behavior depends on whether ethanol is available in isolation or in the context of concurrently scheduled food reinforcement.

  5. Reduced peroxisomal citrate synthase activity increases substrate availability for polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis in plant peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Poirier, Yves; Gebbie, Leigh; Schenk, Peer M; McQualter, Richard B; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2014-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bacterial carbon storage polymers used as renewable, biodegradable plastics. PHA production in plants may be a way to reduce industrial PHA production costs. We recently demonstrated a promising level of peroxisomal PHA production in the high biomass crop species sugarcane. However, further production strategies are needed to boost PHA accumulation closer to commercial targets. Through exogenous fatty acid feeding of Arabidopsis thaliana plants that contain peroxisome-targeted PhaA, PhaB and PhaC enzymes from Cupriavidus necator, we show here that the availability of substrates derived from the β-oxidation cycle limits peroxisomal polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesis. Knockdown of peroxisomal citrate synthase activity using artificial microRNA increased PHB production levels approximately threefold. This work demonstrates that reduction of peroxisomal citrate synthase activity may be a valid metabolic engineering strategy for increasing PHA production in other plant species.

  6. Unmanned Carrier-based Aircraft System: Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    UNMANNED CARRIER-BASED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available...for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed , and completing and reviewing the collection of...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Unmanned Carrier-based Aircraft System: Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its

  7. Interactive effect of reduced pollen availability and Varroa destructor infestation limits growth and protein content of young honey bees.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, C; Stam, E; Gerritsen, L; Cornelissen, B; van der Steen, J; van Langevelde, F; Blacquière, T

    2013-04-01

    Varroa destructor in combination with one or more stressors, such as low food availability or chemical exposure, is considered to be one of the main causes for honey bee colony losses. We examined the interactive effect of pollen availability on the protein content and body weight of young bees that emerged with and without V. destructor infestation. With reduced pollen availability, and the coherent reduced nutritional protein, we expected that V. destructor infestation during the pupal stage would have a larger negative effect on bee development than without infestation. Moreover, when raised with ample pollen available after emergence, infested pupae were expected not to be able to compensate for early losses due to V. destructor. We found that both V. destructor infestation and reduced pollen availability reduced body weight, abdominal protein level, and increased the head to abdomen protein ratio. The availability of pollen did indeed not result in compensation for reduced mass and protein content caused by V. destructor infestation in young bees after 1 week of their adult life. Both V. destructor and nutrition are top concerns for those studying honey bee health and this study demonstrates that both have substantial effects on young bees and that ample available pollen cannot compensate for reduced mass and protein content caused by V. destructor parasitism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reducing Plug Loads in Office Spaces: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Metzger, I.; Cutler, D.; Holland, G.; Hanada, A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This project was one of several demonstrations of new or underutilized commercial energy technologies. The common goal was to demonstrate and measure the performance and economic benefit of the system while monitoring any ancillary impacts to related standards of service and operation and maintenance (O&M) practices. In short, demonstrations at naval facilities simultaneously evaluate the benefits and compatibility of the technology with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) mission, and with NAVFAC's design, construction, operations, and maintenance practices, in particular. This project demonstrated the performance of commercially available advanced power strips (APSs) for plug load energy reductions in building A4 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii.

  9. Demonstration of Hadoop-GIS: A Spatial Data Warehousing System Over MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Ablimit; Sun, Xiling; Vo, Hoang; Liu, Qioaling; Lee, Rubao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel; Wang, Fusheng

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of GPS-enabled devices, and the rapid improvement of scientific instruments have resulted in massive amounts of spatial data in the last decade. Support of high performance spatial queries on large volumes data has become increasingly important in numerous fields, which requires a scalable and efficient spatial data warehousing solution as existing approaches exhibit scalability limitations and efficiency bottlenecks for large scale spatial applications. In this demonstration, we present Hadoop-GIS – a scalable and high performance spatial query system over MapReduce. Hadoop-GIS provides an efficient spatial query engine to process spatial queries, data and space based partitioning, and query pipelines that parallelize queries implicitly on MapReduce. Hadoop-GIS also provides an expressive, SQL-like spatial query language for workload specification. We will demonstrate how spatial queries are expressed in spatially extended SQL queries, and submitted through a command line/web interface for execution. Parallel to our system demonstration, we explain the system architecture and details on how queries are translated to MapReduce operators, optimized, and executed on Hadoop. In addition, we will showcase how the system can be used to support two representative real world use cases: large scale pathology analytical imaging, and geo-spatial data warehousing. PMID:27617325

  10. Demonstration of Hadoop-GIS: A Spatial Data Warehousing System Over MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Aji, Ablimit; Sun, Xiling; Vo, Hoang; Liu, Qioaling; Lee, Rubao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel; Wang, Fusheng

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation of GPS-enabled devices, and the rapid improvement of scientific instruments have resulted in massive amounts of spatial data in the last decade. Support of high performance spatial queries on large volumes data has become increasingly important in numerous fields, which requires a scalable and efficient spatial data warehousing solution as existing approaches exhibit scalability limitations and efficiency bottlenecks for large scale spatial applications. In this demonstration, we present Hadoop-GIS - a scalable and high performance spatial query system over MapReduce. Hadoop-GIS provides an efficient spatial query engine to process spatial queries, data and space based partitioning, and query pipelines that parallelize queries implicitly on MapReduce. Hadoop-GIS also provides an expressive, SQL-like spatial query language for workload specification. We will demonstrate how spatial queries are expressed in spatially extended SQL queries, and submitted through a command line/web interface for execution. Parallel to our system demonstration, we explain the system architecture and details on how queries are translated to MapReduce operators, optimized, and executed on Hadoop. In addition, we will showcase how the system can be used to support two representative real world use cases: large scale pathology analytical imaging, and geo-spatial data warehousing.

  11. Best demonstrated available technology (bdat) for pollution control and waste treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the most current equipment and processes for pollution control and waste treatment that attempt to meet the guidelines set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Technology for pollution control and waste treatment used by the EPA to develop current effluent standards, and pollution control methods used by industry to meet those standards are considered. Standards for gaseous, liquid, and solid pollution are discussed. BDAT (Best Demonstrated Available Technology) is an acronym for best currently available technology as defined by the EPA. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Competition-Induced Reductions in Soil Water Availability Reduced Pine Root Extension Rates

    Treesearch

    K.H. Ludovici; L.A. Morris

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between soil water availability, root extension, and shoot growth of loblolly pine seedlings (Pinus taeda L.) was evaluated in a rhizotron sand mixture in the absence and presence of crabgrass (Digitaria spp.) competition. Heights and diameters of seedlings grown with crabgrass were reduced 33 and SO%, respectively, compared with...

  13. Can persuasive and demonstrative messages to visitors reduce littering in river beaches?

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Ana M; Barberá, Iván; Renison, Daniel; Barri, Fernando R

    2016-12-01

    Littering of public areas is a significant problem worldwide. Here we evaluate the success of persuasive and demonstrative messages at reducing littering in highly visited river beaches in Argentina. We made an intervention at the beaches which consisted of a personalized verbal request asking visitors to take their litter to the waste cans (persuasive message) while they were exposed to the example of picking up the litter already left on the beach (demonstrative message). We conducted 102 observations distributed over 29 dates, two years and four beaches. Each observation consisted of three or four rounds: before the presence of visitors we cleaned the beaches, during the stay of visitors we made the intervention (once or twice) in two out of the four beaches, and early next morning we estimated the amount of litter left per beach. Litter weight ranged from 0 to 53gvisitor(-1)day(-1). Littering per visitor was reduced an average of 35% due to the intervention (p=0.049). We also found differences among beaches (p=0.001), and an increase in littering with crowding (p=0.005). We show for the first time that the personalized request combined with the example of picking up litter is effective in reducing littering in a Latin American country. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Reduced sleep duration mediates decreases in striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in cocaine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Wiers, C E; Shumay, E; Cabrera, E; Shokri-Kojori, E; Gladwin, T E; Skarda, E; Cunningham, S I; Kim, S W; Wong, T C; Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have documented reduced striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) availability in cocaine abusers, which has been associated with impaired prefrontal activity and vulnerability for relapse. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the decreases in D2/D3R remain poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that sleep deprivation is associated with a downregulation of striatal D2/D3R in healthy volunteers. As cocaine abusers have disrupted sleep patterns, here we investigated whether reduced sleep duration mediates the relationship between cocaine abuse and low striatal D2/D3R availability. We used positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride to measure striatal D2/D3R availability in 24 active cocaine abusers and 21 matched healthy controls, and interviewed them about their daily sleep patterns. Compared with controls, cocaine abusers had shorter sleep duration, went to bed later and reported longer periods of sleep disturbances. In addition, cocaine abusers had reduced striatal D2/D3R availability. Sleep duration predicted striatal D2/D3R availability and statistically mediated the relationship between cocaine abuse and striatal D2/D3R availability. These findings suggest that impaired sleep patterns contribute to the low striatal D2/D3R availability in cocaine abusers. As sleep impairments are similarly observed in other types of substance abusers (for example, alcohol and methamphetamine), this mechanism may also underlie reductions in D2/D3R availability in these groups. The current findings have clinical implications suggesting that interventions to improve sleep patterns in cocaine abusers undergoing detoxification might be beneficial in improving their clinical outcomes. PMID:26954979

  15. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    coagulation and collection of the mercury aerosols in exhaust ducts, which is dependent on the hood and collector configuration, was also evaluated. Prototype demonstration tests verified the theoretical basis for mercury aerosol capture that can be used to optimize the baffle plate design, flow rates, and hood exhaust ducts and plenum to achieve 80% or higher removal efficiencies. Results indicated that installation configuration significantly influences a system's capture efficiency. Configurations that retained existing inlet ducts resulted in system efficiencies of more than 80%, whereas installation configurations without inlet ducts significantly reduced capture efficiency. As an alternative to increasing the volume of inlet ducts, the number of baffle plates in the system baffle assembly could be doubled to increase efficiency. Recommended installation and operation procedures were developed on the basis of these results. A water-based mercury capture system developed in Indonesia for installation in smaller shops was also tested and shown to be effective for certain applications. The cost of construction and installation of the baffle plate prototype was approximately US$400. These costs were reported as acceptable by local gold shop owners and government regulators, and were significantly lower than the cost of an alternate charcoal/copper mesh mercury filter available in the region, which costs about US$10,000. A sampling procedure that consists of a particle filter combined with a vapor analyzer was demonstrated as an effective procedure for analyzing both the aerosol and vapor components of the mercury concentrations. Two key findings for enhancing higher mercury collection were identified. First, the aerosol/vapor mercury emissions must be given sufficient time for the mercury particles to coagulate to a size that can be readily captured by the baffle plates. An interval of at least 6 seconds of transit time between the point of evaporation and contact with the

  16. High nutrient availability reduces the diversity and stability of the equine caecal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Naja C. K.; Avershina, Ekaterina; Mydland, Liv T.; Næsset, Jon A.; Austbø, Dag; Moen, Birgitte; Måge, Ingrid; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Background It is well known that nutrient availability can alter the gut microbiota composition, while the effect on diversity and temporal stability remains largely unknown. Methods Here we address the equine caecal microbiota temporal stability, diversity, and functionality in response to diets with different levels of nutrient availability. Hay (low and slower nutrient availability) versus a mixture of hay and whole oats (high and more rapid nutrient availability) were used as experimental diets. Results We found major effects on the microbiota despite that the caecal pH was far from sub-clinical acidosis. We found that the low nutrient availability diet was associated with a higher level of both diversity and temporal stability of the caecal microbiota than the high nutrient availability diet. These observations concur with general ecological theories, suggesting a stabilising effect of biological diversity and that high nutrient availability has a destabilising effect through reduced diversity. Conclusion Nutrient availability does not only change the composition but also the ecology of the caecal microbiota. PMID:26246403

  17. Reducing the availability of food to control feral pigeons: changes in population size and composition.

    PubMed

    Senar, Juan C; Montalvo, Tomás; Pascual, Jordi; Peracho, Victor

    2017-02-01

    As feeding by humans is one of the main food resources to pigeons (Columba livia), there is general agreement that public education that aims to reduce the food base may be the most feasible way to reduce pigeon abundance. However, except for the classic example of Basel, the method has rarely been tested or implemented. We provide results from a 1 year study in the city of Barcelona where we tested the effect of public education on pigeon population abundance and composition. The quantity of food provided by people to pigeons was significantly reduced during the study. Feral pigeon density was reduced by 40% in the two experimental districts, but no variation was detected in the control district. Detailed analyses in one of the districts showed that the reduction was mainly related to the reduction in food availability but not to culling. Pigeons captured at the end of the experiment were larger than at the start of the study, but body condition was reduced. Results show the effectiveness of public information to manage feral pigeon populations in a large city, and that control operations can exert important selection pressure on the population, leading to changes in population composition. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Demonstrating Reduced Environmental and Genetic Diversity in Human Isolates by Analysis of Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Polašek, Ozren; Kolčić, Ivana; Smoljanović, Ankica; Stojanović, Dražen; Grgić, Matijana; Ebling, Barbara; Klarić, Maja; Milas, Josip; Puntarić, Dinko

    2006-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that phenotypic diversity in isolated human populations is decreased in comparison with general outbred population because of reduced genetic and environmental diversity. To demonstrate this in populations for which reduced genetic and environmental diversity had already been established, by studying the amount of variation in plasma lipid levels. Methods Fasting plasma lipid levels (cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein [LDL], and high density lipoprotein [HDL]) were measured in randomly selected 300 inhabitants from 2 isolated human populations, the island of Rab and the neighboring islands of Vis and Lastovo, Croatia. The populations were chosen based on previous analyses of genetic diversity and lifestyle patterns, which were shown to be both less diverse and more uniform than the general Croatian population. We studied whether the 25’-75’ and 5′-95’ interpercentile ranges in observed values were consistently smaller in 2 samples of 300 examinees from isolated populations in comparison with nearly 6000 examinees from an earlier study who were demographically targeted to represent the larger Croatian population. Results General population had much wider range of observed values of triglycerides and HDL than both isolated populations. However, both isolated populations exhibited greater extent of variation in the levels of LDL, while the ranges of cholesterol values were similar. Conclusion Although reduced genetic and environmental diversity in isolated human populations should necessarily reduce the variance in observed phenotypic values, it appears that specific population genetic processes in isolated populations could be acting to maintain the variation. Departure from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to consanguinity, sub-structuring and differentiation within the isolates, and increased rate of new mutations could theoretically explain this paradox. PMID:16909463

  19. Earlier springs are causing reduced nitrogen availability in North American eastern deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Andrew J; Nelson, David M; Craine, Joseph M

    2016-09-12

    There is wide agreement that anthropogenic climate warming has influenced the phenology of forests during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries(1,2). Longer growing seasons can lead to increased photosynthesis and productivity(3), which would represent a negative feedback to rising CO2 and consequently warming(4,5). Alternatively, increased demand for soil resources because of a longer photosynthetically active period in conjunction with other global change factors might exacerbate resource limitation(6,7), restricting forest productivity response to a longer growing season(8,9). In this case, increased springtime productivity has the potential to increase plant nitrogen limitation by increasing plant demand for nitrogen more than nitrogen supplies, or increasing early-season ecosystem nitrogen losses(10,11). Here we show that for 222 trees representing three species in eastern North America earlier spring phenology during the past 30 years has caused declines in nitrogen availability to trees by increasing demand for nitrogen relative to supply. The observed decline in nitrogen availability is not associated with reduced wood production, suggesting that other environmental changes such as increased atmospheric CO2 and water availability are likely to have overwhelmed reduced nitrogen availability. Given current trajectories of environmental changes, nitrogen limitation is likely to continue to increase for these forests, possibly further limiting carbon sequestration potential.

  20. Reduced Carbohydrate Availability Enhances the Susceptibility of Arabidopsis toward Colletotrichum higginsianum1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Horst, Robin J.; Pröls, Reinhard; Pröschel, Marlene; Dietz, Franziska; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Voll, Lars M.

    2013-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is a hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus that is adapted to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). After breaching the host surface, the fungus establishes an initial biotrophic phase in the penetrated epidermis cell, before necrotrophic growth is initiated upon further host colonization. We observed that partitioning of major leaf carbohydrates was shifted in favor of sucrose and at the expense of starch during necrotrophic fungal growth. Arabidopsis mutants with impaired starch turnover were more susceptible toward C. higginsianum infection, exhibiting a strong negative correlation between diurnal carbohydrate accumulation and fungal proliferation for the tested genotypes. By altering the length of the light phase and employing additional genotypes impaired in nocturnal carbon mobilization, we revealed that reduced availability of carbon enhances susceptibility in the investigated pathosystem. Systematic starvation experiments resulted in two important findings. First, we showed that carbohydrate supply by the host is dispensable during biotrophic growth of C. higginsianum, while carbon deficiency was most harmful to the host during the necrotrophic colonization phase. Compared with the wild type, the increases in the total salicylic acid pool and camalexin accumulation were reduced in starch-free mutants at late interaction stages, while an increased ratio of free to total salicylic acid did not convey elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression in starch-free mutants. These observations suggest that reduced carbon availability dampens induced defense responses. In contrast, starch-free mutants were more resistant toward the fungal biotroph Erysiphe cruciferarum, indicating that reduced carbohydrate availability influences susceptibility differently in the interaction with the investigated hemibiotrophic and biotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:23487433

  1. Association of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Reduced In Vivo Norepinephrine Availability in the Locus Coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Ding, Yu-Shin; Henry, Shannan; Potenza, Marc N.; Southwick, Steven M.; Krystal, John H.; Carson, Richard E.; Neumeister, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Animal data suggest that chronic stress is associated with a reduction in norepinephrine transporter (NET) availability in the locus coeruleus. However, it is unclear whether such models are relevant to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which has been linked to noradrenergic dysfunction in humans. OBJECTIVES To use positron emission tomography and the radioligand [11C]methylreboxetine to examine in vivo NET availability in the locus coeruleus in the following 3 groups of individuals: healthy adults (HC group), adults exposed to trauma who did not develop PTSD (TC group), and adults exposed to trauma who developed PTSD (PTSD group) and to evaluate the relationship between NET availability in the locus coeruleus and a contemporary phenotypic model of PTSD symptoms. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional positron emission tomography study under resting conditions at academic and Veterans Affairs medical centers among 56 individuals in the following 3 study groups: HC (n = 18), TC (n = 16), and PTSD (n = 22). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The [11C]methylreboxetine-binding potential of NET availability in the locus coeruleus and the severity of PTSD symptoms assessed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. RESULTS The PTSD group had significantly lower NET availability than the HC group (41% lower, Cohen d = 1.07). NET availability did not differ significantly between the TC and HC groups (31% difference, Cohen d = 0.79) or between the TC and PTSD groups (15% difference, Cohen d = 0.28). In the PTSD group, NET availability in the locus coeruleus was independently positively associated with the severity of anxious arousal (ie, hypervigilance) symptoms (r = 0.52) but not with any of the other PTSD symptom clusters. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These results suggest that PTSD is associated with significantly reduced NET availability in the locus coeruleus and that greater NET availability in this brain region is associated with increased severity

  2. Field demonstration of reduction of lead availability in soil and cabbage (Brassica Chinensis L.) contaminated by mining tailings using phosphorus fertilizers*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zheng-miao; Wang, Bi-ling; Sun, Ye-fang; Li, Jing

    2006-01-01

    A field demonstration of reduction of lead availability in a soil and cabbage (Brassica Chinensis L.) contaminated by mining tailings, located in Shaoxing, China was carried out to evaluate the effects of applications of phosphorus fertilizers on Pb fractionation and Pb phytoavailability in the soil. It was found that the addition of all three P fertilizers including single super phosphate (SSP), phosphate rock (PR), and calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP) significantly decreased the percentage of water-soluble and exchangeable (WE) soil Pb and then reduced the uptake of Pb, Cd, and Zn by the cabbage compared to the control (CK). The results showed that the level of 300 g P/m2 soil was the most cost-effective application rate of P fertilizers for reducing Pb availability at the first stage of remediation, and that at this P level, the effect of WE fraction of Pb in the soil decreased by three phosphorus fertilizers followed the order: CMP (79%)>SSP (41%)>PR (23%); Effectiveness on the reduction of Pb uptake by cabbage was in the order: CMP (53%)>SSP (41%)>PR (30%). Therefore our field trial demonstrated that it was effective and feasible to reduce Pb availability in soil and cabbage contaminated by mining tailings using P fertilizers in China and PR would be a most cost-effective amendment. PMID:16365925

  3. Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R

    2009-10-17

    High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

  4. Increasing temperature reduces the coupling between available nitrogen and phosphorus in soils of Chinese grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yan; Baumann, Frank; Song, Chao; Zhang, Mi; Shi, Yue; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Changes in climatic conditions along geographical gradients greatly affect soil nutrient cycling processes. Yet how climate regimes such as changes in temperature influence soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and their stoichiometry is not well understood. This study investigated the spatial pattern and variability of soil N and P availability as well as their coupling relationships at two soil layers (0-10 and 10-20 cm) along a 4000-km climate transect in two grassland biomes of China, the Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands and the Tibetan alpine grasslands. Our results found that in both grasslands, from cold to warm sites the amounts of soil total N, total P and available P all decreased. By contrast, the amount of available N was positively related to mean annual temperature in the Tibetan grasslands. Meanwhile, with increasing temperature ratio of available N to P significantly increased but the linear relationship between them was considerably reduced. Thus, increasing temperature may not only induce a stoichiometric shift but also loose the coupling between available N and P. This N-P decoupling under warmer conditions was more evident in the Tibetan alpine grasslands where P limitation might become more widespread relative to N as temperatures continue to rise.

  5. Increasing temperature reduces the coupling between available nitrogen and phosphorus in soils of Chinese grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yan; Baumann, Frank; Song, Chao; Zhang, Mi; Shi, Yue; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Changes in climatic conditions along geographical gradients greatly affect soil nutrient cycling processes. Yet how climate regimes such as changes in temperature influence soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and their stoichiometry is not well understood. This study investigated the spatial pattern and variability of soil N and P availability as well as their coupling relationships at two soil layers (0–10 and 10–20 cm) along a 4000-km climate transect in two grassland biomes of China, the Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands and the Tibetan alpine grasslands. Our results found that in both grasslands, from cold to warm sites the amounts of soil total N, total P and available P all decreased. By contrast, the amount of available N was positively related to mean annual temperature in the Tibetan grasslands. Meanwhile, with increasing temperature ratio of available N to P significantly increased but the linear relationship between them was considerably reduced. Thus, increasing temperature may not only induce a stoichiometric shift but also loose the coupling between available N and P. This N-P decoupling under warmer conditions was more evident in the Tibetan alpine grasslands where P limitation might become more widespread relative to N as temperatures continue to rise. PMID:28266635

  6. Increasing temperature reduces the coupling between available nitrogen and phosphorus in soils of Chinese grasslands.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Baumann, Frank; Song, Chao; Zhang, Mi; Shi, Yue; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-03-07

    Changes in climatic conditions along geographical gradients greatly affect soil nutrient cycling processes. Yet how climate regimes such as changes in temperature influence soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and their stoichiometry is not well understood. This study investigated the spatial pattern and variability of soil N and P availability as well as their coupling relationships at two soil layers (0-10 and 10-20 cm) along a 4000-km climate transect in two grassland biomes of China, the Inner Mongolian temperate grasslands and the Tibetan alpine grasslands. Our results found that in both grasslands, from cold to warm sites the amounts of soil total N, total P and available P all decreased. By contrast, the amount of available N was positively related to mean annual temperature in the Tibetan grasslands. Meanwhile, with increasing temperature ratio of available N to P significantly increased but the linear relationship between them was considerably reduced. Thus, increasing temperature may not only induce a stoichiometric shift but also loose the coupling between available N and P. This N-P decoupling under warmer conditions was more evident in the Tibetan alpine grasslands where P limitation might become more widespread relative to N as temperatures continue to rise.

  7. Evaluating the impact of a Connecticut program to reduce availability of unhealthy competitive food in schools.

    PubMed

    Long, Michael W; Henderson, Kathryn E; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2010-10-01

    This article seeks to inform state and local school food policies by evaluating the impact of Connecticut's Healthy Food Certification (HFC), a program which provides monetary incentives to school districts that choose to implement state nutrition standards for all foods sold to students outside reimbursable school meals. Food service directors from all school districts participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) (N = 151) in Connecticut were surveyed about the availability of competitive foods before and after the 2006-2007 implementation of HFC. Food categories were coded as healthy or unhealthy based on whether they met the Connecticut Nutrition Standards. Data on NSLP participation were provided by the State Department of Education. Changes in NSLP participation and availability of unhealthy competitive foods in elementary, middle, and high schools were compared pre- and post-HFC across districts participating (n = 74) versus not participating (n = 77) in HFC. On average, all districts in Connecticut reduced the availability of unhealthy competitive foods, with a significantly greater reduction among HFC districts. Average NSLP participation also increased across the state. Participating in HFC was associated with significantly greater NSLP participation for paid meals in middle school; however, implementing HFC did not increase overall NSLP participation beyond the statewide upward trend. The 2006-2007 school year was marked by a significant decrease in unhealthy competitive foods and an increase in NSLP participation across the state. Participation in Connecticut's voluntary HFC further reduced the availability of unhealthy competitive foods in local school districts, and had either a positive or neutral effect on NSLP participation. © 2010, American School Health Association.

  8. Characterization of Streptococcus oligofermentans sucrose metabolism demonstrates reduced pyruvic and lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xu-Dong; Yue, Lin; Gao, Xue-Jun

    2011-11-01

    Streptococcus (S.) oligofermentans is a newly identified bacteria with a yet to be defined mechanism of sucrose metabolism that results in acid production. This study aimed to investigate the biochemical mechanisms of S. oligoferm-entans glucose metaolism. The S. oligofermentans LMG21532, Lactobacillus (L.) fermentum 38 and the S. mutans UA140 were used to characterize sucrose metabolism by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and lactic acid production. Continuous dynamics and high performance capillary electrophoresis were used to determine LDH activity and lactic acid production, respectively, from bacteria collected at 0, 10 and 30 minutes after cultured in 10% sucrose. These analyses demonstrated that LDH activity of the three bacterial strains examined remained stable but significantly different throughout the sucrose fermentation process. The S. oligofermentans LDH activity ((0.61 ± 0.05) U/mg) was significantly lower than that of L. fermentum ((52.91 ± 8.97) U/mg). In addition, the S. oligofermentans total lactate production ((0.048 ± 0.021) mmol/L) was also significantly lower than that of L. fermentum ((0.958 ± 0.201) mmol/L). Although the S. oligofermentans LDH production was almost double of that produced by S. mutans ((0.32 ± 0.07) U/mg), lactic acid production was approximately one sixth that of S. mutans ((0.296 ± 0.058) mmol/L). Additional tests examining pyruvic acid production (the LDH substrate) demonstrated that lactic acid concentrations correlated with pyruvic acid production. That is, pyruvic acid production by S. oligofermentans was undetectable following sucrose incubation, however, (0.074 ± 0.024) and (0.175 ± 0.098) mmol/L pyruvic acid were produced by S. mutans and L. fermentum, respectively. S. oligofermentans is incapable of fermenting carbohydrates to produce enough pyruvic acid, which results in reduced lactic acid production.

  9. Conocarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal availability and uptake by maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wabel, Mohammad I.; Usman, Adel R.A.; El-Naggar, Ahmed H.; Aly, Anwar A.; Ibrahim, Hesham M.; Elmaghraby, Salem; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of Concarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal accessibility and uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.). The impacts of biochar rates (0.0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0% w/w) and two soil moisture levels (75% and 100% of field capacity, FC) on immobilization and availability of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb to maize plants as well as its application effects on soil pH, EC, bulk density, and moisture content were evaluated using heavy metal-contaminated soil collected from mining area. The biochar addition significantly decreased the bulk density and increased moisture content of soil. Applying biochar significantly reduced NH4OAc- or AB-DTPA-extractable heavy metal concentrations of soils, indicating metal immobilization. Conocarpus biochar increased shoot dry biomass of maize plants by 54.5–102% at 75% FC and 133–266% at 100% FC. Moreover, applying biochar significantly reduced shoot heavy metal concentrations in maize plants (except for Fe at 75% FC) in response to increasing application rates, with a highest decrease of 51.3% and 60.5% for Mn, 28% and 21.2% for Zn, 60% and 29.5% for Cu, 53.2% and 47.2% for Cd at soil moisture levels of 75% FC and 100% FC, respectively. The results suggest that biochar may be effectively used as a soil amendment for heavy metal immobilization and in reducing its phytotoxicity. PMID:26150758

  10. Conocarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal availability and uptake by maize plants.

    PubMed

    Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Usman, Adel R A; El-Naggar, Ahmed H; Aly, Anwar A; Ibrahim, Hesham M; Elmaghraby, Salem; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of Concarpus biochar as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal accessibility and uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.). The impacts of biochar rates (0.0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0% w/w) and two soil moisture levels (75% and 100% of field capacity, FC) on immobilization and availability of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb to maize plants as well as its application effects on soil pH, EC, bulk density, and moisture content were evaluated using heavy metal-contaminated soil collected from mining area. The biochar addition significantly decreased the bulk density and increased moisture content of soil. Applying biochar significantly reduced NH4OAc- or AB-DTPA-extractable heavy metal concentrations of soils, indicating metal immobilization. Conocarpus biochar increased shoot dry biomass of maize plants by 54.5-102% at 75% FC and 133-266% at 100% FC. Moreover, applying biochar significantly reduced shoot heavy metal concentrations in maize plants (except for Fe at 75% FC) in response to increasing application rates, with a highest decrease of 51.3% and 60.5% for Mn, 28% and 21.2% for Zn, 60% and 29.5% for Cu, 53.2% and 47.2% for Cd at soil moisture levels of 75% FC and 100% FC, respectively. The results suggest that biochar may be effectively used as a soil amendment for heavy metal immobilization and in reducing its phytotoxicity.

  11. Commercially available probiotic drinks containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 reduce antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Kottmann, Tanja; Alavi, Manuela

    2014-11-14

    To investigate the effect of Lactobacillus-containing commercially available probiotic formulations in Germany during antibiotic treatment with an analysis of cost-efficiency. In an observational study, we analyzed the frequency of bowel movements from 258 patients with infections in a primary care hospital in western Germany; 107 of the patients were offered a probiotic drink containing at least 10 billion cultures of Lactobacillus casei DN 114001 b.i.d. The economic analysis was based on the costs of patient isolation vs preventive intake of probiotics. In a second pilot study, two commercially available probiotic drinks with different Lactobacillus casei strains were directly compared in 60 patients in a randomized controlled fashion. In the first study, the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) was significantly reduced in the intervention group (6.5% vs 28.4%), and the duration of AAD in days was significantly shorter (1.7 ± 1.1 vs 3.1 ± 2.1). Higher age and creatinine and lower albumin were identified as risk factors for AAD. Ampicillin was the antibiotic with the highest rate of AAD (50%) and with the greatest AAD reduction in the probiotic group (4.2%, relative risk reduction 92%). The economic analysis showed a cost advantage of nearly 60000 €/year in a department of this size. The second study confirmed the preventive effect of the drink with Lactobacillus casei DN114001; however, there were no advantages found for the other tested probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota. In contrast to a drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota, a commercially available probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN 114001 cost-efficiently reduces the prevalence of AAD during antibiotic treatment.

  12. Grout disposal facility vault exhauster: Technical background document on demonstration of best available control technology for toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Glantz, C.S.; Rittman, P.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) is currently operated on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The GDF is located near the east end of the Hanford Site`s 200 East operations area, and is used for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive liquid wastes. In the grout treatment process, selected radioactive wastes from double-shell tanks are mixed with grout-forming solids; the resulting grout slurry is pumped to near-surface concrete vaults for solidification and permanent disposal. As part of this treatment process, small amounts of toxic particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be released to the atmosphere through the GDF`s exhaust system. This analysis constitutes a Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (T-BACT) study, as required in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC 173-460) to support a Notice of Construction for the operation of the GDF exhaust system at a modified flow rate that exceeds the previously permitted value. This report accomplishes the following: assesses the potential emissions from the GDF; estimates air quality impacts to the public from toxic air pollutants; identifies control technologies that could reduce GDF emissions; evaluates impacts of the control technologies; and recommends appropriate emissions controls.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  14. Fan Beam Emission Tomography Demonstrated Successfully in the Reduced-Gravity Environment of Drop Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    Fires onboard manned spacecraft and launch vehicles are a particularly feared hazard because one cannot jump ship while in orbit 240 nmi above the Earth at 17 000 mph! Understanding the physical properties of fires in free fall and on orbit is, therefore, a very important endeavor for NASA s Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. However, detailed information concerning the structure of microgravity fires remained elusive until recently since robustness, limited power, limited volume, and limited mass place severe constraints on diagnostic equipment for use in space and in NASA Glenn Research Center s reduced-gravity facilities. Under NASA Research Associate funding since 2001, En'Urga, Inc. (Dr. Sivathanu, principal investigator, and Dr. Lim, co-investigator) in collaboration with Glenn (Dr. Feikema, coinvestigator) have successfully demonstrated a new technology for use in microgravity combustion. A midinfrared scanning spectrometer has been developed by En'Urga and tested at Glenn to measure 30 spectra per second at different spatial locations in a flame from 1.8 to 4.8 microns.

  15. Rain events decrease boreal peatland net CO2 uptake through reduced light availability.

    PubMed

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M; Berendse, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Boreal peatlands store large amounts of carbon, reflecting their important role in the global carbon cycle. The short-term exchange and the long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in these ecosystems are closely associated with the permanently wet surface conditions and are susceptible to drought. Especially, the single most important peat forming plant genus, Sphagnum, depends heavily on surface wetness for its primary production. Changes in rainfall patterns are expected to affect surface wetness, but how this transient rewetting affects net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) remains unknown. This study explores how the timing and characteristics of rain events during photosynthetic active periods, that is daytime, affect peatland NEE and whether rain event associated changes in environmental conditions modify this response (e.g. water table, radiation, vapour pressure deficit, temperature). We analysed an 11-year time series of half-hourly eddy covariance and meteorological measurements from Degerö Stormyr, a boreal peatland in northern Sweden. Our results show that daytime rain events systematically decreased the sink strength of peatlands for atmospheric CO2 . The decrease was best explained by rain associated reduction in light, rather than by rain characteristics or drought length. An average daytime growing season rain event reduced net ecosystem CO2 uptake by 0.23-0.54 gC m(-2) . On an annual basis, this reduction of net CO2 uptake corresponds to 24% of the annual net CO2 uptake (NEE) of the study site, equivalent to a 4.4% reduction of gross primary production (GPP) during the growing season. We conclude that reduced light availability associated with rain events is more important in explaining the NEE response to rain events than rain characteristics and changes in water availability. This suggests that peatland CO2 uptake is highly sensitive to changes in cloud cover formation and to altered rainfall regimes, a process hitherto largely

  16. Reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vulink, Nienke C; Planting, Robin S; Figee, Martijn; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    Though the dopaminergic system is implicated in Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders (OCRD), the dopaminergic system has never been investigated in-vivo in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). In line with consistent findings of reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), we hypothesized that the dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in the striatum will be lower in patients with BDD in comparison to healthy subjects. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor Binding Potential (BPND) was examined in 12 drug-free BDD patients and 12 control subjects pairwise matched by age, sex, and handedness using [(123)I]iodobenzamide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT; bolus/constant infusion technique). Regions of interest were the caudate nucleus and the putamen. BPND was calculated as the ratio of specific striatal to binding in the occipital cortex (representing nonspecific binding). Compared to controls, dopamine D2/3 receptor BPND was significantly lower in BDD, both in the putamen (p=0.017) and caudate nucleus (p=0.022). This study provides the first evidence of a disturbed dopaminergic system in BDD patients. Although previously BDD was classified as a separate disorder (somatoform disorder), our findings give pathophysiological support for the recent reclassification of BDD to the OCRD in DSM-5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Feasibility studies to improve plant availability and reduce total installed cost in IGCC plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Kevin; Anasti, William; Fang, Yichuan; Subramanyan, Karthik; Leininger, Tom; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-03-30

    The main purpose of this project is to look at technologies and philosophies that would help reduce the costs of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, increase its availability or do both. GE’s approach to this problem is to consider options in three different areas: 1) technology evaluations and development; 2) constructability approaches; and 3) design and operation methodologies. Five separate tasks were identified that fall under the three areas: Task 2 – Integrated Operations Philosophy; Task 3 – Slip Forming of IGCC Components; Task 4 – Modularization of IGCC Components; Task 5 – Fouling Removal; and Task 6 – Improved Slag Handling. Overall, this project produced results on many fronts. Some of the ideas could be utilized immediately by those seeking to build an IGCC plant in the near future. These include the considerations from the Integrated Operations Philosophy task and the different construction techniques of Slip Forming and Modularization (especially if the proposed site is in a remote location or has a lack of a skilled workforce). Other results include ideas for promising technologies that require further development and testing to realize their full potential and be available for commercial operation. In both areas GE considers this project to be a success in identifying areas outside the core IGCC plant systems that are ripe for cost reduction and ity improvement opportunities.

  18. Sarcoidosis Th17 Cells are ESAT-6 Antigen Specific but Demonstrate Reduced IFN-γ Expression

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Bradley W.; Ploetze, Kristen; Isom, Joan; Chambers-Harris, Isfahan; Braun, Nicole A.; Taylor, Thyneice; Abraham, Susamma; Mageto, Yolanda; Culver, Dan A.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.; Drake, Wonder P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Many patients with sarcoidosis demonstrate antigen-specific immunity to mycobacterial virulence factors. Th-17 cells are crucial to the immune response in granulomatous inflammation, and have recently been shown to be present in greater numbers in the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF) of sarcoidosis patients than healthy controls. It is unclear whether Th-17 cells in sarcoidosis are specific for mycobacterial antigens, or whether they have similar functionality to control Th-17 cells. Methods Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of Th-17 cells present in the peripheral blood and BALF of patients with sarcoidosis, the percentage of Th-17 cells that were specific to the mycobacterial virulence factor ESAT-6, and as well as to assess IFN-γ expression in Th-17 cells following polyclonal stimulation. Results Patients with sarcoidosis had greater numbers of Th-17 cells in the peripheral blood and BALF than controls and produced significantly more extracellular IL-17A (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively). ESAT-6 specific Th-17 cells were present in both peripheral blood and BALF of sarcoidosis patients (p<0.001 and p=0.03, respectively). After polyclonal stimulation, Th-17 cells from sarcoidosis patients produced less IFN-γ than healthy controls. Conclusions Patients with sarcoidosis have mycobacterial antigen-specific Th-17 cells peripherally and in sites of active sarcoidosis involvement. Despite the Th1 immunophenotype of sarcoidosis immunology, the Th-17 cells have reduced IFN-γ expression, compared to healthy controls. This reduction in immunity may contribute to sarcoidosis pathogenesis. PMID:23073617

  19. Effect of reduced barometric pressure on water availability related to microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Hawrylewicz, E J; Hagen, C; Tolkacz, V; Ehrlich, R

    1967-01-01

    Data obtained from Mariner IV indicate that the barometric pressure on Mars is considerably lower than previously estimated. Current estimates from Mariner IV indicate a range from 4 to 7 mb and by near infrared spectroscopy 33-56 mb. Inasmuch as the pressure has a marked influence on availability of water, this should affect the existence of Martian life. At the maximum temperatures recorded on Mars, namely 25 degrees C, a barometric pressure of 30 mb is required for the retention of free water. The lower pressure, 4 mb, would suggest that the moisture is present as a vapor above the freezing point and consequently it is not available for utilizing by living cells. The lower estimates of barometric pressure also inversely affect the carbon dioxide concentration in the Martian atmosphere. Our previous studies have demonstrated that spores of Bacillus cereus survive, germinate and grow in a simulated Martian environment (2.4% CO2, 98 mb) supplemented with moisture. The studies described in this paper were designed to determine the effect of low barometric pressures (10 to 98 mb Hg) and high concentrations of carbon dioxide (37 to 100%) in the simulated Martian environment on survival and growth of B cereus. The organism was inoculated into a felsite-limonite soil at 8% moisture level. The temperature cycles used were 8 hr at -65 degrees C and 16 hr at 25 degrees C, or 20 hr at -65 degrees C and 4 hr at 25 degrees C. The data suggest that the organism after achieving maximum growth in the simulated Martian environment (2.4% CO2, 98 mb) immediately enters into the growth phase upon reinoculation into fresh soil. These data reflect upon the possibility of contamination through air movements. Based upon currently available Martian environmental data, the probability of contamination of Mars by terrestrial micro-organisms will be discussed.

  20. SUMOylation of synapsin Ia maintains synaptic vesicle availability and is reduced in an autism mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Leo T. -H.; Craig, Tim J.; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapsins are key components of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release machinery. Their main role is to cluster synaptic vesicles (SVs) to each other and anchor them to the actin cytoskeleton to establish the reserve vesicle pool, and then release them in response to appropriate membrane depolarization. Here we demonstrate that SUMOylation of synapsin Ia (SynIa) at K687 is necessary for SynIa function. Replacement of endogenous SynIa with a non-SUMOylatable mutant decreases the size of the releasable vesicle pool and impairs stimulated SV exocytosis. SUMOylation enhances SynIa association with SVs to promote the efficient reclustering of SynIa following neuronal stimulation and maintain its presynaptic localization. The A548T mutation in SynIa is strongly associated with autism and epilepsy and we show that it leads to defective SynIa SUMOylation. These results identify SUMOylation as a fundamental regulator of SynIa function and reveal a novel link between reduced SUMOylation of SynIa and neurological disorders. PMID:26173895

  1. Reducing Available Soluble β-Amyloid Prevents Progression of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Julia L.; Prada, Claudia M.; Fine, Sara J.; Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Arbel-Ornath, Michal; Greenberg, Steven M.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Frosch, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical blood vessels of the brain, is a major cause of intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment, and is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). CAA progression, as measured in transgenic mice by longitudinal imaging with multiphoton microscopy, occurs in a predictable linear manner. The dynamics of Aβ deposition in and clearance from vascular walls and their relationship to the concentration of Aβ in the brain is poorly understood. We manipulated Aβ levels in the brain using 2 approaches: peripheral clearance via administration of the amyloid binding “peripheral sink” protein gelsolin, and direct inhibition of its formation via administration of LY-411575, a small molecule γ-secretase inhibitor. We found that gelsolin and LY-411575 both reduced the rate of CAA progression in Tg2576 mice from untreated rates of 0.58 ± 0.15% and 0.52 ± 0.09% to 0.11 ± 0.18% (p = 0.04) and −0.17 ± 0.09% (p < 0.001) of affected vessel per day, respectively, in the absence of an immune response. CAA progression was also halted when gelsolin was combined with LY-411575 (−0.004 ± 0.10%, p < 0.003). These data suggest that CAA progression can be prevented with non-immune approaches that may reduce the availability of soluble Aβ, but without evidence of substantial amyloid clearance from vessels. PMID:23095848

  2. Reduced protein availability by albumen removal during chicken embryogenesis decreases body weight and induces hormonal changes.

    PubMed

    Willems, Els; Wang, Yufeng; Koppenol, Astrid; Lesuisse, Jens; Franssens, Lies; Decuypere, Eddy; Buyse, Johan; Everaert, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    What is the central question of this study? Prenatal protein undernutrition by albumen removal in an avian model of fetal programming leads to long-term programming effects, but when do these effects first appear and are these programming effects regulated by the same candidate genes as in mammals? What is the main finding and its importance? The present results indicate that prenatal protein undernutrition by albumen removal induces phenotypical and hormonal changes in the early posthatch period, when the mismatch between the prenatal and postnatal environment first arises, but these changes are not accompanied by an altered gene expression of the selected candidate genes. Studies of the chicken offer a unique model for investigation of the direct effects of reduced prenatal protein availability by the partial replacement of albumen with saline in eggs at embryonic day 1 (albumen-deprived group). The results were compared with mock-treated sham chicks and non-treated control chicks. Although no differences in hatch weight were found, body weight and growth were reduced in the albumen-deprived chicks until 3 weeks of age. The feed intake of the albumen-deprived chicks, however, was increased compared with the control (day 13-21) and the sham chicks (day 16-18). In the albumen-deprived chicks, the ratio of thyroxine to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine in the plasma was increased compared with the control chicks, whereas the plasma corticosterone level was increased only at day 7 compared with both other groups. The plasma glucose concentration and glucose tolerance were not affected by treatment. Several candidate genes previously associated with effects of prenatal protein deprivation in mammals were examined in the liver of newly hatched chicks. Gene expression of glycogen synthase 2, glycogen phosphorylase 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ and glucocorticoid receptor was not affected by the treatment. In conclusion, reduction of prenatal

  3. Evaluation of the Myocilin Mutation Gln368Stop Demonstrates Reduced Penetrance for Glaucoma in European Populations.

    PubMed

    Nag, Abhishek; Lu, Han; Arno, Matthew; Iglesias, Adriana I; Bonnemaijer, Pieter; Broer, Linda; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia; Hysi, Pirro G; Hammond, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Sequence variations in the myocilin (MYOC) gene account for approximately 2% to 4% of glaucoma cases. One particular MYOC mutation, Gln368Stop (dbSNP accession number: rs74315329), is the most common genetic mutation causing glaucoma by increasing intraocular pressure (IOP). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of this MYOC mutation on IOP using data from large-scale European population panels (directly sequenced and imputation based). Cross-sectional, cohort study. For this study, the penetrance of the variant rs74315329 was estimated in 2 population-based cohorts, the TwinsUK (N = 6092) and the Rotterdam Study (RS) (N =11 189). Carriers of the risk allele for rs74315329 were identified using whole-genome sequencing and imputation data (based on 1000 Genomes Project and Haplotype Reference Consortium panels). The penetrance of this variant was evaluated using IOP measurements and data on visual field testing/a diagnosis of glaucoma (if available). The penetrance of the variant rs74315329 was estimated from the percentage of the carriers of the risk allele of the variant who had high IOP (ocular hypertension) or glaucoma. In our study, the observed penetrance of the variant rs74315329 in relation to increased IOP was 12.5% and 19.4% in the TwinsUK and the RS, respectively. Thus, our study suggests a much lower penetrance for rs74315329 for ocular hypertension (and thus glaucoma), in comparison with that reported previously. The significance of this finding is that higher numbers of healthy individuals in the population are expected to be carriers of this mutation, which in turn reduces the utility of identifying carriers of this mutation as a screening tool for glaucoma. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiolarians decreased silicification as an evolutionary response to reduced Cenozoic ocean silica availability.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, David B; Kotrc, Benjamin; Wulf, Gerwin; Schmidt, Daniela N

    2009-06-09

    It has been hypothesized that increased water column stratification has been an abiotic "universal driver" affecting average cell size in Cenozoic marine plankton. Gradually decreasing Cenozoic radiolarian shell weight, by contrast, suggests that competition for dissolved silica, a shared nutrient, resulted in biologic coevolution between radiolaria and marine diatoms, which expanded dramatically in the Cenozoic. We present data on the 2 components of shell weight change--size and silicification--of Cenozoic radiolarians. In low latitudes, increasing Cenozoic export of silica to deep waters by diatoms and decreasing nutrient upwelling from increased water column stratification have created modern silica-poor surface waters. Here, radiolarian silicification decreases significantly (r = 0.91, P < 0.001), from approximately 0.18 (shell volume fraction) in the basal Cenozoic to modern values of approximately 0.06. A third of the total change occurred rapidly at 35 Ma, in correlation to major increases in water column stratification and abundance of diatoms. In high southern latitudes, Southern Ocean circulation, present since the late Eocene, maintains significant surface water silica availability. Here, radiolarian silicification decreased insignificantly (r = 0.58, P = 0.1), from approximately 0.13 at 35 Ma to 0.11 today. Trends in shell size in both time series are statistically insignificant and are not correlated with each other. We conclude that there is no universal driver changing cell size in Cenozoic marine plankton. Furthermore, biologic and physical factors have, in concert, by reducing silica availability in surface waters, forced macroevolutionary changes in Cenozoic low-latitude radiolarians.

  5. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  6. Epigenetic modification of fetal baboon hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase following exposure to moderately reduced nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Mark J; Mitsuya, Kozoh; Li, Cun; Ford, Stephen; McDonald, Thomas J; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Cox, Laura A

    2010-04-15

    Decreased maternal nutrient availability during pregnancy induces compensatory fetal metabolic and endocrine responses. Knowledge of cellular changes involved is critical to understanding normal and abnormal development. Several studies in rodents and sheep report increased fetal plasma cortisol and associated increased gluconeogenesis in response to maternal nutrient reduction (MNR) but observations in primates are lacking. We determined MNR effects on fetal liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (protein, PEPCK1; gene, PCK1 orthologous/homologous human chromosomal region 20q13.31) at 0.9 gestation (G). Female baboon social groups were fed ad libitum (control, CTR) or 70% CTR (MNR) from 0.16 to 0.9G when fetuses were delivered by caesarean section under general anaesthesia. Plasma cortisol was elevated in fetuses of MNR mothers (P < 0.05). Immunoreactive PEPCK1 protein was located around the liver lobule central vein and was low in CTR fetuses but rose to 63% of adult levels in MNR fetuses. PCK1 mRNA measured by QRT-PCR increased in MNR (2.3-fold; P < 0.05) while the 25% rise in protein by Western blot analysis was not significant. PCK1 promoter methylation analysis using bisulfite sequencing was significantly reduced in six out of nine CpG-dinucleotides evaluated in MNR compared with CTR liver samples. In conclusion, these are the first data from a fetal non-human primate indicating hypomethylation of the PCK1 promoter in the liver following moderate maternal nutrient reduction.

  7. Effects of reduced maternal lipoprotein-cholesterol availability on placental progesterone biosynthesis in the baboon.

    PubMed

    Henson, M C; Greene, S J; Reggio, B C; Shi, W; Swan, K F

    1997-04-01

    Maternal low density lipoprotein (LDL) is the principal source of cholesterol substrate for progesterone biosynthesis in the primate placental syncytiotrophoblast. The relationship of LDL-cholesterol availability and other potential cholesterol-yielding pathways to placental progesterone production have not, however, been demonstrated in vivo in a nonhuman primate. Therefore, maternal peripheral lipoprotein-cholesterol and progesterone concentrations were determined in blood samples obtained by venipuncture, from day 72 until day 100, from pregnant baboons (Papio sp) that were either untreated (n = 4) or treated (n = 3) with the inhibitor of hepatic lipoprotein production, 4-aminopyrazolo [3-4-d]pyrimidine (4-APP, 10 mg/kg BW) on days 98-99 of pregnancy (term = 184 days). Although LDL-cholesterol and progesterone levels remained unchanged in untreated animals, LDL-cholesterol concentrations were 9-fold lower (P < 0.005) in baboons receiving 4-APP than in untreated baboons 2 days following initial administration. Commensurate progesterone levels were 3.5-fold lower (P < 0.03) in 4-APP-treated baboons than in untreated baboons. RT-PCR was used to approximate relative changes in transcription of messengers RNAs (mRNAs) for selected cholesterol-sensitive pathways in placental tissue collected on day 100. Thus, expression of mRNAs for LDL receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase appeared enhanced, whereas acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) mRNA was diminished in syncytiotrophoblast-enriched cell fractions as a result of 4-APP administration. No relative differences in mRNAs were apparent in whole placental villous tissue, however, as a result of 4-APP treatment. In summary, this experiment demonstrates a significant decline in progesterone production elicited by maternal LDL-cholesterol withdrawal, and attests to the efficacy of 4-APP administration during baboon pregnancy. These results also suggest a commensurate

  8. Undergraduate Virology Exercises Demonstrate Conventional and Real-Time PCR Using Commercially Available HIV Primers and Noninfectious Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.; Wasilewski, Melissa A.; Farrell, James C.; Glick, David L.

    2009-01-01

    It is an extraordinary challenge to offer an undergraduate laboratory course in virology that teaches hands-on, relevant molecular biology techniques using nonpathogenic models of human virus detection. To our knowledge, there exists no inexpensive kits or reagent sets that are appropriate for demonstrating real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in an…

  9. Undergraduate Virology Exercises Demonstrate Conventional and Real-Time PCR Using Commercially Available HIV Primers and Noninfectious Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.; Wasilewski, Melissa A.; Farrell, James C.; Glick, David L.

    2009-01-01

    It is an extraordinary challenge to offer an undergraduate laboratory course in virology that teaches hands-on, relevant molecular biology techniques using nonpathogenic models of human virus detection. To our knowledge, there exists no inexpensive kits or reagent sets that are appropriate for demonstrating real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in an…

  10. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  11. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  12. Inhibition of cancer cell mitosis by reducing the availability of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Condon, John Rhys

    2016-11-01

    The addition of phosphate groups is an essential requirement for the proper functioning of cyclin and cyclin dependent kinase which control various stages in the mitotic division of cancer cells. Thus limiting the availability of phosphate is likely to interfere with the metabolism of rapidly growing malignant cells. The human hormone glucagon and the anti metabolite mithramycin reduce serum phosphate by increasing phosphaturia and are both very effective in treating Paget's disease of bone, a precancerous condition. In this disorder large doses of glucagon given intravenously relieve bone pain and cause serum phosphate and alkaline phosphatase as well as urine hydroxyproline to fall, indicating a marked reduction in bone turnover. A constant iv infusion of glucagon was given to each of three patients all of whom had secondary malignant bone deposits. Two of the patients had primary prostate cancer and one had a squamous cell lung tumour. All three patients had relief of bone pain and a fall in serum alkaline phosphatase. Serum acid phosphatase also fell in the two patients with prostate cancer. It is proposed that the marked drop in serum phosphate due to glucagon causes intracellular phosphate to fall. This in turn disrupts the addition and removal of phosphate groups essential for the proper functioning of cyclin and cyclin dependent kinase. These two proteins control the transition from G1 to S (DNA synthesis phase) and G2 to M (mitotic phase) in the dividing cycle of malignant cells. Depriving a tumour of an essential ingredient used in phosphorylation reactions will disrupt its growth. It is also proposed that, by the same mechanism, glucagon induced hypophosphataemia renders malignant cells more sensitive to established chemotherapeutic agents and radiation waves. If this hypothesis proves to be correct, lowering intracellular phosphate may become an useful tool in cancer therapy. However extensive studies are necessary to determine whether mitosis in cancer

  13. 75 FR 38592 - Solicitation of Applications and Notice of Funding Availability for Reducing the Effects of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Reducing the Effects of Traumatic Exposure to Grade Crossing and Trespasser Incidents on Train Crews AGENCY... intervention plan for reducing the effects of traumatic exposure to grade crossing and trespasser incidents in... implement programs mediating the effects of employees' exposure to trauma. Proposals that meet the...

  14. A study of New York City obstetrics units demonstrates the potential for reducing hospital inpatient capacity.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda V; Liu, Nan

    2015-04-01

    Hospitals are under significant pressure from payers to reduce costs. The single largest fixed cost for a hospital is inpatient beds, yet there is significant variation in hospital capacity utilization. We study bed capacity in New York City hospital obstetrics units and find that while many hospitals have an insufficient number of beds to provide timely access to care, overall there is significant excess capacity. Our findings, coupled with current demographic and clinical practice trends, indicate that a large fraction of obstetrics units nationwide could likely reduce their bed capacity while assuring timely access to care, resulting in large savings in capital and staffing costs. Given emerging health care delivery and payment models that will likely decrease demand for other types of hospital beds, our study suggests that data-based methodologies should be used by hospitals and policy makers to identify opportunities for reducing excess bed capacity in other inpatient units as well. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Demonstration of reduced radiation losses in hohlraums made from cocktail mixtures by measuring increased radiation temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Schein, J; Rosen, M; Suter, L; Wallace, R; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Campbell, K; Gunther, J; Hammel, B; Landen, O; Sores, C; Olson, R; Rochau, G; Wilkens, H; Kaae, J; Kilkenny, J; Nikroo, A; Regan, S; Meyerhoffer, D

    2006-11-03

    We present results from experiments, numerical simulations, and analytic modeling that demonstrate enhanced radiation confinement of hohlraums made from cocktail materials. We summarize the results from several previous planar sample experiments that showed the potential promise of cocktails. We then discuss a series of more recent hohlraum experiments that attempted to demonstrate enhanced radiation confinement. Once we understood the importance of oxygen contamination in increasing the specific heat and wall losses of uranium-based cocktails, we implemented new manufacturing and handling techniques for cocktail hohlraums that led to our demonstration of a significant increase in radiation temperature (up to +7eV at 300 eV) compared to a pure Au hohlraum. This data agrees well with modeling and suggests we can expect an 18% reduction in wall loss (and 10% reduction in laser energy) for the current ignition design by switching to cocktail hohlraums.

  16. Demonstration of methods to reduce E. coli runoff from dairy manure application sites.

    PubMed

    Meals, Donald W; Braun, David C

    2006-01-01

    Contamination by bacteria is a leading cause of impairment in U.S. waters, particularly in areas of livestock agriculture. We evaluated the effectiveness of several practices in reducing Escherichia coli levels in runoff from fields receiving liquid dairy (Bos taurus) manure. Runoff trials were conducted on replicated hay and silage corn (Zea mays L.) plots using simulated rainfall. Levels of E. coli in runoff were approximately 10(4) to 10(6) organisms per 100 mL, representing a significant pollution potential. Practices tested were: manure storage, delay between manure application and rainfall, manure incorporation by tillage, and increased hayland vegetation height. Storage of manure for 30 d or more consistently and dramatically lowered E. coli counts in our experiments, with longer storage providing greater reductions. Manure E. coli declined by > 99% after approximately 90 d of storage. On average, levels of E. coli in runoff were 97% lower from plots receiving 30-d-old and > 99% lower from plots receiving 90-d-old manure than from plots where fresh manure was applied. Runoff from hayland and cornland plots where manure was applied 3 d before rainfall contained approximately 50% fewer E. coli than did runoff from plots that received manure 1 d before rainfall. Hayland vegetation height alone did not significantly affect E. coli levels in runoff, but interactions with rainfall delay and manure age were observed. Manure incorporation alone did not significantly affect E. coli levels in cornland plot runoff, but incorporation could reduce bacteria export by reducing field runoff and interaction with rainfall delay was observed. Extended storage that avoids additions of fresh manure, combined with application several days before runoff, incorporation on tilled land, and higher vegetation on hayland at application could substantially reduce microorganism loading from agricultural land.

  17. Demonstration and Validation of a High-Performance Floor-Sealant System to Reduce Concrete Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products . All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The...permanently damag- ing and degrading the floor. Therefore, once epoxy-based coatings begin to chip and peel, their initial protective and cosmetic ...concrete surface to improve wear resistance and impermeability to liquids and contami- nants. The product selected for demonstration and validation in

  18. Quantifying sulfate reducing bacteria in microbiologically influenced corrosion. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.

    1992-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing, sulfur-oxidizing, iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing, acid producing, slime-producing, ammonium-producing, and hydrogen-producing bacteria in addition to other physiological groups have been implicated in the corrosion of metals and alloys. However, the most widely recognized and most easily detected bacteria in most corrosion processes are the bacteria that reduce sulfate to sulfide that are collectively called sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB constitute a physiological-ecological assemblage of morphologically very different types of anaerobic bacteria that have in common the capacity to reduce sulfate to hydrogen sulfide in dissimilatory energy-conserving reactions. Hydrogen sulfide can react with metals to produce metal sulfides as corrosion products. Most techniques for the evaluation of SRB populations are related to their potential to cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Standard practices for evaluating the contribution of SRB to corrosion processes depend on the detection and quantification of SRB using culturing techniques that enumerate organisms or quantify intrinsic characteristics of SRB including enzymes and antibodies. Mineralogy of metal sulfides and sulfur isotope fractionation can also be used to verify the involvement of SRB in corrosion. This paper will review standard practices and innovative techniques for detecting and quantifying SRB.

  19. Efficiency of feeding Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores to grazing ewes on reducing availability of parasitic nematode larvae on pasture.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, M E; Miller, J E; Peña, M T; Larsen, M; Gillespie, A

    2003-12-30

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are of concern in sheep production because of production and economic losses. Control of these nematodes is primarily based on the use of anthelmintic treatment and pasture management. The almost exclusive use of anthelmintic treatment has resulted in development of anthelmintic resistance which has led to the need for other parasite control options to be explored. The blood sucking abomasal parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus causes severe losses in small ruminant production in the warm, humid sub-tropic and tropics. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a nematode trapping fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans, in reducing availability of parasitic nematode larvae, specifically H. contortus, on pasture. Chlamydospores of D. flagrans were mixed with a supplement feed which was fed daily to a group of crossbred ewes for the duration of the summer grazing season. A control group was fed the same supplement feed without chlamydospores. A reduction in infective larval numbers was observed in fecal cultures of the fungus-fed group. Herbage samples from the pasture grazed by the fungus-fed group also showed a reduction in infective larvae. There were no significant (P > 0.05) differences in overall fecal egg count, packed cell volume or animal weight between fungus-fed and control groups. Tracer animals were placed on the study pastures at the end of the study to assess pasture infectivity. Although tracer animals were only two per group, those that grazed with the fungus-fed group had substantially reduced (96.8%) nematode burdens as compared to those from the control group pasture. Results demonstrated that the fungus did have activity against nematode larvae in the feces which reduced pasture infectivity and subsequently nematode burdens in tracer animals. This study showed that D. flagrans, fed daily to grazing ewes, was an effective biological control agent in reducing a predominantly H. contortus larval population on pasture.

  20. Arginase II reduces arginine availability and nitric oxide production during endotoxemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arginase is the main pathway for arginine (Arg) disposal and it has been reported that it regulates intracellular Arg availability for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis during endotoxemia. To test the hypothesis that arginase II not only regulates intracellular, but also whole body Arg availability, a mul...

  1. Pituitary adenoma with seizures: PET demonstration of reduced glucose utilization in the medial temporal lobe

    SciTech Connect

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Blume, H.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1986-05-01

    A patient with a benign chromophobe adenoma, who had incomplete surgical removal followed by radiotherapy, continued to have epileptic seizures up to two or three times a day. She was studied with positron emission tomography using /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). This technique showed a high level of glucose utilization in the area of the operated tumor but also clear reduction of glucose utilization in the left medial temporal region adjacent to the sella and the scar tissue from the neoplasm. This area of reduced glucose utilization corresponded well to the same finding observed in other patients with complex partial epilepsy. A left temporal anterior lobectomy was carried out followed by improved control of the epilepsy. Positron emission tomography using FDG, together with electrophysiological examinations, may assist in the management of epilepsy related to pituitary tumors.

  2. A Hybrid Quorum Protocol for Improved Availability, Capacity, Load and Reduced Overhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Parul; Tripathi, Maheshwari

    2016-12-01

    Data replication is playing a vital role in the design of distributed information systems. This paper presents a novel and efficient distributed algorithm for managing replicated data and for better performance and availability. This paper presents an extension to existing wheel protocol for improved performance. Wheel protocol imposes a logical wheel structure on the set of copies of an object and gives smallest read quorum. In addition to small read quorum size for read intensive applications, it is necessary to have good write availability as well. This paper proposes two hybrid wheel protocols, which superimpose logarithmic and ring protocols on top of the wheel protocol. It shows that, both protocols help in improving write availability, read capacity, load and message overhead and also compare their performances with wheel and other protocols. Hybrid protocols expand usage of wheel protocol to different type of applications.

  3. Mental imagery interventions reduce subsequent food intake only when self-regulatory resources are available

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Benjamin; Florack, Arnd; Weissmann, Lukas; König, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that imagining food consumption leads to food-specific habituation effects. In the present research, we replicated these effects and further examined whether the depletion of self-regulatory resources would reduce the habituation effects of imagined food consumption. Since self-regulatory resources have been shown to reduce habituation effects during the perception of emotional stimuli, we expected a reduction in habituation effects from imagined food consumption when self-regulatory resources were depleted. In Study 1, we replicated habituation effects as a response to imagining gummy bear consumption with a high (36) and medium number (18) of repetitions in a camouflaged taste test. Participants imagining gummy bear intake showed decreased food intake compared with participants who imagined putting a coin into a laundry machine. The number of repetitions did not significantly moderate the observed habituation effect. In Study 2, we investigated whether self-regulatory depletion would impede habituation effects evoked by the imagination of walnut consumption. Participants in a depleted state did not show a reduction in food intake after imagining walnut intake compared with participants in a non-depleted state. We discuss directions for future research and processes that might underlie the observed moderating effect of self-regulatory resources. PMID:25506337

  4. Reducing the cost (and increasing the availability) of low-expansion fused glass mirror blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Steven J.; Griffith, B.; Federico, Dan R.; Mehle, Gregory V.

    2003-12-01

    For many years, lightweighted sandwich-style mirror blanks made from Corning's Ultra-Low Expansion glass (ULE) have been used in space telescope systems that demand superior optical performance. Despite the superior performance of this technology, the historically high cost and long schedule to procure such a blank has limited their use to only the most elite missions. Future missions, such as JWST, will seek to dramatically reduce the historical cost/schedule paradigm for ULE blanks by capitalizing on economies-of-scale associated with a multi-segment design. However, for this blank technology to become accessible to a broader range of missions, fundamental changes in technical and business approaches are needed. Over the last four years, ATK COI has worked to develop the requisite technologies to produce ULE mirror blanks in-house, with an emphasis on reducing cost and schedule. Our focus has been in three areas: process development to enable reclamation of ULE glass residuals, glass fusion process qualification, and tooling cost reduction. The status of each of these areas is presented, and conclusions drawn about possible future costs of lightweight ULE mirror blanks.

  5. Tennessee's 3-Star Report: Using Available Data Systems to Reduce Missed Opportunities to Vaccinate Preteens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kelly L; Fankhauser, Melissa K; Hull, Pamela C

    2016-01-01

    All preteens should receive tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis vaccine (Tdap), quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine (Men-ACWY), and the human papillomavirus (HPV) cancer vaccine series. In Tennessee, HPV vaccination rates have stagnated at low levels for a decade. Three fundamental strategies to reduce missed opportunities for immunization include administering all recommended vaccines at the same visit, making strong recommendations for vaccines, and auditing and feedback. In Tennessee, during each summer, a surge of preteens visit local health departments (LHDs) to receive a required Tdap vaccine before entering seventh grade, presenting an opportunity to administer Men-ACWY and HPV. The Tennessee Immunization Program (TIP) coined the term "3-Star visit" for such encounters and developed a monthly report to track them using data from the Patient Tracking Billing Management Information System (PTBMIS) used by LHDs across Tennessee. Implementation of this quality improvement report has correlated with a substantial increase in 3-Star visits from 2013 to 2016, particularly during the summer months.

  6. Reducing the immediate availability of red blood cells in cardiac surgery, a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Haanschoten, M C; van Straten, A H M; Verstappen, F; van de Kerkhof, D; van Zundert, A A J; Soliman Hamad, M A

    2015-01-01

    In our institution, we have redefined our criteria for direct availability of red blood cell (RBC) units in the operation room. In this study, we sought to evaluate the safety of applying this new logistical policy of blood transfusion in the first preliminary group of patients. In March 2010, we started a new policy concerning the elective availability of RBC units in the operation room. This policy was called: No Elective Red Cells (NERC) program. The program was applied for patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or single valve surgery. No elective RBC units were preoperatively ordered for these patients. In case of urgent need, blood was delivered to the operating room within 20 min. The present study includes the first 500 patients who were managed according to this policy. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of biomedical variables on fulfilling this NERC program. The majority of patients (n = 409, 81 %) did not receive any RBCs during the hospital stay. In patients who did receive RBCs (n = 91, 19 %), 11 patients (2.2 %) received RBCs after 24 h postoperatively. Female gender, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and EuroSCORE were significant predictors for the need of blood transfusion (OR = 3.12; 2.79; 1.17 respectively). In a selected group of patients, it is safe to perform cardiac surgery without the immediate availability of RBCs in the operating room. Transfusion was avoided in 81 % of these patients. Female gender, LVEF and EuroSCORE were associated with blood transfusion.

  7. Exogenous addition of histidine reduces copper availability in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Kikushima, Rie; Aitoku, Miho; Nishimura, Akira; Ohtsu, Iwao; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The basic amino acid histidine inhibited yeast cell growth more severely than lysine and arginine. Overexpression of CTR1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transporter on the plasma membrane, or addition of copper to the medium alleviated this cytotoxicity. However, the intracellular level of copper ions was not decreased in the presence of excess histidine. These results indicate that histidine cytotoxicity is associated with low copper availability inside cells, not with impaired copper uptake. Furthermore, histidine did not affect cell growth under limited respiration conditions, suggesting that histidine cytotoxicity is involved in deficiency of mitochondrial copper. PMID:28357248

  8. Exposure to pesticides impairs the expression of fish ornaments reducing the availability of attractive males

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Aguilar, Omar; Macías Garcia, Constantino

    2008-01-01

    Ornament magnitude often reflects a local balance between sexual selection and other sources of natural selection opposing their elaboration. Human activity may disrupt this balance if it modifies the costs of producing, maintaining or displaying the ornaments. When costs are increased, a shortage of acceptable partners may ensue, with consequences commensurate with how stringent (and effective) the process of mate choice is. Here, we show that the expression of ornaments in the viviparous amarillo fish (Girardinichthys multiradiatus) is influenced by embryonic exposure to low concentrations of an organophosphorus insecticide. Male ornamental fin size, dimorphic yellow coloration and display rates were all compromised in exposed fish, but unaffected in their paternal half-sibling controls and in their sisters (morphology and colour). Exposure resulted in smaller fish of both sexes, thus the differential effect by sex was restricted to attributes such as fin size only above the naturally selected magnitude shown by females. Father phenotype predicted offspring morphology of controls, but not of exposed males, which were discriminated against by both control and exposed females. Since stringent female mate choice can result in females refusing to mate with suboptimal mates, this sub-lethal developmental effect can reduce the effective population size of amarillo fish populations. PMID:18348963

  9. Effect of reduced soil water availability on productivity of short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orság, Matěj; Fischer, Milan; Mani Tripathi, Abhishek; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    "Wood, in fact, is the unsung hero of the technological revolution that has brought us from a stone and bone culture to our present age.'' Perlin and Journey (1991). Given its high-energy content and versatile use, biomass in a form of wood has been used for energy purposes since millennia and through times has been preferred source of biomass. Ever since, the production and use of woody biomass resources expands globally. Main drivers for its use as a source of energy are diversification and the mitigation of energy related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through partial substitution of fossil fuels. An alternative option for wood biomass sourcing from natural forests is short rotation woody coppice. Its productivity is largely dependent on the environment in terms of climatic conditions. Especially drought is the major constraint of woody biomass production involving serious economic consequences. In the central Europe, increased global radiation and air temperature together with decreased relative humidity increases the reference evapotranspiration resulting in an increased demand for soil water during growing season. For that reason, our field experiment was designed to evaluate impact of decreased soil water availability on productivity of poplar based short rotation coppice plantation during multiple growing seasons. Throughfall exclusion system based on plastic roof strips placed under the canopy was used to drain up to 70 % of the incoming rain water. Usual methods were used to assess the annual above ground biomass increment expressed in dry matter content. Not surprisingly our results show systematic decline in the productivity of plots subjected to decreased soil water availability but also considerable resilience of the drought-stressed trees which will be also discussed. This study was supported by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought", No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248 and PASED - project supported by Czech program

  10. Reduced by-product formation and modified oxygen availability improve itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Li, An; Pfelzer, Nina; Zuijderwijk, Robbert; Brickwedde, Anja; van Zeijl, Cora; Punt, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Aspergillus niger has an extraordinary potential to produce organic acids as proven by its application in industrial citric acid production. Previously, it was shown that expression of the cis-aconitate decarboxylase gene (cadA) from Aspergillus terreus converted A. niger into an itaconic acid producer (Li et al., Fungal Genet Bio 48: 602-611, 2011). After some initial steps in production optimization in the previous research (Li et al., BMC biotechnol 12: 57, 2012), this research aims at modifying host strains and fermentation conditions to further improve itaconic acid production. Expression of two previously identified A. terreus genes encoding putative organic acid transporters (mttA, mfsA) increased itaconic acid production in an A. niger cis-aconitate decarboxylase expressing strain. Surprisingly, the production did not increase further when both transporters were expressed together. Meanwhile, oxalic acid was accumulated as a by-product in the culture of mfsA transformants. In order to further increase itaconic acid production and eliminate by-product formation, the non-acidifying strain D15#26 and the oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase (oahA) deletion strain AB 1.13 ∆oahA #76 have been analyzed for itaconic acid production. Whereas cadA expression in AB 1.13 ∆oahA #76 resulted in higher itaconic acid production than strain CAD 10.1, this was not the case in strain D15#26. As expected, oxalic acid production was eliminated in both strains. In a further attempt to increase itaconic acid levels, an improved basal citric acid-producing strain, N201, was used for cadA expression. A selected transformant (N201CAD) produced more itaconic acid than strain CAD 10.1, derived from A. niger strain AB1.13. Subsequently, we have focused on the influence of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) on itaconic acid production. Interestingly, reduced D.O. levels (10-25 %) increased itaconic acid production using strain N201 CAD. Similar results were obtained in strain AB 1.13 CAD + HBD2

  11. Effects of reduced energy availability on bone metabolism in women and men.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Maria; Elliott-Sale, Kirsty J; Parsons, Alan; Tang, Johnathan C Y; Greeves, Julie P; Fraser, William D; Sale, Craig

    2017-08-25

    The short-term effects of low energy availability (EA) on bone metabolism in physically active women and men are currently unknown. We evaluated the effects of low EA on bone turnover markers (BTMs) in a cohort of women and a cohort of men, and compared effects between sexes. These studies were performed using a randomised, counterbalanced, crossover design. Eleven eumenorrheic women and eleven men completed two 5-day protocols of controlled (CON; 45kcal·kgLBM(-1)·d(-1)) and restricted (RES; 15kcal·kgLBM(-1)·d(-1)) EAs. Participants ran daily on a treadmill at 70% of their peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) resulting in an exercise energy expenditure of 15kcal·kgLBM(-1)·d(-1) and consumed diets providing 60 and 30kcal·kgLBM(-1)·d(-1). Blood was analysed for BTMs [β-carboxyl-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (β-CTX) and amino-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP)], markers of calcium metabolism [parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin-adjusted calcium (ACa), magnesium (Mg) and phosphate (PO4)] and regulatory hormones [sclerostin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), triiodothyronine (T3), insulin, leptin, glucagon-like-peptide-2 (GLP-2)]. In women, β-CTX AUC was significantly higher (P=0.03) and P1NP AUC was significantly lower (P=0.01) in RES compared to CON. In men, neither β-CTX (P=0.46) nor P1NP (P=0.12) AUCs were significantly different between CON and RES. There were no significant differences between sexes for any BTM AUCs (all P values>0.05). Insulin and leptin AUCs were significantly lower following RES in women only (for both P=0.01). There were no differences in any AUCs of regulatory hormones or markers of calcium metabolism between men and women following RES (all P values>0.05). When comparing within groups, five days of low EA (15kcal·kgLBM(-1)·d(-1)) decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption in women, but not in men, and no sex specific differences were detected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Reduced Sulfur in Ashes and Slags from the Gasification of Coals: Availability for Chemical and Microbial Oxidation †

    PubMed Central

    Strayer, Richard F.; Davis, Edward C.

    1983-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine if reduced sulfur contained in coal gasifier ash and slag was available for microbial and chemical oxidation because eventual large-quantity landfill disposal of these solid wastes is expected. Continuous application of distilled water to a column containing a high-sulfur-content (4% [wt/wt]) gasifier slag yielded leachates with high sulfate levels (1,300 mg of sulfate liter−1) and low pH values (4.2). At the end of the experiment, a three-tube most-probable-number analysis indicated that the waste contained 1.3 × 107 thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria per g. Slag samples obtained aseptically from the column produced sulfate under both abiotic and biotic conditions when incubated in a mineral nutrient solution. Both microbial and chemical sulfate syntheses were greatly stimulated by the addition of thiosulfate to the slag-mineral nutrient solution. These results led to a test of microbial versus chemical sulfur oxidation in ashes and slags from five gasification processes. Sulfate production was measured in sterile (autoclaved) and nonsterile suspensions of the solid wastes in a mineral nutrient solution. These ashes and slags varied in sulfur content from 0.3 to 4.0% (wt/wt). Four of these wastes demonstrated both chemical (2.0 to 27 μg of sulfate g−1 day−1) and microbial (3.1 to 114 μg of sulfate g−1 day−1) sulfur oxidation. Obvious relationships between sulfur oxidation rate and either sulfur content or particle size distribution of the wastes were not immediately evident. We conclude that the sulfur contained in all but one waste is available for oxidation to sulfuric acid and that microorganisms play a partial role in this process. PMID:16346240

  13. Effects on alcohol related fatal crashes of a community based initiative to increase substance abuse treatment and reduce alcohol availability

    PubMed Central

    Hingson, R; Zakocs, R; Heeren, T; Winter, M; Rosenbloom, D; DeJong, W

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This analysis tested whether comprehensive community interventions that focus on reducing alcohol availability and increasing substance abuse treatment can reduce alcohol related fatal traffic crashes. Intervention: Five of 14 communities awarded Fighting Back grants by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to reduce substance abuse and related problems attempted to reduce availability of alcohol and expand substance abuse treatment programs (FBAT communities). Program implementation began on 1 January 1992. Design: A quasi-experimental design matched each program community to two or three other communities of similar demographic composition in the same state. Main outcome measures: The ratio of fatal crashes involving a driver or pedestrian with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.01% or higher, 0.08% or higher, or 0.15% or higher were examined relative to fatal crashes where no alcohol was involved for 10 years preceding and 10 years following program initiation. Results: Relative to their comparison communities, the five FBAT communities experienced significant declines of 22% in alcohol related fatal crashes at 0.01% BAC or higher, 20% at 0.08% or higher, and 17% at 0.15% or higher relative to fatal crashes not involving alcohol. Conclusions: Community interventions to reduce alcohol availability and increase substance abuse treatment can reduce alcohol related fatal traffic crashes. PMID:15805436

  14. Reduced-gravity Environment Hardware Demonstrations of a Prototype Miniaturized Flow Cytometer and Companion Microfluidic Mixing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Candice; Sharpe, Julia Z.; Bishara, Andrew M.; Nelson, Emily S.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Brown, Daniel; McKay, Terri L.; Griffin, DeVon; Chan, Eugene Y.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, astronaut blood samples were collected in-flight, transported to earth on the Space Shuttle, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. If humans are to travel beyond low Earth orbit, a transition towards space-ready, point-of-care (POC) testing is required. Such testing needs to be comprehensive, easy to perform in a reduced-gravity environment, and unaffected by the stresses of launch and spaceflight. Countless POC devices have been developed to mimic laboratory scale counterparts, but most have narrow applications and few have demonstrable use in an in-flight, reduced-gravity environment. In fact, demonstrations of biomedical diagnostics in reduced gravity are limited altogether, making component choice and certain logistical challenges difficult to approach when seeking to test new technology. To help fill the void, we are presenting a modular method for the construction and operation of a prototype blood diagnostic device and its associated parabolic flight test rig that meet the standards for flight-testing onboard a parabolic flight, reduced-gravity aircraft. The method first focuses on rig assembly for in-flight, reduced-gravity testing of a flow cytometer and a companion microfluidic mixing chip. Components are adaptable to other designs and some custom components, such as a microvolume sample loader and the micromixer may be of particular interest. The method then shifts focus to flight preparation, by offering guidelines and suggestions to prepare for a successful flight test with regard to user training, development of a standard operating procedure (SOP), and other issues. Finally, in-flight experimental procedures specific to our demonstrations are described. PMID:25490614

  15. Reduced-gravity environment hardware demonstrations of a prototype miniaturized flow cytometer and companion microfluidic mixing technology.

    PubMed

    Phipps, William S; Yin, Zhizhong; Bae, Candice; Sharpe, Julia Z; Bishara, Andrew M; Nelson, Emily S; Weaver, Aaron S; Brown, Daniel; McKay, Terri L; Griffin, DeVon; Chan, Eugene Y

    2014-11-13

    Until recently, astronaut blood samples were collected in-flight, transported to earth on the Space Shuttle, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. If humans are to travel beyond low Earth orbit, a transition towards space-ready, point-of-care (POC) testing is required. Such testing needs to be comprehensive, easy to perform in a reduced-gravity environment, and unaffected by the stresses of launch and spaceflight. Countless POC devices have been developed to mimic laboratory scale counterparts, but most have narrow applications and few have demonstrable use in an in-flight, reduced-gravity environment. In fact, demonstrations of biomedical diagnostics in reduced gravity are limited altogether, making component choice and certain logistical challenges difficult to approach when seeking to test new technology. To help fill the void, we are presenting a modular method for the construction and operation of a prototype blood diagnostic device and its associated parabolic flight test rig that meet the standards for flight-testing onboard a parabolic flight, reduced-gravity aircraft. The method first focuses on rig assembly for in-flight, reduced-gravity testing of a flow cytometer and a companion microfluidic mixing chip. Components are adaptable to other designs and some custom components, such as a microvolume sample loader and the micromixer may be of particular interest. The method then shifts focus to flight preparation, by offering guidelines and suggestions to prepare for a successful flight test with regard to user training, development of a standard operating procedure (SOP), and other issues. Finally, in-flight experimental procedures specific to our demonstrations are described.

  16. Use of Atmospheric Budget to Reduce Uncertainty in Estimated Water Availability over South Asia from Different Reanalyses

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Dawn Emil; Pathak, Amey; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-01-01

    Disagreements across different reanalyses over South Asia result into uncertainty in assessment of water availability, which is computed as the difference between Precipitation and Evapotranspiration (P–E). Here, we compute P–E directly from atmospheric budget with divergence of moisture flux for different reanalyses and find improved correlation with observed values of P–E, acquired from station and satellite data. We also find reduced closure terms for water cycle computed with atmospheric budget, analysed over South Asian landmass, when compared to that obtained with individual values of P and E. The P–E value derived with atmospheric budget is more consistent with energy budget, when we use top-of-atmosphere radiation for the same. For analysing water cycle, we use runoff from Global Land Data Assimilation System, and water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. We find improvements in agreements across different reanalyses, in terms of inter-annual cross correlation when atmospheric budget is used to estimate P–E and hence, emphasize to use the same for estimations of water availability in South Asia to reduce uncertainty. Our results on water availability with reduced uncertainty over highly populated monsoon driven South Asia will be useful for water management and agricultural decision making. PMID:27388837

  17. Use of Atmospheric Budget to Reduce Uncertainty in Estimated Water Availability over South Asia from Different Reanalyses.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Dawn Emil; Pathak, Amey; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-07-08

    Disagreements across different reanalyses over South Asia result into uncertainty in assessment of water availability, which is computed as the difference between Precipitation and Evapotranspiration (P-E). Here, we compute P-E directly from atmospheric budget with divergence of moisture flux for different reanalyses and find improved correlation with observed values of P-E, acquired from station and satellite data. We also find reduced closure terms for water cycle computed with atmospheric budget, analysed over South Asian landmass, when compared to that obtained with individual values of P and E. The P-E value derived with atmospheric budget is more consistent with energy budget, when we use top-of-atmosphere radiation for the same. For analysing water cycle, we use runoff from Global Land Data Assimilation System, and water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. We find improvements in agreements across different reanalyses, in terms of inter-annual cross correlation when atmospheric budget is used to estimate P-E and hence, emphasize to use the same for estimations of water availability in South Asia to reduce uncertainty. Our results on water availability with reduced uncertainty over highly populated monsoon driven South Asia will be useful for water management and agricultural decision making.

  18. Asians demonstrate reduced sensitivity to unpredictable threat: a preliminary startle investigation using genetic ancestry in a multiethnic sample.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brady D; Bishop, Jeffrey R; Sarapas, Casey; Kittles, Rick A; Shankman, Stewart A

    2014-06-01

    Research has indicated that individuals of Asian descent, relative to other racial groups, demonstrate reduced emotional responding and lower prevalence rates of several anxiety disorders. It is unclear though whether these group differences extend to biomarkers of anxiety disorders and whether genetic differences play a role. This study compared self-identified Caucasian, Latino, and Asian persons (total N = 174) on startle response during a baseline period and while anticipating unpredictable threat-a putative biomarker for certain anxiety disorders--as well as predictable threat. In addition, the association between genetic ancestry and startle response was examined within each racial group to determine potential genetic influences on responding. For the baseline period, Asian participants exhibited a smaller startle response relative to Caucasian and Latino participants, who did not differ. Within each racial group, genetic ancestry was associated with baseline startle. Furthermore, genetic ancestry mediated racial group differences in baseline startle. For the threat conditions, a Race × Condition interaction indicated that Asian participants exhibited reduced startle potentiation to unpredictable, but not predicable, threat relative to Caucasian and Latino participants, who did not differ. However, genetic ancestry was not associated with threat-potentiated startle in any racial group. This study adds to the growing literature on racial differences in emotional responding and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that genetic ancestry may play an important role. Moreover, reduced sensitivity to unpredictable threat may reflect a mechanism for why individuals of Asian descent are at less risk for particular anxiety disorders relative to other racial groups.

  19. EXAMINING A HOME ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY TO REDUCE AVAILABILITY OF LEGAL PRODUCTS THAT CAN BE MISUSED BY YOUTH

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David A.; Johnson, Knowlton W.; Shamblen, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from a study of a home environmental strategy (HES) designed to reduce availability of harmful legal products (HLPs) in the home that can be used by youth to get high. HLPs include inhalants, prescription and non-prescription drugs, and household products that can be ingested to get high. Availability is one of the most consistent predictors of substance use among youth. Parents of 5th to 7th-grade students in four Alaskan communities participated in telephone interviews as part of a larger study of a multi-component Community Prevention Model that included a HES. The strategy was designed to encourage parents to reduce availability of HLPs by removing them from the home, and by locking up and monitoring the supplies of HLPs in the home. Data from 402 parents at Wave 1 and 371 parents at Wave 2 were analyzed using Hierarchical Non-Linear Modeling (HNLM). Results show there was a significant decrease in HLPs in the home from Wave 1 to Wave 2, mostly inhalants, prescription and non-prescription drugs. Parents also reported a significant increase in locking up prescription and non-prescription drugs in the home. Parents’ direct exposure to the HES was marginally associated with the change over time in HLP availability in the home. Indirect exposure through others and media was not associated with this change. Study lessons learned and conclusions are highlighted. PMID:22943304

  20. Reduced availability of brain amines during critical phases of postnatal development in a genetic mouse model of cognitive delay.

    PubMed

    Pascucci, Tiziana; Andolina, Diego; Ventura, Rossella; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Cabib, Simona

    2008-06-27

    Serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NE) play important roles in brain postnatal maturation. Therefore, deficits in brain availability of biogenic amines during critical developmental phases might underlie neurodevelopmental disturbances associated with cognitive impairment. To test this hypothesis we evaluated brain availability of 5-HT, DA and NE, of their immediate precursors 5-hydroxytryptophan and 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine, and of large neutral amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan, in developing PahEnu2 mice, the genetic model of Phenylketonuria (PKU) a cause of severe cognitive delay. We found deficits of brain amine levels in PKU pups between day 14 and 35 of postnatal life, when pups of the healthy background showed developmental peak increases of amines and precursors. 5-HT deficits were most pronounced, were unrelated with brain availability of the amino acid precursor tryptophan, but overlapped with peak brain phenylalanine concentrations and reduced availability of 5-HT direct precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan. These results identify a critical window of brain amine availability susceptible to disturbances in a genetic mouse model of pathological neurodevelopment and suggest a mechanism of interference with brain aminergic synthesis in PKU and non-PKU hyperphenylalaninemia.

  1. Reduced Perinatal Leptin Availability May Contribute to Adverse Metabolic Programming in a Rat Model of Uteroplacental Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Wohlfarth, Maria; Lippach, Gregor; Rauh, Manfred; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-05-01

    Leptin availability in perinatal life critically affects metabolic programming. We tested the hypothesis that uteroplacental insufficiency and intrauterine stress affect perinatal leptin availability in rat offspring. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine vessel ligation (LIG; n = 14), sham operation (SOP; n = 12), or no operation (controls, n = 14). Fetal livers (n = 180), placentas (n = 180), and maternal blood were obtained 4 hours (gestational day [E] 19), 24 hours (E20), and 72 hours (E22) after surgery. In the offspring, we took blood samples on E22 (n = 44), postnatal day (P) 1 (n = 29), P2 (n = 16), P7 (n = 30), and P12 (n = 30). Circulating leptin (ELISA) was significantly reduced in LIG (E22, P1, P2) and SOP offspring (E22). Postnatal leptin surge was delayed in LIG but was accelerated in SOP offspring. Placental leptin gene expression (quantitative RT-PCR) was reduced in LIG (E19, E20, E22) and SOP (E20, E22). Hepatic leptin receptor (Lepr-a, mediating leptin degradation) gene expression was increased in LIG fetuses (E20, E22) only. Surprisingly, hypoxia-inducible factors (Hif; Western blot) were unaltered in placentas and were reduced in the livers of LIG (Hif1a, E20; Hif2a, E19, E22) and SOP (Hif2a, E19) fetuses. Gene expression of prolyl hydroxylase 3, a factor expressed under hypoxic conditions contributing to Hif degradation, was increased in livers of LIG (E19, E20, E22) and SOP (E19) fetuses and in placentas of LIG and SOP (E19). In summary, reduced placental leptin production, increased fetal leptin degradation, and persistent perinatal hypoleptinemia are present in intrauterine growth restriction offspring, especially after uteroplacental insufficiency, and may contribute to perinatal programming of leptin resistance and adiposity in later life.

  2. Asians Demonstrate Reduced Sensitivity to Unpredictable Threat: A Preliminary Startle Investigation using Genetic Ancestry in a Multi-Ethnic Sample

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Brady D.; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Sarapas, Casey; Kittles, Rick A.; Shankman, Stewart A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has indicated that individuals of Asian descent, relative to other racial groups, demonstrate reduced emotional responding and lower prevalence rates of several anxiety disorders. It is unclear though whether these group differences extend to biomarkers of anxiety disorders and whether genetic differences play a role. The present study compared self-identified Caucasians, Latinos, and Asians (total N = 174) on startle response during a baseline period and while anticipating unpredictable threat–a putative biomarker for certain anxiety disorders–as well as predictable threat. In addition, the association between genetic ancestry and startle response was examined within each racial group to determine potential genetic influences on responding. For the baseline period, Asian participants exhibited a smaller startle response relative to Caucasian and Latino participants, who did not differ. Within each racial group, genetic ancestry was associated with baseline startle. Furthermore, genetic ancestry mediated racial group differences in baseline startle. For the threat conditions, a Race × Condition interaction indicated that Asian participants exhibited reduced startle potentiation to unpredictable, but not predicable, threat relative to Caucasian and Latino participants, who did not differ. However, genetic ancestry was not associated with threat-potentiated startle in any racial group. The present study adds to the growing literature on racial differences in emotional responding and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that genetic ancestry may play an important role. Moreover, reduced sensitivity to unpredictable threat may reflect a mechanism for why individuals of Asian descent are at less risk for particular anxiety disorders relative to other racial groups. PMID:24708496

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  5. Water availability drives gas exchange and growth of trees in northeastern US, not elevated CO2 and reduced acid deposition

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Mathieu; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Pederson, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) exhibit high uncertainty about how climate change, elevated atmospheric CO2 (atm. CO2) concentration, and atmospheric pollutants will impact carbon sequestration in forested ecosystems. Although the individual roles of these environmental factors on tree growth are understood, analyses examining their simultaneous effects are lacking. We used tree-ring isotopic data and structural equation modeling to examine the concurrent and interacting effects of water availability, atm. CO2 concentration, and SO4 and nitrogen deposition on two broadleaf tree species in a temperate mesic forest in the northeastern US. Water availability was the strongest driver of gas exchange and tree growth. Wetter conditions since the 1980s have enhanced stomatal conductance, photosynthetic assimilation rates and, to a lesser extent, tree radial growth. Increased water availability seemingly overrides responses to reduced acid deposition, CO2 fertilization, and nitrogen deposition. Our results indicate that water availability as a driver of ecosystem productivity in mesic temperate forests is not adequately represented in DGVMs, while CO2 fertilization is likely overrepresented. This study emphasizes the importance to simultaneously consider interacting climatic and biogeochemical drivers when assessing forest responses to global environmental changes. PMID:28393872

  6. Dopamine D1 receptor blockade impairs alcohol seeking without reducing dorsal striatal activation to cues of alcohol availability

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Rebecca R; Robinson, Donita L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol-associated cues activate both ventral and dorsal striatum in functional brain imaging studies of heavy drinkers. In rodents, alcohol-associated cues induce changes in neuronal firing frequencies and increase dopamine release in ventral striatum, but the impact of alcohol-associated cues on neuronal activity in dorsal striatum is unclear. We previously reported phasic changes in action potential frequency in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum after cues that signaled alcohol availability, prompting approach behavior. Methods We investigated the hypothesis that dopamine transmission modulates these phasic firing changes. Rats were trained to self-administer alcohol, and neuronal activity was monitored with extracellular electrophysiology during “anticipatory” cues that signaled the start of the operant session. Sessions were preceded by systemic administration of the D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0, 10, and 20 μg/kg). Results SCH23390 significantly decreased firing rates during the 60 s prior to cue onset without reducing phasic excitations immediately following the cues. While neuronal activation to cues might be expected to initiate behavioral responses, in this study alcohol seeking was reduced despite the presence of dorsal striatal excitations to alcohol cues. Conclusions These data suggest that D1 receptor antagonism reduces basal firing rates in the dorsal striatum and modulates the ability of neuronal activation to “anticipatory” cues to initiate alcohol seeking in rats with an extensive history of alcohol self-administration. PMID:25642390

  7. Dopamine D1 receptor blockade impairs alcohol seeking without reducing dorsal striatal activation to cues of alcohol availability.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Rebecca R; Robinson, Donita L

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol-associated cues activate both ventral and dorsal striatum in functional brain imaging studies of heavy drinkers. In rodents, alcohol-associated cues induce changes in neuronal firing frequencies and increase dopamine release in ventral striatum, but the impact of alcohol-associated cues on neuronal activity in dorsal striatum is unclear. We previously reported phasic changes in action potential frequency in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum after cues that signaled alcohol availability, prompting approach behavior. We investigated the hypothesis that dopamine transmission modulates these phasic firing changes. Rats were trained to self-administer alcohol, and neuronal activity was monitored with extracellular electrophysiology during "anticipatory" cues that signaled the start of the operant session. Sessions were preceded by systemic administration of the D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0, 10, and 20 μg/kg). SCH23390 significantly decreased firing rates during the 60 s prior to cue onset without reducing phasic excitations immediately following the cues. While neuronal activation to cues might be expected to initiate behavioral responses, in this study alcohol seeking was reduced despite the presence of dorsal striatal excitations to alcohol cues. These data suggest that D1 receptor antagonism reduces basal firing rates in the dorsal striatum and modulates the ability of neuronal activation to "anticipatory" cues to initiate alcohol seeking in rats with an extensive history of alcohol self-administration.

  8. Cytotoxic effect of commercially available methylprednisolone acetate with and without reduced preservatives on dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Candido, Kenneth D; Cokic, Ivan; Krbanjevic, Aleksandar; Berth, Sarah L; Knezevic, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Epidural and intrathecal injections of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) have become the most commonly performed interventional procedures in the United States and worldwide in the last 2 decades. However neuraxial MPA injection has been dogged by controversy regarding the presence of different additives used in commercially prepared glucocorticoids. We previously showed that MPA could be rendered 85% free of polyethylene glycol (PEG) by a simple physical separation of elements in the suspension. The objective of the present study was to explore a possible cytotoxic effect of commercially available MPA (with intact or reduced preservatives) on rat sensory neurons. We exposed primary dissociated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons to commercially available MPA for 24 hours with either the standard (commercial) concentration of preservatives or to different fractions following separation (MPA suspension whose preservative concentration had been reduced, or fractions containing higher concentrations of preservatives). Cells were stained with the TUNEL assay kit to detect apoptotic cells and images were taken on the Bio-Rad Laser Sharp-2000 system. We also detected expression of caspase-3, as an indicator of apoptosis in cell lysates. We exposed sensory neurons from rat DRG to different concentrations of MPA from the original commercially prepared vial. TUNEL assay showed dose-related responses and increased percentages of apoptotic cells with increasing concentrations of MPA. Increased concentrations of MPA caused 1.5 - 2 times higher caspase-3 expression in DRG sensory neurons than in control cells (ANOVA, P = 0.001). Our results showed that MPA with reduced preservatives caused significantly less apoptosis observed with TUNEL assay labeling (P < 0.001) and caspase-3 immunoblotting (P = 0.001) than in neurons exposed to MPA from a commercially prepared vial or "clear phase" that contained higher concentrations of preservatives. Even though MPA with reduced

  9. A high gas fraction, reduced power, syngas bioprocessing method demonstrated with a Clostridium ljungdahlii OTA1 paper biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Mark J; Wiltgen, Jeff; Ritter, John; Mooney, Charles B; Flickinger, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel approach to continuous bioprocessing of gases. A miniaturized, coated-paper strip, high gas fraction, biocomposite absorber has been developed using slowly shaken horizontal anaerobic tubes. Concentrated Clostridium ljungdahlii OTA1 was used as a model system. These gas absorbers demonstrate elevated CO mass transfer with low power input, reduced liquid requirements, elevated substrate consumption, and increased product secretion compared to shaken suspended cells. Concentrated OTA1 cell paste was coated by extrusion onto chromatography paper. The immobilized system shows high, constant reactivity immediately upon rehydration. Cell adhesion was by adsorption to the cellulose fibers; visualized by SEM. The C. ljungdahlii OTA1 coated paper mounted above the liquid level absorbs CO and H2 from a model syngas secreting acetate with minimal ethanol. At 100 rpm shaking speed (7.7 Wm(-3) ) the optimal cell loading is 6.5 gDCW m(-2) to maintain high CO absorbing reactivity without the cells coming off of the paper into the liquid phase. Reducing the medium volume from 10 mL to 4 mL (15% of tube volume) did not decrease CO reactivity. The reduced liquid volume increased secreted product concentration by 80%. The specific CO consumption by paper biocomposites was higher at all shaking frequencies <100 rpm than suspended cells under identical incubation conditions. At 25 rpm the biocomposite outperforms suspended cells for CO absorption by 2.5-fold, with an estimated power reduction of 97% over the power input at 100 rpm. The estimated minimum kL a for miniaturized biocomposite gas-absorbers is ∼100 h(-1) , 10 to 10(4) less power input than other syngas fermentation systems reported in the literature at similar kL a. Specific consumption rates in a biocomposite were ∼14 mmol gDCW-1 h(-1) . This work intensified CO absorption and reactivity by 14-fold to 94 mmol CO m(-2) h(-1) over previous C. ljungdahlii OTA1 work by our group

  10. Has Boston's 2011 cigar packaging and pricing regulation reduced availability of single-flavoured cigars popular with youth?

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Gouveia, Tami; Sbarra, Cheryl; Harding, Nikysha; Kane, Kevin; Hayes, Rashelle; Reid, Margaret

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated retailer compliance with a cigar packaging and pricing regulation in Boston, Massachusetts, enacted in February 2012, and the regulation's impact on availability of single cigars. Grape-flavoured Dutch Masters (DM) single-packaged cigars were examined as market indicator. At quarterly intervals from October 2011 to December 2014, availability and price of DM single cigars were observed through professional inspector visits to tobacco retailers in Boston (n=2232) and 10 comparison cities (n=3400). Differences in price and availability were examined between Boston and the comparison cities and across Boston neighbourhoods. The mean price of DM single cigars sold in Boston increased from under $1.50 in 2011 to above $2.50 in 2014, consistent with regulation requirements. Rates of retailer compliance reached 100% within 15 months postpolicy enactment based on observed price, and 97% at 30 months postenactment based on final sale prices. There was a 34.5% net decrease in the percentage of Boston retailers selling single cigars from 2011 to 2014. The number of Boston neighbourhoods with 3 or more retailers selling single cigars per 100 youth residents decreased from 12 in 2011 to 3 in 2014. No change in price or per cent of retailers selling single cigars was observed in the comparison cities in the same period. Retailers throughout Boston are in compliance with the regulation. The regulation has been effective in reducing levels and disparities in availability of flavoured single cigars popular with youth across Boston neighbourhoods, regardless of socioeconomic status and racial/ethnic composition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Collect Data, Tell Stories: Utilizing Available Data to Improve Wound Product Selection, Reduce Costs, and Improve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mostow, Eliot; Montemayor, Jon D; Pittinger, Sean; Miller, Stephannie; Blasiole, Kimberly N; Fulton, Judith

    2014-08-01

    Objective: To develop a tool to assist in the evaluation of treatment options based on clinically relevant parameters, thus enabling clinicians to heal patients more efficiently. Approach: Outlined here is the prototypic model of a comprehensive analysis tool to compare products by category, accounting for product characteristics, effectiveness data from literature, costs, and patient needs or clinician preferences. Results: The tool is demonstrated with a venous leg ulcer example, and ideas for expanding the tool in the future are provided. Innovation: Although this is a simple model, the authors believe that it provides a valid and useful platform for comparing similar products of a given type using available information and reflecting real-world use to give a practical approach to clinical decision-making. Conclusion: Future funding for comprehensive, comparative effectiveness studies should provide clarity on which products to choose for specific applications. Meanwhile, tools like this can provide guidance, and can be modified to accommodate varying circumstances.

  12. Collect Data, Tell Stories: Utilizing Available Data to Improve Wound Product Selection, Reduce Costs, and Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mostow, Eliot; Montemayor, Jon D.; Pittinger, Sean; Miller, Stephannie; Blasiole, Kimberly N.; Fulton, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop a tool to assist in the evaluation of treatment options based on clinically relevant parameters, thus enabling clinicians to heal patients more efficiently. Approach: Outlined here is the prototypic model of a comprehensive analysis tool to compare products by category, accounting for product characteristics, effectiveness data from literature, costs, and patient needs or clinician preferences. Results: The tool is demonstrated with a venous leg ulcer example, and ideas for expanding the tool in the future are provided. Innovation: Although this is a simple model, the authors believe that it provides a valid and useful platform for comparing similar products of a given type using available information and reflecting real-world use to give a practical approach to clinical decision-making. Conclusion: Future funding for comprehensive, comparative effectiveness studies should provide clarity on which products to choose for specific applications. Meanwhile, tools like this can provide guidance, and can be modified to accommodate varying circumstances. PMID:25126475

  13. Biochar application to a contaminated soil reduces the availability and plant uptake of zinc, lead and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Puga, A P; Abreu, C A; Melo, L C A; Beesley, L

    2015-08-15

    Heavy metals in soil are naturally occurring but may be enhanced by anthropogenic activities such as mining. Bio-accumulation of heavy metals in the food chain, following their uptake to plants can increase the ecotoxicological risks associated with remediation of contaminated soils using plants. In the current experiment sugar cane straw-derived biochar (BC), produced at 700 °C, was applied to a heavy metal contaminated mine soil at 1.5%, 3.0% and 5.0% (w/w). Jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis) and Mucuna aterrima were grown in pots containing soil and biochar mixtures, and control pots without biochar. Pore water was sampled from each pot to confirm the effects of biochar on metal solubility, whilst soils were analyzed by DTPA extraction to confirm available metal concentrations. Leaves were sampled for SEM analysis to detect possible morphological and anatomical changes. The application of BC decreased the available concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn in 56, 50 and 54% respectively, in the mine contaminated soil leading to a consistent reduction in the concentration of Zn in the pore water (1st collect: 99 to 39 μg L(-1), 2nd: 97 to 57 μg L(-1) and 3rd: 71 to 12 μg L(-1)). The application of BC reduced the uptake of Cd, Pb and Zn by plants with the jack bean translocating high proportions of metals (especially Cd) to shoots. Metals were also taken up by Mucuna aterrima but translocation to shoot was more limited than for jack bean. There were no differences in the internal structures of leaves observed by scanning electron microscopy. This study indicates that biochar application during mine soil remediation reduce plant concentrations of potential toxic metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduced mate availability leads to evolution of self-fertilization and purging of inbreeding depression in a hermaphrodite.

    PubMed

    Noël, Elsa; Chemtob, Yohann; Janicke, Tim; Sarda, Violette; Pélissié, Benjamin; Jarne, Philippe; David, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Basic models of mating-system evolution predict that hermaphroditic organisms should mostly either cross-fertilize, or self-fertilize, due to self-reinforcing coevolution of inbreeding depression and outcrossing rates. However transitions between mating systems occur. A plausible scenario for such transitions assumes that a decrease in pollinator or mate availability temporarily constrains outcrossing populations to self-fertilize as a reproductive assurance strategy. This should trigger a purge of inbreeding depression, which in turn encourages individuals to self-fertilize more often and finally to reduce male allocation. We tested the predictions of this scenario using the freshwater snail Physa acuta, a self-compatible hermaphrodite that preferentially outcrosses and exhibits high inbreeding depression in natural populations. From an outbred population, we built two types of experimental evolution lines, controls (outcrossing every generation) and constrained lines (in which mates were often unavailable, forcing individuals to self-fertilize). After ca. 20 generations, individuals from constrained lines initiated self-fertilization earlier in life and had purged most of their inbreeding depression compared to controls. However, their male allocation remained unchanged. Our study suggests that the mating system can rapidly evolve as a response to reduced mating opportunities, supporting the reproductive assurance scenario of transitions from outcrossing to selfing.

  15. Isolation and identification of ferric reducing bacteria and evaluation of their roles in iron availability in two calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, N.; Lakzian, A.; Haghnia, G. H.; Karimi, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Iron is an essential element for all organisms which plays a crucial role in important biochemical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. Iron deficiency seems to be an important problem in many calcareous soils. Biological dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction increases iron availability through reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and evaluate some bacterial isolates for their abilities to reduce Fe(III) in two calcareous soils. Three bacterial isolates were selected and identified from paddy soils by using 16S rRNA amplification and then inoculated to sterilized and non-sterilized calcareous soils in the presence and absence of glucose. The results showed that all isolates belonged to Bacillus genus and were capable of reducing Fe(III) to Fe(II) in vitro condition. The amount of Fe(III) reduction in sterilized calcareous soils was significantly higher when inoculated with PS23 isolate and Shewanella putrefaciens ( S. putrefaciens) (as positive control) compared to PS16 and PS11 isolates. No significant difference was observed between PS11 and PS16 isolates in the presence of indigenous microbial community. The results also revealed that glucose had a significant effect on Fe(III) reduction in the examined calcareous soil samples. The amount of Fe(III) reduction increased two-fold when soil samples were treated with glucose and inoculated by S. putrefaciens and PS23 in non-sterilized soils.

  16. Green tea aqueous extract reduces visceral fat and decreases protein availability in rats fed with a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Bajerska, Joanna; Wozniewicz, Małgorzata; Jeszka, Jan; Drzymala-Czyz, Slawomira; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2011-02-01

    Green tea is associated with beneficial health effects mainly because of its body fat-reducing and hypocholesterolemic activities, but an effective dose without pronounced influence on protein availability is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that green tea aqueous extract (GTAE) depending on dose improves cardiovascular risk indicators such as body weight, visceral fat content, and atherogenic index of plasma and does not have unfavorable effect on protein availability in rats fed with a high-fat diet. The rats fed with a high-fat diet enriched with 1.1 and 2.0% GTAE for 8 weeks had significantly (P < .05) lower atherogenic index (in both groups, about 14.3%). Only administration of 2.0% GTAE significantly (P < .05) decreased body weight gain (5.6%) and prevented visceral fat accumulation (17.8%) in rats. However, considerably (P < .05), reduction in the digestion of protein (but not fat) was observed in both GTAE groups (1.1% GTAE: 82.6% ± 1.8%; 2.0% GTAE: 84.3% ± 0.8%) when compared to the control (93.3% ± 1.5%). It was concluded that GTAE may have preventive effects on the accumulation of visceral fat but only in higher doses. Although both doses improved cardiovascular risk indicators, they, in addition, significantly inhibited protein digestion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Economic Synergy between Dry Cow Diet Improvement and Monensin Bolus Use to Prevent Subclinical Ketosis: An Experimental Demonstration Based on Available Literature

    PubMed Central

    Raboisson, Didier; Barbier, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of subclinical ketosis (SCK) is based on maintaining adequate nutrition in dairy cows during the dry period and close to calving. Recently, an oral-route monensin bolus to prevent SCK was approved in Europe. The present study aims to define the allocation of resources for SCK management at the herd level and evaluate the profitability of administering monensin boluses in cows at risk for SCK. A stochastic model was used to calculate the total cost of SCK for a population with a given prevalence of cows at risk for SCK. This model included the ability of the farmer to correctly target and preventatively treat these cows at risk for SCK. The results clearly demonstrated economic synergy between two management practices. First, reducing the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK dramatically reduces the total cost of SCK and seems profitable in most situations. Second, monensin bolus use to reduce the occurrence of SCK in cows already at risk for SCK is cost-effective. The results also highlighted three economic strategies to manage SCK in the dairy industry in Europe. First, monensin bolus use throughout an entire herd when the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK is high is only profitable in the short-term as a tool to correct acute deterioration at the herd level. Second, decreasing the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK through adequate feeding in the dry period is of financial interest as a baseline strategy when prevalence is high, assuming moderate additional cost linked to the new diet. Third, monensin bolus use when the prevalence of cows at risk for SCK is low is also profitable as a long-term strategy when only cows at high risk for SCK (such as cows that are over-conditioned, old, or have a previous history of SCK-related disorders) are targeted for preventative treatment. Authors suggest to use the present results considering that farmers have a correct, but not perfect, ability to target animals to be preventively targeted with the monensin

  18. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide–Null Mice Demonstrate Enhanced Sweet Taste Preference, Dysglycemia, and Reduced Taste Bud Leptin Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; Shin, Yu-Kyong; White, Caitlin M.; Ji, Sunggoan; Kim, Wook; Carlson, Olga D.; Napora, Joshua K.; Chadwick, Wayne; Chapter, Megan; Waschek, James A.; Mattson, Mark P.; Maudsley, Stuart; Egan, Josephine M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE It is becoming apparent that there is a strong link between taste perception and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence implicates gut-related hormones in taste perception, including glucagon-like peptide 1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). We used VIP knockout mice to investigate VIP's specific role in taste perception and connection to energy regulation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Body weight, food intake, and plasma levels of multiple energy-regulating hormones were measured and pancreatic morphology was determined. In addition, the immunocytochemical profile of taste cells and gustatory behavior were examined in wild-type and VIP knockout mice. RESULTS VIP knockout mice demonstrate elevated plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin levels, with no islet β-cell number/topography alteration. VIP and its receptors (VPAC1, VPAC2) were identified in type II taste cells of the taste bud, and VIP knockout mice exhibit enhanced taste preference to sweet tastants. VIP knockout mouse taste cells show a significant decrease in leptin receptor expression and elevated expression of glucagon-like peptide 1, which may explain sweet taste preference of VIP knockout mice. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that the tongue can play a direct role in modulating energy intake to correct peripheral glycemic imbalances. In this way, we could view the tongue as a sensory mechanism that is bidirectionally regulated and thus forms a bridge between available foodstuffs and the intricate hormonal balance in the animal itself. PMID:20150284

  19. Individual rain events decrease long-term boreal peatland net CO2 uptake through reduced light availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijp, Jelmer; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B.; van der Zee, Sjoerd; Berendse, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Northern peatlands sequester enormous quantities of carbon, suggesting these wetland ecosystems are of fundamental importance for the global carbon cycle. The long-term carbon storage of these wetland ecosystems depends on wet surface conditions, and is prone to drought. Future climate predictions indicate that most of the northern hemisphere is projected to become wetter, but that precipitation will fall in less frequent but more intense events. How such fine-scale climatic changes will affect long-term future net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of northern peatlands remains unknown. In this study we explored the short-term peatland NEE response to day time rain events during the growing season, how timing and characteristics of individual events and environmental conditions modify this response, and the impact of NEE responses to individual rain events for the longer-term (annual) carbon uptake. We used an 11-year time series of half-hourly eddy covariance and meteorological measurements from Degerö Stormyr, a peatland in northern Sweden. Our study shows daytime precipitation events systematically decreased the sink strength for atmospheric CO2. An individual daytime precipitation event reduced net ecosystem CO2 uptake by 0.23-0.54 gC m-2 on average. This reduction was best explained by the reduction in light associated with precipitation events, rather than by precipitation characteristics, timing of events, or drought length. On an annual basis, this reduction of net CO2 uptake corresponds to 24% of the annual net CO2 uptake (NEE) of the study site, equivalent to a 4.4% reduction of gross primary production (GPP) during the growing season. We conclude that accounting for the short-term response of NEE to individual rain events is crucial in determining climate change impacts on long-term sink strength of peatlands to atmospheric CO2. Moreover, reduced light availability associated with rain events is more important in explaining the NEE response to rain events than

  20. Assessment of an apparent relationship between availability of soluble carbohydrates and reduced nitrogen during floral initiation in tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Thomas, J. F.; Tolley-Henry, L.; Rideout, J. W.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Daily relative accumulation rate of soluble carbohydrates (RARS) and reduced nitrogen (RARN) in the shoot, as estimates of source strength, were compared with daily relative growth rates (RGR) of the shoot, as an estimate of sink demand, during floral transformation in apical meristems of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'NC 2326') grown at day/night temperatures of 18/14, 22/18, 26/22, 30/26, and 34/30 C. Source strength was assumed to exceed sink demand for either carbohydrates or nitrogen when the ratio of RARS/RGR or RARN/RGR was greater than unity, and sink demand was assumed to exceed source strength when the ratio was less than unity. Time of floral initiation, which was delayed up to 21 days with increases in temperature over the experimental range, was associated with intervals in which source strength of either carbohydrate or nitrogen exceeded sink demand, while sink demand for the other exceeded source strength. Floral initiation was not observed during intervals in which source strengths of both carbohydrates and nitrogen were greater than or less than sink demand. These results indicate that floral initiation is responsive to an imbalance in the relative availabilities of carbohydrate and nitrogen.

  1. Assessment of an apparent relationship between availability of soluble carbohydrates and reduced nitrogen during floral initiation in tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Thomas, J. F.; Tolley-Henry, L.; Rideout, J. W.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Daily relative accumulation rate of soluble carbohydrates (RARS) and reduced nitrogen (RARN) in the shoot, as estimates of source strength, were compared with daily relative growth rates (RGR) of the shoot, as an estimate of sink demand, during floral transformation in apical meristems of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'NC 2326') grown at day/night temperatures of 18/14, 22/18, 26/22, 30/26, and 34/30 C. Source strength was assumed to exceed sink demand for either carbohydrates or nitrogen when the ratio of RARS/RGR or RARN/RGR was greater than unity, and sink demand was assumed to exceed source strength when the ratio was less than unity. Time of floral initiation, which was delayed up to 21 days with increases in temperature over the experimental range, was associated with intervals in which source strength of either carbohydrate or nitrogen exceeded sink demand, while sink demand for the other exceeded source strength. Floral initiation was not observed during intervals in which source strengths of both carbohydrates and nitrogen were greater than or less than sink demand. These results indicate that floral initiation is responsive to an imbalance in the relative availabilities of carbohydrate and nitrogen.

  2. Simultaneous Voltammetric Measurements of Glucose and Dopamine Demonstrate the Coupling of Glucose Availability with Increased Metabolic Demand in the Rat Striatum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha K; Lee, Christie A; Dausch, Matthew E; Horman, Brian M; Patisaul, Heather B; McCarty, Gregory S; Sombers, Leslie A

    2017-02-15

    Cerebral blood flow ensures delivery of nutrients, such as glucose, to brain sites with increased metabolic demand. However, little is known about rapid glucose dynamics at discrete locations during neuronal activation in vivo. Acute exposure to many substances of abuse elicits dopamine release and neuronal activation in the striatum; however, the concomitant changes in striatal glucose remain largely unknown. Recent developments have combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with glucose oxidase enzyme modified carbon-fiber microelectrodes to enable the measurement of glucose dynamics with subsecond temporal resolution in the mammalian brain. This work evaluates several waveforms to enable the first simultaneous detection of endogenous glucose and dopamine at single recording sites. These molecules, one electroactive and one nonelectroactive, were found to fluctuate in the dorsal striatum in response to electrical stimulation of the midbrain and systemic infusion of cocaine/raclopride. The data reveal the second-by-second dynamics of these species in a striatal microenvironment, and directly demonstrate the coupling of glucose availability with increased metabolic demand. This work provides a foundation that will enable detailed investigation of local mechanisms that regulate the coupling of cerebral blood flow with metabolic demand under normal conditions, and in animal studies of drug abuse and addiction.

  3. Chemical and plant tests to assess the viability of amendments to reduce metal availability in mine soils and tailings.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this research was to assess the potential of several industrial wastes to immobilise metals in two polluted soils deriving from an old Pb/Zn mine. Two different approaches were used to assess the performance of different amendments: a chemical one, using extraction by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and a biological one, using Lupinus albus as a bio-indicator. Four amendments were used: inorganic sugar production waste (named 'sugar foam', SF), sludge from a drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), organic waste from olive mill waste (OMW) and paper mill sludge (PMS). Amendment to soil ratios ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 (w/w). All the amendments were capable of significantly decreasing (p < 0.05) EDTA-extractable Pb, Zn and Cu concentrations in the two soils used, with decreases in ranges 21-100, 25-100 and 2-100 % for Pb, Zn and Cu, respectively. The amendments tested were also effective in reducing the bioavailability of Pb and Zn for L. albus, which gave rise to a decrease in shoot metal accumulation by the lupine plants compared to that found in the control soil. That decrease reached up to 5.6 and 2.8 times for Pb and Zn, respectively, being statistically significant in most cases. Moreover, application of the OMW, DWS and SF amendments led to higher average values of plant biomass (up to 71%) than those obtained in the control soil. The results obtained showed the technology put forward to be a viable means of remediating mine soils as it led to a decrease in the availability and toxicity of metals and, thus, facilitated the growth of a vegetation layer.

  4. Creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) resin increases water demands and reduces energy availability in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida).

    PubMed

    Mangione, Antonio M; Dearing, M Denise; Karasov, William H

    2004-07-01

    Although many plant secondary compounds are known to have serious consequences for herbivores, the costs of processing them are generally unknown. Two potential costs of ingestion and detoxification of secondary compounds are elevation of the minimum drinking water requirement and excretion of energetically expensive metabolites (i.e., glucuronides) in the urine. To address these impacts, we studied the costs of ingestion of resin from creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) on desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida). The following hypotheses were tested: ingestion of creosote resin by woodrats (1) increases minimum water requirement and (2) reduces energy available by increasing fecal and urinary energy losses. We tested the first hypothesis, by measuring the minimum water requirement of woodrats fed a control diet with and without creosote resin. Drinking water was given in decreasing amounts until woodrats could no longer maintain constant body mass. In two separate experiments, the minimum drinking water requirement of woodrats fed resin was higher than that of controls by 18-30% (about 1-1.7 ml/d). We tested several potential mechanisms of increased water loss associated with the increase in water requirement. The rate of fecal water loss was higher in woodrats consuming resin. Neither urinary water nor evaporative water loss was affected by ingestion of resin. Hypothesis 2 was tested by measuring energy fluxes of woodrats consuming control vs. resin-treated diets. Woodrats on a resin diet had higher urinary energy losses and, thus, metabolized a lower proportion of the dietary energy than did woodrats on control diet. Fecal energy excretion was not affected by resin. The excretion of glucuronic acid represented almost half of the energy lost as a consequence of resin ingestion. The increased water requirement and energy losses of woodrats consuming a diet with resin could have notable ecological consequences.

  5. Rewarding Progress, Reducing Debt: Early Results from Ohio's Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration for Low-Income Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Paulette; Patel, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    This report presents early results from a rigorous evaluation of a performance-based scholarship program that was implemented at three community colleges in Ohio during the 2008-2009 academic year. The program in Ohio that is the subject of this report is part of MDRC's national Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration, which was…

  6. Point-of-care platelet function assays demonstrate reduced responsiveness to clopidogrel, but not aspirin, in patients with Drug-Eluting Stent Thrombosis whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Alex R; Petley, Graham; Morton, Geraint; Dawkins, Keith D; Curzen, Nick P

    2008-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that point-of-care assays of platelet reactivity would demonstrate reduced response to antiplatelet therapy in patients who experienced Drug Eluting Stent (DES) ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy compared to matched DES controls. Whilst the aetiology of stent thrombosis (ST) is multifactorial there is increasing evidence from laboratory-based assays that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet therapy is a factor in some cases. Methods From 3004 PCI patients, seven survivors of DES ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy were identified and each matched with two patients without ST. Analysis was performed using (a) short Thrombelastogram PlateletMapping™ (TEG) and (b) VerifyNow Aspirin and P2Y12 assays. TEG analysis was performed using the Area Under the Curve at 15 minutes (AUC15) as previously described. Results There were no differences in responses to aspirin. There was significantly greater platelet reactivity on clopidogrel in the ST group using the Accumetrics P2Y12 assay (183 ± 51 vs. 108 ± 31, p = 0.02) and a trend towards greater reactivity using TEG AUC15 (910 ± 328 vs. 618 ± 129, p = 0.07). 57% of the ST group by TEG and 43% of the ST cases by Accumetrics PRU had results > two standard deviations above the expected mean in the control group. Conclusion This study demonstrates reduced platelet response to clopidogrel in some patients with DES ST compared to matched controls. The availability of point-of-care assays that can detect these responses raises the possibility of prospectively identifying DES patients at risk of ST and manipulating their subsequent risk. PMID:18312665

  7. Complementary effects of antioxidants and sunscreens in reducing UV-induced skin damage as demonstrated by skin biomarker expression.

    PubMed

    Oresajo, Christian; Yatskayer, Margarita; Galdi, Angelike; Foltis, Peter; Pillai, Sreekumar

    2010-06-01

    UV-exposure of the skin causes oxidative stress, leading to inflammatory reactions and premature skin aging. Sunscreens protect by absorbing or reflecting UV on the skin surface. Antioxidants provide protection by quenching UV-induced reactive oxygen species inside skin. To evaluate the complementary photoprotective benefits of formulas containing either an antioxidant complex of Cassia alata leaf extract or a combination of the antioxidant complex and sunscreens on normal healthy volunteers using biomarkers of skin damage. Each formula and a placebo control were applied separately to selected areas on the lower back of 10 individuals for 4 consecutive days. On Day 4, the control and three test sites were exposed to 5 x MED (minimal erythemal dose) of solar-simulated UV-irradiation (UVR). On Day 5, 4-mm punch biopsies were collected from the four exposed sites and a control site (untreated, unexposed) for immunohistochemistry. Exposure to 5 x MED demonstrated significant damage as assessed by thymine dimer formation, MMP-9 and p53 protein expression on untreated exposed skin. The formula containing sunscreens + the antioxidant complex was the most protective, followed by the formula with the antioxidant alone. The study demonstrated that a combination of antioxidants and sunscreens complement each other, resulting in superior photoprotection.

  8. Evaluation of Blast Furnace Slag as a means of Reducing Metal Availability in a Contaminated Sediment for Beneficial use Purposes

    EPA Science Inventory

    An attractive option for the disposal of dredged sediment involves the use of the sediment for beneficial purposes. Treatment (chemical amendment) of the sediment may be necessary to limit the environmental and human availability (bioavailability, leachability, plant uptake) of h...

  9. Oxalate reduces calcium availability in the pads of the prickly pear cactus through formation of calcium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    McConn, Michele M; Nakata, Paul A

    2004-03-10

    The pads (nopales) of the prickly pear cactus are considered to be a good source of minerals and other nutrients on the basis of compositional analysis. In this study, this analysis is taken a step further by assessing the availability of selected minerals in nopales using an in vitro digestion and dialysis method. The results obtained suggest that although nopales are enriched in a number of minerals, their tissue calcium is not freely available. Microscopic analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and oxalate measurements suggest that this reduction in available calcium is a result of its sequestration in the form of calcium oxalate crystals. The issue of mineral availability in plant foods is important when the dependence of many populations around the world on plant foods as their main source of minerals and other nutrients is considered.

  10. Evaluation of Blast Furnace Slag as a means of Reducing Metal Availability in a Contaminated Sediment for Beneficial use Purposes

    EPA Science Inventory

    An attractive option for the disposal of dredged sediment involves the use of the sediment for beneficial purposes. Treatment (chemical amendment) of the sediment may be necessary to limit the environmental and human availability (bioavailability, leachability, plant uptake) of h...

  11. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on

  12. Reduced Salinity Improves Marine Food Availability With Positive Feedbacks on pH in a Tidally-Dominated Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, A. T.; Roberts, E. A.; Galloway, A. W. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal regions around the world are changing rapidly, generating many physiological stressors for marine organisms. Food availability, a major factor determining physiological condition of marine organisms, in these systems reflects the influence of biological and environmental factors, and will likely respond dramatically to long-term changes. Using observations of phytoplankton, detritus, and their corresponding fatty acids and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur, we identified environmental drivers of pelagic food availability and quality along a salinity gradient in a large tidally influenced estuary (San Juan Archipelago, Salish Sea, USA). Variation in chlorophyll a (Chl a), biomarkers and environmental conditions exhibited a similar range at both tidal and seasonal scales, highlighting a tide-related mechanism controlling productivity that is important to consider for long-term monitoring. Multiple parameters of food availability were inversely and non-linearly correlated to salinity, such that availability of high-quality (based on abundance, essential fatty acid concentration and C:N) seston increased below a salinity threshold of 30. The increased marine productivity was associated with increased pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) at lower salinity. Based on this observation we predicted that a decrease of salinity to below the threshold would result in higher Chl a, temperature, DO and pH across a range of temporal and spatial scales, and tested the prediction with a meta-analysis of available data. At all scales, these variables showed significant and consistent increases related to the salinity threshold. This finding provides important context to the increased frequency of below-threshold salinity over the last 71 years in this region, suggesting greater food availability with positive feedbacks on DO and pH. Together, these findings indicate that many of the environmental factors predicted to increase physiological stress to benthic suspension

  13. 77 FR 2064 - Availability of the Report on the International Workshop on Alternative Methods To Reduce, Refine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... Science and Future Directions.'' The report was published as an issue of the journal Procedia in Vaccinology, and is available on the journal's Web site at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal.... William S. Stokes, NICEATM Director, NIEHS, P.O. Box 12233, MD K2-16, Research Triangle Park, NC,...

  14. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability is Reduced in Methamphetamine Dependence and is Linked to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Buyean; London, Edythe D.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Farahi, Judah; Nacca, Angelo; Monterosso, John R.; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Bokarius, Andrew V.; Dahlbom, Magnus; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Bilder, Robert M.; Brody, Arthur L.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    While methamphetamine addiction has been associated with both impulsivity and striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor deficits, human studies have not directly linked the latter two entities. We therefore compared methamphetamine-dependent and healthy control subjects using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11, BIS-11) and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride to measure striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability. The methamphetamine-dependent subjects reported recent use of the drug 3.3 g per week, and a history of using methamphetamine, on average, for 12.5 years. They had higher scores than healthy control subjects on all BIS-11 impulsiveness subscales (p < 0.001). Volume-of-interest analysis found lower striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in methamphetamine-dependent than in healthy control subjects (p < 0.01) and a negative relationship between impulsiveness and striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in the caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens that reached statistical significance in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Combining data from both groups, voxelwise analysis indicated that impulsiveness was related to D2/D3 receptor availability in left caudate nucleus and right lateral putamen/claustrum (p < 0.05, determined by threshold-free cluster enhancement). In separate group analyses, correlations involving the head and body of the caudate and the putamen of methamphetamine-dependent subjects, and the lateral putamen/claustrum of control subjects were observed at a weaker threshold (p < 0.12 corrected). The findings suggest that low striatal D2/D3 receptor availability may mediate impulsive temperament and thereby influence addiction. PMID:19940168

  15. Striatal dopamine d2/d3 receptor availability is reduced in methamphetamine dependence and is linked to impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Buyean; London, Edythe D; Poldrack, Russell A; Farahi, Judah; Nacca, Angelo; Monterosso, John R; Mumford, Jeanette A; Bokarius, Andrew V; Dahlbom, Magnus; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Bilder, Robert M; Brody, Arthur L; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2009-11-25

    While methamphetamine addiction has been associated with both impulsivity and striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor deficits, human studies have not directly linked the latter two entities. We therefore compared methamphetamine-dependent and healthy control subjects using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11, BIS-11) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]fallypride to measure striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor availability. The methamphetamine-dependent subjects reported recent use of the drug 3.3 g per week, and a history of using methamphetamine, on average, for 12.5 years. They had higher scores than healthy control subjects on all BIS-11 impulsiveness subscales (p < 0.001). Volume-of-interest analysis found lower striatal D(2)/D(3) receptor availability in methamphetamine-dependent than in healthy control subjects (p < 0.01) and a negative relationship between impulsiveness and striatal D(2)/D(3) receptor availability in the caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens that reached statistical significance in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Combining data from both groups, voxelwise analysis indicated that impulsiveness was related to D(2)/D(3) receptor availability in left caudate nucleus and right lateral putamen/claustrum (p < 0.05, determined by threshold-free cluster enhancement). In separate group analyses, correlations involving the head and body of the caudate and the putamen of methamphetamine-dependent subjects and the lateral putamen/claustrum of control subjects were observed at a weaker threshold (p < 0.12 corrected). The findings suggest that low striatal D(2)/D(3) receptor availability may mediate impulsive temperament and thereby influence addiction.

  16. Niacinamide pretreatment reduces microvesicle formation in hairless guinea pigs cutaneously exposed to sulfur mustard. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Clark, C.R.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1991-12-31

    It has been proposed that sulfur mustard (HD) may indirectly activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) by alkylating cellular DNA (Papirmeister et al., 1985). Activation of PADPRP results in the depletion of cellular NAD+ which initiates a series of biochemical processes that have been proposed to culminate in blister formation. Preventing PADPRP activation and NAD+ depletion should inhibit blister formation. Niacinamide is both an inhibitor of PADPRP and a precursor for NAD+ synthesis. The present study was undertaken to determine whether niacinamide can protect against HD-induced microvesication in cutaneously exposed hairless guinea pigs. Each site was exposed to HD for 8 min by means of a vapor cup. Niacinamide (750 mg/kg, ip) given as a 30-min pretreatment inhibited microvesicle formation by 50% after HD application. However, niacinamide given 2 hr after HD application did not reduce microvesicle formation. There was no benefit when niacinamide was given as both a pretreatment and treatment when compared to niacinamide given only as a pretreatment. The reduction in microvesication 24 hr after HD did not correlate with skin NAD+ content. Niacinamide did not reduce the degree of erythema or edema. Ballooning degeneration of basal epidermal cells was present in some niacinamide pretreated HD exposure sites.

  17. Reduced soil water availability did not protect two competing grassland species from the negative effects of increasing background ozone.

    PubMed

    Wagg, Serena; Mills, Gina; Hayes, Felicity; Wilkinson, Sally; Cooper, David; Davies, William J

    2012-06-01

    Two common (semi-) natural temperate grassland species, Dactylis glomerata and Ranunculus acris, were grown in competition and exposed to two watering regimes: well-watered (WW, 20-40% v/v) and reduced-watered (RW, 7.5-20% v/v) in combination with eight ozone treatments ranging from pre-industrial to predicted 2100 background levels. For both species there was a significant increase in leaf damage with increasing background ozone concentration. RW had no protective effect against increasing levels of ozone-induced senescence/injury. In high ozone, based on measurements of stomatal conductance, we propose that ozone influx into the leaves was not prevented in the RW treatment, in D. glomerata because stomata were a) more widely open than those in less polluted plants and b) were less responsive to drought. Total seasonal above ground biomass was not significantly altered by increased ozone; however, ozone significantly reduced root biomass in both species to differing amounts depending on watering regime. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. More choice in health insurance marketplaces may reduce the value of the subsidies available to low-income enrollees.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin A; Saltzman, Evan; Bauhoff, Sebastian; Pacula, Rosalie L; Eibner, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Federal subsidies available to enrollees in health insurance Marketplaces are pegged to the premium of the second-lowest-cost silver plan available in each rating area (as defined by each state). People who qualify for the subsidy contribute a percentage of their income to purchase coverage, and the federal government covers the remaining cost up to the price of that premium. Because the number of plans offered and plan premiums vary substantially across rating areas, the effective value of the subsidy may vary geographically. We found that the availability of more plans in a rating area was associated with lower premiums but higher deductibles for enrollees in the second-lowest-cost silver plan. In rating areas with more than twenty plans, the average deductible in the second-lowest-cost silver plan was nearly $1,000 higher than it was in rating areas with fewer than thirteen plans. Because premium costs for second-lowest-cost silver plans are capped, deductibles may be a more salient measure of plan value for enrollees than premiums are. Greater standardization of plans or an alternative approach to calculating the subsidy could provide a more consistent benefit to enrollees across various rating areas. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  1. Tennessee’s 3-Star Report: Using Available Data Systems to Reduce Missed Opportunities to Vaccinate Preteens

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kelly L.; Fankhauser, Melissa K.; Hull, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    All preteens should receive tetanus–diphtheria–pertussis vaccine (Tdap), quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine (Men-ACWY), and the human papillomavirus (HPV) cancer vaccine series. In Tennessee, HPV vaccination rates have stagnated at low levels for a decade. Three fundamental strategies to reduce missed opportunities for immunization include administering all recommended vaccines at the same visit, making strong recommendations for vaccines, and auditing and feedback. In Tennessee, during each summer, a surge of preteens visit local health departments (LHDs) to receive a required Tdap vaccine before entering seventh grade, presenting an opportunity to administer Men-ACWY and HPV. The Tennessee Immunization Program (TIP) coined the term “3-Star visit” for such encounters and developed a monthly report to track them using data from the Patient Tracking Billing Management Information System (PTBMIS) used by LHDs across Tennessee. Implementation of this quality improvement report has correlated with a substantial increase in 3-Star visits from 2013 to 2016, particularly during the summer months. PMID:27980415

  2. Chronic Binge Ethanol Mediated Acidemia Reduces Availability of Glutamine and Related Amino Acids in Maternal Plasma of Pregnant Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Jayanth; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy drinking during pregnancy can result in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), of which, fetal and postnatal growth retardation and central nervous system deficits are cardinal features. While a number of mechanisms have been proposed, none fully account for these deficiencies. We have previously reported that maternal ethanol exposure (1.75 g/kg) results in transient acidemia in the mother and fetus. Alterations in pH are known to regulate glutamine homeostasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that chronic binge ethanol mediated acidosis reduces glutamine concentrations in maternal plasma that result in decreases in the circulating levels of amino acids related to glutamine metabolism. Pregnant ewes were divided into three groups: ethanol (1.75 g/kg), saline control, and acidemia (inspired fractional CO2 was manipulated to mimic the maternal arterial pH pattern created by ethanol). The experiment was conducted on three consecutive days followed by four days without treatment beginning on day 109 of gestation, continuing to day 132. Plasma samples were analyzed for nutrients and metabolites using HPLC and spectrophotometric methods. Maternal plasma concentrations of glutamate increased (58%), while those of glutamine and related amino acids decreased (between 14 and 53%) in response to an acute challenge following the chronic exposure in ethanol treated ewes. No differences in these amino acid concentrations were noted between the ethanol and acidemic group subjects. Maternal plasma lactate increased by ~100% in response to ethanol while glucose and urea did not change in any group. We conclude that maternal chronic binge ethanol consumption results in acidosis mediated reductions in circulating levels of glutamine and related amino acids that could be responsible for neuronal deficits, altered fetal growth, development, and programming. We also speculate that the consequent increase in fetal glutamate during critical periods of brain development may contribute to the

  3. Early molecular events involved in Pinus pinaster Ait. somatic embryo development under reduced water availability: transcriptomic and proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Teyssier, Caroline; Trontin, Jean-François; Eliášová, Kateřina; Pešek, Bedřich; Beaufour, Martine; Morabito, Domenico; Boizot, Nathalie; Le Metté, Claire; Belal-Bessai, Leila; Reymond, Isabelle; Harvengt, Luc; Cadene, Martine; Corbineau, Françoise; Vágner, Martin; Label, Philippe; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne

    2014-09-01

    Maritime pine somatic embryos (SEs) require a reduction in water availability (high gellan gum concentration in the maturation medium) to reach the cotyledonary stage. This key switch, reported specifically for pine species, is not yet well understood. To facilitate the use of somatic embryogenesis for mass propagation of conifers, we need a better understanding of embryo development. Comparison of both transcriptome (Illumina RNA sequencing) and proteome [two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with mass spectrometry (MS) identification] of immature SEs, cultured on either high (9G) or low (4G) gellan gum concentration, was performed, together with analysis of water content, fresh and dry mass, endogenous abscisic acid (ABA; gas chromatography-MS), soluble sugars (high-pressure liquid chromatography), starch and confocal laser microscope observations. This multiscale, integrated analysis was used to unravel early molecular and physiological events involved in SE development. Under unfavorable conditions (4G), the glycolytic pathway was enhanced, possibly in relation to cell proliferation that may be antagonistic to SE development. Under favorable conditions (9G), SEs adapted to culture constraint by activating specific protective pathways, and ABA-mediated molecular and physiological responses promoting embryo development. Our results suggest that on 9G, germin-like protein and ubiquitin-protein ligase could be used as predictive markers of SE development, whereas protein phosphatase 2C could be a biomarker for culture adaptive responses. This is the first characterization of early molecular mechanisms involved in the development of pine SEs following an increase in gellan gum concentration in the maturation medium, and it is also the first report on somatic embryogenesis in conifers combining transcriptomic and proteomic datasets.

  4. JCM-16021, a Chinese Herbal Formula, Attenuated Visceral Hyperalgesia in TNBS-Induced Postinflammatory Irritable Bowel Syndrome through Reducing Colonic EC Cell Hyperplasia and Serotonin Availability in Rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Leung, Fung-Ping; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Wu, Justin C Y; Sung, Joseph J Y; Xu, Hong-Xi; Tong, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of JCM-16021, a revised traditional Chinese herbal formula, on postinflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) in rats. The trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid-induced PI-IBS model rats were orally administrated with different doses of JCM-16021 (1.2, 2.4, and 4.8 g/kg/d) for 14 consecutive days. The results showed that JCM-16021 treatment dose-dependently attenuated visceral hyperalgesia in PI-IBS rats. Further, the colonic enterochromaffin (EC) cell number, serotonin (5-HT) content, tryptophan hydroxylase expression, and mechanical-stimuli-induced 5-HT release were significantly ameliorated. Moreover, the decreased levels of mucosal cytokines in PI-IBS, especially the helper T-cell type 1- (T(h)1-) related cytokine TNF-α, were also elevated after JCM-16021 treatment. These data demonstrate that the analgesic effect of JCM-16021 on TNBS-induced PI-IBS rats may be medicated via reducing colonic EC cell hyperplasia and 5-HT availability.

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  6. Reduced Availability of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Diet Soda Has a Limited Impact on Beverage Consumption Patterns in Maine High School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley Blum, Janet E.; Davee, Anne-Marie; Beaudoin, Christina M.; Jenkins, Paul L.; Kaley, Lori A.; Wigand, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine change in high school students' beverage consumption patterns pre- and post-intervention of reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and diet soda in school food venues. Design: A prospective, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized study design. Setting: Public high schools. Participants: A convenience sample from…

  7. Reduced Availability of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Diet Soda Has a Limited Impact on Beverage Consumption Patterns in Maine High School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley Blum, Janet E.; Davee, Anne-Marie; Beaudoin, Christina M.; Jenkins, Paul L.; Kaley, Lori A.; Wigand, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine change in high school students' beverage consumption patterns pre- and post-intervention of reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and diet soda in school food venues. Design: A prospective, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized study design. Setting: Public high schools. Participants: A convenience sample from…

  8. Reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda has a limited impact on beverage consumption patterns in Maine high school youth.

    PubMed

    Blum, Janet E Whatley; Davee, Anne-Marie; Beaudoin, Christina M; Jenkins, Paul L; Kaley, Lori A; Wigand, Debra A

    2008-01-01

    To examine change in high school students' beverage consumption patterns pre- and post-intervention of reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and diet soda in school food venues. A prospective, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized study design. Public high schools. A convenience sample from control (n = 221) and intervention (n = 235) high schools. Schools aimed to reduce (n = 4) or not change (n = 3) availability of SSB and diet soda in food venues for 1 school year. Subjects' beverage servings/day was determined from a food frequency questionnaire pre- and post-intervention. Two-by-two mixed analysis of variance model compared pre- to post-intervention servings/day between control and intervention subjects, stratified by gender. Consumption of SSB decreased in both intervention and control boys (F = 53.69, P < .05) and girls (F = 22.87, P < .05). Intervention girls decreased diet soda consumption as compared to control girls (F = 6.57, P < .05). Reducing availability of SSB in schools did not result in a greater decrease in SSB consumption by intervention as compared to control subjects. The impact of reducing availability of SSB at school may be limited. A better understanding of beverage consumption patterns may be needed to determine the efficacy of school food policies on those youth susceptible to obesity.

  9. Revised precautionary measures to reduce the possible transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) by blood and blood products; guidance document; availability--FDA. Notice.

    PubMed

    1997-09-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance document entitled "Revised Precautionary Measures to Reduce the Possible Transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) by Blood and Blood Products," dated December 11, 1996. The guidance document is intended to provide recommendations to the blood industry and may include information useful to other interested persons.

  10. Reducing the Strength: a mixed methods evaluation of alcohol retailers' willingness to voluntarily reduce the availability of low cost, high strength beers and ciders in two UK local authorities.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Colin; McGill, Elizabeth; Dickie, Esther; Champo, Enes; Romeri, Ester; Egan, Matt

    2016-05-26

    Reducing the Strength is an increasingly popular intervention in which local authorities ask retailers to stop selling 'super-strength' beers and ciders. The intervention cannot affect alcohol availability, nor consumption, unless retailers participate. In this paper, we ask whether and why retailers choose or refuse to self-impose restrictions on alcohol sales in this way. Mixed method assessment of retailers' participation in Reducing the Strength in two London (UK) local authorities. Compliance rates and the cheapest available unit of alcohol at each store were assessed. Qualitative interviews with retailer managers and staff (n = 39) explored attitudes towards the intervention and perceptions of its impacts. Shops selling super-strength across both areas fell from 78 to 25 (18 % of all off-licences). The median price of the cheapest unit of alcohol available across all retailers increased from £0.29 to £0.33 and in shops that participated in Reducing the Strength it rose from £0.33 to £0.43. The project received a mixed response from retailers. Retailers said they participated to deter disruptive customers, reduce neighbourhood disruptions and to maintain a good relationship with the local authority. Reducing the Strength participants and non-participants expressed concern about its perceived financial impact due to customers shopping elsewhere for super-strength. Some felt that customers' ability to circumvent the intervention would limit its effectiveness and that a larger scale compulsory approach would be more effective. Reducing the Strength can achieve high rates of voluntary compliance, reduce availability of super-strength and raise the price of the cheapest available unit of alcohol in participating shops. Questions remain over the extent to which voluntary interventions of this type can achieve wider social or health goals if non-participating shops attract customers from those who participate.

  11. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  12. An Orally Available Small-Molecule Inhibitor of c-Met, PF-2341066, Reduces Tumor Burden and Metastasis in a Preclinical Model of Ovarian Cancer Metastasis1

    PubMed Central

    Zillhardt, Marion; Christensen, James G; Lengyel, Ernst

    2010-01-01

    Deregulated expression of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor, c-Met, in cancer contributes to tumor progression and metastasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether blocking c-Met with an orally available c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, reduces tumor burden and increases survival in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer metastasis. Treatment of mice injected interperitoneally with SKOV3ip1 cells showed reduced overall tumor burden. Tumor weight and the number of metastases were reduced by 55% (P < .0005) and 62% (P < .0001), respectively. Treatment also increased median survival from 45 to 62 days (P = .0003). In vitro, PF-2341066 reduced HGF-stimulated phosphorylation of c-Met in the tyrosine kinase domain as well as phosphorylation of the downstream signaling effectors, Akt and Erk. It was apparent that inhibition of the pathways was functionally important because HGF-induced branching morphogenesis was also inhibited. In addition, proliferation and adhesion to various extracellular matrices were inhibited by treatment with PF-2341066, and the activity of matrix metalloproteinases was decreased in tumor tissue from treated mice compared with those receiving vehicle. Overall, these data indicate that PF-2341066 effectively reduces tumor burden in an in vivo model of ovarian cancer metastasis and may be a good therapeutic candidate in the treatment of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:20072648

  13. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I Demonstruation Plant, Newman, Kentucky. Appendix B. Best available control technology (BACT) proposals. [Demonstration plant at Newman, KY

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-21

    The best available control technology (BACT) proposals for the following areas of the SRC-I demonstration plant are described: coal preparation and handling, SRC process and deashing, coke and liquid fuels (control of particles and hydrocarbon vapors), cryogenic systems and fuel gas purification (including sulfur recovery system and venting of gaseous wastes). (LTN)

  14. The use of composite materials increase the availability of oil and gas and reduce the cost of drilling and production operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, James C.

    2007-04-01

    Recognizing the potential benefits, the oil exploration and production industry began to experiment with the field use of composite materials in the last half of the 1900's. Gradually, the inherent reluctance to move "unproven materials" into full operational applications is being overcome. Now, the increased price of crude and the need to locate and produce more oil and gas and to reduce associated costs are forcing an accelerated acceptance and use of composite materials in these operations. As a result, the cost of building, servicing, and maintaining drilling rigs and pipe lines is being reduced. "Thought to be depleted" oil and gas deposits are being revitalized. Technology currently in development and/or in the process of field trial demonstration are showing promise to provide enabling capability for obtaining greater reach in both extended reach and deep water drilling. Smart drill pipes and coiled tubing, able to provide both real-time communication from well head to drill bit and to similarly provide down hole power, have been demonstrated. This paper presents a summary of the current state of the use of composites in the Oil Patch and discusses areas of technology development which must be brought to fruition in order for the oil industry the reap full benefit, such as has been accomplished by the aerospace industry.

  15. Development of in vitro models to demonstrate the ability of PecSys®, an in situ nasal gelling technology, to reduce nasal run-off and drip.

    PubMed

    Castile, Jonathan; Cheng, Yu-Hui; Simmons, Ben; Perelman, Michael; Smith, Alan; Watts, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Many of the increasing number of intranasal products available for either local or systemic action can be considered sub-optimal, most notably where nasal drip or run-off give rise to discomfort/tolerability issues or reduced/variable efficacy. PecSys, an in situ gelling technology, contains low methoxy (LM) pectin which gels due to interaction with calcium ions present in nasal fluid. PecSys is designed to spray readily, only forming a gel on contact with the mucosal surface. The present study employed two in vitro models to confirm that gelling translates into a reduced potential for drip/run-off: (i) Using an inclined TLC plate treated with a simulated nasal electrolyte solution (SNES), mean drip length [±SD, n = 10] was consistently much shorter for PecSys (1.5 ± 0.4 cm) than non-gelling control (5.8 ± 1.6 cm); (ii) When PecSys was sprayed into a human nasal cavity cast model coated with a substrate containing a physiologically relevant concentration of calcium, PecSys solution was retained at the site of initial deposition with minimal redistribution, and no evidence of run-off/drip anteriorly or down the throat. In contrast, non-gelling control was significantly more mobile and consistently redistributed with run-off towards the throat. In both models PecSys significantly reduced the potential for run-off/drip ensuring that more solution remained at the deposition site. In vivo, this enhancement of retention will provide optimum patient acceptability, modulate drug absorption and maximize the ability of drugs to be absorbed across the nasal mucosa and thus reduce variability in drug delivery.

  16. Development of in vitro models to demonstrate the ability of PecSys®, an in situ nasal gelling technology, to reduce nasal run-off and drip

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many of the increasing number of intranasal products available for either local or systemic action can be considered sub-optimal, most notably where nasal drip or run-off give rise to discomfort/tolerability issues or reduced/variable efficacy. PecSys, an in situ gelling technology, contains low methoxy (LM) pectin which gels due to interaction with calcium ions present in nasal fluid. PecSys is designed to spray readily, only forming a gel on contact with the mucosal surface. The present study employed two in vitro models to confirm that gelling translates into a reduced potential for drip/run-off: (i) Using an inclined TLC plate treated with a simulated nasal electrolyte solution (SNES), mean drip length [±SD, n = 10] was consistently much shorter for PecSys (1.5 ± 0.4 cm) than non-gelling control (5.8 ± 1.6 cm); (ii) When PecSys was sprayed into a human nasal cavity cast model coated with a substrate containing a physiologically relevant concentration of calcium, PecSys solution was retained at the site of initial deposition with minimal redistribution, and no evidence of run-off/drip anteriorly or down the throat. In contrast, non-gelling control was significantly more mobile and consistently redistributed with run-off towards the throat. Conclusion In both models PecSys significantly reduced the potential for run-off/drip ensuring that more solution remained at the deposition site. In vivo, this enhancement of retention will provide optimum patient acceptability, modulate drug absorption and maximize the ability of drugs to be absorbed across the nasal mucosa and thus reduce variability in drug delivery. PMID:22803832

  17. Demonstration and analysis of reduced reverse-bias leakage current via design of nitride semiconductor heterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Yu, E. T.

    2006-01-01

    An approach for reducing reverse-bias leakage currents in Schottky contacts formed to nitride semiconductor heterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is described, demonstrated, and analyzed. By incorporation of a GaN cap layer atop a conventional AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistor epitaxial layer structure, the direction of the electric field at the metal-semiconductor interface of a Schottky contact is reversed, resulting in a suppression of electron flow into conductive screw dislocations that are known to dominate reverse-bias leakage currents in nitride semiconductors grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Analysis of temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics indicates that, in structures incorporating a GaN cap layer, reverse-bias leakage currents are reduced by one to three orders of magnitude, with the mechanism for leakage current flow differing from that established previously for the more conventional structure due to the alteration in the electric field at the metal-semiconductor interface. Scanned probe measurements of local, nanoscale current distributions confirm directly that current flow via conductive dislocations is suppressed in structures incorporating the GaN cap layer.

  18. Usability testing, initial implementation, and formative evaluation of an evidence-based intervention: lessons from a demonstration project to reduce long-term foster care.

    PubMed

    Akin, Becci A; Bryson, Stephanie A; Testa, Mark F; Blase, Karen A; McDonald, Tom; Melz, Heidi

    2013-12-01

    The field of child welfare faces an undersupply of evidence-based interventions to address long-term foster care. The Permanency Innovations Initiative is a five-year federal demonstration project intended to generate evidence to reduce long stays in foster care for those youth who encounter the most substantial barriers to permanency. This article describes a systematic and staged approach to implementation and evaluation of a PII project that included usability testing as one of its key activities. Usability testing is an industry-derived practice which analyzes early implementation processes and evaluation procedures before they are finalized. This article describes the iterative selection, testing, and analysis of nine usability metrics that were designed to assess three important constructs of the project's initial implementation and evaluation: intervening early, obtaining consent, and engaging parents. Results showed that seven of nine metrics met a predetermined target. This study demonstrates how findings from usability testing influenced the initial implementation and formative evaluation of an evidence-supported intervention. Implications are discussed for usability testing as a quality improvement cycle that may contribute to better operationalized interventions and more reliable, valid, and replicable evidence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reducing Child Maltreatment by Making Parenting Programs Available to All Parents: A Case Example Using the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program.

    PubMed

    Pickering, John A; Sanders, Matthew R

    2016-10-01

    Preventing the maltreatment of children is a major public health challenge. Using the Triple P-Positive Parenting program as an example, this article makes the case that strengthening parenting and family relationships at a population level is a potentially powerful means of taking on this challenge. We focus on the value of making parenting programs available to all parents in the community. We conclude by examining the key ingredients required to make a population-level parenting approach to reducing child maltreatment work. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Reduced availability of voltage-gated sodium channels by depolarization or blockade by tetrodotoxin boosts burst firing and catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H F; Ottaviani, Matteo M; Legros, Christian; Lefort, Claudie; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Allio, Arianna; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Action potential (AP) firing in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) is mainly sustained by Cav1.3 L-type channels that drive BK and SK currents and regulate the pacemaking cycle. As secretory units, CCs optimally recruit Ca2+ channels when stimulated, a process potentially dependent on the modulation of the AP waveform. Our previous work has shown that a critical determinant of AP shape is voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) channel availability. Here, we studied the contribution of Nav channels to firing patterns and AP shapes at rest (−50 mV) and upon stimulation (−40 mV). Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we show that MCCs mainly express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, fast-inactivating Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels that carry little or no Na+ current during slow ramp depolarizations. Time constants and the percentage of recovery from fast inactivation and slow entry into closed-state inactivation are similar to that of brain Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels. The fraction of available Nav channels is reduced by half after 10 mV depolarization from −50 to −40 mV. This leads to low amplitude spikes and a reduction in repolarizing K+ currents inverting the net current from outward to inward during the after-hyperpolarization. When Nav channel availability is reduced by up to 20% of total, either by TTX block or steady depolarization, a switch from tonic to burst firing is observed. The spontaneous occurrence of high frequency bursts is rare under control conditions (14% of cells) but leads to major Ca2+-entry and increased catecholamine release. Thus, Nav1.3/Nav1.7 channel availability sets the AP shape, burst-firing initiation and regulates catecholamine secretion in MCCs. Nav channel inactivation becomes important during periods of high activity, mimicking stress responses. PMID:25620605

  1. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Venisse, Nicolas; Boulamery, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are major antibiotics indicated for the treatment of infection with gram-negative bacilli. They are characterized by high clinical effectiveness but their main drawback is the occurrence of toxicity in a significant number of patients. Pharmacokinetic parameters of aminoglycosides exhibit wide inter-individual variability and the relationships between concentration and effect have been clearly demonstrated. Consistent studies have demonstrated that therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of aminoglycosides administered in multiple daily doses was cost-effective in maximising antibiotic efficacy and/or reducing incidence of toxicity. Therefore TDM of aminoglycosides should be considered "essential". Level of evidence for TDM of aminoglycosides administered once daily is not so clearly demonstrated however it should be highly recommended.

  2. Response of Wolfiporia cocos to iron availability: alterations in growth, expression of cellular proteins, Fe3+-reducing activity and Fe3+-chelators production.

    PubMed

    Arantes, V; Milagres, A M F

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of the brown-rot fungus Wolfiporia cocos under differential iron availability. W. cocos was grown under three differential iron conditions. Growth, catecholate and hydroxamate production, and mycelial and extracellular Fe3+-reducing activities were determined. Iron starvation slowed fungal growth and accelerated pH decline. Some mycelial proteins of low molecular weight were repressed under iron restriction, whereas others of high molecular weight showed positive iron regulation. Mycelial ferrireductase activity decreased as culture aged, while Fe3+-reducing activity of low molecular reductants constantly increased. Hydroxamates production suffered only limited iron repression, whereas catecholates production showed to be more iron repressible. W. cocos seems to possess more than one type of iron acquisition mechanism; one involving secretion of organic acids and ferrireductases and/or extracellular reductants, and another relying on secretion of catecholates and hydroxamates chelators. This paper is the first to report the kinetic study of brown-rot fungus grown under differential iron availability, and the information provided here contributes to address more traditional problems in protecting wood from brown decay, and also makes a contribution in the general area of the physiology of brown-rot fungi.

  3. Use of illite clay for in situ remediation of 137Cs-contaminated water bodies: field demonstration of reduced biological uptake.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Thomas G; Kaplan, Daniel I; Knox, Anna S; Coughlin, Daniel P; Nascimento, Rebecca V; Watson, Siobahn I; Fletcher, Dean E; Koot, Bon-Jun

    2006-07-15

    We hypothesized that adding micaceous minerals to 137Cs-contaminated aquatic systems would serve as an effective in situ remediation technique by sequestering the contaminant and reducing its bioavailability. Results from several laboratory studies are presented from which an effective amendment material was chosen for a replicated field study. The field study was conducted over a 2-year period and incorporated 16 3.3-m diameter column-plots (limnocorrals) that were randomly placed in a 137Cs-contaminated pond. The limnocorrals received three rates of amendment treatments to their water surfaces. The amendment material was a commercially available mineral with high sorption (Kd > 9000 L kg(-1)) and low desorption (<20%) characteristics for cesium, even in the presence of high concentrations of the competing cation, NH4+. In the treated limnocorrals, 137Cs concentrations were reduced some 25-30-fold in the water, 4-5-fold in aquatic plants, and 2-3-fold in fish. The addition of the amendment did not adversely affect water chemistry, although increased turbidity and subsequent siltation did alter the aquatic macroinvertebrate insect community. This in situ technology provides a valuable, less-environmentally intrusive alternative to costly ex situ technologies that require the contaminated sediment to be excavated prior to treatment, or excavated and disposed of elsewhere.

  4. Experimental demonstration of low-complexity fiber chromatic dispersion mitigation for reduced guard-interval OFDM coherent optical communication systems based on digital spectrum sub-band multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Malekiha, Mahdi; Tselniker, Igor; Nazarathy, Moshe; Tolmachev, Alex; Plant, David V

    2015-10-05

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel digital signal processing (DSP) structure for reduced guard-interval (RGI) OFDM coherent optical systems. The proposed concept is based on digitally slicing optical channel bandwidth into multiple spectrally disjoint sub-bands which are then processed in parallel. Each low bandwidth sub-band has a smaller delay-spread compared to a full-band signal. This enables compensation of both chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion using a simple timing and one-tap-per-symbol frequency domain equalizer with a small cyclic prefix overhead. In terms of the DSP architecture, this allows for a highly efficient parallelization of DSP tasks performed over the received signal samples by deploying multiple processors running at a lower clock rate. It should be noted that this parallelization is performed in the frequency domain and it allows for flexible optical transceiver schemes. In addition, the resulting optical receiver is simplified due to the removal of the CD compensation equalizer compared to conventional RGI-OFDM systems. In this paper we experimentally demonstrate digital sub-banding of optical bandwidth. We test the system performance for different modulation formats (QPSK, 16QAM and 32QAM) over various transmission distances and optical launch powers using a 1.5% CP overhead in all scenarios. We also compare the proposed RGI-OFDM architecture performance against common single carrier modulation formats. At the same total data rate and signal bandwidth both systems have similar performance and transmission reach whereas the proposed method allows for a significant reduction of computational complexity due to removal of CD pre/post compensation equalizer.

  5. A 28-day rat inhalation study with an integrated molecular toxicology endpoint demonstrates reduced exposure effects for a prototypic modified risk tobacco product compared with conventional cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Kogel, Ulrike; Schlage, Walter K; Martin, Florian; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Leroy, Patrice; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Gebel, Stephan; Buettner, Ansgar; Wyss, Christoph; Esposito, Marco; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-06-01

    Towards a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, we investigated molecular perturbations accompanying histopathological changes in a 28-day rat inhalation study combining transcriptomics with classical histopathology. We demonstrated reduced biological activity of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP) compared with the reference research cigarette 3R4F. Rats were exposed to filtered air or to three concentrations of mainstream smoke (MS) from 3R4F, or to a high concentration of MS from a pMRTP. Histopathology revealed concentration-dependent changes in response to 3R4F that were irritative stress-related in nasal and bronchial epithelium, and inflammation-related in the lung parenchyma. For pMRTP, significant changes were seen in the nasal epithelium only. Transcriptomics data were obtained from nasal and bronchial epithelium and lung parenchyma. Concentration-dependent gene expression changes were observed following 3R4F exposure, with much smaller changes for pMRTP. A computational-modeling approach based on causal models of tissue-specific biological networks identified cell stress, inflammation, proliferation, and senescence as the most perturbed molecular mechanisms. These perturbations correlated with histopathological observations. Only weak perturbations were observed for pMRTP. In conclusion, a correlative evaluation of classical histopathology together with gene expression-based computational network models may facilitate a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, as shown for a pMRTP.

  6. Highly Ordered Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide Based Polymer Nanocomposites: Promise and Limits for Dynamic Impacts Demonstrated in Model Organic Coatings.

    PubMed

    Schmelter, Dirk; Hintze-Bruening, Horst

    2016-06-29

    Graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in water has been combined with a mixture of aqueous polymer dispersions and melamine formaldehyde resin (MF). Stable low viscous fluids with no obvious signs of mesoscale ordering at 0.3 wt % yield transparent films with GO loadings up to one weight percent in the form of homogeneously aligned double strands, each comprising few individual layers of the carbon allotrope. While baking of the films at 160 °C results in minor thermal reduction of GO, in situ reduction with excess hydroxylamine (HA) in the presence of the polymer colloids yields stable dispersions in which amphiphilic graphene like flakes temporarily encapsulate gaseous reaction products. Depending on the parameters in the time-temperature domain, the hollow spheres may be transferred into solid material or disassemble during film formation, the latter case providing black, smooth, and transparent films with up to eight magnitudes increased electrical conductivity and an oxygen permeability 30-fold higher compared to the neat polymer matrix. In contrast, GO reduces oxygen permeability by that factor, while water permeability stays unchanged. Thermo-mechanical measurements reveal matrix stiffening by the platelets as well as by HA, the latter via modifying the MF reactivity. Excellent stone chip resistance and ballistic impact tests demonstrate efficient energy dissipation and crack deflection provided by the laminate like morphology of GO based composite. On the contrary, the same material only provides moderate substrate protection in rain erosion tests.

  7. Clinical comparison of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh vs a commercially available fluoride breath-freshening toothpaste in reducing breath odor overnight: a multiple-use study.

    PubMed

    Niles, Hollandra P; Hunter, Catherine M; Vazquez, Joe; Williams, Malcolm I; Cummins, Diane

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this randomized, crossover study was to compare the effectiveness of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh toothpaste to a commercially available breath-freshening dentifrice containing fluoride for its ability to reduce volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) responsible for breath odor overnight. The study followed a two-treatment, two-period crossover design. Subjects were given a test product, along with a soft-bristled toothbrush, and instructed to brush their teeth for 1 minute, twice daily (once in the morning and the evening) using the assigned dentifrice for 7 consecutive days. After their evening brushing on the seventh day, subjects reported to the testing facility without oral hygiene, eating, or drinking for the overnight evaluation. After a washout period, subjects repeated the same regimen, now using the other test product. The levels of breath VSC were evaluated instrumentally using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector.

  8. Rising CO2 from historical concentrations enhances the physiological performance of Brassica napus seedlings under optimal water supply but not under reduced water availability.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Michele; Grove, Ivan G; Hare, Martin C; Kettlewell, Peter S; Fiorani, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    The productivity of many important crops is significantly threatened by water shortage, and the elevated atmospheric CO2 can significantly interact with physiological processes and crop responses to drought. We examined the effects of three different CO2 concentrations (historical ~300 ppm, ambient ~400 ppm and elevated ~700 ppm) on physiological traits of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) seedlings subjected to well-watered and reduced water availability. Our data show (1) that, as expected, increasing CO2 level positively modulates leaf photosynthetic traits, leaf water-use efficiency and growth under non-stressed conditions, although a pronounced acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO2 occurred; (2) that the predicted elevated CO2 concentration does not reduce total evapotranspiration under drought when compared with present (400 ppm) and historical (300 ppm) concentrations because of a larger leaf area that does not buffer transpiration; and (3) that accordingly, the physiological traits analysed decreased similarly under stress for all CO2 concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that increasing CO2 concentrations may not significantly counteract the negative effect of increasing drought intensity on Brassica napus performance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  13. Studying the effectiveness of activated carbon R95 respirators in reducing the inhalation of combustion by-products in Hanoi, Vietnam: a demonstration study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Urban air pollution is an increasing health problem, particularly in Asia, where the combustion of fossil fuels has increased rapidly as a result of industrialization and socio-economic development. The adverse health impacts of urban air pollution are well established, but less is known about effective intervention strategies. In this demonstration study we set out to establish methods to assess whether wearing an R95 activated carbon respirator could reduce intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in street workers in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods In this demonstration study we performed a cross-over study in which non-smoking participants that worked at least 4 hours per day on the street in Hanoi were randomly allocated to specific respirator wearing sequences for a duration of 2 weeks. Urines were collected after each period, i.e. twice per week, at the end of the working day to measure hydroxy PAHs (OH-PAH) using gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. The primary endpoint was the urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP). Results Forty-four participants (54.5% male, median age 40 years) were enrolled with the majority being motorbike taxi drivers (38.6%) or street vendors (34.1%). The baseline creatinine corrected urinary level for 1-OHP was much higher than other international comparisons: 1020 ng/g creatinine (IQR: 604–1551). Wearing a R95 mask had no significant effect on 1-OHP levels: estimated multiplicative effect 1.0 (95% CI: 0.92-1.09) or other OH-PAHs, except 1-hydroxynaphthalene (1-OHN): 0.86 (95% CI: 0.11-0.96). Conclusions High levels of urine OH-PAHs were found in Hanoi street workers. No effect was seen on urine OH-PAH levels by wearing R95 particulate respirators in an area of high urban air pollution, except for 1-OHN. A lack of effect may be de to gaseous phase PAHs that were not filtered efficiently by the respirator. The high levels of urinary OH-PAHs found, urges for effective interventions. Trial

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  17. Novel orally available salvinorin A analog PR-38 inhibits gastrointestinal motility and reduces abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sałaga, M; Polepally, P R; Sobczak, M; Grzywacz, D; Kamysz, W; Sibaev, A; Storr, M; Do Rego, J C; Zjawiony, J K; Fichna, J

    2014-07-01

    The opioid and cannabinoid systems play a crucial role in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Selective opioid as well as cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists exert a potent inhibitory action on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and pain. In this study, we examined (in vitro and in vivo) whether PR-38 (2-O-cinnamoylsalvinorin B), a novel analog of salvinorin A, can interact with both systems and demonstrate therapeutic effects. We used mouse models of hypermotility, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We also assessed the influence of PR-38 on the central nervous system by measurement of motoric parameters and exploratory behaviors in mice. Subsequently, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of PR-38 in mouse blood samples after intraperitoneal and oral administration. PR-38 significantly inhibited mouse colonic motility in vitro and in vivo. Administration of PR-38 significantly prolonged the whole GI transit time, and this effect was mediated by µ- and κ-opioid receptors and the CB1 receptor. PR-38 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking functional GI disorders. These data expand our understanding of the interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems and their functions in the GI tract. We also provide a novel framework for the development of future potential treatments of functional GI disorders.

  18. BL-7010 Demonstrates Specific Binding to Gliadin and Reduces Gluten-Associated Pathology in a Chronic Mouse Model of Gliadin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    McCarville, Justin L.; Nisemblat, Yotam; Galipeau, Heather J.; Jury, Jennifer; Tabakman, Rinat; Cohen, Ad; Naftali, Esmira; Neiman, Bela; Halbfinger, Efrat; Murray, Joseph A.; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Varvak, Alexander; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Verdu, Elena F.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder in individuals that carry DQ2 or DQ8 MHC class II haplotypes, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. There is no current treatment other than a gluten-free diet (GFD). We have previously shown that the BL-7010 copolymer poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-styrene sulfonate) (P(HEMA-co-SS)) binds with higher efficiency to gliadin than to other proteins present in the small intestine, ameliorating gliadin-induced pathology in the HLA-HCD4/DQ8 model of gluten sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of two batches of BL-7010 to interact with gliadin, essential vitamins and digestive enzymes not previously tested, and to assess the ability of the copolymer to reduce gluten-associated pathology using the NOD-DQ8 mouse model, which exhibits more significant small intestinal damage when challenged with gluten than HCD4/DQ8 mice. In addition, the safety and systemic exposure of BL-7010 was evaluated in vivo (in rats) and in vitro (genetic toxicity studies). In vitro binding data showed that BL-7010 interacted with high affinity with gliadin and that BL-7010 had no interaction with the tested vitamins and digestive enzymes. BL-7010 was effective at preventing gluten-induced decreases in villus-to-crypt ratios, intraepithelial lymphocytosis and alterations in paracellular permeability and putative anion transporter-1 mRNA expression in the small intestine. In rats, BL-7010 was well-tolerated and safe following 14 days of daily repeated administration of 3000 mg/kg. BL-7010 did not exhibit any mutagenic effect in the genetic toxicity studies. Using complementary animal models and chronic gluten exposure the results demonstrate that administration of BL-7010 is effective and safe and that it is able to decrease pathology associated with gliadin sensitization warranting the progression to Phase I trials in humans. PMID:25365555

  19. School-Level Practices to Increase Availability of Fruits, Vegetables, and Whole Grains, and Reduce Sodium in School Meals - United States, 2000, 2006, and 2014.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Caitlin; Brener, Nancy; Kann, Laura; McManus, Tim; Harris, Diane; Mugavero, Kristy

    2015-08-28

    Students consume up to half of their daily calories at school, often through the federal school meal programs (e.g., National School Lunch Program) administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In 2012, USDA published new required nutrition standards for school meals.* These standards were the first major revision to the school meal programs in >15 years and reflect current national dietary guidance and Institute of Medicine recommendations to meet students' nutrition needs. The standards require serving more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and gradually reducing sodium content over 10 years. To examine the prevalence of school-level practices related to implementation of the nutrition standards, CDC analyzed data from the 2000, 2006, and 2014 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS) on school nutrition services practices related to fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and sodium. Almost all schools offered whole grain foods each day for breakfast and lunch, and most offered two or more vegetables and two or more fruits each day for lunch. The percentage of schools implementing practices to increase availability of fruits and vegetables and decrease sodium content in school meals increased from 2000-2014. However, opportunities exist to increase the percentage of schools nationwide implementing these practices.

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  1. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  4. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  9. Spatial impacts of inorganic ligand availability and localized microbial community structure on mitigation of zinc laden mine water in sulfate-reducing bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Dina M; Almstrand, Robert; Ladderud, Jeffrey; Lee, Ilsu; Landkamer, Lee; Figueroa, Linda; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2017-05-15

    Sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs) represent a passive, sustainable, and long-term option for mitigating mining influenced water (MIW) during release. Here we investigate spatial zinc precipitation profiles as influenced by substrate differentiation, inorganic ligand availability (inorganic carbon and sulfide), and microbial community structure in pilot-scale SRBR columns fed with sulfate and zinc-rich MIW. Through a combination of aqueous sampling, geochemical digests, electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, we were able to delineate zones of enhanced zinc removal, identify precipitates of varying stability, and discern the temporal and spatial evolution of zinc, sulfur, and calcium associations. These geochemical insights revealed spatially variable immobilization regimes between SRBR columns that could be further contrasted as a function of labile (alfalfa-dominated) versus recalcitrant (woodchip-dominated) solid-phase substrate content. Both column subsets exhibited initial zinc removal as carbonates; however precipitation in association with labile substrates was more pronounced and dominated by metal-sulfide formation in the upper portions of the down flow columns with micrographs visually suggestive of sphalerite (ZnS). In contrast, a more diffuse and lower mass of zinc precipitation in the presence of gypsum-like precipitates occurred within the more recalcitrant column systems. While removal and sulfide-associated precipitation were spatially variable, whole bacterial community structure (ANOSIM) and diversity estimates were comparatively homogeneous. However, two phyla exhibited a potentially selective relationship with a significant positive correlation between the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes and sulfide-bound zinc. Collectively these biogeochemical insights indicate that depths of maximal zinc sulfide precipitation are temporally dynamic, influenced by substrate composition and broaden our understanding of bio

  10. Excess lipid availability increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity in muscle: evidence against a role for reduced fatty acid oxidation in lipid-induced insulin resistance in rodents.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Bruce, Clinton R; Beale, Susan M; Hoehn, Kyle L; So, Trina; Rolph, Michael S; Cooney, Gregory J

    2007-08-01

    A reduced capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle has been proposed as a major factor leading to the accumulation of intramuscular lipids and their subsequent deleterious effects on insulin action. Here, we examine markers of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity in rodent models of insulin resistance associated with an oversupply of lipids. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet for either 5 or 20 weeks. Several markers of muscle mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity were measured, including (14)C-palmitate oxidation, palmitoyl-CoA oxidation in isolated mitochondria, oxidative enzyme activity (citrate synthase, beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1), and expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism. Enzyme activity and mitochondrial protein expression were also examined in muscle from other rodent models of insulin resistance. Compared with standard diet-fed controls, muscle from fat-fed mice displayed elevated palmitate oxidation rate (5 weeks +23%, P < 0.05, and 20 weeks +29%, P < 0.05) and increased palmitoyl-CoA oxidation in isolated mitochondria (20 weeks +49%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, oxidative enzyme activity and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha, uncoupling protein (UCP) 3, and mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits were significantly elevated in fat-fed animals. A similar pattern was present in muscle of fat-fed rats, obese Zucker rats, and db/db mice, with increases observed for oxidative enzyme activity and expression of PGC-1alpha, UCP3, and subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. These findings suggest that high lipid availability does not lead to intramuscular lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in rodents by decreasing muscle mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity.

  11. Suppressed Fat Appetite after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Associates with Reduced Brain μ-opioid Receptor Availability in Diet-Induced Obese Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Patt, Marianne; Patt, Jörg T W; Becker, Georg A; Rullmann, Michael; Kranz, Mathias; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Schischke, Kristin; Seyfried, Florian; Brust, Peter; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Krügel, Ute; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2016-01-01

    Brain μ-opioid receptors (MORs) stimulate high-fat (HF) feeding and have been implicated in the distinct long term outcomes on body weight of bariatric surgery and dieting. Whether alterations in fat appetite specifically following these disparate weight loss interventions relate to changes in brain MOR signaling is unknown. To address this issue, diet-induced obese male rats underwent either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sham surgeries. Postoperatively, animals were placed on a two-choice diet consisting of low-fat (LF) and HF food and sham-operated rats were further split into ad libitum fed (Sham-LF/HF) and body weight-matched (Sham-BWM) to RYGB groups. An additional set of sham-operated rats always only on a LF diet (Sham-LF) served as lean controls, making four experimental groups in total. Corresponding to a stage of weight loss maintenance for RYGB rats, two-bottle fat preference tests in conjunction with small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies with the selective MOR radioligand [(11)C]carfentanil were performed. Brains were subsequently collected and MOR protein levels in the hypothalamus, striatum, prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex were analyzed by Western Blot. We found that only the RYGB group presented with intervention-specific changes: having markedly suppressed intake and preference for high concentration fat emulsions, a widespread reduction in [(11)C]carfentanil binding potential (reflecting MOR availability) in various brain regions, and a downregulation of striatal and prefrontal MOR protein levels compared to the remaining groups. These findings suggest that the suppressed fat appetite caused by RYGB surgery is due to reduced brain MOR signaling, which may contribute to sustained weight loss unlike the case for dieting.

  12. Suppressed Fat Appetite after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Associates with Reduced Brain μ-opioid Receptor Availability in Diet-Induced Obese Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hankir, Mohammed K.; Patt, Marianne; Patt, Jörg T. W.; Becker, Georg A.; Rullmann, Michael; Kranz, Mathias; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Schischke, Kristin; Seyfried, Florian; Brust, Peter; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Krügel, Ute; Fenske, Wiebke K.

    2017-01-01

    Brain μ-opioid receptors (MORs) stimulate high-fat (HF) feeding and have been implicated in the distinct long term outcomes on body weight of bariatric surgery and dieting. Whether alterations in fat appetite specifically following these disparate weight loss interventions relate to changes in brain MOR signaling is unknown. To address this issue, diet-induced obese male rats underwent either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sham surgeries. Postoperatively, animals were placed on a two-choice diet consisting of low-fat (LF) and HF food and sham-operated rats were further split into ad libitum fed (Sham-LF/HF) and body weight-matched (Sham-BWM) to RYGB groups. An additional set of sham-operated rats always only on a LF diet (Sham-LF) served as lean controls, making four experimental groups in total. Corresponding to a stage of weight loss maintenance for RYGB rats, two-bottle fat preference tests in conjunction with small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies with the selective MOR radioligand [11C]carfentanil were performed. Brains were subsequently collected and MOR protein levels in the hypothalamus, striatum, prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex were analyzed by Western Blot. We found that only the RYGB group presented with intervention-specific changes: having markedly suppressed intake and preference for high concentration fat emulsions, a widespread reduction in [11C]carfentanil binding potential (reflecting MOR availability) in various brain regions, and a downregulation of striatal and prefrontal MOR protein levels compared to the remaining groups. These findings suggest that the suppressed fat appetite caused by RYGB surgery is due to reduced brain MOR signaling, which may contribute to sustained weight loss unlike the case for dieting. PMID:28133443

  13. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  14. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student…

  16. Randomized ICU Trials Do Not Demonstrate an Association Between Interventions That Reduce Delirium Duration and Short-Term Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S.; Balk, Ethan M.; Fraser, Gilles L.; Skrobik, Yoanna; Riker, Richard R.; Kress, John P.; Whitehead, Shawn; Devlin, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions that reduce delirium duration may also lower short-term mortality. We reviewed randomized trials of adult ICU patients of interventions hypothesized to reduce delirium burden to determine whether interventions that are more effective at reducing delirium duration are associated with a reduction in short-term mortality. Search Methods We searched CINHAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases from 2001 through 2012. Citations were screened for randomized trials that enrolled critically ill adults, evaluated delirium at least daily, compared a drug or non-drug intervention hypothesized to reduce delirium burden with standard care (or control), and reported delirium duration and/or short-term mortality (≤45 days). In duplicate, we abstracted trial characteristics and results and evaluated quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We performed random effects model meta-analyses and meta-regressions. Results We included 17 trials enrolling 2,849 patients which evaluated a pharmacologic intervention (n=13) [dexmedetomidine (n=6); an antipsychotic (n=4); rivastigmine (n=2); and clonidine (n=1)], a multimodal intervention (n=2) [spontaneous-awakening (n=2)]; or a non-pharmacologic intervention (n=2) [early mobilization (n=1); increased perfusion (n=1)]. Overall, average delirium duration was lower in the intervention groups [difference = −0.64 days; 95% CI, −1.15 to −0.13; P = 0.01) being reduced by ≥3 days in 3 studies, 0.1 to < 3 days in 6 studies, 0 days in 7 studies and < 0 days in 1. Across interventions, for 13 studies where short-term mortality was reported, short-term mortality was not reduced (risk ratio = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.06; P = 0.19). Across 13 studies that reported mortality, meta-regression revealed that delirium duration was not associated with reduced short-term mortality (P = 0.11). Conclusions A review of current evidence fails to support that ICU interventions that reduce delirium duration reduce short

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  12. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  17. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  19. The ability of winter grazing to reduce wildfire size, intensity, and fire-induced plant mortality was not demonstrated: A comment on Davies et al. (2015)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recent study by Davies et al. sought to test whether winter grazing could reduce wildfire size, fire behavior metrics, and fire-induced plant mortality in shrub-grasslands. The authors concluded that ungrazed rangelands may experience more fire-induced mortality of native peren...

  20. The ability of winter grazing to reduce wildfire size, intensity, and fire-induced plant mortality was not demonstrated: a comment on Davies et al. (2015)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent study by Davies et al. sought to test whether winter grazing could reduce wildfire size, fire behavior and intensity metrics, and fire-induced plant mortality in shrub-grasslands. The authors concluded that ungrazed rangelands may experience fire-induced mortality of native perennial bunchg...

  1. The ability of winter grazing to reduce wildfire size, intensity, and fire-induced plant mortality was not demonstrated: A comment on Davies et al. (2015)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recent study by Davies et al. sought to test whether winter grazing could reduce wildfire size, fire behavior metrics, and fire-induced plant mortality in shrub-grasslands. The authors concluded that ungrazed rangelands may experience more fire-induced mortality of native peren...

  2. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Chevreuil, Claire; Polard, Elisabeth; Lemonnier, Eric; Guillemot, Paul; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Aripiprazole inaugurates a new generation of antipsychotics called dopamine-serotonin system stabilizers. Its mechanism of action is different as aripiprazole is a partial dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Therefore, aripiprazole is thought to have an antagonistic action in the mesolimbic pathway but an agonistic action in the mesocortical pathway, tending to normalize the dopaminergic transmission regardless of the type of imbalance. Clinical trials involving children and adolescents have demonstrated the efficacy of aripiprazole in bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, mood disorders associated with pervasive developmental disorders, in tics and Tourette's. The most frequent side effects are extrapyramidal symptoms and sleepiness and are dose-dependant. Nevertheless, contrary to other second-generation antipsychotics available in France, it induces little weight gain, does not modify lipid and glucidic profiles, does not increase prolactin levels, or induce QTc lengthening. The main advantage of aripiprazole is its good safety profile, with different toxicity targets to other secondgeneration antipsychotics available in France. Aripiprazole appears to be an alternative for children and adolescents who are vulnerable to these side effects and are having trouble coping with them.

  3. Compare the effcacy of two commercially available mouthrinses in reducing viable bacterial count in dental aerosol produced during ultrasonic scaling when used as a preprocedural rinse.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shamila K; Sharath, Karanth; Shenoy, Santhosh; Sreekumar, Chandini; Shetty, Rashmi N; Biju, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the effcacy of preprocedural mouthrinses (chlorhexidine digluconate and tea tree oil) in reducing microbial content of aerosol product during ultrasonic scaling procedures by viable bacterial count. It was a randomized single blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study. Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to rinse 10 ml of any one of the mouthrinses (chlorhexidine digluconate or tea tree oil or distilled water). Ultrasonic scaling was done for a period of 10 minutes in presence of trypticase soy agar plates placed at standardized distance. Plates were then sent for microbiological evaluation for the aerosol produced. This study showed that all the antiseptic mouthwashes signifcantly reduced the bacterial colony forming units (CFUs) in aerosol samples. Chlorhexidine rinses were found to be superior to tea tree when used preprocedurally in reducing aerolized bacteria. This study advocates preprocedural dural rinsing with an effective antimicrobial mouthrinse during any dental treatment which generates aerosols, reduces the risk of cross-contamination with infectious agents in the dental operatory. The aerolization of oral microbes occurring during dental procedures can potentially result in cross-contamination in the dental operatory and transmission of infectious agents to both dental professionals and patient. It is reasonable to assume therefore, that any stratagem for reducing the viable bacterial content of these aerosols could lower the risk of cross-contamination.

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first (useful as an introduction to kinetics) shows how the rate of a reaction is fast at first and then gradually decreases to zero when one reactant has been used up. The second is a gas density demonstration using 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane. (JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  15. Report: EPA’s Allowing States to Use Bonds to Meet Revolving Fund Match Requirements Reduces Funds Available for Water Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2007-P-00012, March 29, 2007. EPA regulations and policies allowing States to use bonds repaid from SRF interest to meet SRF match requirements are resulting in fewer dollars being available for water projects.

  16. Modeling Demonstrates That Folic Acid Fortification of Whole-Wheat Flour Could Reduce the Prevalence of Folate Inadequacy in Canadian Whole-Wheat Consumers.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yen-Ming; MacFarlane, Amanda J; O'Connor, Deborah L

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory folic acid fortification of white-wheat flour and selected other grain products has reduced the prevalence of neural tube defects in Canada; however, the fortification of whole-wheat flour is not permitted. The objective of this study was to model the impact of adding folic acid to whole-wheat flour on the folate intake distribution of Canadians. Twenty-four-hour dietary recall and supplement intake data (n = 35,107) collected in the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 were used to calculate the prevalence of folate inadequacy (POFI) and the proportion of folic acid intakes above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL). In model 1, folic acid was added to whole-wheat flour-containing foods in amounts comparable to those that are mandatory for white-wheat flour-containing foods. In model 2, a 50% overage of folic acid fortification was considered. Models 3 and 4 included assessment of folate intake distributions in adult whole-wheat consumers with or without a fortification overage. SIDE (Software for Intake Distribution Estimation; Department of Statistics and Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University) was used to estimate usual folate intakes. Mean folate intakes increased by ∼ 5% in all sex and age groups when whole-wheat foods were fortified (models 1 and 2; P < 0.0001). Folic acid fortification of whole-wheat flour-containing foods did not change the POFI or percentage of intakes above the UL in the general population, whether in supplement users or nonusers. Among whole-wheat consumers, the POFI was reduced by 10 percentage points after fortification of whole-wheat flour-containing foods (95% CIs did not overlap). The percentage of whole-wheat consumers with intakes above the UL did not change. Although folic acid fortification of whole-wheat flour-containing foods is unlikely to change the POFI or proportion of folic acid intakes above the UL in the general Canadian population, this fortification strategy may reduce

  17. A biological/chemical process for reduced waste and energy consumption, Caprolactam production: Phase 1, Select microorganisms and demonstrate feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    St.Martin, E.J.

    1995-08-01

    A novel biological/chemical process for converting cyclohexane into caprolactam was investigated. Microorganisms in a bioreactor would be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone followed by chemical synthesis of caprolactam using ammonia. The proposed bioprocess would be more energy efficient and reduce byproducts and wastes that are generated by the current chemical process. We have been successful in isolating from natural soil and water samples two microorganisms that can utilize cyclohexane as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. These microorganisms were shown to have the correct metabolic intermediates and enzymes to convert cyclohexane into cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone and caprolactone. Genetic techniques to create and select for caprolactone hydrolase negative-mutants are being developed. These blocked-mutants will be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone but, because of the block, be unable to metabolize the caprolactone further and excrete it as a final end product.

  18. Novel Ultrasound Joint Selection Methods Using a Reduced Joint Number Demonstrate Inflammatory Improvement when Compared to Existing Methods and Disease Activity Score at 28 Joints.

    PubMed

    Tan, York Kiat; Allen, John C; Lye, Weng Kit; Conaghan, Philip G; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Chew, Li-Ching; Thumboo, Julian

    2016-01-01

    A pilot study testing novel ultrasound (US) joint-selection methods in rheumatoid arthritis. Responsiveness of novel [individualized US (IUS) and individualized composite US (ICUS)] methods were compared with existing US methods and the Disease Activity Score at 28 joints (DAS28) for 12 patients followed for 3 months. IUS selected up to 7 and 12 most ultrasonographically inflamed joints, while ICUS additionally incorporated clinically symptomatic joints. The existing, IUS, and ICUS methods' standardized response means were -0.39, -1.08, and -1.11, respectively, for 7 joints; -0.49, -1.00, and -1.16, respectively, for 12 joints; and -0.94 for DAS28. Novel methods effectively demonstrate inflammatory improvement when compared with existing methods and DAS28.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  16. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  18. Field tests demonstrating reduced activity of ivermectin and moxidectin against small strongyles in horses on 14 farms in Central Kentucky in 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Eugene T; Tolliver, Sharon C; Collins, Sandra S; Ionita, Mariana; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Rossano, Mary

    2011-02-01

    Efficacy of ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) against small strongyles was evaluated in horses (n=363) in field tests on 14 farms in Central Kentucky between 2007 and 2009. Most of the horses were yearlings but a few were weanlings and mares. The number of horses treated with IVM was 255 and those treated with MOX was 108. Horses on six farms were allotted into two groups. One group was treated with each of the two drugs, whereas horses on the other eight farms were treated with only one of the two drugs--IVM on six farms and MOX on two farms. Strongyle eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) compared to initial use of IVM and MOX returned almost twice as quickly after treatment of horses on all of the farms. IVM has been used much more extensively in this geographical area than MOX. Reduced activity of MOX was evident even on farms with rare or no apparent previous use of MOX but with probable extensive use of IVM.

  19. Case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in American Indians and Alaska Natives with diabetes: results from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kelly; Jiang, Luohua; Manson, Spero M; Beals, Janette; Henderson, William; Pratte, Katherine; Acton, Kelly J; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with diabetes in the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart (SDPI-HH) Demonstration Project. Multidisciplinary teams implemented an intensive case management intervention among 30 health care programs serving 138 tribes. The project recruited 3373 participants, with and without current CVD, between 2006 and 2009. We examined data collected at baseline and 1 year later to determine whether improvements occurred in CVD risk factors and in Framingham coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores, aspirin use, and smoking status. A1c levels decreased an average of 0.2% (P < .001). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels decreased, with the largest significant reduction in LDL cholesterol (∆ = -5.29 mg/dL; P < .001). Average Framingham CHD risk scores also decreased significantly. Aspirin therapy increased significantly, and smoking decreased. Participants with more case management visits had significantly greater reductions in LDL cholesterol and A1c values. SDPI-HH successfully translated an intensive case management intervention. Creative retention strategies and an improved understanding of organizational challenges are needed for future Indian health translational efforts.

  20. Case Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk in American Indians and Alaska Natives With Diabetes: Results From the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Manson, Spero M.; Beals, Janette; Henderson, William; Pratte, Katherine; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with diabetes in the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart (SDPI-HH) Demonstration Project. Methods. Multidisciplinary teams implemented an intensive case management intervention among 30 health care programs serving 138 tribes. The project recruited 3373 participants, with and without current CVD, between 2006 and 2009. We examined data collected at baseline and 1 year later to determine whether improvements occurred in CVD risk factors and in Framingham coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores, aspirin use, and smoking status. Results. A1c levels decreased an average of 0.2% (P < .001). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels decreased, with the largest significant reduction in LDL cholesterol (∆ = −5.29 mg/dL; P < .001). Average Framingham CHD risk scores also decreased significantly. Aspirin therapy increased significantly, and smoking decreased. Participants with more case management visits had significantly greater reductions in LDL cholesterol and A1c values. Conclusions. SDPI-HH successfully translated an intensive case management intervention. Creative retention strategies and an improved understanding of organizational challenges are needed for future Indian health translational efforts. PMID:25211728

  1. The ribavirin analog ICN 17261 demonstrates reduced toxicity and antiviral effects with retention of both immunomodulatory activity and reduction of hepatitis-induced serum alanine aminotransferase levels.

    PubMed

    Tam, R C; Ramasamy, K; Bard, J; Pai, B; Lim, C; Averett, D R

    2000-05-01

    The demonstrated utility of the nucleoside analog ribavirin in the treatment of certain viral diseases can be ascribed to its multiple distinct properties. These properties may vary in relative importance in differing viral disease conditions and include the direct inhibition of viral replication, the promotion of T-cell-mediated immune responses via an enhanced type 1 cytokine response, and a reduction of circulating alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels associated with hepatic injury. Ribavirin also has certain known toxicities, including the induction of anemia upon chronic administration. To determine if all these properties are linked, we compared the D-nucleoside ribavirin to its L-enantiomer (ICN 17261) with regard to these properties. Strong similarities were seen for these two compounds with respect to induction of type 1 cytokine bias in vitro, enhancement of type 1 cytokine responses in vivo, and the reduction of serum ALT levels in a murine hepatitis model. In contrast, ICN 17261 had no in vitro antiviral activity against a panel of RNA and DNA viruses, while ribavirin exhibited its characteristic activity profile. Importantly, the preliminary in vivo toxicology profile of ICN 17261 is significantly more favorable than that of ribavirin. Administration of 180 mg of ICN 17261 per kg of body weight to rats by oral gavage for 4 weeks generated substantial serum levels of drug but no observable clinical pathology, whereas equivalent doses of ribavirin induced a significant anemia and leukopenia. Thus, structural modification of ribavirin can dissociate its immunomodulatory properties from its antiviral and toxicologic properties, resulting in a compound (ICN 17261) with interesting therapeutic potential.

  2. Reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in child care and changing provider practices: lessons learned from a demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rachel Y; Calabrese, Trisha; Aird, Laura

    2008-10-01

    The goal was to evaluate, through an American Academy of Pediatrics demonstration project, the effectiveness of a curriculum and train-the-trainer model in changing child care providers' behaviors regarding safe infant sleep practices. Participating licensed child care centers and family child care homes were assigned randomly to intervention and control groups. Observers performed an initial unannounced visit to each site, to watch infants being placed for sleep, to inventory sleep policies, and to administer questionnaires to center staff members. Trainers then used the American Academy of Pediatrics curriculum in educational sessions at intervention sites. Three months later, observers conducted a follow-up observation at each site, and staff members completed a questionnaire about logistic barriers encountered in implementation of safe sleep recommendations. A total of 264 programs and 1212 providers completed the study; the care of 1993 infants was observed. Provider awareness of the American Academy of Pediatrics infant supine sleep position recommendation increased from 59.7% (both groups) to 64.8% (control) and 80.5% (intervention). Exclusive use of the supine position in programs increased from 65.0% to 70.4% (control) and 87.8% (intervention). Observed supine placement increased from 51.0% to 57.1% (control) and 62.1% (intervention). A sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction curriculum using a train-the-trainer model is effective in improving the knowledge and practices of child care providers. Perceived parental objections, provider skepticism about the benefits of supine positioning, and lack of program policies and training opportunities are important barriers to implementation of safe sleep policies. Continued education of parents, expanded training efforts, and statewide regulations, mandates, and monitoring are critical to ongoing efforts to decrease further the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in child care.

  3. Patients with knee osteoarthritis demonstrate improved gait pattern and reduced pain following a non-invasive biomechanical therapy: a prospective multi-centre study on Singaporean population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the effect of a unique therapy with a non-invasive biomechanical foot-worn device (AposTherapy) on Caucasian western population suffering from knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of this therapy on the level of symptoms and gait patterns in a multi-ethnic Singaporean population suffering from knee osteoarthritis. Methods Fifty-eight patients with bilateral medial compartment knee osteoarthritis participated in the study. All patients underwent a computerized gait test and completed two self-assessment questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36). The biomechanical device was calibrated to each patient, and therapy commenced. Changes in gait patterns and self-assessment questionnaires were reassessed after 3 and 6 months of therapy. Results A significant improvement was seen in all of the gait parameters following 6 months of therapy. Specifically, gait velocity increased by 15.9%, step length increased by 10.3%, stance phase decreased by 5.9% and single limb support phase increased by 2.7%. In addition, pain, stiffness and functional limitation significantly decreased by 68.3%, 66.7% and 75.6%, respectively. SF-36 physical score and mental score also increased significantly following 6 months of therapy (46.1% and 22.4%, respectively) (P < 0.05 for all parameters). Conclusions Singaporean population with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis demonstrated improved gait patterns, reported alleviation in symptoms and improved function and quality of life following 6 months of therapy with a unique biomechanical device. Trial registration Registration number NCT01562652. PMID:24383821

  4. [No reduced number of abortions despite easily available emergency contraceptive pills. Studies of women's knowledge, attitudes and experience of the method].

    PubMed

    Tydén, Tanja; Aneblom, Gunilla; von Essen, Louise; Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet; Larsson, Margareta; Odlind, Viveca

    2002-11-21

    Despite the fact that emergency contraceptive pills (ECP) have become easily available across the country during recent years, abortion numbers continue to rise in Sweden, especially in the young age groups (< 25). In a series of studies, we have investigated knowledge, attitudes and experience of ECP among young women. Our results show that, whereas most women are aware of the method, many lack knowledge about the mechanism of action and time frames for best use, which could explain why ECPs are not used by more than a fraction of women who might have had benefit from their use. Since half of the women requesting a termination of pregnancy stated that they would have used ECP if they had had them available at home at the time of the unprotected intercourse which led to an unintended pregnancy, it seems reasonable to encourage women to keep ECPs at home, in case the need should arise. It is important that ECPs are available without prescription, but beyond that, much more information about ECP is necessary in order for the method to be widely accepted and used as a back-up after failure with other contraceptives.

  5. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  6. Lessons learned from implementation of a demonstration program to reduce the burden of anemia and hookworm in women in Yen Bai Province, Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Phuc, Tran Q; Mihrshahi, Seema; Casey, Gerard J; Phu, Luong B; Tien, Nong T; Caruana, Sonia R; Thach, Tran D; Montresor, Antonio; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency, anemia and hookworm disease are important public health problems for women of reproductive age living in developing countries and affect the health of newborns and infants. Iron supplementation and deworming treatment are effective in addressing these problems in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. Daily iron supplementation and deworming after the first trimester is recommended for pregnant women although these programs usually do not operate efficiently or effectively. Weekly iron-folic acid supplementation and regular deworming for non-pregnant women may be a viable approach for improving iron status and preventing anemia during the reproductive years. Addressing these diseases at a population level before women become pregnant could significantly improve women's health before and during pregnancy, as well as their infants' growth and development. Methods and Results This paper describes the major processes undertaken in a demonstration intervention of preventive weekly iron-folic acid supplementation with regular deworming for all 52,000 women aged 15–45 years in two districts of Yen Bai province, in northern Viet Nam. The intervention strategy included extensive consultation with community leaders and village, commune, district and provincial health staff, and training for village health workers. Distribution of the drugs was integrated with the existing health service infrastructure and the village health workers were the direct point of contact with women. Iron-folic acid tablets and deworming treatment were provided free of charge from May 2006. An independent Vietnamese NGO was commissioned to evaluate compliance and identify potential problems. The program resulted in effective distribution of iron-folic acid tablets and deworming treatment to all villages in the target districts, with full or partial compliance of 85%. Conclusion Training for health staff, the strong commitment of all partners and the use of appropriate

  7. Demonstrating Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Richard DeLombard of NASA's Glenn Research Center, hands the relase line for the Microgravity Demonstrator to a visitor for her to start a short experiment showing the effects of microgravity on candle flames. Combustion physics will be a major line of investigation for NASA aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The Microgravity Demonstrator is frequently used at shows and schools to illustrate how phenomena change in microgravity. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  12. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in chemistry instruction. The first illustrates the preparation of a less common oxide of iron, showing why this oxide is rare. The second is an explosion reaction of hydrogen and oxygen that is recommended for use as an attention-getting device. (TW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  6. Reduced carbon availability to bacteroids and elevated ureides in nodules, but not in shoots, are involved in the nitrogen fixation response to early drought in soybean.

    PubMed

    Ladrera, Rubén; Marino, Daniel; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; González, Esther M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2007-10-01

    Nitrogen fixation (NF) in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is highly sensitive to soil drying. This sensitivity has been related to an accumulation of nitrogen compounds, either in shoots or in nodules, and a nodular carbon flux shortage under drought. To assess the relative importance of carbon and nitrogen status on NF regulation, the responses to the early stages of drought were monitored with two soybean cultivars with known contrasting tolerance to drought. In the sensitive cultivar ('Biloxi'), NF inhibition occurred earlier and was more dramatic than in the tolerant cultivar ('Jackson'). The carbon flux to bacteroids was also more affected in 'Biloxi' than in 'Jackson', due to an earlier inhibition of sucrose synthase activity and a larger decrease of malate concentration in the former. Drought provoked ureide accumulation in nodules of both cultivars, but this accumulation was higher and occurred earlier in 'Biloxi'. However, at this early stage of drought, there was no accumulation of ureides in the leaves of either cultivar. These results indicate that a combination of both reduced carbon flux and nitrogen accumulation in nodules, but not in shoots, is involved in the inhibition of NF in soybean under early drought.

  7. Decrease in Available Soil Water Storage Capacity Reduces Vitality of Young Understorey European Beeches (Fagus sylvatica L.)—A Case Study from the Black Forest, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Tamalika; Saha, Somidh; Reif, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Growth and survival of young European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is largely dependent on water availability. We quantified the influence of water stress (measured as Available Soil Water Storage Capacity or ASWSC) on vitality of young beech plants at a dry site. The study site was located in a semi-natural sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.) stand adjacent to beech stands on a rocky gneiss outcrop in southwestern Germany. Plant vitality was measured as crown dieback and estimated by the percentage of dead above ground biomass. The magnitude of crown dieback was recorded in different vertical parts of the crown. Biomass was calculated from the harvested plants following allometric regression equations specifically developed for our study site. Stem discs from harvested plants were used for growth analysis. We found that soil depth up to bedrock and skeleton content significantly influenced ASWSC at the study site. A significant negative correlation between ASWSC and crown dieback was found. Highest rates of crown dieback were noticed in the middle and lower crown. The threshold of crown dieback as a function of drought stress for young beech plants was calculated for the first time in this study. This threshold of crown dieback was found to be 40% of above ground biomass. Beyond 40% crown dieback, plants eventually experienced complete mortality. In addition, we found that the extremely dry year of 2003 significantly hampered growth (basal area increment) of plants in dry plots (ASWSC < 61 mm) in the study area. Recovery in the plants’ radial growth after that drought year was significantly higher in less dry plots (ASWSC > 61 mm) than in dry plots. We concluded that a decrease in ASWSC impeded the vitality of young beech causing partial up to complete crown dieback in the study site. PMID:27137398

  8. Biochar from sugarcane filtercake reduces soil CO2 emissions relative to raw residue and improves water retention and nutrient availability in a highly-weathered tropical soil.

    PubMed

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions.

  9. Biochar from Sugarcane Filtercake Reduces Soil CO2 Emissions Relative to Raw Residue and Improves Water Retention and Nutrient Availability in a Highly-Weathered Tropical Soil

    PubMed Central

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S.; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  10. NASA's F-15B from the Dryden Flight Research Center flew in the supersonic shockwave of a modified U.S. Navy F-5E jet in support of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) project. On Aug. 27, 2003, the F-5 SSBD aircraft demonstrated a method to reduce

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-25

    NASA's F-15B research testbed jet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center flew in the supersonic shockwave of a Northrop Grumman Corp. modified U.S. Navy F-5E jet in support of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) project, which is part of the DARPA's Quiet Supersonic Platform (QSP) program. On Aug. 27, 2003, the F-5 SSBD aircraft demonstrated a method to reduce the intensity of sonic booms.

  11. Annual burning of a tallgrass prairie inhibits C and N cycling in soil, increasing recalcitrant pyrogenic organic matter storage while reducing N availability.

    PubMed

    Soong, Jennifer L; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2015-06-01

    Grassland ecosystems store an estimated 30% of the world's total soil C and are frequently disturbed by wildfires or fire management. Aboveground litter decomposition is one of the main processes that form soil organic matter (SOM). However, during a fire biomass is removed or partially combusted and litter inputs to the soil are substituted with inputs of pyrogenic organic matter (py-OM). Py-OM accounts for a more recalcitrant plant input to SOM than fresh litter, and the historical frequency of burning may alter C and N retention of both fresh litter and py-OM inputs to the soil. We compared the fate of these two forms of plant material by incubating (13) C- and (15) N-labeled Andropogon gerardii litter and py-OM at both an annually burned and an infrequently burned tallgrass prairie site for 11 months. We traced litter and py-OM C and N into uncomplexed and organo-mineral SOM fractions and CO2 fluxes and determined how fire history affects the fate of these two forms of aboveground biomass. Evidence from CO2 fluxes and SOM C:N ratios indicates that the litter was microbially transformed during decomposition while, besides an initial labile fraction, py-OM added to SOM largely untransformed by soil microbes. Additionally, at the N-limited annually burned site, litter N was tightly conserved. Together, these results demonstrate how, although py-OM may contribute to C and N sequestration in the soil due to its resistance to microbial degradation, a long history of annual removal of fresh litter and input of py-OM infers N limitation due to the inhibition of microbial decomposition of aboveground plant inputs to the soil. These results provide new insight into how fire may impact plant inputs to the soil, and the effects of py-OM on SOM formation and ecosystem C and N cycling.

  12. Aluminium alleviates manganese toxicity to rice by decreasing root symplastic Mn uptake and reducing availability to shoots of Mn stored in roots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Hu, Zhen Min; Shao, Ji Feng; Che, Jing; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Manganese (Mn) and aluminium (Al) phytotoxicities occur mainly in acid soils. In some plant species, Al alleviates Mn toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are obscure. Methods Rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings (11 d old) were grown in nutrient solution containing different concentrations of Mn2+ and Al3+ in short-term (24 h) and long-term (3 weeks) treatments. Measurements were taken of root symplastic sap, root Mn plaques, cell membrane electrical surface potential and Mn activity, root morphology and plant growth. Key Results In the 3-week treatment, addition of Al resulted in increased root and shoot dry weight for plants under toxic levels of Mn. This was associated with decreased Mn concentration in the shoots and increased Mn concentration in the roots. In the 24-h treatment, addition of Al resulted in decreased Mn accumulation in the root symplasts and in the shoots. This was attributed to higher cell membrane surface electrical potential and lower Mn2+ activity at the cell membrane surface. The increased Mn accumulation in roots from the 3-week treatment was attributed to the formation of Mn plaques, which were probably related to the Al-induced increase in root aerenchyma. Conclusions The results show that Al alleviated Mn toxicity in rice, and this could be attributed to decreased shoot Mn accumulation resulting from an Al-induced decrease in root symplastic Mn uptake. The decrease in root symplastic Mn uptake resulted from an Al-induced change in cell membrane potential. In addition, Al increased Mn plaques in the roots and changed the binding properties of the cell wall, resulting in accumulation of non-available Mn in roots. PMID:26105187

  13. Aluminium alleviates manganese toxicity to rice by decreasing root symplastic Mn uptake and reducing availability to shoots of Mn stored in roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Hu, Zhen Min; Shao, Ji Feng; Che, Jing; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) and aluminium (Al) phytotoxicities occur mainly in acid soils. In some plant species, Al alleviates Mn toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are obscure. Rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings (11 d old) were grown in nutrient solution containing different concentrations of Mn(2+) and Al(3+) in short-term (24 h) and long-term (3 weeks) treatments. Measurements were taken of root symplastic sap, root Mn plaques, cell membrane electrical surface potential and Mn activity, root morphology and plant growth. In the 3-week treatment, addition of Al resulted in increased root and shoot dry weight for plants under toxic levels of Mn. This was associated with decreased Mn concentration in the shoots and increased Mn concentration in the roots. In the 24-h treatment, addition of Al resulted in decreased Mn accumulation in the root symplasts and in the shoots. This was attributed to higher cell membrane surface electrical potential and lower Mn(2+) activity at the cell membrane surface. The increased Mn accumulation in roots from the 3-week treatment was attributed to the formation of Mn plaques, which were probably related to the Al-induced increase in root aerenchyma. The results show that Al alleviated Mn toxicity in rice, and this could be attributed to decreased shoot Mn accumulation resulting from an Al-induced decrease in root symplastic Mn uptake. The decrease in root symplastic Mn uptake resulted from an Al-induced change in cell membrane potential. In addition, Al increased Mn plaques in the roots and changed the binding properties of the cell wall, resulting in accumulation of non-available Mn in roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    1992-03-25

    Archersstar Sudha Bhuchar, right, launches a video on breast screening for women from ethnic minorities, sponsored by the NHS. The video is available in six languages. Ms Bhuchar is pictured with programme co-ordinator Julietta Patrick.

  15. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  16. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Schieveen, Pauline Gerritsen-van; Royer, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is more and more used to prevent GVHD (Graft Versus Host Disease) during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with reduce-intensity conditioning. If several facts argue in favor of therapeutic drug monitoring, the used pharmacokinetic parameter is to be defined. Especially, the choice between total or ultrafilterable MPA is still under debate even if therapeutic drug monitoring seems to be more practicable with total MPA. The role of other factors implied in GVHD occurrence are also to be assessed in studies which aim at assessing therapeutic drug monitoring of MPA in such situation. For theses reasons, the level evidence of MPA as GVHD prophylaxis during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with reduce-intensity conditioning is potentially useful.

  17. Best demonstrated available technology (BDAT) background document for halogenated pesticide and chlorobenzene wastes K032-K034, K041, K042, K085, K097, K098, K105, D012-D017. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinch, R.; Eby, E.

    1990-05-01

    The background document provides the Agency's technical support and rationale for the development of treatment standards for the constituents to be regulated for the above-mentioned wastes. The section describes the industry affected by the land disposal restrictions for the halogenated pesticide and chlorobenzene wastes included in Table 1-1, the processes generating the wastes, the available characterization data, and the determination of waste treatability groups.

  18. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Alm, Johan; Goksör, Emma

    2016-04-04

    Asthma, eczema, food allergy and allergic rhinitis are common and the cause is still largely unknown, but it is the subject of extensive research. The research results are inconclusive, probably due to individual differences in vulnerability to different exposures and to a highly multifactorial origin. Several environmental factors have been identified as risk factors or as having a potentially protective effect. Smoking during pregnancy or childhood increases the risk of obstructive symptoms and asthma. Breastfeeding reduces the risk of infectious diseases and thereby also the risk of early obstructive symptoms. Even if mothers avoid certain foods during pregnancy or breastfeeding, this does not reduce the risk of allergic disease in the child. The child should be introduced to foods between four and six months of age, without avoiding or delaying any particular food. Vaccinations do not affect the risk of allergic disease. The risk of allergic disease is not increased by exposure to furry animals in the home, if the child is healthy. However, children who are already allergic should at least avoid the animals to which they are allergic.

  19. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Perrotta, F M; Lubrano, E

    2016-09-09

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that possibly leads to structural damage and to a reduction of joint function and poor quality of life. Treatment of PsA has changed since its introduction of anti- TNF drugs, which have shown to reduce the symptoms and signs of the disease and slow the radiographic progression. However, recently, the discovery of new pathogenic mechanisms have made possible the development of new molecules that target pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in skin, joint and entheseal inflammation. New drugs like ustekinumab, secukinumab and apremilast inhibit interleukin axis and intracellular pathways and showed their efficacy and safety in randomized clinical trials. These drugs have been recently approved for the treatment of PsA and included in the new EULAR and GRAPPA treatment recommendations. The aim of this paper is to briefly review the clinical trials that led to their approval for PsA.

  20. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Jütte, R

    1996-01-01

    Pain, and toothache in particular, belongs to the most basic human experiences. This paper describes how the experience of pain is shaped and modified by individual human minds and by specific medical cultures. It explores what social historians of medicine call the historical, social, cultural, and psychological construction of pain. The story of how people reconstruct the experience of pain in past and present demands that we look beyond the medical gaze. The voices most often neglected in medical history belong of course to patients. However, their testimony is difficult to recover, except for more recent times. We have to look therefore for their hidden voices in diaries, memoirs, essays, poems, novels and other literary genres. These scattered records and fragmentary episodes of bouts of illness suggest that the history of toothache cannot be reduced to a parable about biomedical progress, but stands at the crossroad of bodies, minds, and cultures.

  1. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    1991-02-20

    Using infrared sensors developed from those used in satellites for observing stars, the thermometer can take a reading in just two seconds. Its makers, Diatek of San Diego, claim it is accurate to within 0.1°C. A report in New Scientist says the thermometer measures temperature without coming into contact with the car or any mucous membranes so reducing the risk of infection: a particular risk with babies and seriously ill patients. A probe, covered with a disposable sheath, is placed at the opening of the ear canal. A microprocessor measures the heat picked up by the sensors and converts it into body temperature, which is then shown on a liquid crystal display.

  2. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    1987-12-19

    This nineteenth century illustration of a midwife on her way to a delivery was just one of the many fascinating slides shown recently at a Christmas Lecture at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, demonstrating the 'Story of Birth' through the ages. The delivery of babies was always regarded as the exclusive responsibility of the midwife, whose typical image was that of 'not quite drunk and but not quite sober', according to the speaker Mr john Studd, Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at King's college Hospital. Men were not allowed in the birthing chamber, and in the sixteenth century a Doctor Wertt of Hamburg was burned at the stake for masquerading as a woman in order to discover the wonder of childbirth.

  3. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie; Le Guellec, Chantal; Richard, Damien; Libert, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Itraconazole is a triazole antifungal agent that is active against Aspergillus, histoplasmosis, and rare fungal infections. Itraconazole exhibit marked variability in drug concentration as a result of inconsistent absorption, metabolism, or interaction with concomitant medications. Preclinical and clinical data have exhibited a relationship between serum concentrations and treatment efficacy or toxicity, thus therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of itraconazole is largely used to optimise therapy. The analysis of bibliographic data demonstrate that, even if the utility of itraconazole's TDM has not been proved by randomized controlled trial or pharmacoeconomics studies, it could be useful for managing an absence of response or a drug-drug interactions, or interpreting an adverse effect. However, the interest of this monitoring was proved only in some populations of patients (neutropenics or AIDS patients) so its level of proof varies between levels "potentially useful" and "recommended".

  4. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Durand, J P; Parzefall, J; Richard, B

    1982-06-01

    Do the blind cave salamander Proteus and its epigean relative Necturus use the chemical sense in searching for prey? Proteus shows a significant, and Necturus only a weak, preference for water which passes living prey before entering a choice chamber. Prey which was frozen before the test also gave the same result in both species. However, with this immobilized prey the time for a decision in the test was much longer. The results of ten series of tests demonstrate the importance of chemoreception for prey detection in Proteus. The weaker reactions in Necturus can be explained probably by the different biotope. Six other series of tests have been conducted to show that our results are not influenced by stimuli relating to mechanoreception, thigmotaxis and rheotropism.

  5. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Avendaño, Jairo

    2016-01-01

    To analyse sociodemographic characteristics, descriptive psychopathology and therapy in the first decade of service of the Hospital Psiquiátrico San Isidro del Valle del Cauca, 1958-1968. Retrospective descriptive study of a series of case histories of the studied period, and by qualitative analysis and conceptual networks. Sociodemographic variables were analysed, and it was observed that, although the patient population increased, hospitalisation was reduced due to the implementation of a "Day Hospital" and outpatient services. The majority of patients were young adults, women engaged in housework, and several lower-middle income patients, primarily referred by their families. Hospital stay was short, with a high frequency of readmissions. The main reason for discharge was improvement, and the predominant diagnosis and symptomatology was schizophrenia, with the treatment being antipsychotic neuroleptics. The correlation of the short time of hospitalisation, more outpatient clinics, the large number of readmissions, and improvement as the reason for discharge, is consistent with the results of the International Pilot Study of Schizophrenia 1968, which included a sample of 100 patients from Hospital psychiatric San Isidro del Valle del Cauca, in which it was concluded that the disorder did not cause a progressive deterioration in patients and that, on the contrary, showed a significant percentage recovery. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Geißler, K; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2016-02-01

    Surgery in the pharynx belongs to the most frequent otorhinolaryngological procedures. Adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy are amongst the most frequent surgeries at all and belong to the first procedures which are performed by otorhinolaryngology residents during their specialist training. Therefore, it is essential to study early during the specialist training the most frequent pharyngeal procedures, surgical techniques, complications and outcome. A series of excellent clinical trials and meta-analyses have been published in the recent year demonstrating that adenoidectomy is an important therapy element in pediatric otorhinolaryngology. In particular due to the developments in the field of laser surgery, tonsillotomy could experience a revival in the recent years. The indication spectrum is still widening. There are many fields where clinical trials are needed to proof if tonsillotomy is as effective as tonsillectomy but with the advantage of lower morbidity. There are manifold pharyngeal surgical procedures to treat patients with obstructive sleep apnea. These surgical techniques have proved valuable especially as alternative to conservative therapy and in case of treatment failure under airway pressure therapy. As the obstruction during this type of sleep-related respiratory disorder is often not located at one anatomical site, an individual combination of several pharyngeal and other surgeries are needed for an effective treatment of the patient. The present article gives an overview of the most important pharyngeal surgeries for future otorhinolaryngologists under specialist training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Elodie; de Lara, Manuel Tunon

    2013-01-01

    Pholcodine is an opioid that has been widely used worldwide since 1950 for the treatment of non-productive cough in children and adults. The results of early preclinical studies but also those of recent clinical trials have shown the antitussive efficacy of pholcodine to be superior to that of codeine, of longer duration, and with an equivalent or safer toxicity profile. Also, there is no risk of addiction. Concern had been raised over a possible cross-sensitisation with neuromuscular blocking agents. While a recent assessment of the available data by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has confirmed the favourable risk-benefit ratio of pholcodine, further studies are needed to clear this point. Copyright © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clemence

    2010-01-01

    Vigabatrin is a second generation anticonvulsant drug available in France since 1995. It is an amino acid analogue of the GABA, marketed under the racemic form [R(-)/S(+)50/50], but only the S(+)-enantiomer is active. Neither the mechanism of action of vigabatrin, an irreversible enzymatic inhibition, nor its pharmacokinetic characteristics (no binding to plasma proteins, low metabolism, no interaction with CYP), are in favour of TDM. There is no validated therapeutic range, but to the recommended dosage of 1 to 3g a day correspond plasma concentrations ranging from 0,8 to 36 mg/L (6 - 279 µmol/L). For this molecule, the level of proof of the interest of the TDM was estimated in: to be useless.

  9. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Bouquié, Régis; Dailly, Eric; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an analogue of carbamazepine, used for the treatment of partial seizure with or without secondary generalization. The two forms R and S of the mono-hydroxylated derivatives (MHD) are responsible for most of the anti-convulsant activity and it is the concentrations of MHD that are relevant in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Analysis of currently literature provides no well-established relationship between plasma concentration of MHD and efficiency or toxicity. Although there is not a validated therapeutic range, the residual concentrations of usually observed therapeutic MHD are situated between 12 and 30 mg/L. In certain pathological or physiological circumstances, the pharmacokinetic variability of the oxcarbazepine can be considerable, but this strong unpredictability does not nevertheless justify the TDM of the MHD. Based on the available evidence, TDM of MHD is not routinely warranted but may be possibly useful in specific situations such as pregnancy or renal insufficiency.

  10. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Jelassi, Mohamed Larbi; Benlmouden, Amine; Lefeuvre, Sandrine; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Billaud, Eliane M

    2011-01-01

    Level of Evidence for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Vancomycin. Vancomycin is an antibiotic for exclusive hospital use administrated in intravenous infusion to treat systemic infections. It is mainly eliminated by kidneys and potentially nephrotoxic. Data available show that Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of vancomycin is highly recommended. It aims to ensure efficacy and avoid resistance by maintaining trough plasma concentrations above the MIC. Secondary, vancomycine TDM may be indicated to prevent nephrotoxicity in high risk patients. TDM is often underwent at steady state (48 to 72 h after the treatment initiation) unless in case of renal impairment (24 h). While compared with intermittent administration, continuous infusion did not result in prognosis improvement; however it resulted in lower pharmacokinetic variability and better cost-efficiency. Targeted trough concentrations for intermittent infusion are between 15 and 20 mg/L (up to 25-30 mg/L for GISA). In case of continuous infusion, targets are higher (25 to 40 mg/L).

  11. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santín-Medeiros, Fernanda; Cristi-Montero, Carlos; Jaén-Jiménez, Raúl; Casajús, José Antonio; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-06-30

    The present study aims to compare the vertical counts registered by GT1M, GT3X and ActiTrainer. Treadmill activities, repeated sit-stands and rest were completed by 31 young, 31 adults and 35 older adults while wearing the accelerometers (GT1M, GT3X and ActiTrainer) on their right hips. Independent sample t-test analyses were performed to determine differences between counts in each age group and activities along with the Bland & Altman analysis to determine the degree of agreement. In order to determine the correction factor for the ActiTrainer counts, the linear regression forward analysis was used to minimize differences with the GT3X and the GT1M counts. Differences among ActiTrainer, GT1M, and GT3X were revealed in all activities except in rest. The counts for ActiTrainer were significantly lower than those of GT3X and GT1M. The correction factor for ActiTrainer with GT1M (GT1M counts = 3185.564 + 649.647; *ActiTrainer counts - 36.163; *weight [kg] - 7.545 *age [years] r = 0.864; r2 = 0.746; r2 corrected = 0.745; SEE = 1451) and GT3X (GT3X counts = 3501.977 + 705.662 *ActiTrainer counts - 40.523 *weight [kg] - 11.864 *age [years] r = 0.901; r2 = 0.812; r2 corrected = 0.811; SEE = 310.160) reduced these differences. The GT1M and GT3X vertical counts may be compared. However, a correction factor to decrease differences to compare ActiTrainer counts with those of GT1M or GT3X counts must be applied.

  12. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Renaud, Lise; Caron Bouchard, Monique

    2010-02-16

    In 2005, a 12-week health promotion campaign in Québec utilized a multimedia communications strategy in which a website was used to supply information and to serve as an accompaniment to support individual engagement with the campaign. The "Défi Santé 5/30" or "5/30 Health Challenge" was intended to reinforce behaviours related to healthy eating and the regular practice of physical activity. This communications strategy offered the public the ability to personally engage in a "health challenge" by fixing objectives to attain over the course of the campaign. The campaign's media use and impact are evaluated with the aid of a telephone survey (n = 609), discussion groups with individuals (n = 102) who had been exposed to the campaign, and discussion groups with health professionals (n = 32). The article explores underlying explanations for behavioural changes during the campaign with a focus on the role of the website. Several characteristics can potentially contribute to the development of motivation and fidelity in users: specific objectives of the website; content; architecture and usage techniques; media convergence and contribution of partners; an accompaniment approach that is at once virtual, media-based, interpersonal while also using contributions from health professionals. Non-facilitating factors are also discussed: technical and socio-cultural accessibility; ethics and constraints related to the participation of health professionals. The "Défi Santé 5/30" has demonstrated that a website utilizing virtual, media-based, interpersonal and technical accompaniment can contribute to behavioural change.

  13. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Dufour, Sarah; Lavergne, Chantal; Ramos, Yuddy

    2016-03-14

    The objectives of this study were to 1) map the geographic distribution of rates of children reported to Montreal child protective services by ethnocultural group (Black, other visible minorities, not from visible minorities) and 2) estimate the relative contribution of different territorial characteristics to the rates for those groups. The study covered the 505 Montreal-area census tracts for which complete data were available. The reporting rates by group (dependent variables) and various territorial characteristics such as poverty (independent variables) were mapped and subjected to multiple linear regression and geographically weighted regression. The results of the geographically weighted regression were then mapped. The geographic distribution and reporting rates varied greatly by group, with the Black children having the highest rates. Although territorial characteristics explained 51% of variance for the children who were not members of visible minorities, they were clearly less effective in predicting rates in the case of Black children (18%) and other minorities (18%). Already well-known territorial risk factors are at work in Montreal, but their influence is not equally strong in all census tracts nor, especially, in all ethnocultural groups. Therefore, when only the distribution and prediction of reports for all children as a whole are examined, important differences are underestimated. Access to and appropriateness of services offered to vulnerable families, including those of visible minorities, could, however, be improved with a better understanding of local dynamics.

  14. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Calbiac, Pascale De; Lamoureux, Fabien; Pourrat, Xavier; Bretault, Lydia; Marchand, Sophie; Grassin, Jacqueline; Antier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of Bronchial Superinfections: Data Related to Stability of Antibiotics in Portable Pumps. Given many data about the stability of antibiotics in portable pump (elastomer) are lacking, this study was designed to make a point about available data and to evaluate the stability of antibiotics when exposed to temperature within 35°C (average temperature measured in real conditions of use). First, to collect information about the stability of antibiotics in portable pump and to confront them with the local antibiotics protocols dedicated to the treatment of bronchial superinfection in patients with cystic fibrosis; second, to evaluate the stability of piperacillin associated with tazobactam at 35°C. While measured concentrations in tazobactam did not show significant variation during the study, piperacillin measurements showed a major reduction of concentration (up to 33%), both time and concentration related to. Such information must be pointed out to prescribers and patients to ensure a cold accumulator is placed in the pump can'ying-bag and to limit the duration of infusion to 24h with a single pump. This experimental program will keep on going with the stability study of both ticarcillin and cefsulodin in portable pump. Copyright © 2006 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Demaeyer, Ph

    2016-01-01

    Medicine owes many to Hippocrate, but pneumology traces its origin back to antiquity, from Mesopotamia to ancient Rome. Regarding prehistory: if viscera of this period have not been kept, some bones were. Since Neanderthals, it is then possible to study osteoarticular pathologies (often chronic arthrosis). But no evidence of tuberculosis was found (all thoracic kyphosis are not tuberculosis). Tuberculosis probably appears during the Neolithic age, because of high concentration of population. In ancient times, pneumology was of course not a real medical specialty. However, respiratory illness already constituted a big part of antique medical practice. The purpose of the physician in antiquity was to establish a diagnosis, a prognostic and to propose a treatment. Prognostic revealed to be of great importance in ancient times, since therapeutic efficacy was limited. Contemporary physicians often neglect this part of their practice. In ancient times, physicians also tried to gradually eliminate magic-religious aspects in taking care of the patients. This review will propose a journey from Mesopotamia to ancient Egypt (and its medical papyrus). Very few sources are available concerning medicine in pre-Columbian cultures. However, it is well known that shamans had, besides their religious competences, a great pharmacopoeia. Because of these very few sources, this topic will not be added to this article. Little is known in Europa about chinese medicine before the Jesuit mission in China during the 17th and 18th centuries. Yet, chinese medicine grew in parallel with European's one. Some relevant elements of this medicine will hereafter be shown.

  16. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid is an anticonvulsant drug available in France since 1967. It is a broad spectrum molecule indicated in various forms of epilepsy of the adult and the child, but it is also prescribed in the treatment of different other pathologies of nervous system. The divalproate sodium is indicated in the treatment of bipolar disorders. The valproic acid is marketed under various pharmaceutical forms, with different corresponding tmax values. But, whatever the administered preparation, the circulating active molecule is the ion valproate. Elimination half-life is from 11 to 20 h. Metabolization of valproate is important and represents its main route of elimination. Valpromide is comparable to a prodrug which metabolizes in valproate. The inter and intraindividual variability of the plasma concentrations are important. Several studies show a concentration-effect relationship, but two interventional trials ended in the lack of interest of the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM), although it is of current practice. However, numerous drug interactions may modify the plasma concentrations of valproate. The therapeutic range is from 50 to 100 mg/L (346 - 693 μmol/L). The level of proof of the interest of the TDM for this molecule was estimated in: recommended.

  17. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence; Debruyne, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Clobazam is a 1,5 benzodiazepine available in France since 1975, used in add-on with the other anticonvulsant drugs in the treatment of refractory epilepsies of child and adult and for the treatment of anxiety of adult. It is mainly metabolized in desmethylclobazam, or norclobazam, active metabolite, present in a concentration approximately eight times superior to that of the parent drug, but with an activity of the order of 20 to 40% of that of clobazam. Elimination half-life of clobazam is of 18 h while that of norclobazam is from 40 to 50 h. There is a large interindividual variability in the plasma concentrations. Furthermore, clobazam being prescribed in add-on with the other anticonvulsant drugs in resistant epilepsies, concentration-effect relationship is difficult to bring to light, since, in many studies, the patients who did not answer received the highest doses. Adverse reactions are moderated, appearing more often for the highest concentrations; also the phenomenon of tolerance seems more frequent in high concentrations. However, because of the kinetic interactions, a dosage of clobazam and norclobazam can be useful in certain cases. There is no validated therapeutic range, but the usual concentrations are in the range of 100-300 μg/L for the parent drug and about ten times more for the metabolite. The level of proof of the interest of the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for this molecule is estimated in: rather useless.

  18. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Cuerda Compes, María Cristina; García-Luna, Pedro P; Martínez Faedo, Ceferino; Mauri Roca, Sílvia; Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Virgili Casas, M Nuria; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2016-07-19

    Introducción:la nutrición parenteral (NP) a largo plazo puede asociarse a complicaciones graves, con un deterioro importante de la calidad de vida de los pacientes con síndrome de intestino corto (SIC). Teduglutida, un análogo del péptido-2 similar al glucagón, pertenece a una nueva familia terapéutica y representa el primer abordaje no sintomático del SIC. Objetivos: revisar los datos preclínicos y clínicos en cuanto a eficacia y seguridad de teduglutida. Resultados: la aprobación de teduglutida se basó en los resultados de un estudio en fase III de 24 semanas, doble ciego, controlado con placebo (STEPS). Pacientes con fallo intestinal por SIC dependientes de NP ≥ 3 veces/semana durante ≥ 12 meses recibieron 0,05 mg/kg de teduglutida (n = 43) o placebo (n = 43) 1 vez/día. En la semana 24 hubo significativamente más respondedores en el grupo de teduglutida que en el de placebo (63 vs.30%; p = 0,002). La reducción absoluta media del volumen de NP frente al valor basal en la semana 24 fue significativamente mayor con teduglutida (4,4 vs.2,3 l/semana; p < 0,001). La necesidad de NP se redujo ≥ 1 día en la semana 24 en el 54% de pacientes tratados con teduglutida vs.23% con placebo. Del total de pacientes que recibieron teduglutida en los ensayos en fase III (n = 134), el 12% consiguió una autonomía completa de la NP. Por lo general, la administración subcutánea de teduglutida se toleró bien. Conclusiones: se ha demostrado que teduglutida recupera la absorción intestinal y reduce significativamente la dependencia de la NP, consiguiendo incluso la independencia en algunos pacientes.

  19. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Vizuet Vega, Norma Isela; Shamah Levy, Teresa; Gaona Pineda, Elsa Berenice; Cuevas Nasu, Lucía; Méndez Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio

    2016-07-19

    Introducción: la anemia es un factor de riesgo en la población infantil con consecuencias graves para su crecimiento y desarrollo. Los programas de ayuda alimentaria pueden contribuir a su prevención y control. Objetivo: estudiar la adherencia al consumo de suplementos y su relación con la prevalencia de anemia en niños menores de tres años de edad en San Luis Potosí, México beneficiarios del programa PROSPERA.Métodos: se realizó un análisis comparativo en niños de 12 a 36 meses que consumen diferentes suplementos alimenticios: 414 pertenecientes al grupo de intervención y 334 al de comparación. Se midió la hemoglobina (Hb) por Hemocue clasificando como anémicos a quienes tuvieron valores <110 g/l. Se aplicaron pruebas de t de Student y X2. Se estimaron efectos de intervención mediante el método de diferencias en diferencias y un puntaje de adherencia al consumo de suplementos.Resultados: al final del estudio la prevalencia de anemia disminuyó 11.2 pp en el grupo de intervención y 8.7 pp en el de comparación; la interacción del puntaje de adherencia por suplemento y etapa de observación mostró que la adherencia al consumo de Bebida láctea + Vitaniño reduce el riesgo de presentar anemia (p = 0,14). El consumo de Nutrisano + Vitaniño se asoció con menor riesgo (0,2), ambos con respecto al consumo de Nutrisano.Conclusiones: el programa PROSPERA tuvo efectos importantes en la disminución de las prevalencias de anemia. Se recomienda llevar a cabo acciones para mejorar la adherencia al consumo de suplementos alimenticios, a fIn de mejorar la efectividad de los programas.

  20. Efficacy Analysis of a Script-based Guide for EVAR Execution: is it Possible to Reduce Patient Exposure to Contrast, Operative Time and Blood Loss even when Advanced Technologies are not Available?

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, Giovani José Dal Poggetto; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha; Dalbem, Andréia Marques de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite the patient and medical staff exposure to radiation in endovascular aneurysm repair, the benefits of this abdominal aortic aneurysm type of surgical management are justfied by minor recovery time and hospitalization, as well as an option for patients not elected to conventional open repair. In this minimally invasive surgical aproach, time of procedure and radiation doses can be substantial - and the increasing frequency of these procedures and it's complexity have impelled vascular surgeons to face additional and successive risk to occupational radiation exposure. Meticulous study of the computed tomography angiography during the endovascular aneurysm repair preparation allows reduction of unnecessary radiation exposure, as also reduces consecutive image acquisition and contrast use (that may be related to renal overload in susceptible patients). Some studies have proposed strategies to optimize endovascular intervention to reduce contrast use and X-ray exposure. Although they might prove to be effective, they rely on use of additional specific and advanced equipment, available only in major centers. As an alternative to this expensive and restrict technology, it is presented a simpler technique through image manipulation on software OsiriX, aiming to reduce both exposures. OBJECTIVE To analyze the efficacy of the adoption of a study protocol and a script-based guide in preparation for endovascular aneurysm repair through verifying it's impact over the surgical procedure - as referred to intravascular contrast infuse, effects over renal function, blood loss and operatory time. METHODS A longitudinal prospective study from March 2014 through March 2015, where 30 performed endovascular aneurysm repair were compared to a historic control group. The planning for endovascular aneurysm repair through the patient's tomographic image manipulation in the prospective group was performed with OsiriX MD software. A script-based guide upon gathering

  1. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  2. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  3. Evaluation of normal yellow dent corn and high available phosphorus corn in combination with reduced dietary phosphorus and phytase supplementation for broilers grown to market weights in litter pens.

    PubMed

    Yan, F; Kersey, J H; Fritts, C A; Waldroup, P W; Stilborn, H L; Crum, R C; Rice, D W; Raboy, V

    2000-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the extent fecal P levels could be reduced while maintaining performance. Various strategies were employed including the use of a high available phosphorus hybrid of corn (HAPC), supplementation with phytase enzyme, and reduced dietary P levels. The use of HAPC resulted in a 50% reduction in phytate-bound dietary P as compared with a normal yellow dent corn (YDC) diet. Dietary nonphytate P was maintained at either NRC (1994) recommendations for appropriate age periods or reduced by 0.075 or 0.15%. Portions of the diets were supplemented with 1,000 units of phytase/kg. Male chicks of a commercial strain were grown to 56 d on the test diets. Broilers fed diets with HAPC had BW, feed conversion, livability, and tibia ash that were equal to or superior to those fed diets with YDC with considerably reduced fecal P content at any dietary level of nonphytate P. Phytase supplementation enabled birds to maintain live performance at lower levels of nonphytate P, further reducing the fecal P output. One of the greatest contributions of phytase was a reduction in mortality at the lower levels of nonphytate P. Dietary P levels could be reduced by 0.075% under NRC (1994) recommendations without adversely affecting live performance; a reduction of 0.15% in conjunction with phytase supplementation maintained BW, feed conversion, and livability but reduced tibia ash. The extent to which dietary P levels can be reduced over the entire feeding program is subject to further research.

  4. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Microgravity Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The Demonstrator is a tool to create microgravity conditions in your classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions and to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. A wealth of back-round material on free-fall, microgravity, and micro-gravity sciences is available in two educational documents available through the NASA Teacher Resource Centers: Microgravity-Activity Guide for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, and The Mathematics of Microgravity. The remainder of this manual is divided into five sections. The first explains how to put the Microgravity Demonstrator together. The next section introduces the individual demonstrations and discusses the underlying physical science concepts. Following that are detailed steps for conducting each demonstration to make your use of the Demonstrator most effective. Next are some ideas on how to make your own Microgravity Demonstrator. The last section is a tips and troubleshooting guide for video connections and operations. If you have one of the NASA Microgravity Demonstrators, this entire manual should be useful. If you have a copy of the Microgravity Demonstrator Videotape and would like to use that as a teaching tool, the Demonstrations and Scientific Background section of this manual will give you insight into the science areas studied in microgravity.

  6. Availability of Maintained Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    to other replacement policies. The problem is formulated and solved as a nonlinear programming problem. Lie � studied the optimal availability...availability equation of the system are non- linear; the optimization methods employed to solve this problem are both generalized reduced gradient ( GRG ...66 V. CORRECTIVE AND PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE AND OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES ... .......... 69 Effect of Corrective and Preventive Maintenance

  7. Rotary Burner Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Flanagan

    2003-04-30

    The subject technology, the Calcpos Rotary Burner (CRB), is a burner that is proposed to reduce energy consumption and emission levels in comparison to currently available technology. burners are used throughout industry to produce the heat that is required during the refining process. Refineries seek to minimize the use of energy in refining while still meeting EPA regulations for emissions.

  8. Efficiency of a miniaturized silica monolithic cartridge in reducing matrix ions as demonstrated in the simultaneous extraction of morphine and codeine from urine samples for quantification with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Nema, T; Chan, E C Y; Ho, P C

    2011-09-01

    Presence of matrix ions could negatively affect the sensitivity and selectivity of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS). In this study, the efficiency of a miniaturized silica monolithic cartridge in reducing matrix ions was demonstrated in the simultaneous extraction of morphine and codeine from urine samples for quantification with LC-MS. The miniaturized silica monolith with hydroxyl groups present on the largely exposed surface area function as a weak cation exchanger for solid phase extraction (SPE). The miniaturized silica cartridge in 1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm length was housed in a 2-ml syringe fixed over a SPE vacuum manifold for extraction. The cleaning effectiveness of the cartridge was confirmed by osmometer, atomic absorption spectrometer, LC-MS and GC-TOFMS. The drugs were efficiently extracted from urine samples with recoveries ranging from 86% to 114%. The extracted analytes, after concentration and reconstitution, were quantified using LC-MS/MS. The limits of detection for morphine and codeine were 2 ng/ml and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations of measurements ranged from 3% to 12%. The monolithic sorbent offered good linearity with correlation coefficients > 0.99, over a concentration range of 50-500 ng/ml. The silica monolithic cartridge was found to be more robust than the particle-based packed sorbent and also the commercial cartridge with regards to its recyclability and repeated usage with minimal loss in efficiency. Our study demonstrated the efficiency of the miniaturized silica monolith for removal of matrix ions and extraction of drugs of abuse in urinary screening.

  9. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  10. Evaluation of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2. Part 6: 90-day OECD 413 rat inhalation study with systems toxicology endpoints demonstrates reduced exposure effects of a mentholated version compared with mentholated and non-mentholated cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Alberto; Lebrun, Stefan; Kogel, Ulrike; Ho, Jenny; Tan, Wei Teck; Titz, Bjoern; Leroy, Patrice; Vuillaume, Gregory; Bera, Monali; Martin, Florian; Rodrigo, Gregory; Esposito, Marco; Dempsey, Ruth; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick

    2016-11-30

    The toxicity of a mentholated version of the Tobacco Heating System (THS2.2M), a candidate modified risk tobacco product (MRTP), was characterized in a 90-day OECD inhalation study. Differential gene and protein expression analysis of nasal epithelium and lung tissue was also performed to record exposure effects at the molecular level. Rats were exposed to filtered air (sham), to THS2.2M (at 15, 23 and 50 μg nicotine/l), to two mentholated reference cigarettes (MRC) (at 23 μg nicotine/l), or to the 3R4F reference cigarette (at 23 μg nicotine/l). MRCs were designed to meet 3R4F specifications. Test atmosphere analyses demonstrated that aldehydes were reduced by 75%-90% and carbon monoxide by 98% in THS2.2M aerosol compared with MRC smoke; aerosol uptake was confirmed by carboxyhemoglobin and menthol concentrations in blood, and by the quantities of urinary nicotine metabolites. Systemic toxicity and alterations in the respiratory tract were significantly lower in THS2.2M-exposed rats compared with MRC and 3R4F. Pulmonary inflammation and the magnitude of the changes in gene and protein expression were also dramatically lower after THS2.2M exposure compared with MRCs and 3R4F. No menthol-related effects were observed after MRC mainstream smoke-exposure compared with 3R4F.

  11. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  12. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  13. Demonstration of integrated optimization software

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    NeuCO has designed and demonstrated the integration of five system control modules using its proprietary ProcessLink{reg_sign} technology of neural networks, advanced algorithms and fuzzy logic to maximize performance of coal-fired plants. The separate modules control cyclone combustion, sootblowing, SCR operations, performance and equipment maintenance. ProcessLink{reg_sign} provides overall plant-level integration of controls responsive to plant operator and corporate criteria. Benefits of an integrated approach include NOx reduction improvement in heat rate, availability, efficiency and reliability; extension of SCR catalyst life; and reduced consumption of ammonia. All translate into cost savings. As plant complexity increases through retrofit, repowering or other plant modifications, this integrated process optimization approach will be an important tool for plant operators. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  14. Telavancin Demonstrates Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Vancomycin, Daptomycin, and Linezolid in Broth Microdilution MIC and One-Compartment Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jordan R.; Barber, Katie E.; Hallesy, Jessica; Raut, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates have arisen with reduced susceptibility to several anti-MRSA agents. Telavancin (TLV), a novel anti-MRSA agent, retains low MICs against these organisms. Our objective was to determine the MICs for TLV, daptomycin (DAP), vancomycin (VAN), and linezolid (LZD) against daptomycin-nonsusceptible (DNS) S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heteroresistant VISA (hVISA), and linezolid-resistant (LZDr) S. aureus. We also evaluated these agents against each phenotype in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Seventy DNS, 100 VISA, 180 hVISA, and 25 LZDr MRSA isolates were randomly selected from our library and tested to determine their MICs against TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD via broth microdilution and a Trek panel. Four isolates were randomly selected for 168-h in vitro models to evaluate treatment with TLV at 10 mg/kg of body weight/day, DAP at 10 mg/kg/day, VAN at 1 g every 12 h (q12h), and LZD at 600 mg q12h. The MIC50/90 for TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD against 70 DNS S. aureus isolates were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 2/4 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 2/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 100 VISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 4/8 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 170 hVISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 0.5/1 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 25 LZDr isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.03/0.06 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 2/2 μg/ml, and 8/8 μg/ml, respectively. The TLV MIC was >0.125 μg/ml for 10/365 (2.7%) isolates. In PK/PD models, TLV was universally bactericidal at 168 h and statistically superior to all antibiotics against DNS S. aureus strain R2334. These data further establish the potency of TLV against resistant MRSA. The model data demonstrate in vitro bactericidal activity of TLV against hVISA, VISA, DNS S. aureus, and LZDr S. aureus strains. Further clinical research is warranted. PMID:26124162

  15. Telavancin demonstrates activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid in broth microdilution MIC and one-compartment pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan R; Barber, Katie E; Hallesy, Jessica; Raut, Animesh; Rybak, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates have arisen with reduced susceptibility to several anti-MRSA agents. Telavancin (TLV), a novel anti-MRSA agent, retains low MICs against these organisms. Our objective was to determine the MICs for TLV, daptomycin (DAP), vancomycin (VAN), and linezolid (LZD) against daptomycin-nonsusceptible (DNS) S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heteroresistant VISA (hVISA), and linezolid-resistant (LZD(r)) S. aureus. We also evaluated these agents against each phenotype in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Seventy DNS, 100 VISA, 180 hVISA, and 25 LZD(r) MRSA isolates were randomly selected from our library and tested to determine their MICs against TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD via broth microdilution and a Trek panel. Four isolates were randomly selected for 168-h in vitro models to evaluate treatment with TLV at 10 mg/kg of body weight/day, DAP at 10 mg/kg/day, VAN at 1 g every 12 h (q12h), and LZD at 600 mg q12h. The MIC50/90 for TLV, DAP, VAN, and LZD against 70 DNS S. aureus isolates were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 2/4 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 2/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 100 VISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 4/8 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 170 hVISA isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.06/0.125 μg/ml, 0.5/1 μg/ml, 1/2 μg/ml, and 1/2 μg/ml, respectively. Against 25 LZD(r) isolates, the MIC50/90 were 0.03/0.06 μg/ml, 1/1 μg/ml, 2/2 μg/ml, and 8/8 μg/ml, respectively. The TLV MIC was >0.125 μg/ml for 10/365 (2.7%) isolates. In PK/PD models, TLV was universally bactericidal at 168 h and statistically superior to all antibiotics against DNS S. aureus strain R2334. These data further establish the potency of TLV against resistant MRSA. The model data demonstrate in vitro bactericidal activity of TLV against hVISA, VISA, DNS S. aureus, and LZD(r) S. aureus strains. Further clinical research is warranted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  16. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  17. Global Availability of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Turk-Adawi, Karam; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent non-communicable disease globally, namely cardiovascular disease (CVD), is also the leading cause of mortality, with over 80% of the deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. To lessen the impact of CVDs on individuals and societies, a comprehensive approach is needed. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) involves delivery of structured exercise, education and risk reduction, in a cost-effective manner. Robust evidence demonstrates it reduces mortality up to 25%, improves functional capacity, as well as decreases re-hospitalization. Despite its benefits, and clinical practice guideline recommendations to refer cardiac patients, CR programs are grossly under-used. Worldwide, there is low availability of CR; only 38.8% of countries globally have CR programs. Specifically, 68.0% of high-income and 23% of LMICs (28.2% for middle- and 8.3% for low-income countries) have CR. CR density estimates ranged from 1 program per 0.1–6.4 million inhabitants. CR availability is much lower than that of other evidence-based secondary prevention therapies, such as revascularization and pharmacological therapies. Multi-level strategies to augment CR capacity and availability at national and international levels such as supportive public health policies, systematic referral strategies, and alternative models of delivery are needed. PMID:25027487

  18. BEAM Technology Flight Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, David

    2005-01-01

    As technologies advance, their growing complexity makes them harder to maintain. Detection methods for isolating and identifying impending problems are needed to balance this complexity. Through comparison of signal pairs from onboard sensors, the Beacon-based Exception Analysis For Multimissions (BEAM) algorithm can identify and help classify deviations in system operation from a data-trained statistical model. The goal of this task is to mature BEAM and validate its performance on a flying test bed. A series of F-18 flight demonstrations with BEAM monitoring engine parameters in real time was used to demonstrate in-the-field readiness. Captured F-18 and simulated F-18 engine data were used in model creation and training. The algorithm was then ported to the embedded system with a data buffering, file writing, and data-time-stamp monitoring shell to reduce the impact of embedded system faults on BEAM'S ability to correctly identify engine faults. Embedded system testing identified hardware related restrictions and contributed to iterative improvements in the code's runtime performance. The system was flown with forced engine flameouts and other pilot induced faults to simulate operation out of the norm. Successful detection of these faults, confirmed through post-flight data analysis, helped BEAM achieve TRL6.

  19. SSME Key Operations Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian; Bradley, Michael; Ives, Janet

    1997-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test program was conducted between August 1995 and May 1996 using the Technology Test Bed (TTB) Engine. SSTO vehicle studies have indicated that increases in the propulsion system operating range can save significant weight and cost at the vehicle level. This test program demonstrated the ability of the SSME to accommodate a wide variation in safe operating ranges and therefore its applicability to the SSTO mission. A total of eight tests were completed with four at Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Engine Test Facility and four at the Stennis Space Center (SSC) A-2 attitude test stand. Key demonstration objectives were: 1) Mainstage operation at 5.4 to 6.9 mixture ratio; 2) Nominal engine start with significantly reduced engine inlet pressures of 50 psia LOX and 38 psia fuel; and 3) Low power level operation at 17%, 22%, 27%, 40%, 45%, and 50% of Rated Power Level. Use of the highly instrumented TTB engine for this test series has afforded the opportunity to study in great detail engine system operation not possible with a standard SSME and has significantly contributed to a greater understanding of the capabilities of the SSME and liquid rocket engines in general.

  20. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work si shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing• ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testingThe driving requirements for this development are:• SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components• Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  1. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  2. ORION II bus demonstration. Demonstration report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, J.

    1989-02-01

    The Central New York Regional Transportation Authority conducted an 18-month demonstration to determine how the ORION II bus operates in actual service. The ORION II vehicle is a small low floor, accessible heavy duty, diesel-powered transit bus designed to meet the needs of the elderly and handicapped. It has the capacity to seat 26 passengers with 4 wheelchair lockdowns. Side and rear doors are equipped with electrically powered ramps. Eight Thomas vehicles (22-foot, 11,500 lbs, wheelchair equipped, gasoline fueled) were also tested during the demonstration period. Operations (fuel and oil usage) and maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) data were collected and charted-out in the report as well as driver, passenger, and maintenance surveys. This report provides descriptions, photographs, and comparison charts of both the diesel-fueled ORION II transit bus and the gasoline-fueled Thomas vehicles along with the demonstration test plan, evaluations, conclusions, and survey results.

  3. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  4. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  6. A 7-month cigarette smoke inhalation study in C57BL/6 mice demonstrates reduced lung inflammation and emphysema following smoking cessation or aerosol exposure from a prototypic modified risk tobacco product.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Peck, Michael J; Buettner, Ansgar; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Vuillaume, Gregory; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Martin, Florian; Boué, Stéphanie; Schlage, Walter K; Schneider, Thomas; Titz, Bjoern; Talikka, Marja; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2015-06-01

    Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) are designed to reduce smoking-related health risks. A murine model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was applied to investigate classical toxicology end points plus systems toxicology (transcriptomics and proteomics). C57BL/6 mice were exposed to conventional cigarette smoke (3R4F), fresh air (sham), or a prototypic MRTP (pMRTP) aerosol for up to 7 months, including a cessation group and a switching-to-pMRTP group (2 months of 3R4F exposure followed by fresh air or pMRTP for up to 5 months respectively). 3R4F smoke induced the typical adaptive changes in the airways, as well as inflammation in the lung, associated with emphysematous changes (impaired pulmonary function and alveolar damage). At nicotine-matched exposure concentrations of pMRTP aerosol, no signs of lung inflammation and emphysema were observed. Both the cessation and switching groups showed a similar reversal of inflammatory responses and no progression of initial emphysematous changes. A significant impact on biological processes, including COPD-related inflammation, apoptosis, and proliferation, was identified in 3R4F-exposed, but not in pMRTP-exposed lungs. Smoking cessation or switching reduced these perturbations to near sham-exposed levels. In conclusion, the mouse model indicated retarded disease progression upon cessation or switching to pMRTP which alone had no adverse effects.

  7. The borohydride-reducible compounds of human aortic elastin. Demonstration of a new cyclic amino acid in alkali hydrolysate, and changes with age and in patients with annulo-aortic ectasia including one with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Halme, T; Jutila, M; Vihersaari, T; Oksman, P; Light, N D; Penttinen, R

    1985-01-01

    Human aortic elastin reduced with [3H]borohydride was analysed by ion-exchange chromatography after alkali or acid hydrolysis. Alkali hydrolysates of elastins contained a radioactive peak that was eluted between proline and leucine. This peak was not present in foetal elastin, but its proportion increased steadily during aging. Aortic samples from patients with annulo-aortic ectasia (aneurysm of the ascending aorta), including one with classical Marfan syndrome, contained less elastin (CNBr-insoluble material) than did the age-matched controls. The proportion of radioactivity in the new peak of all these aortas was low when compared with age-matched controls. Gas-chromatographic/mass-spectrometric analysis suggested that it contained a cyclic derivative of a hydrated aldol-condensation product. The concentration of the cross-link precursors, lysine aldehyde and aldol-condensation product (estimated from the acid-hydrolysis product 6-chloronorleucine and the acid-degradation product of reduced aldol-condensation product) was high in very young aortas but remained quite stable after childhood. No differences were observed in cross-link profiles of acid hydrolysates between pathological and control aortas. A low proportion of radioactivity in the new peak may indicate the presence of young or immature elastin in the pathological aortas. PMID:4084226

  8. Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) background document for newly listed wastes: K107, k108, k109, k110, k111, k112, u328, u353, k117, k118, k136, k123, k124, k125, k126, k131, k132, u359. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-30

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (the Agency or EPA) is establishing best demonstrated available technology (BDAT) treatment standards for the following listed hazardous wastes identified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Sections 261.32 and 261.33(f) (40 CFR 261.32 and 261.33(f)): 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) Production Wastes: K107, K108, K109, and K110; Dinitrotoluene (DNT) and Toluenediamine (TDA) Production Wastes: K111, K112, U328, and U353; Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) Production Wastes: K117, K118, and K136; Ethylenebisdithiocarbamic acid (EBDC) Production Wastes: K123, K124, K125, and K126; Methyl Bromide Production Wastes: K131 and K132; and 2-Ethoxyethanol Waste: U359.

  9. Why Demonstrations Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    2005-01-01

    With the current focus on constructivist perspectives, science demonstrations have fallen out of favor in some circles. Demonstrations are easy to do and offer many benefits and unique opportunities in the constructivist classroom. With careful use, demonstrations can be powerful teaching tools. A wonderful quality of a demonstration (or a series…

  10. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  11. Development of a Field Demonstration for Cost-Effective Low-Grade Heat Recovery and Use Technology Designed to Improve Efficiency and Reduce Water Usage Rates for a Coal-Fired Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Russell; Dombrowski, K.; Bernau, M.; Morett, D.; Maxson, A.; Hume, S.

    2016-06-30

    Coal-based power generation systems provide reliable, low-cost power to the domestic energy sector. These systems consume large amounts of fuel and water to produce electricity and are the target of pending regulations that may require reductions in water use and improvements in thermal efficiency. While efficiency of coal-based generation has improved over time, coal power plants often do not utilize the low-grade heat contained in the flue gas and require large volumes of water for the steam cycle make-up, environmental controls, and for process cooling and heating. Low-grade heat recovery is particularly challenging for coal-fired applications, due in large part to the condensation of acid as the flue gas cools and the resulting potential corrosion of the heat recovery materials. Such systems have also not been of significant interest as recent investments on coal power plants have primarily been for environmental controls due to more stringent regulations. Also, in many regions, fuel cost is still a pass-through to the consumer, reducing the motivation for efficiency improvements. Therefore, a commercial system combining low-grade heat-recovery technologies and associated end uses to cost effectively improve efficiency and/or reduce water consumption has not yet been widely applied. However, pressures from potential new regulations and from water shortages may drive new interest, particularly in the U.S. In an effort to address this issue, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sought to identify and promote technologies to achieve this goal.

  12. LFR Demonstrator Materials Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, M

    2006-08-02

    Interest in fast reactor development has increased with the Department of Energy's introduction of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) [1]. The GNEP program plans development of a sodium cooled Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) that can be used to reduce the amount spent LWR fuel in storage and the number of high level waste sites needed for expansion of nuclear power throughout the world over the 21st century. In addition, the program proposes to make nuclear power more available while reducing the proliferation concerns by revising policies and technology for control of weapons useable materials. This would be accomplished with establishment of new institutional arrangements based on selective siting of reprocessing, enrichment and waste disposal facilities. The program would also implement development of small reactors suitable for use in developing countries or remote regions with small power grids. Over the past several years, under the Department of Energy (DOE) NERI and GEN IV programs research has been conducted on small lead cooled reactors. The Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) [2] is the most recent version of this type of reactor and research is continuing on it in the GEN IV program in parallel with GNEP. SSTAR is a small (10MWe-100MWe) reactor that is fueled once for life. It complements the GNEP program very well in that it serves one of the world markets not currently addressed by large reactors and its development requirements are similar to those for the ABRs. In particular, the fuel and structural materials for these fast spectrum reactors share common thermal and neutron environments. The coolants, sodium in ABR and lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) in SSTAR, are the major developmental difference. This report discusses the status of structural materials for fast reactor core and primary system components and selected aspects of their development.

  13. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  14. Public health impacts of the severe haze in Equatorial Asia in September-October 2015: demonstration of a new framework for informing fire management strategies to reduce downwind smoke exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplitz, Shannon N.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Marlier, Miriam E.; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Kim, Patrick S.; Liu, Tianjia; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Schwartz, Joel; Pongsiri, Montira; Myers, Samuel S.

    2016-09-01

    In September-October 2015, El Niño and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions set the stage for massive fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), leading to persistently hazardous levels of smoke pollution across much of Equatorial Asia. Here we quantify the emission sources and health impacts of this haze episode and compare the sources and impacts to an event of similar magnitude occurring under similar meteorological conditions in September-October 2006. Using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, we first calculate the influence of potential fire emissions across the domain on smoke concentrations in three receptor areas downwind—Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore—during the 2006 event. This step maps the sensitivity of each receptor to fire emissions in each grid cell upwind. We then combine these sensitivities with 2006 and 2015 fire emission inventories from the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) to estimate the resulting population-weighted smoke exposure. This method, which assumes similar smoke transport pathways in 2006 and 2015, allows near real-time assessment of smoke pollution exposure, and therefore the consequent morbidity and premature mortality, due to severe haze. Our approach also provides rapid assessment of the relative contribution of fire emissions generated in a specific province to smoke-related health impacts in the receptor areas. We estimate that haze in 2015 resulted in 100 300 excess deaths across Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, more than double those of the 2006 event, with much of the increase due to fires in Indonesia’s South Sumatra Province. The model framework we introduce in this study can rapidly identify those areas where land use management to reduce and/or avoid fires would yield the greatest benefit to human health, both nationally and regionally.

  15. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  16. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes several chemistry demonstrations that use an overhead projector. Some of the demonstrations deal with electrochemistry, and another deals with the reactions of nonvolatile immiscible liquid in water. (TW)

  17. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are demonstrations of the optical activity of two sugar solutions, and the effects of various substituents on acid strength using an overhead projector. Materials and procedures for each demonstration are discussed. (CW)

  18. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  19. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Marrocco, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  20. Classroom Demonstrations: Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Sandra M.

    These demonstrations stress individual differences, a concept becoming increasingly important in psychological research. Intended for use in undergraduate psychology courses, four demonstrations that illustrate common examples of human variation are described. The demonstrations deal with the following individual differences: taste blindness,…

  1. Bent Creek demonstration program

    Treesearch

    Erik C. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Bent Creek Research and Demonstration Forest scientists have transferred the results of research on the ecology and management of Southern Appalachian hardwoods since 1925. Since 1989, a full-time technology transfer specialist has led demonstration efforts. The demonstration program was designed to quickly transfer research results to interested users and to free...

  2. Bent Creek demonstration program

    Treesearch

    Erik C. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Bent Creek Research and Demonstration Forest scientists have transferred the results of research on the ecology and management of Southern Appalachian hardwoods since 1925. Since 1989, a full-time technology transfer specialist has led demonstration efforts. The demonstration program was designed to quickly transfer research results to interested users, and free-up...

  3. A Boyle's Law Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sathe, Dileep V.

    1984-01-01

    The usual apparatus for demonstrating Boyle's law produces reasonably accurate results, but is not impressive as a demonstration because students cannot easily appreciate the change in pressure. An apparatus designed to produce a more effective demonstration is described. Procedures employed are also described. (JN)

  4. Adolescents' Demonstrative Behavior Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parfilova, Gulfiya G.; Karimova, Lilia Sh.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of demonstrative behavior is very topical among teenagers and this issue has become the subject of systematic scientific research. Demonstrative manifestations in adolescents disrupt the favorable socialization; therefore, understanding, prevention and correction of demonstrative behavior at this age is relevant and requires special…

  5. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  6. Classical Demonstration of Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Moore, Dennis R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a classical demonstration of polarization for high school students. The initial state of this model, which demonstrates the important concepts of the optical and quantum problems, was developed during the 1973 summer program on lecture demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy. (HM)

  7. Analysis of Skylab fluid mechanics science demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Butz, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the data reduction and analysis of the Skylab fluid mechanics demonstrations are presented. All the fluid mechanics data available from the Skylab missions were identified and surveyed. The significant fluid mechanics phenomena were identified and reduced to measurable quantities wherever possible. Data correlations were performed using existing theories. Among the phenomena analyzed were: static low-g interface shapes, oscillation frequency and damping of a liquid drop, coalescence, rotating drop, liquid films and low-g ice melting. A survey of the possible applications of the results was made and future experiments are recommended.

  8. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  9. Data surety demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, T.; Harris, M.; Herrington, P.; Kromer, D.

    1998-08-01

    The use of data surety within the International Monitoring System (IMS) is designed to offer increased trust of acquired sensor data at a low cost. The demonstrations discussed in the paper illustrate the feasibility of hardware authentication for sensor data and commands in a retrofit environment and a new system and of the supporting key management system. The individual demonstrations which are summarized in the paper are: (1) demonstration of hardware authentication for communication authentication in a retrofit environment; (2)demonstration of hardware authentication in a new system; and (3) demonstration of key management for sensor data and command authentication.

  10. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  11. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  12. Reduced voltage losses yield 10% efficient fullerene free organic solar cells with >1 V open circuit voltages† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ee02598f Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, S.; Dimitrov, S.; Abdelsamie, M.; Gorman, J.; Ashraf, R. S.; Holliday, S.; Wadsworth, A.; Gasparini, N.; Kaienburg, P.; Yan, H.; Amassian, A.; Brabec, C. J.; Durrant, J. R.; McCulloch, I.

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of the energy levels at the donor–acceptor interface of organic solar cells has driven their efficiencies to above 10%. However, further improvements towards efficiencies comparable with inorganic solar cells remain challenging because of high recombination losses, which empirically limit the open-circuit voltage (V oc) to typically less than 1 V. Here we show that this empirical limit can be overcome using non-fullerene acceptors blended with the low band gap polymer PffBT4T-2DT leading to efficiencies approaching 10% (9.95%). We achieve V oc up to 1.12 V, which corresponds to a loss of only E g/q – V oc = 0.5 ± 0.01 V between the optical bandgap E g of the polymer and V oc. This high V oc is shown to be associated with the achievement of remarkably low non-geminate and non-radiative recombination losses in these devices. Suppression of non-radiative recombination implies high external electroluminescence quantum efficiencies which are orders of magnitude higher than those of equivalent devices employing fullerene acceptors. Using the balance between reduced recombination losses and good photocurrent generation efficiencies achieved experimentally as a baseline for simulations of the efficiency potential of organic solar cells, we estimate that efficiencies of up to 20% are achievable if band gaps and fill factors are further optimized. PMID:28066506

  13. Discovery of a 3-(4-Pyrimidinyl) Indazole (MLi-2), an Orally Available and Selective Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Inhibitor that Reduces Brain Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jack D; DeMong, Duane E; Greshock, Thomas J; Basu, Kallol; Dai, Xing; Harris, Joel; Hruza, Alan; Li, Sarah W; Lin, Sue-Ing; Liu, Hong; Macala, Megan K; Hu, Zhiyong; Mei, Hong; Zhang, Honglu; Walsh, Paul; Poirier, Marc; Shi, Zhi-Cai; Xiao, Li; Agnihotri, Gautam; Baptista, Marco A S; Columbus, John; Fell, Matthew J; Hyde, Lynn A; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Lin, Yinghui; Mirescu, Christian; Morrow, John A; Yin, Zhizhang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhou, Xiaoping; Chang, Ronald K; Embrey, Mark W; Sanders, John M; Tiscia, Heather E; Drolet, Robert E; Kern, Jonathan T; Sur, Sylvie M; Renger, John J; Bilodeau, Mark T; Kennedy, Matthew E; Parker, Eric M; Stamford, Andrew W; Nargund, Ravi; McCauley, John A; Miller, Michael W

    2017-03-16

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a large, multidomain protein which contains a kinase domain and GTPase domain among other regions. Individuals possessing gain of function mutations in the kinase domain such as the most prevalent G2019S mutation have been associated with an increased risk for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Given this genetic validation for inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity as a potential means of affecting disease progression, our team set out to develop LRRK2 inhibitors to test this hypothesis. A high throughput screen of our compound collection afforded a number of promising indazole leads which were truncated in order to identify a minimum pharmacophore. Further optimization of these indazoles led to the development of MLi-2 (1): a potent, highly selective, orally available, brain-penetrant inhibitor of LRRK2.

  14. Water data to answer urgent water policy questions: Monitoring design, available data and filling data gaps for determining the effectiveness of agricultural management practices for reducing tributary nutrient loads to Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentanzo, Elin A.; Choquette, Anne F.; Reckhow, Kenneth H.; Hayes, Laura; Hagan, Erik R; Argue, Denise M.; Cangelosi, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout its history, the United States has made major investments in assessing natural resources, such as soils, timber, oil and gas, and water. These investments allow policy makers, the private sector and the American public to make informed decisions about cultivating, harvesting or conserving these resources to maximize their value for public welfare, environmental conservation and the economy. As policy issues evolve, new priorities and challenges arise for natural resource assessment, and new approaches to monitoring are needed. For example, informed conservation and use of the nation’s finite fresh water resources in the context of increasingly intensive land development is a priority for today’s policy decisionmakers. There is a need to evaluate whether today’s water monitoring programs are generating the information needed to answer questions surrounding these new policy priorities. The Northeast-Midwest Institute (NEMWI), in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, initiated this project to explore the types and amounts of water data needed to address water-quality related policy questions of critical concern to today’s policy makers. The collaborating entities identified two urgent water policy questions and conducted case studies in the Northeast-Midwest region to determine the water data needed, water data available, and the best ways to fill the data gaps relative to those questions. This report details the output from one case study and focuses on the Lake Erie drainage basin, a data-rich area expected to be a best-case scenario in terms of water data availability.

  15. A Single-blind, Split-face, Randomized, Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Intradermal and Intramuscular Injection of Two Commercially Available Botulinum Toxin A Formulas to Reduce Signs of Facial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sapra, Priya; Sapra, Sheetal; Khanna, Julie; Mraud, Kelli; Bonadonna, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effectiveness of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection in improving skin texture and midface lift while reducing pore size and sebum production, as well as investigate the differences in effectiveness between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA using intradermal and intramuscular injection methods. Design: A 16-week, single-blind, split-face, randomized study. Each patient served as their own control, receiving onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA randomized to either the left or right side of the face. Patients received intradermal botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 0 and intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 2. Participants: Ten women aged 35 to 65 years who exhibited static rhytids in the glabellar and periorbital area. Measurements: The primary endpoint was efficacy of split-face treatment of intradermal and intramuscular onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA as assessed by a blinded evaluator using baseline and post-treatment photographs. The secondary endpoints included safety as assessed by adverse events and patient satisfaction measured by questionnaires completed at baseline and post-treatment. Results: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A led to a statistically significant improvement in skin texture (p=0.004) while also resulting in mild midface lift (p=0.024), but did not provide a significant reduction of pore size and sebum production. There was no statistically significant difference between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA when injected intradermally or intramuscularly. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A appears to be a safe and effective therapy that provides an improvement in facial skin texture and midface lift. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (ID#: NCT02907268). PMID:28367260

  16. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  17. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  18. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  19. Transcriptional assessment by microarray analysis and large-scale meta-analysis of the metabolic capacity of cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues to cope with reduced nutrient availability in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Echasseriau, Yann; Crespo, Diego; Baron, Daniel; Planas, Josep V; Prunet, Patrick; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2014-08-01

    The effects of nutrient availability on the transcriptome of cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues were assessed in juvenile gilthead sea bream fed with a standard diet at two feeding levels: (1) full ration size and (2) 70 % satiation followed by a finishing phase at the maintenance ration. Microarray analysis evidenced a characteristic transcriptomic profile for each muscle tissue following changes in oxidative capacity (heart > red skeletal muscle > white skeletal muscle). The transcriptome of heart and secondly that of red skeletal muscle were highly responsive to nutritional changes, whereas that of glycolytic white skeletal muscle showed less ability to respond. The highly expressed and nutritionally regulated genes of heart were mainly related to signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. In contrast, those of white muscle were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms related to proteolysis and protein ubiquitination. Microarray meta-analysis using the bioinformatic tool Fish and Chips ( http://fishandchips.genouest.org/index.php ) showed the close association of a representative cluster of white skeletal muscle with some of cardiac and red skeletal muscle, and many GO terms related to mitochondrial function appeared to be common links between them. A second round of cluster comparisons revealed that mitochondria-related GOs also linked differentially expressed genes of heart with those of liver from cortisol-treated gilthead sea bream. These results show that mitochondria are among the first responders to environmental and nutritional stress stimuli in gilthead sea bream, and functional phenotyping of this cellular organelle is highly promising to obtain reliable markers of growth performance and well-being in this fish species.

  20. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  1. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  2. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  3. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  4. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  5. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  6. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  7. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  8. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  9. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  10. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  11. USFWS demonstration fees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan; Vaske, Jerry; Donnelly, Maureen; Shelby, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This study examined National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) visitors' reactions to changes in fees implemented as part of the fee demonstration program. Visitors' evaluations of the fees paid were examined in addition to their beliefs about fees and the fee demonstration program, and the impact of fees paid on their intention to return. All results were analyzed relative to socio-demographic characteristics.

  12. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  13. The Microgravity Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    The Microgravity Demonstrator is a tool used to create microgravity conditions in the classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions in order to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. The manual is…

  14. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  15. Demonstrable farm scale ethanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mapel, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives were: to build and demonstrate that a farm scale alcohol plant can be built and run on renewable resources, i.e. corn as the source and corn cobs as the fuel; to show that it can be a continuous operation during the winter months when field work is at a minimum; and to demonstrate that a sufficient supply of fuel can be produced to dramatically reduce dependence on non-renewable energy. The investigators felt they had succeeded with their project. The spent spillage was fed to cattle on the farm. They feel by using corn grown on the farm, the project should continue to be profitable. 7 figures.

  16. Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model. The effect of vibration on launch vehicle dynamics was studied. Conditions included three modes of instability. The film includes close up views of the simulator fuel tank with and without stability control. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030984. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  17. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  18. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon F.; Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a method of demonstrating the optical activity of glucose using an overhead projector and easily obtainable materials. Explores the difference between reflected and transmitted light (Tyndall Effect) using sodium thiosulfate, hydrochloric acid, and an overhead projector. (ML)

  19. Commissioning the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqin; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator deploys high purity germanium (HPGe) detector modules to search for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment is aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility and low backgrounds for a next generation Ge-based BBz experiment. The program of testing and commissioning the Demonstrator modules is a critical step to debug and improve the experimental apparatus, to establish and refine operational procedures, and to develop data analysis tools. In this talk, we will discuss our experience commissioning the Demonstrator modules and show how this program leads to successful data-taking. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  20. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  1. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  2. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  3. Classroom Demonstration of Sunspots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Thomas O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An overhead projector, projection screen, and clear tungsten Filament light bulb operated through a dimmer or variac switch are used to demonstrate the fact that black appearance of sunspots is due only to contrast and that sunspots are bright. (SK)

  4. Demonstrating Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, David S.; Amundson, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes laboratory exercises with chickens selecting their food from dyed and natural corn kernels as a method of demonstrating natural selection. The procedure is based on the fact that organisms that blend into their surroundings escape predation. (BR)

  5. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are two demonstrations for teaching chemistry using the overhead projector. Included are "Oxidation of Cyclohexanol--An Amoebalike Reaction," and "A Diels-Alder Reaction for the Overhead Projector." Materials and procedures are detailed. (CW)

  6. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  7. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  8. Technology Demonstration Missions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Technology Demonstration Missions (TDM) Program seeks to infuse new technology into space applications, bridging the gap between mature “lab-proven” technology and "flight-ready" status....

  9. Demonstrating Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, David S.; Amundson, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes laboratory exercises with chickens selecting their food from dyed and natural corn kernels as a method of demonstrating natural selection. The procedure is based on the fact that organisms that blend into their surroundings escape predation. (BR)

  10. Classroom Demonstration of Sunspots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Thomas O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An overhead projector, projection screen, and clear tungsten Filament light bulb operated through a dimmer or variac switch are used to demonstrate the fact that black appearance of sunspots is due only to contrast and that sunspots are bright. (SK)

  11. Interactive spectra demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Bruce C.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes an interactive demonstration to help students qualitatively understand emission, continuous, and absorption spectra. Students throw colored balls at a person representing an electron that can move between discrete energy levels.

  12. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon F.; Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a method of demonstrating the optical activity of glucose using an overhead projector and easily obtainable materials. Explores the difference between reflected and transmitted light (Tyndall Effect) using sodium thiosulfate, hydrochloric acid, and an overhead projector. (ML)

  13. Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Mike Conley delivers a presentation from the Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of t...

  14. Constructing Training Demonstrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-16

    evaluates approaches and platforms to be employed for demonstrations, such as film, video, computer-based training, videogames , and simulations [10...case currently underway. It is composed of (1) existing curricula at the Army’s Armor School at Fort Knox, Kentucky; (2) a comparison of...demonstration approaches; and (3) a use case involving breaching operations. Armor School Training The Armor School’s mission is to educate and train Soldiers

  15. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  16. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  17. Loudspeaker line array educational demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Moser, Brad; Gee, Kent L

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a physical demonstration of an audio-range line array used to teach interference of multiple sources in a classroom or laboratory exercise setting. Software has been developed that permits real-time control and steering of the array. The graphical interface permits a user to vary the frequency, the angular response by phase shading, and reduce sidelobes through amplitude shading. An inexpensive, eight-element loudspeaker array has been constructed to test the control program. Directivity measurements of this array in an anechoic chamber and in a large classroom are presented. These measurements have good agreement with theoretical directivity predictions, thereby allowing its use as a quantitative learning tool for advanced students as well as a qualitative demonstration of arrays in other settings. Portions of this paper are directed toward educators who may wish to implement a similar demonstration for their advanced undergraduate or graduate level course in acoustics. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  18. Demonstrations in Introductory Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Stein, S.; van der Lee, S.; Swafford, L.; Klosko, E.; Delaughter, J.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geophysical concepts are challenging to teach at introductory levels, because students need to understand both the underlying physics and its geological application. To address this, our introductory courses include class demonstrations and experiments to demonstrate underlying physical principles and their geological applications. Demonstrations and experiments have several advantages over computer simulations. First, computer simulations "work" even if the basic principle is wrong. In contrast, simple demonstrations show that a principle is physically correct, rather than a product of computer graphics. Second, many students are unfamiliar with once-standard experiments demonstrating ideas of classical physics used in geophysics. Demonstrations are chosen that we consider stimulating, relevant, inexpensive, and easy to conduct in a non-lab classroom. These come in several groups. Many deal with aspects of seismic waves, using springs, light beams, and other methods such as talking from outside the room to illustrate the frequency dependence of diffraction (hearing but not seeing around a corner). Others deal with heat and mass transfer, such as illustrating fractional crystallization with apple juice and the surface/volume effect in planetary evolution with ice. Plate motions are illustrated with paper cutouts showing effects like motion on transform faults and how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence along the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska. Radioactive decay is simulated by having the class rise and sit down as a result of coin flips (one tail versus two gives different decay rates and hence half lives). This sessions' goal of exchanging information about demonstrations is an excellent idea: some of ours are described on http://www.earth.nwu.edu/people/seth/202.

  19. Test plan for the retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    This test plan describes a simulated buried waste retrieval demonstration that will be performed at the Caterpillar, Inc., Edwards Training Center located near Peoria, Illinois. The purpose of the demonstration is to determine the effectiveness of using readily available excavation equipment to retrieve, size, and handle various simulated waste forms that are similar in size, structure, and composition to those expected to be found in US Department of Energy contaminated waste pits and trenches. The objectives of this demonstration are to: meet and maintain daily production goals of 80 yd{sup 3}/day; minimize spillage and dust generation through careful and deliberate operations; document and evaluate methods for manipulating, sizing, and/or working around large objects; and document and evaluate requirements for operator augmentation and remote operation for hot test pit excavation operations. Four conditions comprising the range of environments to be evaluated include excavation of random material from below grade; stacked boxes and barrels from below grade; random materials from at grade; and stacked boxes and barrels from at grade. Results of the retrieval demonstration will reduce unknowns in the body of knowledge about retrieval equipment and procedural options for removal of buried transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It is anticipated that DOE will factor this information into a remedial investigation/feasibility plan leading to a final record of decision for disposition of buried TRU waste.

  20. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K; Cuppett, D; Dyer, D

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with Kalwall building panels. An added feature of the Kalwall system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  1. Native Mussels Alter Nutrient Availability and Reduce Blue ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nutrient cycling is a key process that ties all organisms together. This is especially apparent in stream environments in which nutrients are taken up readily and cycled through the system in a downstream trajectory. Ecological stoichiometry predicts that biogeochemical cycles of different elements are interdependent because the organisms that drive these cycles require fixed ratios of nutrients. There is growing recognition that animals play an important role in biogeochemical cycling across ecosystems. In particular, dense aggregations of consumers can create biogeochemical hotspots in aquatic ecosystems via nutrient translocation. We predicted that filter-feeding freshwater mussels, which occur as speciose, high biomass aggregates, would create biogeochemical hotspots in streams by altering nutrient limitation and algal dynamics. In a field study, we manipulated nitrogen and phosphorus using nutrient-diffusing substrates in areas with high and low mussel abundance, recorded algal growth and community composition, and determined in situ mussel excretion stoichiometry at 18 sites in 3 rivers (Kiamichi, Little, and Mt. Fork rivers, southcentral U.S.). Our results indicate that mussels greatly influence ecosystem processes by modifying the nutrients that limit primary productivity. Sites without mussels were N-limited with ~26% higher abundances of N-fixing blue-green algae, while sites with high mussel densities were co-limited (N and P) and dominated by diatoms

  2. Accelerator Availability and Reliability Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Suhring

    2003-05-01

    Maintaining reliable machine operations for existing machines as well as planning for future machines' operability present significant challenges to those responsible for system performance and improvement. Changes to machine requirements and beam specifications often reduce overall machine availability in an effort to meet user needs. Accelerator reliability issues from around the world will be presented, followed by a discussion of the major factors influencing machine availability.

  3. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  4. Autonomous docking ground demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Steve L.; Le, Thomas Quan; Othon, L. T.; Prather, Joseph L.; Eick, Richard E.; Baxter, Jim M.; Boyd, M. G.; Clark, Fred D.; Spehar, Peter T.; Teters, Rebecca T.

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Docking Ground Demonstration is an evaluation of the laser sensor system to support the docking phase (12 ft to contact) when operated in conjunction with the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) software. The docking mechanism being used was developed for the Apollo/Soyuz Test Program. This demonstration will be conducted using the 6-DOF Dynamic Test System (DTS). The DTS simulates the Space Station Freedom as the stationary or target vehicle and the Orbiter as the active or chase vehicle. For this demonstration, the laser sensor will be mounted on the target vehicle and the retroflectors will be on the chase vehicle. This arrangement was chosen to prevent potential damage to the laser. The laser sensor system, GN&C, and 6-DOF DTS will be operated closed-loop. Initial conditions to simulate vehicle misalignments, translational and rotational, will be introduced within the constraints of the systems involved.

  5. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P. ); Hartley, J.N. . Environmental Management Operations); Hinchee, R. )

    1992-08-01

    Environmental Management Operations (EMO) is conducting an Innovative Technology Demonstration Program for Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). Several innovative technologies are being demonstrated to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ. The bioremediation demonstration will evaluate a bioventing process in which the naturally occurring consortium of soil bacteria will be stimulated to aerobically degrade soil contaminants, including fuel and TCE, in situ.

  6. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hartley, J.N.; Hinchee, R.

    1992-08-01

    Environmental Management Operations (EMO) is conducting an Innovative Technology Demonstration Program for Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). Several innovative technologies are being demonstrated to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ. The bioremediation demonstration will evaluate a bioventing process in which the naturally occurring consortium of soil bacteria will be stimulated to aerobically degrade soil contaminants, including fuel and TCE, in situ.

  7. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  8. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  9. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  10. Education & Collection Facility GSHP Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Joplin, Jeff

    2015-03-28

    The Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS) designed and implemented an innovative ground source heat pump (GSHP) system for heating and cooling its new Education and Collection Facility (ECF) building addition. The project goal was to successfully design and install an open-loop GSHP system that utilized water circulating within an underground municipal recycled (non-potable) water system as the heat sink/source as a demonstration project. The expected results were to significantly reduce traditional GSHP installation costs while increasing system efficiency, reduce building energy consumption, require significantly less area and capital to install, and be economically implemented wherever access to a recycled water system is available. The project added to the understanding of GSHP technology by implementing the first GSHP system in the United States utilizing a municipal recycled water system as a heat sink/source. The use of this fluid through a GSHP system has not been previously documented. This use application presents a new opportunity for local municipalities to develop and expand the use of underground municipal recycled (non-potable) water systems. The installation costs for this type of technology in the building structure would be a cost savings over traditional GSHP costs, provided the local municipal infrastructure was developed. Additionally, the GSHP system functions as a viable method of heat sink/source as the thermal characteristics of the fluid are generally consistent throughout the year and are efficiently exchanged through the GSHP system and its components. The use of the recycled water system reduces the area required for bore or loop fields; therefore, presenting an application for building structures that have little to no available land use or access. This GSHP application demonstrates the viability of underground municipal recycled (non-potable) water systems as technically achievable, environmentally supportive, and an efficient

  11. Inseparable Phone Books Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balta, Nuri; Çetin, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed at first introducing a well-known discrepant event; inseparable phone books and second, turning it into an experiment for high school or middle school students. This discrepant event could be used especially to indicate how friction force can be effective in producing an unexpected result. Demonstration, discussion, explanation…

  12. The Breaking Broomstick Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamola, Karl C.; Pollock, Joseph T.

    1993-01-01

    Describes and explains the breaking broomstick demonstration first reported in 1532. A needle is fixed at each end of the broomstick, and these needles are made to rest on two glasses, placed on chairs. If the broomstick is struck violently with another stout stick, the former will be broken, but the glasses will remain intact. (PR)

  13. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  14. DEMONSTRATION PLAN FIELD MEASUREMENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The demonstration of innovative field measurement devices for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil is being conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in June 2000 at the Navy Base Ventura County site in Port Hueneme, California. The primary purpose of the demonstration is to evaluate innovative field measurement devices for TPH in soil based on their performance and cost as compared to a conventional, off-site laboratory analytical method. The seven field measurement devices listed below will be demonstrated. CHEMetrics, Inc.'s, RemediAidTm Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Starter Kit Wilks Enterprise, Inc.'s, Infracal' TOG/TPH Analyzer, Models CVH and HATR-T Horiba Instruments, Incorporated's, OCMA-350 Oil Content Analyzer Dexsil' Corporation's PetroFLAGTm Hydrocarbon Test Kit for Soil Environmental Systems Corporation's Synchronous Scanning Luminoscope siteLAB@ Corporation's Analytical Test Kit UVF-3 I OOA Strategic Diagnostics, Inc.'s, EnSys Petro Test System This demonstration plan describes the procedures that will be used to verify the performance and cost of each field measurement device. The plan incorporates the quality assurance and quality control elements needed to generate data of sufficient quality to document each device's performance and cost. A separate innovative technology verification report (ITVR) will be prepared for each device. The ITVRs will present the demonstratio

  15. Astronomy Demonstrations and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    Demonstrations in astronomy classes seem to be more necessary than in physics classes for three reasons. First, many of the events are very large scale and impossibly remote from human senses. Secondly, while physics courses use discussions of one- and two-dimensional motion, three-dimensional motion is the normal situation in astronomy; thus,…

  16. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  17. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  18. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Provides two demonstrations: (1) electrolyte migration of ions using colored ions which cross a strip of gelatin allowing for noticeable migration; and (2) photochemical reduction of Fe+3 by the citrate ion. Points out both reactions can be done in a Petri dish using common lab materials. (MVL)

  19. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  20. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  1. A Magnetic Circuit Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderkooy, John; Lowe, June

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration designed to illustrate Faraday's, Ampere's, and Lenz's laws and to reinforce the concepts through the analysis of a two-loop magnetic circuit. Can be made dramatic and challenging for sophisticated students but is suitable for an introductory course in electricity and magnetism. (JRH)

  2. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Provides two demonstrations: (1) electrolyte migration of ions using colored ions which cross a strip of gelatin allowing for noticeable migration; and (2) photochemical reduction of Fe+3 by the citrate ion. Points out both reactions can be done in a Petri dish using common lab materials. (MVL)

  3. ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FORBES, JACK

    THE ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL IS LOCATED IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA, WHERE THE NAVAJO LANGUAGE IS UNIVERSALLY SPOKEN BY THE NAVAJO PEOPLE. IT IS LOCATED ON A NAVAJO RESERVATION AND WAS DESIGNED AS A BIA EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOL TO SERVE 200 ELEMENTARY PUPILS, MOST OF WHOM ARE IN THE BOARDING SCHOOL SITUATION. AN OBJECTIVE OF THE SCHOOL IS TO GAIN…

  4. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are three chemistry demonstrations: (1) a simple qualitative technique for taste pattern recognition in structure-activity relationships; (2) a microscale study of gaseous diffusion using bleach, HCl, ammonia, and phenolphthalein; and (3) the rotation of polarized light by stereoisomers of limonene. (MVL)

  5. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are three chemistry demonstrations: (1) a simple qualitative technique for taste pattern recognition in structure-activity relationships; (2) a microscale study of gaseous diffusion using bleach, HCl, ammonia, and phenolphthalein; and (3) the rotation of polarized light by stereoisomers of limonene. (MVL)

  6. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  7. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  8. Why Demonstrations Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The author remembers how exciting it was when the teacher had "stuff" on the front desk: unfamiliar objects and other things out of place in the traditional classroom. Years later, as a new teacher, the author learned the importance of building lessons around concepts and that demonstrations are an integral part of concept development in science.…

  9. A Magnetic Circuit Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderkooy, John; Lowe, June

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration designed to illustrate Faraday's, Ampere's, and Lenz's laws and to reinforce the concepts through the analysis of a two-loop magnetic circuit. Can be made dramatic and challenging for sophisticated students but is suitable for an introductory course in electricity and magnetism. (JRH)

  10. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  11. A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations are a great vehicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. Educational research is replete with data showing that concept application in an inquiry setting reinforces long-term science content retention. This means that students learn best when they experience applications of concepts and…

  12. Constructing Virtual Training Demonstrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    asymmetric threats present an ongoing need to disseminate lessons learned straight from the battlefield to a wide audience of personnel. Interactive...materials because they accelerate learning , stimulate interest, and communicate better than text. They also can be delivered on a wide variety of...areas of research (e.g., observational learning studies, behavioral modeling training) to identify factors influencing demonstration effectiveness; and

  13. A Biofeedback Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Michael K.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for measurement of biophysical signals produced by the human body. The signals, after amplification, could provide acoustical feedback through a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), or they could be seen either with an oscilloscope or a high speed chart recorder. (GA)

  14. A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations are a great vehicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. Educational research is replete with data showing that concept application in an inquiry setting reinforces long-term science content retention. This means that students learn best when they experience applications of concepts and…

  15. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  16. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  17. Physical Education Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lucy

    For several years, physical educators in Marion County, Florida, have been actively illustrating their programs to the community they serve. These demonstrations reflect the variety and diversity of the county's physical education programs. The main objectives for these presentations are: (1) to inform the public; (2) to give exposure to the…

  18. Repository Drift Backfilling Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Londe, I.; Dubois, J.Ph.; Bauer, C.

    2008-07-01

    The 'Backfilling Demonstrator' is one of the technological demonstrators developed by ANDRA in the framework of the feasibility studies for a geological repository for high-level long-lived (HL-LL waste) within a clay formation. The demonstrator concerns the standard and supporting backfills as defined in Andra's 2005 design. The standard backfill is intended to fill up almost all drifts of the underground repository in order to limit any deformation of the rock after the degradation of the drift lining. The supporting backfill only concerns a small portion of the volume to be backfilled in order to counter the swelling pressure of the swelling clay contained in the sealing structures. The first objective of the demonstrator was to show the possibility of manufacturing a satisfactory backfill, in spite of the exiguity of the underground structures, and of reusing as much as possible the argillite muck. For the purpose of this experiment, the argillite muck was collected on Andra's work-site for the implementation of an underground research laboratory. Still ongoing, the second objective is to follow up the long-term evolution of the backfill. Approximately 200 m{sup 3} of compacted backfill material have been gathered in a large concrete tube simulating a repository drift. The standard backfill was manufactured exclusively with argillite. The supporting backfill was made by forming a mixture of argillite and sand. Operations were carried out mostly at Richwiller, close to Mulhouse, France. The objectives of the demonstrator were met: an application method was tested and proven satisfactory. The resulting dry densities are relatively high, although the moduli of deformation do not always reach the set goal. The selected objective for the demonstrator was a dry density corresponding to a relatively high compaction level (95% of the standard Proctor optimum [SPO]), for both pure argillite and the argillite-sand mixture. The plate-percussion compaction technique was

  19. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  20. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  1. Notional Airspace Operations Demonstration Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trongale, Nicholas A.

    2006-01-01

    The airspace operations demonstration (AOD) is intended to show that the Access 5 Step 1 functional requirements can be met. The demonstration will occur in two phases. The initial on-range phase will be carried out in restricted airspace to demonstrate the cooperative collision avoidance (CCA) functional requirements and to provide risk-reduction for the AOD by allowing the test team to rehearse some elements of the demonstration mission. The CCA system to be used in these flights is based on Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) which is a commercially-available system by which airplanes constantly broadcast their current position and altitude to other aircraft and ground resources over a dedicated radio datalink. The final phase will occur in the national airspace (NAS) and will be the formal demonstration of the remainder of the proposed functional requirements. The general objectives of the AOD are as follows: (1) Demonstrate that the UAS can aviate in the NAS (2) Demonstrate that the UAS can navigate in the NAS (3) Demonstrate that the UAS can communicate with the NAS (4) Demonstrate that the UAS can perform selected collision avoidance functions in the NAS (5) Demonstrate that the UAS can evaluate and avoid weather conflicts in the NAS (6) Demonstrate that the UAS can provide adequate command and control in the NAS In addition to the stated objectives, there are a number of goals for the flight demonstration. The demo can be accomplished successfully without achieving these goals, but these goals are to be used as a guideline for preparing for the mission. The goals are: (1) Mission duration of at least 24 hours (2) Loiter over heavy traffic to evaluate the data block issue identified during the Access 5 Airspace Operations Simulations (3) Document the contingency management process and lessons learned (4) Document the coordination process for Ground Control Stations (GCS) handoff (5) Document lessons learned regarding the process of flying in

  2. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the mechanical/structural assembly of the beam builder is reported. The following structures were investigated: cross brace magazine/dispenser subsystem; and rolling mill supply reel, guide, and drive. The fabrication facility design and a detail design of all major subsystem components are discussed. The number of spot welds per structural joint were reduced which enables the doubling of length of truss which can be produced within known electrode life limits.

  3. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress on fabrication facility (beam builder) support structure control, clamp/weld block, and welding and truss cut off is discussed. The brace attachment design was changed and the design of the weld mechanism was modified which achieved the following system benefits: (1) simplified weld electrode life; (2) reduced weld power requirements; and (3) simplified brace attachment mechanisms. Static and fatigue characteristics of spot welded 2024T3 aluminum joints are evaluated.

  4. Chemical Domino Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Dale

    1998-04-01

    The Chemical Domino Demonstration is both educational and entertaining. It provides an excellent means for a review of chemical concepts at the conclusion of a general chemistry course. This demonstration consists of a number of different chemical reactions occurring in sequence in a Rube Goldberg-type apparatus. These reactions include the reduction of water by an active metal, the oxidation of a moderately active metal by an acid, reduction of metallic ions by a metal of greater activity, acid-base neutralization reactions in solution monitored with indicators, a gas-phase acid-base neutralization reaction, decomposition of a compound, precipitation of an insoluble salt, substitution reactions of coordination complexes, and pyrotechnic oxidation-reduction reactions including a hypergolic oxidation-reduction reaction, an intramolecular oxidation-reduction reaction, and the combustion of a flammable gas.

  5. Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshangi, Nasser

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a autonomous umbilical mating for the mars umbilical technology demonstrator. The Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator (MUTD) shall provide electrical power and fiber optic data cable connections between two simulated mars vehicles. The Omnibot is used to provide the mobile base for the system. The mate to umbilical plate is mounted on a three axis Cartesian table, which is installed on the Omnibot mobile base. The Omnibot is controlled in a teleoperated mode. The operator using the vision system will guide the Omnibot to get close to the mate to plate. The information received from four ultrasonic sensors is used to identify the position of mate to plate and mate the umbilical plates autonomously. A successful experimentation verifies the approach.

  6. GFAST Software Demonstration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-17

    NASA engineers and test directors gather in Firing Room 3 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to watch a demonstration of the automated command and control software for the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft. The software is called the Ground Launch Sequencer. It will be responsible for nearly all of the launch commit criteria during the final phases of launch countdowns. The Ground and Flight Application Software Team (GFAST) demonstrated the software. It was developed by the Command, Control and Communications team in the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. GSDO is helping to prepare the center for the first test flight of Orion atop the SLS on Exploration Mission 1.

  7. GFAST Software Demonstration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-17

    NASA engineers and test directors gather in Firing Room 3 in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to watch a demonstration of the automated command and control software for the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft. In front, far right, is Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, launch director for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). The software is called the Ground Launch Sequencer. It will be responsible for nearly all of the launch commit criteria during the final phases of launch countdowns. The Ground and Flight Application Software Team (GFAST) demonstrated the software. It was developed by the Command, Control and Communications team in the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. GSDO is helping to prepare the center for the first test flight of Orion atop the SLS on EM-1.

  8. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  9. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  10. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  11. Education Demonstration Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, A.; Lee, R. L.

    2005-10-01

    Several GA Fusion Education Program plasma related demonstration items were developed this year. A 120 V ac powered electromagnetic coil shows eddy current levitation over an aluminum sheet and continuously changing magnetic force interactions using additional permanent magnets. A 300 V dc plasma device, with variable current capability and analog data ports, is used to develop plasma I/V plots. An on-demand (via push button) fully enclosed 24 in. Jacob's ladder provides air plasma and buoyancy effects. A low cost Mason jar vacuum chamber filled with inert gas shows pressure and gas species plasma characteristics when excited by a Tesla coil. These demonstration items are used in the Scientist-In-the-Classroom program, GA facility tours, and teacher seminars to present plasma to students and teachers. Three very popular Build-It workshops were held to enable teachers to build these items and take them back to their classroom.

  12. AVNG system demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, Jonathan Louis; Mac Arthur, Duncan W; Kondratov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander; Razinkov, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    An attribute measurement system (AMS) measures a number of unclassified attributes of potentially classified material. By only displaying these unclassified results as red or green lights, the AMS protects potentially classified information while still generating confidence in the measurement result. The AVNG implementation that we describe is an AMS built by RFNC - VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. To provide additional confidence, the AVNG was designed with two modes of operation. In the secure mode, potentially classified measurements can be made with only the simple red light/green light display. In the open mode, known unclassified material can be measured with complete display of the information collected from the radiation detectors. The AVNG demonstration, which occurred in Sarov, Russia in June 2009 for a joint US/Russian audience, included exercising both modes of AVNG operation using a number of multi-kg plutonium sources. In addition to describing the demonstration, we will show photographs and/or video taken of AVNG operation.

  13. Great Lakes Demonstration 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Representatives from CG Districts 1, 5 , 13, and 17  Enbridge Pipeline, Co.  EPA  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  Observers (CG...distances from the vessel‟s hull. (Figure 5 ) In that configuration, the recovery hose and hydraulic lines dragged across the surface of the nearby...No. CG-D-08-12 2. Government Accession Number 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Great Lakes Demonstration 2 Final Report 5

  14. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris

    1988-01-01

    Describes two oscillating reactions: the Briggs-Raucher reaction using H202, KIO3, malonic acid, and MnSO4 which changes from yellow to blue, and the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction uses NaBrO3, NaBr, malonic acid, and ferroin solution and changes from red to blue. Includes a third color demonstration on the six oxidation states of manganese. (MVL)

  15. SAMSON Technology Demonstrator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    escrow service in the operational environment. For the SAMSON TD, two key escrow systems were demonstrated: StrongAuth SKLES; a 3rd party key... escrow appliance; and A custom database-based key escrow system created for the SAMSON TD. The external label that is placed on file objects that...the key that was used to protect the file. When a SAMSON component presents a token to the KMS, the associated key is retrieved from the escrow and

  16. The Blowgun Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukamoto, Koji; Uchino, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    We have found that a simple demonstration experiment using a match or a cotton swab and a drinking straw or an acrylic pipe serves as an effective introduction to dynamics. The most basic apparatus has a cotton swab serving as a dart and the straw as the blowgun. When blown from a starting point near the exit end of the straw, the cotton swab does…

  17. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The completion of assembly of the beam builder and its first automatic production of truss is discussed. A four bay, hand assembled, roll formed members truss was built and tested to ultimate load. Detail design of the fabrication facility (beam builder) was completed and designs for subsystem debugging are discussed. Many one bay truss specimens were produced to demonstrate subsystem operation and to detect problem areas.

  18. The Blowgun Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukamoto, Koji; Uchino, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    We have found that a simple demonstration experiment using a match or a cotton swab and a drinking straw or an acrylic pipe serves as an effective introduction to dynamics. The most basic apparatus has a cotton swab serving as a dart and the straw as the blowgun. When blown from a starting point near the exit end of the straw, the cotton swab does…

  19. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris

    1988-01-01

    Describes two oscillating reactions: the Briggs-Raucher reaction using H202, KIO3, malonic acid, and MnSO4 which changes from yellow to blue, and the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction uses NaBrO3, NaBr, malonic acid, and ferroin solution and changes from red to blue. Includes a third color demonstration on the six oxidation states of manganese. (MVL)

  20. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.