Science.gov

Sample records for demonstrating complete stabilization

  1. Stability of geodesically complete cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico

    2016-11-01

    We study the stability of spatially flat FRW solutions which are geodesically complete, i.e. for which one can follow null (graviton) geodesics both in the past and in the future without ever encountering singularities. This is the case of NEC-violating cosmologies such as smooth bounces or solutions which approach Minkowski in the past. We study the EFT of linear perturbations around a solution of this kind, including the possibility of multiple fields and fluids. One generally faces a gradient instability which can be avoided only if the operator (3) R δ N is present and its coefficient changes sign along the evolution. This operator (typical of beyond-Horndeski theories) does not lead to extra degrees of freedom, but cannot arise starting from any theory with second-order equations of motion. The change of sign of this operator prevents to set it to zero with a generalised disformal transformation.

  2. Stability of geodesically complete cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico

    2016-11-22

    We study the stability of spatially flat FRW solutions which are geodesically complete, i.e. for which one can follow null (graviton) geodesics both in the past and in the future without ever encountering singularities. This is the case of NEC-violating cosmologies such as smooth bounces or solutions which approach Minkowski in the past. We study the EFT of linear perturbations around a solution of this kind, including the possibility of multiple fields and fluids. One generally faces a gradient instability which can be avoided only if the operator {sup (3)} RδN is present and its coefficient changes sign along the evolution. This operator (typical of beyond-Horndeski theories) does not lead to extra degrees of freedom, but cannot arise starting from any theory with second-order equations of motion. The change of sign of this operator prevents to set it to zero with a generalised disformal transformation.

  3. JEA successfully completes world's largest CFB demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-30

    JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) has successfully completed an eighth year landmark demonstration project that continues in baseload commercial operation. It scales up atmospheric fluidized-bed technology demonstration to the near-300-MW size, providing important data on a technology that can achieve > 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% NOx reduction at relatively high efficiencies and at costs comparable to those of conventional pulverized coal plants. The article recounts the history of the project. Performance tests showed a blend of coal and petcoke were most efficient as a feedstock. 3 figs.

  4. Video stabilization using space-time video completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V.; Frantc, V.; Marchuk, V.; Shrayfel, I.; Gapon, N.; Agaian, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a video stabilization method using space-time video completion for effective static and dynamic textures reconstruction instead of frames cropping. The proposed method can produce full-frame videos by naturally filling in missing image parts by locally aligning image data of neighboring frames. We propose to use a set of descriptors that encapsulate the information of periodical motion of objects necessary to reconstruct missing/corrupted frames. The background is filled-in by extending spatial texture synthesis techniques using set of 3D patches. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the task of full-frame video stabilization.

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  6. Summary of the evidence file demonstrating completion of the NIF Project Completion Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Haynam, C. A.

    2014-12-04

    This document summarizes the results of performance verification tests on NIF that demonstrate it has met its performance-related Project Completion Criteria (PCC). It includes measurements made on NIF with the NIF diagnostics, the calibration of these diagnostics and the supporting analyses that verify the NIF performance criteria have been met.

  7. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  8. 14 CFR 29.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at Vy. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  9. 14 CFR 27.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at V Y. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  10. 14 CFR 27.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at V Y. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  11. 14 CFR 27.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at V Y. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  12. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  13. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  15. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Stability § 23.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal...

  16. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  17. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Stability § 23.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal...

  18. 14 CFR 27.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at V Y. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  19. 14 CFR 29.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at Vy. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  20. 14 CFR 29.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at Vy. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  1. 14 CFR 27.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at V Y. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  2. 14 CFR 29.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at Vy. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  3. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Stability § 23.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal...

  4. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Stability § 23.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal...

  5. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Stability § 23.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal...

  6. 14 CFR 29.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal....175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. (a) Climb. Static longitudinal stability must be... rotorcraft trimmed at Vy. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the cruise condition...

  7. Technology Demonstration Summary Site Program Demonstration Test Soliditech Inc Solidification-stabilization Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of the Soliditech, Inc., SITE demonstration was to develop reliable performance and cost information about the Soliditech solidification, stabilization technology. The Soliditech process mixes hazardous waste materials with Portland cement or pozzolanic m...

  8. The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program: Flight Demonstration Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Future aircraft turbine engines, both commercial and military, must be able to accommodate expected increased levels of steady-state and dynamic engine-face distortion. The current approach of incorporating sufficient design stall margin to tolerate these increased levels of distortion would significantly reduce performance. The objective of the High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) program is to design, develop, and flight-demonstrate an advanced, integrated engine control system that uses measurement-based estimates of distortion to enhance engine stability. The resulting distortion tolerant control reduces the required design stall margin, with a corresponding increase in performance and decrease in fuel burn. The HISTEC concept has been developed and was successfully flight demonstrated on the F-15 ACTIVE aircraft during the summer of 1997. The flight demonstration was planned and carried out in two phases, the first to show distortion estimation, and the second to show distortion accommodation. Post-flight analysis shows that the HISTEC technologies are able to successfully estimate and accommodate distortion, transiently setting the stall margin requirement on-line and in real-time. This allows the design stall margin requirement to be reduced, which in turn can be traded for significantly increased performance and/or decreased weight. Flight demonstration of the HISTEC technologies has significantly reduced the risk of transitioning the technology to tactical and commercial engines.

  9. Complete unconscious control: using (in)action primes to demonstrate completely unconscious activation of inhibitory control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Justin; Albarracin, Dolores

    2013-09-01

    Although robust evidence indicates that action initiation can occur unconsciously and unintentionally, the literature on action inhibition suggests that inhibition requires both conscious thought and intentionality. In prior research demonstrating automatic inhibition in response to unconsciously processed stimuli, the unconscious stimuli had previously been consciously associated with an inhibitory response within the context of the experiment, and participants had consciously formed a goal to activate inhibition processes when presented with the stimuli (because task instructions required participants to engage in inhibition when the stimuli occurred). Therefore, prior work suggests that some amount of conscious thought and intentionality are required for inhibitory control. In the present research, we recorded event-related potentials during two go/no-go experiments in which participants were subliminally primed with general action/inaction concepts that had never been consciously associated with task-specific responses. We provide the first demonstration that inhibitory control processes can be modulated completely unconsciously and unintentionally.

  10. Demonstrating Vertical Stability Between Geodetic Techniques at SGF Herstmonceux, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, G. M.; Rodriguez, J.; Sherwood, R.; Shoobridge, T.; Wilkinson, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The most valuable geodetic sites contributing data for global reference frame determination are stations equipped with multiple co-located techniques regularly providing high quality data, located on stable ground, and which have well defined inter-technique local ties with demonstrably negligible relative motion. The Space Geodesy Facility (SGF) in Herstmonceux, UK, operates a productive and precise GGOS 'next generation' satellite laser ranging station (HERL), two IGS GNSS sites (HERS, HERT) and a permanently situated absolute gravimeter. Over recent years an assessment of the stability of the site has been instigated, with a particular focus on measuring inter-technique height variation. A campaign of fortnightly levelling surveys began in 2010 to monitor the relative heights of a series of monuments using a Lecia DNA03 bar-code levelling instrument, with instrumental accuracy of 0.3mm. The monuments include an absolute gravimeter pier, the SLR pillar and points on the GNSS monuments. In total 22 relative heights are measured during an approximately two hour survey run, which involves two members of the SGF team. The results from four years of data show that the height differences between most of the monuments are highly stable at the sub-mm level and lack systematic variation. However, a well-defined annual height variation of magnitude ±0.5mm has been discovered between certain monuments, in particular the HERS tower. These on-going levelling surveys lead us to conclude that the inter-technique ties at the Space Geodesy Facility are stable at the millimetre level and that consequently the Herstmonceux site will continue to make a major contribution to the ITRF in the context of the GGOS sub-mm goal.

  11. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  12. Demonstration of relaxed static stability on a commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Cokeley, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Increasing jet aircraft fuel costs from 25 percent to nearly 60 percent of the aircraft direct operating costs have led to a heavy emphasis on the development of transport aircraft with significantly improved aerodynamic performance. The application of the concept of relaxed static stability (RSS) and the utilization of an active control stability augmentation system make it possible to design an aircraft with reduced aerodynamic trim drag due to a farther-aft cg balance. Reduced aerodynamic parasite drag and lower structural weight due to a smaller horizontal tail surface can also be obtained. The application of RSS has been studied under a NASA-sponsored program to determine ways of improving the energy efficiency in current and future transport aircraft. Attention is given to a near-term pitch active control system, an advanced pitch active control system, and an operational overview.

  13. Demonstration and Field Evaluation of Streambank Stabilization with Submerged Vanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, H.; Hoopes, J.; Poggi, D.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Walz, K.; ,

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of submerged vanes for reducing bank erosion and improving aquatic habitat is being evaluated at a site on North Fish Creek, a Lake Superior tributary. Increased runoff from agricultural areas with clayey soils has increased flood magnitudes and the erosion potential/transport capacity of the stream. Most of the creek's sediment load originates from the erosion of 17 large bluffs. This creek contains important recreational fisheries that are potentially limited by the loss of aquatic habitat from deposition of sediment on spawning beds. Submerged vanes are a cost effective and environmentally less intrusive alternative to traditional structural stabilization measures. Submerged vanes protrude from a channel bed, are oriented at an angle to the local velocity, and are distributed along a portion of channel. They induce a transverse force and torque on the flow along with longitudinal vortexes that alter the cross sectional shape and alignment of the channel. Submerged vanes were installed at a bluff/bend site in summer and fall 2000. The number, size, and layout of the vanes were based upon the channel morphology under estimated bankfull conditions. The effectiveness of the vanes will be evaluated by comparing surveys of the bluff face, streamflow, and channel conditions for several years after installation of the submerged vanes with surveys before and immediately after their installation.

  14. [A case of liver metastasis of rectal cancer demonstrating complete response to 5-FU + Leucovorin + UFT].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Ikuya; Nakada, Hiroshi; Inokuma, Shigehisa; Hoshino, Takanobu; Daijo, Hashimoto

    2002-04-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is a rate-limiting enzyme that metabolizes 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We report a patient with metachronous liver metastasis from rectal cancer with low expression of DPD, who demonstrated complete response to chemotherapy comprising 5-FU, Leucovorin, and UFT. A 53-year-old man underwent macroscopically curative proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer (Curability B). The DPD level in the primary tumor determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was extremely low (10.3 U/mg.protein). Three months postoperatively, 5-FU (333 mg/m2) + Leucovorin (200 mg/m2) therapy (once a week for 3 weeks with a one-week rest interval, repeatedly) was started as an adjuvant therapy. However, computed tomography demonstrated a solitary liver metastasis 3 cm in size 1 month later. Chemotherapy was continued with dose escalation of 5-FU (500 mg/m2) and with oral administration of UFT-E (400 mg/body, daily). Five months later, computed tomography did not detect the liver metastasis, and this finding was maintained for two months (complete response). This case provides evidence that a low expression of DPD in the primary lesion is related to a favorable response of liver metastasis to 5-FU-based systemic chemotherapy.

  15. Stabilization of premaxilla repositioned during secondary bone grafting in complete bilateral cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Hossein; Mesgarzadeh, Abolhasan; Tehranchi, Azita; Morad, Golnaz; Samieerad, Sahand; Younessian, Farnaz

    2014-07-01

    Secondary bone grafting simultaneous to premaxillary repositioning is a well-recognized surgical procedure for the management of bilateral cleft lip and palate patients. Proper stabilization of the repositioned premaxilla is considered as a key factor for the success of secondary bone grafting because the mobility of the premaxillary segment jeopardizes graft integration. This case series reports a reliable method of premaxillary stabilization that incorporated the intrasurgical application of resin bone cement to cover and reinforce the arch bars or orthodontic brackets applied on the maxillary teeth. Occlusal loads were reduced by application of posterior bite blocks on the mandibular teeth. The stabilization method was performed on 7 patients (5 women and 2 men) with a mean age of 12.4 years. During postsurgery follow-ups, the repositioned premaxillary segments did not show mobility in any of the patients. The palatal fistulae were completely closed. Panoramic radiographies taken 2 months after surgery demonstrated acceptable graft integration. The patients have now been followed up to 5 years. No evidence of relapse has been observed. This technique seemed to be undemanding, included minimal laboratory procedure, and maintained the labial mucosa overlying the repositioned segment intact.

  16. Front-end planning and evaluation for West Valley Demonstration Project completion

    SciTech Connect

    Gramling, J.; Sharma, V.; Marschke, S.

    1995-12-31

    In December 1988, the U.S. Department of Energy and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority announced their intent to prepare a joint environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate alternatives for West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) completion and closure and/or long-term maintenance of the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) in West Valley, New York. Planning was initiated for the eventual closure of the site, even though vitrification of the high-level waste (HLW) stored at the site was, at that time, a number of years in the future. West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSC), the WVDP management and operations contractor, and their architect/engineer, Raytheon Nuclear Incorporated, were authorized to develop characterization studies and engineering evaluations of closure alternatives for the various facilities of the WNYNSC. This paper presents a summary of the status of that effort, including the resolution of unique problems.

  17. THE SITE DEMONSTRATION OF CHEMFIX SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS AT THE PORTABLE EQUIPMENT SALVAGE COMPANY SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the GHEMFIX solidification/stabilization process was conducted under the United States Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The demonstration was conducted in March 1989, at the Portable Equipment Sa...

  18. Absence of Complete Finite-Larmor-Radius Stabilization in Extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Schnack, D. D.; Ebrahimi, F.; Zweibel, E. G.; Suzuki, M.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2008-08-22

    The dominant finite-Larmour-radius (FLR) stabilization effects on interchange instability can be retained by taking into account the ion gyroviscosity or the generalized Ohm's law in an extended MHD model. However, recent simulations and theoretical calculations indicate that complete FLR stabilization of the interchange mode may not be attainable by ion gyroviscosity or the two-fluid effect alone in the framework of extended MHD. For a class of plasma equilibria in certain finite-{beta} or nonisentropic regimes, the critical wave number for complete FLR stabilization tends toward infinity.

  19. Absence of complete finite-Larmor-radius stabilization in extended MHD.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Schnack, D D; Ebrahimi, F; Zweibel, E G; Suzuki, M; Hegna, C C; Sovinec, C R

    2008-08-22

    The dominant finite-Larmour-radius (FLR) stabilization effects on interchange instability can be retained by taking into account the ion gyroviscosity or the generalized Ohm's law in an extended MHD model. However, recent simulations and theoretical calculations indicate that complete FLR stabilization of the interchange mode may not be attainable by ion gyroviscosity or the two-fluid effect alone in the framework of extended MHD. For a class of plasma equilibria in certain finite-beta or nonisentropic regimes, the critical wave number for complete FLR stabilization tends toward infinity.

  20. Completeness map evaluation demonstrated with candidate next-generation cardiac CT architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Baodong; Bennett, James; Wang Ge; De Man, Bruno; Zeng Kai; Yin Zhye; Fitzgerald, Paul; Yu Hengyong

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: In this report, the authors introduce the general concept of the completeness map, as a means to evaluate the completeness of data acquired by a given CT system design (architecture and scan mode). They illustrate the utility of completeness map by applying the completeness map concept to a number of candidate CT system designs, as part of a study to advance the state-of-the-art in cardiac CT. Methods: In order to optimally reconstruct a point within a volume of interest (VOI), the Radon transform on all possible planes through that point should be measured. The authors quantified the extent to which this ideal condition is satisfied for the entire image volume. They first determined a Radon completeness number for each point in the VOI, as the percentage of possible planes that is actually measured. A completeness map is then defined as a 3D matrix of the completeness numbers for the entire VOI. The authors proposed algorithms to analyze the projection datasets in Radon space and compute the completeness number for a fixed point and apply these algorithms to various architectures and scan modes that they are evaluating. In this report, the authors consider four selected candidate architectures, operating with different scan modes, for a total of five system design alternatives. Each of these alternatives is evaluated using completeness map. Results: If the detector size and cone angle are large enough to cover the entire cardiac VOI, a single-source circular scan can have {>=}99% completeness over the entire VOI. However, only the central z-slice can be exactly reconstructed, which corresponds to 100% completeness. For a typical single-source architecture, if the detector is limited to an axial dimension of 40 mm, a helical scan needs about five rotations to form an exact reconstruction region covering the cardiac VOI, while a triple-source helical scan only requires two rotations, leading to a 2.5x improvement in temporal resolution. If the source and

  1. SUMMARY OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION SITE DEMONSTRATIONS AT UNCONTROLLED HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four large-scale solidification/stabilization demonstrations have occurred under EPA's SITE program. In general, physical testing results have been acceptable. Reduction in metal leachability, as determined by the TCLP test, has been observed. Reduction in organic leachability ha...

  2. A Complete 2D Stability Analysis of Fast MHD Shocks in an Ideal Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhinin, Yuri

    An algorithm of numerical testing of the uniform Lopatinski condition for linearized stability problems for 1-shocks is suggested. The algorithm is used for finding the domains of uniform stability, neutral stability, and instability of planar fast MHD shocks. A complete stability analysis of fast MHD shock waves is first carried out in two space dimensions for the case of an ideal gas. Main results are given for the adiabatic constant γ=5/3 (mono-atomic gas), that is most natural for the MHD model. The cases γ=7/5 (two-atomic gas) and γ>5/3 are briefly discussed. Not only the domains of instability and linear (in the usual sense) stability, but also the domains of uniform stability, for which a corresponding linearized stability problem satisfies the uniform Lopatinski condition, are numerically found for different given angles of inclination of the magnetic field behind the shock to the planar shock front. As is known, uniform linearized stability implies the nonlinear stability, that is local existence of discontinuous shock front solutions of a quasilinear system of hyperbolic conservation laws.

  3. EPA SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL WASTE TECHNOLOGIES/GEO-CON IN SITU STABILIZATION/ SOLIDIFICATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an EPA evaluation of the first field demonstration of an in situ stabilization/solidification process for contaminated soil under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. Demonstration of this process was a joint effort of two vendors...

  4. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  5. HANFORD PLUTONIUM FINISHG PLAN (PFP) COMPLETES PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION KEY SAFETY ISSUES CLOSED

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-02-24

    A long and intense effort to stabilize and repackage nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium-bearing leftovers from defense production and nuclear experiments concluded successfully in February, bringing universal congratulations to the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The victorious stabilization and packaging endeavor at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), managed and operated by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, Inc., finished ahead of all milestones in Hanford's cleanup agreement with regulators, and before deadlines set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), a part of the federal Executive Branch that oversees special nuclear materials. The PFP stabilization and packaging project also completed under budget for its four-year tenure, and has been nominated for a DOE Secretarial Award. It won the Project of the Year Award in the local chapter competition of the Project Management Institute, and is being considered for awards at the regional and national level.

  6. A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PLANT AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Petkus, Lawrence L.; Paul, James; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene; May, Joseph

    2003-02-27

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification melter was shut down in September 2002 after being used to vitrify High Level Waste (HLW) and process system residuals for six years. Processing of the HLW occurred from June 1996 through November 2001, followed by a program to flush the remaining HLW through to the melter. Glass removal and shutdown followed. The facility and process equipment is currently in a standby mode awaiting deactivation. During HLW processing operations, nearly 24 million curies of radioactive material were vitrified into 275 canisters of HLW glass. At least 99.7% of the curies in the HLW tanks at the WVDP were vitrified using the melter. Each canister of HLW holds approximately 2000 kilograms of glass with an average contact dose rate of over 2600 rem per hour. After vitrification processing ended, two more cans were filled using the Evacuated Canister Process to empty the melter at shutdown. This history briefly summarizes the initial stages of process development and earlier WVDP experience in the design and operation of the vitrification systems, followed by a more detailed discussion of equipment availability and failure rates during six years of operation. Lessons learned operating a system that continued to function beyond design expectations also are highlighted.

  7. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based

  8. Tested Demonstrations: The Effect of Free Radical Stability on the Rate of Bromination of Hydrocarbons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents a demonstration of the effect of alkyl free radical stability on the rate of free radical halogenation of hydrocarbons. The arenes toluene, ethylbenzene and comene are photobrominated comparatively, using an overhead projector both to provide a light source for the chemical reaction and to project the results on a screen. (CS)

  9. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF LEAD-BASED PAINT REMOVAL AND INORGANIC STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of a wet abrasive blasting technology to remove lead-based paint from exterior wood siding and brock substrates and to stabilize the resultant blasting media (coal slag and mineral sand) paint debris to reduce the leachable l...

  10. Demonstration of Femtosecond-Phase Stabilization in 2 km OpticalFiber

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.W.; Wilcox, R.; Byrd, J.M.

    2007-06-01

    Long-term phase drifts of less than a femtosecond per hour have been demonstrated in a 2 km length of single-mode optical fiber, stabilized interferometrically at 1530 nm. Recent improvements include a wide-band phase detector that reduces the possibility of fringe jumping due to fast external perturbations of the fiber and locking of the master CW laser wavelength to an atomic absorption line. Mode-locked lasers may be synchronized using two wavelengths of the comb, multiplexed over one fiber, each wavelength individually interferometrically stabilized.

  11. Demonstration Results on the Effects of Mercury Speciation on the Stabilization of Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, T.B.; Hulet, G.A.; Morris, M.I.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1999-06-01

    Mercury-contaminated wastes are currently being stored at approximately 19 Department of Energy sites, the volume of which is estimated to be about 16m(sup)3. These wastes exist in various forms including soil, sludges, and debris, which present a particular challenge regarding possible mercury stabilization methods. This reports provides the test results of three vendors, Allied Technology Group, IT Corporation, and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., that demonstrate the effects of mercury speciation on the stabilization of the mercury wastes. Mercury present in concentrations that exceed 260 parts per million must be removed by extraction methods and requires stabilization to ensure that the final wasteforms leach less than 0.2mg/L of mercury by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure or 0.025 mg/L using the Universal Treatment Standard.

  12. Subsonic static and dynamic stability characteristics of the test technique demonstrator NASP configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the procedure used for and the results obtained of wind-tunnel tests of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) configuration, which were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center High Speed Tunnel using a blended body NASP configuration designed by the research center. Static and dynamic stability characteristics were measured at Mach numbers 0.3, 0.6, and 0.8. In addition to tests of the baseline configuration, component buildup tests with a canard surface and with a body flap were carried out. Results demonstrated a positive static stability of the baseline configuration, except at the higher angles of attack at Mach 0.8. A good agreement was found between the inphase dynamic parameters and the corresponding static data.

  13. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  14. Amber fossils demonstrate deep-time stability of Caribbean lizard communities.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Emma; del Rosario Castañeda, María; Garwood, Russell J; Mahler, D Luke; Sanger, Thomas J; Herrel, Anthony; de Queiroz, Kevin; Losos, Jonathan B

    2015-08-11

    Whether the structure of ecological communities can exhibit stability over macroevolutionary timescales has long been debated. The similarity of independently evolved Anolis lizard communities on environmentally similar Greater Antillean islands supports the notion that community evolution is deterministic. However, a dearth of Caribbean Anolis fossils--only three have been described to date--has precluded direct investigation of the stability of anole communities through time. Here we report on an additional 17 fossil anoles in Dominican amber dating to 15-20 My before the present. Using data collected primarily by X-ray microcomputed tomography (X-ray micro-CT), we demonstrate that the main elements of Hispaniolan anole ecomorphological diversity were in place in the Miocene. Phylogenetic analysis yields results consistent with the hypothesis that the ecomorphs that evolved in the Miocene are members of the same ecomorph clades extant today. The primary axes of ecomorphological diversity in the Hispaniolan anole fauna appear to have changed little between the Miocene and the present, providing evidence for the stability of ecological communities over macroevolutionary timescales.

  15. Amber fossils demonstrate deep-time stability of Caribbean lizard communities

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Emma; del Rosario Castañeda, María; Garwood, Russell J.; Mahler, D. Luke; Sanger, Thomas J.; Herrel, Anthony; de Queiroz, Kevin; Losos, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Whether the structure of ecological communities can exhibit stability over macroevolutionary timescales has long been debated. The similarity of independently evolved Anolis lizard communities on environmentally similar Greater Antillean islands supports the notion that community evolution is deterministic. However, a dearth of Caribbean Anolis fossils—only three have been described to date—has precluded direct investigation of the stability of anole communities through time. Here we report on an additional 17 fossil anoles in Dominican amber dating to 15–20 My before the present. Using data collected primarily by X-ray microcomputed tomography (X-ray micro-CT), we demonstrate that the main elements of Hispaniolan anole ecomorphological diversity were in place in the Miocene. Phylogenetic analysis yields results consistent with the hypothesis that the ecomorphs that evolved in the Miocene are members of the same ecomorph clades extant today. The primary axes of ecomorphological diversity in the Hispaniolan anole fauna appear to have changed little between the Miocene and the present, providing evidence for the stability of ecological communities over macroevolutionary timescales. PMID:26216976

  16. Trifascicular block progressing to complete AV block on exercise: a rare presentation demonstrating the usefulness of exercise testing

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Agarwal, Sumit; Ganiga Sanjeeva, Naveen Chandra; Rao, M Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man presented with dyspnoea and giddiness on exertion for the last 1 month. A resting ECG during showed trifascicular block with complete right bundle branch block, left anterior fascicular block and a prolonged PR interval of >0.24 s. His echocardiography showed no evidence of wall motion abnormality. He was subjected to a treadmill test for exercise-induced ischaemia, which showed complete atrioventricular (AV) block during first stage of Bruce protocol. His symptoms of dyspnoea and giddiness were also reproduced. The test was terminated and ECG returned to trifascicular block, similar to that at his baseline ECG during recovery. Coronary angiogram (CAG) was performed to rule out any ischaemic cause for this exercise-induced AV block, which was normal. In view of his reproducible symptoms and demonstration of complete AV block on exercise, a dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD) was implanted. His symptoms disappeared and he remained asymptomatic on follow-up. PMID:25819829

  17. Stability-Weighted Matrix Completion of Incomplete Multi-modal Data for Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Thung, Kim-Han; Adeli, Ehsan; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2016-01-01

    Effective utilization of heterogeneous multi-modal data for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) diagnosis and prognosis has always been hampered by incomplete data. One method to deal with this is low-rank matrix completion (LRMC), which simultaneous imputes missing data features and target values of interest. Although LRMC yields reasonable results, it implicitly weights features from all the modalities equally, ignoring the differences in discriminative power of features from different modalities. In this paper, we propose stability-weighted LRMC (swLRMC), an LRMC improvement that weights features and modalities according to their importance and reliability. We introduce a method, called stability weighting, to utilize subsampling techniques and outcomes from a range of hyper-parameters of sparse feature learning to obtain a stable set of weights. Incorporating these weights into LRMC, swLRMC can better account for differences in features and modalities for improving diagnosis. Experimental results confirm that the proposed method outperforms the conventional LRMC, feature-selection based LRMC, and other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:28286884

  18. Longitudinal stability analysis of a suborbital re-entry demonstrator for a deployable capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovazzo, Michele; Carandente, Valerio; Savino, Raffaele; Zuppardi, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    In the field of atmospheric re-entry technology several research and industrial projects are based on the design of deployable, umbrella-like Thermal Protection Systems (TPSs) and aero-brakes. These systems are made of flexible, high temperature resistant fabrics, folded at launch and deployed in space for de-orbit and re-entry operations. This technology is very promising for low cost research and industrial applications, but requires to be validated by experimental flight tests. The University of Naples "Federico II" is currently working on the development of different down-scaled technological demonstrators for this kind of capsule to be launched by different classes of sounding rockets. In the present work an aerodynamic longitudinal stability analysis for a possible, suborbital re-entry demonstrator, has been performed in continuum and rarefied regimes. The longitudinal stability behavior of the capsule, along the entire re-entry path, has been investigated in the whole range of angle of attack and, in particular, around the nominal and the reverse equilibrium re-entry attitudes (i.e. around 0° and 180°, respectively) to implement a proper re-entry strategy able not to compromise the effectiveness of the flying system.

  19. 42 CFR 137.21 - How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? 137.21 Section 137.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? The...

  20. Terrestrial Radar Interferometry: The current state-of-the-art demonstrated by real-world slope stability case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, Michael; Thomas, Adam; Holley, Rachel

    2013-04-01

    Risk associated with natural terrain is typically mapped and monitored using established geodetic, geotechnical and remote sensing (satellite and airborne) techniques; however such techniques can pose challenges related to health and safety, cost and the density and frequency of measurements. Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) systems offer users new capabilities in the mapping and monitoring of ground displacements, and more specifically, slope stability. Use of portable radar systems that facilitate quick deployment and data acquisition, rapid and long distance scanning, and the ability to function and operate in most weather conditions, are revolutionising the terrestrial survey industry. This work presents a summary of the capabilities, limitations and applications of a state-of-the-art TRI system. The system is quick to deploy, allowing data acquisition within tens of minutes of arrival on site and requiring little or no permanent site infrastructure. Imaging scans are typically completed in less than 1 minute for a field of view of up to 360°, with repeat scans possible at up to 1-2 minute intervals. The system gives an azimuth resolution of around 8 m at distances of 1 km, with the capability to image slopes at distances of between 50 m and 10 km from the sensor with a deformation accuracy of less than 1 mm. These capabilities represent a significant advance over more traditional stability monitoring methods. The benefits of the TRI technology will be demonstrated through various natural and artificial slope stability case studies. Measurements on artificial slopes in environments such as quarries and open-cast mines allow benchmarking of capabilities across a variety of surface characteristics and failure mechanisms. These results allow an informed consideration of the applicability in various natural slope stability applications, and enable discussion on how TRI can meet the additional challenges encountered in natural environments.

  1. Demonstration of an Ultra-Stable Cryogenic Platform with 25 pK/root-Hz Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Colin J.; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; Duncan, R. V.

    2004-01-01

    Existing paramagnetic susceptibility thermometers used in fundamental physics experiments near 2.2 K are capable of measuring temperature changes with a precision of about 100 pK in a one-hertz measurement bandwidth, with a demonstrated drift stability of about a nK per day. Commercial electrical heater controllers are only able to control power dissipation to a precision of about ten parts per million (ppm), with an open loop drift of about 50 ppm per day. We have developed an ultra-stable temperature platform with a demonstrated noise of 25 pK in a one-hertz bandwidth, and we have identified the physical source of this residual noise. We used an array of RF-biased Josephson junctions to precisely control the electrical power dissipation in a heater resistor mounted on this thermally isolated cryogenic platform to well beyond our ability to measure, which we estimate is stable to better than a part in 10(exp 12). This Josephson heater controller may be used in a new synchronous demodulation circuit to maintain absolute temperature stability of the stage to about the same level as the demonstrated noise, provided that the He-4 superfluid transition temperature is fundamentally stable at this level. This work may provide a blackbody temperature reference for use in space radiometry applications that is considerably more stable than the temperature of the cosmic background radiation itself. This new technology may enable critical heat capacity measurements in He-4 within a weightless laboratory to a reduced temperature of about 10(exp -11), where the critical fluctuation lengths would be about a cm, and the fluctuation rates would be measurable within the bandwidth of the thermometry.

  2. Interim Report: Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection - 300 Area Uranium Plume Treatability Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Richards, Emily L.; Butler, Bart C.; Parker, Kent E.; Glovack, Julia N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Baum, Steven R.; Clayton, Eric T.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.

    2007-07-31

    This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to treat aqueous uranium within the 300 Area aquifer of the Hanford site. The general treatability testing approach consists of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, in order to develop an effective chemical formulation for the polyphosphate amendments and evaluate the transport properties of these amendments under site conditions. Phosphorus-31 (31P) NMR was utilized to determine the effects of Hanford groundwater and sediment on the degradation of inorganic phosphates. Static batch tests were conducted to optimize the composition of the polyphosphate formulation for the precipitation of apatite and autunite, as well as to quantify the kinetics, loading and stability of apatite as a long-term sorbent for uranium. Dynamic column tests were used to further optimize the polyphosphate formulation for emplacement within the subsurface and the formation of autunite and apatite. In addition, dynamic testing quantified the stability of autunite and apatite under relevant site conditions. Results of this investigation provide valuable information for designing a full-scale remediation of uranium in the 300 aquifer.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of the Stabilizing Effect of Dielectric Coatings on Magnetically Accelerated Imploding Metallic Liners.

    PubMed

    Awe, T J; Peterson, K J; Yu, E P; McBride, R D; Sinars, D B; Gomez, M R; Jennings, C A; Martin, M R; Rosenthal, S E; Schroen, D G; Sefkow, A B; Slutz, S A; Tomlinson, K; Vesey, R A

    2016-02-12

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70  μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. The inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130  μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  4. Experimental Demonstration of the Stabilizing Effect of Dielectric Coatings on Magnetically Accelerated Imploding Metallic Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awe, T. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Yu, E. P.; McBride, R. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Martin, M. R.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Sefkow, A. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Tomlinson, K.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70 μ m of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR =Rin,0/Rin(z ,t ) ] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. The inner-wall radius Rin(z ,t ) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130 μ m over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  5. Experimental demonstration of the stabilizing effect of dielectric coatings on magnetically accelerated imploding metallic liners

    DOE PAGES

    Awe, Thomas James; Peterson, Kyle J.; Yu, Edmund P.; ...

    2016-02-10

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70 μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. Lastly, the inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130 μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  6. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T. Tanaka, R.; Uesugi, Y.; Yoshitama, H.; Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.

    2015-04-15

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  7. Experimental demonstration of the stabilizing effect of dielectric coatings on magnetically accelerated imploding metallic liners

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, Thomas James; Peterson, Kyle J.; Yu, Edmund P.; McBride, Ryan D.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Martin, Matthew R.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger A.; Schroen, D. G.; Tomlinson, Kurt

    2016-02-10

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70 μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. Lastly, the inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130 μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  8. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  9. 42 CFR 137.21 - How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... stability and financial management capacity? 137.21 Section 137.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance Planning Phase § 137.21 How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? The...

  10. 42 CFR 137.21 - How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... stability and financial management capacity? 137.21 Section 137.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance Planning Phase § 137.21 How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? The...

  11. 42 CFR 137.21 - How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... stability and financial management capacity? 137.21 Section 137.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance Planning Phase § 137.21 How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? The...

  12. 42 CFR 137.21 - How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... stability and financial management capacity? 137.21 Section 137.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance Planning Phase § 137.21 How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? The...

  13. Clean-coal technology by-products used in a highway embankment stabilization demonstration project. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nodjomian, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Clean-coal technology by-products are used in a highway embankment demonstration project. This research chronicles the procedures used in the process and analyzes the stability of a repaired highway embankment. The reconstructed slope is analyzed using an Intelligent Discussion Support System that was developed from a slope stability program. Water quality studies are performed and an instrumentation plan is suggested. The calculated factors of safety and the observed embankment performance give indications that the field demonstration project was a success. Long-term monitoring will be the best barometer for determining embankment gross movement and the future of FGD by-products as a stabilizing material.

  14. Report: Manchester Band of Pomo Indians Needs to Improve Its Financial Management System and Demonstrate Completion of Grant Work

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0320, September 21, 2016. The Manchester Band of Pomo Indians' inadequate financial management system, and shortfalls in completing grant tasks, resulted in all costs claimed being questioned.

  15. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST SOLIDITECH, INC. SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the Soliditech, Inc., solidification/ stabilization process for the on-site treatment of waste materials. The Soliditech process mixes and chemically treats waste material with Urrichem (a proprietary reagent), additives, pozzolanic mat...

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANIC/INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS - SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicate Technology Corporation's (STC's) technology for treating hazardous waste utilizes silicate compounds to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents in contaminated soils and sludges. STC has developed two groups of reagents: SOILSORB HM for treating wastes with inorgan...

  17. Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation - Demonstration Bulletin: In-Situ Soil Stabilization

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ stabilization technology immobilizes organics and inorganic compounds in wet or dry soils by using reagents (additives) to polymerize with the soils and sludges producing a cement-like mass. Two basic components of this technology are the Geo-Con/DSM Deep Soil Mixing Sy...

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: MOLECULAR BONDING SYSTEM FOR HEAVY METALS STABILIZATION - SOLUCORP INDUSTRIES LTD.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents an evaluation of the Molecular Bonding System (MBS) and its ability to chemically stabilize three metals-contaminated wstes/soils during a SITe demo. The MBS process treated approximately 500 tons each of soil/Fill, Slag, and Miscellaneous Smelter Waste wit...

  19. Technology Demonstration Summary: International Waste Technologies In Situ Stabilization/Solidification, Hialeah, Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation was performed of the International Waste Technologies (IWT) HWT-20 additive and the Geo-Con, Inc. deep-soil-mixing equipment for an in situ stabilization/solidification process and its applicability as an on-site treatment method for waste site cleanup. The analysis...

  20. A technique to stabilize record bases for Gothic arch tracings in patients with implant-retained complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Raigrodski, A J; Sadan, A; Carruth, P L

    1998-12-01

    Clinicians have long expressed concern about the accuracy of the Gothic arch tracing for recording centric relation in edentulous patients. With the use of dental implants to assist in retaining complete dentures, the problem of inaccurate recordings, made for patients without natural teeth, can be significantly reduced. This article presents a technique that uses healing abutments to stabilize the record bases so that an accurate Gothic arch tracing can be made.

  1. Demonstration of effective control of fast-ion-stabilized sawteeth by electron-cyclotron current drive.

    PubMed

    Lennholm, M; Eriksson, L-G; Turco, F; Bouquey, F; Darbos, C; Dumont, R; Giruzzi, G; Jung, M; Lambert, R; Magne, R; Molina, D; Moreau, P; Rimini, F; Segui, J-L; Song, S; Traisnel, E

    2009-03-20

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies >or=0.5 MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  2. Complete structure of the bacterial flagellar hook reveals extensive set of stabilizing interactions

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Barker, Clive S.; Yoon, Young-Ho; Wolf, Matthias; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar hook is a tubular helical structure made by the polymerization of multiple copies of a protein, FlgE. Here we report the structure of the hook from Campylobacter jejuni by cryo-electron microscopy at a resolution of 3.5 Å. On the basis of this structure, we show that the hook is stabilized by intricate inter-molecular interactions between FlgE molecules. Extra domains in FlgE, found only in Campylobacter and in related bacteria, bring more stability and robustness to the hook. Functional experiments suggest that Campylobacter requires an unusually strong hook to swim without its flagella being torn off. This structure reveals details of the quaternary organization of the hook that consists of 11 protofilaments. Previous study of the flagellar filament of Campylobacter by electron microscopy showed its quaternary structure made of seven protofilaments. Therefore, this study puts in evidence the difference between the quaternary structures of a bacterial filament and its hook. PMID:27811912

  3. Complete mode-set stability analysis of magnetically insulated ion diode equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S.A.; Lemke, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    We present the first analysis of the stability of magnetically insulated ion diodes that is fully relativistic and includes electromagnetic perturbations both parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. Applying this formalism to a simple diode equilibrium model that neglects velocity shear and density gradients, we find a fast growing mode that has all of the important attributes of the low frequency mode observed in numerical simulations of magnetically insulated ion diodes, which may be a major cause of ion divergence. We identify this mode as a modified two-stream instability. Previous stability analyses indicate a variety of unstable modes, but none of these exhibit the same behavior as the low frequency mode observed in the simulations. In addition, we analyze a realistic diode equilibrium model that includes velocity shear and an electron density profile consistent with that observed in the numerical simulations. We find that the diocotron instability is reduced, but not fully quenched by the extension of the electron sheath to the anode. However, the inclusion of perturbations parallel to the applied magnetic field with a wavelength smaller than the diode height does eliminate growth of this instability. This may explain why the diocotron mode has been observed experimentally with proton sources, but not with LiF, since the turn on of LiF is not uniform.

  4. Ceramicrete stabilization of low-level mixed wastes - a complete story

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S.Y.; Strain, R.V.

    1997-03-01

    During the last three years, Ceramicrete (chemically bonded phosphate ceramics) have been investigated at Argonne-East for low-temperature stabilization and solidification of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE`s) mixed wastes, for which conventional high-temperature treatments cannot be used because of volatiles and pyrophorics present in these wastes. This paper summarizes the development of Ceramicrete and provides the current technology status. We discuss our early investigations with surrogates that are typical of DOE mixed wastes, subsequent testing with actual waste streams, and scale-up of the process to an operational level. Current efforts include testing the process at an operational level for an ash waste stream from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and obtaining sufficient information to prepare a technology performance report.

  5. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  6. Test program to demonstrate the stability of hydrazine in propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, C. M.; Sutton, D.

    1983-01-01

    The suitability of stainless steels and Inconel for long-term hydrazine propellant-storage tanks is investigated. Rectangular coupon samples cut from propellent tanks were sealed with a measured amount of hydrazine in glass capsules, stored at 43 or 60 C, and removed after 6 to 24 months, when corrosion of the coupon and decomposition of the hydrazine was determined, and SEM and electron spectroscopy were performed on some coupons. Corrosion was found to be unmeasurably low for all the coupons, and hydrazine decomposition produced less than 1.0 cu cm of gas per sq cm of wetted surface per year, except in those few cases when catalysis or contamination were detected. Especially good stability was observed for type 304L stainless steel. The decomposition rates determined in the coupon tests are confirmed by preliminary results of actual tank storage trials.

  7. Photo-induced electrochemical anodization of p-type silicon: achievement and demonstration of long term surface stability.

    PubMed

    Dhanekar, Saakshi; Islam, S S; Harsh

    2012-06-15

    Surface stability is achieved and demonstrated by porous silicon (PS) fabricated using a wavelength-dependent photo-electrochemical (PEC) anodization technique. During anodization, the photon flux for all wavelengths was kept constant while only the effect of light wavelength on the surface morphology of PS was investigated. PS optical sensors were realized, characterized and tested using a photoluminescence (PL) quenching technique. An aliphatic chain of alcohols (methanol to n-octanol) was detected in the range of 10-200 ppm. Long term surface stability was observed from samples prepared under red (750-620 nm) and green illumination (570-495 nm), where the PL quenching cycles evoke the possibility of using PS for stable sensor device applications. This study provides a route for preparing highly sensitive organic vapour sensors with a precise selection of the fabrication parameters and demonstrating their prolonged performance.

  8. Complete stability of cellular neural networks with unbounded time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Chen, Tianping

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the delayed cellular neural networks (DCNNs) in the case that the time-varying delays are unbounded. Under some conditions, it shows that the DCNNs can exhibit 3(n) equilibrium points. Then, we track the dynamics of u(t)(t>0) in two cases with respect to different types of subset regions in which u(0) is located. It concludes that every solution trajectory u(t) would converge to one of the equilibrium points despite the time-varying delays, that is, the delayed cellular neural networks are completely stable. The method is novel and the results obtained extend the existing ones. In addition, two illustrative examples are presented to verify the effectiveness of our results.

  9. Complete characterization of the stability of cluster synchronization in complex dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Francesco; Pecora, Louis M.; Hagerstrom, Aaron M.; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization is an important and prevalent phenomenon in natural and engineered systems. In many dynamical networks, the coupling is balanced or adjusted to admit global synchronization, a condition called Laplacian coupling. Many networks exhibit incomplete synchronization, where two or more clusters of synchronization persist, and computational group theory has recently proved to be valuable in discovering these cluster states based on the topology of the network. In the important case of Laplacian coupling, additional synchronization patterns can exist that would not be predicted from the group theory analysis alone. Understanding how and when clusters form, merge, and persist is essential for understanding collective dynamics, synchronization, and failure mechanisms of complex networks such as electric power grids, distributed control networks, and autonomous swarming vehicles. We describe a method to find and analyze all of the possible cluster synchronization patterns in a Laplacian-coupled network, by applying methods of computational group theory to dynamically equivalent networks. We present a general technique to evaluate the stability of each of the dynamically valid cluster synchronization patterns. Our results are validated in an optoelectronic experiment on a five-node network that confirms the synchronization patterns predicted by the theory. PMID:27152349

  10. Complete characterization of the stability of cluster synchronization in complex dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Francesco; Pecora, Louis M; Hagerstrom, Aaron M; Murphy, Thomas E; Roy, Rajarshi

    2016-04-01

    Synchronization is an important and prevalent phenomenon in natural and engineered systems. In many dynamical networks, the coupling is balanced or adjusted to admit global synchronization, a condition called Laplacian coupling. Many networks exhibit incomplete synchronization, where two or more clusters of synchronization persist, and computational group theory has recently proved to be valuable in discovering these cluster states based on the topology of the network. In the important case of Laplacian coupling, additional synchronization patterns can exist that would not be predicted from the group theory analysis alone. Understanding how and when clusters form, merge, and persist is essential for understanding collective dynamics, synchronization, and failure mechanisms of complex networks such as electric power grids, distributed control networks, and autonomous swarming vehicles. We describe a method to find and analyze all of the possible cluster synchronization patterns in a Laplacian-coupled network, by applying methods of computational group theory to dynamically equivalent networks. We present a general technique to evaluate the stability of each of the dynamically valid cluster synchronization patterns. Our results are validated in an optoelectronic experiment on a five-node network that confirms the synchronization patterns predicted by the theory.

  11. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  12. Supersonic dynamic stability characteristics of the test technique demonstrator NASP configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, David A.; Boyden, Richmond P.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1992-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) configuration were conducted in both test sections of the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The model used is a Langley designed blended body NASP configuration. Dynamic stability characteristics were measured on this configuration at Mach numbers of 2.0, 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5. In addition to tests of the baseline configuration, component buildup tests were conducted. The test results show that the baseline configuration generally has positive damping about all three axes with only isolated exceptions. In addition, there was generally good agreement between the in-pulse dynamic parameters and the corresponding static data which were measured during another series of tests in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Also included are comparisons of the experimental damping parameters with results from the engineering predictive code APAS (Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System). These comparisons show good agreement at low angles of attack; however, the comparisons are generally not as good at the higher angles of attack.

  13. Initial radiation of jaws demonstrated stability despite faunal and environmental change.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Philip S L; Friedman, Matt; Brazeau, Martin D; Rayfield, Emily J

    2011-07-06

    More than 99 per cent of the roughly 58,000 living vertebrate species have jaws. This major clade, whose members are collectively known as gnathostomes ('jawed mouths'), made its earliest definitive appearance in the Silurian period, 444-416 million years (Myr) ago, with both the origin of the modern (crown-group) radiation and the presumptive invasion of land occurring by the end of the Devonian period (359 Myr ago). These events coincided with a major faunal shift that remains apparent today: the transition from Silurian ecosystems dominated by jawless fishes (agnathans) to younger assemblages composed almost exclusively of gnathostomes. This pattern has inspired several qualitative descriptions of the trophic radiation and ecological ascendance of the earliest jawed vertebrates. Here we present a quantitative analysis of functional variation in early gnathostome mandibular elements, placing constraints on our understanding of evolutionary patterns during this critical interval. We document an initial increase in functional disparity in the Silurian that stabilized by the first stage of the Devonian, before the occurrence of an Emsian (∼400 Myr ago) oxygenation event implicated in the trophic radiation of vertebrates. Subsequent taxonomic diversification during the Devonian did not result in increased functional variation; instead, new taxa revisited and elaborated on established mandibular designs. Devonian functional space is dominated by lobe-finned fishes and 'placoderms'; high disparity within the latter implies considerable trophic innovation among jaw-bearing stem gnathostomes. By contrast, the major groups of living vertebrates--ray-finned fishes and tetrapods--show surprisingly conservative mandibular morphologies with little indication of functional diversification or innovation. Devonian gnathostomes reached a point where they ceased to accrue further mandibular functional disparity before becoming taxonomic dominants relative to 'ostracoderm

  14. V2O5 encapsulated MWCNTs in 2D surface architecture: Complete solid-state bendable highly stabilized energy efficient supercapacitor device

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Bidhan; Dubal, Deepak P.; Gómez-Romero, Pedro; Kale, Bharat B.; Sankapal, Babasaheb R.

    2017-01-01

    A simple and scalable approach has been reported for V2O5 encapsulation over interconnected multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) network using chemical bath deposition method. Chemically synthesized V2O5/MWCNTs electrode exhibited excellent charge-discharge capability with extraordinary cycling retention of 93% over 4000 cycles in liquid-electrolyte. Electrochemical investigations have been performed to evaluate the origin of capacitive behavior from dual contribution of surface-controlled and diffusion-controlled charge components. Furthermore, a complete flexible solid-state, flexible symmetric supercapacitor (FSS-SSC) device was assembled with V2O5/MWCNTs electrodes which yield remarkable values of specific power and energy densities along with enhanced cyclic stability over liquid configuration. As a practical demonstration, the constructed device was used to lit the ‘VNIT’ acronym assembled using 21 LED’s. PMID:28256550

  15. V2O5 encapsulated MWCNTs in 2D surface architecture: Complete solid-state bendable highly stabilized energy efficient supercapacitor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Bidhan; Dubal, Deepak P.; Gómez-Romero, Pedro; Kale, Bharat B.; Sankapal, Babasaheb R.

    2017-03-01

    A simple and scalable approach has been reported for V2O5 encapsulation over interconnected multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) network using chemical bath deposition method. Chemically synthesized V2O5/MWCNTs electrode exhibited excellent charge-discharge capability with extraordinary cycling retention of 93% over 4000 cycles in liquid-electrolyte. Electrochemical investigations have been performed to evaluate the origin of capacitive behavior from dual contribution of surface-controlled and diffusion-controlled charge components. Furthermore, a complete flexible solid-state, flexible symmetric supercapacitor (FSS-SSC) device was assembled with V2O5/MWCNTs electrodes which yield remarkable values of specific power and energy densities along with enhanced cyclic stability over liquid configuration. As a practical demonstration, the constructed device was used to lit the ‘VNIT’ acronym assembled using 21 LED’s.

  16. Contaminated soil stabilization demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Sampson, A.E.; Phillips, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    Long-term herbicide control along with a shotcrete cover was constructed at the Hanford Site in May 1991. The cover system allows for maintenance-free containment of contaminants by preventing wind and water transport of contaminants from the soil surface, preventing plant uptake of contaminants, and minimizing water infiltration through the soil column. The cover is composed of two parts: a commercial nonwoven geotextile material impregnated with trifluralin, and a >5-centimeter top cover of shotcrete containing polyethylene fibers. The herbicide-impregnated geotextile functions to prevent plant root growth into contaminated soil if any holes or cracks develop in the shotcrete layer. The herbicide component, trifluralin, is mixed into polymer nodules that degrade slowly over many years, thus releasing trifluralin slowly over time. The shotcrete topcover was sprayed using a sludge pump and air compressor to form a hard, impenetrable surface that prevents wind erosion and reduces water infiltration through the contaminated materials underneath. The benefits of the cover system are expected to last 20 to 30 years. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Complete Regression of Xenograft Tumors upon Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel via Π-Π Stacking Stabilized Polymeric Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yang; van der Meel, Roy; Theek, Benjamin; Blenke, Erik Oude; Pieters, Ebel H.E.; Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; Ehling, Josef; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Storm, Gert; van Nostrum, Cornelus F.; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with taxane-based chemotherapeutics, such as paclitaxel (PTX), is complicated by their narrow therapeutic index. Polymeric micelles are attractive nanocarriers for tumor-targeted delivery of PTX, as they can be tailored to encapsulate large amounts of hydrophobic drugs and achieve prolonged circulation kinetics. As a result, PTX deposition in tumors is increased while drug exposure to healthy tissues is reduced. However, many PTX-loaded micelle formulations suffer from low stability and fast drug release in the circulation, limiting their suitability for systemic drug targeting. To overcome these limitations, we have developed paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded micelles which are stable without chemical crosslinking and covalent drug attachment. These micelles are characterized by excellent loading capacity and strong drug retention, attributed to π-π stacking interaction between PTX and the aromatic groups of the polymer chains in the micellar core. The micelles are based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-(N-(2-benzoyloxypropyl) methacrylamide) (mPEG-b-p(HPMAm-Bz)) block copolymers, which improved the pharmacokinetics and the biodistribution of PTX, and substantially increased PTX tumor accumulation (by more than 2000%; as compared to Taxol® or control micellar formulations). Improved biodistribution and tumor accumulation were confirmed by hybrid μCT-FMT imaging using near-infrared labeled micelles and payload. The PTX-loaded micelles were well tolerated at different doses while they induced complete tumor regression in two different xenograft models (i.e. A431 and MDA-MB-468). Our findings consequently indicate that π-π stacking-stabilized polymeric micelles are promising carriers to improve the delivery of highly hydrophobic drugs to tumors and to increase their therapeutic index. PMID:25831471

  18. SUPPORT FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE ARM PROJECT AND DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE GWIS MODEL FOR A VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE

    SciTech Connect

    F. DAVID MARTIN; MARK B. MURPHY - STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES, LLC

    1999-12-31

    Strategic Technology Resources, L.L.C. (STR) provided work for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in response to Request for Proposal 005BZ0019-35. The objectives of the work in this project were to: (1) support the completion of the Advanced Reservoir Management (ARM) cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) LA9502037, and (2) support the development of a field demonstration of the LANL-developed Global Weapons Information System (GWIS) model for virtual enterprises. The second objective was contingent upon DOE approval of the Advanced Information Management (AIM) CRADA. At the request of the LANL Technical Representative, the project was granted a no-cost extension to November 30, 1999. As part of the project, STR provided managerial support for the ARM CRADA by: (1) assessing the data resources of the participating companies, (2) facilitating the transfer of technical data to LANL, (3) preparing reports, (4) managing communications between the parties to the ARM CRADA, and (5) assisting with the dissemination of information between the parties to technical professional societies and trade associations. The first phase of the current project was to continue to engage subcontractors to perform tasks in the ARM CRADA for which LANL expertise was lacking. All of the ARM field studies required of the project were completed, and final reports for all of the project studies are appended to this final report. The second phase of the current project was to support the field demonstration of the GWIS model for virtual enterprises in an oilfield setting. STR developed a hypertext Webpage that describes the concept and implementation of a virtual enterprise for reservoir management in the petroleum industry. Contents of the hypertext document are included in this report on the project.

  19. Establishment of a novel anabolism-based addiction system with an artificially introduced mevalonate pathway: complete stabilization of plasmids as universal application in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jens; Steinle, Anna; Reichelt, Rudolf; Ewering, Christian; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    Plasmid stability in recombinant microorganisms is a very important requirement for highly efficient plasmid-based production processes in biotechnology. To stably maintain plasmids, we developed in this study an efficient and stringent novel anabolism-based addiction system, which can be widely used. This novel addiction system is based on two components: (i) an Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3) knockout mutant of the ispH gene coding for 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (EC 1.17.1.2) of the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway, impairing the synthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and (ii) a completely synthetic and episomal mevalonate (MVA) pathway as an alternative supplier of essential IPP. The latter is encoded by a plasmid that contains the genes for HMG-CoA reductases from Lactococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus plus HMG-CoA-synthase, MVA kinase, MVP kinase and MVPP decarboxylase from S. aureus. This plasmid should then also harbor the genes for the protein or for the pathway that will be produced or that will be utilized for production of a chemical. To demonstrate the functionality of this addiction system, a mutated cyanophycin synthetase gene (cphA(6308)C595S) was used. To determine plasmid stabilities, flasks experiments in media supplied or not supplied with antibiotics were carried out with the knockout mutant and two control strains, one harboring plasmid pCOLADuet-1::MVA1-5::cphA(6308) and the other harboring a conventional expression plasmid pET-23a::cphA(6308). As revealed by measuring the colony-forming units of aliquots spread on solid media with or without antibiotics, the knockout mutant revealed a plasmid stability of 100% whereas the control strains exhibited plasmid stabilities of only 64% and 2%, respectively. Radiometric enzyme activity measurements for CphA revealed only 95% and 12.5% of the activity in the control strains harboring pCOLADuet-1::MVA1-5::cphA(6308) and pET-23a::cphA(6308), respectively, in

  20. Field Demonstration, Optimization, and Rigorous Validation of Peroxygen-Based ISCO for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater - CHP Stabilization Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    phytate is isolated from soybeans . However, the three stabilizer vary in price and availability. Phytate, the most expensive of the stabilizers, is...mM stabilizer 16 Hydrogen peroxide concentrations as a function of time in slurries containing the Washington subsurface solid with and without...port of the MCS column as a function of cumulative flow are shown in Figures 1-20 and 1-21, respectively. Similar to results in the ICS system, the

  1. Multiple high-level QM/MM reaction paths demonstrate transition-state stabilization in chorismate mutase: correlation of barrier height with transition-state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Claeyssens, Frederik; Ranaghan, Kara E; Manby, Frederick R; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2005-10-28

    Multiple profiles for the reaction from chorismate to prephenate in the enzyme chorismate mutase calculated with hybrid density functional combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d)-CHARMM27) agree well with experiment, and provide direct evidence of transition-state stabilization by this important enzyme, which is at the centre of current debates about the nature of enzyme catalysis.

  2. Demonstration of ATG Process for Stabilizing Mercury (<260 ppm) Contaminated Mixed Waste. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference # 2407

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Mercury contaminated wastes in many forms are present at various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Based on efforts led by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) and its Mercury Working Group (HgWG), the inventory of wastes contaminated with <260 ppm mercury and with radionuclides stored at various DOE sites is estimated to be approximately 6,000 m3). At least 26 different DOE sites have this type of mixed low-level waste in their storage facilities. Extraction methods are required to remove mercury from waste containing >260 ppm levels, but below 260 ppm Hg contamination levels the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not require removal of mercury from the waste. Steps must still be taken, however, to ensure that the final waste form does not leach mercury in excess of the limit for mercury prescribed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) when subjected to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At this time, the limit is 0.20 mg/L. However, in the year 2000, the more stringent Universal Treatment Standard (UTS) of 0.025 mg/L will be used as the target endpoint. Mercury contamination in the wastes at DOE sites presents a challenge because it exists in various forms, such as soil, sludges, and debris, as well as in different chemical species of mercury. Stabilization is of interest for radioactively contaminated mercury waste (<260 ppm Hg) because of its success with particular wastes, such as soils, and its promise of applicability to a broad range of wastes. However, stabilization methods must be proven to be adequate to meet treatment standards. It must also be proven feasible in terms of economics, operability, and safety. To date, no standard method of stabilization has been developed and proven for such varying waste types as those within the DOE complex.

  3. Non-operative management is superior to surgical stabilization in spine injury patients with complete neurological deficits: A perspective study from a developing world country, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Ali, Syed Faizan; Enam, Syed Ather

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surgical stabilization of injured spine in patients with complete spinal cord injury is a common practice despite the lack of strong evidence supporting it. The aim of this study is to compare clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of surgical stabilization versus conservative management of spinal injury in patients with complete deficits, essentially from a developing country's point of view. Methods: A detailed analysis of patients with traumatic spine injury and complete deficits admitted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Pakistan, from January 2004 till January 2010 was carried out. All patients presenting within 14 days of injury were divided in two groups, those who underwent stabilization procedures and those who were managed non-operatively. The two groups were compared with the endpoints being time to rehabilitation, length of hospital stay, 30 day morbidity/mortality, cost of treatment, and status at follow up. Results: Fifty-four patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and half of these were operated. On comparing endpoints, patients in the operative group took longer time to rehabilitation (P-value = 0.002); had longer hospital stay (P-value = 0.006) which included longer length of stay in special care unit (P-value = 0.002) as well as intensive care unit (P-value = 0.004); and were associated with more complications, especially those related to infections (P-value = 0.002). The mean cost of treatment was also significantly higher in the operative group (USD 6,500) as compared to non-operative group (USD 1490) (P-value < 0.001). Conclusion: We recommend that patients with complete SCI should be managed non-operatively with a provision of surgery only if their rehabilitation is impeded due to pain or deformity. PMID:22145085

  4. CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF MIXED ORGANIC AND METAL COMPOUNDS - EPA SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION OF THE SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In November 1990, the Silicate Technology Corporation`s (STC) proprietary process for treating soil contaminated with toxic semivolatile organic and inorganic contaminants was evaluated in a Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) field demonstration at the Selma Pressu...

  5. Analysis of gold(I/III)-complexes by HPLC-ICP-MS demonstrates gold(III) stability in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Ta, Christine; Reith, Frank; Brugger, Joël; Pring, Allan; Lenehan, Claire E

    2014-05-20

    Understanding the form in which gold is transported in surface- and groundwaters underpins our understanding of gold dispersion and (bio)geochemical cycling. Yet, to date, there are no direct techniques capable of identifying the oxidation state and complexation of gold in natural waters. We present a reversed phase ion-pairing HPLC-ICP-MS method for the separation and determination of aqueous gold(III)-chloro-hydroxyl, gold(III)-bromo-hydroxyl, gold(I)-thiosulfate, and gold(I)-cyanide complexes. Detection limits for the gold species range from 0.05 to 0.30 μg L(-1). The [Au(CN)2](-) gold cyanide complex was detected in five of six waters from tailings and adjacent monitoring bores of working gold mines. Contrary to thermodynamic predictions, evidence was obtained for the existence of Au(III)-complexes in circumneutral, hypersaline waters of a natural lake overlying a gold deposit in Western Australia. This first direct evidence for the existence and stability of Au(III)-complexes in natural surface waters suggests that Au(III)-complexes may be important for the transport and biogeochemical cycling of gold in surface environments. Overall, these results show that near-μg L(-1) enrichments of Au in environmental waters result from metastable ligands (e.g., CN(-)) as well as kinetically controlled redox processes leading to the stability of highly soluble Au(III)-complexes.

  6. Experimental setup to demonstrate low-frequency high-precision frequency stabilization of 1550 nm ECL Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoen, Steven; Téllez, Gregorio; Quetschke, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Advances in fiber and waveguide technologies have brought about a new type of laser: the Planar Waveguide External Cavity Laser (PW-ECL) that shows a great potential for precision interferometric measurements. We show an experimental setup based on a 1550nm PW-ECL which was designed to achieve a frequency stabilization of 30 Hz/sqrt(Hz) or less at 10 mHz. The presented design makes use of thermal shielding to suppress temperature fluctuations at low frequencies as well as a vacuum system, high finesse cavity and low-noise electronics to reduce the frequency noise. A description of the components used in the design is given and initial results are presented.

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  8. Non-parallel stability of a flat-plate boundary layer using the complete Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, H.; Konzelmann, U.

    1990-12-01

    Non-parallel effects which are due to the growing boundary layer are investigated by direct numerical integration of the complete Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows. The problem formulation is spatial, i.e. disturbances may grow or decay in the downstream direction as in the physical experiments. In the past various non-parallel theories were published that differ considerably from each other in both approach and interpretation of the results. In this paper a detailed comparison of the Navier-Stokes calculation with the various non-parallel theories is provided. It is shown that the good agreement of some of the theories with experiments is fortuitous and that the difference between experiments and theories concerning the branch I neutral location cannot be explained by non-parallel effects.

  9. Clinical and experimental demonstration of complete healing of porous Dacron patch grafts used for closure of the arteriotomy after carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Wu, M H; Sauvage, L R

    1999-05-01

    A clinical porous Dacron patch graft used for closure after carotid endarterectomy was explanted 24 hr postmortem during autopsy. There had been no TIAs or stroke postoperatively, and the cause of death was congestive heart failure. The graft had been implanted for 25 months. The specimen had a very clean surface, was completely incorporated by full-wall tissue ingrowth, and the flow surface was covered with well-organized neointima containing endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, as confirmed by immunological studies. For comparison, animal experiments were performed. In both the clinical and experimental specimens the carotid patches were patent without neointimal compromise of the lumen, and their healing patterns were similar, with endothelium on the flow surface.

  10. The stability of source localization in a whole-head magnetoencephalography system demonstrated by auditory evoked field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Yang, Hong-Chang; Tsai, Sung-Ying; Liu, Yu-Wei; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan

    2011-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), which is a very sensitive magnetic sensor, has been widely used to detect the ultra-small magnetic signals in many different territories, especially in the biomagnetic measurement. In this study, a 128-channel SQUID first-order axial gradiometer system for whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements was setup to characterize the auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs). A 500 Hz monaural pure tone persisting 425 ms with the sound pressure level of 80 dB was randomly applied to the left ear of subject with the inter-stimulus interval of 1.5 ˜ 2.8 s to prevent fatigue of nerves. We demonstrated the characteristic waveforms of AEFs can be accurately recorded and analyzed. Using source localization processes, the origins of AEFs were successfully calculated to be at the auditory cortices which are brain areas known for responsive to sound stimulus. A phantom experiment also proved the good localization accuracy of the established MEG system and measurement procedures. The validated performance of the SQUID system suggests that this technique can also be employed in other brain research.

  11. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay. PMID:26861328

  12. Demonstration of In-Situ Stabilization of Buried Waste at Pit G-11 at the Brookhaven National laboratory Glass Pits Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P.; Gilbert, J.; Heiser, J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1989 BNL was added to the EPAs National Priorities List. The site is divided into seven operable units (OU). OU-I includes the former landfill area. The field task site is noted as the AOC 2C Glass Holes location. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing into the 1980s, BNL disposed of laboratory waste (glassware, chemicals and animal carcasses) in numerous shallow pits. The drivers for remediating the pits are; historical records that indicate hazardous materials may have been disposed of in the pits; ground water contamination down gradient of the pits; a test excavation of one of the glass holes that unearthed laboratory glass bottles with unidentified liquids still contained; and the fact that BNL rests atop an EPA designated sole-source aquifer. The specific site chosen for this demonstration was pit G-11. The requirements that lead to choosing this pit were; a well characterized pit and a relatively isolated pit where our construction operations would not impact on adjacent pits. The glass holes area, including pit G-11, was comprehensively surveyed using a suite of geophysical techniques (e.g., EM-31, EM-61, GPR). Prior to stabilizing the waste form a subsurface barrier was constructed to contain the entire waste pit. The pit contents were then stabilized using a cement grout applied via jet grouting. The stabilization was performed to make removal of the waste from the pit easier and safer in terms of worker exposure. The grouting process would mix and masticate the waste and grout and form a single monolithic waste form. This large monolith would then be subdivided into smaller 4 foot by 4 foot by 10-12 foot block using a demolition grout. The smaller blocks would then be easily removed from the site and disposed of in a CERCLA waste site.

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  20. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  3. Demonstration of NFS DeHg Process for Stabilizing Mercury (<260 ppm) Contaminated Mixed Waste. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 2229

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Mercury-contaminated wastes in many forms are present at various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Based on efforts led by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) and its Mercury Working Group (HgWG), the inventory of wastes contaminated with < 260 ppm mercury and with radionuclides stored at various DOE sites is estimated to be approximately 6,000 m3 (Conley, Morris, Osborne-Lee, and Hulet 1998). At least 26 different DOE sites have this type of mixed low-level waste in their storage facilities. Extraction methods are required to remove mercury from waste containing >260 ppm levels, but below 260 ppm Hg contamination levels, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not require removal of mercury from the waste. Steps must still be taken, however, to ensure that the final waste form does not leach mercury in excess of the limit for mercury prescribed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) when subjected to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At this time, the limit is 0.20mg/L. However, in the year 2000, the more stringent Universal Treatment Standard (UTS) of 0.025 mg/L will be used as the target endpoint. Mercury contamination in the wastes at DOE sites presents a challenge because it exists in various forms, such as soil, sludges, and debris. Stabilization is of interest for radioactively contaminated mercury waste (<260 ppm Hg) because of its success with particular wastes, such as soils, and its promise of applicability to a broad range of wastes. However, stabilization methods must be proven to be adequate to meet treatment standards and to be feasible in terms of economics, operability, and safety. To date, no standard method of stabilization has been developed and proven for such varying waste types as those within the DOE complex.

  4. The Use of Expert Judgment in the Assessment of Demonstrated Learning in the Antioch College-Yellow Springs Adult Degree Completion Program. CAEL Institutional Report No. 1. Antioch College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    The implementation of the Adult Degree Completion Program (ADCP) at Antioch-Yellow Springs is described. The ADCP is a transfer program designed to enable adults who have never finished colege to complete their undergraduate degree work, often without having to abandon their obligations to families or to professions. To enroll in the program,…

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student…

  6. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  7. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  8. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  9. Fluorinated Alkoxide-Based Magnesium-Ion Battery Electrolytes that Demonstrate Li-Ion-Battery-Like High Anodic Stability and Solution Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Adam J; Stringham, Kyle K; Bartlett, Bart M

    2016-09-07

    Based on DFT predictions, a series of highly soluble fluorinated alkoxide-based electrolytes were prepared, examined electrochemically, and reversibly cycled. The alcohols react with ethylmagnesium chloride to generate a fluoroalkoxy-magnesium chloride intermediate, which subsequently reacts with aluminum chloride to generate the electrolyte. Solutions starting from a 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-methylpropan-2-ol precursor exhibit high anodic stability, 3.2 V vs Mg(2+/0), and a record 3.5 mS/cm solution conductivity. Excellent galvanostatic cycling and capacity retention (94%) is observed with more than 300 h of cycle time while employing the standard Chevrel phase-Mo6S8 cathode material.

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  20. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  1. Dimensional stability of complete denture permanent acrylic resin denture bases; A comparison of dimensions before and after a second curing cycle.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, Michael Robert; Juszczyk, Andrzej Stanislaw; Rodriguez, Jose Mauricio; Curtis, Richard Victor

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure deformation of mandibular complete denture permanent bases after secondary curing. A cast of a flat mandibular edentulous ridge was duplicated ten times. A wax base was laid on the original cast, two wax sprues were attached and an overcast was made. The overcast was used to produce wax bases similar in outline and thickness on the duplicate casts. These were invested and following manufacturer's instructions ten similar acrylic resin bases were produced. The fitting surface of each denture base was scanned on a contacting scanner with an axis resolution of 1 microm and accurate to 25 microm. Denture teeth were waxed up on the base on the original master cast, an overcast was made to produce wax ups and tooth positions that were similar in outline and thickness to the original. These were processed, removed from the flasks and excess acrylic resin was removed. The denture bases were rescanned in an identical fashion to the first scanning procedure. Using commercially developed metrology software calibrated colour maps were generated for each denture base that illustrates measurements of differences between pairs of surfaces. Histograms showing distributions of distances between points were constructed. 50% of the points were separated by a mean 50 microm or less and that 90% of the points were separated by 160 microm or less. The maximum separation was of 380 microm. Complete denture permanent bases were not found to distort significantly as a result of being subjected to a second heat curing cycle as part of final processing of dentures.

  2. An extended action for the effective field theory of dark energy: a stability analysis and a complete guide to the mapping at the basis of EFTCAMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    We present a generalization of the effective field theory (EFT) formalism for dark energy and modified gravity models to include operators with higher order spatial derivatives. This allows the extension of the EFT framework to a wider class of gravity theories such as Hořava gravity. We present the corresponding extended action, both in the EFT and the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism, and proceed to work out a convenient mapping between the two, providing a self contained and general procedure to translate a given model of gravity into the EFT language at the basis of the Einstein-Boltzmann solver EFTCAMB. Putting this mapping at work, we illustrate, for several interesting models of dark energy and modified gravity, how to express them in the ADM notation and then map them into the EFT formalism. We also provide for the first time, the full mapping of GLPV models into the EFT framework. We next perform a thorough analysis of the physical stability of the generalized EFT action, in absence of matter components. We work out viability conditions that correspond to the absence of ghosts and modes that propagate with a negative speed of sound in the scalar and tensor sector, as well as the absence of tachyonic modes in the scalar sector. Finally, we extend and generalize the phenomenological basis in terms of α-functions introduced to parametrize Horndeski models, to cover all theories with higher order spatial derivatives included in our extended action. We elaborate on the impact of the additional functions on physical quantities, such as the kinetic term and the speeds of propagation for scalar and tensor modes.

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first (useful as an introduction to kinetics) shows how the rate of a reaction is fast at first and then gradually decreases to zero when one reactant has been used up. The second is a gas density demonstration using 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane. (JN)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  1. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  10. Efficient penetration of ceric ammonium nitrate oxidant-stabilized gamma-maghemite nanoparticles through the oval and round windows into the rat inner ear as demonstrated by MRI.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Ostrovsky, Stella; Israel, Liron L; Feng, Hao; Kettunen, Mikko I; Lellouche, Jean-Paul Moshe; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2016-05-30

    We aimed to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast effect and delivery efficiency through the middle ear into the inner ear using novel super-paramagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe2 O3 ) nanoparticles (NPs) generated using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN)-mediated oxidation of Fe3 O4 NPs (CAN-γ-Fe2 O3 NPs). The CAN-γ-Fe2O3 NPs, having hydrodynamic diameters of 50-60 nm and potentials of +55.2 mV, displayed super-paramagnetic behavior characterized by a saturation magnetization Ms of 75.2 emu/g NPs. The r1 and r2* relaxivity (curve slopes) values were 0.0015 and 189 mmol(-1)  s(-1) , respectively, indicating strong T2* relaxation maghemite-based NPs. The CAN-γ-Fe2 O3 NPs were stable in the 7.0 T magnetic field. At 3 h after the tympanic medial wall administration, the NPs had significantly located to the cochlea and vestibule. The signal started to recover at 6 h in the ipsilateral cochlea and by 2 d in the vestibule post-administration. There was no difference in the signal intensity between the left and right ears on the 14th d. Prussian blue staining for iron demonstrated NP distribution in the inner ear tissue. The novel CAN-γ-Fe2 O3 NPs are a strong MRI T2 contrast agent and penetrated the round and oval windows and have potential application in the molecular imaging of the inner ear. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  11. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  12. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  2. Comparison of the Drag of a Fin-Stabilized Body of Revolution and of a Complete Airplane Configuration as Obtained at Transonic Speeds in a Slotted Wind Tunnel and in Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Robert R.; Braslow, Albert L.

    1955-01-01

    A comparison of the zero-lift drag coefficients at Mach numbers from 0.81 to 1.41 of a fin-stabilized parabolic body of revolution as measured in the Langley transonic blowdown tunnel has been made with measurements obtained in free-flight on a larger but geometrically similar model. The absolute values of drag coefficient obtained in the slotted wind tunnel were equivalent to the free-flight drag-coefficient values up to a Mach number of 1.4 when adjustments were made for the effect on viscous drag of differences in Reynolds number between the two test conditions. Excellent agreement was obtained between the two tests for the pressure-drag variation with Mach number, regardless of whether the scale effect on skin friction was considered. Favorable agreement was also obtained between the pressure-drag increments due t o the presence of the stabilizing fins as determined in the wine tunnel from fins-on and fins-off tests and as obtained by a different method in free flight. Tests of a specific airplane configuration to obtain an indication of the problems involved in the construction and tests of small-scale (approximately 7-inch span) complete airplane configuration with internal air flow indicated that reliable zero-lift drag-coefficient measurements at Mach numbers up to 1.4 can be attained with such models, provided the model is constructed with a high but not an unreasonable degree of accuracy.

  3. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The completion of assembly of the beam builder and its first automatic production of truss is discussed. A four bay, hand assembled, roll formed members truss was built and tested to ultimate load. Detail design of the fabrication facility (beam builder) was completed and designs for subsystem debugging are discussed. Many one bay truss specimens were produced to demonstrate subsystem operation and to detect problem areas.

  4. Complete Makeover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 23, 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    We finish our look at Mars's dynamic atmosphere with an image of the surface that has been completely modified by the wind. Even the small ridges that remain have been ground down to a cliff-face with a 'tail' of eroded material. The crosshatching shows that the wind regime has remained mainly E/W to ENE/WSW.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.9, Longitude 221 East (139 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  5. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  6. Protein linear indices of the 'macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix' in bioinformatics. Part 1: prediction of protein stability effects of a complete set of alanine substitutions in Arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Medina-Marrero, Ricardo; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Romero-Zaldivar, Vicente; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-04-15

    A novel approach to bio-macromolecular design from a linear algebra point of view is introduced. A protein's total (whole protein) and local (one or more amino acid) linear indices are a new set of bio-macromolecular descriptors of relevance to protein QSAR/QSPR studies. These amino-acid level biochemical descriptors are based on the calculation of linear maps on Rn[f k(xmi):Rn-->Rn] in canonical basis. These bio-macromolecular indices are calculated from the kth power of the macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix. Total linear indices are linear functional on Rn. That is, the kth total linear indices are linear maps from Rn to the scalar R[f k(xm):Rn-->R]. Thus, the kth total linear indices are calculated by summing the amino-acid linear indices of all amino acids in the protein molecule. A study of the protein stability effects for a complete set of alanine substitutions in the Arc repressor illustrates this approach. A quantitative model that discriminates near wild-type stability alanine mutants from the reduced-stability ones in a training series was obtained. This model permitted the correct classification of 97.56% (40/41) and 91.67% (11/12) of proteins in the training and test set, respectively. It shows a high Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC=0.952) for the training set and an MCC=0.837 for the external prediction set. Additionally, canonical regression analysis corroborated the statistical quality of the classification model (Rcanc=0.824). This analysis was also used to compute biological stability canonical scores for each Arc alanine mutant. On the other hand, the linear piecewise regression model compared favorably with respect to the linear regression one on predicting the melting temperature (tm) of the Arc alanine mutants. The linear model explains almost 81% of the variance of the experimental tm (R=0.90 and s=4.29) and the LOO press statistics evidenced its predictive ability (q2=0.72 and scv=4.79). Moreover, the

  7. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  8. Assessment of the influence of Laser phototherapy on the bone repair process of complete fractures in tibiae of rabbits stabilized with semi-rigid internal fixation treated with or without MTA graft: a histological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luiz G. P.; Silva, Aline C. P.; Silva, Anna Paula L. T.; Neves, Bruno Luiz R. C.; Santos, Nicole R. S.; dos Santos, Jean N.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2016-03-01

    Beside biomaterials, Laser phototherapy has shown positive effects as auxiliary therapy in bone repair process, especially when involving large bone losses. The aim of this histological study was to evaluate, by light microscopy, the influence of laser phototherapy on the repair of complete tibial fractures in rabbits treated or not with semi-rigid internal fixation and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate - MTA graft. Twelve Rabbits were randomly divided into four groups with three animals each. After general anesthesia, complete fractures were created in one tibia with a carborundum disk. All animals (groups I-IV) had the fracture stabilized with semi-rigid fixation (wire osteosynthesis - WO). Group I was routinely fixed with WO; groups II and IV fracture was filled by blood clot and MTA implant. In Groups III and IV fracture was filled by blood clot and further irradiated with laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, CW, Φ = 0.04 cm2, 20.4 J/cm2, per session, t = 300s, 142.8 J/cm2 per treatment). The phototherapy protocol was applied immediately after the surgery and repeated each 48 hours during 15 days. Animal death occurred on the 30th postoperative day. After removal of the specimens, the samples were routinely processed, stained with HE and evaluated by light microscopy. Histologically, the group treated with MTA graft and irradiated with laser showed the fracture filled by a more organized and mature trabecular bone, when compared with all other groups. From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that the association of Laser phototherapy + MTA graft in fractures treated with WO improved bone repair when compared with fractures treated only with WO.

  9. Completion and Field Demonstration of a Portable Coastal Observatory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-23

    circles indicate one or more errors in the data decoding, blue triangles show a decoding quality factor. A value less than 0.8 indicates that the...of the small coastal buoys using the designs developed under this project have been made at a number of sites including Bermuda , Monterey Bay, the

  10. Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Iacocca, E.; Awad, A. A.; Dumas, R. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Braun, H. B.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far. PMID:26351104

  11. Addressing problems in complete dentures.

    PubMed

    LaBarre, Eugene; Giusti, Lola; Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela

    2007-10-01

    The authors have compiled a set of solutions to the most common issues influencing the success of complete denture cases. A brief review and discussion of occlusal vertical dimension is presented, followed by a troubleshooting guide to problems such as inadequate retention and stability, discomfort, and other problems affecting treatment outcome.

  12. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  13. Tested Demonstrations. A Chemiluminescence Demonstration - Oxalyl Chloride Oxidation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilber, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive, effective chemiluminescence demonstration requires minimal preparation. It is based on the oxidation of oxalyl chloride by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an appropriate fluorescent sensitizer. The reaction mechanism is not completely understood. (BB)

  14. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  15. Shuttle bay telerobotics demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Cogeos, P.

    1987-01-01

    A demonstration of NASA's robotics capabilities should be a balanced agenda of servicing and assembly tasks combined with selected key technical experiments. The servicing tasks include refueling and module replacement. Refueling involves the mating of special fluid connectors while module replacement requires an array of robotic technologies such as special tools, the arm of a logistics tool, and the precision mating of orbital replacement units to guides. The assembly task involves the construction of a space station node and truss structure. The technological experiments will focus on a few important issues: the precision manipulation of the arms by a teleoperator, the additional use of several mono camera views in conjunction with the stereo system, the use of a general purpose end effector versus a caddy of tools, and the dynamics involved with using a robot with a stabilizer.

  16. Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model. The effect of vibration on launch vehicle dynamics was studied. Conditions included three modes of instability. The film includes close up views of the simulator fuel tank with and without stability control. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030984. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  17. SSME Key Operations Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian; Bradley, Michael; Ives, Janet

    1997-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test program was conducted between August 1995 and May 1996 using the Technology Test Bed (TTB) Engine. SSTO vehicle studies have indicated that increases in the propulsion system operating range can save significant weight and cost at the vehicle level. This test program demonstrated the ability of the SSME to accommodate a wide variation in safe operating ranges and therefore its applicability to the SSTO mission. A total of eight tests were completed with four at Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Engine Test Facility and four at the Stennis Space Center (SSC) A-2 attitude test stand. Key demonstration objectives were: 1) Mainstage operation at 5.4 to 6.9 mixture ratio; 2) Nominal engine start with significantly reduced engine inlet pressures of 50 psia LOX and 38 psia fuel; and 3) Low power level operation at 17%, 22%, 27%, 40%, 45%, and 50% of Rated Power Level. Use of the highly instrumented TTB engine for this test series has afforded the opportunity to study in great detail engine system operation not possible with a standard SSME and has significantly contributed to a greater understanding of the capabilities of the SSME and liquid rocket engines in general.

  18. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  19. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  20. Optimisation of a complete method for the analysis of volatiles involved in the flavour stability of beer by solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saison, Daan; De Schutter, David P; Delvaux, Filip; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2008-05-09

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was used for the quantification of 32 volatiles which represent the typical chemical reactions that can occur during beer ageing. Detection was accomplished by employing on-fibre derivatisation using o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and normal HS-SPME extraction. The procedures were optimised for SPME fibre selection, PFBHA loading temperature and time, extraction temperature and time, and effect of salt addition. Interference of matrix effects was overcome by calibrating according to the standard addition method and by using internal standards. Afterwards, the method was validated successfully and was applied to study the flavour stability of different beer types.

  1. Amodal Completion in Bonobos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasaka, Yasuo; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    We trained two bonobos to discriminate among occluded, complete, and incomplete stimuli. The occluded stimulus comprised a pair of colored shapes, one of which appeared to occlude the other. The complete and incomplete stimuli involved the single shape that appeared to have been partially covered in the occluded stimulus; the complete stimulus…

  2. ARJIS satellite demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severance, Steve; Williams, Carl

    2005-06-01

    In 2003, the California Space Authority (CSA) was provided funding by the U. S. Congress through the Defense Appropriations Act to develop a project that would demonstrate the U.S. space enterprise capability that would contribute to the effectiveness of those engaged in Homeland Security. The project was given broad latitude in selecting the area of Homeland Security to be addressed and the nature of the space technology to be applied. CSA became aware of a nascent law enforcement data-sharing project in the San Diego region known as the Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS). First developed by the police departments in San Diego, ARJIS is an innovative system that shares criminal justice information among 50 federal, state, and local agencies. ARJIS was completing a pilot project that enabled officers to receive information on handheld computers, which was transmitted wirelessly through cellular networks. The accessed information came from several databases that collectively contained the entire region's crime and arrest reports, traffic citations, and incidents, as well as state and county wants and warrants. The fundamental limitations that plague all cellular-based devices caught CSA's attention and resulted in a cooperative effort to harden the communications link between the patrol officer and critical data. The principal goal of the SATCOM development task was to create a proof-of-concept application that would use SATCOM links to augment the current ARJIS handheld wireless (cellular) capability. The successful technical demonstration and the positive support for satellite communications from the law enforcement community showed that this project filled a need-both for improved information sharing and for highly reliable communications systems.

  3. SECURES: Austin, Texas demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Glynn; Shaw, Scott; Scharf, Peter; Stellingworth, Bob

    2003-09-01

    The Law Enforcement technology development community has a growing interest in the technologies associated with gunshot detection and localization. These interests revolve around community-oriented policing. Technologies of interest include those associated with muzzle blast and bullet shockwave detection and the inter-netting of these acoustic sensors with electro-optic sensors. To date, no one sensor technology has proven totally effective for a complete solution. PSI has a muzzle blast detection and localization product which is wireless, highly mobile and reconfigurable, with a user-friendly laptop processor and display unit, which completed a one-year demonstration in Austin, Texas on July 6, 2002. This demonstration was conducted under a Cooperative Agreement with the National Institute of Justice and in cooperation with the Austin Police Department. This paper will discuss the details of the demonstrations, provide a summarized evaluation, elucidate the lessons learned, make recommendations for future deployments and discuss the developmental directions indicated for the future.

  4. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  5. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  6. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work si shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing• ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testingThe driving requirements for this development are:• SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components• Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  7. Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a Semispan Wind-Tunnel Model of the XF7U-1 Airplane and a Comparison with Complete-Model Wind-Tunnel Tests and Semispan-Model Wing-Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Kenneth W.; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on an 0.08-scale semispan model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.97. The results are compared with those obtained with an 0.08-scale sting-mounted complete model tested in the same tunnel and with an 0.026-scale semispan model tested by the wing-flow method. The lift-curve slopes obtained for the 0.08-scale semispan model and the 0.026-scale wing-flow model were in good agreement but both were generally lower than the values obtained for the sting model. The results of an unpublished investigation have shown that tunnel-wall boundary-layer and strut-leakage effects can came the difference noted between the lift-curve slopes of the sting and the semispan data. Fair agreement was obtained among the data of the three models as regard the variation of pitching-moment coefficients with lift coefficient. The agreement between the complete and the semispan models was more favorable with the vertical fine on, because the wall-boundary-layer and strut leakage effects were less severe. In the Mach number range between 0.94 and 0.97, ailavator-control reversal was indicated in the wing-flow data near zero lift; Whereas, these same trends were indicated in the larger scale semispan data at somewhat higher lift coefficients.

  8. Reactor surface contamination stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Contaminated surfaces, such as the face of a nuclear reactor, need to be stabilized (fixed) to avoid airborne contamination during decontamination and decommissioning activities, and to prepare for interim safe storage. The traditional (baseline) method of fixing the contamination has been to spray a coating on the surfaces, but ensuring complete coverage over complex shapes, such as nozzles and hoses, is difficult. The Hanford Site C Reactor Technology Demonstration Group demonstrated innovative technologies to assess stabilization properties of various coatings and to achieve complete coverage of complex surfaces on the reactor face. This demonstration was conducted in two phases: the first phase consisted of a series of laboratory assessments of various stabilization coatings on metal coupons. For the second phase, coatings that passed the laboratory tests were applied to the front face of the C Reactor and evaluated. The baseline coating (Rust-Oleum No. 769) and one of the innovative technologies did not completely cover nozzle assemblies on the reactor face, the most critical of the second-phase evaluation criteria. However, one of the innovative coating systems, consisting of a base layer of foam covered by an outer layer of a polymeric film, was successful. The baseline technology would cost approximately 33% as much as the innovative technology cost of $64,000 to stabilize an entire reactor face (196 m{sup 2} or 2116 ft{sup 2}) with 2,004 nozzle assemblies, but the baseline system failed to provide complete surface coverage.

  9. Reliability prediction for the SLOWPOKE demonstration reactor building heating demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Winfield, D.J. ); Cole, D.; Bennett, L.G.I.

    1991-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE demonstration reactor (SDR) is a new prototype heating reactor, nominally 2 MW(thermal), developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at the Whiteshell Laboratories. This project is part of a program to demonstrate the concept of supplying low-grade heat up to 10 MW(thermal) to localized district heating grids from an unpressurized nuclear heating source using a low-enriched, CANDU-type fuel. Reactor thermal-hydraulic and core physics commissioning experiments and analysis up to 1.2 MW(thermal) were completed in 1990. This report presents that part of the safety and reliability analysis program that provided reliability predictions for the associated building heating demonstration (BHD) systems. Proposed upgrades to test the 10-MW(thermal) core design have delayed the long-term heat demonstration commissioning tests.

  10. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  11. ORION II bus demonstration. Demonstration report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, J.

    1989-02-01

    The Central New York Regional Transportation Authority conducted an 18-month demonstration to determine how the ORION II bus operates in actual service. The ORION II vehicle is a small low floor, accessible heavy duty, diesel-powered transit bus designed to meet the needs of the elderly and handicapped. It has the capacity to seat 26 passengers with 4 wheelchair lockdowns. Side and rear doors are equipped with electrically powered ramps. Eight Thomas vehicles (22-foot, 11,500 lbs, wheelchair equipped, gasoline fueled) were also tested during the demonstration period. Operations (fuel and oil usage) and maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) data were collected and charted-out in the report as well as driver, passenger, and maintenance surveys. This report provides descriptions, photographs, and comparison charts of both the diesel-fueled ORION II transit bus and the gasoline-fueled Thomas vehicles along with the demonstration test plan, evaluations, conclusions, and survey results.

  12. Section 32 Program. Streambank Erosion Control, Evaluation and Demonstration. Work Unit 4. Research on Soil Stability and Identification of Causes of Streambank Erosion. Investigation of a Grid for Bank Protection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    NOV 79 A C SPIVEY, C R STYRON UNCLASSIFIED WES-INVESTISATION- 3 SECTION 32 PROGRAM STREAMBANK EROSION CONTROL EVALUATION AND DEMONSTRATION WORK UNIT 4 ...piece of 3 / 4 -in. (19.05-mm) plywood (Photo 5). The front wheels of a half-ton truck were driven on the plywood to press the grids into the soil (Photo...400 300 U 20 0 40 -~ z 0- 0 a 4 0 a 𔃺 12 14 Is is 20 22 24 20 28 30JANUARY Figure 3 .(Sheet 2 of 3 ) 40 -100’ 30- -8’ MAXIMUM -70’ 0 0 0, Z0 40 MINIMUM

  13. FY 1999 cold demonstration of the Multi-Point Injection (MPI) process for stabilizing contaminated sludge in buried horizontal tanks with limited access at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschinger, J.L.; Lewis, B.E.; Spence, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    A major problem faced by the U.S. Department of Energy is the remediation of buried tank waste. Exhumation of the sludge is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation does not typically remove all the contaminated material from the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and uniformly mixed with the sludge. Ground Environmental Services, Inc., has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity, jet-delivery system, which is termed Multi-Point-Injection (MPI{trademark}). This robust jet-delivery system has been used to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow-buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in a cylindrical test tank (FY 1998). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process was able to successfully form a 32-ton uniform monolith in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of a zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within the 40-inch-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies of Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAATs) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily mixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.

  14. Latino College Completion: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Latino College Completion: Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  18. Latino College Completion: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Status of the Majorana Demonstrator

    DOE PAGES

    Cuesta, C.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; ...

    2015-08-06

    The Majorana Collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular high purity Ge detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double-beta decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. Lastly, the current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  7. Status of the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, C.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Schmitt, C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Timkin, V.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-08-06

    The Majorana Collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular high purity Ge detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double-beta decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. Lastly, the current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  8. FY 1999 Cold Demonstration of the Multi-Point Injection (MPI ) Process for Stabilizing Contaminated Sludge in Buried Horizontal Tanks with Limited Access at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschinger, J.L.

    2000-02-04

    Operations at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Site (SRS), have generated a variety of waste streams that have resulted in releases to the environment. These releases have created areas or suspected areas of contamination and contaminated facilities that could contain hazardous, radioactive, and/or mixed wastes. As a result, these areas or facilities are subject to environmental assessments and possible restoration, primarily under the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). To reduce risks to human health and the environment and to comply with the requirements of the various environmental laws and regulations, multidisciplinary environmental restoration (ER) programs [which include remedial actions and decontamination and decommissioning and waste management programs] have been established to identify, characterize, and remediate sites and facilities at both ORNL and SRS. To coordinate and ensure compliance with the applicable laws and regulations, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regions, and the respective state environmental agencies have entered into Federal Facilities Compliance Agreements (FFCA) and/or Consent Agreements. The Environmental Management, Office of Technology Development, and other agencies provide needed technology development and demonstration support for ER programs. The work described in this report is an illustration of the cooperation between and among the DOE, Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER)--ORNL, Westinghouse--SRS, Bechtel Jacobs Company, and Ground Environmental Services, Inc., (GES), a small business technology provider.

  9. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  10. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are demonstrations of the optical activity of two sugar solutions, and the effects of various substituents on acid strength using an overhead projector. Materials and procedures for each demonstration are discussed. (CW)

  11. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  12. Classroom Demonstrations: Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Sandra M.

    These demonstrations stress individual differences, a concept becoming increasingly important in psychological research. Intended for use in undergraduate psychology courses, four demonstrations that illustrate common examples of human variation are described. The demonstrations deal with the following individual differences: taste blindness,…

  13. Adolescents' Demonstrative Behavior Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parfilova, Gulfiya G.; Karimova, Lilia Sh.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of demonstrative behavior is very topical among teenagers and this issue has become the subject of systematic scientific research. Demonstrative manifestations in adolescents disrupt the favorable socialization; therefore, understanding, prevention and correction of demonstrative behavior at this age is relevant and requires special…

  14. A Boyle's Law Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sathe, Dileep V.

    1984-01-01

    The usual apparatus for demonstrating Boyle's law produces reasonably accurate results, but is not impressive as a demonstration because students cannot easily appreciate the change in pressure. An apparatus designed to produce a more effective demonstration is described. Procedures employed are also described. (JN)

  15. Classical Demonstration of Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Moore, Dennis R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a classical demonstration of polarization for high school students. The initial state of this model, which demonstrates the important concepts of the optical and quantum problems, was developed during the 1973 summer program on lecture demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy. (HM)

  16. TRUEX hot demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  17. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  18. Data surety demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, T.; Harris, M.; Herrington, P.; Kromer, D.

    1998-08-01

    The use of data surety within the International Monitoring System (IMS) is designed to offer increased trust of acquired sensor data at a low cost. The demonstrations discussed in the paper illustrate the feasibility of hardware authentication for sensor data and commands in a retrofit environment and a new system and of the supporting key management system. The individual demonstrations which are summarized in the paper are: (1) demonstration of hardware authentication for communication authentication in a retrofit environment; (2)demonstration of hardware authentication in a new system; and (3) demonstration of key management for sensor data and command authentication.

  19. Enhanced colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borum, La Rhonda Terese

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2 is the most thermodynamically stable calcium phosphate in physiological environments. Hence, it is the main inorganic mineral found in bone and teeth. Its colloidal stability, however, is poor because hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles exhibit sediment formation upon standing at short time periods, where agglomerates form and lead to non-homogeneous suspensions. Surface modification is a promising method to tailor the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite for biomaterial applications. Three techniques to modify the HAp surface and enhance the colloidal stability of HAp were investigated. Modified particles were characterized by methods sensitive to surface chemistry changes, such as sedimentation studies, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and electrophoresis. Sedimentation studies demonstrated how effective each technique was in improving the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite particles. Electrophoresis provided information on electrostatic interactions within each system. The first technique entailed an esterification reaction of the HAp surface with dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures. DRIFT results showed that dodecyl groups from the alcohol replaced acidic hydroxyl and phosphate sites on the HAp surface, giving rise to enhanced colloidal stability through steric interactions in ethanol suspensions. TGA curves gave insight to the degree of esterification for the esterified particles. Higher reaction temperatures give rise to a higher degree of esterification resulting in better colloidal stability. The second technique applied a silica coating on the HAp surface by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol. Silica was coated onto the HAp surface at 5--75 wt% loading amounts. A combination of acid dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), along with BET showed that the silica coating is complete at 50 wt% silica loading. The silica coating

  20. A simple demonstration of corrosion cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guichelaar, Philip J.; Williams, Molly W.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to reinforce and enhance the understanding of galvanic cells, anode cathode reactions and polarization phenomena. Complete instructions are given for laboratory demonstration to be performed by students.

  1. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications. PMID:27872473

  2. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-11-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications.

  3. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  4. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  5. Beyond FASFA Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Ben; Page, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)--which students must complete to qualify for most federal, state, and institutional financial aid--is a gateway to college through which many students must pass, particularly those from low- to moderate-income households (King, 2004; Kofoed, 2013). Yet given the complexity of the…

  6. Making College Completion Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Heather

    2011-01-01

    There are countless justifications for why young adults, faced with so many distractions, do not complete their educations. Many students fail to finish college because of a lack of information and understanding about healthy relationships and sex education. The author's own struggles and eventual successes as a student and mother compelled her to…

  7. College Completion Tool Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In March, 2009, President Obama proposed the American Graduation Initiative, which established the goal that by 2020 the United States will regain its position as the nation with the highest percentage of its population holding post-secondary degrees and credentials. The College Completion Toolkit provides information that governors and other…

  8. Completing a Simple Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Students have problems successfully arranging an electric circuit to make the bulb produce light. Investigates the percentage of students able to complete a circuit with a given apparatus, and the effects of prior experience on student success. Recommends hands-on activities at the elementary and secondary school levels. (Contains 14 references.)…

  9. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  10. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  11. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  12. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  13. USFWS demonstration fees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan; Vaske, Jerry; Donnelly, Maureen; Shelby, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This study examined National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) visitors' reactions to changes in fees implemented as part of the fee demonstration program. Visitors' evaluations of the fees paid were examined in addition to their beliefs about fees and the fee demonstration program, and the impact of fees paid on their intention to return. All results were analyzed relative to socio-demographic characteristics.

  14. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  15. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  16. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  17. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  18. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, C; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A.S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, Adam S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Snyder, N; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J. E.; Vasilyev, S.; et al.

    2015-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, modular, HPGe detector array with a mass of 44-kg (29 kg Ge-76 and 15 kg Ge-nat) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Ge-76. The next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double beta decay searches will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is envisioned to demonstrate a path forward to achieve a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value of 2039 keV. The MAJO-RANA DEMONSTRATOR follows a modular implementation to be easily scalable to the next generation experiment. First, the prototype module was assembled; it has been continuously taking data from July 2014 to June 2015. Second, Module 1 with more than half of the total enriched detectors and some natural detectors has been assembled and it is being commissioned. Finally, the assembly of Module 2, which will complete MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, is already in progress.

  19. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  20. Status of the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, C.; Buuck, M.; Detwiler, J. A.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A. W.; Chan, Y.-D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Arnquist, I. J.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Avignone, F. T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Bertrand, F. E.; and others

    2015-10-28

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, modular, HPGe detector array with a mass of 44-kg (29 kg {sup 76}Ge and 15 kg {sup nat}Ge) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. The next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double beta decay searches will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is envisioned to demonstrate a path forward to achieve a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value of 2039 keV. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR follows a modular implementation to be easily scalable to the next generation experiment. First, the prototype module was assembled; it has been continuously taking data from July 2014 to June 2015. Second, Module 1 with more than half of the total enriched detectors and some natural detectors has been assembled and it is being commissioned. Finally, the assembly of Module 2, which will complete MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, is already in progress.

  1. ExoMars Entry Demonstrator Module Dynamic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormieux, Marc; Gulhan, Ali; Berner, Claude

    2011-05-01

    In the frame of ExoMars DM aerodynamics characterization, pitch damping derivatives determination is required as it drives the parachute deployment conditions. Series of free-flight and free- oscillation tests (captive model) have been conducted with particular attention for data reduction. 6 Degrees- of-Freedom (DoF) analysis tools require the knowledge of local damping derivatives. In general ground tests do not provide them directly but only effective damping derivatives. Free-flight (ballistic range) tests with full oscillations around trim angle have been performed at ISL for 0.5

  2. Reservoir stability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, T.J.

    1981-07-01

    The objective of the reservoir stability studies project is to develop stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock caverns, and porous rock structures for air storage in utility applications. Because reservoir stability was deemed crucial to commercialization of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems this project has received major emphasis in the early phases of the overall CAES program. A long term plan, including state-of-the-art assessment, numerical model development and experimental studies culminating in field research, as necessary, was formulated. This plan, initiated in 1977, has been completed during FY-1981 to the stage of specific experimental studies and field research. Activities within this project during FY-1981 have included completion of site specific geotechnical design evaluations using methodologies developed to assess hard rock cavern stability, implementation of in-mine research to evaluate numerical and laboratory study conclusions on the response of domal salt, and preparation of integrated laboratory and field study facilities to assess developed predictive methods and determine in situ response of a porous media reservoir to air injection. The major activity in the project has been the field study component of the porous media studies. Accomplishments there have included completion of exploration, permitting and leasing, operation contractor selection and negotiation, and initiation of procurement and construction for an FY-1982 test initiation. A major program milestone, drilling of the injection withdrawal well for this test, was completed ahead of schedule.

  3. Image Zoom Completion.

    PubMed

    Hidane, Moncef; El Gheche, Mireille; Aujol, Jean-Francois; Berthoumieu, Yannick; Deledalle, Charles-Alban

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a high-resolution image from a pair consisting of a complete low-resolution image and a high-resolution but incomplete one. We refer to this task as the image zoom completion problem. After discussing possible contexts in which this setting may arise, we introduce a nonlocal regularization strategy, giving full details concerning the numerical optimization of the corresponding energy and discussing its benefits and shortcomings. We also derive two total variation-based algorithms and evaluate the performance of the proposed methods on a set of natural and textured images. We compare the results and get with those obtained with two recent state-of-the-art single-image super-resolution algorithms.

  4. SRS SWPF Construction Completion

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Jack; Sheppard, Frank; Marks, Pam

    2016-08-04

    Now that construction is complete, DOE and construction contractor Parsons, are focusing on testing the Savannah River Site’s Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) systems and training the workforce to operate the plant in preparation for the start of operations. Once in operation, the SWPF will significantly increase processing rates at SRS tank farms in an effort to empty the site’s high-level radioactive waste tanks.

  5. SRS SWPF Construction Completion

    ScienceCinema

    Craig, Jack; Sheppard, Frank; Marks, Pam

    2016-08-17

    Now that construction is complete, DOE and construction contractor Parsons, are focusing on testing the Savannah River Site’s Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) systems and training the workforce to operate the plant in preparation for the start of operations. Once in operation, the SWPF will significantly increase processing rates at SRS tank farms in an effort to empty the site’s high-level radioactive waste tanks.

  6. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  7. Demonstrating Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, David S.; Amundson, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes laboratory exercises with chickens selecting their food from dyed and natural corn kernels as a method of demonstrating natural selection. The procedure is based on the fact that organisms that blend into their surroundings escape predation. (BR)

  8. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  9. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon F.; Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a method of demonstrating the optical activity of glucose using an overhead projector and easily obtainable materials. Explores the difference between reflected and transmitted light (Tyndall Effect) using sodium thiosulfate, hydrochloric acid, and an overhead projector. (ML)

  10. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  11. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  12. Classroom Demonstration of Sunspots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Thomas O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An overhead projector, projection screen, and clear tungsten Filament light bulb operated through a dimmer or variac switch are used to demonstrate the fact that black appearance of sunspots is due only to contrast and that sunspots are bright. (SK)

  13. Technology Demonstration Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Technology Demonstration Missions (TDM) Program seeks to infuse new technology into space applications, bridging the gap between mature “lab-proven” technology and "flight-ready" status....

  14. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  15. Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Mike Conley delivers a presentation from the Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of t...

  16. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  17. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress in the development of a beam builder to be deployed by space shuttle for assembly of large structures in space is reported. The thermal coating for the structural truss was selected and the detail truss design and analysis completed. Data acquired during verification of the design of the basic 'building block' truss are included as well as design layouts for various fabrication facility subsystems.

  18. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  19. METCAN demonstration manual, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The various features of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer program to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites are demonstrated. Different problems are used to demonstrate various capabilities of METCAN for both static and cyclic analyses. A complete description of the METCAN output file is also included to help interpret results.

  20. Stability and Retention.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Stability of tooth position in the broader sense considers all the forces that may act on the tooth. Reitan reported that significant forces remained in the periodontium after tooth movement, and he carried out research that demonstrated residual stretching of the crestal periodontal fibers more than 7 months after tooth movement. Brain demonstrated that severing the fibers reduced the relapse in tooth position in dogs. Edwards published a series of papers exploring the effects of surgical transection of the gingival fibers on tooth stability, recommending that circumferential fiberotomy be performed in order to increase posttreatment tooth stability. Other researchers have suggested ways to increase the stability of the incisors, which are typically most prone to relapse. Peck and Peck recommended that interproximal reduction be done to broaden the contact point. Boese also recommended interproximal reduction as part of a four-pronged approach to retention.

  1. Complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, N; Venugopal, P S; Deshpande, R; Anderson, D

    2003-03-01

    Thoracic ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect with very few reported survivors after surgical correction. We report a case of complete thoracic ectopia cordis with double outlet right ventricle. The diagnosis was established antenatally and a repair was undertaken soon after birth. The child remained stable and was extubated on the fifth post-operative day. Forty-eight hours later the child succumbed to an unexplained respiratory arrest. Also presented is a review of the different surgical strategies for this unusual condition.

  2. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Asra; Hanif, Farha; Hanif, Shumaila Muhammad; Abdullah, Farhan Essa; Shamim, Muhammad Shahid

    2008-07-01

    The incidence of Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) is about 1 in 20,000. People with CAIS are normal appearing females, despite the presence of testes and a 46, XY chromosome constitution. We came across a case in which a 17 years old girl presented with the complaint of inguinal hernia and amenorrhea. Subsequent investigations were done revealing absence of female internal genitalia and the presence of abdominal mass, possibly testes. Syndrome has been linked to mutations in AR, the gene for the human Androgen Receptor, located at Xq11-12 leading to the insensitivity of the receptor to testosterone. Gonadectomy was performed and life long Hormone replacement therapy was advised.

  3. Autonomous docking ground demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Steve L.; Le, Thomas Quan; Othon, L. T.; Prather, Joseph L.; Eick, Richard E.; Baxter, Jim M.; Boyd, M. G.; Clark, Fred D.; Spehar, Peter T.; Teters, Rebecca T.

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Docking Ground Demonstration is an evaluation of the laser sensor system to support the docking phase (12 ft to contact) when operated in conjunction with the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) software. The docking mechanism being used was developed for the Apollo/Soyuz Test Program. This demonstration will be conducted using the 6-DOF Dynamic Test System (DTS). The DTS simulates the Space Station Freedom as the stationary or target vehicle and the Orbiter as the active or chase vehicle. For this demonstration, the laser sensor will be mounted on the target vehicle and the retroflectors will be on the chase vehicle. This arrangement was chosen to prevent potential damage to the laser. The laser sensor system, GN&C, and 6-DOF DTS will be operated closed-loop. Initial conditions to simulate vehicle misalignments, translational and rotational, will be introduced within the constraints of the systems involved.

  4. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hartley, J.N.; Hinchee, R.

    1992-08-01

    Environmental Management Operations (EMO) is conducting an Innovative Technology Demonstration Program for Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). Several innovative technologies are being demonstrated to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ. The bioremediation demonstration will evaluate a bioventing process in which the naturally occurring consortium of soil bacteria will be stimulated to aerobically degrade soil contaminants, including fuel and TCE, in situ.

  5. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  6. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  7. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  8. Insert tree completion system

    SciTech Connect

    Brands, K.W.; Ball, I.G.; Cegielski, E.J.; Gresham, J.S.; Saunders, D.N.

    1982-09-01

    This paper outlines the overall project for development and installation of a low-profile, caisson-installed subsea Christmas tree. After various design studies and laboratory and field tests of key components, a system for installation inside a 30-in. conductor was ordered in July 1978 from Cameron Iron Works Inc. The system is designed to have all critical-pressure-containing components below the mudline and, with the reduced profile (height) above seabed, provides for improved safety of satellite underwater wells from damage by anchors, trawl boards, and even icebergs. In addition to the innovative nature of the tree design, the completion includes improved 3 1/2-in. through flowline (TFL) pumpdown completion equipment with deep set safety valves and a dual detachable packer head for simplified workover capability. The all-hydraulic control system incorporates a new design of sequencing valve for both Christmas tree control and remote flowline connection. A semisubmersible drilling rig was used to initiate the first end flowline connection at the wellhead for subsequent tie-in to the prelaid, surface-towed, all-welded subsea pipeline bundle.

  9. Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, R.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Poelker, M.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.; Kholopov M.; Shevchenko, O.; McIntosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-09-04

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  10. Technology demonstration by the BIRD-mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieß, K.; Bärwald, W.; Gill, E.; Kayal, H.; Montenbruck, O.; Montenegro, S.; Halle, W.; Skrbek, W.; Studemund, H.; Terzibaschian, T.; Venus, H.

    2005-01-01

    kg, high peak power of 200 W at 10-20 min, and average power 60 W, advanced thermal control system with radiators, heat pipes, MLI, temperature sensors and contingency heaters, new developed high-performance spacecraft bus computer with integrated latch-up protection and error detection and correction system, three-axis stabilization of the spacecraft by an attitude control system in state space representation, integrating the payload platform with its structure, thermal and power requirements, onboard determination of the spacecraft position and velocity by the onboard navigation system basing on receiving and onboard processing of GPS data, S-band communication with high bit rate (2.2 Mbps) and low bit rate. The total mass of the complete spacecraft is 92 kg. BIRD shall demonstrate the limits and the advantages of using new developed components, methods, algorithms and technologies. The satellite was launched with the Indian PSLV-C3 from Shar on 22nd October 2001 into an Sun-synchronous circular orbit of an altitude of about 568 km. (The paper describes the new developed technologies like onboard navigation system, the high-performance failure tolerant spacecraft computer, the precision reaction wheels, the star sensor, the attitude control system, the onboard classification experiment and the results and flight experience up to now.)

  11. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  12. A Biofeedback Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Michael K.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for measurement of biophysical signals produced by the human body. The signals, after amplification, could provide acoustical feedback through a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), or they could be seen either with an oscilloscope or a high speed chart recorder. (GA)

  13. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  14. A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations are a great vehicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. Educational research is replete with data showing that concept application in an inquiry setting reinforces long-term science content retention. This means that students learn best when they experience applications of concepts and…

  15. DEMONSTRATION PLAN FIELD MEASUREMENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The demonstration of innovative field measurement devices for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil is being conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in June 2000 at the Navy Base Ventura County site in Port Hueneme, California. The primary purpose of the demonstration is to evaluate innovative field measurement devices for TPH in soil based on their performance and cost as compared to a conventional, off-site laboratory analytical method. The seven field measurement devices listed below will be demonstrated. CHEMetrics, Inc.'s, RemediAidTm Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Starter Kit Wilks Enterprise, Inc.'s, Infracal' TOG/TPH Analyzer, Models CVH and HATR-T Horiba Instruments, Incorporated's, OCMA-350 Oil Content Analyzer Dexsil' Corporation's PetroFLAGTm Hydrocarbon Test Kit for Soil Environmental Systems Corporation's Synchronous Scanning Luminoscope siteLAB@ Corporation's Analytical Test Kit UVF-3 I OOA Strategic Diagnostics, Inc.'s, EnSys Petro Test System This demonstration plan describes the procedures that will be used to verify the performance and cost of each field measurement device. The plan incorporates the quality assurance and quality control elements needed to generate data of sufficient quality to document each device's performance and cost. A separate innovative technology verification report (ITVR) will be prepared for each device. The ITVRs will present the demonstratio

  16. ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FORBES, JACK

    THE ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL IS LOCATED IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA, WHERE THE NAVAJO LANGUAGE IS UNIVERSALLY SPOKEN BY THE NAVAJO PEOPLE. IT IS LOCATED ON A NAVAJO RESERVATION AND WAS DESIGNED AS A BIA EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOL TO SERVE 200 ELEMENTARY PUPILS, MOST OF WHOM ARE IN THE BOARDING SCHOOL SITUATION. AN OBJECTIVE OF THE SCHOOL IS TO GAIN…

  17. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  18. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  19. Astronomy Demonstrations and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    Demonstrations in astronomy classes seem to be more necessary than in physics classes for three reasons. First, many of the events are very large scale and impossibly remote from human senses. Secondly, while physics courses use discussions of one- and two-dimensional motion, three-dimensional motion is the normal situation in astronomy; thus,…

  20. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Provides two demonstrations: (1) electrolyte migration of ions using colored ions which cross a strip of gelatin allowing for noticeable migration; and (2) photochemical reduction of Fe+3 by the citrate ion. Points out both reactions can be done in a Petri dish using common lab materials. (MVL)

  1. A Magnetic Circuit Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderkooy, John; Lowe, June

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration designed to illustrate Faraday's, Ampere's, and Lenz's laws and to reinforce the concepts through the analysis of a two-loop magnetic circuit. Can be made dramatic and challenging for sophisticated students but is suitable for an introductory course in electricity and magnetism. (JRH)

  2. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are three chemistry demonstrations: (1) a simple qualitative technique for taste pattern recognition in structure-activity relationships; (2) a microscale study of gaseous diffusion using bleach, HCl, ammonia, and phenolphthalein; and (3) the rotation of polarized light by stereoisomers of limonene. (MVL)

  3. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  4. Repository Drift Backfilling Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Londe, I.; Dubois, J.Ph.; Bauer, C.

    2008-07-01

    The 'Backfilling Demonstrator' is one of the technological demonstrators developed by ANDRA in the framework of the feasibility studies for a geological repository for high-level long-lived (HL-LL waste) within a clay formation. The demonstrator concerns the standard and supporting backfills as defined in Andra's 2005 design. The standard backfill is intended to fill up almost all drifts of the underground repository in order to limit any deformation of the rock after the degradation of the drift lining. The supporting backfill only concerns a small portion of the volume to be backfilled in order to counter the swelling pressure of the swelling clay contained in the sealing structures. The first objective of the demonstrator was to show the possibility of manufacturing a satisfactory backfill, in spite of the exiguity of the underground structures, and of reusing as much as possible the argillite muck. For the purpose of this experiment, the argillite muck was collected on Andra's work-site for the implementation of an underground research laboratory. Still ongoing, the second objective is to follow up the long-term evolution of the backfill. Approximately 200 m{sup 3} of compacted backfill material have been gathered in a large concrete tube simulating a repository drift. The standard backfill was manufactured exclusively with argillite. The supporting backfill was made by forming a mixture of argillite and sand. Operations were carried out mostly at Richwiller, close to Mulhouse, France. The objectives of the demonstrator were met: an application method was tested and proven satisfactory. The resulting dry densities are relatively high, although the moduli of deformation do not always reach the set goal. The selected objective for the demonstrator was a dry density corresponding to a relatively high compaction level (95% of the standard Proctor optimum [SPO]), for both pure argillite and the argillite-sand mixture. The plate-percussion compaction technique was

  5. SMES: Redefining the path to commerical demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, W. G.; Lighthipe, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage) is an emerging technology offering tremendous potential benefits to the utility industry. San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) and Bechtel are leading a team of companies and national laboratories working towards design and construction of the world's first demonstration facility for large, commercial SMES for enhancing transmission stability in the Southwestern United States.

  6. SMES: Redefining the path to commercial demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, W.G.; Lighthipe, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    SMES (Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage) is an emerging technology offering tremendous potential benefits to the utility industry. San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) and Bechtel are leading a team of companies and national laboratories working towards design and construction of the world`s first demonstration facility for large, commercial SMES for enhancing transmission stability in the Southwestern United States.

  7. Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) tail camera video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) was a joint research project by NASA and the FAA to test a survivable aircraft impact using a remotely piloted Boeing 720 aircraft. The tail camera movie is one shot running 27 seconds. It shows the impact from the perspective of a camera mounted high on the vertical stabilizer, looking forward over the fuselage and wings.

  8. Beyond complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a general and consistent formulation for linear subsystem quantum dynamical maps, developed from a minimal set of postulates, primary among which is a relaxation of the usual, restrictive assumption of uncorrelated initial system-bath states. We describe the space of possibilities admitted by this formulation, namely that, far from being limited to only completely positive (CP) maps, essentially any C-linear, Hermiticity-preserving, trace-preserving map can arise as a legitimate subsystem dynamical map from a joint unitary evolution of a system coupled to a bath. The price paid for this added generality is a trade-off between the set of admissible initial states and the allowed set of joint system-bath unitary evolutions. As an application, we present a simple example of a non-CP map constructed as a subsystem dynamical map that violates some fundamental inequalities in quantum information theory, such as the quantum data processing inequality.

  9. Mars oxygen processor demonstration project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the 1986-87 space system design project was to design and procure the hardware necessary to demonstrate continuous production of oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere. The work was an extension of a design project that was started during the previous academic year. A yttria stabilized, zirconium oxide electrochemical cell was operated in a controlled temperature environment to separate oxygen, which has been dissociated thermally from the primary constituent of the Martian atmosphere-carbon dioxide. This system was perhaps the most primitive chemical processor that could be developed as part of an extraterrestrial chemicals production demonstration project. The course began in January, 1987. Speakers were brought in to discuss the Martian environment, concepts for resource extraction and system requirements for an autonomous chemical processor. The class simultaneously refined its work plans, which were developed as part of the fall semester senior seminar course. Hardware was purchased using funds provided by the Planetary Society. However, the key hardware element was the zirconia cell. Development of that type of cell is beyond the capabilities of undergraduate engineering students. Consequently, the cell was borrowed. The design elements emphasized in this project were as follows: (1) System reliability analysis; (2) Autonomous operation and control; (3) High temperature seal design; (4) Design for minimum thermal stress; (5) Passive shut down environmental control; (6) Integrated instrumentation concepts; (7) Identification of extraterrestrial resources; (8) Evaluation of chemical processor concepts; (9) Integrated hardware design; and (10) Finite element analysis.

  10. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  11. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  12. Education Demonstration Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, A.; Lee, R. L.

    2005-10-01

    Several GA Fusion Education Program plasma related demonstration items were developed this year. A 120 V ac powered electromagnetic coil shows eddy current levitation over an aluminum sheet and continuously changing magnetic force interactions using additional permanent magnets. A 300 V dc plasma device, with variable current capability and analog data ports, is used to develop plasma I/V plots. An on-demand (via push button) fully enclosed 24 in. Jacob's ladder provides air plasma and buoyancy effects. A low cost Mason jar vacuum chamber filled with inert gas shows pressure and gas species plasma characteristics when excited by a Tesla coil. These demonstration items are used in the Scientist-In-the-Classroom program, GA facility tours, and teacher seminars to present plasma to students and teachers. Three very popular Build-It workshops were held to enable teachers to build these items and take them back to their classroom.

  13. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  14. Chemical Domino Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Dale

    1998-04-01

    The Chemical Domino Demonstration is both educational and entertaining. It provides an excellent means for a review of chemical concepts at the conclusion of a general chemistry course. This demonstration consists of a number of different chemical reactions occurring in sequence in a Rube Goldberg-type apparatus. These reactions include the reduction of water by an active metal, the oxidation of a moderately active metal by an acid, reduction of metallic ions by a metal of greater activity, acid-base neutralization reactions in solution monitored with indicators, a gas-phase acid-base neutralization reaction, decomposition of a compound, precipitation of an insoluble salt, substitution reactions of coordination complexes, and pyrotechnic oxidation-reduction reactions including a hypergolic oxidation-reduction reaction, an intramolecular oxidation-reduction reaction, and the combustion of a flammable gas.

  15. Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshangi, Nasser

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a autonomous umbilical mating for the mars umbilical technology demonstrator. The Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator (MUTD) shall provide electrical power and fiber optic data cable connections between two simulated mars vehicles. The Omnibot is used to provide the mobile base for the system. The mate to umbilical plate is mounted on a three axis Cartesian table, which is installed on the Omnibot mobile base. The Omnibot is controlled in a teleoperated mode. The operator using the vision system will guide the Omnibot to get close to the mate to plate. The information received from four ultrasonic sensors is used to identify the position of mate to plate and mate the umbilical plates autonomously. A successful experimentation verifies the approach.

  16. Arctic Craft Demonstration Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    up the beach towards the NARL facility because beluga whales were in the area and they might be scared further offshore. He stated that the local...Eskimo Whaling Commission (AEWC) both to ensure the demonstration would not interfere with their sustenance hunting activities and also to inquire about...weather conditions were sunny with a light breeze. Occasional whale spouts were sighted in the distance but not close enough for mammal

  17. The Blowgun Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukamoto, Koji; Uchino, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    We have found that a simple demonstration experiment using a match or a cotton swab and a drinking straw or an acrylic pipe serves as an effective introduction to dynamics. The most basic apparatus has a cotton swab serving as a dart and the straw as the blowgun. When blown from a starting point near the exit end of the straw, the cotton swab does…

  18. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  19. Great Lakes Demonstration 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Representatives from CG Districts 1, 5 , 13, and 17  Enbridge Pipeline, Co.  EPA  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  Observers (CG...distances from the vessel‟s hull. (Figure 5 ) In that configuration, the recovery hose and hydraulic lines dragged across the surface of the nearby...No. CG-D-08-12 2. Government Accession Number 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Great Lakes Demonstration 2 Final Report 5

  20. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  1. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

  2. Is quantum theory predictably complete?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupczynski, M.

    2009-07-01

    Quantum theory (QT) provides statistical predictions for various physical phenomena. To verify these predictions a considerable amount of data has been accumulated in the 'measurements' performed on the ensembles of identically prepared physical systems or in the repeated 'measurements' on some trapped 'individual physical systems'. The outcomes of these measurements are, in general, some numerical time series registered by some macroscopic instruments. The various empirical probability distributions extracted from these time series were shown to be consistent with the probabilistic predictions of QT. More than 70 years ago the claim was made that QT provided the most complete description of 'individual' physical systems and outcomes of the measurements performed on 'individual' physical systems were obtained in an intrinsically random way. Spin polarization correlation experiments (SPCEs), performed to test the validity of Bell inequalities, clearly demonstrated the existence of strong long-range correlations and confirmed that the beams hitting far away detectors somehow preserve the memory of their common source which would be destroyed if the individual counts of far away detectors were purely random. Since the probabilities describe the random experiments and are not the attributes of the 'individual' physical systems, the claim that QT provides a complete description of 'individual' physical systems seems not only unjustified but also misleading and counter productive. In this paper, we point out that we even do not know whether QT is predictably complete because it has not been tested carefully enough. Namely, it was not proven that the time series of existing experimental data did not contain some stochastic fine structures that could have been averaged out by describing them in terms of the empirical probability distributions. In this paper, we advocate various statistical tests that could be used to search for such fine structures in the data and to

  3. A complete inorganic colour converter based on quantum-dot-embedded silicate glasses for white light-emitting-diodes.

    PubMed

    Han, Karam; Im, Won Bin; Heo, Jong; Chung, Woon Jin

    2016-02-28

    A complete inorganic quantum dot color converter for a white LED is achieved using silicate-based quantum-dot-embedded glasses (QDEGs). The white LED exhibits a high CRI of 90 and highly improved thermal stability up to 200 °C, demonstrating its robustness and practicality. The CdSe/CdS core/shell structure within the silicate glass is expected to enhance the colour converting efficiency.

  4. Aquifer stability investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

    1981-09-01

    The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

  5. Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Wilson

    2006-10-31

    A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

  6. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  7. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  8. Reinforcement of a mandibular complete denture with internal metal framework.

    PubMed

    Balch, J Heath; Smith, Pamela D; Marin, Mark A; Cagna, David R

    2013-03-01

    Metal framework reinforcement is used in complete dentures to improve the fracture resistance, dimensional stability, accuracy, weight, and retention of a definitive prosthesis. A novel technique for suspending a metal framework within the denture base of mandibular complete dentures is described.

  9. Advanced servomanipulator remote maintenance demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.L.; Bradley, E.C.

    1989-03-01

    The advanced servomanipulator (ASM) is a dual-arm, force-reflecting, master/slave servomanipulator that was designed for remote maintenance applications and is digitally controlled. The ASM is installed in the Maintenance Systems Test Area (MSTA) of the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The unique aspect of ASM is that the slave arms were designed to be remotely maintainable, using a similar remote manipulator system, to maximize availability and minimize downtime. This test report describes the results of the maintenance testing conducted on ASM. Demonstration of the ability to maintain ASM remotely is an important precursor to the ultimate application of ASM in a totally remote facility. The approach taken in the design of ASM was for the manipulator slave arms to be composed of modules capable of being removed and replaced by another manipulator system of similar capabilities. The ASM incorporates gear and torque tube drives with drive couplings that facilitate remote maintenance. Although the use of special fixtures is normally discouraged for remote maintenance, special fixtures were required for this demonstration due to the complex nature of the slave arms. This test was performed to demonstrate that the ASM slave arms could be completely disassembled and reassembled remotely. Maintenance of ASM was successfully demonstrated using the M-2 servomanipulator and special fixtures. The entire disassembly process took about 4 h, and the assembly took about 3 1/2 h. Although there were some problems, in general, the arm modules were adequately designed for remote removal and replacement. Recommendations, which are documented in this report, have been made for improvements. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  10. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  11. Space Research Benefits Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Angie Jackman, a NASA project manager in microgravity research, demonstrates the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  12. Santa Clara Demonstration Status

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

    1996-08-01

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales

  13. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  14. West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Under the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Public Law 96-368, liquid high-level radioactive waste stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York, is to be solidified (vitrified) in borosilicate glass and transported to a federal repository for geologic disposal. This waste material resulted from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations conducted between 1966 and 1972. Project costs are shared by the US Department of Energy (90 percent) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (10 percent). The site on which the Project is located is owned by New York State. This report is an overview of West Valley's plans and accomplishments.

  15. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  16. Puget Sound telecommuting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Quaid, M.; Heifetz, L.; Farley, M.; Christensen, D.; Ulberg, C.; Gordon, A.; Spain, D.; Whitaker, B.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the Puget Sound Telecommuting demonstration project. This is a part-time work and transportation alternative that substitutes the normal work commute with the choice of working at home or at an office close to home. According to Link Resources, a research and consulting firm located in New York, there were 4.6 million part-time home telecommuters in the United States in 1991. This figure, which included only company employees who work at home during normal business hours, is up from 3.4 million in 1990, an increase of 35 percent in one year. Part-time telecommuters average 2.5 days per week at home. (There are also about 876,000 full-time telecommuters in the US.) The study done by Link Resources estimates that 4.5 percent of the civilian work force age 18 or older is telecommuting. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) began exploring telecommuting as an alternate route to work for Washington, first through The Governor`s Conference on Telecommuting in June 1989. The conference raised corporate and government awareness of telecommuting, and set the stage for further investigation. In 1990, WSEO launched the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration to explore the environmental, organizational, and personal sides of telecommuting. This report presents the interim research results.

  17. Puget Sound telecommuting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Quaid, M.; Heifetz, L.; Farley, M.; Christensen, D. ); Ulberg, C.; Gordon, A.; Spain, D.; Whitaker, B. )

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the Puget Sound Telecommuting demonstration project. This is a part-time work and transportation alternative that substitutes the normal work commute with the choice of working at home or at an office close to home. According to Link Resources, a research and consulting firm located in New York, there were 4.6 million part-time home telecommuters in the United States in 1991. This figure, which included only company employees who work at home during normal business hours, is up from 3.4 million in 1990, an increase of 35 percent in one year. Part-time telecommuters average 2.5 days per week at home. (There are also about 876,000 full-time telecommuters in the US.) The study done by Link Resources estimates that 4.5 percent of the civilian work force age 18 or older is telecommuting. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) began exploring telecommuting as an alternate route to work for Washington, first through The Governor's Conference on Telecommuting in June 1989. The conference raised corporate and government awareness of telecommuting, and set the stage for further investigation. In 1990, WSEO launched the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration to explore the environmental, organizational, and personal sides of telecommuting. This report presents the interim research results.

  18. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  19. BEAM Technology Flight Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, David

    2005-01-01

    As technologies advance, their growing complexity makes them harder to maintain. Detection methods for isolating and identifying impending problems are needed to balance this complexity. Through comparison of signal pairs from onboard sensors, the Beacon-based Exception Analysis For Multimissions (BEAM) algorithm can identify and help classify deviations in system operation from a data-trained statistical model. The goal of this task is to mature BEAM and validate its performance on a flying test bed. A series of F-18 flight demonstrations with BEAM monitoring engine parameters in real time was used to demonstrate in-the-field readiness. Captured F-18 and simulated F-18 engine data were used in model creation and training. The algorithm was then ported to the embedded system with a data buffering, file writing, and data-time-stamp monitoring shell to reduce the impact of embedded system faults on BEAM'S ability to correctly identify engine faults. Embedded system testing identified hardware related restrictions and contributed to iterative improvements in the code's runtime performance. The system was flown with forced engine flameouts and other pilot induced faults to simulate operation out of the norm. Successful detection of these faults, confirmed through post-flight data analysis, helped BEAM achieve TRL6.

  20. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  1. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-15

    The subject of this report is progress during the quarter for Phase I -- Design and Permitting, Phase II -- Coolside/LIMB Construction, Start-Up and Phase III -- Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Under Phase I, Task 2, Consol Technology Transfer, Consol R D continued to review the status of the Coolside installation and identified construction details which required additional action. Activities in Task 4.0 -- Permitting and Licensing have focused on finalizing a subcontract agreement for trucking the DOE Coolside/LIMB ash to a solid waste landfill. Under Phase II, Task 1, Project Management, purchase orders were placed with two (2) lime suppliers for supplying the specified hydrated lime to be used for the Coolside test program. For Subtask 2.2 -- Sorbent Feed System Installation, the construction and installation of the sorbent feed system has been completed. Under Phase III, Subtask 2.1, Optimization of the Coolside sorbent feed system, the ash recycle system and the caustic injection system were initiated. 3 figs.

  2. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  3. Status of NC Primer Demonstration & Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-20

    Primer Demos: Gloss Paint Scheme 4 Demonstration COMPLETE BUNO Induction Date Non- Chrome Primer Date Delivery Date Carrier Deployments...Includes T-6, T-34, T-44, T-45* NC Primer Demos: Gloss Paint Scheme 6 P-3C Demonstration is on-going… • PPG-Deft 02-GN-084 demonstrated over CCC on OML...Only one P-3C demonstrating NC Primer, A/C # 510  Primed Sept. 15, 2011 NC Primer Demos: Gloss Paint Scheme 7 NC Primer Demos: Gloss Paint

  4. Satellite servicer system flight demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James S.

    1989-01-01

    A program to develop the capability of servicing satellites in remote locations, where a series of flight that will demonstrate autonomous rendezvous and docking, supervised autonomous Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) exchange, supervised autonomous fluid transfer and, proximity operations for Space Station Freedom were planned, is described. The flight demonstrations are the results of several mission scenarios with complex technical objectives. Three Shuttle flights are planned to complete the multi-objective program. The major hardware elements of the program are described and discussed. Demonstration objectives and technical approaches to the flight demonstrations are discussed. Existing and developing technologies are assessed for applicability to the Satellite Servicer System (SSSFD) program.

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  6. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  7. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  8. Space Research Benefits Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An entranced youngster watches a demonstration of the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Steel bearings are dropped onto plates made of steel, titanium alloy, and zirconium liquid metal alloy, so-called because its molecular structure is amorphous and not crystalline. The bearing on the liquid metal plate bounces for a minute or more longer than on the other plates. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  9. The GLORIA demonstrator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majcher, A.; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-10-01

    GLORIA stands for "GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array" and it is the first free and open-access network of robotic telescopes on the world. Based on a Web 2.0 environment amateur and professional users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes, and/or analyzing data acquired with GLORIA, or from other free access databases. GLORIA project develops free standards, protocols and tools for controlling Robotic Telescopes and related instrumentation, for scheduling observations in the telescope network, and for conducting so-called off-line experiments based on the analysis of astronomical data. This contribution summarizes the implementation and results from the first research level off-line demonstrator experiment implemented in GLORIA, which was base on the data collected with the "Pi of the Sky" telescope in Chile.

  10. Parker Hybrid Hydraulic Drivetrain Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, Raymond; Howland, James; Venkiteswaran, Prasad

    2014-03-31

    This report examines the benefits of Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid brake energy recovery systems used in commercial applications for vocational purposes. A detailed background on the problem statement being addressed as well as the solution set specific for parcel delivery will be provided. Objectives of the demonstration performed in high start & stop applications included opportunities in fuel usage reduction, emissions reduction, vehicle productivity, and vehicle maintenance. Completed findings during the demonstration period and parallel investigations with NREL, CALSTART, along with a literature review will be provided herein on this research area. Lastly, results identified in the study by third parties validated the savings potential in fuel reduction of on average of 19% to 52% over the baseline in terms of mpg (Lammert, 2014, p11), Parker data for parcel delivery vehicles in the field parallels this at a range of 35% - 50%, emissions reduction of 17.4% lower CO2 per mile and 30.4% lower NOx per mile (Gallo, 2014, p15), with maintenance improvement in the areas of brake and starter replacement, while leaving room for further study in the area of productivity in terms of specific metrics that can be applied and studied.

  11. The Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Engineers operate the controls of the Stability Tunnel: Plans for a new tunnel to study stability problems began in the late thirties. The Stability Tunnel was authorized in 1939 and began operations in June 1941. The installation was completed in December that year with the completion of a new 10,000 Horsepower Diesel-electric generating plant. It was a single return, closed jet tunnel with a 6-foot square test section. The tunnel was disassembled and shipped to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1958. The tunnel had two separate test sections: one for curved flow, the other for rolling flow. 'The facility...simulates the motion of the aircraft in curved or rolling flight. This is done by actually curving or rolling the airstream as it passes over the model and at the same time providing the proper velocity distribution.' (From AIAA-80-0309) >From Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing: 'The only tunnel directly designed for dynamic stability work is located at the Langley Field branch of the NACA. Its most vital feature is its ability to subject the models to curving air streams that simulate those actually encountered when an airplane rolls, pitches, or yaws. the rotating airstream for simulating roll is produced by a motor-driven paddle just ahead of the test section. Curved air of properly varying velocity for simulating pitch and yaw is produced by a combination of a curved test section and velocity screens. The proper use of this apparatus makes possible the determination of the stability derivatives.' Published in F.H. Lutze, 'Experimental Determination of Pure Rotary Stability Derivatives using a Curved and Rolling Flow Wind Tunnel,' AIAA-80-0309, AIAA 18th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Pasadena, CA, January 14-16, 1980; Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1947).

  12. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Marrocco, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  13. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  14. Soil bioventing demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.S.; Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; DiGiulio, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot scale demonstration project of a soil bioventing system, which utilizes the biodegradation in soil and physical removal of VOC by induced air flow, is in operation at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Field in Traverse City, Michigan. The system is being tested to determine its suitability for remediation of the vadose zone in conjunction with aquifer remediation at a site contaminated by an aviation gas spill. Several microcosm studies with soil obtained from the vertical profile of the contaminated site showed rapid microbial decompositions of hydrocarbon fumes with NPK nutrient and moisture addition. Basic removal kinetics data were obtained from these experiments. Field pneumatic pump tests for soil-air characterization have been conducted. The soil-air permeability and pressure distributions under the air injection/withdrawal systems were obtained. On the basis of information from the laboratory and field tests, a conceptual design at a field scale was made. The system will be implemented on the selected study site and the operation will start in fall, 1990. Additional soil core samplings and continuous monitoring of operation are planned.

  15. Plug cluster module demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    The low pressure, film cooled rocket engine design concept developed during two previous ALRC programs was re-evaluated for application as a module for a plug cluster engine capable of performing space shuttle OTV missions. The nominal engine mixture ratio was 5.5 and the engine life requirements were 1200 thermal cycles and 10 hours total operating life. The program consisted of pretest analysis; engine tests, performed using residual components; and posttest analysis. The pretest analysis indicated that operation of the operation of the film cooled engine at O/F = 5.5 was feasible. During the engine tests, steady state wall temperature and performance measurement were obtained over a range of film cooling flow rates, and the durability of the engine was demonstrated by firing the test engine 1220 times at a nominal performance ranging from 430 - 432 seconds. The performance of the test engine was limited by film coolant sleeve damage which had occurred during previous testing. The post-test analyses indicated that the nominal performance level can be increased to 436 seconds.

  16. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology`s threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report.

  17. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology's threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report.

  18. Space fabrication demonstration system, technical volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The automatic beam builder ABB was developed, fabricated, and demonstrated within the established contract cost and schedule constraints. The ABB demonstrated the feasibility of: producing lightweight beams automatically within the required rate of 1 to 5 ft of completed beam per minute and producing structurally sound beams with axial design load of 5538 N based on the Grumman photovoltaic satellite solar power system design reference structure.

  19. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  20. Stability and robustness of metal-supported SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Lau, Grace Y.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.

    Tubular metal-supported SOFCs with YSZ electrolyte and electrodes comprising porous YSZ backbone and infiltrated Ni and LSM catalysts are operated at 700 °C. Tolerance to five complete anode redox cycles and five very rapid thermal cycles is demonstrated. The power output of a cell with as-infiltrated Ni anode degrades rapidly over 15 h operation. This degradation can be attributed primarily to coarsening of the fine infiltrated Ni particles. A cell in which the infiltrated Ni anode is precoarsened at 800 °C before operation at 700 °C shows dramatically improved stability. Stable operation over 350 h is demonstrated.

  1. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  2. Measuring homework completion in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrew M; Uebelacker, Lisa A; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an observer-based coding system for the characterization and completion of homework assignments during Behavioral Activation (BA). Existing measures of homework completion are generally unsophisticated, and there is no current measure of homework completion designed to capture the particularities of BA. The tested scale sought to capture the type of assignment, realm of functioning targeted, extent of completion, and assignment difficulty. Homework assignments were drawn from 12 (mean age = 48, 83% female) clients in two trials of a 10-session BA manual targeting treatment-resistant depression in primary care. The two coders demonstrated acceptable or better reliability on most codes, and unreliable codes were dropped from the proposed scale. In addition, correlations between homework completion and outcome were strong, providing some support for construct validity. Ultimately, this line of research aims to develop a user-friendly, reliable measure of BA homework completion that can be completed by a therapist during session.

  3. RF/Optical Demonstration: Focal Plane Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D. J.; Chung, S.; Kovalik, J.; Gama, E.; Fernandez, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we describe the second-generation focal plane optical assembly employed in the RF/optical demonstration at DSS-13. This assembly receives reflected light from the two mirror segments mounted on the RF primary. The focal plane assembly contains a fast steering mirror (FSM) to stabilize the focal plane spot, a pupil camera to aid in aligning the two segments, and several additional cameras for receiving the optical signal prior to as well as after the FSM loop.

  4. Link prediction via matrix completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech, Ratha; Hao, Dong; Pan, Liming; Cheng, Hong; Zhou, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Inspired by the practical importance of social networks, economic networks, biological networks and so on, studies on large and complex networks have attracted a surge of attention in the recent years. Link prediction is a fundamental issue to understand the mechanisms by which new links are added to the networks. We introduce the method of robust principal component analysis (robust PCA) into link prediction, and estimate the missing entries of the adjacency matrix. On the one hand, our algorithm is based on the sparse and low-rank property of the matrix, while, on the other hand, it also performs very well when the network is dense. This is because a relatively dense real network is also sparse in comparison to the complete graph. According to extensive experiments on real networks from disparate fields, when the target network is connected and sufficiently dense, whether it is weighted or unweighted, our method is demonstrated to be very effective and with prediction accuracy being considerably improved compared to many state-of-the-art algorithms.

  5. A complete model of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Traci, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A set of constitutive equations suitable for a priori computation of turbulent shear flows has been developed. Since no properties of a given turbulent flow need be known in advance in order to obtain a solution, the equations comprise a complete model of turbulence. Perturbation analysis shows that the model predicts a composite five-layer structure for an incompressible turbulent boundary layer, viz, a defect layer, a law-of-the-wall layer, a viscous sublayer, a near-surface roughness layer, and a viscous superlayer at the boundary-layer edge. Analysis of the defect layer demonstrates the key improvement of the model over its predecessor, the Saffman-Wilcox two-equation model of turbulence. Examination of model-predicted sublayer structure yields model-parameter boundary conditions appropriate for surfaces with roughness and mass injection. Results of numerical computations of compressible and incompressible equilibrium boundary layers show that, for such flows, the model is as accurate as mixing-length theory. Applications to transitional boundary layers and to nonequilibrium relaxation of a boundary layer passing from a rough to a smooth surface indicate that the model's applicability extends far beyond that of mixing-length theory's.

  6. Deep Space 1 Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The completely assembled Deep Space 1 (DS-1) technology demonstrator spacecraft. The DS-1 spacecraft incorporates a number of advanced technology concepts in its mission, but none so 'high profile' as its Ion propulsion system. The name itself evokes visions of Star Trek and science fiction fantasy, although the idea actually dates from the 1950s. However, unlike the 'Warp Drive' propulsion system that zings the fictional starship Enterprise across the cosmos in minutes, the almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  7. A Forceful Demonstration by FORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    is a real workhorse for the study of the distant universe. How FORS was built The FORS project is being carried out under ESO contract by a consortium of three German astronomical institutes, namely the Heidelberg State Observatory and the University Observatories of Göttingen and Munich. When this project is concluded, the participating institutes will have invested about 180 man-years of work. The Heidelberg State Observatory was responsible for directing the project, for designing the entire optical system, for developing the components of the imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric optics, and for producing the special computer software needed for handling and analysing the measurements obtained with FORS. Moreover, a telescope simulator was built in the shop of the Heidelberg observatory that made it possible to test all major functions of FORS in Europe, before the instrument was shipped to Paranal. The University Observatory of Göttingen performed the design, the construction and the installation of the entire mechanics of FORS. Most of the high-precision parts, in particular the multislit unit, were manufactured in the observatory's fine-mechanical workshops. The procurement of the huge instrument housings and flanges, the computer analysis for mechanical and thermal stability of the sensitive spectrograph and the construction of the handling, maintenance and aligning equipment as well as testing the numerous opto- and electro-mechanical functions were also under the responsibility of this Observatory. The University of Munich had the responsibility for the management of the project, the integration and test in the laboratory of the complete instrument, for design and installation of all electronics and electro-mechanics, and for developing and testing the comprehensive software to control FORS in all its parts completely by computers (filter and grism wheels, shutters, multi-object slit units, masks, all optical components, electro motors, encoders etc

  8. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  9. Sternal "retraction": a novel application of a mandibular distractor in treating ectopia cordis with complete cleft sternum.

    PubMed

    Gart, Michael S; Vicari, Frank A

    2015-05-01

    Complete thoracic ectopia cordis is associated with a uniformly dismal prognosis. The primary challenges of this disorder are (1) returning the heart to the thoracic cavity, (2) stabilizing the chest wall, and (3) repairing the sternal defect. Previously published techniques for achieving these goals have demonstrated very limited success and/or significant morbidity.We present a novel application of a mandibular distraction device as part of staged repair of this historically challenging problem. This method uses immediate stabilization and gradual "retraction" of the sternal remnants, thereby allowing physiologic compensation and avoiding the cardiorespiratory embarrassment associated with returning the heart to the thoracic cavity. Moreover, this technique allows stabilization of the associated sternal cleft and chest wall without the commonly associated morbidity of the currently available techniques.

  10. High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Vacuum Demonstration Completed for Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2001-01-01

    Common to many of the space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces--is a need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway at the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios (10,000 to 1) and very high temperatures (>2000 K). The innovative refractive secondary concentrator offers significant advantages over all other types of secondary concentrators. The refractive secondary offers the highest throughput efficiency, provides for flux tailoring, requires no active cooling, relaxes the pointing and tracking requirements of the primary concentrator, and enables very high system concentration ratios. This technology has broad applicability to any system that requires the conversion of solar energy to heat. Glenn initiated the development of the refractive secondary concentrator in support of Shooting Star, a solar thermal propulsion flight experiment, and continued the development in support of Space Solar Power.

  11. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-31

    During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

  12. Stabilizing population.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Mitchell, J

    1998-04-01

    This article is a reprint of the Worldwatch Institute's "State of the World Report," Chapter 10: "Building a New Economy." 16 countries reached zero population growth by 1997. 33 countries have stabilized population, which amounts to 14% of world population. It is estimated that by 2050 population will include an additional 3.6 billion people beyond the present 6 billion. About 60% of the added population will be in Asia, an increase from 3.4 billion in 1995 to 5.4 billion in 2050. China's current population of 1.2 billion will reach 1.5 billion. India's population is expected to rapidly rise from 930 million to 1.53 billion. Populations in the Middle East and North Africa are expected to double in size. Sub-Saharan population is expected to triple in size. By 2050, Nigeria will have 339 million people, which was the entire population of Africa in 1960. There is a great need to stabilize population in a number of currently unstabilized countries. In 1971, Bangladesh and Pakistan had the same population; however, by 2050, Pakistan, without a strong commitment to reducing population growth, will have 70 million more people than Bangladesh. Population stabilization will depend on removal of physical and social barriers that prevent women from using family planning services and thereby help them control their own unwanted fertility. Stabilization will require poverty alleviation and removal of the need for large families. Family size is reduced with lower infant and child mortality risk, increased education, a higher legal age of marriage, and investment in stabilization programs. Solutions to global population growth cannot wait for health reform and budget deficit reductions.

  13. Electroluminescence from completely horizontally oriented dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komino, Takeshi; Sagara, Yuta; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oki, Yuji; Nakamura, Nozomi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    A complete horizontal molecular orientation of a linear-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescent guest emitter 2,6-bis(4-(10Hphenoxazin-10-yl)phenyl)benzo[1,2-d:5,4-d'] bis(oxazole) (cis-BOX2) was obtained in a glassy host matrix by vapor deposition. The orientational order of cis-BOX2 depended on the combination of deposition temperature and the type of host matrix. Complete horizontal orientation was obtained when a thin film with cis-BOX2 doped in a 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) host matrix was fabricated at 200 K. The ultimate orientation of guest molecules originates from not only the kinetic relaxation but also the kinetic stability of the deposited guest molecules on the film surface during film growth. Utilizing the ultimate orientation, a highly efficient organic light-emitting diode with the external quantum efficiency of 33.4 ± 2.0% was realized. The thermal stability of the horizontal orientation of cis-BOX2 was governed by the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the CBP host matrix; the horizontal orientation was stable unless the film was annealed above Tg.

  14. Complete to Compete: Common College Completion Metrics. Technical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Ryan; Reindl, Travis; Witham, Keith; Stanley, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Improved college completion rates are critical to the future of the United States, and states must have better data to understand the nature of the challenges they confront or target areas for policy change. The 2010-2011 National Governors Association (NGA) Chair's initiative, "Complete to Compete", recommends that all states collect data from…

  15. Stabilization of autoionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ereifej, Heider Naim

    2000-09-01

    In the first experiment, the stabilization process of doubly excited states in Barium was examined for the case when a laser field was used to induce stimulated emission of the excited core electron. Stabilization is referred to all the atoms that form a singly excited neutral state after being in a doubly excited autoionizing state. Relative to pure fluorescence, the application of a laser pulse which was long relative to the autoionization lifetime was found to increase the number of atoms that were stabilized. Shake-up spectra in which the principal quantum number of both electrons changes during the stimulated emission process was also clearly demonstrated. In the second experiment, a short laser pulse (short relative to the autoionization lifetime) was used to stimulate doubly excited Calcium atoms to form a stable configuration. Because the stimulated emission process happens on a fast time scale, more atoms were stabilized before they had a chance to autoionize. As a result, much larger enhancement factors were achieved. In the third and final experiment, a direct measurement of the oscillations between degenerate bound state configurations in a rapidly autoionizing system was clearly demonstrated. Because of the short pulse excitation, the atom was prepared in one of many accessible two-electron configurations. This state of the atom was not an energy eigenstate but a non-stationary wavepacket. The evolution of these wavepackets was monitored by changing the timing between the exciting ``pump'' laser and the stimulating ``probe'' laser.

  16. Simple Buoyancy Demonstrations Using Saltwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosby, Ronald M.; Petry, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of saline solutions for demonstrations of buoyancy showing oscillations of the Cartesian diver. Describes the physical principles, preparation, and instructional uses for the demonstration. (YP)

  17. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Carrell, L. A., Luff Exploration Co., Denver, CO

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determination of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) is being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in- place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  18. Improved Recovery Demonstration for Williston Basin Carbonates.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3-D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimate of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  19. Improved Recovery Demonstration for Williston Basin Carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Larry A. Carrell

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional is being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  20. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  6. Laminar flow control SPF/08 feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, R. C.; Williams, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of applying superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) technology to laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts was demonstrated. Procedures were developed to produce smooth, flat titanium panels, using thin -0.016 inch sheets, meeting LFC surface smoothness requirements. Two large panels 28 x 28 inches were fabricated as final demonstration articles. The first was flat on the top and bottom sides demonstrating the capability of the tooling and the forming and diffusion bonding procedures to produce flat, defect free surfaces. The second panel was configurated for LFC porous panel treatment by forming channels with dimpled projections on the top side. The projections were machined away leaving holes extending into the panel. A perforated titanium sheet was adhesively bonded over this surface to complete the LFC demonstration panel. The final surface was considered flat enough to meet LFC requirements for a jet transport aircraft in cruising flight.

  7. Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmoyer, Allan

    2006-01-01

    U.S. space policy directs pursuit of commercial opportunities for providing transportation and other services low Earth orbit and beyond. COTS Project established to implement policy. COTS strategy: Phase 1) Assist industry with system development/demonstrations (COTS Demos); Phase 2) Procure commercial services for ISS logistics support. COTS Demonstrations competition completed in 10 months. Two industry partners selected for funded Space Act Agreements: 1) SpaceX & Rocketplane-Kistler; and 2) Unfunded Space Act Agreements in work with other competitors. COTS budget of $500 M thru 2010, with pay for performance milestone approach. Cargo flight demonstrations planned for 2008 and 2009: Crew flight demonstration options for 2011-2012. Commercial cargo transportation services potentially available as early as 2009-2010. Successful COTS partners may open new space markets and provide reliable, cost effective cargo and crew transportation services, a new era for commercial space.

  8. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-08-31

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program is a government and industry co-funded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes. One goal of the program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a variety of energy efficient, environmentally superior coal-based technologies. Demonstration projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising coal technologies that have proceeded beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This report is a post-project assessment of the DOE CCT Demonstration Program, the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project. A major objective of the CCT Program is to provide the technical data necessary for the private sector to proceed confidently with the commercial replication of the demonstrated technologies. An essential element of meeting this goal is the dissemination of results from the demonstration projects. This post-project assessment (PPA) report is an independent DOE appraisal of the successes that the completed project had in achieving its objectives and aiding in the commercialization of the demonstrated technology. The report also provides an assessment of the expected technical, environmental, and economic performance of the commercial version of the technology, as well as an analysis of the commercial market.

  9. Wireless Emergency Alerts: New York City Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    public warn- ing specialists distribute information about emergency incidents and city services via Twitter, Re- ally Simple Syndication (RSS) feed, and...worked with Jackson, the Mayor’s Office, and NYC OEM’s press officers to issue the press re- CMU/SEI-2012-SR-016 | 12 lease before the demonstration...satisfied that the information we provided to the general public in our initial press re- lease was sufficient and completing adoption activities didn’t

  10. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers.

  11. An essay on Bergman completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Yong

    2013-10-01

    We give first of all a new criterion for Bergman completeness in terms of the pluricomplex Green function. Among several applications, we prove in particular that every Stein subvariety in a complex manifold admits a Bergman complete Stein neighborhood basis, which improves a theorem of Siu. Secondly, we give for hyperbolic Riemann surfaces a sufficient condition for when the Bergman and Poincaré metrics are quasi-isometric. A consequence is an equivalent characterization of uniformly perfect planar domains in terms of growth rates of the Bergman kernel and metric. Finally, we provide a noncompact Bergman complete pseudoconvex manifold without nonconstant negative plurisubharmonic functions.

  12. Genotype imputation via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K.; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  13. Swarm stability for high-order linear time-invariant singular multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jianxiang; Yao, Zhicheng; Liu, Guangbin; Zhong, Yisheng

    2015-06-01

    Swarm-stability and swarm-stabilisation problems for high-order linear time-invariant singular multi-agent systems with directed networks are investigated. First, necessary and sufficient conditions for swarm stability and asymptotic swarm stability are proposed, which are independent of the dimensions of Jordan blocks of the Laplacian matrix of the interaction topology. Then, an approach is given to determine the absolute motion as a whole, and it is shown that the absolute motion is completely determined by initial states if the interaction topology is balanced. Furthermore, an approach is presented to determine gain matrices for asymptotic swarm stabilisation. Moreover, leader-following swarm-stability and swarm-stabilisation problems are investigated. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate theoretical results.

  14. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  15. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost.

  16. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions. PMID:27688385

  17. Stability of yttria-stabilized zirconia during pyroprocessing tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Jeong; Lee, Sung-Jai; Kim, Sung-Wook; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Cho, Soo Haeng; Oh, Seung Chul; Jeon, Min Ku; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kang, Hyun Woo; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated for use as a ceramic material, which can be commonly used for both electrolytic reduction and electrorefining. First, the stability of YSZ in salts for electrolytic reduction and electrorefining was examined. Then, its stability was demonstrated by a series of pyroprocessing tests, such as electrolytic reduction, LiCl distillation, electrorefining, and LiClsbnd KCl distillation, using a single stainless steel wire mesh basket containing fuel and YSZ. A single basket was used by its transportation from one test to subsequent tests without the requirements for unloading.

  18. Demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Amanda S.; Brosha, Eric

    2016-08-03

    This is a progress report for the demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package. There are five tasks associated with this, and four have been completed as of August 2016: Station Demonstration and Site Recommendation, Order Sensor Equipment, Build Sensors, and Install Sensors. The final task to be completed is Sensor Demonstration and Data Analysis, and expected completion date is January 26, 2017. This progress report details each of the tasks and goes into detail about what is currently being worked on, along with the budget and planned work for July 27, 2016 to January 26, 2017.

  19. Revisiting the Electric Pickle Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The electric pickle is a classic demonstration that is widely used in both high school and college settings to explain the general principles behind atomic emission. The demonstration fails to provide an interesting multi-line spectrum.

  20. The NASA Flight Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. M.; Routh, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Flight Demonstration Program was initiated by the Office of Space Flight in October 1983. The purposes of this program are to conduct an ongoing series of flight demonstrations which demonstrate critical enabling technology to potential Shuttle users and at the same time provide hands on experience to NASA engineers. Flight demonstrations are selected through a peer review process in response to an annual solicitation issued by the Flight Demonstration Office at NASA Headquarters. As of July 1985 one major flight demonstration has been successfully conducted, two flight demonstrations are scheduled to fly in November on STS 61-B, and five flight demonstrations are in various stages of development and planned to be flown during the next three years.

  1. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  2. Stability of laser heated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, P. K. S.; Pirri, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    A local stability analysis is utilized to determine the stability of disturbances generated at each point along a nozzle of variable area ratio for a one-dimensional flow heated by laser radiation entering from the upstream direction. The governing equations for the quasi-one-dimensional flow without viscous dissipation, diffusion, and thermal conduction but including radiative heat transfer are given. The governing equations are combined to yield a relationship which governs the Mach number variation through the nozzle. The complete steady-state solution can be calculated from knowledge of the Mach number profile, the inlet conditions, and the laser power. The local stability analysis permits obtaining contour (or contours) of neutral stability. Solutions have been obtained for various nozzle configurations, but only one set of example calculations is presented. The results obtained indicate that the analysis serves as an important indicator as to where potential absorption wave phenomena may be initiated.

  3. V-NIP Ceaser: Video Stabilization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoor, Kamran; Ahmed, Atique; Ahmad, Sohail; Manzoor, Umar; Nefti, Samia

    In this paper, we propose a practical and robust approach of video stabilization that produces full-frame stabilized videos with good visual quality. While most previous methods end up with producing low resolution stabilized videos, our completion method produces full-frame videos by temporally filling in missing frame parts by locally aligning required data from neighboring frames. The proposed system has been evaluated on large number of real life videos; results were very promising and support the implementation of the solution.

  4. Favorite Demonstrations for College Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Peer-reviewed, classroom-tested, and tailored specifically for introductory science courses, Favorite Demonstrations is a complement to every college instructor's lesson plans. The book is an all-in-one compilation of 36 popular classroom demonstrations published since 1993 in the "Favorite Demonstration" column of NSTA's Journal of College …

  5. Loop Group Parakeet Virtual Cable Concept Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, T.; McNeill, T. C.; Reynolds, A. B.; Blair, W. D.

    2002-07-01

    The Parakeet Virtual Cable (PVC) concept demonstrator uses the Ethernet Local Area Network (LAN) laid for the Battle Command Support System (BCSS) to connect the Parakeet DVT(DA) (voice terminal) to the Parakeet multiplexer. This currently requires pairs of PVC interface units to be installed for each DVT(DA) . To reduce the cost of a PVC installation, the concept of a Loop Group Parakeet Virtual Cable (LGPVC) was proposed. This device was designed to replace the up to 30 PVC boxes and the multiplexer at the multiplexer side of a PVC installation. While the demonstrator is largely complete, testing has revealed an incomplete understanding of how to emulate the proprietary handshaking occurring between the circuit switch and the multiplexer. The LGPVC concept cannot yet be demonstrated.

  6. Technologies of democracy: experiments and demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Brice

    2011-12-01

    Technologies of democracy are instruments based on material apparatus, social practices and expert knowledge that organize the participation of various publics in the definition and treatment of public problems. Using three examples related to the engagement of publics in nanotechnology in France (a citizen conference, a series of public meetings, and an industrial design process), the paper argues that Science and Technology Studies provide useful tools and methods for the analysis of technologies of democracy. Operations of experiments and public demonstrations can be described, as well as controversies about technologies of democracy giving rise to counter-experiments and counter-demonstrations. The political value of the analysis of public engagement lies in the description of processes of stabilization of democratic orders and in the display of potential alternative political arrangements.

  7. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; ...

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  8. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and

  9. Stabilizing brokerage

    PubMed Central

    Stovel, Katherine; Golub, Benjamin; Milgrom, Eva M. Meyersson

    2011-01-01

    A variety of social and economic arrangements exist to facilitate the exchange of goods, services, and information over gaps in social structure. Each of these arrangements bears some relationship to the idea of brokerage, but this brokerage is rarely like the pure and formal economic intermediation seen in some modern markets. Indeed, for reasons illuminated by existing sociological and economic models, brokerage is a fragile relationship. In this paper, we review the causes of instability in brokerage and identify three social mechanisms that can stabilize fragile brokerage relationships: social isolation, broker capture, and organizational grafting. Each of these mechanisms rests on the emergence or existence of supporting institutions. We suggest that organizational grafting may be the most stable and effective resolution to the tensions inherent in brokerage, but it is also the most institutionally demanding. PMID:22198763

  10. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  11. Integrated powerhead demonstration full flow cycle development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. Mathew; Nichols, James T.; Sack, William F.; Boyce, William D.; Hayes, William A.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Powerhead Demonstration (IPD) is a 1,112,000 N (250,000 lbf) thrust (at sea level) LOX/LH2 demonstration of a full flow cycle in an integrated system configuration. Aerojet and Rocketdyne are on contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory to design, develop, and deliver the required components, and to provide test support to accomplish the demonstration. Rocketdyne is on contract to provide a fuel and oxygen turbopump, a gas-gas injector, and system engineering and integration. Aerojet is on contract to provide a fuel and oxygen preburner, a main combustion chamber, and a nozzle. The IPD components are being designed with Military Spaceplane (MSP) performance and operability requirements in mind. These requirements include: lifetime >=200 missions, mean time between overhauls >=100 cycles, and a capability to throttle from 20% to 100% of full power. These requirements bring new challenges both in designing and testing the components. This paper will provide some insight into these issues. Lessons learned from operating and supporting the space shuttle main engine (SSME) have been reviewed and incorporated where applicable. The IPD program will demonstrate phase I goals of the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program while demonstrating key propulsion technologies that will be available for MSP concepts. The demonstration will take place on Test Stand 2A at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB. The component tests will begin in 1999 and the integrated system tests will be completed in 2002.

  12. New Adaptive Optics Technique Demonstrated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    Enrico Marchetti, the MAD Project Manager. "The system behaviour was very stable and the acquisition and closed loop operations were fast and smooth." ESO PR Photo 19d/07 ESO PR Photo 19d/07 AO Strehl Maps After routine checks on the closed loop stability and preliminary scans of the system parameters, the telescope was pointed to Omega Centauri, a very crowded area in the sky, and an optimal test case for extracting accurate measurements on AO correction performance with good spatial resolution on the FoV. Three 11 magnitude stars within a circle of ~1.5 arcmin diameter were selected as the baseline for wavefront sensing and the MCAO loop was closed successfully. Omega Centauri will be observed for several nights more, in order to test the AO correction in different seeing conditions. "This is a tremendous achievement that opens new perspectives in the era of extremely large telescopes," said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. " "I am very proud of the ESO staff and wish to congratulate all involved for their prowess," she added. The MAD images perfectly show the validity of the concept. The image quality was almost uniform over the whole field of view and beautifully corrected for some of the atmospheric turbulence. More Information The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) Demonstrator MAD was built by ESO in collaboration with the Astronomical Observatories of Arcetri and Padova (Italy) and the Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal), as a pathfinder for 2nd generation VLT instrumentation and the European Extremely Large Telescope project. The MCAO technique is based on probing the atmospheric turbulence on a large volume of atmosphere by means of several wavefront sensors (WFS), which point at different locations in the observed field of view, and by means of several deformable mirrors - optically conjugated at different altitudes on the atmosphere above the telescope - which correct for the atmospheric disturbance. The signals provided

  13. Tight informationally complete quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, A. J.

    2006-10-01

    We introduce a class of informationally complete positive-operator-valued measures which are, in analogy with a tight frame, 'as close as possible' to orthonormal bases for the space of quantum states. These measures are distinguished by an exceptionally simple state-reconstruction formula which allows 'painless' quantum state tomography. Complete sets of mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued measures are both members of this class, the latter being the unique minimal rank-one members. Recast as ensembles of pure quantum states, the rank-one members are in fact equivalent to weighted 2-designs in complex projective space. These measures are shown to be optimal for quantum cloning and linear quantum state tomography.

  14. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V.; Pjevac, Petra; Han, Ping; Herbold, Craig; Albertsen, Mads; Jehmlich, Nico; Palatinszky, Marton; Vierheilig, Julia; Bulaev, Alexandr; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; von Bergen, Martin; Rattei, Thomas; Bendinger, Bernd; Nielsen, Per H.; Wagner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered as a two-step process catalyzed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetically advantageous. This functional separation has puzzled microbiologists for a century. Here we report on the discovery and cultivation of a completely nitrifying bacterium from the genus Nitrospira, a globally distributed group of nitrite oxidizers. The genome of this chemolithoautotrophic organism encodes both the pathways for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, which are concomitantly expressed during growth by ammonia oxidation to nitrate. Genes affiliated with the phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase genes of Nitrospira are present in many environments and were retrieved on Nitrospira-contigs in new metagenomes from engineered systems. These findings fundamentally change our picture of nitrification and point to completely nitrifying Nitrospira as key components of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities. PMID:26610024

  15. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  16. Exploring complete positivity in hierarchy equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, B.; Rudnicki, Ł.; Tanimura, Y.; Mintert, F.

    2017-01-01

    We derive a purely algebraic framework for the identification of hierarchy equations of motion that induce completely positive dynamics and demonstrate the applicability of our approach with several examples. We find bounds on the violation of complete positivity for microscopically derived hierarchy equations of motion and construct well-behaved phenomenological models with strongly non-Markovian revivals of quantum coherence.

  17. Complete wetting of graphene by biological lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-03-01

    Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a graphene sheet.Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a

  18. Integrated restructurable flight control system demonstration results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jerold L.; Hsu, John Y.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the complementary capabilities of several restructurable flight control system (RFCS) concepts through the integration of these technologies into a complete system. Performance issues were addressed through a re-examination of RFCS functional requirements, and through a qualitative analysis of the design issues that, if properly addressed during integration, will lead to the highest possible degree of fault-tolerant performance. Software developed under previous phases of this contract and under NAS1-18004 was modified and integrated into a complete RFCS subroutine for NASA's B-737 simulation. The integration of these modules involved the development of methods for dealing with the mismatch between the outputs of the failure detection module and the input requirements of the automatic control system redesign module. The performance of this demonstration system was examined through extensive simulation trials.

  19. The NASA telerobot technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, P. S.; French, R. L.; Sirota, A. R.; Matijevic, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The ongoing development of a telerobot technology demonstrator is reported. The demonstrator is implemented as a laboratory-based research testbed, and will show proof-of-concept for supervised automation of space assembly, servicing, and repair operations. The demonstrator system features a hierarchically layered intelligent control architecture which enables automated planning and run-time sequencing of complex tasks by a supervisory human operator. The demonstrator also provides a full bilateral force-reflecting hand control teleoperations capability. The operator may switch smoothly between the automated and teleoperated tasking modes in run-time, either on a preplanned or operator-designated basis.

  20. Pacific Northwest Resources Inventory Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Land Resource Inventory Demonstration project is designed to demonstrate to users from state and local agencies in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho the cost effective role that Landsat derived information can play in natural resource planning and management when properly supported by ground and aircraft data. The project has been organized into five main phases: (1) maps and overlays, (2) early digital image analysis, (3) demonstration of applications using interactive image analysis, (4) Landsat products and land resources information systems, and (5) documentation. The demonstration project has been applied to Washington forestry, water inventory in southern Idaho, and monitoring of tansy ragwort in western Oregon.

  1. West Valley Demonstration Project, Waste Management Area #3 -- Closure Alternative I

    SciTech Connect

    Marschke, Stephen F.

    2000-06-30

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the completion of the West Valley Demonstration Project and closure and/or long-term management of facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center divided the site into Waste Management Areas (WMAs), and for each WMA, presented the impacts associated with five potential closure alternatives. This report focuses on WMA 3 (the High-Level Waste (HLW) Storage Area (Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2), the Vitrification Facility and other facilities) and closure Alternative I (the complete removal of all structures, systems and components and the release of the area for unrestricted use), and reestimates the impacts associated with the complete removal of the HLW tanks, and surrounding facilities. A 32-step approach was developed for the complete removal of Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2, the Supernatant Treatment System Support Building, and the Transfer Trench. First, a shielded Confinement Structure would be constructed to reduce the shine dose rate and to control radioactivity releases. Similarly, the tank heels would be stabilized to reduce potential radiation exposures. Next, the tank removal methodology would include: 1) excavation of the vault cover soil, 2) removal of the vault roof, 3) cutting off the tank’s top, 4) removal of the stabilized heel remaining inside the tank, 5) cutting up the tank’s walls and floor, 6) removal of the vault’s walls, the perlite blocks, and vault floor, and 7) radiation surveying and backfilling the resulting hole. After the tanks are removed, the Confinement Structure would be decontaminated and dismantled, and the site backfilled and landscaped. The impacts (including waste disposal quantities, emissions, work-effort, radiation exposures, injuries and fatalities, consumable materials used, and costs) were estimated based on this 32 step removal methodology, and added to the previously estimated impacts for closure of the other facilities within WMA 3 to obtain the total impacts from

  2. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  3. Advanced airborne ISR demonstration system (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Daniel J.

    2005-05-01

    Recon/Optical, Inc. (ROI) is developing an advanced airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) demonstration system based upon the proven ROI technology used in the SHAred Reconnaissance Pod (SHARP) for the U.S. Navy F/A-18. The demonstration system, which includes several state-of-the-art technology enhancements for next-generation ISR, is scheduled for flight testing in the summer of 2005. The demonstration system contains a variant of the SHARP medium altitude CA-270 camera, comprising an inertially stabilized Visible/NIR 5Kx5K imager and MWIR 2Kx2K imager to provide simultaneous high resolution/wide area coverage dual-band operation. The imager has been upgraded to incorporate a LN-100G GPS/INS within the sensor passive isolation loop to improve the accuracy of the NITF image metadata. The Image Processor is also based upon the SHARP configuration, but the demo system contains several enhancements including increased image processing horsepower, Ethernet-based Command & Control, next-generation JPEG2000 image compression, JPEG2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) network data server/client architecture, bi-directional RF datalink, advanced image dissemination/exploitation, and optical Fibrechannel I/O to the solid state recorder. This paper describes the ISR demonstration system and identifies the new network centric CONOPS made possible by the technology enhancements.

  4. DOE`s annealing prototype demonstration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.; Nakos, J.; Rochau, G.

    1997-02-01

    One of the challenges U.S. utilities face in addressing technical issues associated with the aging of nuclear power plants is the long-term effect of plant operation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). As a nuclear plant operates, its RPV is exposed to neutrons. For certain plants, this neutron exposure can cause embrittlement of some of the RPV welds which can shorten the useful life of the RPV. This RPV embrittlement issue has the potential to affect the continued operation of a number of operating U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. However, RPV material properties affected by long-term irradiation are recoverable through a thermal annealing treatment of the RPV. Although a dozen Russian-designed RPVs and several U.S. military vessels have been successfully annealed, U.S. utilities have stated that a successful annealing demonstration of a U.S. RPV is a prerequisite for annealing a licensed U.S. nuclear power plant. In May 1995, the Department of Energy`s Sandia National Laboratories awarded two cost-shared contracts to evaluate the feasibility of annealing U.S. licensed plants by conducting an anneal of an installed RPV using two different heating technologies. The contracts were awarded to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Center for Research and Technology Development (CRTD) and MPR Associates (MPR). The ASME team completed its annealing prototype demonstration in July 1996, using an indirect gas furnace at the uncompleted Public Service of Indiana`s Marble Hill nuclear power plant. The MPR team`s annealing prototype demonstration was scheduled to be completed in early 1997, using a direct heat electrical furnace at the uncompleted Consumers Power Company`s nuclear power plant at Midland, Michigan. This paper describes the Department`s annealing prototype demonstration goals and objectives; the tasks, deliverables, and results to date for each annealing prototype demonstration; and the remaining annealing technology challenges.

  5. DSS 13 frequency stability tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous article, the results of frequency stability tests at DSS 13 were presented in table form for tau = 1000 s for the test period May 1985 through March 1986. This article is a continuation of that initial report and presents specially selected Allan sigma (square root of variance) plots of each of the subsystem test previously reported. An additional result obtained from tests performed during July 1986 was included for completeness. The Allan sigma plots are useful in that frequency stability information is not only given for tau = 1000 s, but for tau values in the regions of 1, 100, 500, and 2000 s as well.

  6. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  7. Complete feeds-intensive systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most commercially cultivated fish are raised in high-density culture systems where the assumption is that the contribution of natural foods to the nutrition of the fish is insignificant. Thus, intensively cultured fish must be fed a nutritionally complete feed. A short section on the concept and im...

  8. Indiana College Completion. 2014 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Commission for Higher Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is committed to providing a clearer and more comprehensive picture of college completion in order to inform and advance Indiana's collective efforts to boost education attainment. In partnership with Indiana public colleges and the National Student Clearinghouse, the Commission has collected completion…

  9. Completing College: Rethinking Institutional Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinto, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Even as the number of students attending college has more than doubled in the past forty years, it is still the case that nearly half of all college students in the United States will not complete their degree within six years. It is clear that much remains to be done toward improving student success. For more than twenty years, Vincent Tinto's…

  10. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  11. Review of "A Complete Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The research summary, "A Complete Education," presents the Obama administration's proposal for ensuring that all students have a comprehensive education. The key areas include: strengthening instruction in literacy and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); increasing access to instruction in a broader range of subject…

  12. Shannon Information in Complete Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ching; Chang, Chang-Heng; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2004-03-01

    Genomes are books of life and necessarily carry a huge amount of information. This study was first motivated by the question: "How much information do complete genomes have?" As an answer we measured a particular type of Shannon information in all prokaryotes and eukaryotes whose complete genomes have been sequenced and are available in publically assessible database. The Shannon information in complete genome sequences follow an extremely simple pattern. With the exception of one eukaryote the Shannon information in all (more than 200) complete sequences belong to a single universality class given by a simple geometric recursion formula. The data are interpreted in terms of models for genome growth and inferred to suggest that the ancestors of present day genomes began to grow, mainly by stochastic, selectively neutral, duplications and short mutations, most likely when they were not more than 300 nt long. This notion of selective neutralism independently corroborates Kimura's neutral theory of evolution which was based on the investigation of polymorphisms of genes.

  13. On the dimensionality of ecological stability.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Ian; Petchey, Owen L; Montoya, José M; Jackson, Andrew L; McNally, Luke; Viana, Mafalda; Healy, Kevin; Lurgi, Miguel; O'Connor, Nessa E; Emmerson, Mark C

    2013-04-01

    Ecological stability is touted as a complex and multifaceted concept, including components such as variability, resistance, resilience, persistence and robustness. Even though a complete appreciation of the effects of perturbations on ecosystems requires the simultaneous measurement of these multiple components of stability, most ecological research has focused on one or a few of those components analysed in isolation. Here, we present a new view of ecological stability that recognises explicitly the non-independence of components of stability. This provides an approach for simplifying the concept of stability. We illustrate the concept and approach using results from a field experiment, and show that the effective dimensionality of ecological stability is considerably lower than if the various components of stability were unrelated. However, strong perturbations can modify, and even decouple, relationships among individual components of stability. Thus, perturbations not only increase the dimensionality of stability but they can also alter the relationships among components of stability in different ways. Studies that focus on single forms of stability in isolation therefore risk underestimating significantly the potential of perturbations to destabilise ecosystems. In contrast, application of the multidimensional stability framework that we propose gives a far richer understanding of how communities respond to perturbations.

  14. Universal Fault-Tolerant Gates on Concatenated Stabilizer Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Theodore J.; Takagi, Ryuji; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2016-07-01

    It is an oft-cited fact that no quantum code can support a set of fault-tolerant logical gates that is both universal and transversal. This no-go theorem is generally responsible for the interest in alternative universality constructions including magic state distillation. Widely overlooked, however, is the possibility of nontransversal, yet still fault-tolerant, gates that work directly on small quantum codes. Here, we demonstrate precisely the existence of such gates. In particular, we show how the limits of nontransversality can be overcome by performing rounds of intermediate error correction to create logical gates on stabilizer codes that use no ancillas other than those required for syndrome measurement. Moreover, the logical gates we construct, the most prominent examples being Toffoli and controlled-controlled-Z , often complete universal gate sets on their codes. We detail such universal constructions for the smallest quantum codes, the 5-qubit and 7-qubit codes, and then proceed to generalize the approach. One remarkable result of this generalization is that any nondegenerate stabilizer code with a complete set of fault-tolerant single-qubit Clifford gates has a universal set of fault-tolerant gates. Another is the interaction of logical qubits across different stabilizer codes, which, for instance, implies a broadly applicable method of code switching.

  15. The 4 K Stirling cryocooler demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, W. Dodd

    1992-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes the results and conclusions from an SBIR program intended to demonstrate an innovative Stirling cycle cryocooler concept for efficiently lifting heat from 4 K. Refrigeration at 4 K, a temperature useful for superconductors and sensitive instruments, is beyond the reach of conventional regenerative thermodynamic cycles due to the rapid loss of regenerator matrix heat capacity at temperatures below about 20 K. To overcome this fundamental limit, the cryocooler developed under this program integrated three unique features: recuperative regeneration between the displacement gas flow streams of two independent Stirling cycles operating at a 180 degree phase angle, tailored distortion of the two expander volume waveforms from sinusoidal to perfectly match the instantaneous regenerator heat flux from the two cycles and thereby unload the regenerator, and metal diaphragm working volumes to promote near isothermal expansion and compression processes. Use of diaphragms also provides unlimited operating life potential and eliminates bearings and high precision running seals. A phase 1 proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that counterflow regenerator operation between 77 K and 4 K increases regenerator effectiveness by minimizing metal temperature transient cycling. In phase 2, a detailed design package for a breadboard cryocooler was completed. Fabrication techniques were successfully developed for manufacturing high precision miniature parallel plate recuperators, and samples were produced and inspected. Process development for fabricating suitably flat diaphragms proved more difficult and expensive than anticipated, and construction of the cryocooler was suspended at a completion level of approximately 75%. Subsequent development efforts on other projects have successfully overcome diaphragm fabrication difficulties, and alternate funding is currently being sought for completion and demonstration testing of the 4 K Stirling cryocooler.

  16. A Demonstration of Sample Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Mark D.; Brumbach, Stephen B.; Hartman, JudithAnn R.

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of sample segregation, which is simple, and visually compelling illustrates the importance of sample handling for students studying analytical chemistry and environmental chemistry. The mixture used in this demonstration has two components, which have big particle size, and different colors, which makes the segregation graphic.

  17. Understanding Statistics Using Computer Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Peter K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses programs that clarify some statistical ideas often discussed yet poorly understood by students. The programs adopt the approach of demonstrating what is happening, rather than using the computer to do the work for the students (and hide the understanding). The programs demonstrate normal probability plots, overfitting of…

  18. A Demonstration on Every Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1995-01-01

    Argues that inclusion of demonstrations on examinations increases students' ability to observe carefully the physical world around them, translate from observation in terms of models, and make quantitative estimates and physicist-type "back-of-the-envelope" calculations. Presents demonstration ideas covering the following topics:…

  19. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  20. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  1. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  2. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  3. Rocket Ignition Demonstrations Using Silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, Sibtosh; Santoro, Robert; Watkins, William B.; Kincaid, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Rocket ignition demonstration tests using silane were performed at the Penn State Combustion Research Laboratory. A heat sink combustor with one injection element was used with gaseous propellants. Mixtures of silane and hydrogen were used as fuel, and oxygen was used as oxidizer. Reliable ignition was demonstrated using fuel lead and and a swirl injection element.

  4. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  5. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  6. Tested Demonstrations: A Simple Demonstration of Reversible Oxygenation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kildahl, Nicholas K.

    1983-01-01

    Materials needed, reaction involved, and potential hazards are provided for a demonstration of reversible oxygenation. Also discusses the importance of the reaction in biological systems, focusing on hemoglobin/myoglobin and their function in mammals. (JM)

  7. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Raymond E.; Heller, Thomas J.; Bush, Stuart A.

    1991-01-01

    This Annual Report on Colorado-Ute Electric Association's NUCLA Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Demonstration Program covers the period from February 1987 through December 1988. The outline for presentation in this report includes a summary of unit operations along with individual sections covering progress in study plan areas that commenced during this reporting period. These include cold-mode shakedown and calibration, plant commercial performance statistics, unit start-up (cold), coal and limestone preparation and handling, ash handling system performance and operating experience, tubular air heater, baghouse operation and performance, materials monitoring, and reliability monitoring. During this reporting period, the coal-mode shakedown and calibration plan was completed. (VC)

  8. Advance Power Technology Demonstration on Starshine 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Wilt, David; Raffaelle, Ryne; Button, Robert; Smith, Mark; Kerslake, Thomas; Miller, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The Starshine 3 satellite will carry several power technology demonstrations. Since Starshine 3 is primarily a passive experiment and does not need electrical power to successfully complete its mission, the requirement for a highly reliable power system is greatly reduced. This creates an excellent opportunity to test new power technologies. Several government and commercial interests have teamed up to provide Starshine 3 with a small power system using state-of-the-art components. Starshine 3 will also fly novel integrated microelectronic power supplies (IMPS) for evaluation.

  9. Demonstrating Ultra-Low Diesel Vehicle Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, R.N.

    2000-08-20

    Evaluate performance of near-term exhaust emissions control technologies on a modern diesel vehicle over transient drive cycles; Phase 1: Independent (separate) evaluations of engine-out, OEM catalysts, CDPF, and NOx adsorber (Completed March 2000); Phase 2: Combine NOx adsorber and CDPF to evaluate/demonstrate simultaneous reduction of NOx and PM (Underway--interim results available); Establish potential for these technologies to help CIDI engines meet emission reduction targets; and Investigate short-term effects of fuel sulfur on emissions performance

  10. Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trageser, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and fabrication associated with upgrades for the Medical Operations Workstation in the Habitat Demonstration Unit. The work spanned a ten week period. The upgrades will be used during the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. Upgrades include a deployable privacy curtain system, a deployable tray table, an easily accessible biological waste container, reorganization and labeling of the medical supplies, and installation of a retractable camera. All of the items were completed within the ten week period.

  11. Influence of rice bran stearin on stability, properties and encapsulation efficiency of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR)-stabilized water-in-rice bran oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Prichapan, Nattapong; McClements, David Julian; Klinkesorn, Utai

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, rice bran stearin was used to improve the physical stability and encapsulation efficiency of water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions fabricated from rice bran oil and polyglycerol polyricinoleate ester (PGPR). In the absence of rice bran stearin, the emulsions were highly unstable to phase separation with an oil layer forming on their surfaces. Phase separation was delayed by increasing the PGPR concentration because this reduced the water droplet size. Phase separation could be completely inhibited by replacement of 30 to 45wt% of rice bran oil with rice bran stearin due to the formation of a semi-solid fat crystal network that prevented droplet movement. Moreover, addition of rice bran stearin delayed the release of ferrous sulfate from the W/O emulsions. These results demonstrate that rice bran stearin can be used to improve the stability and encapsulation efficiency of W/O emulsions and reduce the level of PGPR required to stabilize them.

  12. DEMONSTRATION AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The demonstration of technologies for determining the presence of dioxin in soil and sediment is being conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in Saginaw, Michigan, at Green Point Environmental Learning Center from approximately April 26 to May 6, 2004. The primary purpose of the demonstration is to evaluate innovative monitoring technologies. The technologies listed below will be demonstrated. .AhRC PCRTM Kit, Hybrizyme Corporation .Ah-IMMUNOASSY@ Kit, Paralsian, Inc. .Coplanar PCB Immunoassay Kit, Abraxis LLC .DF-l Dioxin/Furan Immunoassay Kit, CAPE Technologies L.L.C. .CALUX@ by Xenobiotic Detection Systems, Inc- .Dioxin ELISA Kit, Wako Pure Chemical Industries LTD. This demonstration plan describes the procedures that will be used to verify the performance and cost of these technologies. The plan incorporates the quality assurance and quality control elements needed to generate data of sufficient quality to document each technology's performance and cost. A separate innovative technology verification report (ITVR) will.be prepared for each technology. The ITVRs will present the demonstration findings associated with the demonstration objectives. The objective of this program is to promote the acceptance and use of innovative field technologies by providing well-documented performance and cost data obtained from field demonstrations.

  13. Offsite demonstrations for MWLID technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.; Gruebel, R.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of the Offsite Demonstration Project for Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID)-developed environmental site characterization and remediation technologies is to facilitate the transfer, use, and commercialization of these technologies to the public and private sector. The meet this goal, the project identified environmental restoration needs of mixed waste and/or hazardous waste landfill owners (Native American, municipal, DOE, and DoD); documenting potential demonstration sites and the contaminants present at each site; assessing the environmental regulations that would effect demonstration activities; and evaluating site suitability for demonstrating MWLID technologies at the tribal and municipal sites identified. Eighteen landfill sites within a 40.2-km radius of Sandia National Laboratories are listed on the CERCLIS Site/Event Listing for the state of New Mexico. Seventeen are not located within DOE or DoD facilities and are potential offsite MWLID technology demonstration sites. Two of the seventeen CERCLIS sites, one on Native American land and one on municipal land, were evaluated and identified as potential candidates for off-site demonstrations of MWLID-developed technologies. Contaminants potentially present on site include chromium waste, household/commercial hazardous waste, volatile organic compounds, and petroleum products. MWLID characterization technologies applicable to these sites include Magnetometer Towed Array, Cross-borehole Electromagnetic Imaging, SitePlanner {trademark}/PLUME, Hybrid Directional Drilling, Seamist{trademark}/Vadose Zone Monitoring, Stripping Analyses, and x-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Heavy Metals.

  14. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, S.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Balderrot-Barrera, C. X.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. E.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2017-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultralow background, 40-kg modular high purity Ge (HPGe) detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ-decay) in 76Ge. The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate a background rate at or below 3 counts/(t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value for 76Ge 0νββ-decay. In this paper, the status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, including its design and measurements of properties of the HPGe crystals is presented.

  15. Optical Communications and Sensor Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Optical Communications and Sensor Demonstration (OCSD) project addresses two cross-cutting capabilities of value to many future small spacecraft missions: high-speed optical transmission of data and small spacecraft proximity operations. Optical data rates demonstrated by OCSD are expected to be 200 megabits persecond (Mbs) or higher, a factor of 100 increase over current high-end CubeSat communications systems. The proximity sensors developed for this mission enable relative position measurement between two small satellites - a capability not previously demonstrated.

  16. Notional Airspace Operations Demonstration Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trongale, Nicholas A.

    2006-01-01

    The airspace operations demonstration (AOD) is intended to show that the Access 5 Step 1 functional requirements can be met. The demonstration will occur in two phases. The initial on-range phase will be carried out in restricted airspace to demonstrate the cooperative collision avoidance (CCA) functional requirements and to provide risk-reduction for the AOD by allowing the test team to rehearse some elements of the demonstration mission. The CCA system to be used in these flights is based on Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) which is a commercially-available system by which airplanes constantly broadcast their current position and altitude to other aircraft and ground resources over a dedicated radio datalink. The final phase will occur in the national airspace (NAS) and will be the formal demonstration of the remainder of the proposed functional requirements. The general objectives of the AOD are as follows: (1) Demonstrate that the UAS can aviate in the NAS (2) Demonstrate that the UAS can navigate in the NAS (3) Demonstrate that the UAS can communicate with the NAS (4) Demonstrate that the UAS can perform selected collision avoidance functions in the NAS (5) Demonstrate that the UAS can evaluate and avoid weather conflicts in the NAS (6) Demonstrate that the UAS can provide adequate command and control in the NAS In addition to the stated objectives, there are a number of goals for the flight demonstration. The demo can be accomplished successfully without achieving these goals, but these goals are to be used as a guideline for preparing for the mission. The goals are: (1) Mission duration of at least 24 hours (2) Loiter over heavy traffic to evaluate the data block issue identified during the Access 5 Airspace Operations Simulations (3) Document the contingency management process and lessons learned (4) Document the coordination process for Ground Control Stations (GCS) handoff (5) Document lessons learned regarding the process of flying in

  17. Crafting a Gauss Gun Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Matthew E.; Blodgett, E. D.

    2006-12-01

    A Gauss Gun launches a ferromagnetic projectile using a pulsed electromagnet. This demonstration provides a nice counterpoint to the popular Thompson's jumping ring demonstration, which launches a nonferromagnetic ring via repulsion of an induced current. The pulsed current must be short enough in duration so that the projectile is not retarded by lingering current in the launch solenoid, but also large enough to provide a suitably impressive velocity. This project involved an iterative design process, as we worked through balancing all the different design criteria. We recommend it as a very nice electronics design project which will produce a very portable and enjoyable demonstration. AAPT sponsor Earl Blodgett.

  18. Contour Completion Without Region Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2016-08-01

    Contour completion plays an important role in visual perception, where the goal is to group fragmented low-level edge elements into perceptually coherent and salient contours. Most existing methods for contour completion have focused on pixelwise detection accuracy. In contrast, fewer methods have addressed the global contour closure effect, despite psychological evidences for its importance. This paper proposes a purely contour-based higher order CRF model to achieve contour closure, through local connectedness approximation. This leads to a simplified problem structure, where our higher order inference problem can be transformed into an integer linear program and be solved efficiently. Compared with the methods based on the same bottom-up edge detector, our method achieves a superior contour grouping ability (measured by Rand index), a comparable precision-recall performance, and more visually pleasing results. Our results suggest that contour closure can be effectively achieved in contour domain, in contrast to a popular view that segmentation is essential for this purpose.

  19. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  20. Informationally complete joint measurements on finite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We show that there are informationally complete joint measurements of two conjugated observables on a finite quantum system, meaning that they enable the identification of all quantum states from their measurement outcome statistics. We further demonstrate that it is possible to implement a joint observable as a sequential measurement. If we require minimal noise in the joint measurement, then the joint observable is unique. If d is odd, then this observable is informationally complete. But if d is even, then the joint observable is not informationally complete, and one has to allow more noise in order to obtain informational completeness.

  1. Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, O. ); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. ); Cooper, L. ); Caicedo, A. . Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

    1991-08-01

    A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. High dynamic GPS receiver validation demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Statman, J. I.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Validation Demonstration establishes that the high dynamic Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver concept developed at JPL meets the dynamic tracking requirements for range instrumentation of missiles and drones. It was demonstrated that the receiver can track the pseudorange and pseudorange rate of vehicles with acceleration in excess of 100 g and jerk in excess of 100 g/s, dynamics ten times more severe than specified for conventional High Dynamic GPS receivers. These results and analytic extensions to a complete system configuration establish that all range instrumentation requirements can be met. The receiver can be implemented in the 100 cu in volume required by all missiles and drones, and is ideally suited for transdigitizer or translator applications.

  3. A complete subsea wireline system

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, B.; Dines, C.; Headworth, C.

    1987-01-01

    At the present time there are around 400 subsea completions worldwide and even the most conservative surveys predict a doubling of this number within the next decade. This paper discusses the evolution and operation of a flexible, self-contained system which makes optimum use of existing technology thereby offering a safe, reliable and economical system for riserless re-entry into any subsea well.

  4. Complete liquefaction methods and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2013-10-15

    A method and apparatus are described to provide complete gas utilization in the liquefaction operation from a source of gas without return of natural gas to the source thereof from the process and apparatus. The mass flow rate of gas input into the system and apparatus may be substantially equal to the mass flow rate of liquefied product output from the system, such as for storage or use.

  5. Dynesys dynamic stabilization-related facet arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dynamic stabilization devices are designed to stabilize the spine while preserving some motion. However, there have been reports demonstrating limited motion at the instrumented level of the lumbar spine after Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS). The causes of this limited motion and its actual effects on outcomes after DDS remain elusive. In this study, the authors investigate the incidence of unintended facet arthrodesis after DDS and clinical outcomes. METHODS This retrospective study included 80 consecutive patients with 1- or 2-level lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent laminectomy and DDS. All medical records, radiological data, and clinical evaluations were analyzed. Imaging studies included pre- and postoperative radiographs, MR images, and CT scans. Clinical outcomes were measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Furthermore, all patients had undergone postoperative CT for the detection of unintended arthrodesis of the facets at the indexed level, and range of motion was measured on standing dynamic radiographs. RESULTS A total of 70 patients (87.5%) with a mean age of 64.0 years completed the minimum 24-month postoperative follow-up (mean duration 29.9 months). Unintended facet arthrodesis at the DDS instrumented level was demonstrated by CT in 38 (54.3%) of the 70 patients. The mean age of patients who had facet arthrodesis was 9.8 years greater than that of the patients who did not (68.3 vs 58.5 years, p = 0.009). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, including VAS back and leg pain, ODI, and JOA scores between patients with and without the unintended facet arthrodesis. Furthermore, those patients older than 60 years were more likely to have unintended facet arthrodesis (OR 12.42) and immobile spinal segments (OR 2.96) after DDS. Regardless of whether unintended facet arthrodesis was present or not, clinical

  6. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background) perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to 'complete normal order' the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all 'cephalopod' Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of 'complete normal ordering' (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering) reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting 'trick' we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  7. Rubens Flame-Tube Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficken, George W.; Stephenson, Francis C.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates and explains the phenomenon associated with Rubens flame-tube demonstration, specifically the persistance of flames at regular intervals along the tube for few minutes after the gas is turned off. (GA)

  8. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  9. Classroom Demonstrations of Polymer Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, F.

    1990-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations of selected mechanical properties of polymers are described that can be used to make quantitative measurements. Stiffness, strength, and extensibility are mechanical properties used to distinguish one polymer from another. (KR)

  10. Classroom Demonstrations of Auditory Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haws, LaDawn; Oppy, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents activities to help students gain understanding about auditory perception. Describes demonstrations that cover topics, such as sound localization, wave cancellation, frequency/pitch variation, and the influence of media on sound propagation. (CMK)

  11. Demonstrating Forces between Parallel Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Blane

    2000-01-01

    Describes a physics demonstration that dramatically illustrates the mutual repulsion (attraction) between parallel conductors using insulated copper wire, wooden dowels, a high direct current power supply, electrical tape, and an overhead projector. (WRM)

  12. Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villa, Marco; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The CubeSat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) project will demonstrate rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) using two 3-unit (3U) CubeSats. Each CubeSat is a satellite with the dimensions 4 inches x 4 inches x 13 inches (10 centimeters x 10 centimeters x 33 centimeters) and weighing approximately 11 pounds (5 kilograms). This flight demonstration will validate and characterize many new miniature low-power proximity operations technologies applicable to future missions. This mission will advance the state of the art in nanosatellite attitude determination,navigation and control systems, in addition to demonstrating relative navigation capabilities.The two CPOD satellites are scheduled to be launched together to low-Earth orbit no earlier than Dec. 1, 2015.

  13. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  14. Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westley, Deborah; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks (EDSN) mission is to demonstrate interactive satellite swarms capable of collecting, exchanging and transmitting multi-point scientific measurements. Satellite swarms enable a wide array of scientific, commercial and academic research not achievable with a single satellite. The EDSN satellites are scheduled to be launched into space as secondary payloads on the first flight of the Super Strypi launch vehicle no earlier than Oct. 29, 2015.

  15. Yo-Yo Pull Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, William

    2013-01-01

    A popular demonstration involves placing a yo-yo on a level table and gently pulling the string horizontally when it is wrapped to come out below the center of the yo-yo's axis. Students are then asked to predict which way the yo-yo will move. A similar demonstration is performed with a tricycle by pulling forward on a pedal with the pedal down in…

  16. An artificial gravity demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, C.; Lemke, L.; Penzo, P.

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gravity experiment which is tethered to a Delta second stage and which uses the Small Expendable Deployer System is proposed. Following tether deployment, the Delta vehicle performs the required spin-up maneuver and can then be passivated. A surplus reentry vehicle houses the artificial gravity life science experiments. When the experiments are completed, the reentry phase of the experiment is initiated by synchronizing the spin of the configuration with the required deorbit impulse.

  17. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  18. Adaptive braking by Ase1 prevents overlapping microtubules from sliding completely apart.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Fink, Gero; Ruhnow, Felix; Diez, Stefan; Janson, Marcel E

    2011-09-04

    Short regions of overlap between ends of antiparallel microtubules are central elements within bipolar microtubule arrays. Although their formation requires motors, recent in vitro studies demonstrated that stable overlaps cannot be generated by molecular motors alone. Motors either slide microtubules along each other until complete separation or, in the presence of opposing motors, generate oscillatory movements. Here, we show that Ase1, a member of the conserved MAP65/PRC1 family of microtubule-bundling proteins, enables the formation of stable antiparallel overlaps through adaptive braking of Kinesin-14-driven microtubule-microtubule sliding. As overlapping microtubules start to slide apart, Ase1 molecules become compacted in the shrinking overlap and the sliding velocity gradually decreases in a dose-dependent manner. Compaction is driven by moving microtubule ends that act as barriers to Ase1 diffusion. Quantitative modelling showed that the molecular off-rate of Ase1 is sufficiently low to enable persistent overlap stabilization over tens of minutes. The finding of adaptive braking demonstrates that sliding can be slowed down locally to stabilize overlaps at the centre of bipolar arrays, whereas sliding proceeds elsewhere to enable network self-organization.

  19. PROPANE BIOSTIMULATIOIN BARRIER DEMONSTRATED IN MTBE-CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) and U.S. Navy recently completed a technology demonstration at the Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) in Port Hueneme, CA. The demonstration was undertaken to determine whether biodegradation is reducing intrinsic...

  20. Five National Demonstrations of Educational Equity. Evaluation Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Jane G.

    In 1980, five institutions received contracts to implement a comprehensive demonstration program of educational equity in a local education agency.A 3-year implementation phase was completed in September 1983. The contractors and their five demonstration sites were: (1) the University of Tennessee, and the Reidsville (North Carolina) City School…

  1. Exponentially Stabilizing Robot Control Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Bayard, David S.

    1990-01-01

    New class of exponentially stabilizing laws for joint-level control of robotic manipulators introduced. In case of set-point control, approach offers simplicity of proportion/derivative control architecture. In case of tracking control, approach provides several important alternatives to completed-torque method, as far as computational requirements and convergence. New control laws modified in simple fashion to obtain asymptotically stable adaptive control, when robot model and/or payload mass properties unknown.

  2. Flow stabilization of the ideal MHD resistive wall mode^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time in a numerical calculation that for a typical circular cylindrical equilibrium, the ideal MHD resistive wall mode (RWM) can be completely stabilized by bulk equilibrium plasma flow, V, for a window of wall locations without introducing additional dissipation into the system. The stabilization is due to a resonance between the RWM and the Doppler shifted ideal MHD sound continuum. Our numerical approach introduces^2 u=φξ+ iV .∇ξ and the perturbed wall current^3 as variables, such that the eigenvalue, φ, only appears linearly in the linearized stability equations, which allows for the use of standard eigenvalue solvers. The wall current is related to the plasma displacement at the boundary by a Green's function. With the introduction of the resistive wall, we find that it is essential that the finite element grid be highly localized around the resonance radius where the parallel displacement, ξ, becomes singular. We present numerical convergence studies demonstrating that this singular behavior can be approached in a limiting sense. We also report on progress toward extending this calculation to an axisymmetric toroidal geometry. ^1Work supported by a DOE FES fellowship through ORISE and ORAU. ^2L.Guazzotto, J.P Freidberg, and R. Betti, Phys.Plasmas 15, 072503 (2008). ^3S.P. Smith and S. C. Jardin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 080701 (2008).

  3. Predator interference and stability of predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Přibylová, Lenka; Berec, Luděk

    2015-08-01

    Predator interference, that is, a decline in the per predator consumption rate as predator density increases, is generally thought to promote predator-prey stability. Indeed, this has been demonstrated in many theoretical studies on predator-prey dynamics. In virtually all of these studies, the stabilization role is demonstrated as a weakening of the paradox of enrichment. With predator interference, stable limit cycles that appear as a result of environmental enrichment occur for higher values of the environmental carrying capacity of prey, and even a complete absence of the limit cycles can happen. Here we study predator-prey dynamics using the Rosenzweig-MacArthur-like model in which the Holling type II functional response has been replaced by a predator-dependent family which generalizes many of the commonly used descriptions of predator interference. By means of a bifurcation analysis we show that sufficiently strong predator interference may bring about another stabilizing mechanism. In particular, hysteresis combined with (dis)appearance of stable limit cycles imply abrupt increases in both the prey and predator densities and enhanced persistence and resilience of the predator-prey system. We encourage refitting the previously collected data on predator consumption rates as well as for conducting further predation experiments to see what functional response from the explored family is the most appropriate.

  4. Composite stabilizer unit

    SciTech Connect

    Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  5. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOEpatents

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  6. Demonstration Extension: Copper-to-Silver-to-Gold Penny Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitz, Ed

    2008-01-01

    This demonstration, if done in the original way, can lead to fires in waste containers (sometimes in the middle of the night after the experiment has been conducted), because pyrophoric zinc is generated by suspending powdered zinc in hot sodium hydroxide. This is avoided by using hot ZnSO[subscript 4].

  7. Favorite Demonstrations: A Macroscopic Demonstration of a Microscopic Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellen, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Finding ways to demonstrate microscopic phenomena and contending with life science students' lack of interest in physical principles are two problems in laboratory courses. Describes a clinical laboratory test for parasite infection that can be used to effectively solve both of them. (RT)

  8. Auditory demonstrations simulating Mayan architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubman, David

    2005-09-01

    Fascination with the ancient temples and ball court at Chichen Itza provide rich opportunities for science education. Children of all ages are delighted to learn that the sound of handclaps scattered from long temple staircases are transformed into bird chirps. Their engagement in such seemingly magical phenomena provides magic moments for teaching acoustical principals, including the picket-fence effect (PFE). PFE transforms impulsive sounds scattered from spatially periodic structures into tonal sounds. PFE is demonstrated with a computer possessing a sound card and a simple sound editing program. The inverse relationship between tonal frequency and the time interval between periodic impulses is easily demonstrated. The number of impulses needed to produce an audible tone is easily demonstrated and compared with the number of steps on the staircase. Transformation of audible tones into downward-gliding chirps is simulated by monotonically increasing the time between impulses. The Great Ball Court also provides opportunities for acoustical demonstration. Observers clapping their hands while standing between the long, tall, and parallel walls of the playing field marvel at the profound flutter echo heard for about 1.5 s. The flutter echo sonogram demonstrates the speed of sound and frequency-selective atmospheric attenuation.

  9. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  10. DEMONSTRATION AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A demonstration of field portable/mobile technologies for measuring trace elements in soil and sediments was conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The demonstration took place from January 24 to 28, 2005, at the Kennedy Athletic, Recreational and Social Park at Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, Florida. The purpose of the demonstration was to verify the performance of various instruments that employ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurement technologies for the determination of 13 toxic elements in a variety of soil and sediment samples. Instruments from the technology developers listed below were demonstrated. o Innov-X Systems, Inc.o NITON LLC (2 instruments ) o Oxford Instruments Portable Division (formerly Metorex, Inc.) .Oxford Instruments Analytical .Rigaku, Inc.o RONTEC USA Inc.o Xcalibur XRF Services Inc. (Division of Elvatech Ltd. ) This demonstration plan describes the procedures that will be used to verify the performance and cost of the XRF instruments provided by these technology developers. The plan incorporates the quality assurance and quality control elements needed to generate data of sufficient quality to perform this verification. A separate innovative technology verification report (ITVR) will be prepared for each instrument. The objective of this program is to promote the acceptance and use of innovative field technologies by providing well-documented perfor

  11. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  12. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  13. Loudspeaker line array educational demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Moser, Brad; Gee, Kent L

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a physical demonstration of an audio-range line array used to teach interference of multiple sources in a classroom or laboratory exercise setting. Software has been developed that permits real-time control and steering of the array. The graphical interface permits a user to vary the frequency, the angular response by phase shading, and reduce sidelobes through amplitude shading. An inexpensive, eight-element loudspeaker array has been constructed to test the control program. Directivity measurements of this array in an anechoic chamber and in a large classroom are presented. These measurements have good agreement with theoretical directivity predictions, thereby allowing its use as a quantitative learning tool for advanced students as well as a qualitative demonstration of arrays in other settings. Portions of this paper are directed toward educators who may wish to implement a similar demonstration for their advanced undergraduate or graduate level course in acoustics.

  14. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  15. Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Mallinger

    2004-08-27

    Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

  16. Apollo 14 composite casting demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, I. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the demonstration was to show that mixtures of materials of different specific gravities would remain stable in the liquid state and during freezing in low g and not segregate as they do on earth. An inflight demonstration was performed on the Apollo 14 mission during the translunar and and transearth coast periods. The apparatus consisted of an electrical heater, a heat sink device for cooling, and sealed metal capsules containing matrix materials having a low-melting point and dispersants. The evaluation of the demonstration samples was accomplished by comparing space processed (flight) samples with (control) samples processed on the ground under otherwise similar conditions. In the low q environment of space flight the dispersions of particles, fibers, and gases in a liquid metal matrix were maintained during solidification. Dispersions of normally immiscible liquids were also maintained during solidification.

  17. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost.

  18. Understanding HBCU Retention and Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, David A. R.; Awokoya, Janet T.

    2012-01-01

    An appendix provides regression analyses.As the cost of higher education continues to climb, colleges and universities are finding themselves under increased pressure to demonstrate their value by enrolling, graduating and launching graduates into careers with the skills needed to compete as part of the American workforce. Few institutions are…

  19. Polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers for outdoor use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogl, O.

    1982-01-01

    Polymeric materials that are stable enough to use outdoors without changes in excess of 20 years are investigated. Ultraviolet stabilizers or plastic materials were synthesized, polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers, particularly of the 2(2-hydroxyphenyl)2H-benzotriazole family were prepared their polymerization, copolymerization and grafting onto other polymers were demonstrated, and ultraviolet stabilizing systems were devised. These materials were evaluated from the photophysical point of view.

  20. Upgraded demonstration vehicle task report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, J.; Hardy, K.; Livingston, R.; Sandberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    Vehicle/battery performance capabilities and interface problems that occurred when upgraded developmental batteries were integrated with upgraded versions of comercially available electric vehicles were investigated. Developmental batteries used included nickel zinc batteries, a nickel iron battery, and an improved lead acid battery. Testing of the electric vehicles and upgraded batteries was performed in the complete vehicle system environment to characterize performance and identify problems unique to the vehicle/battery system. Constant speed tests and driving schedule range tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer. The results from these tests of the upgraded batteries and vehicles were compared to performance capabilities for the same vehicles equipped with standard batteries.