Science.gov

Sample records for demyelinating disease masquerading

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  2. CNS demyelination in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Brinar, Vesna V; Petelin, Zeljka; Brinar, Marko; Djaković, Visnja; Zadro, Ivana; Vranjes, Davorka

    2006-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases represent a diverse group of disorders that have generally of unknown etiology and poorly understood pathogenesis. They may be organ-specific or systemic, giving rise to overlapping syndromes; more than one autoimmune disease may occur in the same patient. Numerous case reports have documented that multiple sclerosis (MS) may be present concurrently with other autoimmune diseases, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroid disease, type I diabetes mellitus and pernicious anemia. Case reports of disseminated encephalomyelitis (DEM) coincidental with other autoimmune diseases are rare. Many of systemic autoimmune diseases cause central nervous system (CNS) demyelination and are frequently then diagnosed as MS, whereas they often are instances of DEM, the result of vascular, granulomatous or postinfectious manifestations. We have reviewed 15 patients with autoimmune diseases and CNS demyelination in order to determine the nature of the demyelinating process.

  3. The innate immune system in demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Lior; Quintana, Francisco J; Weiner, Howard L

    2012-07-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis are chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. Both the adaptive and the innate immune systems have been suggested to contribute to their pathogenesis and recovery. In this review, we discuss the role of the innate immune system in mediating demyelinating diseases. In particular, we provide an overview of the anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functions of dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cells, NK-T cells, γδ T cells, microglial cells, and astrocytes. We emphasize the interaction of astroctyes with the immune system and how this interaction relates to the demyelinating pathologies. Given the pivotal role of the innate immune system, it is possible that targeting these cells may provide an effective therapeutic approach for demyelinating diseases.

  4. Th17 cells in autoimmune demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recently published studies in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) have demonstrated an association between the development of demyelinating plaques and the accumulation of Th17 cells in the central nervous system and periphery. However, a causal relationship has been difficult to establish. In fact, in reports published thus far, interleukin (IL)-17A deficiency or neutralization in vivo attenuates, but does not completely abrogate, EAE. There is growing evidence that clinically similar forms of autoimmune demyelinating disease can be driven by myelin-specific T cells of distinct lineages with different degrees of dependence on IL-17A production to achieve their pathological effects. While such observations cast doubts about the potential therapeutic efficacy of Th17 blocking agents in MS, the collective data suggest that IL-17A expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could serve as a surrogate biomarker of neuroinflammation and plaque formation and be a useful outcome measure for future clinical trials. PMID:20195867

  5. Glutamate Receptors in Neuroinflammatory Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Christopher; Paul, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS). The condition predominantly affects young adults and is characterised by immunological and inflammatory changes in the periphery and CNS that contribute to neurovascular disruption, haemopoietic cell invasion of target tissues, and demyelination of nerve fibres which culminate in neurological deficits that relapse and remit or are progressive. The main features of MS can be reproduced in the inducible animal counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The search for new MS treatments invariably employs EAE to determine drug activity and provide a rationale for exploring clinical efficacy. The preclinical development of compounds for MS has generally followed a conventional, immunotherapeutic route. However, over the past decade, a group of compounds that suppress EAE but have no apparent immunomodulatory activity have emerged. These drugs interact with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate family of glutamate receptors reported to control neurovascular permeability, inflammatory mediator synthesis, and resident glial cell functions including CNS myelination. The review considers the importance of the glutamate receptors in EAE and MS pathogenesis. The use of receptor antagonists to control EAE is also discussed together with the possibility of therapeutic application in demyelinating disease. PMID:16883070

  6. Demyelinating, degenerative, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dooley, D M

    1977-01-01

    Fifty per cent of patients diagnosed as having multiple sclerosis, primary lateral sclerosis, or hereditary spinocerebellar disorders were observed to have enduring favorable changes in neurological function during the 15 to 27 months they have been followed. The patients who were the least severely disabled were benefitted the most by the stimulation and made the most rapid progress. For example, the patient having only an ataxic or a spastic gait typically was observed to improve faster than the patient having both an ataxic and a spastic gait. The long term effect of electrostimulation of the spinal cord on these patients is unknown. The purpose of the stimulation is to attempt to obtain an improvement in neurological function so that the patient may experience a better life style. It is not thought that the electrical current has any effect on the basic disease process. Electrostimulation over the posterior spinal roots and spinal cord, although not new, has not been used extensively for the treatment of patients with arterial disease. The patients who have responded the most dramatically to electrostimulation are those with vasospastic disorders. A larger percentage of patients showed a greater response to implanted stimulation than to transcutaneous stimulation. Electrostimulation of the nervous system is not designed to replace standard therapeutic measures of treatment of patients with vascular disease, but to supplement them.

  7. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination.

  8. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  9. Involvement of morbilliviruses in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Sips, G J; Chesik, D; Glazenburg, L; Wilschut, J; De Keyser, J; Wilczak, N

    2007-01-01

    Two members of the morbillivirus genus of the family Paramyxoviridae, canine distemper virus (CDV) and measles virus (MV), are well-known for their ability to cause a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS in their natural hosts, dogs and humans, respectively. Both viruses have been studied for their potential involvement in the neuropathogenesis of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Recently, three new members of the morbillivirus genus, phocine distemper virus (PDV), porpoise morbillivirus (PMV) and dolphin morbillivirus (DMV), have been discovered. These viruses have also been shown to induce multifocal demyelinating disease in infected animals. This review focuses on morbillivirus-induced neuropathologies with emphasis on aetiopathogenesis of CNS demyelination. The possible involvement of a morbillivirus in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis is discussed.

  10. Diagnostic pitfalls in spine surgery: masqueraders of surgical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2011-10-01

    Disorders of the spine are common in clinical medicine, and spine surgery is being performed with increasing frequency in the US. Although many patients with an established diagnosis of a true surgically treatable lesion are referred to a neurosurgeon, the evaluation of patients with spinal disorders can be complex and fraught with diagnostic pitfalls. While "common conditions are common," astute clinical acumen and vigilance are necessary to identify lesions that masquerade as surgically treatable spine disease that can lead to erroneous diagnosis and treatment. In this review, the authors discuss musculoskeletal, peripheral nerve, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, and vascular conditions that mimic the syndromes produced by surgical lesions. It is possible that nonsurgical and surgical conditions coexist at times, complicating treatment plans and natural histories. Awareness of these diagnoses can help reduce diagnostic error, thereby avoiding the morbidity and expense associated with an unnecessary operation.

  11. The spectrum of MOG autoantibody-associated demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Markus; Di Pauli, Franziska; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) has been identified as a target of demyelinating autoantibodies in animal models of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Numerous studies have aimed to establish a role for MOG antibodies in patients with MS, although the results have been controversial. Cell-based immunoassays using MOG expressed in mammalian cells have demonstrated the presence of high-titre MOG antibodies in paediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, MS, aquaporin-4-seronegative neuromyelitis optica, or isolated optic neuritis or transverse myelitis, but only rarely in adults with these disorders. These studies indicate that MOG antibodies could be associated with a broad spectrum of acquired human CNS demyelinating diseases. This Review article discusses the current literature on MOG antibodies, their potential clinical relevance, and their role in the pathogenesis of MOG antibody-associated demyelinating disorders.

  12. Adrenocortical carcinoma masquerading as Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Jarial, Kush Dev; Walia, Rama; Kumar, Santosh; Bhansali, Anil

    2017-03-29

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) can be classified as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent or ACTH-independent depending on the ACTH levels. However, 30% of the patients with CS have ACTH levels in the 'grey zone' (5-20 pg/mL), thereby posing a challenge in establishing the aetiological diagnosis. In a patient with full-blown features of Cushing's syndrome with equivocal ACTH levels, and a pituitary microadenoma on contrast-enhanced MRI sella, can falsely lead to a diagnosis of Cushing's disease. Pituitary microadenoma, if <6 mm in size, may be an incidental finding (incidentaloma) in this scenario and can be present in ∼3-27% of the healthy population. Therefore, in a patient with CS with equivocal ACTH levels and a pituitary microadenoma, multiple samplings for ACTH and adrenal imaging should be performed to exclude ACTH-independent CS and if required, bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling to determine the source of ACTH excess. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Intravenous transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cells attenuates demyelination in an ICR outbred mouse model of demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pringproa, Kidsadagon; Sathanawongs, Anucha; Khamphilai, Chananthida; Sukkarinprom, Sarocha; Oranratnachai, Apichart

    2016-01-01

    Induction of demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) of experimental mice using cuprizone is widely used as an animal model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of demyelination. However, different mouse strains used result in different pathological outcomes. Moreover, because current medicinal treatments are not always effective in multiple sclerosis patients, so the study of exogenous cell transplantation in an animal model is of great importance. The aims of the present study were to establish an alternative ICR outbred mouse model for studying demyelination and to evaluate the effects of intravenous cell transplantation in the present developed mouse model. Two sets of experiments were conducted. Firstly, ICR outbred and BALB/c inbred mice were fed with 0.2% cuprizone for 6 consecutive weeks; then demyelinating scores determined by luxol fast blue stain or immunolabeling with CNPase were evaluated. Secondly, attenuation of demyelination in ICR mice by intravenous injection of mES cells was studied. Scores for demyelination in the brains of ICR mice receiving cell injection (mES cells-injected group) and vehicle (sham-inoculated group) were assessed and compared. The results showed that cuprizone significantly induced demyelination in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of both ICR and BALB/c mice. Additionally, intravenous transplantation of mES cells potentially attenuated demyelination in ICR mice compared with sham-inoculated groups. The present study is among the earliest reports to describe the cuprizone-induced demyelination in ICR outbred mice. Although it remains unclear whether mES cells or trophic effects from mES cells are the cause of enhanced remyelination, the results of the present study may shed some light on exogenous cell therapy in central nervous system demyelinating diseases. PMID:27904491

  14. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Saberio; Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Pirela, Daniela; Morlote, Diana; Cusnir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly); endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly. PMID:27790622

  15. Citation classics in central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee-Eun; Park, Kang M; Kim, Yerim; Yoon, Dae Y; Bae, Jong S

    2017-06-01

    To identify and analyze the characteristics of the most influential articles about central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating disease. The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science database and the 2014 Journal Citation Reports Science Edition were used to retrieve the top 100 cited articles on CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease. The citation numbers, journals, years of publication, authorships, article types, subjects and main issues were analyzed. For neuromyelitis optica (NMO), articles that were cited more than 100 times were regarded as a citation classic and described separately. The top 100 cited articles were published between 1972 and 2011 in 13 journals. The highest number of articles (n = 24) was published in Brain, followed by The New England Journal of Medicine (n = 21). The average number of citations was 664 (range 330-3,897), and 64% of the articles were from the United States and the United Kingdom. The majority of the top 100 cited articles were related to multiple sclerosis (n = 87), and only a few articles reported on other topics such as NMO (n = 9), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (n = 2) and optic neuritis (n = 2). Among the top 100 cited articles, 77% were original articles. Forty-one citation classics were found for NMO. Our study provides a historical perspective on the research progress on CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease and may serve as a guide for important advances and trends in the field for associated researchers.

  16. [Autoimmune disease among secondary autonomic disease--acute demyelinating polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H

    1992-04-01

    Acute demyelinating polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome) among secondary autonomic diseases was described as a representative disorder due to autoimmune mechanism. The possible roles of preceding vital infection, cellular and/or humoral immune abnormalities in developing the disease have been considered. A comparison was made between acute demyelinating polyneuropathy and experimental allergic neuritis in respects of their causes. Polyneuropathy associated with M proteinemia and Rowland's syndrome was also briefly reviewed.

  17. Demyelination and axonal preservation in a transgenic mouse model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Julia M; McCulloch, Mailis C; Montague, Paul; Brown, Angus M; Thilemann, Sebastian; Pratola, Laura; Gruenenfelder, Fredrik I; Griffiths, Ian R; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2010-01-01

    It is widely thought that demyelination contributes to the degeneration of axons and, in combination with acute inflammatory injury, is responsible for progressive axonal loss and persistent clinical disability in inflammatory demyelinating disease. In this study we sought to characterize the relationship between demyelination, inflammation and axonal transport changes using a Plp1-transgenic mouse model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. In the optic pathway of this non-immune mediated model of demyelination, myelin loss progresses from the optic nerve head towards the brain, over a period of months. Axonal transport is functionally perturbed at sites associated with local inflammation and ‘damaged’ myelin. Surprisingly, where demyelination is complete, naked axons appear well preserved despite a significant reduction of axonal transport. Our results suggest that neuroinflammation and/or oligodendrocyte dysfunction are more deleterious for axonal health than demyelination per se, at least in the short term. PMID:20091761

  18. Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases of Childhood: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    EKİZOĞLU, Esme; TEKTÜRK TOPALOĞLU, Pınar; YAPICI, Zuhal; ERAKSOY, Mefkûre

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are demyelinating inflammatory diseases, considered to have a striking pathophysiological resemblance. However, due to the differences in both clinical course and clinical approaches, it is important to differentiate between the two conditions, to plan further investigations and therapy protocols. These diseases have similar but also distinct clinical, radiological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings. ADEM is typically a monophasic disease of children. MS occurs generally in adult age, but uncommonly may develop in childhood with variable features. Our case is a 14 year-old-girl, presented with a three-month history of left hemiparesis, followed by right hemiparesis, cerebellar signs, myelitis and cortical visual disturbances. Based on the clinical follow-up, MR and CSF findings, our patient was diagnosed with relapsing tumefactive multiple sclerosis. Steroid treatment was not significantly effective, however the patient has benefited from plasmapheresis clinically and radiologically. Our patient is still being followed under the disease modifying therapy without any relapse.

  19. Clinical and Pharmacological Aspects of Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases in Childhood: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  20. Chromatic visual evoked potentials in young patients with demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Manca Tekavčič; Brecelj, Jelka; Kranjc, Branka Stirn

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate color vision in young patients with demyelinating disease both clinically and electrophysiologically. Thirty young patients (8-28 years, mean age 19 years) with demyelinating disease with or without a history of optic neuritis (ON) were investigated. Color vision was evaluated clinically with the Ishihara test and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue (FM 100 hue) test and electrophysiologically with chromatic visual evoked potentials (cVEPs). Color deficiency axis and error score (ES) obtained with the FM 100 hue test were analyzed. cVEPs to isoluminant red-green (R-G) and blue-yellow (B-Y) stimuli were recorded. The stimulus was a 7 deg circle composed of horizontal sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 2 cycles/deg and 90% chromatic contrast. Onset-offset mode of stimulation (ON:OFF=300∶700  ms) was used. Since the majority of the patients were adults (>18  years), the negative wave (N wave) of the cVEP respones is the prominent part and therefore was analyzed. Sixty eyes were studied-22 with at least one episode of ON (ON group) and 38 without any clinically evident episode of ON (nON group). The average ES in the ON group was 179.18±171.8, whereas in the nON group it was 87.60±65.34. The average N-wave latency in the ON group was 144±44  ms for the R-G stimulus and 146±56  ms for the B-Y stimulus, whereas in the nON group, it was 117±13  ms for the R-G stimulus and 121±22  ms for the B-Y one. The average N-wave amplitude in the ON group was 9.3±7.1  μV for the R-G stimulus and 5.1±3.9  μV for the B-Y one, whereas in the nON group, it was 10.8±8.3  μV for the R-G stimulus and 6.4±4.3  μV for the B-Y one. A significant difference between the ON and the nON group was found: in the ON group, ES was higher (p=0.01) and N-wave latency was longer (p=0.01) compared with those in the nON group. The study showed that color vision is expectedly more affected in the ON

  1. Role of autoantibodies in acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system in children.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Reindl, Markus

    2013-12-01

    The recent detection of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) autoantibodies in acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases, such as neuromyelitis optica, or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and multiple sclerosis, in children strongly indicates that B-cell-dependent mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis. This review aims to give an overview of the role of autoantibodies in inflammatory demyelinating pediatric diseases, with a focus on antibodies to AQP4 and MOG.

  2. Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cañellas, A Rovira; Gols, A Rovira; Izquierdo, J Río; Subirana, M Tintoré; Gairin, X Montalban

    2007-05-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) include a broad spectrum of central nervous system disorders that can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, imaging, laboratory and pathological findings. However, there can be a considerable overlap between at least some of these disorders, leading to misdiagnoses or diagnostic uncertainty. The relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are the most common IIDDs. Other MS phenotypes include those with a progressive course from onset (primary progressive and progressive relapsing) or with a benign course continuing for years after onset (benign MS). Uncommon forms of IIDDs can be classified clinically into: (1) fulminant or acute IIDDs, such as the Marburg variant of MS, Baló's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; (2) monosymptomatic IIDDs, such as those involving the spinal cord (transverse myelitis), optic nerve (optic neuritis) or brainstem and cerebellum; and (3) IIDDs with a restricted topographical distribution, including Devic's neuromyelitis optica, recurrent optic neuritis and relapsing transverse myelitis. Other forms of IIDD, which are classified clinically and radiologically as pseudotumoral, can have different forms of presentation and clinical courses. Although some of these uncommon IIDDs are variants of MS, others probably correspond to different entities. MR imaging of the brain and spine is the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing these disorders, and together with the clinical and laboratory findings can accurately classify them. Precise classification of these disorders may have relevant prognostic and treatment implications, and might be helpful in distinguishing them from tumoral or infectious lesions, avoiding unnecessary aggressive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.

  3. Metastatic pancreatic carcinoma masquerading as cystic lung disease: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Stern, Emily; Huseini, Taha; Kuok, YiJin; Lake, Fiona

    2017-09-01

    This 52-year-old male ex-smoker presented with a six-month history of progressive breathlessness and weight loss. He deteriorated acutely, and was admitted with severe type 1 respiratory failure. Apart from diffuse coarse crackles on chest auscultation, physical examination was unremarkable. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed diffuse cystic changes throughout the lungs. A diagnosis of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) was considered. Further workup identified a coincidental pancreatic lesion of uncertain significance, which remained indeterminate on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and on positron emission tomography (PET). Transbronchial biopsy revealed enteric differentiated adenocarcinoma exhibiting lepidic spread, and autopsy later confirmed primary pancreatic malignancy. This case demonstrates that metastatic pancreatic malignancy can present with severe respiratory failure and masquerade as cystic lung disease.

  4. Central and peripheral demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Gulati, Natasha Singh

    2014-01-01

    Several conditions cause damage to the inherently normal myelin of central nervous system, perepheral nervous system or both central and perepheral nervous system and hence termed as central demyelinating diseases, perepheral demyelinating diseases and combined central and perepheral demyelinating diseases respectively. Here we analysed and foccused on the etiology, prevalance, incidence and age of these demyelinating disorders. Clinical attention and various diagnostic tests are needed to adequately assess all these possibilities. PMID:24741263

  5. Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases Masquerading as Head and Neck Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Greene; Sandin; Hiemenz; Toney

    1994-01-01

    Lesions of the head and neck and upper respiratory tract can be quite difficult to diagnose at times when presenting symptoms and signs appear out of character or biopsy of affected tissue reveals nonspecific results. A heightened awareness of important historical facts such as place of birth and residence, travel and occupation may provide important clues to narrow the differential diagnosis. Not all destructive ulcers and tumors of the head and neck are malignant. Inflammatory and infectious diseases that mimic cancer are presented.

  6. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  7. Association between demyelinating disease and autoimmune rheumatic disease in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Ana Luiza M; Cabral, Nadia C; Osaku, Fabiane M; Len, Claudio A; Oliveira, Enedina M L; Terreri, Maria Teresa

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. Autoimmunity in patients with demyelinating disease and in their families has been broadly investigated and discussed. Recent studies show a higher incidence of rheumatic autoimmune diseases among adult patients with MS or NMO and their families, but there are no studies in the pediatric population. To evaluate an association of MS and NMO with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in pediatric patients. 22 patients younger than 21 years old with MS or NMO diagnosed before the age of 18 years were evaluated regarding epidemiological data, clinical presentation, association with autoimmune diseases, family history of autoimmune diseases, laboratory findings, imaging studies and presence of auto-antibodies. Among the patients studied, there was a prevalence of females (68.1%). The mean age of symptoms onset was 8 years and 9 months and the mean current age was 16 years and 4 months. Two patients (9%) had a history of associated autoimmune rheumatic disease: one case of juvenile dermatomyositis in a patient with NMO and another of systemic lupus erythematosus in a patient with MS. Three patients (13%) had a family history of autoimmunity in first-degree relatives. Antinuclear antibody was found positive in 80% of patients with NMO and 52% of patients with MS. About 15% of antinuclear antibody-positive patients were diagnosed with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases. Among patients with demyelinating diseases diagnosed in childhood included in this study there was a high frequency of antinuclear antibody positivity but a lower association with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases than that observed in studies conducted in adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between demyelinating disease and autoimmune rheumatic disease in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Ana Luiza M; Cabral, Nadia C; Osaku, Fabiane M; Len, Claudio A; Oliveira, Enedina M L; Terreri, Maria Teresa

    2016-09-28

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. Autoimmunity in patients with demyelinating disease and in their families has been broadly investigated and discussed. Recent studies show a higher incidence of rheumatic autoimmune diseases among adult patients with MS or NMO and their families, but there are no studies in the pediatric population. To evaluate an association of MS and NMO with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in pediatric patients. 22 patients younger than 21 years old with MS or NMO diagnosed before the age of 18 years were evaluated regarding epidemiological data, clinical presentation, association with autoimmune diseases, family history of autoimmune diseases, laboratory findings, imaging studies and presence of auto-antibodies. Among the patients studied, there was a prevalence of females (68.1%). The mean age of symptoms onset was 8 years and 9 months and the mean current age was 16 years and 4 months. Two patients (9%) had a history of associated autoimmune rheumatic disease: one case of juvenile dermatomyositis in a patient with NMO and another of systemic lupus erythematosus in a patient with MS. Three patients (13%) had a family history of autoimmunity in first-degree relatives. ANA was found positive in 80% of patients with NMO and 52% of patients with MS. About 15% of ANA-positive patients were diagnosed with rheumatologic autoimmune disieses. Among patients with demyelinating diseases diagnosed in childhood included in this study there was a high frequency of ANA positivity but a lower association with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases than that observed in studies conducted in adults. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  9. Paraneoplastic syndrome: a masquerade of autoimmune inner ear disease.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Keefe, Michael W; Harris, Jeffrey P; Matsuoka, Akihiro J

    2015-01-01

    Rare and diagnostically challenging, paraneoplastic syndromes can appear months to years before detection of their underlying neoplasms and are associated with rapidly progressive neurologic deficits, including cochleovestibulopathy and death. Less than 20 cases of paraneoplastic cochleovestibulopathy have been reported in the online database PubMed. We present three recent cases: one patient with a history of B-cell follicular lymphoma who developed dermatomyositis and hearing loss before detection of lymphoma recurrence in his anterior chest wall, a second patient with sudden asymmetric hearing loss, found to have a 12-cm renal mass before death, and a third with fluctuating bilateral hearing loss who was ultimately found to have a thymoma. Although characterized as type VI (non-immune rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss) within the Harris autoimmune inner ear disease classification system, the mechanism of paraneoplastic cochleovestibulopathy is not well understood. Although specific anti-neuronal antibodies such as anti-Hu may be associated with other paraneoplastic neurologic disorders, these antibodies have limited diagnostic utility with paraneoplastic cochleovestibulopathy. Steroids have limited efficacy with regard to hearing recovery, whereas intravenous immunoglobulin has been shown to be of benefit. These recent cases demonstrate how auditory and vestibular deficits may be indicative of a rare but potentially life-threatening occult neoplasm where timely diagnosis is critical. We believe that understanding paraneoplastic cochleovestibulopathy is of interest across a broad range of clinical practices.

  10. Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Pediatric Demyelinating Disease: Multiple Sclerosis and Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired pediatric demyelinating diseases manifest acutely with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or with various other acute deficits in focal or polyfocal areas of the central nervous system. Patients may experience a monophasic illness (as in the case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis) or one that may manifest as a chronic, relapsing disease [e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The diagnosis of pediatric MS and other demyelinating disorders of childhood has been facilitated by consensus statements regarding diagnostic definitions. Treatment of pediatric MS has been modeled after data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset MS. There are now an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for MS, and many will be formally studied for use in pediatric patients. There are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss acute management as well as chronic immunotherapies in acquired pediatric demyelination.

  11. Rat sleep and eye movement density as biological markers of demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Anch, A M; Laposky, A D

    Myelin mutants provide an opportunity to study neurophysiological and behavioral effects of demyelination. The taiep rats are myelin mutants with progressive demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in five neurological symptoms: tremor, ataxia, immobility, epilepsy, and paralysis. The demyelination affects the brainstem, an important area in the control of sleep. This study compared eye movement density (EMD) in taiep vs. normal control rats during paradoxical sleep (PS). It was hypothesized that taiep rats would have significantly reduced EMD during PS in comparison to normal controls due to their demyelinating disease. In addition, demyelination of brainstem structures would suggest possible changes in sleep-wake structure. Hence, we compared sleep-wake stages in taiep vs. normal, control rats. The results confirmed significantly reduced EMD during PS in taiep rats compared to normal rats during the 12-h (light) recording period. In addition, analysis of EMD values across the 12-h light period revealed significant differences in EMD values as a function of time of day in the taeip rats only. Comparison of waking and sleep values across the 12-h light phase revealed an "immobility episode" in three taiep rats, which was not present in normal controls. In addition, PS percentage was significantly lower and low-voltage sleep was significantly higher in taiep rats. These results suggest that EMD, immobility episodes, and sleep architecture may be useful as measurable biological events in the study of demyelinating disease. The results were discussed in terms of possible mechanisms underlying these differences, as well as possible implications for future studies.

  12. The road to remyelination in demyelinating diseases: current status and prospects for clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Watzlawik, Jens O; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-06-01

    Within CNS disorders, demyelinating diseases are among the most devastating and cost intensive due to long-term disabilities affecting relatively young patients. Multiple sclerosis, a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in which the persistent inhibitory microenvironment of the resident oligodendrocyte precursor cells abrogates regeneration of myelin sheaths, is the most prominent disease in the spectrum of demyelinating diseases. The essential goal is to stimulate creation of new myelin sheaths on the demyelinated axons, leading to restoration of saltatory conduction and resolving functional deficits. The past few decades witnessed significant efforts to understand the cellular interactions at the lesion site with studies suggesting efficient remyelination as a prerequisite for functional repair. Despite its proven efficacy in experimental models, immunosuppression has not had profound clinical consequences in multiple sclerosis, which argued for a paradigm shift in the design of therapeutics aiming to achieve remyelination. For example, targeting oligodendrocytes themselves may drive remyelination in the CNS. This group and others have demonstrated that natural autoreactive antibodies directed at oligodendrocyte progenitors participate in remyelination. Accordingly, the authors developed a recombinant autoreactive natural human IgM antibody with therapeutic potential for remyelination.

  13. Characterization of Oligodendroglial Populations in Mouse Demyelinating Disease Using Flow Cytometry: Clues for MS Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goings, Gwendolyn E.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing and enumerating cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage (OLCs) is crucial for understanding demyelination and therapeutic benefit in models of demyelinating disease in the central nervous system. Here we describe a novel method for the rapid, unbiased analysis of mouse OLCs using flow cytometry. The assay was optimized to maximize viable yield of OLCs and maintain OLC antigen integrity. Panels of antibodies were assembled for simultaneous analysis of seven antigens on individual cells allowing for characterization of oligodendroglial cells throughout the lineage. We verified the utility of the assay with cultured OLCs and through a time course of developmental myelination. Next we employed the assay to characterize OLC populations in two well-characterized models of demyelination: cuprizone-induced demyelination and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In EAE we observed a dramatic loss of mature oligodendrocytes coincident with a dramatic expansion of oligodendrocyte progenitors cells (OPCs) at the onset of disease suggesting an attempt of the host to repair myelin. This expanded OPC pool was maintained through remission and relapse suggesting an arrest in differentiation in the face of the chronic autoimmune T cell-mediated inflammatory response. These robust, reproducible changes in OLCs through disease provide a rapid quantitative global analysis of myelin-producing cells in the adult mouse brain and important information regarding effects of disease on oligodendroglial proliferation/differentiation which is useful for defining the pathogenesis and therapy of MS. PMID:25247590

  14. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress mediated neuronal loss in viral induced CNS demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Reas S; Dine, Kimberly; Das Sarma, Jayasri; Shindler, Kenneth S

    2014-01-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by central nervous system inflammation and demyelination, and increasing evidence demonstrates significant neuronal damage also occurs and is associated with permanent functional impairment. Current MS therapies have limited ability to prevent neuronal damage, suggesting additional neuroprotective therapies are needed. Compounds that activate the NAD+-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase prevent neuronal loss in an autoimmune-mediated MS model, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown, and it is unclear whether SIRT1 activating compounds exert similar effects in demyelinating disease induced by other etiologies. We measured neuronal loss in C57BL/6 mice inoculated with a neurotropic strain of mouse hepatitis virus, MHV-A59, that induces an MS-like disease. Oral treatment with the SIRT1 activating compound SRTAW04 significantly increased SIRT1 activity within optic nerves and prevented neuronal loss during optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve lesion that occurs in MS and its animal models. MHV-A59 induced neuronal loss was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and SRTAW04 treatment significantly reduced ROS levels while promoting increased expression of enzymes involved in mitochondrial function and reduction of ROS. SRTAW04 exerted similar protective effects in EAE spinal cords, with decreased demyelination. Results demonstrate that SIRT1 activating compounds prevent neuronal loss in viral-induced demyelinating disease similar to their effects in autoimmune-mediated disease. One mechanism of this neuroprotective effect involves increasing mitochondrial biogenesis with reduction of oxidative stress. SIRT1 activators represent a potential neuroprotective therapy for MS. Understanding common mechanisms of these effects in distinct disease models will help identify targets for more specific therapies.

  15. Myelin basic protein-specific T lymphocytes proliferation and programmed cell death in demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Zanzottera, Milena; Delbue, Serena; Marchioni, Enrico; Maserati, Renato; Longhi, Renato; Ferrante, Pasquale; Clerici, Mario

    2008-12-01

    A dynamic equilibrium between proliferation and programmed cell death (PCD) of auto-reactive T lymphocytes plays a pivotal role in the prevention of autoimmune diseases. We analyzed T lymphocytes myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific PCD and proliferation in demyelinating diseases. Results showed that MBP-specific PCD was significantly decreased in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), not determined leukoencephalopathy (NDLE), and acute MS (AMS) patients compared to patients with stable MS (SMS) and healthy controls. MBP-specific proliferation/PCD rates were high in CD4+ T lymphocytes of PML, NDLE, and AMS patients, and in CD8+ T cells of PML and AMS individuals alone. Alterations of the balance between MBP-specific proliferation and PCD are present in demyelinating diseases and could play a major role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  16. Comparison of Cerebrospinal Fluid Opening Pressure in Children With Demyelinating Disease to Children With Primary Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Followell, Bethanie; Aylward, Shawn C

    2017-03-01

    The authors aimed to compare the opening pressures of children with demyelinating disease to children with primary intracranial hypertension. Medical records were reviewed for a primary diagnosis of demyelinating disease, or primary intracranial hypertension. Diagnosis of demyelinating disease was made according to either the 2007 or 2012 International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group criteria. Primary intracranial hypertension diagnosis was confirmed by presence of elevated opening pressure, normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and neuroimaging. The authors compared 14 children with demyelinating disease to children with primary intracranial hypertension in 1:1 and 1:2 fashions. There was a statistically significant higher BMI in the primary intracranial hypertension group compared to the demyelinating group ( P = .0203). The mean cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was higher in the demyelinating disease group compared to primary intracranial hypertension ( P = .0002). Among both comparisons, the cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, glucose, protein and red blood cell counts in children with demyelinating disease were comparable to age- and sex-matched controls with primary intracranial hypertension.

  17. PERK activation preserves the viability and function of remyelinating oligodendrocytes in immune-mediated demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yifeng; Huang, Guangcun; Jamison, Stephanie; Li, Jin; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Lin, Wensheng

    2014-02-01

    Remyelination occurs in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions but is generally considered to be insufficient. One of the major challenges in MS research is to understand the causes of remyelination failure and to identify therapeutic targets that promote remyelination. Activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress modulates cell viability and function under stressful conditions. There is evidence that PERK is activated in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in demyelinated lesions in both MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this study, we sought to determine the role of PERK signaling in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in MS and EAE using transgenic mice that allow temporally controlled activation of PERK signaling specifically in oligodendrocytes. We demonstrated that persistent PERK activation was not deleterious to myelinating oligodendrocytes in young, developing mice or to remyelinating oligodendrocytes in cuprizone-induced demyelinated lesions. We found that enhancing PERK activation, specifically in (re)myelinating oligodendrocytes, protected the cells and myelin against the detrimental effects of interferon-γ, a key proinflammatory cytokine in MS and EAE. More important, we showed that enhancing PERK activation in remyelinating oligodendrocytes at the recovery stage of EAE promoted cell survival and remyelination in EAE demyelinated lesions. Thus, our data provide direct evidence that PERK activation cell-autonomously enhances the survival and preserves function of remyelinating oligodendrocytes in immune-mediated demyelinating diseases.

  18. Molecular analysis of the genes causing recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makiko; Abe, Akiko; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Yamao, Satoshi; Arai, Hidee; Hattori, Hideji; Iai, Mizue; Watanabe, Kyoko; Oka, Nobuyuki; Chida, Keiji; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common hereditary neuropathy, has been classified into two types, demyelinating and axonal types. We previously analyzed the genes causing dominant demyelinating CMT in 227 Japanese patients to identify the genetic background, but could not find any mutations in 110 patients. To investigate the frequency of patients with autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT (CMT4) mutations, we analyzed the coding sequence of known causative genes of CMT4 in 103 demyelinating CMT patients, excluding seven patients owing to lack of specimens. We found one patient with a GDAP1 mutation, one patient with an MTMR2 mutation, two patients with SH3TC2/KIAA1985 mutations and three patients with FGD4 mutations. Twelve patients, including five previously detected patients with PRX mutations, were diagnosed as CMT4, accounting for 5.5% of demyelinating CMT. In the patient with GDAP1 mutation, only one mutation inherited from his mother was detected by genomic sequencing. Analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using messenger RNA (mRNA) from the patient's leukocytes revealed the absence of transcription from the allele inherited from his father, suggesting the existence of one more mutation leading to a lack or destabilization of mRNA. Most patients carrying CMT4 gene mutations present with early-onset and slowly progressive symptoms, which may be associated with the function of mutants. We could not identify the disease-causing gene in 96 patients (about 45%). Further studies including studies with next-generation sequencers will be required to identify the causative gene in Japanese CMT.

  19. Association of Demyelinating and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Case Series and Overview of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    ATMACA, Murat Mert; ALTIOKKA UZUN, Güneş; SHUGAIV, Erkingül; KÜRTÜNCÜ, Murat; ERAKSOY, Mefküre

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications of inflammatory bowel diseases (i.e., ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease) can be summarized as a combination of neuromuscular manifestations, cerebrovascular and demyelinating diseases that can be seen in approximately 3% of patients. In addition, asymptomatic cerebral white matter lesions may be detected in these patients. Clustering of diseases within families may be explained by the exposure to similar environmental factors, shared genes, or complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Here we report an epileptic patient with Crohn’s disease and cerebral white matter lesions, a family with ulcerative colitis and multiple sclerosis and two patients who have both multiple sclerosis and Crohn’s disease.

  20. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jose; González, Silvia; Morales, Ximena; Yescas, Petra; Ochoa, Adriana; Corona, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants. PMID:22973516

  1. Harnessing GPR17 Biology for Treating Demyelinating Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    100 µg of peptide on each site of immunization. Pertussis toxin (200 ng) was injected on the day of immunization and on day 2 of immunization. The...by immunizing mice with 200 ug of MOG35-55/CFA emulsion. 200 ng of Pertussis toxin was administered on day 0 and day 2. Disease severity was graded

  2. Directional diffusivity as a magnetic resonance (MR) biomarker in demyelinating disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Cross, Anne H.; Xu, Junqian; Naismith, Robert; Sun, Shu-Wei; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2007-09-01

    Directional diffusivities derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) measurements describe water movement parallel to (λ ||, axial diffusivity) and perpendicular to (λ⊥radial diffusivity) axonal tracts. λ || and λ⊥ have been shown to differentially detect axon and myelin abnormalities in several mouse models of central nervous system white matter pathology in our laboratory. These models include experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), (1) myelin basic protein mutant mice with dysmyelination and intact axons, (2) cuprizone-induced demyelination, and remyelination, with reversible axon injury (2, 3) and a model of retinal ischemia in which retinal ganglion cell death is followed by Wallerian degeneration of optic nerve, with axonal injury preceding demyelination. (4) Decreased λ|| correlates with acute axonal injury and increased λ⊥ indicates myelin damage. (4) More recently, we have translated this approach to human MR, investigating acute and chronic optic neuritis in adults with multiple sclerosis, brain lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in children. We are also investigating the use of this technique to probe the underlying structural change of the cervical spinal cord in acute and chronic T2- hyperintense lesions in spinal stenosis, trauma, and transverse myelitis. In each of these demyelinating diseases, the discrimination between axonal and myelin injury which we can achieve has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. For those patients with myelin injury but intact axons, early, directed drug therapy has the potential to prevent progression to axonal loss and permanent disability.

  3. [A case of asymmetric demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with chronic graft-versus-host disease].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Seki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Oshima, Kumi; Asai, Takashi; Motokura, Toru; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year-old man, who suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia at 45 years old and was treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 46 years old after the induction of complete remission by the standard chemotherapy, developed the symptoms of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) such as dry eyes, dry mouth, skin thickening, skin scaling, skin pigmentation and impaired liver function. He was admitted to our hospital because of the acute development of diplopia and weakness of his left upper extremity accompanying with the exacerbation of other symptoms of cGVHD. Neurological examinations revealed the right abducens nerve palsy and asymmetric muscular weakness of the extremities; the proximal part of the left upper extremity and the distal part of the right upper extremity were markedly involved. Neurophysiological studies including magnetic motor root stimulation revealed demyelinating neuropathy specifically involving the motor nerves. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy associated with cGVHD was made. Nighteen reports are available on peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD patients, but to date little is known about the pathophysiology of this condition. Most of those patients have been diagnosed as having symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In this study, contrary to previous reports, the asymmetric involvement of motor nerves is noteworthy. Accumulation and further analyses of the cases like the present case are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD.

  4. β2-Integrins in demyelinating disease: not adhering to the paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Wohler, Jillian E.; Dugger, Kari J.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The β2-integrins are a subfamily of integrins expressed on leukocytes that play an essential role in leukocyte trafficking, activation, and many other functions. Studies in EAE, the animal model for multiple sclerosis, show differential requirements for β2-integrins in this disease model, ranging from critical in the case of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) to unimportant in the case of CD11d/CD18. Importantly, expression of β2-integrins on T cell subsets provides some clues as to the function(s) these adhesion molecules play in disease development. For example, transferred EAE studies have shown that Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) expression on αβ T cells is critical for disease development, and the absence of LFA-1 on Tregs in recipient mice results in exacerbated disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of β2-integrins in demyelinating disease and new information about the role of β2-integrins with respect to alterations in Treg numbers and function. In addition, we discuss the potential for targeting β2-integrins in human demyelinating disease in light of the recent animal model studies. PMID:20007244

  5. beta2-integrins in demyelinating disease: not adhering to the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Wohler, Jillian E; Dugger, Kari J; Barnum, Scott R

    2010-03-01

    The beta(2)-integrins are a subfamily of integrins expressed on leukocytes that play an essential role in leukocyte trafficking, activation, and many other functions. Studies in EAE, the animal model for multiple sclerosis, show differential requirements for beta(2)-integrins in this disease model, ranging from critical in the case of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) to unimportant in the case of CD11d/CD18. Importantly, expression of beta(2)-integrins on T cell subsets provides some clues as to the function(s) these adhesion molecules play in disease development. For example, transferred EAE studies have shown that Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) expression on alphabeta T cells is critical for disease development, and the absence of LFA-1 on Tregs in recipient mice results in exacerbated disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of beta(2)-integrins in demyelinating disease and new information about the role of beta(2)-integrins with respect to alterations in Treg numbers and function. In addition, we discuss the potential for targeting beta(2)-integrins in human demyelinating disease in light of the recent animal model studies.

  6. Gray Matter Changes in Demyelinating Disease: Correlations with Clinical Scores.

    PubMed

    Onu, Mihaela; Aroceanu, Adina; Ferastraoaru, Victor; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2015-09-01

    Recent MR studies have shown that, in multiple sclerosis, selective regional, but not global gray matter atrophy occurs in multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to identify specific areas of gray matter volume changes and explore the relationship between atrophy and clinical motor outcomes. Nine patients with relapsing remitting MS and 9 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR acquisitions, a GE- Genesis- Signa, 1.5T MR system, was used. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM), subcortical structures segmentation (FIRST) and volumetric (SIENAx) FSL tools were used in the study. Group comparison showed atrophy for several gray matter regions. The most important volume reductions were found for subcortical deep gray matter areas. Correlations with clinical scores were checked and specific gray matter areas showed significant volume reductions associated with motor scores (9-hole peg time and 25-feet walk time) and EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale). We performed a voxelwise analysis of gray matter changes in MS and found a more prominent atrophy for the subcortical structures than for cortical gray matter. Using an additional analysis (FIRST and SIENAx segmentation/volumetry) we were able to confirm the VBM results and to quantify the degree of atrophy in specific structures. Specific gray matter regions which volume reductions correlate with 25-feet walk, 9-hole peg times and EDSS suggest that 25-feet walk time is the best predictor of disease progression in terms of gray matter reduction.

  7. Diffusion abnormality maps in demyelinating disease: correlations with clinical scores.

    PubMed

    Onu, Mihaela; Roceanu, Adina; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Bendic, Robert; Tarta, Eugen; Preoteasa, Florentin; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as a noninvasive tool to assess pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the correlation between classical MRI measures and physical disability is modest in MS. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI technique holds particular promise in this regard. The present study shows brain regions where FA and individual diffusivities abnormalities are present and check their correlations with physical disability clinical scores. Eight patients and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR-DTI acquisitions, a Genesis Signa 1.5 T MR system, an EP/SE scanning sequence, 25 gradient directions were used. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) group comparisons showed reduced FA and increased individual diffusivities in several brain regions in patients. Significant correlations were found between FA and: EDSS, 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score; between λ2 and: P100 (r&l), 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW; between λ3 and: 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score. Fractional anisotropy and individual radial diffusivities proved to be important markers of motor disabilities in MS patients when the disease duration mean and the disability scores values range are relatively high. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quadrivalent HPV vaccination and risk of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Nikolai Madrid; Svanström, Henrik; Pasternak, Björn; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sundström, Karin; Fink, Katharina; Hviid, Anders

    2015-01-06

    Case reports have suggested a link between human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and development of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases. To investigate if quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination is associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases. Using nationwide registers we identified a cohort of all females aged 10 years to 44 years in Denmark and Sweden, followed up from 2006 to 2013, information on qHPV vaccination, and data on incident diagnoses of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases. The primary analysis used a cohort design including vaccinated and unvaccinated study participants. A secondary analysis used a self-controlled case-series design including only cases. Both analyses used a 2-year risk period following vaccination. Information on qHPV vaccination was obtained through the national vaccination and prescription registers. The primary outcomes were multiple sclerosis and a composite end point of other demyelinating diseases. Incidence rate ratios were estimated using Poisson regression, comparing rates of events in the 2-year risk periods following vaccination and in unvaccinated time periods. The study included 3,983,824 females, among whom 789,082 received a total of 1,927,581 qHPV vaccine doses. During follow-up, 4322 multiple sclerosis cases and 3300 cases of other demyelinating diseases were identified, of which 73 and 90, respectively, occurred within the risk period. In the cohort analysis, there was no increased risk of multiple sclerosis (crude incidence rates, 6.12 events/100,000 person-years [95% CI, 4.86-7.69] and 21.54 events/100,000 person-years [95% CI, 20.90-22.20] for the vaccinated and unvaccinated periods; adjusted rate ratio, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.70-1.15]) or other demyelinating diseases (crude incidence rates, 7.54 events/100,000 person-years [95% CI, 6.13-9.27] and 16.14 events/100,000 person-years [95% CI, 15.58-16.71]; adjusted rate ratio, 1.00 [95% CI, 0

  9. Demyelinating disease in patients treated with TNF antagonists in rheumatology: data from BIOBADASER, a pharmacovigilance database, and a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cruz Fernández-Espartero, María; Pérez-Zafrilla, Beatriz; Naranjo, Antonio; Esteban, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana M; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto

    2011-12-01

    To estimate the rate of demyelinating diseases in patients with rheumatic diseases treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists and to describe the cases reported to 3 different pharmacovigilance sources. All confirmed cases of demyelinating disease, optic neuritis, and multiple sclerosis (MS) in patients with rheumatic diseases treated with TNF-antagonists were reviewed from 3 different sources: (1) the Spanish Registry of biological therapies in rheumatic diseases (BIOBADASER); (2) the Spanish Pharmacovigilance Database of Adverse Drug Reactions (FEDRA); and (3) a systematic review (PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library). In BIOBADASER, the incidence rate per 1000 patients was estimated with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). In 21,425 patient-years in BIOBADASER, there were 9 patients with confirmed demyelinating disease, 4 with optic neuritis, and 1 with MS. In addition, 22 patients presented polyneuropathies, paresthesias, dysesthesias, facial palsy, or vocal cord paralysis without confirmed demyelination. The incidence rate of demyelinating disease in patients with rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF-antagonists in BIOBADASER was 0.65 per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 0.39-1.1). The incidence of MS in BIOBADASER was 0.05 (95% CI: 0.01-0.33), while the incidence in the general Spanish population was 0.02 to 0.04 cases per 1000. Compared with BIOBADASER, cases in FEDRA (n = 19) and in the literature (n = 48) tend to be younger, have shorter exposure to TNF-antagonists, and recover after discontinuation of the drug. It is not clear whether TNF antagonists increase the incidence of demyelinating diseases in patients with rheumatic diseases. Differences between cases depending on the pharmacovigilance source could be explained by selective reporting bias outside registries. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Demyelinating disease in patients treated with TNF antagonists in rheumatology: data from BIOBADASER, a pharmacovigilance database, and a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Espartero, María Cruz; Pérez-Zafrilla, Beatriz; Naranjo, Antonio; Esteban, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana M; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto

    2011-02-01

    To estimate the rate of demyelinating diseases in patients with rheumatic diseases treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists and to describe the cases reported to 3 different pharmacovigilance sources. All confirmed cases of demyelinating disease, optic neuritis, and multiple sclerosis (MS) in patients with rheumatic diseases treated with TNF-antagonists were reviewed from 3 different sources: (1) the Spanish Registry of biological therapies in rheumatic diseases (BIOBADASER); (2) the Spanish Pharmacovigilance Database of Adverse Drug Reactions (FEDRA); and (3) a systematic review (PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library). In BIOBADASER, the incidence rate per 1000 patients was estimated with a 95% confidence interval (95%CI). In 21,425 patient-years in BIOBADASER, there were 9 patients with confirmed demyelinating disease, 4 with optic neuritis, and 1 with MS. In addition, 22 patients presented polyneuropathies, paresthesias, dysesthesias, facial palsy, or vocal cord paralysis without confirmed demyelination. The incidence rate of demyelinating disease in patients with rheumatic diseases exposed to TNF antagonists in BIOBADASER was 0.65 per 1000 patient-years (95%CI: 0.39-1.1). The incidence of MS in BIOBADASER was 0.05 (95%CI: 0.01-0.33), while the incidence in the general Spanish population was 0.02 to 0.04 cases per 1000. Compared with BIOBADASER, cases in FEDRA (n = 19) and in the literature (n = 48) tend to be younger, have shorter exposure to TNF-antagonists, and recover after discontinuation of the drug. It is not clear whether TNF antagonists increase the incidence of demyelinating diseases in patients with rheumatic diseases. Differences between cases depending on the pharmacovigilance source could be explained by selective reporting bias outside registries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum antibodies against central nervous system proteins in human demyelinating disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newcombe, J; Gahan, S; Cuzner, M L

    1985-01-01

    An immunoblotting technique has been used to screen serum samples from patients with demyelinating disease for antibody directed against central nervous system proteins. Antibodies of the IgM, IgG and IgA class directed against one or more of the particulate fraction proteins tubulin, myelin basic protein, 69 K neurofilament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin associated glycoprotein or Wolfgram protein were present in 94, 54 and 47%, respectively, of multiple sclerosis sera examined. IgM antibodies against tubulin and myelin basic protein predominated. A similar antibody spectrum was seen in a significant proportion of sera from patients with optic neuritis, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and motor neurone disease, in which primary or secondary demyelination occurs. Antibodies of all three classes directed against the 169 K and 220 K neurofilament proteins and against some unidentified proteins of human peripheral nerve, kidney, liver, spleen and skeletal muscle were detected in sera from healthy subjects and patients with neurological disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2579754

  12. Physiological Dynamics in Demyelinating Diseases: Unraveling Complex Relationships through Computer Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Coggan, Jay S.; Bittner, Stefan; Stiefel, Klaus M.; Meuth, Sven G.; Prescott, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite intense research, few treatments are available for most neurological disorders. Demyelinating diseases are no exception. This is perhaps not surprising considering the multifactorial nature of these diseases, which involve complex interactions between immune system cells, glia and neurons. In the case of multiple sclerosis, for example, there is no unanimity among researchers about the cause or even which system or cell type could be ground zero. This situation precludes the development and strategic application of mechanism-based therapies. We will discuss how computational modeling applied to questions at different biological levels can help link together disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. By making testable predictions and revealing critical gaps in existing knowledge, such models can help direct research and will provide a rigorous framework in which to integrate new data as they are collected. Nowadays, there is no shortage of data; the challenge is to make sense of it all. In that respect, computational modeling is an invaluable tool that could, ultimately, transform how we understand, diagnose, and treat demyelinating diseases. PMID:26370960

  13. Tangier's disease: An uncommon cause of facial weakness and non-length dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, M.; Bindu, P. S.; Chickabasaviah, Y. T.; Gayathri, N.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in various organs secondary to adenotriphosphate binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1) transporter deficiency and disrupted reverse cholesterol transport. It causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially misdiagnosed leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. The characteristic lipid profile of Tangier disease was noted in this patient viz. extremely low high density lipoprotein (HDL), elevated triglyceride (TG), and reduced apolipoprotein A1. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27011649

  14. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides perturb lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells: Implications for inflammatory demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Clayton W.; Foster, Scott C.; Itakura, Asako; Matsumoto, Steven G.; Asari, Akira; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Sherman, Larry S.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the central nervous system. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and its receptor, CD44, are implicated in the initiation and progression of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Digestion of hyaluronan tethered to brain vascular endothelial cells by a hyaluronidase blocks the slow rolling of lymphocytes along activated brain vascular endothelial cells and delays the onset of EAE. These effects could be due to the elimination of hyaluronan or the generation of hyaluronan digestion products that influence lymphocytes or endothelial cells. Here, we found that hyaluronan dodecasaccharides impaired activated lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells when applied to lymphocytes but not to the endothelial cells. The effects of hyaluronan dodecasaccharides on lymphocyte rolling were independent of CD44 and a receptor for degraded hyaluronan, toll-like receptor-4. Subcutaneous injection of hyaluronan dodecasaccharides or tetrasaccharides delayed the onset of EAE in a manner similar to subcutaneous injection of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides can therefore act directly on lymphocytes to modulate the onset of inflammatory demyelinating disease. PMID:23333375

  15. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides perturb lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells: implications for inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Clayton W; Foster, Scott C; Itakura, Asako; Matsumoto, Steven G; Asari, Akira; McCarty, Owen J T; Sherman, Larry S

    2013-04-24

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the central nervous system. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and its receptor, CD44, are implicated in the initiation and progression of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Digestion of hyaluronan tethered to brain vascular endothelial cells by a hyaluronidase blocks the slow rolling of lymphocytes along activated brain vascular endothelial cells and delays the onset of EAE. These effects could be due to the elimination of hyaluronan or the generation of hyaluronan digestion products that influence lymphocytes or endothelial cells. Here, we found that hyaluronan dodecasaccharides impaired activated lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells when applied to lymphocytes but not to the endothelial cells. The effects of hyaluronan dodecasaccharides on lymphocyte rolling were independent of CD44 and a receptor for degraded hyaluronan, Toll-like receptor-4. Subcutaneous injection of hyaluronan dodecasaccharides or tetrasaccharides delayed the onset of EAE in a manner similar to subcutaneous injection of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides can therefore act directly on lymphocytes to modulate the onset of inflammatory demyelinating disease. Copyright © 2013 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in patients with demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: distinction from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ueno, Hiroki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagano, Yoshito; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-10-01

    Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are both demyelinating polyneuropathies. The differences in nerve enlargement degree and pattern at multiple evaluation sites/levels are not well known. We investigated the differences in nerve enlargement degree and the distribution pattern of nerve enlargement in patients with demyelinating CMT and CIDP, and verified the appropriate combination of sites/levels to differentiate between these diseases. Ten patients (aged 23-84 years, three females) with demyelinating CMT and 16 patients (aged 30-85 years, five females) with CIDP were evaluated in this study. The nerve sizes were measured at 24 predetermined sites/levels from the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots (CNR) using ultrasonography. The evaluation sites/levels were classified into three regions: distal, intermediate and cervical. The number of sites/levels that exhibited nerve enlargement (enlargement site number, ESN) in each region was determined from the 24 sites/levels and from the selected eight screening sites/levels, respectively. The cross-sectional areas of the peripheral nerves were markedly larger at all evaluation sites in patients with demyelinating CMT than in patients with CIDP (p < 0.01). However, the nerve sizes of CNR were not significantly different between patients with either disease. When we evaluated ESN of four selected sites for screening from the intermediate region, the sensitivity and specificity to distinguish between demyelinating CMT and CIDP were 0.90 and 0.94, respectively, with the cut-off value set at four. Nerve ultrasonography is useful to detect nerve enlargement and can clarify morphological differences in nerves between patients with demyelinating CMT and CIDP.

  17. Chronic Demyelinating Polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeffrey A

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the chronic demyelinating neuropathies, with a focus on the diagnosis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies and the features that can help differentiate immune-mediated neuropathies from other chronic demyelinating peripheral nerve conditions. Advances in clinical phenotyping and outcomes assessment have enabled neurologists to improve disease recognition, treatment, and disease monitoring. Our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of demyelinating neuropathies is evolving. Identification of new antibodies and recognition that node of Ranvier dysfunction may be an early pathogenic feature may herald further diagnostic and treatment advancements. The chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies are heterogeneous. The clinical and diagnostic features are sometimes overlapping, and the specific disorders are variable in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis. This heterogeneity underscores the importance of achieving diagnostic accuracy and implementing disease-specific treatment approaches.

  18. The TIM-3 pathway ameliorates Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Tomoki; Tomiki, Hiroki; Tsugane, Sayaka; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Akiba, Hisaya; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-07-01

    Infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in the central nervous system (CNS) induces an immune-mediated demyelinating disease in susceptible mouse strains and serves as a relevant infection model for human multiple sclerosis. T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) has been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. In this study, we examined the regulatory role of the TIM-3 pathway in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD). The expression of TIM-3 was increased at both protein and mRNA levels in the spinal cords of mice with TMEV-IDD compared with naive controls. In addition, by utilizing a blocking mAb, we demonstrate that TIM-3 negatively regulates TMEV-specific ex vivo production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ by CD8(+) T cells from the CNS of mice with TMEV-IDD at 36 days post-infection (dpi). In vivo blockade of TIM-3 by using the anti-TIM-3 mAb resulted in significant exacerbation of the development of TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. The number of infiltrating mononuclear cells in the CNS was also increased in mice administered with anti-TIM-3 mAb both at the induction phase (10 dpi) and at the effector phase (36 dpi). Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular cytokines revealed that the number of CD4(+) T cells producing TNF, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 was significantly increased at the effector phase in the CNS of anti-TIM-3 mAb-treated mice. These results suggest that the TIM-3 pathway plays a critical role in the regulation of TMEV-IDD.

  19. Characterization of the spectrum of Korean inflammatory demyelinating diseases according to the diagnostic criteria and AQP4-Ab status

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relative frequencies of demyelinating diseases among Korean patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (IIDD) have not been sufficiently studied. We therefore describe a cohort of 203 patients with IIDD from three centers in Korea whose syndromes were identified precisely according to international clinical criteria and autoantibody to aquaporin 4 (AQP4-Ab) status. Methods In total, 260 consecutive patients were screened and 203 were included from three hospitals in Korea. All were tested for AQP4-Ab by using a cell-based assay. Patients who met the criteria for definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or had a positive AQP4-Ab test result were defined as the NMO group. Among the others, patients were assessed if they had acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis (MS), acute transverse myelitis, optic neuritis, or other demyelinating disease as a clinically isolated syndrome of the brain. Results Eighteen percent of patients were classified as the NMO group, 2% as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 18% as MS, 41% as acute transverse myelitis, 11% as optic neuritis, and 8% as other clinically isolated syndrome of the brain. AQP4-Ab was positive in 18% of patients and the relative frequency of NMO to MS (NMO/MS ratio) was 1.06. The mean duration of follow up in our patients was 64 months. Conclusions Among Korean patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases, the incidence of NMO may be similar to that of MS, and the overall positivity of AQP4-Ab could be lower than previously reported. In addition, acute transverse myelitis that is not associated with MS or NMO can be relatively common in these patients. Further population-based studies with AQP4-Ab are needed to determine the exact incidence of NMO and other idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases in Korea. PMID:24779645

  20. In Vivo and In Vitro Models of Demyelinating Disease: Endogenous Factors Influencing Demyelinating Disease Caused by Mouse Hepatitis Virus in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, O.; Dugre, R.; Percy, D.; Dales, S.

    1982-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of JHM virus (JHMV), the neuropathic strain of mouse hepatitis virus, into Wistar Furth, Wistar Lewis, and Fischer 344 rats at various ages indicated that Wistar Furth rats are more susceptible to the virus than are the other strains. Fischer 344 and Wistar Lewis rats were more resistant to inoculation at 2 and 5 days of age and completely resistant by 10 days of age. In contrast, Wistar Furth rats which were very susceptible at both 2 and 5 days of age remained susceptible until 21 days of age. Intracerebral challenge of an F1 cross between Wistar Furth and Wistar Lewis rats at 10 days of age indicated that resistance to JHMV infection is dominant. Cyclophosphamide treatment 28 days after intracerebral inoculation exacerbated an inapparent infection, leading to paralysis in eight of nine and death in six of nine Wistar Furth test rats. In such immunosuppressed animals, grey- and white-matter lesions were noted throughout the central nervous system, in contrast to the purely demyelinating lesions noted previously. Since rats, unlike mice, were not susceptible to disease after intracerebral injection with the serorelated viscerotropic strain MHV-3, we wished to extend our understanding of the neurological disease process elicited by the two viruses in rodents. For this reason, various mouse strains, including some with recognized immunodeficiencies, were challenged by different routes of inoculation. Intraperitoneal infection of nude and beige mice with JHMV indicated that lack of natural killer cell functions does not markedly enhance the susceptibility to virus, whereas T-cell activity appears to be essential for resisting infection. JHMV and MHV-3 replication in peritoneal macrophages from highly resistant A/J mice was reduced in comparison with that noted in macrophages from susceptible C57BL6/J mice. An initial intraperitoneal inoculation of JHMV was able to protect C57BL6/J mice against fatal intracerebral challenge within 3 days

  1. γδT Cells: the Overlooked T cell Subset in Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Smith, Sherry S.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells represent a small subpopulation of T cells that express a restricted repertoire of T cell receptors and, unlike αβ T cells, function more as cells of the innate immune system. These cells are found in skin and mucosal sites as well as secondary lymphoid tissues and, frequently act as first line of defense sentinels. γδ T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease although little was known regarding their trafficking and effector functions. In this brief review we highlight recent studies demonstrating that γδ T cells migrate rapidly to the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. γδ T cell trafficking to the CNS is independent of β2-integrins and occurs well before onset of clinical signs of disease, peaking early during the acute phase of disease. γδ T cell-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ and TNF-α appears critical for EAE development, suggesting these cells may set the stage for activation of other subsets of infiltrating effector cells. These data suggest that γδ T cells or subsets of γδ T cells may represent a new therapeutic target in demeylinating disease. PMID:19610090

  2. gammadelta T cells: the overlooked T-cell subset in demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Smith, Sherry S; Barnum, Scott R

    2010-01-01

    gammadelta T cells represent a small subpopulation of T cells expressing a restricted repertoire of T-cell receptors and, unlike alphabeta T cells, function more as cells of the innate immune system. These cells are found in skin and mucosal sites as well as secondary lymphoid tissues and frequently act as first line of defense sentinels. gammadelta T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease, although little was known regarding their trafficking and effector functions. In this Mini-Review, we highlight recent studies demonstrating that gammadelta T cells migrate rapidly to the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. gammadelta T-cell trafficking to the CNS is independent of beta(2)-integrins and occurs well before onset of clinical signs of disease, peaking early during the acute phase of disease. gammadelta T-cell-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, appears critical for EAE development, suggesting that these cells may set the stage for activation of other subsets of infiltrating effector cells. These data suggest that gammadelta T cells or subsets of gammadelta T cells may represent a new therapeutic target in demeylinating disease.

  3. Progression of relapsing-remitting demyelinating disease does not require increased TCR affinity or epitope spread

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Anna E.; Edwards, Lindsay J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the basis of T cell recognition of myelin that governs the progression from acute symptoms into disease remission, relapse and chronic progression in a secondary progressive model of demyelinating disease. Until now, the frequency and affinity of myelin-reactive CD4 T cells that elicit relapsing-remitting disease have not been quantified. The micropipette adhesion frequency assay was used to obtain a sensitive and physiologically relevant two-dimensional measurement of frequency and TCR affinity for myelin, as the inherent low affinity does not allow the use of specific-peptide:MHC-II tetramers for this purpose. We found the highest affinity and frequency of polyclonal myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-reactive cells infiltrate the CNS during acute disease, while affinities during remission, relapse and chronic disease are not significantly different from each other. Frequency analysis revealed that the vast majority of CNS-infiltrating CD4 T cells are MOG-reactive at all time points demonstrating epitope spread is not a predominant factor for disease progression. Further, time points at which mice were symptomatic were characterized by an infiltration of Th17 cells in the CNS while symptom remission showed an enrichment of cells producing IFN-γ. Also, the ratio of regulatory T cells to Foxp3- CD4 T cells was significantly higher in the CNS at remission than during acute disease. The results of this study indicate that a high frequency of T cells specific for a single myelin antigen, rather than increased TCR affinity or epitope spread, govern the transition from acute symptoms through remission, relapse and chronic disease states. PMID:25267971

  4. Molecular mimicry as an inducing trigger for CNS autoimmune demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Emily M. L.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects about 0.1% of the worldwide population. This deleterious disease is marked by infiltration of myelinspecific T cells that attack the protective myelin sheath that surrounds CNS nerve axons. Upon demyelination, saltatory nerve conduction is disrupted, and patients experience neurologic deficiencies. The exact cause for MS remains unknown, although most evidence supports the hypothesis that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to disease development. Epidemiologic evidence supports a role for environmental pathogens, such as viruses, as potentially key contributors to MS induction. Pathogens can induce autoimmunity via several well-studied mechanisms with the most postulated being molecular mimicry. Molecular mimicry occurs when T cells specific for peptide epitopes derived from pathogens cross-react with self-epitopes, leading to autoimmune tissue destruction. In this review, we discuss an in vivo virus-induced mouse model of MS developed in our laboratory, which has contributed greatly to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying molecular mimicry-induced CNS autoimmunity. PMID:22168423

  5. Low Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in Demyelinating Disease in a Northern Tenerife Population

    PubMed Central

    González-Platas, Montserrat; González-Platas, Javier; Bermúdez-Hernández, Moises; Pérez-Martín, Maria Yaiza; Croissier-Elías, Cristina; Pérez-Lorensu, Pedro Javier

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disorders are seen in patients with demyelinating disease (DD) more often than in the general population. Combination of physical and psychological factors such as pain, spasms, nocturia, depression, anxiety, or medication effects could contribute to sleep disruption. Frequently, these disturbances have a major impact on health and quality of life of patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of sleep disorders in patients seen in the DD consultation. Methods: 240 patients; mean age 43 years, 187 women; 163 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS): 144 relapsing-remitting, 19 progressive forms, 36 clinically isolated syndrome, 26 radiological isolated syndrome, and 15 patients with others DD. All participants completed questionnaires: Pittsburgh, Epworth, and Stanford scales, indirect symptoms of RLS and Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54. Results: Moderate/severe insomnia 12.5%, OSA 5.8%, RLS 9.6% (confirmed 3 cases), narcolepsy 0, fatigue (> 4) 24.6%. Physical QoL 66.6 ± 19.6, Mental QoL 66.1 ± 21.9. Patients with an established diagnosis showed higher scores on insomnia compared to the group of CIS and RIS (F = 3.85; p = 0.023), no differences were in the other parameters. Fatigue showed high correlation with insomnia (r = 0.443; p < 0.001), RLS (r = 0.513; p < 0.001), and sleepiness (r = 0.211; p = 0.001). None of the variables included in the regression model were shown to be predictors of Physical and Mental QoL. Conclusions: A high percentage of our sample sleeps well. Emphasize the low prevalence of sleep disorders (insomnia, fatigue, RLS, etc). We detected an overestimation in the RLS questionnaire and the low QoL recorded. Citation: González-Platas M, González-Platas J, Bermúdez-Hernández M, Pérez-Martín MY, Croissier-Elías C, Pérez-Lorensu PJ. Low prevalence of sleep disorders in demyelinating disease in a northern tenerife population. J Clin Sleep

  6. Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Mark R.; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Seong-Joon; Park, Kyung Seok; Vincent, Angela; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical relevance of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG-Ab) in a cohort of adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the CNS. Methods: Live cell-based assays for MOG-Ab (IgG1 subset) and antibody to aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) were performed in a cohort of 270 adult patients with IDD and 72 controls. Patients were first grouped by positive antibody result as MOG-Ab or AQP4-Ab, and the remainder were grouped by published diagnostic criteria. Results: Seventeen patients with IDD (6.3%) had MOG-Abs and 49 patients (18.1%) had AQP4-Abs; none had both antibodies. The MOG-Ab patients predominantly manifested with isolated symptoms of optic neuritis (83%). One-third of these patients experienced relapses, which involved only the optic nerve, and all relapsed within 1 year of disease onset. At onset, MRI in the MOG-Ab group uniquely demonstrated perineural enhancement, extending to the soft tissues around the optic nerves (33%). Although about 30% of MOG-Ab patients had brain MRI lesions, they had fewer periventricular lesions than the 26 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS); none of these lesions were ovoid or perpendicular to the ventricle. Moreover, MOG-Ab patients did not meet the diagnostic criteria for definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and had less spinal cord involvement than the AQP4-Ab group. Four patients (23.5%) had poor visual outcomes (<0.2) or paraplegia. Conclusions: MOG-Abs may be a disease-specific biomarker in adult patients with IDD who have a disease distinct from NMO or MS. The radiologic as well as clinical manifestations of MOG-Ab patients can be useful in their differential diagnosis. PMID:26516628

  7. Characteristics of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with concurrent diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Wu, Xiaohua; Xie, Huijun; Han, Ying; Guan, Yangtai; Qin, Yong; Zheng, Huimin; Jiang, Jianming; Niu, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common type of inherited peripheral neuropathy and has a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. CMT with concurrent diabetes mellitus (DM) is rare. The purpose of this study is to explore the genetic, clinical and pathological characteristics of the patients with CMT and concurrent DM. Methods: We investigated gene mutations (the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene, myelin protein zero gene, lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor gene, early growth response gene and the neurofilament light chain gene loci) of a relatively large and typical Chinese family with CMT1 and concurrent DM2. From the literature, we also retrieved all reported families and single cases with CMT and concurrent DM. We comprehensively analyzed the characteristics of total 33 patients with CMT and concurrent DM, and further compared these characteristics with those of patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Results: Patients with CMT and concurrent DM had some relatively independent characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms. So we designated that kind of characteristic demyelinating CMT which accompanies DM as Yu-Xie syndrome (YXS), a new specific clinical subtype of CMT. Conclusion: CMT is an etiologic factor of DM, even though the intrinsic association between CMT and DM still remains further exploration. PMID:25120817

  8. Chronic restraint stress during early Theiler’s virus infection exacerbates the subsequent demyelinating disease in SJL mice: II. CNS disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Erin E.; Sieve, Amy N.; Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Carcoba, Luis M.; Young, Colin R.; Ambrus, Andrew; Storts, Ralph; Welsh, C. Jane R.; Meagher, Mary W.

    2010-01-01

    Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection is a well-characterized model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous research has shown that chronic restraint stress (RS) during early TMEV infection exacerbates behavioral signs of disease. The present data suggest RS-induced increases in CNS inflammation, demyelination, and axonal degeneration may underlie this exacerbation. In addition, we report that males exhibit greater CNS inflammation and higher numbers of demyelinating lesions while females show greater susceptibility to RS-induced exacerbation. These findings indicate RS during early TMEV infection increases CNS lesion formation during the late phase and suggest the effects of RS are sex-dependent. PMID:20167380

  9. Vaccines and the risk of multiple sclerosis and other central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Langer-Gould, Annette; Qian, Lei; Tartof, Sara Y; Brara, Sonu M; Jacobsen, Steve J; Beaber, Brandon E; Sy, Lina S; Chao, Chun; Hechter, Rulin; Tseng, Hung Fu

    2014-12-01

    Because vaccinations are common, even a small increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) or other acquired central nervous system demyelinating syndromes (CNS ADS) could have a significant effect on public health. To determine whether vaccines, particularly those for hepatitis B (HepB) and human papillomavirus (HPV), increase the risk of MS or other CNS ADS. A nested case-control study was conducted using data obtained from the complete electronic health records of Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) members. Cases were identified through the KPSC CNS ADS cohort between 2008 and 2011, which included extensive review of medical records by an MS specialist. Five controls per case were matched on age, sex, and zip code. Vaccination of any type (particularly HepB and HPV) identified through the electronic vaccination records system. All forms of CNS ADS were analyzed using conditional logistic regression adjusted for race/ethnicity, health care utilization, comorbid diseases, and infectious illnesses before symptom onset. We identified 780 incident cases of CNS ADS and 3885 controls; 92 cases and 459 controls were females aged 9 to 26 years, which is the indicated age range for HPV vaccination. There were no associations between HepB vaccination (odds ratio [OR], 1.12; 95% CI, 0.72-1.73), HPV vaccination (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.62-1.78), or any vaccination (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.86-1.22) and the risk of CNS ADS up to 3 years later. Vaccination of any type was associated with an increased risk of CNS ADS onset within the first 30 days after vaccination only in younger (<50 years) individuals (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.18-4.57). We found no longer-term association of vaccines with MS or any other CNS ADS, which argues against a causal association. The short-term increase in risk suggests that vaccines may accelerate the transition from subclinical to overt autoimmunity in patients with existing disease. Our findings support clinical anecdotes of CNS ADS symptom onset

  10. Secondary demyelination disorders and destruction of white matter.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Parmar, Hemant A

    2014-03-01

    Demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system are characterized by the breakdown of myelin, with or without preservation of the associated axons. Primary demyelinating diseases typically involve loss of myelin with relative sparing of axons. Secondary demyelinating disorders represent a spectrum of white matter disease characterized by damage to neurons or axons with the resultant breakdown of myelin. The pathologic changes seen in secondary demyelinating disorders are varied, ranging from pure demyelination to necrosis with subsequent demyelination. Secondary demyelinating diseases are associated with a wide variety of conditions, including infections/vaccinations, nutritional/vitamin deficiencies, chemical agents, genetic abnormalities, and vascular insult. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Biology, Epidemiology, and Pathogenesis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy, the JC Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczy, Michael W.; Marshall, Leslie J.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Atwood, Walter J.; Nath, Avindra; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a debilitating and frequently fatal central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease caused by JC virus (JCV), for which there is currently no effective treatment. Lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain leads to their eventual destruction and progressive demyelination, resulting in multiple foci of lesions in the white matter of the brain. Before the mid-1980s, PML was a relatively rare disease, reported to occur primarily in those with underlying neoplastic conditions affecting immune function and, more rarely, in allograft recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs. However, with the onset of the AIDS pandemic, the incidence of PML has increased dramatically. Approximately 3 to 5% of HIV-infected individuals will develop PML, which is classified as an AIDS-defining illness. In addition, the recent advent of humanized monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Crohn's disease has also led to an increased risk of PML as a side effect of immunotherapy. Thus, the study of JCV and the elucidation of the underlying causes of PML are important and active areas of research that may lead to new insights into immune function and host antiviral defense, as well as to potential new therapies. PMID:22763635

  12. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Disease Type- and Status-Specific Alteration of CSF Metabolome Coordinated with Clinical Parameters in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases of CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Byung Soo; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Do Yup; Kim, Ho Jin

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IDDs) are a group of disorders with different aetiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions. These disorders include multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM). Differential diagnosis of the CNS IDDs still remains challenging due to frequent overlap of clinical and radiological manifestation, leading to increased demands for new biomarker discovery. Since cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolites may reflect the status of CNS tissues and provide an interfacial linkage between blood and CNS tissues, we explored multi-component biomarker for different IDDs from CSF samples using gas chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling coupled to multiplex bioinformatics approach. We successfully constructed the single model with multiple metabolite variables in coordinated regression with clinical characteristics, expanded disability status scale, oligoclonal bands, and protein levels. The multi-composite biomarker simultaneously discriminated four different immune statuses (a total of 145 samples; 54 MS, 49 NMOSD, 30 ITM, and 12 normal controls). Furthermore, systematic characterization of transitional metabolic modulation identified relapse-associated metabolites and proposed insights into the disease network underlying type-specific metabolic dysfunctionality. The comparative analysis revealed the lipids, 1-monopalmitin and 1-monostearin were common indicative for MS, NMOSD, and ITM whereas fatty acids were specific for the relapse identified in all types of IDDs. PMID:27855220

  14. Intestinal tuberculosis masquerading as difficult to treat Crohn disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Niriella, Madunil A; Kodisinghe, S Kuleesha; De Silva, Arjuna P; Hewavisenthi, Janaki; de Silva, Hithanadura J

    2016-08-24

    Crohn disease has low prevalence in Sri Lanka while compared to the West, while intestinal tuberculosis is common in the region. Since clinical, endoscopic and investigation features of Crohn disease overlap with intestinal tuberculosis, differentiating these two conditions becomes a dilemma for the clinician in the intestinal tuberculosis endemic setting. An 18-year old Sri Lankan Muslim female presented with chronic abdominal pain and weight loss. Colonoscopy revealed an ulcerated ileocaecal valve and a terminal ileal stricture. Biopsy confirmed Crohn disease with no supportive features to suggest intestinal tuberculosis. Despite treatment with adequate immunosuppression she failed to improve and underwent a limited right hemicolectomy and terminal ileal resection. Histology confirmed intestinal tuberculosis and she made full recover with 6 months of anti-tuberculosis treatment. This case illustrates the importance of reviewing the diagnosis to include intestinal tuberculosis in an endemic setting, when already diagnosed Crohn disease is treatment refractory.

  15. Cerebral demyelination in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Brinar, Vesna V; Cikes, Nada; Petelin, Zeljka; Hlavati, Marina; Poser, Charles M

    2004-06-01

    A 38-year-old woman with a history of a granulomatous lesion of the nose, developed blurred vision, ataxic gait, and spastic tetraparesis. The presence of demyelination on the brain MRI led to the diagnosis of cerebral demyelination associated with Wegener's granulomatosis. Pulse cyclophosphamide administration resulted in some clinical of improvement of her condition. Demyelinating lesions seen in Wegener's have been ascribed to multiple sclerosis, but in this case, they are much more reminiscent of disseminated encephalomyelitis (DEM). The immunological challenge of the underlying disease, may, in the genetically susceptible person, presumably trigger the appearance of MS lesions. Wegener's granulomatosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of MS.

  16. Contralateral recurrence of tumefactive demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Guranda, Mihail; Essig, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Tumefactive demyelination refers to large focal demyelinating lesions in the brain, which can be mistaken for malignancy. In some patients, these lesions are monophasic with a self-limited course; however, other patients demonstrate recurrent disease with new tumefactive or non-tumefactive lesions, and a subsequent diagnosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is not uncommon. Owing to the limited data available in the literature, many questions about the patterns and prognostic significance of recurrent tumefactive lesions remain unanswered. The current case report involves a patient who recovered from tumefactive demyelination and presented two years later with a new recurrent tumefactive lesion in the contralateral brain. PMID:26427896

  17. Antibody-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Remyelination Promotes Axon Health in Progressive Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-10-01

    Demyelination underlies early neurological symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, axonal damage is considered critical for permanent chronic deficits. The precise mechanisms by which axonal injury occurs in MS are unclear; one hypothesis is the absence or failure of remyelination, suggesting that promoting remyelination may protect axons from death. This report provides direct evidence that promoting oligodendrocyte remyelination protects axons and maintains transport function. Persistent Theiler's virus infection of Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL)/J mice was used as a model of MS to assess the effects of remyelination on axonal injury following demyelination in the spinal cord. Remyelination was induced using an oligodendrocyte/myelin-specific recombinant human monoclonal IgM, rHIgM22. The antibody is endowed with strong anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We used (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at the brainstem to measure N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) as a surrogate of neuronal health and spinal cord integrity. We found increased brainstem NAA concentrations at 5 weeks post-treatment with rHIgM22, which remained stable out to 10 weeks. Detailed spinal cord morphology studies revealed enhanced remyelination in the rHIgM22-treated group but not in the isotype control antibody- or saline-treated groups. Importantly, we found rHIgM22-mediated remyelination protected small- and medium-caliber mid-thoracic spinal cord axons from damage despite similar demyelination and inflammation across all experimental groups. The most direct confirmation of remyelination-mediated protection of descending neurons was an improvement in retrograde transport. Treatment with rHIgM22 significantly increased the number of retrograde-labeled neurons in the brainstem, indicating that preserved axons are functionally competent. This is direct validation that remyelination preserves spinal cord axons and protects functional axon integrity.

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid masquerading as 'malignant' ophthalmopathy of Graves's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ford, H C; Delahunt, J W; Teague, C A

    1983-01-01

    A patient with Graves's disease is described in whom the periorbital changes of severe ophthalmopathy and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome delayed the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid. It is suggested that the immunosuppressive therapy which the patient received may have enhanced the growth of a pre-existing malignancy. Images PMID:6688354

  19. Early Motor Unit Disease Masquerading as Psychogenic Breathy Dysphonia: A Clinical Case Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Arnold E.

    1971-01-01

    Presented is a study of a 20-year-old girl with mild, breathy dysphonia, previously diagnosed as psychogenic. In actuality, her voice change was a sign of early myasthenia gravis. It is pointed out that voice changes can be a first and only sign of early neurologic disease. (Author/KW)

  20. Investigation of the role of delayed-type-hypersensitivity responses to myelin in the pathogenesis of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed Central

    Borrow, P; Welsh, C J; Tonks, P; Dean, D; Blakemore, W F; Nash, A A

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of autoimmune responses to the pathogenesis of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease was investigated. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myelin were examined in both symptomatic and asymptomatic mice at different times post-infection, in order to determine whether autoreactivity correlates with the development of demyelination. The results indicate that although autoimmune responses probably do not play a major role in the initiation of demyelination at early times post-infection, autoreactivity to myelin antigens dose eventually develop in symptomatic animals, perhaps through the mechanism of epitope spreading. Autoimmunity to myelin components is therefore an additional factor that may contribute to lesion progression in chronically diseased animals. Images Figure 2 PMID:9659218

  1. Pulmonary Blastomycosis Masquerading as Metastatic Disease in the Lung: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vahid, Bobbak; Wildemore, Bernadette; Nguyen, Christopher; Sistrun, Niki; Marik, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of pulmonary blastomycosis appearing as metastatic laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Pulmonary blastomycosis was discovered as right lower lobe subpleural activity consistent with metastatic disease on a positron emission tomographic (PET) scan following total laryngectomy and bilateral neck dissection for locally invasive laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest showed a right lower lobe, subpleural pulmonary nodule. CT-guided fine-needle aspiration of the nodule revealed broad-based budding yeast consistent with blastomycosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a PET-positive pulmonary blastomycosis lesion mimicking pulmonary malignancy reported in the literature. PMID:16915161

  2. Diffuse intrapulmonary malignant mesothelioma masquerading as interstitial lung disease: a distinctive variant of mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brandon T; Klein, Julianne R H; Hornychová, Helena; Nuti, Rathna; Thirumala, Seshadri; Leslie, Kevin O; Colby, Thomas V; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2013-10-01

    Malignant mesothelioma typically encases lungs as a thick rind, while relatively sparing lung parenchyma. We describe an unusual presentation of mesothelioma characterized by diffuse intrapulmonary growth, with absent or inconspicuous pleural involvement, clinically simulating interstitial lung disease (ILD). We identified 5 patients (median age 56 y, all men) with diffuse intrapulmonary malignant mesothelioma in our pathology consultation practice from 2009 to 2012. Clinical history, imaging, and pathology materials were reviewed. Symptoms included chronic dyspnea (4 cases), cough (3), and acute dyspnea with bilateral pneumothorax (1). Chest imaging showed irregular opacities (5), reticulation (4), pleural effusions (2), and subpleural nodular densities (1), without radiologic evidence of pleural disease or masses. A clinicoradiologic diagnosis of ILD was made in all cases, and wedge biopsies were performed. Histologic evaluation revealed a neoplastic proliferation of bland epithelioid or spindled cells, showing various growth patterns simulating silicotic nodules, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Some areas mimicked adenocarcinoma, with lepidic, acinar, micropapillary, and solid patterns. Initial diagnoses by referring pathologists included reactive changes (1), hypersensitivity pneumonitis versus drug reaction (1), desquamative interstitial pneumonia versus neoplasm (1), and mesothelioma (2). Microscopic pleural involvement was identified in 4 cases. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the characteristic immunophenotype of mesothelioma in all cases. Median survival of 3 patients treated with chemotherapy was 28 months. Two patients received no therapy and survived 3 and 4 weeks, respectively. "Diffuse intrapulmonary malignant mesothelioma" is a rare variant with a distinctive presentation that clinically mimics ILD. Recognition is essential to avoid misdiagnosis.

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as a trophic ulcer in a patient with Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Venkatswami, Sandhya; Anandan, S; Krishna, Nikilesh; Narayanan, C D

    2010-12-01

    Nonhealing trophic ulcers in leprosy are a common phenomenon, but acute malignant transformations of the same are relatively rare. This study reports on a 35-year-old man previously treated for Hansen's disease with a squamous cell carcinoma involving the right foot with rapid lymphatic spread. He was being treated as a benign trophic ulcer for more than 12 months until he started developing huge inguinal lymph nodes and the ulcer rapidly increased in size. Squamous cell carcinomas are known to occur in ulcers of considerable duration but such rapid growth in such a short duration and rapid lymphatic spread is unusual in Marjolin's ulcer as the lymphatics are usually destroyed because of previous inflammation and scarring.

  4. Epistaxis in end stage liver disease masquerading as severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M; Matthews, Jason D; Ohning, Gordon V; Kovacs, Thomas O; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A; Machicado, Gustavo A; Dulai, Gareth S

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of end stage liver disease (ESLD) patients with severe epistaxis thought to be severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). METHODS: This observational single center study included all consecutive patients with ESLD and epistaxis identified from consecutive subjects hospitalized with suspected UGIH and prospectively enrolled in our databases of severe UGIH between 1998 and 2011. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients were registered for severe UGIH in the data basis, 461 (36.9%) were cirrhotics. Epistaxis rather than UGIH was the bleeding source in 20 patients. All patients had severe coagulopathy. Epistaxis was initially controlled in all cases. Fifteen (75%) subjects required posterior nasal packing and 2 (10%) embolization in addition to correction of coagulopathy. Five (25%) patients died in the hospital, 12 (60%) received orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), and 3 (15%) were discharged without OLT. The mortality rate was 63% in patients without OLT. CONCLUSION: Severe epistaxis in patients with ESLD is (1) a diagnosis of exclusion that requires upper endoscopy to exclude severe UGIH; and (2) associated with a high mortality rate in patients not receiving OLT. PMID:25320538

  5. Epistaxis in end stage liver disease masquerading as severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M; Matthews, Jason D; Ohning, Gordon V; Kovacs, Thomas O; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A; Machicado, Gustavo A; Dulai, Gareth S

    2014-10-14

    To describe the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of end stage liver disease (ESLD) patients with severe epistaxis thought to be severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). This observational single center study included all consecutive patients with ESLD and epistaxis identified from consecutive subjects hospitalized with suspected UGIH and prospectively enrolled in our databases of severe UGIH between 1998 and 2011. A total of 1249 patients were registered for severe UGIH in the data basis, 461 (36.9%) were cirrhotics. Epistaxis rather than UGIH was the bleeding source in 20 patients. All patients had severe coagulopathy. Epistaxis was initially controlled in all cases. Fifteen (75%) subjects required posterior nasal packing and 2 (10%) embolization in addition to correction of coagulopathy. Five (25%) patients died in the hospital, 12 (60%) received orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), and 3 (15%) were discharged without OLT. The mortality rate was 63% in patients without OLT. Severe epistaxis in patients with ESLD is (1) a diagnosis of exclusion that requires upper endoscopy to exclude severe UGIH; and (2) associated with a high mortality rate in patients not receiving OLT.

  6. [The diagnostic value of electromyography in patients with demyelinating diseases of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Manovich, Z Kh; Gruzman, G B

    1975-01-01

    The authors used EMG registrations of the reflex potentials in the orbicular ocular muscles appearing in an electrostimulation of the supraorbital nerve. The study included an analysis of the fluctuations of the latent period of the winking reflex in patients with different lesions of the central and peripheral nervous system. The authors were able to show a significant elongation of the latent period in patients with disseminated sclerosis, encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre polyradiculoneuritis. In other signs of focal lesions of the brain stem and polyneuropathy the latent period of the winking reflex was near to the normal indices. The authors propose to use this method for the study of the process of demyelinization in the brain stem and for early diagnosis of disseminated sclerosis.

  7. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, N; Meuth, S G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) represent chronic, autoimmune demyelinating disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system. Although both disorders share some fundamental pathogenic elements, treatments do not provide uniform effects across both disorders. We aim at providing an overview of current and future disease-modifying strategies in these disorders to demonstrate communalities and distinctions. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have demonstrated short-and long-term beneficial effects in CIDP but are not effective in MS. Dimethyl fumarate (BG-12), teriflunomide and laquinimod are orally administered immunomodulatory drugs that are already approved or likely to be approved in the near future for the basic therapy of patients with relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) due to positive results in Phase III clinical trials. However, clinical trials with these drugs in CIDP have not (yet) been initiated. Natalizumab and fingolimod are approved for the treatment of RRMS, and trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy in CIDP are now planned. Alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab and daclizumab respresent monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development for their use in RRMS patients. Attempts to study the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab and B cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibodies, i.e. rituximab, ocrelizumab or ofatumumab, in CIDP patients are currently under way. We provide an overview of the mechanism of action and clinical data available on disease-modifying immunotherapy options for MS and CIDP. Enhanced understanding of the relative effects of therapies in these two disorders may aid rational treatment selection and the development of innovative treatment approaches in the future. PMID:24032475

  8. Acquired versus familial demyelinative neuropathies in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Gutmann, L; Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1985-01-01

    The electrophysiologic differences between chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and the demyelinative form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease have recently been reported. The present report extends these observations to include the genetically determined demyelinating neuropathies seen in metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's leukodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome. The electrophysiologic features of metachromatic leukodystrophy (five patients), Krabbe's (four patients), and Cockayne's syndrome (three patients) were all similar. There was uniform slowing of conduction (both in different nerves and in different nerve segments), and conduction block was not seen. These findings are consistent with a uniform degree of demyelination in multiple nerves and throughout the entire length of individual axons. Thus, uniform slowing of nerve conduction constitutes strong evidence for a familial demyelinative neuropathy, as opposed to the multifocal slowing seen in acute and chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy.

  9. Demyelinating Disease following Anti-TNFa Treatment: A Causal or Coincidental Association? Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Andreadou, E; Kemanetzoglou, E; Brokalaki, Ch; Evangelopoulos, M E; Kilidireas, C; Rombos, A; Stamboulis, E

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNFa) are an established therapeutic option for several autoimmune and inflammatory bowel diseases. Despite their clinical effectiveness, neurological adverse events have been reported and literature data suggest a potential role of anti-TNFa in the induction of demyelination of the CNS. We present four patients treated with anti-TNFa who developed symptoms suggestive of CNS demyelination. The first patient, a 17-year-old male who received etanercept for psoriatic arthritis for eight months, presented with dysesthesias up to T4 level. The second patient, a 30-year-old male treated with adalimumab for three years due to ankylosing spondylitis, presented with right unilateral tinnitus. The third case, a 47-year-old female, received etanercept for four years because of psoriatic arthritis and developed persistent headache and left-sided face and head numbness. Finally, the fourth patient, a 57-years-old female treated with etanercept for six years due to ankylosing spondylitis, presented with difficulty in speech, swallowing, and ptosis of the right corner of the mouth. In all cases, brain MRI showed lesions suggestive of demyelination, while positive oligoclonal bands were detected in the CSF. Anti-TNFa treatments were discontinued and patients showed clinical improvement with pulsed intravenous corticosteroid therapy. CNS demyelination following anti-TNFa treatment represents a relatively rare but potential serious complication. Close follow-up and MRI monitoring of these patients is mandatory to elucidate whether the clinical manifestations represent adverse events occurring during anti-TNFa therapy or a first demyelinating episode.

  10. Characterization of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in the mouse cerebral cortex: a confocal microscopy approach to demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, Francesco; Strippoli, Maurizio; Errede, Mariella; Benagiano, Vincenzo; Roncali, Luisa; Ambrosi, Glauco; Virgintino, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The identification of stem cells resident in the adult central nervous system has redirected the focus of research into demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, mainly affecting the brain white matter. This immunocytochemical and morphometrical study was carried out by confocal microscopy in the adult mouse cerebral cortex, with the aim of analysing, in the brain grey matter, the characteristics of the oligodendrocyte lineage cells, whose capability to remyelinate is still controversial. The observations demonstrated the presence in all the cortex layers of glial restricted progenitors, reactive to A2B5 marker, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, expressing the NG2 proteoglycan, and pre-oligodendrocytes and pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes, reactive to the specific marker O4. NG2 expressing cells constitute the major immature population of the cortex, since not only oligodendrocyte precursor cells and pre-oligodendrocytes but also a part of the glial restrict progenitors express the NG2 proteoglycan. Together with the population of these immature cells, a larger population of mature oligodendrocytes was revealed by the classical oligodendrocyte and myelin markers, 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, myelin basic protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. The results indicate that oligodendrocyte precursors committed to differentiate into myelin forming oligodendrocytes are present through all layers of the adult cortex and that their phenotypic features exactly recall those of the oligodendroglial lineage cells during development.

  11. Role of the Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) pathway in regulation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Sho; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Tsugane, Sayaka; Takeichi, Naoya; Yanagisawa, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Motoki; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-09-15

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) belongs to the CD28 family of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules and regulates adaptive immunity. This molecule induces the development of regulatory T cells, T cell tolerance, or apoptosis. We examined the role of PD-1 pathway in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) mice. Up-regulation of PD-1 and PD-1 ligand-1 (PD-L1) mRNA expression in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were induced by TMEV infection in vitro. Furthermore, PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA expression was increased in the spinal cords of the TMEV-infected mice in vivo. Treatment with a blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against PD-1, especially during the effector phase, resulted in significant deterioration of the TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a dramatically increase of CD4(+) T cells producing Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α in the spinal cord of anti-PD-1 mAb-treated mice. These results indicate that the PD-1 pathway plays a pivotal regulatory role in the development of TMEV-IDD.

  12. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  13. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient.

  14. Infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus directly induces proinflammatory cytokines in primary astrocytes via NF-kappaB activation: potential role for the initiation of demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Palma, JoAnn P; Kwon, Daeho; Clipstone, Neil A; Kim, Byung S

    2003-06-01

    Theiler's virus infection in the central nervous system (CNS) induces a demyelinating disease very similar to human multiple sclerosis. We have assessed cytokine gene activation upon Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection and potential mechanisms in order to delineate the early events in viral infection that lead to immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Infection of SJL/J primary astrocyte cultures induces selective proinflammatory cytokine genes (interleukin-12p40 [IL-12p40], IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and beta interferon [IFN-beta]) important in the innate immune response to infection. We find that TMEV-induced cytokine gene expression is mediated by the NF-kappaB pathway based on the early nuclear NF-kappaB translocation and suppression of cytokine activation in the presence of specific inhibitors of the NF-kappaB pathway. Further studies show this to be partly independent of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and IFN-alpha/beta pathways. Altogether, these results demonstrate that infection of astrocytes and other CNS-resident cells by TMEV provides the early NF-kappaB-mediated signals that directly activate various proinflammatory cytokine genes involved in the initiation and amplification of inflammatory responses in the CNS known to be critical for the development of immune-mediated demyelination.

  15. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  16. Dynamic Changes in Brain Mesenchymal Perivascular Cells Associate with Multiple Sclerosis Disease Duration, Active Inflammation, and Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Iacobaeus, Ellen; Sugars, Rachael V; Törnqvist Andrén, Anton; Alm, Jessica J; Qian, Hong; Frantzen, Janek; Newcombe, Jia; Alkass, Kanar; Druid, Henrik; Bottai, Matteo; Röyttä, Matias; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2017-10-01

    Vascular changes, including blood brain barrier destabilization, are common pathological features in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Blood vessels within adult organs are reported to harbor mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with phenotypical and functional characteristics similar to pericytes. We performed an immunohistochemical study of MSCs/pericytes in brain tissue from MS and healthy persons. Post-mortem brain tissue from patients with early progressive MS (EPMS), late stage progressive MS (LPMS), and healthy persons were analyzed for the MSC and pericyte markers CD146, platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), CD73, CD271, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and Ki67. The MS samples included active, chronic active, chronic inactive lesions, and normal-appearing white matter. MSC and pericyte marker localization were detected in association with blood vessels, including subendothelial CD146(+) PDGFRβ(+) Ki67(+) cells and CD73(+) CD271(+) PDGFRβ(+) Ki67(-) cells within the adventitia and perivascular areas. Both immunostained cell subpopulations were termed mesenchymal perivascular cells (MPCs). Quantitative analyses of immunostainings showed active lesions containing increased regions of CD146(+) PDGFRβ(+) Ki67(+) and CD73(+) CD271(+) PDGFRβ(+) Ki67(-) MPC subpopulations compared to inactive lesions. Chronic lesions presented with decreased levels of CD146(+) PDGFRβ(+) Ki67(+) MPC cells compared to control tissue. Furthermore, LPMS lesions displayed increased numbers of blood vessels harboring greatly enlarged CD73(+) CD271(+) adventitial and perivascular areas compared to control and EPMS tissue. In conclusion, we demonstrate the presence of MPC subgroups in control human brain vasculature, and their phenotypic changes in MS brain, which correlated with inflammation, demyelination and MS disease duration. Our findings demonstrate that brain-derived MPCs respond to pathologic mechanisms involved in MS disease progression and suggest that vessel

  17. Primary Cutaneous Plasmacytosis: Masquerading as Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Zawar, Vijay; Sharma, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cutaneous plasmacytosis (CP) is a rare entity with few cases reported in world literature. CP masquerading as hidradenitis suppurativa like presentation is a unique case with some features differentiating it clinically from it which were further confirmed by histopathology and immunostaining. Our case showed hyperplasia of mature plasma cells and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, immunostaining for CD138 positivity and kappa: lambda ratio more than 3:1. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any underlying pathology, presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinemia and/or plasma cell proliferation. PMID:27057027

  18. TNFR2 Deficiency Acts in Concert with Gut Microbiota To Precipitate Spontaneous Sex-Biased Central Nervous System Demyelinating Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick G; Bonn, Michael B; Franklin, Craig L; Ericsson, Aaron C; McKarns, Susan C

    2015-11-15

    TNF-α antagonists provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune disorders such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. However, TNF antagonism unexplainably exacerbates CNS autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. We demonstrate that TNFR2 deficiency results in female-biased spontaneous autoimmune CNS demyelination in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific 2D2 TCR transgenic mice. Disease in TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice was associated with CNS infiltration of T and B cells as well as increased production of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific IL-17, IFN-γ, and IgG2b. Attenuated disease in TNF(-/-) 2D2 mice relative to TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice identified distinctive roles for TNFR1 and TNFR2. Oral antibiotic treatment eliminated spontaneous autoimmunity in TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice to suggest role for gut microbiota. Illumina sequencing of fecal 16S rRNA identified a distinct microbiota profile in male TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 that was associated with disease protection. Akkermansia muciniphila, Sutterella sp., Oscillospira sp., Bacteroides acidifaciens, and Anaeroplasma sp. were selectively more abundant in male TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice. In contrast, Bacteroides sp., Bacteroides uniformis, and Parabacteroides sp. were more abundant in affected female TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice, suggesting a role in disease causation. Overall, TNFR2 blockade appears to disrupt commensal bacteria-host immune symbiosis to reveal autoimmune demyelination in genetically susceptible mice. Under this paradigm, microbes likely contribute to an individual's response to anti-TNF therapy. This model provides a foundation for host immune-microbiota-directed measures for the prevention and treatment of CNS-demyelinating autoimmune disorders.

  19. Temporal dynamics of anti-MOG antibodies in CNS demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Di Pauli, Franziska; Mader, Simone; Rostasy, Kevin; Schanda, Kathrin; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Ehling, Rainer; Deisenhammer, Florian; Reindl, Markus; Berger, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Recent studies demonstrated the presence of autoantibodies to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in juvenile patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, so far no longitudinal studies on anti-MOG antibodies have been performed. Therefore, we determined serum and CSF antibodies against native human MOG in 266 pediatric and adult subjects with ADEM, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), MS, other neurological diseases (OND) and healthy controls (HC) and longitudinal samples of 25 patients with ADEM, CIS, MS and OND using an immunofluorescence assay. We detected serum high-titer MOG IgG in 15/34 (44%) patients with ADEM, but only rarely in CIS (3/38, 8%), MS (2/89, 2%), OND (1/58, 2%) and HC (0/47). Longitudinal analysis of serum anti-MOG IgG showed different temporal dynamics of serum antibody responses in ADEM, CIS and MS and indicated an association of a favorable clinical outcome in ADEM with a decrease in antibody titers over time.

  20. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  1. Immunological reaction of the demyelinating Semliki Forest virus with immune serum to glycolipids and its possible importance to central nervous system viral auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, H E; Mehta, S; Gregson, N A; Leibowitz, S

    1984-01-01

    The avirulent demyelinating strain A7(74) of Semliki Forest virus after passage through mouse brain in vivo and mouse brain cell cultures has been shown to react immunologically with immune sera against galactocerebroside, glucocerebroside, total ganglioside and GT1b ganglioside but not against myelin or sulphatide . Semliki Forest virus is known to take host membrane glycolipid into its coat. The importance of the findings is discussed in relation to the production of a possible anti-brain cell auto-immune phenomenon and its implication in a disease such as multiple sclerosis.

  2. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Astrocytes and/or Myeloid Cells Is Not Required for the Development of Autoimmune Demyelinating Disease1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Le Moan, Natacha; Baeten, Kim M.; Rafalski, Victoria A.; Kyu Ryu, Jae; Rios Coronado, Pamela E.; Bedard, Catherine; Syme, Catriona; Davalos, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia-like tissue alterations, characterized by the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), have been described in the normal appearing white matter and pre-demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. As HIF-1α regulates the transcription of a wide set of genes involved in neuroprotection and neuroinflammation, HIF-1α expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory demyelination. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the effect of cell-specific genetic ablation or overexpression of HIF-1α on the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for MS. HIF-1α was mainly expressed in astrocytes and microglia/macrophages in the mouse spinal cord at the peak of EAE. However, genetic ablation of HIF-1α in astrocytes and/or myeloid cells did not ameliorate clinical symptoms. Furthermore, conditional knock-out of Von Hippel Lindau, a negative regulator of HIF-1α stabilization, failed to exacerbate the clinical course of EAE. In accordance with clinical symptoms, genetic ablation or overexpression of HIF-1α did not change the extent of spinal cord inflammation and demyelination. Overall, our data indicate that despite dramatic upregulation of HIF-1α in astrocytes and myeloid cells in EAE, HIF-1α expression in these two cell types is not required for the development of inflammatory demyelination. Despite numerous reports indicating HIF-1α expression in glia, neurons, and inflammatory cells in the CNS of MS patients, the cell-specific contribution of HIF-1α to disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that although HIF-1α is dramatically upregulated in astrocytes and myeloid cells in EAE, cell-specific depletion of HIF-1α in these two cell types surprisingly does not affect the development of neuroinflammatory disease. Together with two recently published studies showing a role for oligodendrocyte-specific HIF-1α in myelination and T-cell-specific HIF-1α in

  3. [Autopsy case of a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and suspected chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which was later diagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Nishihira, Yasushi; Endo, Kazuhiro; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of a 74-year-old man with late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) diagnosed by genetic screening, later associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At the age of 70 years, the patient was admitted to our hospital because of progressive weakness and dysesthesia in the right upper limb. In the early stages of the illness, he was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and transient improvement was achieved with intravenous immunoglobulin. However, the symptoms progressively worsened and became refractory. Gene analysis revealed PMP22 gene duplication, which confirmed CMT1A. On sural nerve biopsy, severe demyelinating neuropathy and abundant onion-bulb formations with endoneurial infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed. Thereafter, pseudo-bulbar palsy and respiratory muscle weakness developed insidiously and progressed rapidly along with muscle weakness in the limbs and trunk. The patient died about four years after the onset of this disease. Postmortem examination showed moderate neuronal cell loss, Bunina bodies, and TDP-43-positive inclusions in the anterior horn cells. The spinal cord revealed axonal loss and extensive macrophage permeation in the corticospinal tracts. On the basis of these findings, the final neuropathological diagnosis was ALS. This is the first report of an autopsy case of CMT1A complicated with ALS. We here discuss the significant clinical and neuropathological findings of this case.

  4. Significance of de-novo IgD and IgM synthesis in CSF of patients with relapsing-remitting form of disseminated demyelinating disease of CNS.

    PubMed

    Dincić, E; Jovicić, A; Dokić-Protić, V; Popović, P; Dordević, D; Raicević, R

    2000-01-01

    Disseminated demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (DDD CNS) is immunologically mediated, with confirmed significant intrathecal immunoglobulin production. According to recently known immunopathogenic occurrences and activation of humoral immune response, we have assumed that the presence of oligoclonal immunoglobulins of M and D classes can be confirmed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with DDD CNS. With the aim of its further determination in CSF of relapsing-remitting DDD CNS patients in either remission and relapse phase, respectively, we have confirmed the presence of oligoclonal IgD and IgM bands, the association of this production and the presence of new demyelinating zones found by MRI of endocranium, as the time elapsed from the last relapse until the obtaining of CSF for further analyses. Method of isoelectric focusing with Western blott procedure was used for the confirmation of oligoclonal IgM and IgD bands presence in CSF. Significant presence of intrathecally synthetized oligoclonal IgM and IgD in patients with DDD CNS in exacerbation phase was presented. Almost in all patients in this phase was found at least one indicator of acute phase (positive MRI finding, presence of oligoclonal IgM or IgD bands). Significant decrease of positive findings of oligoclonal Ig bands in CSF was correlated with the time elapsed from the onset of relapse until the obtaining of CSF for the analysis due to short half-life of those Ig in CSF.

  5. Terminal Ileitis as a Feature of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Masquerading as Crohn Disease in Adults.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Hemal N; McAllister, Brian P; Gaines, Darryl D; Ostrov, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), more recently termed immunoglobulin A (IgA) vasculitis, is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis characterized by perivascular IgA deposition. This disease manifests clinically as palpable purpura, arthralgia, gastrointestinal symptoms, and renal dysfunction. Although ileitis can be seen in HSP, terminal ileitis is virtually pathognomonic for Crohn disease. We present a comprehensive review of the literature on this association, including 2 cases of our own, to demonstrate the importance of considering HSP in the differential diagnosis of ileitis suggestive of Crohn disease. We review the growing body of literature suggesting a pathophysiologic link between the conditions, possibly through an IgA-mediated mechanism.

  6. DNA methylation in demyelinated multiple sclerosis hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chomyk, Anthony M; Volsko, Christina; Tripathi, Ajai; Deckard, Sadie A; Trapp, Bruce D; Fox, Robert J; Dutta, Ranjan

    2017-08-18

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS). Memory impairments and hippocampal demyelination are common features in MS patients. Our previous data have shown that demyelination alters neuronal gene expression in the hippocampus. DNA methylation is a common epigenetic modifier of gene expression. In this study, we investigated whether DNA methylation is altered in MS hippocampus following demyelination. Our results show that mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferase were increased in demyelinated MS hippocampus, while de-methylation enzymes were decreased. Comparative methylation profiling identify hypo-methylation within upstream sequences of 6 genes and hyper-methylation of 10 genes in demyelinated MS hippocampus. Genes identified in the current study were also validated in an independent microarray dataset generated from MS hippocampus. Independent validation using RT-PCR revealed that DNA methylation inversely correlated with mRNA levels of the candidate genes. Queries across cell-specific databases revealed that a majority of the candidate genes are expressed by astrocytes and neurons in mouse and human CNS. Taken together, our results expands the list of genes previously identified in MS hippocampus and establish DNA methylation as a mechanism of altered gene expression in MS hippocampus.

  7. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  8. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies.

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vanasse, Michel; Rossignol, Elsa; Hadad, Elie

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is characterized clinically by a progressive symmetrical weakness evolving over a period of at least 2 months. There is increased CSF protein and conduction block, reduced nerve conduction velocities, increased distal latencies, and/or absent F wave or prolonged F wave latency in two or more nerves. Incidence is lower in children (10 times less) than in adults, and the condition presents in an acute or subacute manner with frequent relapses. It is not associated with other systemic diseases such as neoplasia, diabetes mellitus, or monoclonal gammopathies. It appears to be immune-related as a variety of humoral and cellular autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated. Treatment is based on results obtained in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted in adults as such studies are lacking in the pediatric population. The evolution of CIDP is more favorable in children than in adults, with 80-100% response rates to standard treatments (steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and/or plasmapheresis) and excellent outcome with complete functional recovery in most patients. Cases refractory to standard therapies do exist in children, for which azathioprine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate mofetil alone or more often in association with other treatments have been used. However, safety and efficacy data are still insufficient to give specific recommendations regarding the optimal choice.

  10. The electrodiagnostic distinctions between chronic familial and acquired demyelinative neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1982-06-01

    We compared the electrodiagnostic studies of 40 patients with chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and 18 patients with familial demyelinative neuropathy. Patients with acquired neuropathy had differential slowing of conduction velocity when distal latencies were compared with more proximal conduction velocities in the same nerve, when equivalent segments of different nerves were compared, and when dispersion of compound motor action potentials was examined. Conduction block was noted in some patients. Patients with familial disease had uniform conduction slowly of all nerve segments, and conduction block was not seen. Chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy is characterized by multifocal slowing of nerve conduction, whereas familial demyelinative neuropathy is characterized by uniform conduction slowing.

  11. Pyoderma gangrenosum masquerading as Donovanosis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Varadraj V.; Kikkeri, Naveen Narayanshetty; Athanikar, S. B.; Myageri, Anil; Rai, Vijetha

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis and destruction of tissue. PG is diagnosed after excluding more commonly occurring condition presenting with similar manifestation. Though PG has been reported to occur over the genitalia, it rarely presents with concurrent involvement of the groin. Herein, we present a case of PG masquerading as Donovanosis. PMID:26396454

  12. 22q11.2q13 duplication including SOX10 causes sex-reversal and peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Falah, Nadia; Posey, Jennifer E; Thorson, Willa; Benke, Paul; Tekin, Mustafa; Tarshish, Brocha; Lupski, James R; Harel, Tamar

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of genetic syndromes may be difficult when specific components of a disorder manifest at a later age. We present a follow up of a previous report [Seeherunvong et al., (2004); AJMGA 127: 149-151], of an individual with 22q duplication and sex-reversal syndrome. The subject's phenotype evolved to include peripheral and central demyelination, Waardenburg syndrome type IV, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH; MIM 609136). DNA microarray analysis defined the duplication at 22q11.2q13, including SOX10. Sequencing of the coding region of SOX10 did not reveal any mutations. Our data suggest that SOX10 duplication can cause disorders of sex development and PCWH, supporting the hypothesis that SOX10 toxic gain of function rather than dominant negative activity underlies PCWH.

  13. The immune response in the CNS in Theiler's virus induced demyelinating disease switches from an early adaptive response to a chronic innate-like response.

    PubMed

    Gilli, Francesca; Li, Libin; Pachner, Andrew R

    2016-02-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is an important model of the progressive disability caused by irreversible CNS tissue injury, and provides an example of how a CNS pathogen can cause inflammation, demyelination, and neuronal damage. We were interested in which molecules, especially inflammatory mediators, might be upregulated in the CNS throughout TMEV-IDD. We quantitated by a real-time RT-PCR multi-gene system the expression of a pathway-focused panel of genes at 30 and 165 days post infection, characterizing both the early inflammatory and the late neurodegenerative stages of TMEV-IDD. Also, we measured 32 cytokines/chemokines by multiplex Luminex analysis in CSF specimens from early and late TMEV-IDD as well as sham-treated mice. Results indicate that, in the later stage of TMEV-IDD, activation of the innate immune response is most prominent: TLRs, type I IFN response genes, and innate immunity-associated cytokines were highly expressed in late TMEV-IDD compared to sham (p ≤ 0.0001) and early TMEV-IDD (p < 0.05). Conversely, several molecular mediators of adaptive immune response were highly expressed in early TMEV-IDD (all p ≤ 0.001). Protein detection in the CSF was broadly concordant with mRNA abundance of the corresponding gene measured by real-time RT-PCR in the spinal cord, since several cytokines/chemokines were increased in the CSF of TMEV-IDD mice. Results show a clear shift from adaptive to innate immunity from early to late TMEV-IDD, indicating that adaptive and innate immune pathways are likely involved in the development and progression of the disease to different extents. CSF provides an optimal source of biomarkers of CNS neuroinflammation.

  14. Molecular Disruptions of the Panglial Syncytium Block Potassium Siphoning and Axonal Saltatory Conduction: Pertinence to Neuromyelitis Optica and other Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rash, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The panglial syncytium maintains ionic conditions required for normal neuronal electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Vital among these homeostatic functions is “potassium siphoning”, a process originally proposed to explain astrocytic sequestration and long-distance disposal of K+ released from unmyelinated axons during each action potential. Fundamentally different, more efficient processes are required in myelinated axons, where axonal K+ efflux occurs exclusively beneath and enclosed within the myelin sheath, precluding direct sequestration of K+ by nearby astrocytes. Molecular mechanisms for entry of excess K+ and obligatorily-associated osmotic water from axons into innermost myelin are not well characterized, whereas at the output end, axonally-derived K+ and associated osmotic water are known to be expelled by Kir4.1 and aquaporin-4 channels concentrated in astrocyte endfeet that surround capillaries and that form the glia limitans. Between myelin (input end) and astrocyte endfeet (output end) is a vast network of astrocyte “intermediaries” that are strongly inter-linked, including with myelin, by abundant gap junctions that disperse excess K+ and water throughout the panglial syncytium, thereby greatly reducing K+-induced osmotic swelling of myelin. Here, I review original reports that established the concept of potassium siphoning in unmyelinated CNS axons, summarize recent revolutions in our understanding of K+ efflux during axonal saltatory conduction, then describe additional components required by myelinated axons for a newly-described process of voltage-augmented “dynamic” potassium siphoning. If any of several molecular components of the panglial syncytium are compromised, K+ siphoning is blocked, myelin is destroyed, and axonal saltatory conduction ceases. Thus, a common thread linking several CNS demyelinating diseases is the disruption of potassium siphoning/water transport within the panglial syncytium. Continued

  15. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gorson, Kenneth C; Katz, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune disorder of the peripheral nervous system. This article highlights our current understanding of the condition along with its phenotypic variants that are encountered in clinical practice. The diagnostic evaluation of CIDP includes laboratory studies to detect associated medical conditions and electrodiagnostic studies to assess for demyelination. Current treatment options include corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immune globulin, along with alternative therapies that may be used as corticosteroid-sparing agents or for treatment-refractory cases. Approximately 85% to 90% of patients eventually improve or stabilize with treatment, and the long-term prognosis of CIDP is favorable.

  16. Characterization of variations in IL23A and IL23R genes: possible roles in multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Peng; Jin, Mei-Hua; Yue, Hui; Zhang, Qiong; Fu, Jin; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is among the most serious inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IDD). Interleukin-23A (IL23A) regulates and coordinates the activities of immune cells by interacting with its receptor IL23R and plays key roles in the pathogenesis of immune inflammatory diseases. IDD, deemed to be a kind of autoimmune diseases, may involve IL23A in the pathogenesis. The aim of this work was to validate the hypothesized involvement of IL-23A and its receptor in IDD. We sequenced the IL-23A and IL-23R genes for 206 Chinese Han IDD patients and evaluated SNPs within or near those genes. The serum levels of IL23A in IDD participants were analyzed using ELISA. The statistical analyses were conducted using Chi-Square Tests as implemented in SPSS (version 19.0). The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test of the population was carried out using online software OEGE. Three variants rs2066808, rs2371494, rs11575248 in IL-23A gene and one variant rs1884444 in IL-23R gene were demonstrated to be associated with the risk of MS or other IDD diseases, and the expression level of serum IL-23A in the MS patients was also altered. We conclude that variants in IL-23A and IL-23R genes were associated with the risk of MS or other IDD diseases. PMID:27893410

  17. Mutations in the spike glycoprotein of human coronavirus OC43 modulate disease in BALB/c mice from encephalitis to flaccid paralysis and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Jacomy, Hélène; St-Jean, Julien R; Brison, Elodie; Marceau, Gabriel; Desforges, Marc; Talbot, Pierre J

    2010-07-01

    The etiology of most neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system remains unknown and likely involves a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental triggering factors. Given that exposure to numerous infectious pathogens occurs during childhood, and that some viral infections can lead to neurodegeneration and demyelination, it is conceivable that some viruses may act as triggering factors in neuropathogenesis. We have previously shown that the prototype OC43 strain of the common cold-associated human respiratory coronavirus has the capacity to infect human neuronal and glial cells and does persist in human brains. Moreover, it has neuroinvasive properties in susceptible BALB/c mice, where it leads to a chronic encephalitis with accompanying disabilities. Here, we show that mutations in the viral spike glycoprotein, reproducibly acquired during viral persistence in human neural cell cultures, led to a drastically modified virus-induced neuropathology in BALB/c mice, characterized by flaccid paralysis and demyelination. Even though infection by both mutated and wild-type viruses led to neuroinflammation, the modified neuropathogenesis induced by the mutated virus was associated with increased viral spread and significantly more CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system, as well as significantly increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 and the chemokine CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1). Moreover, recombinant virus harboring the S glycoprotein mutations retained its neurotropism, productively infecting neurons. Therefore, interaction of a human respiratory coronavirus with the central nervous system may modulate virus and host factors resulting in a modified neuropathogenesis in genetically susceptible individuals.

  18. Inflammatory demyelination alters subcortical visual circuits.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Sheila Espírito Santo; Mendonça, Henrique Rocha; Wheeler, Natalie A; Campello-Costa, Paula; Jacobs, Kimberle M; Gomes, Flávia C A; Fox, Michael A; Fuss, Babette

    2017-08-18

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease classically associated with axonal damage and loss; more recently, however, synaptic changes have been recognized as additional contributing factors. An anatomical area commonly affected in MS is the visual pathway; yet, changes other than those associated with inflammatory demyelination of the optic nerve, i.e., optic neuritis, have not been described in detail. Adult mice were subjected to a diet containing cuprizone to mimic certain aspects of inflammatory demyelination as seen in MS. Demyelination and inflammation were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Synaptic changes associated with inflammatory demyelination in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) were determined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and electrophysiological field potential recordings. In the cuprizone model, demyelination was observed in retinorecipient regions of the subcortical visual system, in particular the dLGN, where it was found accompanied by microglia activation and astrogliosis. In contrast, anterior parts of the pathway, i.e., the optic nerve and tract, appeared largely unaffected. Under the inflammatory demyelinating conditions, as seen in the dLGN of cuprizone-treated mice, there was an overall decrease in excitatory synaptic inputs from retinal ganglion cells. At the same time, the number of synaptic complexes arising from gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-generating inhibitory neurons was found increased, as were the synapses that contain the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN2B and converge onto inhibitory neurons. These synaptic changes were functionally found associated with a shift toward an overall increase in network inhibition. Using the cuprizone model of inflammatory demyelination, our data reveal a novel form of synaptic (mal)adaption in the CNS that is characterized by a shift of the excitation/inhibition balance toward inhibitory

  19. Early identification of 'acute-onset' chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  20. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. Methods To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Interpretation Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS. PMID:26273684

  1. A Case of Cauda Equina Syndrome in Early-Onset Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Clinically Similar to Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Ha, Sam Yeol; Nam, Taek Kyun

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) which seemed clinically similar to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type1 (CMT1). CIDP is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy, either progressive or relapsing-remitting. It is a non-hereditary disorder characterized by symmetrical motor and sensory deficits. Rarely, spinal nerve roots can be involved, leading to CES by hypertrophic cauda equina. A 34-year-old man presented with low back pain, radicular pain, bilateral lower-extremity weakness, urinary incontinence, and constipation. He had had musculoskeletal deformities, such as hammertoes and pes cavus, since age 10. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse thickening of the cauda equina. Electrophysiological testing showed increased distal latency, conduction blocks, temporal dispersion, and severe nerve conduction velocity slowing (3 m/s). We were not able to find genetic mutations at the PMP 22, MPZ, PRX, and EGR2 genes. The pathologic findings of the sural nerve biopsy revealed thinly myelinated nerve fibers with Schwann cells proliferation. We performed a decompressive laminectomy, intravenous IgG (IV-IgG) and oral steroid. At 1 week after surgery, most of his symptoms showed marked improvements except foot deformities. There was no relapse or aggravation of disease for 3 years. We diagnosed the case as an early-onset CIDP with cauda equine syndrome, whose initial clinical findings were similar to those of CMT1, and successfully managed with decompressive laminectomy, IV-IgG and oral steroid. PMID:25237436

  2. Serum Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibody Are Independently Associated with Lesions in Spinal Cord in Central Nervous System Demyelinating Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Youming; Zheng, Yangbo; Chen, Mengyu; Zhang, Bin; Gao, Cong; Shan, Fulan; Yang, Ning; Fan, Yongxiang

    2014-01-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) is associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Early recognition of useful parameters may be helpful to distinguish their difference. This retrospective study analyzed thyroid parameters from 243 serum samples (relapse = 128; remission = 115) of 178 patients with demyelinating diseases (NMO, n = 25; TM, n = 48; MS, n = 105). The relationship between thyroid and clinical parameters was analyzed. Patients with NMO and TM had a higher frequency of abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TG-Ab), and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) than MS patients (p<0.05). The level of TSH and TG-Ab returned to normal levels after administration of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (p<0.05). In 96 patients (NMO, n = 19; TM, n = 25; MS, n = 52) without treatment, serum levels of TSH, TG-Ab and TPO-Ab were significantly different between patients with and without myelitis (p<0.01). Patients positive for aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies showed higher abnormalities of TSH (p = 0.001), TG-Ab (p = 0.004) and TPO-Ab (p<0.0001) levels than AQP4 antibodies negative patients. Logistic regression analyses revealed independent relationships between TSH (odds ratio [OR]  = 33.994; p<0.0001), TG-Ab (OR = 7.703; p = 0.017) and myelitis occurrence in 96 patients at the active stage. In 52 MS patients experiencing their first attack, MS patients with myelitis were associated with TSH abnormalities (OR = 42.778; p<0.0001). This study showed increased abnormalities of thyroid parameters in patients with NMO and TM than in MS patients. MS patients with myelitis also had greater TSH abnormality than in MS patients without myelitis. Abnormal TSH and TG-Ab were independently associated with myelitis occurrence in central nervous system demyelinating disorders. PMID:25093326

  3. Transgenic mouse model for central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, T; Feigenbaum, L; Jay, G

    1991-01-01

    A common feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis in humans and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rodents is the marked elevation in the expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the involved sites. By specific targeting of a syngeneic MHC class I gene to oligodendrocytes, we have generated transgenic mice which not only exhibit severe involuntary tremors and develop tonic seizures but also show extensive demyelination in both the brain and the spinal cord. The fact that demyelination in these mice occurs in the absence of immune infiltration dismisses an autoimmune involvement but suggests that the MHC class I antigens play a direct role in inducing disease. Our findings lend support to the possibility that demyelinating diseases are induced by infectious agents such as viruses which can either directly activate MHC gene expression in oligodendroglia or indirectly activate expression through the release by reactive T cells of gamma interferon in the brain. Images PMID:1717829

  4. Mitochondrial immobilization mediated by syntaphilin facilitates survival of demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Nobuhiko; Chiang, Hao; Mahad, Don J.; Kidd, Grahame J.; Liu, LiPing; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a primary cause of permanent neurological disability in individuals with the CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. Dysfunction of axonal mitochondria and imbalanced energy demand and supply are implicated in degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons. The purpose of this study was to define the roles of mitochondrial volume and distribution in axonal degeneration following acute CNS demyelination. We show that the axonal mitochondrial volume increase following acute demyelination of WT CNS axons does not occur in demyelinated axons deficient in syntaphilin, an axonal molecule that immobilizes stationary mitochondria to microtubules. These findings were supported by time-lapse imaging of WT and syntaphilin-deficient axons in vitro. When demyelinated, axons deficient in syntaphilin degenerate at a significantly greater rate than WT axons, and this degeneration can be rescued by reducing axonal electrical activity with the Na+ channel blocker flecainide. These results support the concept that syntaphilin-mediated immobilization of mitochondria to microtubules is required for the volume increase of axonal mitochondria following acute demyelination and protects against axonal degeneration in the CNS. PMID:24958879

  5. Therapeutic options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is a rare acquired immune-mediated progressive or relapsing disorder causing peripheral neuropathic disease of duration more than two months. Many individuals with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy fail to make a long-term recovery with current treatment regimes. The aim of this study was to prospectively review the literature to determine the effectiveness of therapies for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Methods Articles published from January 1990 to December 2012 were searched for studies to treat adults with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Peer-reviewed full-text articles published in English were included. Results Nine placebo-controlled double-blinded randomised trials were reviewed to treat subjects with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy exhibiting various degrees of effectiveness. The most effect treatments were; three randomised controlled trials using intravenous immunoglobulin, a study comparing pulsed dexamethasone and short term prednisolone and rituximab all showed promising results and were well tolerated. Conclusion IVIg and corticosteroids remain first line treatments for CIDP. Therapies using monoclonal antibodies, such as Rituximab and Natalizumab offer the most promise for treatment of Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy however they also need further research, as does the use of stem cell therapy for treating Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Large randomised controlled trials and better patient selection are required to address responsiveness of CIDP patients to conventional treatments to elucidate mechanisms of action and future directions for therapeutic improvement. PMID:24507546

  6. Masquerading Bundle Branch Block: A Poor Prognostic Sign Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dhanse, Suheil; Kareem, Hashir; Devasia, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Masquerading bundle branch block is a rare but important finding on the Electrocardiogram (ECG). It is an indication of severe and diffuse conduction system disease and usually indicates poor prognosis. The precordial leads show a Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB) pattern while the limb leads resemble a Left Bundle Branch Block (LBBB). This finding on an ECG is almost invariably associated with severe underlying heart disease. It is extremely important to be aware of this finding as it is a marker of poor cardiac outcomes. We report the case of a 68-year-old gentleman, who presented with progressive dyspnoea on exertion over three months. ECG showed a broad QRS complex with a RBBB pattern on the precordial leads and a LBBB pattern on the limb leads (suggestive of masquerading bundle branch block). A coronary angiogram revealed severe Triple Vessel Disease (TVD). The patient was scheduled for an early Coronary Artery By-Pass Grafting Surgery. However, his clinical condition deteriorated and he died while awaiting the surgery. PMID:27790494

  7. Demyelination in canine distemper virus infection: a review.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes severe immunosuppression and neurological disease in dogs, associated with demyelination, and is a model for multiple sclerosis in man. In the early stage of the infection, demyelination is associated with viral replication in the white matter. In acute demyelinating lesions there is massive down-regulation of myelin transcription and metabolic impairment of the myelin-producing cells, but there is no evidence that these cells are undergoing apoptosis or necrosis. Oligodendroglial change is related to restricted infection of these cells (transcription but no translation) and marked activation of microglial cells in acute lesions. Concomitant with immunological recovery during the further course of the disease, inflammation occurs in the demyelinating plaques with progression of the lesions in some animals. A series of experiments in vitro suggests that chronic inflammatory demyelination is due to a bystander mechanism resulting from interactions between macrophages and antiviral antibodies. Autoimmune reactions are also observed, but do not correlate with the course of the disease. The progressive or relapsing course of the disease is associated with viral persistence in the nervous system. Persistence of CDV in the brain appears to be favored by non-cytolytic selective spread of the virus and restricted infection, in this way escaping immune surveillance in the CNS. The CDV Fusion protein appears to play an important role in CDV persistence. Similarities between canine distemper and rodent models of virus-induced demyelination are discussed.

  8. Initial analysis of non-typical Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) at onset and late developing demyelinating disease in Italian patients by SSCP and automated DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sartore, M.; Semeraro, A.; Fortina, P.

    1994-09-01

    LHON is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by maternal inheritance and late onset of blindness caused by bilateral retinal degeneration. A number of molecular defects are known affecting expression of seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I, III and IV. We screened genomic DNA from Italian patients for seven of the known point mutations in the ND-1, ND-4 and ND-6 subunits of complex I by PCR followed by SSCP and restriction enzyme digestion. Most of the patients had nonfamilial bilateral visual loss with partial or no recovery and normal neurological examination. Fundoscopic examination revealed that none of the patients had features typical of LHON. Nine of 21 patients (43%) showed multifocal CNS demyelination on MRI. Our results show aberrant SSCP patterns for a PCR product from the ND-4 subunit in one affected child and his mother. Sfa NI and Mae III digestions suggested the absence of a previously defined LHON mutation, and automated DNA sequence analysis revealed two A to G neutral sequence polymorphisms in the third position of codons 351 and 353. In addition, PCR products from the same two samples and an unrelated one showed abnormal SSCP patterns for the ND-1 subunit region of complex I due to the presence of a T to C change at nt 4,216 which was demonstrated after Nla III digestion of PCR products and further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Our results indicate that additional defects are present in the Italian population, and identification of abnormal SSCP patterns followed by targeted automated DNA sequence analysis is a reasonable strategy for delineation of new LHON mutations.

  9. The Prevalence of Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibody in Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases Presented to a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia: Presentation and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Background. There have been inconsistent reports on the prevalence and pathogenicity of anti-Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in patients presented with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IIDDs). Objective. To estimate the prevalence of anti-AQP4 antibody in patients with IIDDs presented to University Malaya Medical Centre in terms of patients' clinical and radiological presentations and prognoses. Methods. Retrospective data review of IIDDs patients presented from 2005 to 2015. Patients were classified into classical multiple sclerosis (CMS), opticospinal (OS) presentation, optic neuritis (ON), transverse myelitis (TM), brainstem syndrome (BS), and tumefactive MS. Anti-Aquaporin 4 antibody was tested using the Indirect Immunofluorescence Test (IIFT) cell-based assay. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS version 20. Results. Anti-AQP4 antibody was detected in 53% of patients presented with IIDDs. CMS was more common in the seronegative group, 27/47 (57.45%; p < 0.001). Conversely, OS involvement was more common in the seropositive group, 26/53 (49.06%; p < 0.001). Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) on MRI were also more common in the seropositive group, 29/40 (72.50%; p = 0.004). Only 2/40 (5.00%) had MRI evidence of patchy or multiple short-segment spinal cord lesions in the AQP4-positive group (p = 0.003). The relapse rate and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were also higher in the seropositive group (5.43 versus 3.17, p = 0.005; 4.07 versus 2.51, p = 0.006, resp.). Typical clinical presentations that defined NMO were also seen in the seronegative patients, but in a lower frequency. Conclusion. Our cohort of patients had a higher prevalence of seropositivity of anti-AQP4 antibody as compared to those in Western countries. This was also associated with a more typical presentation of opticospinal involvement with LESCLs on MRI, a higher rate of relapse, and EDSS. PMID:28203460

  10. Regulatory and T effector cells have overlapping low to high ranges in TCR affinities for self during demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jennifer D.; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Zhu, Cheng; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Having regulatory T cells with the same antigen specificity as the responding conventional T cells is thought to be important in maintaining peripheral tolerance. It has been demonstrated that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) there are MOG-specific Tregs that infiltrate into the central nervous system (CNS). However the affinity of naturally occurring polyclonal Tregs for any self-antigen let alone MOG has not been analyzed in the periphery or at the site of autoimmune disease. Utilizing the highly sensitive micropipette adhesion frequency assay, which allows one to determine on a single cell basis the affinity and frequency of polyclonal antigen-specific T cells directly ex vivo, we demonstrate that at peak disease MOG-specific Tregs were progressively enriched in the draining cervical lymph nodes and CNS as compared to spleen. These frequencies were greater than the frequencies measured by tetramer analysis indicative of the large fraction of lower affinity T cells that comprise the MOG specific Tconv and Treg response. Of interest, the self-reactive CD4+ Tconvs and Tregs displayed overlapping affinities for MOG in the periphery, yet in the CNS, the site of neuroinflammation, Tconvs skew towards higher affinities. The majority of the MOG-specific Tregs in the CNS possessed the methylation signature associated with thymic derived Tregs. These findings indicate that tTreg affinity range matches that of their Tconvs in the periphery and suggest a change in TCR affinity as a potential mechanism for autoimmune progression and escape from immune regulation. PMID:26385521

  11. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy generation".

  12. Transcriptional Changes in Canine Distemper Virus-Induced Demyelinating Leukoencephalitis Favor a Biphasic Mode of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms “viral replication” and “humoral immune response” as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to “metabolite and energy

  13. Pathogenesis and molecular biology of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, the JC virus-induced demyelinating disease of the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Major, E O; Amemiya, K; Tornatore, C S; Houff, S A; Berger, J R

    1992-01-01

    disease, for which no consensus of antiviral therapy exists, may yield to innovative treatment protocols. Images PMID:1310438

  14. Tubercular mastitis - a great masquerader.

    PubMed

    Gon, Sonia; Bhattacharyya, Aditi; Majumdar, Bipasa; Kundu, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Tubercular mastitis is a rare clinical entity as mammary gland tissue, like spleen and skeletal muscle, offers resistance to the survival and multiplication of the tubercle bacillus. Tuberculosis of the breast can mimic carcinoma, whereas in young patients it can be mistaken for a pyogenic breast abscess, thus labeled a "great masquerader" in recognition of its multifaceted presentation. Breast tuberculosis commonly affects women in the reproductive age group, between 21 and 30 years, and is rare in prepubescent females and elderly women. Fine needle aspiration cytology is very useful and it is a promising technique in expert hands. In tuberculosis-endemic countries, the finding of granuloma on fine needle aspiration cytology warrants empirical treatment for tuberculosis even in the absence of positive acid-fast bacilli and without culture results. We hereby report a case of tubercular mastitis in a post-menopausal seronegative female diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology with a positive acid-fast bacilli and a review of the recent literature.

  15. Evaluation of a patient with suspected chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jani-Acsadi, Agnes; Lewis, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Demyelinating neuropathies are typically characterized by physiological slowing of conduction velocity and pathologically by segmental loss of myelin and in some instances, evidence of remyelination. Clinically, patients with demyelinating neuropathy can be seen with inherited disorders (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) or acquired disorders, typically immune-mediated or inflammatory. The acquired disorders can be either acute or subacute as seen in the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) form of Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic progressive or relapsing disorders such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. It is important to develop a logical approach to diagnosing these disorders. This requires an understanding of the clinical, genetic, physiological, and pathological features of these neuropathies. Clinically, important features to consider are the temporal progression, degree of symmetry, and involvement of proximal as well as distal muscles. Genetically, recognizing the different inheritance patterns and age of onset allow for a coordinated approach to determining a specific genotype. Physiologically, besides nerve conduction slowing, other physiological hallmarks of demyelination include temporal dispersion of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) on proximal stimulation, conduction block, and distal CMAP duration prolongation with certain patterns of involvement pointing to specific disorders. This chapter focuses on these various aspects of the evaluation of patients with chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies to develop a comprehensive and thoughtful diagnostic concept.

  16. Challenges in pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, Göknur; Yüksel, Deniz; Temoçin, Cağri Mesut; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, a treatable immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system is less common in childhood compared to adults. Despite different sets of diagnostic criteria, lack of a reliable biologic marker leads to challenges in diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Our first aim was to review clinical presentation, course, response to treatment, and prognosis in our childhood patients. We also aimed to document diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls and challenges at the bedside. Our original cohort consisted of 23 pediatric patients who were referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. Seven patients reaching to an alternative diagnosis were excluded. In the remaining patients, diagnostic, treatment and follow-up data were compared in typical patients who satisfied both clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria and atypical patients who failed to meet minimal research chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy electrodiagnostic requirements. Eight of 16 patients (50%) met the minimal chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy research diagnostic requirements. There was only a statistically significant difference (p = 0.010) in terms of European Neuromuscular Centre childhood chronic inflammatory diagnostic mandatory clinical criteria between the two groups. Misdiagnosis due to errors in electrophysiological interpretation (100%, n = 8), cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation (100%, n = 4 and/or subjective improvement on any immunotherapy modality (80 ± 19.27%)) was frequent. Pediatric CIDP is challenging in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls at the bedside. Diagnostic errors due to electrophysiological interpretation, cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation, and/or subjective improvement on immunotherapy should be considered.

  17. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    As a syndrome with typical and atypical cases, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has been a difficult disorder to diagnose and treat. The pathophysiologic basis for CIDP has not been established, contributing to the challenges in dealing with these patients. However, as one of only a handful of treatable peripheral neuropathies, there has been a tendency to diagnose CIDP to attempt a therapeutic intervention. We are also aware that there has also been overtreatment of some patients. This combination of overdiagnosis and prolonged treatment has been a concern. This chapter will review these challenges and discuss recent findings that will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. The factors leading to misdiagnosis of CIDP were explored in a cohort of patients referred to a neuromuscular center. On a more positive note, the identification of two disorders with antibodies directed at paranodal constituents has excited the field. Treatment options have increased and been clarified. Pulse corticosteroids have been compared with oral prednisone and with intravenous immunoglobulin. The clinical trial of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in CIDP has shown both efficacy and a very low side effect profile adding to our therapeutic options. The current review will identify recent developments that show both the challenges and the exciting growth in our ability to diagnose and treat CIDP.

  18. Distribution patterns of demyelination correlate with clinical profiles in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, S; Ogawara, K; Misawa, S; Mori, M; Hattori, T

    2002-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a heterogeneous disorder having a wide clinical range, and is characterised by multifocal demyelination that can involve the distal nerve terminals, intermediate nerve segments, and nerve roots. Objective: To investigate whether the distribution patterns of demyelination along the course of the nerve correlate with clinical profiles in patients with CIDP. Methods: Motor nerve conduction studies were carried out on 42 consecutive patients. According to the physiological criteria for demyelination, the presence of a demyelinative lesion was determined in the distal nerve segments (distal pattern) or intermediate nerve segments (intermediate pattern), or in both (diffuse pattern). The serum concentration of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α was measured by immunoassay. Results: Patients were classified as having a distal (n=10), intermediate (n=13), or diffuse (n=15) pattern, or were unclassified (n=4). Patients with the distal or diffuse pattern had common clinical features such as subacute onset, symmetric symptoms, and weakness involving proximal as well as distal muscles. Patients with the distal pattern had a good response to treatment and a monophasic remitting course, but the diffuse pattern was associated with a treatment dependent relapsing course, reflecting longer disease activity. The serum TNF-α concentrations increased only in the "diffuse" subgroup of patients, and this might be associated with breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier and therefore, involvement of the intermediate segments. The intermediate pattern was characterised by a chronic course, asymmetric symptoms, less severe disability, and refractoriness to treatments. Conclusions: CIDP consists of subtypes with varying predilections for lesions along the course of the nerve. The distribution patterns of conduction abnormalities may be useful in the prediction of outcome of patients with CIDP. PMID:11784822

  19. A case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy presented with unilateral ptosis.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Sadegh; Karamimagham, Sina; Poursadeghfard, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy is an autoimmune disease with progressive and relapsing courses. The main clinical presentations are diffuse deep tendon hyporeflexia or areflexia and symmetric proximal-distal muscles weakness. Myasthenia gravis is also an immune mediated disease with fluctuating ocular and bulbar symptoms and sometimes weakness. Although both myasthenia gravis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are immune mediated disorders, clinical presentations are obviously different in the two diseases. Herein, we will report a case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy who presented with isolated unilateral ptosis. Initially, the patient was managed as ocular type of myasthenia gravis, but after progression to general limb weakness and areflexia, the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy was made. Although unilateral ptosis is a typical feature of myasthenia gravis, it may be seen as the first presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as well which mimics myasthenia gravis disease.

  20. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role.

  1. Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus Masquerading as Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Vengal, Manoj; Siyo, Nizaro; Ahmed, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumours of maxillary sinus are rare. They are usually diagnosed in the late stages when they perforate the sinus walls. The presence of large air space in the maxillary sinus facilitates asymptomatic growth of the sinus malignancy. The clinical presentation of these tumours depends on the sinus wall involved by the disease. The medial wall is usually the first to become eroded, leading to nasal obstruction, epistaxis or discharge. Rarely, symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma can resemble dental infection and the affected patients may visit dental clinic seeking treatment. This report presents a case of carcinoma of maxillary sinus mimicking odontogenic infection. Computed tomographic findings explained the reason for the present lesion to masquerade as an inflammatory condition. The importance of advanced imaging modalities for prompt identification of such lesions is discussed. PMID:27790593

  2. Pretibial Myxedema Masquerading as a Venous Leg Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Hughes, Olivia; MacQuhae, Flor; Kirsner, Robert S

    2017-03-01

    The authors report a case of pretibial myxedema (PTM) masquerading as a venous leg ulcer to alert wound care clinicians to this diagnostic possibility. Pretibial myxedema is a localized form of mucin cutaneous deposition characterized by indurated plaques most commonly on anterior legs. It is more likely to present in patients with Graves' disease, but it can be found in euthyroid patients as well. The physiopathology of PTM is complex, and there is an accumulation of highly hydrophilic glycosaminoglycans in the dermis. Minimal morbidity is associated with PTM, but the pruritus related to mucin deposition can be intense. The skin around venous leg ulcers and the skin changes related to PTM can have a similar clinical presentation, which may be a reason PTM is under-recognized.

  3. Securing iris recognition systems against masquerade attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbally, Javier; Gomez-Barrero, Marta; Ross, Arun; Fierrez, Julian; Ortega-Garcia, Javier

    2013-05-01

    A novel two-stage protection scheme for automatic iris recognition systems against masquerade attacks carried out with synthetically reconstructed iris images is presented. The method uses different characteristics of real iris images to differentiate them from the synthetic ones, thereby addressing important security flaws detected in state-of-the-art commercial systems. Experiments are carried out on the publicly available Biosecure Database and demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed security enhancing approach.

  4. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  5. Stem cell therapy for demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Pazour, Jan; Mokrý, Jaroslav

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that attacks mainly young people. It leads to the progressive deterioration of the neurological status. Histopatologically, this disease is characterized by appearance of multiple foci of the demyelination in white matter of the CNS, with various grade of an axonal loss. The current treatment is targeted on moderating the inflammatory process and symptomatic therapy. In spite of all this therapy, the course of the disease often progresses. The tissue of the CNS in mammalians, including humans, is able to provide some degree of spontaneous remyelination. Unfortunatelly the extent of this process is not sufficient for the complete restoration. The support of remyelination by using the cell manipulations is the aim of many experimental studies. Theoretically, it is possible to achieve remyelination either by exogenous induction of remyelination from endogenous sources (precursor cells) or by the real transplantation of myelin-forming cells intrafocally, intracerebroventricularly or into the blood stream. In this work, we present the brief view on the recent state of this topic. We present the list of the cell types, useable for cell transplantations and the summary of the growth factors influencing the behaviour of the oligodendroglial precursors. We are considering the hampers in usage of the cell therapy of demyelinating disorders in clinics.

  6. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    PubMed

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The spectrum of post-vaccination inflammatory CNS demyelinating syndromes.

    PubMed

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota

    2014-03-01

    A wide variety of inflammatory diseases temporally associated with the administration of various vaccines, has been reported in the literature. A PubMed search from 1979 to 2013 revealed seventy one (71) documented cases. The most commonly reported vaccinations that were associated with CNS demyelinating diseases included influenza (21 cases), human papilloma virus (HPV) (9 cases), hepatitis A or B (8 cases), rabies (5 cases), measles (5 cases), rubella (5 cases), yellow fever (3 cases), anthrax (2 cases),meningococcus (2 cases) and tetanus (2 cases). The vast majority of post-vaccination CNS demyelinating syndromes, are related to influenza vaccination and this could be attributed to the high percentage of the population that received the vaccine during the HI1N1 epidemia from 2009 to 2012. Usually the symptoms of the CNS demyelinating syndrome appear few days following the immunization (mean: 14.2 days) but there are cases where the clinical presentation was delayed (more than 3 weeks or even up to 5 months post-vaccination) (approximately a third of all the reported cases). In terms of the clinical presentation and the affected CNS areas, there is a great diversity among the reported cases of post-vaccination acute demyelinating syndromes. Optic neuritis was the prominent clinical presentation in 38 cases, multifocal disseminated demyelination in 30, myelitis in 24 and encephalitis in 17. Interestingly in a rather high proportion of the patients (and especially following influenza and human papiloma virus vaccination-HPV) the dominant localizations of demyelination were the optic nerves and the myelon, presenting as optic neuritis and myelitis (with or without additional manifestations of ADEM), reminiscent to neuromyelitic optica (or, more generally, the NMO-spectrum of diseases). Seven patients suffered an NMO-like disease following HPV and we had two similar cases in our Center. One patient with post-vaccination ADEM, subsequently developed NMO. Overall, the

  8. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model.

    PubMed

    Das, H K; Das, D; Doley, R; Sahu, P P

    2016-03-02

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  9. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an overview of 10 cases in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Ware, Tyson L; Kornberg, Andrew J; Rodriguez-Casero, M Victoria; Ryan, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a rare condition in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 10 cases of childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a single center, in the era of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetic microarray, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status. Robust neurophysiologic abnormalities were present in all cases and both MRI and lumbar puncture were useful adjuncts in diagnosis. Genetic microarray is a simple technique useful in excluding the most common hereditary demyelinating neuropathy. Intravenous immunoglobulin was an effective first-line therapy in most cases, with refractory cases responding to corticosteroids and rituximab. We found the chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status useful for assessing outcome at final follow-up, whereas the modified Rankin score was better for assessing peak motor disability.

  10. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    PubMed Central

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  11. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  12. Masquerading bundle branch block: a variety of right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Elizari, Marcelo V; Baranchuk, Adrian; Chiale, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    The so-called 'masquerading' type of right bundle branch block is caused by the simultaneous presence of a high-degree left anterior fascicular block often accompanied with severe left ventricular enlargement and/or fibrotic block in the anterolateral wall of the left ventricle. These conditions tend to reorient the terminal electrical forces of the QRS complex towards the left and upwards, in such a way that the characteristic slurred S wave in lead I becomes smaller or even disappears. In many cases of standard masquerading right bundle branch block, a small Q wave in lead I is present due to the initial forces of the left anterior fascicular block, which are oriented rightwards and inferiorly. However, in some cases, the Q wave in lead I also vanishes, and the mimicking of a left bundle branch block becomes perfect in standard leads. This is commonly associated with an inferior myocardial infarction or severe inferior fibrosis in cardiomyopathies. The typical QRS changes of right bundle branch block may eventually be concealed even in the right precordial leads; under such circumstances, the ECG diagnosis may be mistaken and the right bundle branch block totally missed. The masquerading right bundle branch block carries a poor prognosis, since it always implies the presence of a severe underlying heart disease.

  13. Electrostimulation of the nervous system for patients with demyelinating and degenerative diseases of the nervous system and vascular diseases of the extremities.

    PubMed

    Dooley, D M; Sharkey, J

    The results of electrostimulation of the spinal cord for symptoms other than that of pain are recorded in this publication. 50% of patients with multiple sclerosis, primary lateral sclerosis and hereditary spino-cerebellar disorders were observed to have enduring favourable changes in neurological function during the 15 to 27 months they have been followed. The patients who were the least severely disabled had the greatest amount of increased function and were benefitted the most by the stimulation. Those who had the fewest neurological pathways affected make the most rapid progress. For example, the patient with only an ataxic or spastic gait was observed to improve faster than the patient with an ataxic and a spastic gait. The long-term effect of electrostimulation of the spinal cord on patients with these diseases is unknown at the present time. The purpose of the stimulation is to increase neurological function so that the patient can live a better life style. It is not thought that the electrical current is responsible for a 'cure' of the basic disease process. Electrostimulation of the posterior spinal roots and spinal cord, while not new, has not been used extensively for the treatment of patients with arterial disease. The patients who have responded the most dramatically to electrostimulation are those with vasospastic disorders. A larger percentage of patients showed a greater response to implanted stimulation than to transcutaneous stimulation. Electrostimulation of the nervous system is not designed to replace standard therapeutic measures of treatment of patients with vascular disease but to supplement them.

  14. Early identification of ‘acute-onset’ chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B.; Kiernan, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P < 0.001) and prolonged relative refractory period (P < 0.01), without changes in threshold electrotonus. In contrast, in patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P < 0.05; decreased subexcitability, P < 0.05) and increased

  15. Density-dependent predation influences the evolution and behavior of masquerading prey.

    PubMed

    Skelhorn, John; Rowland, Hannah M; Delf, Jon; Speed, Michael P; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2011-04-19

    Predation is a fundamental process in the interaction between species, and exerts strong selection pressure. Hence, anti-predatory traits have been intensively studied. Although it has long been speculated that individuals of some species gain protection from predators by sometimes almost-uncanny resemblances to uninteresting objects in the local environment (such as twigs or stones), demonstration of antipredatory benefits to such "masquerade" have only very recently been demonstrated, and the fundamental workings of this defensive strategy remain unclear. Here we use laboratory experiments with avian predators and twig-mimicking caterpillars as masqueraders to investigate (i) the evolutionary dynamics of masquerade; and (ii) the behavioral adaptations associated with masquerade. We show that the benefit of masquerade declines as the local density of masqueraders relative to their models (twigs, in our system) increases. This occurs through two separate mechanisms: increasing model density both decreased predators' motivation to search for masqueraders, and made masqueraders more difficult to detect. We further demonstrated that masquerading organisms have evolved complex microhabitat selection strategies that allow them to best exploit the density-dependent properties of masquerade. Our results strongly suggest the existence of opportunity costs associated with masquerade. Careful evaluation of such costs will be vital to the development of a fuller understanding of both the distribution of masquerade across taxa and ecosystems, and the evolution of the life history strategies of masquerading prey.

  16. [Demyelinating polyneuropathies in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic alcoholic intoxication].

    PubMed

    Kovrazhkina, E A

    2012-01-01

    Frequency and nosological attribution of demyelinating polyneuropathies in patients with diabetes mellitus and alcoholism were determined. Eighty-six inpatients with alcoholic (n=46) and diabetic (n=40) polyneuropathy were examined clinically and using electroneuromyography (ENMG). A demyelinating pathogenetic variant was identified by clinical and ENMG data in 27 (31%) patients. Nine patients (33%) had dysimmune polyneuropathies (acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy). Polyneuropathies were specified as toxic/metabolic with the prevalence of a demyelinating component within the main disease in 18 (67%) patients. Clinical and ENMG-signs of the demyelinating variant of alcoholic and diabetic neuropathy are presented. The efficacy of the antioxidant berlition was shown for toxic/metabolic polyneuropathies while the addition of immune modulators was needed for treatment of dysimmune polyneuropathy.

  17. Influence of laser irradiation on demyelination of nervous fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Nataly O.; Plaksij, Yu. S.; Mamilov, Serge A.

    2000-11-01

    Problem demyelinating diseases from actual in modern of neurology. Main disease of this group - multiple sclerosis, which morphological manifestation is the process demyelineation - disintegration of myelin, which covers axial cylinders of nervous filaments. The outcome of such damage is violation of realization of nervous impulses, dissonance of implement and coordination functions. Most typical the feature of a multiple sclerosis is origin of repeated remissions, which compact with indication remyelination. In development of disease the large role is played by modifications of immunological of a reactivity of an organism. The purpose of the title is development of new methods of treatment of a multiple sclerosis because of lasertherapy. For thsi purpose the influence of a laser exposure on demyelination and remyelination processes will be investigated, is investigated pathological fabrics at microscopic and submicroscopic levels. The study of proceses demyelination and remyelination will be conducted on experimental animals (rats), which are sick experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), that is the most adequate model of a multiple sclerosis. The patients' EAE animals will be subjected to treatment by a laser exposure. For want of it there will be determinate optimum lengths of waves, dozes and modes of laser radiation.

  18. Optical measurement of conduction in single demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Demyelination was initiated in Xenopus sciatic nerves by an intraneural injection of lysolecithin over a 2-3-mm region. During the next week macrophages and Schwann cells removed all remaining damaged myelin by phagocytosis. Proliferating Schwann cells then began to remyelinate the axons, with the first few lamellae appearing 13 d after surgery. Action potentials were recorded optically through the use of a potential- sensitive dye. Signals could be detected both at normal nodes of Ranvier and within demyelinated segments. Before remyelination, conduction through the lesion occurred in only a small fraction of the fibers. However, in these particular cases we could demonstrate continuous (nonsaltatory) conduction at very low velocities over long (greater than one internode) lengths of demyelinated axons. We have previously found through loose patch clamp experiments that the internodal axolemma contains voltage-dependent Na+ channels at a density approximately 4% of that at the nodes. These channels alone, however, are insufficient for successful conduction past the transition point between myelinated and demyelinated regions. Small improvements in the passive cable properties of the axon, adequate for propagation at this site, can be realized through the close apposition of macrophages and Schwann cells. As the initial lamellae of myelin appear, the probability of success at the transition zone increases rapidly, though the conduction velocity through the demyelinated segment is not appreciably changed. A detailed computational model is used to test the relative roles of the internodal Na+ channels and the new extracellular layer. The results suggest a possible mechanism that may contribute to the spontaneous recovery of function often seen in demyelinating disease. PMID:2163432

  19. Chronic dysimmune neuropathies: Beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Deshmukh, Shrikant S.; Dhonde, Pramod D.

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of chronic dysimmune neuropathies has widened well beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Pure motor (multifocal motor neuropathy), sensorimotor with asymmetrical involvement (multifocal acquired demylinating sensory and motor neuropathy), exclusively distal sensory (distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy) and very proximal sensory (chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy) constitute the variants of CIDP. Correct diagnosis of these entities is of importance in terms of initiation of appropriate therapy as well as prognostication of these patients. The rates of detection of immune-mediated neuropathies with monoclonal cell proliferation (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, multiple myeloma, etc.) have been facilitated as better diagnostic tools such as serum immunofixation electrophoresis are being used more often. Immune neuropathies associated with malignancies and systemic vasculitic disorders are being defined further and treated early with better understanding of the disease processes. As this field of dysimmune neuropathies will evolve in the future, some of the curious aspects of the clinical presentations and response patterns to different immunosuppressants or immunomodulators will be further elucidated. This review also discusses representative case studies. PMID:21808468

  20. Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination: a model for early nerve degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rambukkana, Anura

    2004-08-01

    The molecular events that occur at the early phase of many demyelinating neurodegenerative diseases are unknown. A recent demonstration of rapid demyelination and axonal injury induced by Mycobacterium leprae provides a model for elucidating the molecular events of early nerve degeneration which might be common to neurodegenerative diseases of both infectious origin and unknown etiology. The identification of the M. leprae-targeted Schwann cell receptor, dystroglycan, and its associated molecules in myelination, demyelination and axonal functions suggests a role for these molecules in early nerve degeneration.

  1. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Masquerading as Metastasis after Heavy Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Masaru; Mukai, Yutaka; Ushijima, Ryo-ichi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Umeki, Kenji; Okada, Fumito; Nureki, Shin-ichi; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is useful in disease monitoring of malignancies after therapy, while an FDG uptake may also be present in benign diseases. We herein demonstrate a case of disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis mimicking systemic metastasis of prostate cancer. This case highlights that clinicians should consider Mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with prostate cancer who demonstrate multifocal FDG uptakes masquerading as metastasis, even when the chest photographs reveal a normal appearance and a sputum examination demonstrates negative results. An invasive surgical biopsy may be required and a pathological analysis would be critical in the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:27853089

  2. The Effect of Age on the Susceptibility and Severity of Demyelination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    EAE, aging, neurofascin, transgenics, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis . Accomplishments- The accomplishments on this project will be...results will impact our understanding of the consequences of multiple sclerosis in an aging population. In particular we have determined that in the

  3. Density-dependent predation influences the evolution and behavior of masquerading prey

    PubMed Central

    Skelhorn, John; Rowland, Hannah M.; Delf, Jon; Speed, Michael P.; Ruxton, Graeme D.

    2011-01-01

    Predation is a fundamental process in the interaction between species, and exerts strong selection pressure. Hence, anti-predatory traits have been intensively studied. Although it has long been speculated that individuals of some species gain protection from predators by sometimes almost-uncanny resemblances to uninteresting objects in the local environment (such as twigs or stones), demonstration of antipredatory benefits to such “masquerade” have only very recently been demonstrated, and the fundamental workings of this defensive strategy remain unclear. Here we use laboratory experiments with avian predators and twig-mimicking caterpillars as masqueraders to investigate (i) the evolutionary dynamics of masquerade; and (ii) the behavioral adaptations associated with masquerade. We show that the benefit of masquerade declines as the local density of masqueraders relative to their models (twigs, in our system) increases. This occurs through two separate mechanisms: increasing model density both decreased predators’ motivation to search for masqueraders, and made masqueraders more difficult to detect. We further demonstrated that masquerading organisms have evolved complex microhabitat selection strategies that allow them to best exploit the density-dependent properties of masquerade. Our results strongly suggest the existence of opportunity costs associated with masquerade. Careful evaluation of such costs will be vital to the development of a fuller understanding of both the distribution of masquerade across taxa and ecosystems, and the evolution of the life history strategies of masquerading prey. PMID:21464318

  4. Amoebiasis masquerading as inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Den, Yo; Kinoshita, Junji; Deshpande, Gautam A; Hiraoka, Eiji

    2015-11-25

    A 60-year-old Japanese man presented with bloody diarrhoea. He stated that he had been diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) 3 years prior, but discontinued follow-up care as treatment was ineffective. One year later, he came to our hospital with anorexia and weight loss. The abdomen was soft and flat without tenderness. Laboratory tests were unremarkable; faecal culture and Clostridium difficile toxin were negative. Findings and biopsy from a subsequent colonoscopy reconfirmed his diagnosis of UC. Neither mesalazine, which was initially prescribed, nor additional treatments improved his symptoms. Repeat colonoscopy, performed 5 months later, demonstrated similar findings in the same area. Although the pathology remained consistent with UC, multiple treatment failures suggested ongoing occult infection. Additional testing revealed positive Entamoeba histolytica antibody. 14 days of metronidazole dramatically improved his symptoms. He has remained asymptomatic after 2 years. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Factitious Cushing's syndrome masquerading as Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Thynne, Tilenka; White, Graham H; Burt, Morton G

    2014-03-01

    Factitious Cushing's syndrome is extremely rare. The diagnosis is challenging as cross-reactivity of synthetic corticosteroids or their metabolites in immunoassay measurements of plasma or urinary cortisol can make distinguishing between true and factitious Cushing's syndrome difficult. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is usually suppressed in factitious Cushing's syndrome. A 54-year-old woman presented with clinical and biochemical features of Cushing's syndrome and an unsuppressed ACTH concentration. She denied recent exogenous corticosteroid use. Initial investigations revealed a markedly elevated urinary free cortisol, mildly elevated midnight salivary cortisol and normal morning cortisol concentration. Plasma ACTH was not suppressed at 13 ng/l (RR 10-60 ng/l). A pituitary MRI was normal, but inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) revealed a post corticotrophin releasing hormone ACTH ratio >20:1 in the left petrosal sinus. Ketoconazole therapy amplified discordance between the urinary free and morning plasma cortisol concentrations. Further investigation of this discordance using high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) revealed a urinary free cortisol excretion of only 20 nmol/24 h, but prednisolone excretion of 16,200 nmol/24 h. Factitious Cushing's syndrome can mimic endogenous ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism during initial investigations and IPSS. This case highlights the importance of (i) recognizing the significance of discordant results; (ii) using an ACTH assay capable of reliably differentiating ACTH-dependent from ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome; and (iii) appreciating that IPSS is only useful to localize the source of ACTH in confirmed ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. In this case, measurement of corticosteroids by HPLC-MS/MS was essential in reaching the correct diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  7. Cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice: age-related vulnerability and exploratory behavior deficit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongkai; Li, Chengren; Wang, Hanzhi; Mei, Feng; Liu, Zhi; Shen, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Lan

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disease that mainly affects young individuals (15 to 35 years old) but its etiology remains largely undefined. Recently, accumulating evidence indicated that demyelination and/or dysfunction of oligodendrocytes is an important feature of its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the vulnerability of young individuals to demyelination may contribute to the onset of schizophrenia. In the present study, three different age cohorts of mice, i.e. juvenile (3 weeks), young-adult (6 weeks) and middle-aged (8 months), were subjected to a 6-week diet containing 0.2% cuprizone (CPZ) to create an animal model of acute demyelination. Then, age-related vulnerability to CPZ-induced demyelination, behavioral outcomes, and myelination-related molecular biological changes were assessed. We demonstrated: (1) CPZ treatment led to more severe demyelination in juvenile and young-adult mice than in middle-aged mice in the corpus callosum, a region closely associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; (2) the higher levels of demyelination in juvenile and young-adult mice were correlated with a greater reduction of myelin basic protein, more loss of CC-1-positive mature oligodendrocytes, and higher levels of astrocyte activation; and (3) CPZ treatment resulted in a more prominent exploratory behavior deficit in juvenile and young-adult mice than in middle-aged mice. Together, our data demonstrate an age-related vulnerability to demyelination with a concurrent behavioral deficit, providing supporting evidence for better understanding the susceptibility of the young to the onset of schizophrenia.

  8. Demyelination precedes oligodendrocyte loss in canine distemper virus-induced encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G; Weissenböck, H; Vandevelde, M; Lassmann, H; Griot, C

    2002-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a negative-stranded RNA morbillivirus, causes a persistent infection within the central nervous system resulting in a progressive, multifocal demyelinating disease. Demyelination is thought to be caused by a selective alteration of the myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Metabolic impairment and morphological changes of the oligodendrocytes after CDV infection have previously been observed in vitro as well as in vivo. Until now it has been suggested that the oligodendrocytes completely disappear from CDV-induced demyelinating lesions. However, ultrastructural analysis in brain tissue sections and immunohistochemical examination of oligodendrocytes in dog brain cell cultures contradicted these observations. In this study oligodendrocytes from different categories of CDV-induced lesions were examined by in situ hybridization for proteolipid protein mRNA and--as a new tool employed on canine brain tissue sections--by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, a myelin-specific enzyme. A down-regulation in the myelin gene transcription was detected already before demyelination occurred. However, a decrease in the number of oligodendrocytes was not observed until demyelination became evident. Although there was further depletion of oligodendrocytes in plaques with progressive demyelination, we demonstrated for the first time that these cells were still present in a significant amount even in chronic, completely demyelinated distemper lesions.

  9. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  10. Disinhibition of Cathepsin C Caused by Cystatin F Deficiency Aggravates the Demyelination in a Cuprizone Model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junjie; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yanli; Hou, Changyi; Yang, Xiaohan; Shimizu, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Fan, Kai; Ma, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Although the precise mechanism underlying initial lesion development in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear, CNS inflammation has long been associated with demyelination, and axonal degeneration. The activation of microglia/macrophages, which serve as innate immune cells in the CNS, is the first reaction to even minor pathologic changes in the CNS and is considered an initial pathogenic event in MS. Microglial activation accompanies a variety of gene expressions, including cystatin F (Cys F), which belongs to the cystatin superfamily and is one of the cathepsin inhibitors. In our previous study we showed that Cys F has a unique expression pattern in microglia/macrophages in the demyelination process. Specifically, the timing of Cys F induction correlated with ongoing demyelination, and the sites of Cys F expression overlapped with areas of remyelination. Cys F induction ceased in chronic demyelination when remyelination capacity was lost, suggesting that Cys F expressed by microglia/macrophages may play an important role in demyelination and/or remyelination. The functional role of Cys F in demyelinating disease of the CNS, however, is unclear. Cys F gene knockout mice were used in the current study to clarify the functional role of Cys F in the demyelination process in a cuprizone-induced demyelination animal model. We demonstrated that absence of the Cys F gene and the resulting disinhibition of cathepsin C (Cat C) aggravates the demyelination, and this finding may be related to the increased expression of the glia-derived chemokine, CXCL2, which may attract inflammatory cells to sites of myelin sheath damage. This effect was reversed by knock down of the Cat C gene. The findings gain further insight to function of Cat C in pathophysiology of MS, which may have implications for therapeutics for the prevention of neuroinflammation-involved neurological disorders in the future.

  11. Disinhibition of Cathepsin C Caused by Cystatin F Deficiency Aggravates the Demyelination in a Cuprizone Model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Junjie; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yanli; Hou, Changyi; Yang, Xiaohan; Shimizu, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Fan, Kai; Ma, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Although the precise mechanism underlying initial lesion development in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear, CNS inflammation has long been associated with demyelination, and axonal degeneration. The activation of microglia/macrophages, which serve as innate immune cells in the CNS, is the first reaction to even minor pathologic changes in the CNS and is considered an initial pathogenic event in MS. Microglial activation accompanies a variety of gene expressions, including cystatin F (Cys F), which belongs to the cystatin superfamily and is one of the cathepsin inhibitors. In our previous study we showed that Cys F has a unique expression pattern in microglia/macrophages in the demyelination process. Specifically, the timing of Cys F induction correlated with ongoing demyelination, and the sites of Cys F expression overlapped with areas of remyelination. Cys F induction ceased in chronic demyelination when remyelination capacity was lost, suggesting that Cys F expressed by microglia/macrophages may play an important role in demyelination and/or remyelination. The functional role of Cys F in demyelinating disease of the CNS, however, is unclear. Cys F gene knockout mice were used in the current study to clarify the functional role of Cys F in the demyelination process in a cuprizone-induced demyelination animal model. We demonstrated that absence of the Cys F gene and the resulting disinhibition of cathepsin C (Cat C) aggravates the demyelination, and this finding may be related to the increased expression of the glia-derived chemokine, CXCL2, which may attract inflammatory cells to sites of myelin sheath damage. This effect was reversed by knock down of the Cat C gene. The findings gain further insight to function of Cat C in pathophysiology of MS, which may have implications for therapeutics for the prevention of neuroinflammation-involved neurological disorders in the future. PMID:28066178

  12. Chlorhexidine Anaphylaxis Masquerading as Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Wang, Siew May; Nather, Aziz; Tan, Jiong Hao; Tay, Sen Hee; Poon, Keah How

    2015-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is a commonly used antiseptic and disinfectant in the health-care setting. Its usage has increased in recent years with intensive campaigns and infection control guidelines to combat hospital-acquired infections. As a result, patients and health-care workers (HCW) are exposed to increasing chlorhexidine usage. In recent years, adverse reactions to chlorhexidine ranging from allergic contact dermatitis, photosensitivity, fixed drug eruptions, urticaria and anaphylactic shock have been reported. Most have been isolated case reports on adverse reactions occurring in healthy individuals or HCW. We report a case of anaphylactic shock caused by applying chlorhexidine cleansing solution and masquerading as septic shock from left-leg necrotising fasciitis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Rathke cleft cyst masquerading as pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengxian; Bao, Xinjie; Liu, Xiaohai; Deng, Kan; Feng, Ming; Yao, Yong; Wang, Renzhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) is a rare cystic sellar entity, which is usually small in size and asymptomatic in most patients. RCC presenting panhypopituitarism and a cystic lesion with rim enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging is extremely rare. Therefore, it is easy to be misdiagnosed as pituitary abscess because of the similar clinical manifestations and neuroimaging changes. Case summary: We report a rare case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess clinically and radiologically with no evidence of central nervous system infection. The patient was initially suspected to be diagnosed with pituitary abscess, which was denied by the histopathological findings of RCC with no intraoperative drainage of abscess. We present an uncommon case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess in a 62-year-old Chinese male patient. The patient was admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital complaining of severe frontal pulsatile headache, visual acuity deficit, polyuria, polydipsia, and slight disturbance of consciousness. The biochemical and endocrinological examinations revealed severe hyponatremia and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar lesion with the apparent cystic change and rim enhancement. Accordingly, pituitary abscess was misdiagnosed at the beginning. The patient received hormone replacement therapy and underwent a trans-sphenoidal surgery. The surgical findings were uneventful. The histopathological examinations showed no infiltration of inflammatory cells or pus, and proved the lesion to be RCC. Conclusion: Through this rare case, we aim to emphasize that the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions requires constant vigilance and that RCC may lead to clinical and radiological changes similar with pituitary abscess. PMID:28272259

  14. Remodelling of motor nerve terminals in demyelinating axons of periaxin null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Court, Felipe A; Brophy, Peter J; Ribchester, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Myelin formation around axons increases nerve conduction velocity and regulates phenotypic characteristics of the myelinated axon. In the peripheral nervous system, demyelinating forms of hereditary Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases, due to Schwann-cell intrinsic molecular defects, leads to reduced nerve conduction velocity and changes in the axonal phenotype. Several mouse models of CMT diseases have been generated, allowing the study of consequences of demyelination in peripheral nerve fibres. Nevertheless, the effect of demyelination at the level of the neuromuscular synapse has been largely overlooked. Here we show that in the periaxin knock-out mice, a model of CMT condition, neuromuscular junctions develop profound morphological changes in pre-terminal region of motoraxons. These changes include extensive preterminal branches which originate in demyelinated regions of the nerve fibre and axonal swellings associated with residually-myelinated regions of the fibre. Using intracellular recording from muscle fibres we detected asynchronous failure of action potential transmission at high but not low stimulation frequencies, a phenomenon consistent with branch point failure. Taken together, our morphological and electrophysiological findings suggest that preterminal branching due to segmental demyelination near the neuromuscular synapse in periaxin KO mice may underlie phenotypic disabilities present in this mouse model of CMT disease. These results opens a new avenue of research in order to understand the cellular changes responsible for clinical disabilities in demyelinating conditions. PMID:18205176

  15. Carcinoma transverse colon masquerading as carcinoma gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Munghate, Anand; Kumar, Ashwani; Singh, Harnam; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Bimaljot; Chauhan, Mahak

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer worldwide .Its incidence is reported to be increasing in developing countries. It commonly presents with weight loss, anaemia, lump abdomen, change of bowel habit, obstruction or fresh rectal bleeding. Beside these common modes of presentations, there are some rare manifestations which masqueraded as different disease like obstructive jaundice, empyema gall bladder or cholecystitis. A 60-year-old male presented to hospital with right sided pain abdomen. On abdominal examination mild tenderness was present in right hypochondrium. Intra operatively gall bladder was separated from the adjoining gut, peritoneum and liver bed and was removed. On further exploration, there was a large mass in the vicinity of the gall bladder related to transverse colon. Extended right hemicolectomy was done. Histopathological examination of gut mass revealed adenocarcinoma of transverse colon with free margins and gall bladder showed cholecystitis with no evidence of malignancy. We present an interesting case of colon cancer colon that caused diagnostic confusion by mimicking as cholecystitis. Colorectal cancer constitutes a major public health issue globally. Therefore, public awareness, screening of high-risk populations, early diagnosis and effective treatment and follow-up will help to reduce its occurance and further complications.

  16. Follow-Up of Emergency Department MRI Scans Suggesting New Diagnosis of CNS Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Pakpoor, Jina; Saylor, Deanna; Izbudak, Izlem; Liu, Li; Mowry, Ellen M; Probasco, John; Yousem, David M

    2017-07-01

    The literature has shown that new cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be missed in the emergency department (ED), causing unnecessary delays for patients. In 2012, an MRI scanner was introduced into the ED of our institution. This study examines the potential value of the radiologists' MRI reports for patients with previously undiagnosed MS who presented to the ED. In this retrospective study, electronic medical records were reviewed for patients without a prior diagnosis of a demyelinating disorder, who underwent imaging on the ED's MRI scanner between March 1, 2014, and March 1, 2016, and for whom the radiologist reported a possible demyelinating disorder. Patient encounters of 61 women and 31 men (mean age, 41.2 years) met the inclusion criteria. In 48 of 92 (52.2%) cases where the radiology report suggested a demyelinating diagnosis, the patient was also given such a diagnosis as the final outcome. Where a demyelinating disorder was placed as the only, first, second, or third (or later) differential diagnosis, the final diagnosis was concordant with demyelination in 84.3% (43/51), 37.5% (3/8), 18.2% (2/11), and 0% (0/22) of cases, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiologist-suggested demyelinating disease as the top differential diagnosis after MRI showed a high concordance rate with demyelinating disease being the final diagnosis. Scans in the ED for neurologic deficits can lead to early guidance for a diagnosis of demyelination to be made. Downstream effects may include reduced admission rates, avoidance of unnecessary use of other procedures, and early commencement of disease-modifying therapy.

  17. Brain microbiota disruption within inflammatory demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Branton, W. G.; Lu, J. Q.; Surette, M. G.; Holt, R. A.; Lind, J.; Laman, J. D.; Power, C.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities reside in healthy tissues but are often disrupted during disease. Bacterial genomes and proteins are detected in brains from humans, nonhuman primates, rodents and other species in the absence of neurological disease. We investigated the composition and abundance of microbiota in frozen and fixed autopsied brain samples from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and age- and sex-matched nonMS patients as controls, using neuropathological, molecular and bioinformatics tools. 16s rRNA sequencing revealed Proteobacteria to be the dominant phylum with restricted diversity in cerebral white matter (WM) from MS compared to nonMS patients. Both clinical groups displayed 1,200–1,400 bacterial genomes/cm3 and low bacterial rRNA:rDNA ratios in WM. RNAseq analyses showed a predominance of Proteobacteria in progressive MS patients’ WM, associated with increased inflammatory gene expression, relative to a broader range of bacterial phyla in relapsing-remitting MS patients’ WM. Although bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and RNA polymerase beta subunit immunoreactivities were observed in all patients, PGN immunodetection was correlated with demyelination and neuroinflammation in MS brains. Principal component analysis revealed that demyelination, PGN and inflammatory gene expression accounted for 86% of the observed variance. Thus, inflammatory demyelination is linked to an organ-specific dysbiosis in MS that could contribute to underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:27892518

  18. Auraptene induces oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in a cuprizone-induced animal model of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Shimizu, Risei; Furuta, Kohei; Sugino, Mami; Watanabe, Takashi; Aoki, Rui; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-05-15

    We investigated the effects of auraptene on mouse oligodendroglial cell lineage in an animal model of demyelination induced by cuprizone. Auraptene, a citrus coumarin, was intraperitoneally administered to mice fed the demyelinating agent cuprizone. Immunohistochemical analysis of the corpus callosum and/or Western blotting analysis of brain extracts revealed that cuprizone reduced immunoreactivity for myelin-basic protein, a marker of myelin, whereas it increased immunoreactivity to platelet derived-growth factor receptor-α, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Administration of auraptene enhanced the immunoreactivity to oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells, but had no effect on immunoreactivity to myelin-basic protein or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. These findings suggest that auraptene promotes the production of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in an animal model of demyelination and may be useful for individuals with demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Central Nervous System Demyelination and Remyelination is Independent from Systemic Cholesterol Level in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Sun, Wenhui; Brogden, Graham; Sun, Yanyong; Kammeyer, Patricia; Kalkuhl, Arno; Colbatzky, Florian; Deschl, Ulrich; Naim, Hassan Y; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    High dietary fat and/or cholesterol intake is a risk factor for multiple diseases and has been debated for multiple sclerosis. However, cholesterol biosynthesis is a key pathway during myelination and disturbances are described in demyelinating diseases. To address the possible interaction of dyslipidemia and demyelination, cholesterol biosynthesis gene expression, composition of the body's major lipid repositories and Paigen diet-induced, systemic hypercholesterolemia were examined in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) using histology, immunohistochemistry, serum clinical chemistry, microarrays and high-performance thin layer chromatography. TME-virus (TMEV)-infected mice showed progressive loss of motor performance and demyelinating leukomyelitis. Gene expression associated with cholesterol biosynthesis was overall down-regulated in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. Spinal cord levels of galactocerebroside and sphingomyelin were reduced on day 196 post TMEV infection. Paigen diet induced serum hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipidosis. However, high dietary fat and cholesterol intake led to no significant differences in clinical course, inflammatory response, astrocytosis, and the amount of demyelination and remyelination in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. The results suggest that down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis is a transcriptional marker for demyelination, quantitative loss of myelin-specific lipids, but not cholesterol occurs late in chronic demyelination, and serum hypercholesterolemia exhibited no significant effect on TMEV infection.

  20. Imaging and clinical properties of inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Min; Liang, Hui; Yu, Quntao; Yan, Zhihui; Kong, Min

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor usually occurs in the brain and rarely occurs in the spinal cord. On imaging, inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor appears very similar to intramedullary tumors such as gliomas. It is often misdiagnosed as intramedullary tumor and surgically resected. In view of this, the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and the pathological fea-tures of 36 cases of inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor in the spinal cord were retrospec-tively analyzed and summarized. Most of these cases suffered from acute or subacute onset and exhibited a sensorimotor disorder. Among them, six cases were misdiagnosed as having intra-dullary gliomas, and inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor was only identified and pathologi-cally confirmed after surgical resection. Lesions in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord were com-mon. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed edema and space-occupying lesions to varying grees at the cervical-thoracic junction, with a predominant feature of non-closed rosette-like forcement (open-loop sign). Pathological examination showed perivascular cuffing of predominantly dense lymphocytes, and demyelination was observed in six of the misdiagnosed cases. These re-sults suggest that tumor-like inflammatory demyelinating disease in the spinal cord is a kind of special demyelinating disease that can be categorized as inflammatory pseudotumor. These solitary lesions are easily confused with intramedullary neoplasms. Patchy or non-closed reinforcement (open-ring sign) on magnetic resonance imaging is the predominant property of inflammatory myelinating pseudotumor, and inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination are additional pa-logical properties. PMID:25206559

  1. Differential diagnosis and evaluation in pediatric inflammatory demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Hemingway, Cheryl; Tardieu, Marc

    2016-08-30

    Major advances have been made in the clinical and radiologic characterization of children presenting with the different forms of an acquired inflammatory demyelinating syndrome (ADS) such as acute disseminating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, and clinically isolated syndromes. Nevertheless, a proportion of cases that present with similar symptoms are due to a broad spectrum of other inflammatory disorders affecting the white matter, primary CNS tumors, or neurometabolic diseases. The clinician therefore has to be aware of the different forms of ADS, the risk factors for a chronic-relapsing course, and features that indicate an alternative diagnosis. The goal of this article is therefore to provide an outline of a pathway for evaluating pediatric patients with a presumed inflammatory demyelinating disorder and discussing the spectrum of the more common differential diagnoses.

  2. Nerve-dependent changes in skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain after experimental denervation, cross-reinnervation and in a demyelinating mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Maggs, Alison M.; Huxley, Clare; Hughes, Simon M.

    2010-01-01

    Innervation regulates the contractile properties of vertebrate muscle fibers, in part through the effect of electrical activity on expression of distinct myosins. Here we analyse the role of innervation in regulating the accumulation of the general, maturational and adult forms of rodent slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) that are defined by the presence of distinct antigenic epitopes. Denervation increases the number of fibers that express general slow MyHC, but it decreases the adult slow MyHC epitope. Cross-reinnervation of slow muscle by a fast nerve leads to an increase in the number of fibers that express fast MyHC. In both cases, there is an increase in fibers that express slow and fast IIA MyHCs but without the adult slow MyHC epitope. The data suggest that innervation is required for maturation and maintenance of diversity of both slow and fast fibers. The sequence of slow MyHC epitope transitions is a useful biomarker, and it may play a significant role during nerve-dependent changes in muscle fiber function. We applied this detailed muscle analysis to a transgenic mouse model of Human Motor and Sensory Neuropathy IA, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A), in which electrical conduction in some motor neurons is poor due to demyelination. The mice display atrophy of some muscle fibers and changes in slow and fast MyHC epitope expression suggestive of a progressive increase in innervation of muscle fibers by fast motor neurons, even at early stages. The potential role of these early changes in disease pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:19016545

  3. Chronic arsenic poisoning masquerading as Landry-Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goddard, M J; Tanhehco, J L; Dau, P C

    1992-09-01

    Acute arsenic intoxication may present as Landry-Guillain-Barré syndrome because of similarities in clinical symptoms involving the gastrointestinal tract, weakness, and sensory symptoms. Electrodiagnostic findings may be similar with demyelinating changes predominating early in both diseases. A case is presented of repeated arsenic poisoning over two years misdiagnosed as Landry-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Proximal F-loop latency (M-wave latency at wrist + F-wave latency at wrist - 2 M-wave latency at axilla) helped to establish the correct diagnosis. Serial electrodiagnostic studies were done documenting the evolution of chronic repeated arsenic poisoning from a picture showing demyelination to one with severe axonal loss.

  4. Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma masquerading as pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William H

    2004-11-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a relatively rare adenocarcinoma that typically arises in the lung periphery and grows along alveolar walls, without destroying the lung parenchyma. It is often multicentric and may arise from a previously stable scar. Because the parenchyma is preserved and because BAC may arise simultaneously in multiple lobes, the chest radiograph and symptoms (cough, chest pain, and sputum production) may be indistinguishable from pneumonia or other noninfectious inflammatory processes (eg, hypersensitivity pneumonitis or bronchiolitis obliterans). The clinician should suspect BAC if what otherwise appears to be pneumonia lacks fever or leukocytosis or does not respond to antibiotics. BAC accounts for 2.6-4.3 % of all lung cancers. On a radiograph, BAC often appears as a solitary nodule, but may also appear as a patchy, lobar or multilobar infiltrates, often with air bronchograms indistinguishable from pneumonia. Positron-emission tomography does not help distinguish BAC from pneumonia. Among BAC patients, 62% present without symptoms and with only an abnormal radiograph, whereas 38% present with symptoms of cough, chest pain, and sputum production. Bronchoscopy is usually normal. Preoperative diagnosis with transbronchial biopsy, bronchoscopic cytology examination, or expectorated sputum cytology is more common with the diffuse or multicentric forms. Cure depends on complete resection. A trial of antibiotics and reassessment of clinical findings is a reasonable approach, but biopsy or cytology is the only means of ruling in malignancy and ruling out other etiologies, so biopsy should always be considered when a presumed pneumonia does not respond to antibiotics. I saw a 61-year-old man whose initial diagnosis was pneumonia. He took a 10-day course of oral azithromycin, but his symptoms and chest radiograph were unchanged. A tomogram showed interstitial prominence and peripheral air-space disease in the right upper and lower lobes

  5. Diagnoses in Pediatric Patients With Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Lesions Suspicious for Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael L; Kukreja, Marcia; Horn, Paul S; Standridge, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in pediatric patients frequently show abnormal white matter lesions, which may be concerning for demyelinating disease. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pediatric patients who have MRI lesions concerning for demyelinating disease at presentation and ultimately are diagnosed with a primary central nervous system demyelinating disease. A retrospective chart review was performed on MRI reports of patients who underwent imaging evaluation at a single tertiary pediatric hospital. Of 299 patients identified, 192 presented with acute neurologic complaints. In this group, ≥ 5 discrete lesions, African American race, and having brain stem, thalamic, cerebellar, or optic nerve lesions was associated with the patient being diagnosed with a disease that required further treatment. The other 107 patients underwent MRI for other indications. Among these subjects, having lesions within the corpus callosum or cerebellum was associated with being diagnosed with a disease requiring further treatment.

  6. Gene expression changes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Puttini, Stefania; Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Mermod, Nicolas; Renaud, Susanne; Steck, Andreas J; Kuntzer, Thierry

    2014-05-15

    Chronic-inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disease with no known biomarkers for diagnosing the disease or assessing its prognosis. We performed transcriptional profiling microarray analysis on skin punch biopsies from 20 CIDP patients and 17 healthy controls to identify disease-associated gene expression changes. We demonstrate changes in expression of genes involved in immune and chemokine regulation, growth and repair. We also found a combination of two upregulated genes that can be proposed as a novel biomarker of the disorder.

  7. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  8. Machine learning approach identifies new pathways associated with demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Reiner; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis is an experimentally virus-induced inflammatory demyelinating disease of the spinal cord, displaying clinical and pathological similarities to chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify pathways associated with chronic demyelination using an assumption-free combined microarray and immunohistology approach. Movement control as determined by rotarod assay significantly worsened in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis -virus-infected SJL/J mice from 42 to 196 days after infection (dpi). In the spinal cords, inflammatory changes were detected 14 to 196 dpi, and demyelination progressively increased from 42 to 196 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed 1001 differentially expressed genes over the study period. The dominating changes as revealed by k-means and functional annotation clustering included up-regulations related to intrathecal antibody production and antigen processing and presentation via major histocompatibility class II molecules. A random forest machine learning algorithm revealed that down-regulated lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis, differentially expressed neurite morphogenesis and up-regulated toll-like receptor-4-induced pathways were intimately associated with demyelination as measured by immunohistology. Conclusively, although transcriptional changes were dominated by the adaptive immune response, the main pathways associated with demyelination included up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 and down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Cholesterol biosynthesis is a rate limiting step of myelination and its down-regulation is suggested to be involved in chronic demyelination by an inhibition of remyelination.

  9. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Lukas; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  10. When DLB, PD, and PSP masquerade as MSA

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Uitti, Ryan J.; van Gerpen, Jay A.; Cheshire, William P.; Josephs, Keith A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Langston, J. William

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine ways to improve diagnostic accuracy of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we assessed the diagnostic process in patients who came to autopsy with antemortem diagnosis of MSA by comparing clinical and pathologic features between those who proved to have MSA and those who did not. We focus on likely explanations for misdiagnosis. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 134 consecutive patients with an antemortem clinical diagnosis of MSA who came to autopsy with neuropathologic evaluation of the brain. Of the 134 patients, 125 had adequate medical records for review. Clinical and pathologic features were compared between patients with autopsy-confirmed MSA and those with other pathologic diagnoses, including dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson disease (PD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Results: Of the 134 patients with clinically diagnosed MSA, 83 (62%) had the correct diagnosis at autopsy. Pathologically confirmed DLB was the most common misdiagnosis, followed by PSP and PD. Despite meeting pathologic criteria for intermediate to high likelihood of DLB, several patients with DLB did not have dementia and none had significant Alzheimer-type pathology. Autonomic failure was the leading cause of misdiagnosis in DLB and PD, and cerebellar ataxia was the leading cause of misdiagnosis in PSP. Conclusions: The diagnostic accuracy for MSA was suboptimal in this autopsy study. Pathologically confirmed DLB, PD, and PSP were the most common diseases to masquerade as MSA. This has significant implications not only for patient care, but also for research studies in MSA cases that do not have pathologic confirmation. PMID:26138942

  11. Fibronectin connecting segment-1 peptide inhibits pathogenic leukocyte trafficking and inflammatory demyelination in experimental models of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chaoling; Greathouse, Kelsey M; Beacham, Rebecca L; Palladino, Steven P; Helton, E Scott; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2017-06-01

    The molecular determinants of pathogenic leukocyte migration across the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) are unknown. Specific disease modifying therapies for CIDP are also lacking. Fibronectin connecting segment-1 (FNCS1), an alternatively spliced fibronectin variant expressed by microvascular endothelial cells at sites of inflammation in vitro and in situ, is a counterligand for leukocyte α4 integrin (also known as CD49d) implicated in pathogenic leukocyte trafficking in multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. We sought to determine the role of FNCS1 in CIDP patient leukocyte trafficking across the BNB in vitro and in severe chronic demyelinating neuritis in vivo using a representative spontaneous murine CIDP model. Peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from 7 untreated CIDP patients were independently infused into a cytokine-treated, flow-dependent in vitro BNB model system. Time-lapse digital video microscopy was performed to visualize and quantify leukocyte trafficking, comparing FNCS1 peptide blockade to relevant controls. Fifty 24-week old female B7-2 deficient non-obese diabetic mice with spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy (SAPP) were treated daily with 2mg/kg FNCS1 peptide for 5days via intraperitoneal injection with appropriate controls. Neurobehavioral measures of disease severity, motor nerve electrophysiology assessments and histopathological quantification of inflammation and morphometric assessment of demyelination were performed to determine in vivo efficacy. The biological relevance of FNCS1 and CD49d in CIDP was evaluated by immunohistochemical detection in affected patient sural nerve biopsies. 25μM FNCS1 peptide maximally inhibited CIDP leukocyte trafficking at the human BNB in vitro. FNCS1 peptide treatment resulted in significant improvements in disease severity, motor electrophysiological parameters of demyelination and histological measures of

  12. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Khema R; Saadia, Daniela; Facca, Alicia G; Bhatia, Rita; Ayyar, D Ram; Sheremata, William

    2008-06-01

    To describe temporal profile of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) in patients with definite, relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy has been rarely reported in association with central nervous system demyelinating disorder indistinguishable from MS. In addition to usual diagnostic studies for CIDP and MS in all 5 patients, we studied proximal segments of nerves using deep tendon reflex latency measurements of biceps reflex, patellar reflex, and ankle reflex. All patients with MS subsequently (4-22 years) developed definite CIDP. Two of these patients developed multiple cranial nerve and spinal root enhancement on subsequent imaging without new intraparenchymal enhancement after a diagnosis of CIDP. The deep tendon reflex latencies were prolonged at more than 2 sites in all patients. Cerebral spinal fluid protein increased (70 +/- 19 to 144.8 +/- 17.4 mg/dL, P = 0.0001) at time of diagnosis of CIDP. Clinical improvement was observed in all patients after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. When patients with MS develop CIDP, manifestations of central and peripheral disease involvement seem to respond to intravenous immunoglobulin. These cases suggest that there may be common antigenic targets in central and peripheral nervous system in this subset of patients.

  13. ADAM12 is expressed by astrocytes during experimental demyelination.

    PubMed

    Baertling, Fabian; Kokozidou, Maria; Pufe, Thomas; Clarner, Tim; Windoffer, Reinhard; Wruck, Christoph J; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove; Beyer, Cordian; Kipp, Markus

    2010-04-22

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 12 represents a member of a large family of similarly structured multi-domain proteins. In the central nervous system (CNS), ADAM12 has been suggested to play a role in brain development, glioblastoma cell proliferation, and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Furthermore, ADAM12 was reported to be almost exclusively expressed by oligodendrocytes and could, therefore, be considered as suitable marker for this cell type. In the present study, we investigated ADAM12 expression in the healthy and pathologically altered murine CNS. As pathological paradigm, we used the cuprizone demyelination model in which myelin loss during multiple sclerosis is imitated. Besides APC(+) oligodendrocytes, SMI311(+) neurons and GFAP(+) astrocytes express ADAM12 in the adult mouse brain. ADAM12 expression was further analyzed in vitro. After the induction of demyelination, we observed that activated astrocytes are the main source of ADAM12 in brain regions affected by oligodendrocyte loss. Exposure of astrocytes in vitro to either lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), glutamate, or hydrogen peroxide revealed a highly stimulus-specific regulation of ADAM12 expression which was not seen in microglial BV2 cells. It appears that LPS- and TNFalpha-induced ADAM12 expression is mediated via the classic NFkappaB pathway. In summary, we demonstrated that ADAM12 is not a suitable marker for oligodendrocytes. Our results further suggest that ADAM12 might be implicated in the course of distinct CNS diseases such as demyelinating disorders.

  14. Corneal sensitivity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Surbhi; Myneni, Ajay A; Mu, Lina; Myers, Bennett H; Patel, Sangita P

    2014-07-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis may result from a variety of ocular or systemic diseases. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune neuropathy that affects any nerve plexus but with no known association with corneal disease. We observed 2 patients with CIDP and visually compromising neurotrophic corneal ulcers. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of neurotrophic corneas in patients with CIDP to identify a subpopulation of asymptomatic patients who are at risk for vision loss. This is an observational case series of 2 patients with CIDP with visually compromising neurotrophic corneal ulcers and a prospective clinical study comparing corneal sensitivity in 9 patients with CIDP versus 9 age- and sex-matched controls. Corneal sensitivity was tested with an esthesiometer. Statistical analyses were performed to determine patterns or significances in relation to the subject's age, gender, and duration and severity of the disease. The overall median corneal sensitivity was 5.7 for patients with CIDP and 6.0 for controls (P = 0.09). The mean corneal sensitivity was 5.6 ± 0.4 in patients with CIDP compared with 5.8 ± 0.3 in controls. No specific pattern was found with age, gender, or duration and severity of the disease among patients with CIDP. Although the case series demonstrated decreased corneal sensitivity in both patients with CIDP, the prospective study detected reduced corneal sensitivity in patients with CIDP when compared with controls, but did not reach statistical significance. Ophthalmic examinations with measurement of corneal sensitivity should be considered in the management of patients with CIDP.Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01379833.

  15. Intraocular Silicone Oil Masquerading as Terson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Samavat, Bijan; Mehrian, Payam; Hedayatfar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Terson syndrome is described as intraocular hemorrhage in association with any type of intracranial hemorrhage and is associated with higher mortality rate and vision loss. Intraocular hemorrhage in Terson syndrome may be diagnosed using computed tomography but there are false positive results. Silicone oil which is widely used for internal tamponade of complicated retinal detachments has high attenuation on computed tomography and hyperintensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging that can mimic intraocular hemorrhage. This report shows that silicone oil is another origin of false positive results in interpreting CT findings for detecting Terson syndrome. Case Report. A 71-year-old diabetic woman presented with loss of consciousness. Brain computed tomography revealed right cerebellar hemorrhage and ventricular hemorrhage and hyperdensity in vitreous cavity of the left eye that was initially interpreted as vitreous hemorrhage. Terson syndrome was the initial diagnosis but ophthalmoscopic examination and brain MRI showed that the left eye had silicone oil tamponade. Conclusion. Without knowing the history of previous vitreoretinal surgery, CT scan findings of intraocular silicone oil may be interpreted as vitreous hemorrhage. In patients with concomitant intracranial hemorrhage, it can masquerade as Terson syndrome. PMID:27747119

  16. Scabies masquerading as bullous pemphigoid: scabies surrepticius.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-01-01

    Scabies, a parasitic infestation caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, is diagnosed by observing either the mite, its ova, or its excrement. The mite tracts, known as burrows and a characteristic presentation of the pruritic condition, are typically found on the web spaces between the fingers. Other cutaneous lesions include excoriated papules, pustules, and vesicles. However, atypical clinical variants of scabies, such as bullous, crusted, hidden, incognito, nodular, and scalp forms of the parasitic infestation, mimic the morphologic features of other non-parasitic dermatoses. A 76-year-old man presented with pruritic blisters and urticarial plaques that demonstrated not only pathology changes, but direct immunofluorescence also showed findings of bullous pemphigoid. His condition improved, but did not resolve, with topical corticosteroid cream for the management of the primary autoimmune blistering disorder. When other family members subsequently developed scabies, the correct diagnosis for his condition, bullous scabies, was established by demonstrating mites, ova, and scybala on a mineral oil preparation from a skin scraping of a newly appearing burrow. Bullous scabies can masquerade not only clinically, but also both pathologically and immunologically as bullous pemphigoid. Scabies serrupticius is introduced as a unifying term to designate all of the non-classic presentations of S. scabiei mite infestation.

  17. Scabies masquerading as bullous pemphigoid: scabies surrepticius

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-01-01

    Scabies, a parasitic infestation caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, is diagnosed by observing either the mite, its ova, or its excrement. The mite tracts, known as burrows and a characteristic presentation of the pruritic condition, are typically found on the web spaces between the fingers. Other cutaneous lesions include excoriated papules, pustules, and vesicles. However, atypical clinical variants of scabies, such as bullous, crusted, hidden, incognito, nodular, and scalp forms of the parasitic infestation, mimic the morphologic features of other non-parasitic dermatoses. A 76-year-old man presented with pruritic blisters and urticarial plaques that demonstrated not only pathology changes, but direct immunofluorescence also showed findings of bullous pemphigoid. His condition improved, but did not resolve, with topical corticosteroid cream for the management of the primary autoimmune blistering disorder. When other family members subsequently developed scabies, the correct diagnosis for his condition, bullous scabies, was established by demonstrating mites, ova, and scybala on a mineral oil preparation from a skin scraping of a newly appearing burrow. Bullous scabies can masquerade not only clinically, but also both pathologically and immunologically as bullous pemphigoid. Scabies serrupticius is introduced as a unifying term to designate all of the non-classic presentations of S. scabiei mite infestation. PMID:28883737

  18. Displacing lateral meniscus masquerading as patella dislocation.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A; Fontboté, Cristián A; Rohr, Sara R

    2014-10-01

    To alert the treating clinician to an uncommon knee meniscal condition that often masquerades as a more common patella condition. Retrospective chart review of a series of cases was undertaken. A series of 12 knees in 11 patients were referred to an orthopaedic surgeon with a diagnosis of recurrent lateral patella dislocation. Three knees had undergone patella realignment surgery with continuance of symptoms. Eight patients had prior magnetic resonance images read as no meniscal pathology and no acute patella/patella retinacular injury. All patients presented for a consult with a similar history. Under anaesthesia, all knees had a stable patella as judged by physical examination. At the time of surgery, six patients had a frank tear in the lateral meniscus, all of which were readily displaceable. Six knees showed a displaceable lateral meniscus with attenuation but not a visible frank tear. Ten menisci were treated with repair, and two knees underwent partial lateral meniscectomies. Patient follow-up of minimally 18 months revealed no further episodes of "knee-cap dislocation" or symptoms of catching and locking. The clinician treating a patient with a history of a knee locking in flexion should have a high index of suspicion for a lateral meniscus tear or an unstable hypermobile lateral meniscus, despite patient report of perceived patella movement. History of symptoms occurring in knee flexion and attention to patella physical examination should be key factors in this diagnostic conundrum. Retrospective chart review, Level IV.

  19. Analysis of the Host Transcriptome from Demyelinating Spinal Cord of Murine Coronavirus-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Ruth; Li, Fan; Dragomir, Isabelle; Chua, Ming Ming W.; Gregory, Brian D.; Weiss, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection of the mouse central nervous system (CNS) with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) induces a demyelinating disease pathologically similar to multiple sclerosis and is therefore used as a model system. There is little information regarding the host factors that correlate with and contribute to MHV-induced demyelination. Here, we detail the genes and pathways associated with MHV-induced demyelinating disease in the spinal cord. High-throughput sequencing of the host transcriptome revealed that demyelination is accompanied by numerous transcriptional changes indicative of immune infiltration as well as changes in the cytokine milieu and lipid metabolism. We found evidence that a Th1-biased cytokine/chemokine response and eicosanoid-derived inflammation accompany persistent MHV infection and that antigen presentation is ongoing. Interestingly, increased expression of genes involved in lipid transport, processing, and catabolism, including some with known roles in neurodegenerative diseases, coincided with demyelination. Lastly, expression of several genes involved in osteoclast or bone-resident macrophage function, most notably TREM2 and DAP12, was upregulated in persistently infected mouse spinal cord. This study highlights the complexity of the host antiviral response, which accompany MHV-induced demyelination, and further supports previous findings that MHV-induced demyelination is immune-mediated. Interestingly, these data suggest a parallel between bone reabsorption by osteoclasts and myelin debris clearance by microglia in the bone and the CNS, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using an RNA-seq approach to study the host CNS response to persistent viral infection. PMID:24058676

  20. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

  1. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  2. Mexican American Male Masquerades in the Institution as Bully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oesterreich, Heather A.; Sosa-Provencio, Mia A.; Anatska, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    This Black and Chicana Feminist case study challenges national discourse surrounding school bullying as individualistic, student-centered. We explore the warrior lens of Mexican/Mexican-American males. While masquerading institutional compliance, they simultaneously unmask policies, practices as the means to control mind/bodies/spirit. This…

  3. Tinea corporis masquerading as subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Modi, Gunjan M; Maender, Jennifer L; Coleman, Neil; Hsu, Sylvia

    2008-04-15

    Few papers discuss the potential challenge of differentiating dermatophytosis from subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This masquerade, most often manifest on the face, is of both clinical and therapeutic importance. We report a patient whose extensive tinea corporis very closely mimicked SCLE. The threshold for biopsy should be low in cases that exhibit atypical features for either of these entities.

  4. Autotaxin and lysophosphatidic acid1 receptor-mediated demyelination of dorsal root fibers by sciatic nerve injury and intrathecal lysophosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although neuropathic pain is frequently observed in demyelinating diseases such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis, the molecular basis for the relationship between demyelination and neuropathic pain behaviors is poorly understood. Previously, we found that lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPA1) signaling initiates sciatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and demyelination. Results In the present study, we have demonstrated that sciatic nerve injury induces marked demyelination accompanied by myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) down-regulation and damage of Schwann cell partitioning of C-fiber-containing Remak bundles in the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, but not in the spinal nerve. Demyelination, MAG down-regulation and Remak bundle damage in the dorsal root were abolished in LPA1 receptor-deficient (Lpar1-/-) mice, but these alterations were not observed in sciatic nerve. However, LPA-induced demyelination in ex vivo experiments was observed in the sciatic nerve, spinal nerve and dorsal root, all which express LPA1 transcript and protein. Nerve injury-induced dorsal root demyelination was markedly attenuated in mice heterozygous for autotaxin (atx+/-), which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to LPA. Although the addition of LPC to ex vivo cultures of dorsal root fibers in the presence of recombinant ATX caused potent demyelination, it had no significant effect in the absence of ATX. On the other hand, intrathecal injection of LPC caused potent dorsal root demyelination, which was markedly attenuated or abolished in atx+/- or Lpar1-/- mice. Conclusions These results suggest that LPA, which is converted from LPC by ATX, activates LPA1 receptors and induces dorsal root demyelination following nerve injury, which causes neuropathic pain. PMID:21062487

  5. Dietary cholesterol promotes repair of demyelinated lesions in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Stefan A.; Gerndt, Nina; Winchenbach, Jan; Stumpf, Sina K.; Hosang, Leon; Odoardi, Francesca; Ruhwedel, Torben; Böhler, Carolin; Barrette, Benoit; Stassart, Ruth; Liebetanz, David; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Edgar, Julia M.; Saher, Gesine

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder in which remyelination failure contributes to persistent disability. Cholesterol is rate-limiting for myelin biogenesis in the developing CNS; however, whether cholesterol insufficiency contributes to remyelination failure in MS, is unclear. Here, we show the relationship between cholesterol, myelination and neurological parameters in mouse models of demyelination and remyelination. In the cuprizone model, acute disease reduces serum cholesterol levels that can be restored by dietary cholesterol. Concomitant with blood-brain barrier impairment, supplemented cholesterol directly supports oligodendrocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation, and restores the balance of growth factors, creating a permissive environment for repair. This leads to attenuated axon damage, enhanced remyelination and improved motor learning. Remarkably, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, cholesterol supplementation does not exacerbate disease expression. These findings emphasize the safety of dietary cholesterol in inflammatory diseases and point to a previously unrecognized role of cholesterol in promoting repair after demyelinating episodes. PMID:28117328

  6. The Biology of Persistent Infection: Inflammation and Demyelination following Murine Coronavirus Infection of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hosking, Martin P.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of humans. Although causes of MS are enigmatic, underlying elements contributing to disease development include both genetic and environmental factors. Recent epidemiological evidence has pointed to viral infection as a trigger to initiating white matter damage in humans. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is a positive strand RNA virus that, following intracranial infection of susceptible mice, induces an acute encephalomyelitis that later resolves into a chronic fulminating demyelinating disease. Immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system is critical both to quell viral replication and instigate demyelination. Recent efforts by our laboratory and others have focused upon strategies capable of enhancing remyelination in response to viral-induced demyelination, both by dampening chronic inflammation and by surgical engraftment of remyelination – competent neural precursor cells. PMID:19946572

  7. Vitamin D and estrogen synergy in Vdr-expressing CD4(+) T cells is essential to induce Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and prevent autoimmune demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Justin A; Nashold, Faye E; Mayne, Christopher G; Nelson, Corwin D; Hayes, Colleen E

    2015-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from an autoimmune attack on the axon-myelin unit. A female MS bias becomes evident after puberty and female incidence has tripled in the last half-century, implicating a female sex hormone interacting with a modifiable environmental factor. These aspects of MS suggest that many female MS cases may be preventable. Mechanistic knowledge of this hormone-environment interaction is needed to devise strategies to reduce female MS risk. We previously demonstrated that vitamin D3 (D3) deficiency increases and D3 supplementation decreases experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) risk in a female-biased manner. We also showed that D3 acts in an estrogen (E2)-dependent manner, since ovariectomy eliminated and E2 restored D3-mediated EAE protection. Here we probed the hypothesis that E2 and D3 interact synergistically within CD4(+) T cells to control T cell fate and prevent demyelinating disease. The E2 increased EAE resistance in wild-type (WT) but not T-Vdr(0) mice lacking Vdr gene function in CD4(+) T cells, so E2 action depended entirely on Vdr(+)CD4(+) T cells. The E2 levels were higher in WT than T-Vdr(0) mice, suggesting the Vdr(+)CD4(+) T cells produced E2 or stimulated its production. The E2 decreased Cyp24a1 and increased Vdr transcripts in T cells, prolonging the calcitriol half-life and increasing calcitriol responsiveness. The E2 also increased CD4(+)Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells in a Vdr-dependent manner. Thus, CD4(+) T cells have a cooperative amplification loop involving E2 and calcitriol that promotes CD4(+)Helios(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cell development and is disrupted when the D3 pathway is impaired. The global decline in population D3 status may be undermining a similar cooperative E2-D3 interaction controlling Treg cell differentiation in women, causing a breakdown in T cell self tolerance and a rise in MS incidence.

  8. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination.

  9. Gut Commensalism, Cytokines, and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  10. Mesenchymal stromal-cell transplants induce oligodendrocyte progenitor migration and remyelination in a chronic demyelination model

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Merchán, J; Jones, J; Ivorra, J L; Pastor, D; Viso-León, M C; Armengól, J A; Moltó, M D; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Martínez, S

    2013-01-01

    Demyelinating disorders such as leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of myelin that may lead toward a chronic demyelination of the brain's white matter, impairing normal axonal conduction velocity and ultimately causing neurodegeneration. Current treatments modifying the pathological mechanisms are capable of ameliorating the disease; however, frequently, these therapies are not sufficient to repress the progressive demyelination into a chronic condition and permanent loss of function. To this end, we analyzed the effect that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) grafts exert in a chronically demyelinated mouse brain. As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitors were recruited surrounding the graft due to the expression of various trophic signals by the grafted MSCs. Although there was no significant reaction in the non-grafted side, in the grafted regions oligodendrocyte progenitors were detected. These progenitors were derived from the nearby tissue as well as from the neurogenic niches, including the subependymal zone and dentate gyrus. Once near the graft site, the cells matured to myelinating oligodendrocytes. Finally, electrophysiological studies demonstrated that axonal conduction velocity was significantly increased in the grafted side of the fimbria. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that in chronic demyelinated white matter, BM-MSC transplantation activates oligodendrocyte progenitors and induces remyelination in the tissue surrounding the stem cell graft. PMID:23990019

  11. Mesenchymal stromal-cell transplants induce oligodendrocyte progenitor migration and remyelination in a chronic demyelination model.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Merchán, J; Jones, J; Ivorra, J L; Pastor, D; Viso-León, M C; Armengól, J A; Moltó, M D; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Martínez, S

    2013-08-29

    Demyelinating disorders such as leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of myelin that may lead toward a chronic demyelination of the brain's white matter, impairing normal axonal conduction velocity and ultimately causing neurodegeneration. Current treatments modifying the pathological mechanisms are capable of ameliorating the disease; however, frequently, these therapies are not sufficient to repress the progressive demyelination into a chronic condition and permanent loss of function. To this end, we analyzed the effect that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) grafts exert in a chronically demyelinated mouse brain. As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitors were recruited surrounding the graft due to the expression of various trophic signals by the grafted MSCs. Although there was no significant reaction in the non-grafted side, in the grafted regions oligodendrocyte progenitors were detected. These progenitors were derived from the nearby tissue as well as from the neurogenic niches, including the subependymal zone and dentate gyrus. Once near the graft site, the cells matured to myelinating oligodendrocytes. Finally, electrophysiological studies demonstrated that axonal conduction velocity was significantly increased in the grafted side of the fimbria. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that in chronic demyelinated white matter, BM-MSC transplantation activates oligodendrocyte progenitors and induces remyelination in the tissue surrounding the stem cell graft.

  12. The In Vivo PDGF Response During Remyelination in Mouse Spinal Cord Following Murine Hepatitis Virus Strain A59-Induced Transient Demyelination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-14

    Mechanisms involved in myelin repair (remyelination) are poorly understood. This project examined changes in oligodendrocyte function during remyelination in the adult central nervous system (CNS). Knowledge of how oligodendrocytes remyelinate adult CNS may lead to therapies for chronic human demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, demyelination is followed by partial, but incomplete remyelination.

  13. Visual Evoked Potential Recording in a Rat Model of Experimental Optic Nerve Demyelination.

    PubMed

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Chitranshi, Nitin; Reedman, Brittany; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2015-07-29

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) recording is widely used in clinical practice to assess the severity of optic neuritis in its acute phase, and to monitor the disease course in the follow-up period. Changes in the VEP parameters closely correlate with pathological damage in the optic nerve. This protocol provides a detailed description about the rodent model of optic nerve microinjection, in which a partial demyelination lesion is produced in the optic nerve. VEP recording techniques are also discussed. Using skull implanted electrodes, we are able to acquire reproducible intra-session and between-session VEP traces. VEPs can be recorded on individual animals over a period of time to assess the functional changes in the optic nerve longitudinally. The optic nerve demyelination model, in conjunction with the VEP recording protocol, provides a tool to investigate the disease processes associated with demyelination and remyelination, and can potentially be employed to evaluate the effects of new remyelinating drugs or neuroprotective therapies.

  14. A rare presentation of atypical demyelination: tumefactive multiple sclerosis causing Gerstmann’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are a rare manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Differential diagnosis of such space occupying lesions may not be straightforward and sometimes necessitate brain biopsy. Impaired cognition is the second most common clinical manifestation of tumefactive MS; however complex cognitive syndromes are unusual. Case presentation We report the case of a 30 year old woman who presented with Gerstmann’s syndrome. MRI revealed a large heterogeneous contrast enhancing lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. Intravenous corticosteroids did not stop disease progression. A tumour or cerebral lymphoma was suspected, however brain biopsy confirmed inflammatory demyelination. Following diagnosis of tumefactive MS treatment with natalizumab effectively suppressed disease activity. Conclusions The case highlights the need for clinicians, radiologists and surgeons to appreciate the heterogeneous presentation of tumefactive MS. Early brain biopsy facilitates rapid diagnosis and management. Treatment with natalizumab may be useful in cases of tumefactive demyelination where additional evidence supports a diagnosis of relapsing MS. PMID:24694183

  15. [Multifocal demyelinating polyneuropathy with persistent conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kimura, J; Kameyama, M

    1990-11-01

    Multifocal demyelinating neuropathy with persistent conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome) is a variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), which often clinically simulates a motor neuron disease (MND). We report here three patients initially suspected to have MND, who later were diagnosed as a Lewis-Sumner syndrome. One of them showed a remarkable clinical improvement after immunoglobulin therapy. The definitive diagnosis of this syndrome rests upon nerve conduction studies, uncovering multiple sites of persistent conduction block. Technically, it is important to exclude insufficient stimulus which may lead to an erroneous impression of conduction block. Magnetic stimulation, as compared to electric current, elicited larger responses possibly because of deeper current penetration. We found this mode of stimulation useful especially in testing focal demyelination requiring full activation of a diseased nerve at a most proximal segment.

  16. [Osmotic demyelination syndrome in Addison crisis and severe hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Signe Elisabeth Bødker; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch

    2008-12-08

    Acute adrenal insufficiency is a life threatening disease with dehydration, hypotension, cerebral dysfunction and gastrointestinal symptoms accompanied by low plasma sodium and high plasma potassium. Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) can occur rarely following correction of plasma sodium. We describe a case with extremely low plasma sodium and subsequent development of ODS. Correction which is too slow may lead to cerebral oedema, brain stem herniation and low sodium encephalopathy. Correction which is too fast may cause ODS. The dilemma is accentuated by concomitant Addison crisis.

  17. A Case of Paraneoplastic Demyelinating Motor Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mostoufizadeh, Sohrab; Souri, Maryam; de Seze, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is commonly accompanied by cancer but demyelinating ones are not commonly reported. We report the clinical, neurophysiological, and biological characteristics of an 82-year-old patient who presented with a demyelinating motor neuropathy and high titre of anti-ganglioside antibodies associated with oesophageal cancer. The neurological course worsened rapidly despite immunotherapy, leading to a bedridden status. We propose to suspect a paraneoplastic origin in older patients or when the clinical course progresses rapidly within a few weeks or months. PMID:22649345

  18. Creatine Enhances Mitochondrial-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Survival After Demyelinating Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nanescu, Sonia E.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic oligodendrocyte loss, which occurs in the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS), contributes to axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Current therapies are able to reduce MS severity, but do not prevent transition into the progressive phase of the disease, which is characterized by chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, pharmacological compounds that promote oligodendrocyte survival could be beneficial for neuroprotection in MS. Here, we investigated the role of creatine, an organic acid involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) buffering, in oligodendrocyte function. We found that creatine increased mitochondrial ATP production directly in oligodendrocyte lineage cell cultures and exerted robust protection on oligodendrocytes by preventing cell death in both naive and lipopolysaccharide-treated mixed glia. Moreover, lysolecithin-mediated demyelination in mice deficient in the creatine-synthesizing enzyme guanidinoacetate-methyltransferase (Gamt) did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell recruitment, but resulted in exacerbated apoptosis of regenerated oligodendrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Remarkably, creatine administration into Gamt-deficient and wild-type mice with demyelinating injury reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, thereby increasing oligodendrocyte density and myelin basic protein staining in CNS lesions. We found that creatine did not affect the recruitment of macrophages/microglia into lesions, suggesting that creatine affects oligodendrocyte survival independently of inflammation. Together, our results demonstrate a novel function for creatine in promoting oligodendrocyte viability during CNS remyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report that creatine enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and protects against caspase-dependent oligodendrocyte apoptosis during CNS remyelination. This work has important implications for the development of therapeutic targets for diseases characterized by

  19. Creatine Enhances Mitochondrial-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Survival After Demyelinating Injury.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Kelly A; Chapey, Kristen S; Nanescu, Sonia E; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-08

    Chronic oligodendrocyte loss, which occurs in the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS), contributes to axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Current therapies are able to reduce MS severity, but do not prevent transition into the progressive phase of the disease, which is characterized by chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, pharmacological compounds that promote oligodendrocyte survival could be beneficial for neuroprotection in MS. Here, we investigated the role of creatine, an organic acid involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) buffering, in oligodendrocyte function. We found that creatine increased mitochondrial ATP production directly in oligodendrocyte lineage cell cultures and exerted robust protection on oligodendrocytes by preventing cell death in both naive and lipopolysaccharide-treated mixed glia. Moreover, lysolecithin-mediated demyelination in mice deficient in the creatine-synthesizing enzyme guanidinoacetate-methyltransferase (Gamt) did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell recruitment, but resulted in exacerbated apoptosis of regenerated oligodendrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Remarkably, creatine administration into Gamt-deficient and wild-type mice with demyelinating injury reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, thereby increasing oligodendrocyte density and myelin basic protein staining in CNS lesions. We found that creatine did not affect the recruitment of macrophages/microglia into lesions, suggesting that creatine affects oligodendrocyte survival independently of inflammation. Together, our results demonstrate a novel function for creatine in promoting oligodendrocyte viability during CNS remyelination.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report that creatine enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and protects against caspase-dependent oligodendrocyte apoptosis during CNS remyelination. This work has important implications for the development of therapeutic targets for diseases characterized by

  20. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ... Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 deficiency ameliorates the clinical course and demyelination in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Florian; Herder, Vanessa; Kalkuhl, Arno; Haist, Verena; Zhang, Ning; Schaudien, Dirk; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2012-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular proteases involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether MMPs induce direct myelin degradation, leukocyte infiltration, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and/or extracellular matrix remodeling in the pathogenesis of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME), a virus-induced model of MS. During the demyelinating phase of TME, the highest transcriptional upregulation was detected for Mmp12, followed by Mmp3. Mmp12 (-/-) mice showed reduced demyelination, macrophage infiltration, and motor deficits compared with wild-type- and Mmp3 knock-out mice. However, BBB remained unaltered, and the amount of extracellular matrix deposition was similar in knock-out mice and wild-type mice. Furthermore, stereotaxic injection of activated MMP-3, -9, and -12 into the caudal cerebellar peduncle of adult mice induced a focally extensive primary demyelination prior to infiltration of inflammatory cells, as well as a reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes and a leakage of BBB. All these results demonstrate that MMP-12 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of TME, most likely due to its primary myelin- or oligodendrocyte-toxic potential and its role in macrophage extravasation, whereas there was no sign of BBB damage or alterations to extracellular matrix remodeling/deposition. Thus, interrupting the MMP-12 cascade may be a relevant therapeutic approach for preventing chronic progressive demyelination.

  2. Sphenoid sinus organized hematoma with cranial neuropathies masquerading as a malignancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIN, YU-HSUAN; WANG, PO-CHIN; LIN, YAOH-SHIANG

    2016-01-01

    Sinonasal organized hematoma (SNOH) is rarely encountered in clinical practice. The disease demonstrates a high tendency for occurrence in East Asian individuals, and in the majority of cases, is located in the maxillary sinus. The current report presents the case of an 81-year-old female who developed a space-occupying lesion, which masqueraded as a skull base malignancy, following surgery for the treatment of isolated sphenoid sinus aspergilloma. Subsequent endoscopic endonasal surgery confirmed the diagnosis of an OH of the sphenoid sinus. The patient recovered from all neurological deficits within two months, with the exception of the loss of visual perception. Although SNOH presents a diagnostic challenge, when physicians possess knowledge of its typical imaging features, this facilitates the achievement of a correct diagnosis and the prescription of optimal treatment. PMID:27284357

  3. Sphenoid sinus organized hematoma with cranial neuropathies masquerading as a malignancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Po-Chin; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang

    2016-06-01

    Sinonasal organized hematoma (SNOH) is rarely encountered in clinical practice. The disease demonstrates a high tendency for occurrence in East Asian individuals, and in the majority of cases, is located in the maxillary sinus. The current report presents the case of an 81-year-old female who developed a space-occupying lesion, which masqueraded as a skull base malignancy, following surgery for the treatment of isolated sphenoid sinus aspergilloma. Subsequent endoscopic endonasal surgery confirmed the diagnosis of an OH of the sphenoid sinus. The patient recovered from all neurological deficits within two months, with the exception of the loss of visual perception. Although SNOH presents a diagnostic challenge, when physicians possess knowledge of its typical imaging features, this facilitates the achievement of a correct diagnosis and the prescription of optimal treatment.

  4. Arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Natarajan; Santhanakrishnan, Alwar Govindan; Sivakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2012-07-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not uncommon. However, lesions masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy are rare. A child with a cervicothoracic arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy is presented, and the relevant literature is reviewed. A girl born by vaginal delivery at full term without any antecedent risk factors for obstetric brachial plexus palsy was noted to have decreased movements of the right upper extremity. After 7 months, there was no improvement. An MRI scan was obtained, which revealed a cervicothoracic spinal extradural arachnoid cyst. During surgery, the cyst was found to communicate with the dura at the axilla of the C-7 nerve root. The cyst was excised in toto. Six months later, there was improvement in the infant's neurological status. This case illustrates that spinal arachnoid cysts should be entertained in the differential diagnosis when a child presents with obstetric brachial plexus palsy without known antecedent risk factors for obstetric palsy.

  5. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies and their variants

    PubMed

    Vallat, J.-M.; Tabaraud, F.; Magy, L.; Macian, F.

    2002-12-01

    The Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP) constitute a syndrome whose incidence is difficult to evaluate, and is probably underestimated. In the course of this presentation, we deliberately restricted discussion to issues raised in recent years concerning the extent of this syndrome. We discuss diagnostic criteria, especially electrophysiological ones. As the criteria proposed by the ad hoc committee of the American Academy of Neurology in 1991 have been questioned due to lack of sensitivity, new ones have been proposed recently. We briefly discuss the different types of chronic dysimmune demyelinating neuropathy: not only the CIDP, but also the Lewis and Sumner syndrome or multifocal inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and the multiple conduction block neuropathies. At last, we point out the consistent finding of axonal involvement in the course of a chronic demyelinating neuropathy; over time, it can become predominant, which may make diagnosis difficult by suggesting a chronic axonal neuropathy that may be assumed to be primary. Consideration of these points may help clinicians recognize more chronic dysimmune neuropathies, for which immunosuppressive therapy has been found to be effective.

  6. [Target Molecule for a Demyelinating Type of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into demyelinating type, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and axonal form, acute axonal motor neuropathy (AMAN). It has been clearly established that the target molecule for the former is a ganglioside. In contrast, despite years of effort, the target molecule for the latter has not been identified. Recently, molecules around the nodes of Ranvier have entered the spotlight, and "moesin" was reported to be a target molecule for cytomegalovirus associated-AIDP.

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Schaik, I N; Winer, J B; De Haan, R; Vermeulen, M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is an immune mediated disorder characterised by progressive or relapsing symmetrical motor or sensory symptoms and signs in more than one limb, developing over at least two months. It may cause prolonged periods of disability and even death. Several uncontrolled studies have suggested a beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin. To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials concerning the efficacy and safety of intravenous immunoglobulin in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. We used the Search Strategy of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Review Group to search the Disease Group register and other databases for randomised controlled trials from 1985 onwards. Randomised controlled studies examining the effects of any dose of intravenous immunoglobulin versus placebo, plasma exchange or corticosteroids in patients with definite or probable chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Outcome measures had to include one of the following: a disability score, the Medical Research Council sum score, electrophysiological data or walking distance. Studies which reported the frequency of adverse effects were used to assess the safety of treatment. Two reviewers independently reviewed literature searches to identify potentially relevant trials, scored their quality and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data, we calculated relative risks, and for continuous data, effect sizes (for definition see statistical analysis section) and weighted pooled effect sizes. Statistical uncertainty was expressed in 95% confidence intervals. Sensitivity analysis excluding studies with quality scores below A 0.50 and below B 0.75 was planned but not performed as all studies had quality scores above 0.75. Six randomised controlled trials were considered eligible including 170 patients. Four studies on 113 patients compared intravenous immunoglobulin against

  8. Unusual basal ganglia lesions in a diabetic uraemic patient proven to be demyelination: first pathological observation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Yasutaka; Mito, Yasunori; Yanai, Mituru; Fukazawa, Yu-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure was admitted to our hospital because of consciousness disturbance and parkinsonism. Cranial MRI showed very characteristic features involving the bilateral basal ganglia. Subsequent postmortem examinations demonstrated demyelination in the affected areas. These myelin destruction patterns were quite similar to those of central pontine myelinolysis. However, rapid correction of hyponatraemia was ruled out in this patient. Therefore, a new demyelinating brain disease associated with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure was suggested. PMID:22948993

  9. Multiple hereditary exostoses: A pseudoaneurysm masquerading as tumor.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Hari; Link, Thomas M; O'Donnell, Richard J; Horvai, Andrew E; Motamedi, Daria

    2016-08-01

    Multiple hereditary exostoses is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by numerous benign osteochondromas. Complications are rare and can include deformity, growth abnormality, fracture, adventitial bursa formation, local mass effect on a nerve, malignant degeneration, and vascular complications including stenosis, occlusion, arteriovenous fistula, and pseudoaneurysm. We present a case of multiple hereditary exostoses leading to a deep femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in the proximal medial thigh with subsequent rupture and hematoma, masquerading as tumor.

  10. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zardawi, Ibrahim; Chong, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  11. Pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus masquerading as a mucocele.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yok Kuan; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sushil; Chong, Aun Wee; Prepageran, Narayanan; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Khairuzzana, Baharudin; Lingham, Omkara Rubini

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of benign salivary gland tumor. It can also be found in the larynx, ear, neck, and nasal septum. It is rarely found in the maxillary sinus, and it has never been reported in the frontal sinus. We report a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus that masqueraded as a mucocele. We discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient, and we review the literature.

  12. The Origins of Concentric Demyelination: Self-Organization in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Khonsari, Roman H.; Calvez, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Baló's concentric sclerosis is a rare atypical form of multiple sclerosis characterized by striking concentric demyelination patterns. We propose a robust mathematical model for Baló's sclerosis, sharing common molecular and cellular mechanisms with multiple sclerosis. A reconsideration of the analogies between Baló's sclerosis and the Liesegang periodic precipitation phenomenon led us to propose a chemotactic cellular model for this disease. Rings of demyelination appear as a result of self-organization processes, and closely mimic Baló lesions. According to our results, homogeneous and concentric demyelinations may be two different macroscopic outcomes of a single fundamental immune disorder. Furthermore, in chemotactic models, cellular aggressivity appears to play a central role in pattern formation. PMID:17225855

  13. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-06-01

    A Spanish group recently reported that four patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy carrying IgG4 autoantibodies against contactin 1 showed aggressive symptom onset and poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin. We aimed to describe the clinical and serological features of Japanese chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients displaying the anti-contactin 1 antibodies. Thirteen of 533 (2.4%) patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy had anti-contactin 1 IgG4 whereas neither patients from disease or normal control subjects did (P = 0.02). Three of 13 (23%) patients showed subacute symptom onset, but all of the patients presented with sensory ataxia. Six of 10 (60%) anti-contactin 1 antibody-positive patients had poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 8 of 11 (73%) antibody-positive patients had good response to corticosteroids. Anti-contactin 1 IgG4 antibodies are a possible biomarker to guide treatment option.

  14. Mitochondria as Crucial Players in Demyelinated Axons: Lessons from Neuropathology and Experimental Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Graham R.; Mahad, Don J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are the most efficient producers of energy in the form of ATP. Energy demands of axons, placed at relatively great distances from the neuronal cell body, are met by mitochondria, which when functionally compromised, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess. Axons are made metabolically efficient by myelination, which enables saltatory conduction. The importance of mitochondria for maintaining the structural integrity of myelinated axons is illustrated by neuroaxonal degeneration in primary mitochondrial disorders. When demyelinated, the compartmentalisation of ion channels along axons is disrupted. The redistribution of electrogenic machinery is thought to increase the energy demand of demyelinated axons. We review related studies that focus on mitochondria within unmyelinated, demyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the central nervous system. Based on neuropathological observations we propose the increase in mitochondrial presence within demyelinated axons as an adaptive process to the increased energy need. An increased presence of mitochondria would also increase the capacity to produce deleterious agents such as ROS when functionally compromised. Given the lack of direct evidence of a beneficial or harmful effect of mitochondrial changes, the precise role of increased mitochondrial presence within axons due to demyelination needs to be further explored in experimental demyelination in-vivo and in-vitro. PMID:21331147

  15. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and the various related demyelinating syndromes: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Karussis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of motor and sensory function, that results from immune-mediated inflammation, demyelination and subsequent axonal damage. MS is one of the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. Several variants of MS (and CNS demyelinating syndromes in general) have been nowadays defined in an effort to increase the diagnostic accuracy, to identify the unique immunopathogenic profile and to tailor treatment in each individual patient. These include the initial events of demyelination defined as clinically or radiologically isolated syndromes (CIS and RIS respectively), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and its variants (acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis-AHL, Marburg variant, and Balo's concentric sclerosis), Schilder's sclerosis, transverse myelitis, neuromyelitis optica (NMO and NMO spectrum of diseases), recurrent isolated optic neuritis and tumefactive demyelination. The differentiation between them is not only a terminological matter but has important implications on their management. For instance, certain patients with MS and prominent immunopathogenetic involvement of B cells and autoantibodies, or with the neuromyelitic variants of demyelination, may not only not respond well but even deteriorate under some of the first-line treatments for MS. The unique clinical and neuroradiological features, along with the immunological biomarkers help to distinguish these cases from classical MS. The use of such immunological and imaging biomarkers, will not only improve the accuracy of diagnosis but also contribute to the identification of the patients with CIS or RIS who, are at greater risk for disability progression (worse prognosis) or, on the contrary, will have a more benign course. This review summarizes in a critical way, the diagnostic criteria (historical and updated) and the definitions/characteristics of MS of the various variants

  16. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M. )

    1990-09-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with (3H)thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease.

  17. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Demyelination and Remyelination in the Cuprizone Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tagge, Ian; O’Connor, Audrey; Chaudhary, Priya; Pollaro, Jim; Berlow, Yosef; Chalupsky, Megan; Bourdette, Dennis; Woltjer, Randy; Johnson, Mac; Rooney, William

    2016-01-01

    Cuprizone administration in mice provides a reproducible model of demyelination and spontaneous remyelination, and has been useful in understanding important aspects of human disease, including multiple sclerosis. In this study, we apply high spatial resolution quantitative MRI techniques to establish the spatio-temporal patterns of acute demyelination in C57BL/6 mice after 6 weeks of cuprizone administration, and subsequent remyelination after 6 weeks of post-cuprizone recovery. MRI measurements were complemented with Black Gold II stain for myelin and immunohistochemical stains for associated tissue changes. Gene expression was evaluated using the Allen Gene Expression Atlas. Twenty-five C57BL/6 male mice were split into control and cuprizone groups; MRI data were obtained at baseline, after 6 weeks of cuprizone, and 6 weeks post-cuprizone. High-resolution (100μm isotropic) whole-brain coverage magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) parametric maps demonstrated concurrent caudal-to-rostral and medial-to-lateral gradients of MTR decrease within corpus callosum (CC) that correlated well with demyelination assessed histologically. Our results show that demyelination was not limited to the midsagittal line of the corpus callosum, and also that opposing gradients of demyelination occur in the lateral and medial CC. T2-weighted MRI gray/white matter contrast was strong at baseline, weak after 6 weeks of cuprizone treatment, and returned to a limited extent after recovery. MTR decreases during demyelination were observed throughout the brain, most clearly in callosal white matter. Myelin damage and repair appear to be influenced by proximity to oligodendrocyte progenitor cell populations and exhibit an inverse correlation with myelin basic protein gene expression. These findings suggest that susceptibility to injury and ability to repair vary across the brain, and whole-brain analysis is necessary to accurately characterize this model. Whole-brain parametric mapping across

  18. Phosphatidic acid mediates demyelination in Lpin1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Karim; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Hendriks, William T; Han, Gil-Soo; Grès, Sandra; Carman, George M; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Verheijen, Mark H G; Chrast, Roman

    2008-06-15

    Lipids play crucial roles in many aspects of glial cell biology, affecting processes ranging from myelin membrane biosynthesis to axo-glial interactions. In order to study the role of lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells, we specifically deleted in Schwann cells the Lpin1 gene, which encodes the Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme necessary for normal triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The affected animals developed pronounced peripheral neuropathy characterized by myelin degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation, and a reduction in nerve conduction velocity. The observed demyelination is mediated by endoneurial accumulation of the substrate of the PAP1 enzyme, phosphatidic acid (PA). In addition, we show that PA is a potent activator of the MEK-Erk pathway in Schwann cells, and that this activation is required for PA-induced demyelination. Our results therefore reveal a surprising role for PA in Schwann cell fate determination and provide evidence of a direct link between diseases affecting lipid metabolism and abnormal Schwann cell function.

  19. Phosphatidic acid mediates demyelination in Lpin1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nadra, Karim; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Hendriks, William T.; Han, Gil-Soo; Grès, Sandra; Carman, George M.; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Verheijen, Mark H.G.; Chrast, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play crucial roles in many aspects of glial cell biology, affecting processes ranging from myelin membrane biosynthesis to axo-glial interactions. In order to study the role of lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells, we specifically deleted in Schwann cells the Lpin1 gene, which encodes the Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme necessary for normal triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The affected animals developed pronounced peripheral neuropathy characterized by myelin degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation, and a reduction in nerve conduction velocity. The observed demyelination is mediated by endoneurial accumulation of the substrate of the PAP1 enzyme, phosphatidic acid (PA). In addition, we show that PA is a potent activator of the MEK–Erk pathway in Schwann cells, and that this activation is required for PA-induced demyelination. Our results therefore reveal a surprising role for PA in Schwann cell fate determination and provide evidence of a direct link between diseases affecting lipid metabolism and abnormal Schwann cell function. PMID:18559480

  20. [Pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Aranami, Toshimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is considered to be a demyelinating autoimmune disorder in the peripheral nervous system. Concerning cellular immune response, activity of IFN-gamma producing Th1 and IL-17 producing Th17 cells might be accelerated in patients with CIDP, while regulatory function of CD4+ CD25(high) Foxp3+ regulatory T cells might be diminished. Humoral immune responses against several myelin components such as myelin protein zero and gangliosides such as GM1 might be also induced in a part of patients with CIDP. Besides, growing body of evidences suggest that immune response against several molecules expressed in the noncompact myelin might be involved in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  1. Cuprizone demyelination of the corpus callosum in mice correlates with altered social interaction and impaired bilateral sensorimotor coordination.

    PubMed

    Hibbits, Norah; Pannu, Ravinder; Wu, T John; Armstrong, Regina C

    2009-08-14

    For studies of remyelination in demyelinating diseases, the cuprizone model of CC (corpus callosum) demyelination has experimental advantages that include overall size, proximity to neural stem cells of the subventricular zone, and correlation with a lesion predilection site in multiple sclerosis. In addition, cuprizone treatment can be ended to allow more direct analysis of remyelination than with viral or autoimmune models. However, CC demyelination lacks a useful functional correlate in rodents for longitudinal analysis throughout the course of demyelination and remyelination. In the present study, we tested two distinct behavioural measurements in mice fed 0.2% cuprizone. Running on a 'complex' wheel with varied rung intervals requires integration between cerebral hemispheres for rapid bilateral sensorimotor coordination. Maximum running velocity on the 'complex' wheel decreased during acute (6 week) and chronic (12 week) cuprizone demyelination. Running velocity on the complex wheel distinguished treated (for 6 weeks) from non-treated mice, even after a 6-week recovery period for spontaneous remyelination. A second behavioural assessment was a resident-intruder test of social interaction. The frequency of interactive behaviours increased among resident mice after acute or chronic demyelination. Differences in both sensorimotor coordination and social interaction correlated with demonstrated CC demyelination. The wheel assay is applicable for longitudinal studies. The resident-intruder assay provides a complementary assessment of a distinct modality at a specific time point. These behavioural measurements are sufficiently robust for small cohorts as a non-invasive assessment of demyelination to facilitate analysis of subsequent remyelination. These measurements may also identify CC involvement in other mouse models of central nervous system injuries and disorders.

  2. The Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Response to Demyelination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    oligodendrocyte regeneration associated with reduced apoptosis during recovery. The effect of increased PDGF-A is likely as a survival factor during the...also a substantial loss of mature oligodendrocyte cells. Within lesions associated with spinal cord injury, mature oligodendrocytes undergo apoptosis...models of demyelination with remyelination: infection with murine hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHV-A59) and ingestion of the neurotoxicant cuprizone

  3. Meningeal inflammation and demyelination in a patient clinically diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Hiroshi; Oguchi, Kenya; Takei, Yo-ichi; Kitazawa, Kazuo; Higuchi, Kayoko; Ohara, Shinji

    2014-11-15

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases with overlapping clinical features. A case is reported of a 51-year-old female who presented with headache, progressive aphasia and hemiparesis without preceding infection or vaccination. Brain MRI revealed multiple, often confluent, subcortical white matter lesions without enhancement, affecting predominantly the left cerebral hemisphere. CSF examination failed to reveal oligoclonal bands. Brain biopsy revealed both pathological features of ADEM and findings are consistent with the early stage of MS, including meningeal B and T lymphocytic infiltration, perivenular demyelination, subpial demyelination and discrete confluent plaque-like foci of demyelination. Steroid treatment resulted in remarkable clinical and radiological improvement and there has been no recurrence in six years of follow-up. This case highlights the difficulties in differentiating between ADEM and the first attack of MS and further suggests that ADEM and the early stage of MS, and its tumefactive variant, may have a common underlying pathologic mechanism, which may have a therapeutic implication in treating these diseases.

  4. Skin-derived neural precursors competitively generate functional myelin in adult demyelinated mice.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Sabah; Laterza, Cecilia; Roussel, Delphine; Bachelin, Corinne; Marteyn, Antoine; Deboux, Cyrille; Martino, Gianvito; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived (iPS-derived) neural precursor cells may represent the ideal autologous cell source for cell-based therapy to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in myelin diseases. So far, the therapeutic potential of reprogrammed cells has been evaluated in neonatal demyelinating models. However, the repair efficacy and safety of these cells has not been well addressed in the demyelinated adult CNS, which has decreased cell plasticity and scarring. Moreover, it is not clear if these induced pluripotent-derived cells have the same reparative capacity as physiologically committed CNS-derived precursors. Here, we performed a side-by-side comparison of CNS-derived and skin-derived neural precursors in culture and following engraftment in murine models of adult spinal cord demyelination. Grafted induced neural precursors exhibited a high capacity for survival, safe integration, migration, and timely differentiation into mature bona fide oligodendrocytes. Moreover, grafted skin-derived neural precursors generated compact myelin around host axons and restored nodes of Ranvier and conduction velocity as efficiently as CNS-derived precursors while outcompeting endogenous cells. Together, these results provide important insights into the biology of reprogrammed cells in adult demyelinating conditions and support use of these cells for regenerative biomedicine of myelin diseases that affect the adult CNS.

  5. Demyelination arrest and remyelination induced by glatiramer acetate treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Aharoni, Rina; Herschkovitz, Avia; Eilam, Raya; Blumberg-Hazan, Michal; Sela, Michael; Bruck, Wolfgang; Arnon, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    The interplay between demyelination and remyelination is critical in the progress of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the present study, we explored the capacity of glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone) to affect the demyelination process and/or lead to remyelination in mice inflicted by chronic EAE, using both scanning electron microscopy and immunohistological methods. Spinal cords of untreated EAE mice revealed substantial demyelination accompanied by tissue destruction and axonal loss. In contrast, in spinal cords of GA-treated mice, in which treatment started concomitantly with disease induction (prevention), no pathology was observed. Moreover, when treatment was initiated after the appearance of clinical symptoms (suppression) or even in the chronic disease phase (delayed suppression) when substantial demyelination was already manifested, it resulted in a significant decrease in the pathological damage. Detection of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) expressing the NG2 or O4 markers via colocalization with the proliferation marker BrdU indicated their elevated levels in spinal cords of GA-treated mice. The mode of action of GA in this system is attributed to increased proliferation, differentiation, and survival of OPCs along the oligodendroglial maturation cascade and their recruitment into injury sites, thus enhancing repair processes in situ. PMID:18678887

  6. A novel model of demyelination and remyelination in a GFP-transgenic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yangwu; Lei, Xudan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yanan; Xu, Fei; Feng, Xizeng; Wei, Shihui; Li, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Demyelinating diseases consist of a variety of autoimmune conditions in which the myelin sheath is damaged due to genetic and/or environmental factors. During clinical treatment, some patients undergo partial remyelination, especially during the early disease stages. However, the mechanisms that regulate demyelination remain unclear. The myelin structure, myelin formation and myelin-related gene expression are highly conserved between mammals and zebrafish. Therefore, the zebrafish is an ideal model organism to study myelination. In this study, we generated a transgenic zebrafish Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressing a fusion protein composed of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and NTR from the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressed NTR-EGFP reproducibly and hereditarily in oligodendrocytes along the spinal cord. Treatment of zebrafish larvae Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) with metronidazole (Mtz) resulted in the selective ablation of oligodendrocytes and led to demyelination, accompanied by behavioral changes, including decreased total movement distance, velocity, total movement time and fast movement time. After withdrawal of Mtz for a seven day recovery period, the expression of EGFP and MBP protein was observed again which indicates remyelination. Additionally, locomotor capacity was restored. Collectively, Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp), a heritable and stable transgenic line, provides a novel, powerful tool to study the mechanisms of demyelination and remyelination. PMID:25527642

  7. Autoimmune antigenic targets at the node of Ranvier in demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panos; Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of demyelination in the PNS and CNS. Rapid reversal of electrophysiological blockade after plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is more likely to result from removal or neutralization of an antibody that impairs saltatory conduction than from remyelination. Although up to 30% of patients with acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy harbour autoantibodies, specific antigens have been identified in no more than 13% of cases. To date, autoantigens identified at the node of Ranvier include neurofascin 186, gliomedin and possibly moesin in the nodal domain, and contactin-1, Caspr1 and neurofascin 155 in the paranodal domain. In some patients with multiple sclerosis, paranodal CNPase and juxtaparanodal contactin-2 trigger a humoral response. This Review explores the molecular anatomy of the node of Ranvier, focusing on proteins with extracellular domains that could serve as antigens. The clinical implications of node-specific antibody responses are addressed, and the best approaches to identify antibodies that target nodal proteins are highlighted. Also discussed are the roles of these antibodies as either secondary, disease-exacerbating responses, or as a primary effector mechanism that defines demyelination or axonal degeneration at the node, identifies disease subtypes or determines response to treatments.

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: A new animal model for new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    de Sèze, J; Kremer, L; Alves do Rego, C; Taleb, O; Lam, D; Beiano, W; Mensah-Nyagan, G; Trifilieff, E; Brun, S

    2016-12-01

    Animal models are fundamental to advance knowledge of disease pathogenesis and to test/develop new therapeutic strategies. Most of the current knowledge about the pathogenic mechanisms underpinning autoimmune demyelination processes implicating autoantigens has been obtained using the Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis (EAN) animal model. The most widely used EAN model is obtained by active immunization of Lewis rats using a peptide, P0 (180-199), issuing from the major peripheral nervous system myelin protein. But this model mimics only the classical monophasic acute form of demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, i.e. Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We developed a new model by immunizing Lewis rats using the same immunodominant neuritogenic peptide P0 (180-199) but this time with its S-palmitoyl derivative, S-palm P0 (180-199). All of the animals immunized with the S-palm P0 (180-199) peptide developed a chronic relapsing-remitting form of the disease corresponding to the electrophysiological criteria of demyelination (slow sensory nerve conduction velocity, prolonged motor nerve latency, partial motor nerve conduction blocks) with axon degeneration. These findings were confirmed by immunohistopathology study and thus, appear to mimic human chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP). This new model opens up new avenues of research for testing new anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute clinical onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Molín, Jéssica; Márquez, Mercedes; Raurell, Xavier; Matiasek, Kaspar; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of acute-onset ambulatory paraparesis with electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with axonal and demyelinating lesions in a Rottweiler dog. Although the clinical findings were compatible with acute canine idiopathic polyneuropathy, postmortem investigations revealed a chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy affecting the nerve roots. Due to the combination of acute clinical presentation and chronic pathologic features, this case is consistent with the acute-onset form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-CIDP).

  10. Type 1 reaction masquerading clinically as ENL: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khodke, Ashish; Shetty, Vanaja P

    2015-06-01

    Attention is drawn to a Type 1 reaction masquerading clinically as ENL. Histology showed no evidence of ENL but suggested heightened T-cell activity (CMI), a characteristic feature of Type 1 reaction. We present a case of a 29 year old man diagnosed as lepromatous leprosy with recurrent Type 2 reaction treated with thalidomide for 2 years. The patient was referred to our institute from a teaching hospital. Skin biopsies were carried out during two separate eruptive episodes 2 months apart. Histopathology showed heightened T-cell activity, but no evidence of ENL.

  11. Invasive Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Masquerading as Nodular Scleritis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Medha; Sundar, Dheepak; Vanathi, Murugesan; Meel, Rachna; Kashyap, Seema; Chawla, Rohan; Tandon, Radhika

    The authors report a rare case of ocular surface squamous neoplasia with intraocular involvement that had an initial masquerade presentation of recurrent anterior nodular scleritis. A 35-year-old male patient presented with right eye recurrent anterior nodular scleritis for which a lamellar patch graft was done. Two months later, the patient presented with recurrence of symptoms. Histopathology review revealed the presence of well-differentiated squamous cell malignancy. A high index of suspicion for malignancy is required in such cases when they do not respond to conventional therapy.

  12. Predators are less likely to misclassify masquerading prey when their models are present

    PubMed Central

    Skelhorn, John; Ruxton, Graeme D.

    2010-01-01

    Masquerading animals have evolved striking visual resemblances to inanimate objects. These animals gain protection from their predators not simply by avoiding detection, but by causing their predators to misclassify them as the ‘models’ that they appear to resemble. Using domestic chicks as predators and twig-mimicking caterpillars as prey, we demonstrated that masquerading prey were more likely to be misclassified as their models when viewed in isolation from their models than when viewed alongside examples of their model, although they benefitted from masquerade to some extent in both conditions. From this, we predict a selection pressure on masqueraders to use microhabitats that reduce the risk of them being viewed simultaneously with examples of their model, and/or to more closely resemble their model in situations where simultaneous viewing is commonplace. PMID:20410028

  13. Recurrent Isolated Sixth Nerve Palsy in Relapsing-Remitting Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Bustani, Najwa; Weiss, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated sensory and motor demyelinating polyneuropathy that typically presents as a relapsing-remitting or progressive disorder. Cranial neuropathies infrequently occur in association with other more typical symptoms of CIDP. We report a case of CIDP with recurrent isolated sixth nerve palsy. Her physical examination showed a right sixth nerve palsy and absent deep tendon reflexes as the only indicator of her disease. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed thickening without enhancement of the trigeminal and sixth cranial nerves. Nerve conduction study (NCS) revealed a sensory and motor demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction block and temporal dispersion in multiple nerves consistent with CIDP. Cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated albuminic-cytologic dissociation. She had a remarkable response to intravenous immunoglobulin and remains asymptomatic without any additional immunomodulating therapy. Isolated cranial neuropathies can rarely occur as the sole manifestation of relapsing-remitting CIDP. The profound demyelination found on NCS in this case demonstrates that there can be a dramatic discordance between the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in some patients with this disorder.

  14. Loss of Saltation and Presynaptic Action Potential Failure in Demyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mustafa S.; Popovic, Marko A.; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2017-01-01

    In cortical pyramidal neurons the presynaptic terminals controlling transmitter release are located along unmyelinated axon collaterals, far from the original action potential (AP) initiation site, the axon initial segment (AIS). Once initiated, APs will need to reliably propagate over long distances and regions of geometrical inhomogeneity like branch points (BPs) to rapidly depolarize the presynaptic terminals and confer temporally precise synaptic transmission. While axon pathologies such as demyelinating diseases are well established to impede the fidelity of AP propagation along internodes, to which extent myelin loss affects propagation along BPs and axon collaterals is not well understood. Here, using the cuprizone demyelination model, we performed optical voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging from control and demyelinated layer 5 pyramidal neuron axons. In the main axon, we find that myelin loss switches the modality of AP propagation from rapid saltation towards a slow continuous wave. The duration of single AP waveforms at BPs or nodes was, however, only slightly briefer. In contrast, by using two-photon microscopy-guided loose-seal patch recordings from axon collaterals we revealed a presynaptic AP broadening in combination with a reduced velocity and frequency-dependent failure. Finally, internodal myelin loss was also associated with de novo sprouting of axon collaterals starting from the primary (demyelinated) axon. Thus, the loss of oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths bears functional consequences beyond the main axon, impeding the temporal fidelity of presynaptic APs and affecting the functional and structural organization of synaptic connectivity within the neocortex. PMID:28289377

  15. Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells in Chronic Demyelination of Multiple Sclerosis Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Alison Ruth; Carroll, William M

    2015-09-01

    Reports that chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis brain and spinal cord lesions contained immature oligodendrocyte lineage cells have generated major interest aimed at the potential for promotion of endogenous repair. Despite the prominence of the optic nerve as a lesion site and its importance in clinical disease assessment, no detailed studies of multiple sclerosis-affected optic nerve exist. This study aims to provide insight into the cellular pathology of chronic demyelination in multiple sclerosis through direct morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of optic nerve in conjunction with observations from an experimental cat optic nerve model of successful remyelination. Myelin staining was followed by immunohistochemistry to differentially label neuroglia. Digitally immortalized sections were then analyzed to generate quantification data and antigenic phenotypes including maturational stages within the oligodendrocyte lineage. It was found that some chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis optic nerve lesions contained oligodendroglial cells and that heterogeneity existed in the presence of myelin sheaths, oligodendrocyte maturational stages and extent of axonal investment. The findings advance our understanding of oligodendrocyte activity in chronically demyelinated human optic nerve and may have implications for studies aimed at enhancement of endogenous repair in multiple sclerosis.

  16. Roles of an extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor and ECM processing enzymes in demyelinating canine distemper encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Alldinger, S; Gröters, S; Miao, Q; Fonfara, S; Kremmer, E; Baumgärtner, W

    2006-04-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. Due to the central nervous system (CNS) tropism of the virus and associated neuropathological changes, demyelinating canine distemper encephalitis (CDE) represents a relevant model for human demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. The present review decribes the role of CD44 antigen (CD44), the principle cell surface receptor for hyaluronate and extracellular matrix (ECM) processing enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs]) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) in the pathogenesis of demyelination. In acute and subacute CDE, a plaque-associated CD44 up-regulation is found that parallels astrocyte activation. Likewise, MMPs and TIMPs are prominently up-regulated in these lesions and are expressed mostly by astrocytes and microglia. In chronic lesions, CD44 expression declines together with the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive astrocytes. In addition, in this plaque type, CD44 is expressed on the cell membrane of perivascular mononuclear cells. In this phase, a decrease of MMP and TIMP expressions apart from MMP-11, -12, and -13 is obvious. In summary, CD44 and MMPs might be associated with the onset of demyelination and may interact to initiate ECM disturbances. Ligation of CD44 in the early phase may induce chemokines and cytokines and hence initiate and perpetuate the inflammatory process. In the chronic phase, it is conceivable that a MMP-TIMP imbalance may be the motor for lesion progression with a simultaneous influx of CD44-positive activated immune cells.

  17. Multiexponential T2 and Magnetization Transfer MRI of Demyelination and Remyelination in Murine Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    McCreary, Cheryl R; Bjarnason, Thorarin A; Skihar, Viktor; Mitchell, J Ross; Yong, V Wee; Dunn, Jeff F

    2009-01-01

    Identification of remyelination is important in the evaluation of potential treatments of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Local injection of lysolecithin into the brain or spinal cord provides a murine model of demyelination with spontaneous remyelination. The aim of this study was to determine if quantitative, multicomponent T2 (qT2) analysis and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), both indicative of myelin content, could detect changes in myelination, particularly remyelination, of the cervical spinal cord in mice treated with lysolecithin. We found that the myelin water fraction and geometric mean T2 value of the intra/extracellular water significantly decreased at 14 days then returned to control levels by 28 days after injury, corresponding to clearance of myelin debris and remyelination which was shown by eriochrome cyanine and oil red O staining of histological sections. The MTR was significantly decreased 14 days after lysolecithin injection, and remained low over the time course studied. Evidence of demyelination shown by both qT2 and MTR lagged behind the histological evidence of demyelination. Myelin water fraction increased with remyelination, however MTR remain lower after 28 days. The difference between qT2 and MTR may identify early remyelination. PMID:19349232

  18. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment.

  19. Masquerade Detection Using a Taxonomy-Based Multinomial Modeling Approach in UNIX Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-25

    Consistent Naïve- Bayes to Detect Masqueraders”, PAKDD 2004 , pp 329-340. [13] M. Oka, Y. Oyama, and K. Kato, “Eigen Co- occurrence Matrix Method for...A. Maxion and T. N. Townsend, “Masquerade Detection Augmented with Error Analysis”, IEEE Transactions on Reliability, Vol. 53, No. 1, March 2004 ...in a Masquerade Detection System”, Technical Report, School of Computing Science, Newcastle University, CS-TR N o 869, Nov 2004 . [10] B.K

  20. Diagnostic algorithm for relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, W K; Barkhof, Frederik; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2017-07-18

    To establish whether children with relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes (RDS) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Ab) show distinctive clinical and radiologic features and to generate a diagnostic algorithm for the main RDS for clinical use. A panel reviewed the clinical characteristics, MOG-Ab and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) Ab, intrathecal oligoclonal bands, and Epstein-Barr virus serology results of 110 children with RDS. A neuroradiologist blinded to the diagnosis scored the MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and serologic tests results were compared. The findings showed that 56.4% of children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), 25.4% with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 12.7% with multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and 5.5% with relapsing optic neuritis (RON). Blinded analysis defined baseline MRI as typical of MS in 93.5% of children with MS. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presentation was seen only in the non-MS group. Of NMOSD cases, 30.7% were AQP4-Ab positive. MOG-Ab were found in 83.3% of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD, 100% of MDEM, and 33.3% of RON. Children with MOG-Ab were younger, were less likely to present with area postrema syndrome, and had lower disability, longer time to relapse, and more cerebellar peduncle lesions than children with AQP4-Ab NMOSD. A diagnostic algorithm applicable to any episode of CNS demyelination leads to 4 main phenotypes: MS, AQP4-Ab NMOSD, MOG-Ab-associated disease, and antibody-negative RDS. Children with MS and AQP4-Ab NMOSD showed features typical of adult cases. Because MOG-Ab-positive children showed notable and distinctive clinical and MRI features, they were grouped into a unified phenotype (MOG-Ab-associated disease), included in a new diagnostic algorithm. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. [On the mechanisms and diagnosis of conduction disturbances due to demyelination with special reference to multifocal demyelinating neuropathy (Lewis-Sumner)].

    PubMed

    Kaji, R; Kimura, J

    1991-12-01

    Multifocal demyelinating neuropathy with persistent conduction block can mimic motor neuron disease, but is potentially reversible. Its diagnosis rests upon electrophysiological demonstration of focal conduction block at multiple sites. Conduction block is the most important mechanism causing clinical symptoms in peripheral nerve demyelination. On the other hand, conduction slowing is not always associated with clinical symptoms. In 2 out of 9 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy, MRI showed focal swelling of the nerve at the site of conduction block. Both of them had elevated titers of anti-GM1 antibodies. In one, we biopsied a portion of the medial pectoral nerve, which was adjacent to the focal swelling, at surgical exploration. Pathological findings included very thin myelin associated with large diameter fibers and small onion bulb formation, suggesting that remyelinative process is abortive in this disease leading to persistent conduction block. Anti-GM1 antibodies bound to the denuded axoplasmic membrane may interfere with the process by masking the cell surface markers. The reason why the sensory fibers are spared is unclear, but it may be possible that GM1 in sensory axons have less affinity to the antibody than that in motor fibers.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  3. A role for galanin in human and experimental inflammatory demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Wraith, David C.; Pope, Robert; Butzkueven, Helmut; Holder, Heidi; Vanderplank, Penny; Lowrey, Pauline; Day, Michael J.; Gundlach, Andrew L.; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Scolding, Neil; Wynick, David

    2009-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed by many differing subsets of neurons in the nervous system. There is a marked upregulation in the levels of the peptide in a variety of nerve injury models and in the basal forebrain of humans with Alzheimer's disease. Here we demonstrate that galanin expression is specifically and markedly upregulated in microglia both in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and shadow plaques. Galanin expression is also upregulated in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, although solely in oligodendrocytes. To study whether the observed increase in expression of galanin in inflammatory demyelination might modulate disease activity, we applied the EAE model to a panel of galanin transgenic lines. Over-expression of galanin in transgenic mice (Gal-OE) abolishes disease in the EAE model, whilst loss-of-function mutations in galanin or galanin receptor-2 (GalR2) increase disease severity. The pronounced effects of altered endogenous galanin or GalR2 expression on EAE disease activity may reflect a direct neuroprotective effect of the neuropeptide via activation of GalR2, similar to that previously described in a number of neuronal injury paradigms. Irrespective of the mechanism(s) by which galanin alters EAE disease activity, our findings imply that galanin/GalR2 agonists may have future therapeutic implications for MS. PMID:19717462

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N

    2013-12-30

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. This review was first published in 2002 and has since been updated, most recently in 2013. To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the efficacy and safety of IVIg in CIDP. On 4 December 2012, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (2012, issue 11 in the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE and EMBASE to December 2012 and ISI from January 1985 to May 2008. We searched for ongoing trials through two metaRegistries (World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal and Current Controlled Trials). We selected RCTs testing any dose of IVIg versus placebo, plasma exchange or corticosteroids in definite or probable CIDP. Two authors reviewed literature searches to identify potentially relevant RCTs, scored their quality and extracted data independently. We contacted authors for additional information. We considered eight RCTs, including 332 participants, to be eligible for inclusion in the review. These trials were homogeneous and the overall risk of bias low. Five studies, in a total of 235 participants compared IVIg against placebo. One trial with 20 participants compared IVIg with plasma exchange, one trial compared IVIg with prednisolone in 32 participants, and one trial, newly included at this update, compared IVIg with intravenous methylprednisolone in 46 participants.A significantly higher proportion of participants improved in disability within one month after IVIg treatment as compared with placebo (risk ratio (RR) 2.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.72 to 3.36; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome 3.03 (95% CI 2.33 to 4.55), high quality evidence). Whether all these improvements

  5. Magnetisation transfer ratio in optic neuritis is associated with axonal loss, but not with demyelination.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A; Chaganti, J; Garrick, R; Moffat, K; Yiannikas, C

    2011-05-01

    Pathophysiological basis of Magnetisation Transfer Ratio (MTR) reduction in multiple sclerosis still remains a matter of controversy. Optic nerve represents an ideal model to study the consequences of axonal loss and demyelination on MTR since effects of disease on the optic nerve are clinically apparent and potentially quantifiable by objective means. By measuring the latency of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) (measure of optic nerve conduction) and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) thickness (measure of axonal damage) we investigated the effect of neurodegeneration and demyelination on MTR after an episode of optic neuritis (ON). 23 patients with a single unilateral episode of ON and 10 healthy volunteers were enrolled. Orbital MRI including MTR protocol, Optical Coherence Tomography and Multifocal VEP were performed at post-acute stage of ON. Average MTR of affected eye was significantly reduced as compared to the fellow eye and normal controls. There was a highly significant correlation between MTR and measures of axonal loss (RNFL thickness and mfVEP amplitude), which was independent on the level of demyelination. While latency delay also correlated significantly with MTR, correlation became non-significant when adjusted for the degree of axonal loss. There was a significant reduction of MTR in a group of patients with extensive axonal damage, while MTR remained normal in a group of patients with extensive demyelination, but little or no axonal loss. Results of this study indicate that reduction of optic nerve MTR after an episode of ON has a strong association with the degree of axonal damage, but not with demyelination. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disruption of neurofascin and gliomedin at nodes of Ranvier precedes demyelination in experimental allergic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lonigro, Aurélie; Devaux, Jérôme J

    2009-01-01

    High densities of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels at nodes of Ranvier enable the rapid regeneration and propagation of the action potentials along myelinated axons. In demyelinating pathologies, myelin alterations lead to conduction slowing and even to conduction block. In order to unravel the mechanisms of conduction failure in inflammatory demyelinating diseases, we have examined two models of Guillain-Barré syndrome: the experimental allergic neuritis induced in the Lewis rat by immunization against peripheral myelin (EAN-PM) and against a neuritogenic P2 peptide (EAN-P2). We found that Nav channel clusters were disrupted at EAN-PM nodes. Neurofascin and gliomedin, two cell adhesion molecules involved with aggregating Nav channels at nodes, were selectively affected prior to demyelination in EAN-PM, indicating that degradation of the axo-glial unit initiated node alteration. This was associated with autoantibodies to neurofascin and gliomedin. Node disruption was, however, independent from complement deposition at nodes, and deposits of the terminal complement complex (C5b-9) were found on the external surface of Schwann cells in EAN-PM. In these animals, the paranodal junctions were also affected and Kv1 channels, which are normally juxtaparanodal, were found dispersed at nodes and paranodes. Altogether, these alterations were associated with conduction deficits in EAN-PM ventral spinal roots. EAN-P2 animals also exhibited inflammatory demyelination, but did not show alteration in nodal clusters or autoantibodies. Our results highlighted the complex mechanisms underlying conduction abnormalities in demyelinating disorders, and unraveled neurofascin and gliomedin as two novel immune targets in experimental allergic neuritis.

  7. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with cholesterol deposits in a dog.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, Pablo; Sponenberg, D Philip; Pancotto, Theresa; King, Rosalind H M; Jortner, Bernard S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy occurred in an 11-year-old Labrador Retriever dog. Spinal cord compression resulted from massive radiculitis with prominent cholesterol granulomas. Cholesterol deposition and associated granuloma formation is unique in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, in both its human and canine expressions. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Asymmetric Type F Botulism with Cranial Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Jessica A.; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C. Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N.; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients. PMID:22257488

  10. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, Inna; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is one of the acquired demyelinating neuropathies and is considered to be immune mediated. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical history, neurologic examination, electrophysiologic studies, CSF studies, and pathologic examination. Early diagnosis and treatment is important to prevent irreversible axonal loss and optimize improvement in function. The first-line agents for treatment are intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids, and plasmapheresis, which have all been demonstrated to be effective in controlled studies. Studies have not shown a significant difference between these three treatments, and the initial choice of therapy is often based on availability, cost, ease of administration, and side effect profile. If patients do not respond to one of these agents, they may respond to one of the others and sometimes in combination. If the first-line agents are not effective, chemotherapeutic or immunosuppressive agents may be considered. There are limited controlled studies of these modalities, and they are often used in conjunction with a first-line treatment. The majority of patients require long-term therapy to maintain a response and to prevent relapse.

  11. Paraneoplastic tumefactive demyelination with underlying combined germ cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Broadfoot, Jack R; Archer, Hilary A; Coulthard, Elizabeth; Appelman, Auke P A; Sutak, Judit; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Love, Seth

    2015-12-01

    Paraneoplastic demyelination is a rare disorder of the central nervous system. We describe a 60-year-old man with tumefactive demyelination who had an underlying retroperitoneal germ cell cancer. He presented with visuospatial problems and memory loss and had a visual field defect. His MRI was interpreted as a glioma but stereotactic biopsy showed active demyelination. Investigation for multiple sclerosis was negative but CT imaging showed retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, and nodal biopsy confirmed a combined germ cell cancer. He responded poorly to corticosteroid treatment, and his visual field defect progressed. However, 6 months after plasma exchange and successful chemotherapy, he has partially improved clinically and radiographically. Tumefactive demyelination is typically associated with multiple sclerosis but may be paraneoplastic. It is important to recognise paraneoplastic tumefactive demyelination early, as the neurological outcome relies on treating the associated malignancy.

  12. Inflammatory/demyelinating central nervous system involvement in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF): coincidence or association?

    PubMed

    Akman-Demir, G; Gul, A; Gurol, E; Ozdogan, H; Bahar, S; Oge, A E; Gurvit, H; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Yazici, H; Eraksoy, M

    2006-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in FMF is uncommon, but recently cases with multiple sclerosis (MS) and FMF have been reported. Here we assess patients with both FMF and MS, in order to clarify any relationship between FMF and MS, and to evaluate disease characteristics. Our MS database between 1986-2005 was screened retrospectively, and patients with both FMF and inflammatory/demyelinating CNS disease were evaluated among a total of 2800 patients including definite MS (n = 2268) and other demyelinating disorders. There were 12 patients with FMF, who developed a CNS disorder with multifocal white matter lesions. Median age at onset of FMF was 7 years, and median age at neurological onset was 26.8 years. Nine patients (including two siblings) had definite MS according to clinical and MRI findings, whereas 3 patients had atypical features suggesting other demyelinating disorders. Disease severity varied among the patients between very mild to a fatal course. All 8 patients evaluated for oligoclonal IgG bands in CSF were positive. The rate of FMF among our patients with definite MS is almost 4 times the expected prevalence in Turkey. Our series including a sibling pair concordant for FMF and MS may suggest that similar genetic susceptibility and environmental factors might be responsible, although coincidence still remains a possibility. A prospective study on a larger sample seems to be justified.

  13. Protective Effect of a cAMP Analogue on Behavioral Deficits and Neuropathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Darvishi, Marzieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Gorji, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that leads to neuronal cell loss. Cyclic AMP and its analogs are well known to decrease inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of bucladesine, a cell-permeable analogue of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on myelin proteins (PLP, PMP-22), inflammation, and apoptotic, as well as anti-apoptotic factors in cuprizone model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed with chow containing 0.2% copper chelator cuprizone or vehicle by daily oral gavage for 5 weeks to induce reversible demyelination predominantly of the corpus callosum. Bucladesine was administered intraperitoneally at different doses (0.24, 0.48, or 0.7 μg/kg body weight) during the last 7 days of 5-week cuprizone treatment. Bucladesine exhibited a protective effect on myelination. Furthermore, bucladesine significantly decreased the production of interleukin-6 pro-inflammatory mediator as well as nuclear factor-κB activation and reduced the mean number of apoptotic cells compared to cuprizone-treated mice. Bucladesine also decreased production of caspase-3 as well as Bax and increased Bcl-2 levels. Our data revealed that enhancement of intracellular cAMP prevents demyelination and plays anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in mice cuprizone model of demyelination. This suggests the modulation of intracellular cAMP as a potential target for treatment of MS.

  14. Acute parkinsonian syndrome with demyelinating leukoencephalopathy in bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lockman, L A; Sung, J H; Krivit, W

    1991-01-01

    A syndrome of rigidity, bradykinesia, spasticity, and often myoclonus and dementia developed acutely in 5 patients who had undergone successful engraftment of bone marrow transplants for the treatment of various hematologic diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated widespread changes in white matter; brain biopsy disclosed mild demyelination associated with active phagocytosis of myelin. One patient, who was not treated, remains severely demented. Patients treated with very high-dose methylprednisolone had complete clinical recovery.

  15. CXCL10 and trafficking of virus-specific T cells during coronavirus-induced demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Linda N.; Liu, Michael T.; Kane, Joy A. C.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in the central nervous system (CNS) following infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) is associated with an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Treatment of mice with anti-CXCL10 neutralizing antibody results in limited CD4+ T cell infiltration into the CNS accompanied by a reduction in white matter damage. The current study determines the antigen-specificity of the T lymphocytes present during chronic disease and evaluates how blocking CXCL10 signaling affects retention of virus-specific T cells within the CNS. CXCL10 neutralization selectively reduced accumulation and/or retention of virus-specific CD4+ T cells, yet exhibited limited effect on virus-specific CD8+ T cells. The response of CXCL10 neutralization on virus-specific T cell subsets is not due to differential expression of the CXCL10 receptor CXCR3 on T cells as there was no appreciable difference in receptor expression on virus-specific T cells during either acute or chronic disease. These findings emphasize the importance of virus-specific CD4+ T cells in amplifying demyelination in JHMV-infected mice. In addition, differential signals are required for trafficking and retention of virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during chronic demyelination in JHMV-infected mice. PMID:19626487

  16. Small bowel endometriosis masquerading as regional enteritis.

    PubMed

    Minocha, A; Davis, M S; Wright, R A

    1994-05-01

    A 35-year-old female presented with recurrent right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and vomiting. She was afebrile with diffuse abdominal tenderness. Plain x-ray of abdomen revealed small bowel obstruction. A barium x-ray of the small bowel showed stricture of the terminal ileum. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a 6-cm mass in right lower quadrant. She was empirically managed as having Crohn's disease. She underwent laparotomy after failure of medical management with high-dose steroids. There was ulceration and narrowing of terminal ileum. Frozen sections revealed endometriosis. Ileocecectomy was performed. Histopathology of resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of endometriosis, and there was no evidence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasia. Ileal endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease in menstruating females presenting with perimenstrual symptoms.

  17. The quality of cortical network function recovery depends on localization and degree of axonal demyelination.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Manuela; Narayanan, Venu; Göbel, Kerstin; Bittner, Stefan; Ruck, Tobias; Meuth, Patrick; Herrmann, Alexander M; Stangel, Martin; Gudi, Viktoria; Skripuletz, Thomas; Daldrup, Thiemo; Wiendl, Heinz; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Ehling, Petra; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G

    2017-01-01

    Myelin loss is a severe pathological hallmark common to a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelination in the central nervous system appears in the form of lesions affecting both white and gray matter structures. The functional consequences of demyelination on neuronal network and brain function are not well understood. Current therapeutic strategies for ameliorating the course of such diseases usually focus on promoting remyelination, but the effectiveness of these approaches strongly depends on the timing in relation to the disease state. In this study, we sought to characterize the time course of sensory and behavioral alterations induced by de- and remyelination to establish a rational for the use of remyelination strategies. By taking advantage of animal models of general and focal demyelination, we tested the consequences of myelin loss on the functionality of the auditory thalamocortical system: a well-studied neuronal network consisting of both white and gray matter regions. We found that general demyelination was associated with a permanent loss of the tonotopic cortical organization in vivo, and the inability to induce tone-frequency-dependent conditioned behaviors, a status persisting after remyelination. Targeted, focal lysolecithin-induced lesions in the white matter fiber tract, but not in the gray matter regions of cortex, were fully reversible at the morphological, functional and behavioral level. These findings indicate that remyelination of white and gray matter lesions have a different functional regeneration potential, with the white matter being able to regain full functionality while cortical gray matter lesions suffer from permanently altered network function. Therefore therapeutic interventions aiming for remyelination have to consider both region- and time-dependent strategies.

  18. TRPA1 deficiency is protective in cuprizone-induced demyelination-A new target against oligodendrocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Sipos, Éva; Ács, Péter; Bölcskei, Kata; Pohóczky, Krisztina; Kemény, Ágnes; Sándor, Zoltán; Szőke, Éva; Sétáló, György; Komoly, Sámuel; Pintér, Erika

    2016-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory, demyelinating degenerative disease of the central nervous system. Current treatments target pathological immune responses to counteract the inflammatory processes. However, these drugs do not restrain the long-term progression of clinical disability. For this reason, new therapeutic approaches and identification of novel target molecules are needed to prevent demyelination or promote repair mechanisms. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a nonselective cation channel with relatively high Ca(2+) permeability. Its pathophysiological role in central nervous system disorders has not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we aimed to assess the distribution of TRPA1 in the mouse brain and reveal its regulatory role in the cuprizone-induced demyelination. This toxin-induced model, characterized by oligodendrocyte apoptosis and subsequent primary demyelination, allows us to investigate the nonimmune aspects of multiple sclerosis. We found that TRPA1 is expressed on astrocytes in the mouse central nervous system. Interestingly, TRPA1 deficiency significantly attenuated cuprizone-induced demyelination by reducing the apoptosis of mature oligodendrocytes. Our data suggest that TRPA1 regulates mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, as well as transcription factor c-Jun and a proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member (Bak) expression resulting in enhanced oligodendrocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, we propose that TRPA1 receptors enhancing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration modulate astrocyte functions, and influence the pro or anti-apoptotic pathways in oligodendrocytes. Inhibition of TRPA1 receptors might successfully diminish the degenerative pathology in multiple sclerosis and could be a promising therapeutic target to limit central nervous system damage in demyelinating diseases. GLIA 2016;64:2166-2180. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Primary Cutaneous Histoplasmosis Masquerading as Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Poonam; Aggarwal, Radhika; Kaushal, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a genus of dimorphic fungi having various varieties of which the commonest one causing infection is Histoplasma capsulatum known to cause histoplasmosis. It has a varied disease spectrum ranging from an acute infection to chronic disease especially in lungs, disseminated disease and cutaneous disorder. Histoplasma capsulatum usually causes subclinical infection and serious infections only manifest in immunocompromised patients. Frank cases of infection are seen in pulmonary histoplasmosis. The spores of these organisms are seen to be strongly associated with droppings of birds and bats. A combination of these droppings and some soil types provide for an excellent environment for the proliferation of spores. Pulmonary histoplasmosis and disseminated disease are very common in AIDS patients and are a great cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Primary cutaneous histoplasmosis is very rare and occurs due to penetrating injuries. Once diagnosis is made, the lesions respond very well to oral itraconazole, fluconazole or amphotericicn B. We report a rare case of Cutaneous Histoplasmosis (CHP) in a 70-year-old male with complaints of multiple nodules all over his body in a HIV seronegative and otherwise immunocompetent patient. PMID:28273974

  20. Identifying and quantifying recurrent novae masquerading as classical novae

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2014-06-20

    Recurrent novae (RNe) are cataclysmic variables with two or more nova eruptions within a century. Classical novae (CNe) are similar systems with only one such eruption. Many of the so-called CNe are actually RNe for which only one eruption has been discovered. Since RNe are candidate Type Ia supernova progenitors, it is important to know whether there are enough in our Galaxy to provide the supernova rate, and therefore to know how many RNe are masquerading as CNe. To quantify this, we collected all available information on the light curves and spectra of a Galactic, time-limited sample of 237 CNe and the 10 known RNe, as well as exhaustive discovery efficiency records. We recognize RNe as having (1) outburst amplitude smaller than 14.5 – 4.5 × log (t {sub 3}), (2) orbital period >0.6 days, (3) infrared colors of J – H > 0.7 mag and H – K > 0.1 mag, (4) FWHM of Hα > 2000 km s{sup –1}, (5) high excitation lines, such as Fe X or He II near peak, (6) eruption light curves with a plateau, and (7) white dwarf mass greater than 1.2 M {sub ☉}. Using these criteria, we identify V1721 Aql, DE Cir, CP Cru, KT Eri, V838 Her, V2672 Oph, V4160 Sgr, V4643 Sgr, V4739 Sgr, and V477 Sct as strong RN candidates. We evaluate the RN fraction among the known CNe using three methods to get 24% ± 4%, 12% ± 3%, and 35% ± 3%. With roughly a quarter of the 394 known Galactic novae actually being RNe, there should be approximately a hundred such systems masquerading as CNe.

  1. Ocular Neuromyotonia Associated with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nathan H; Bucelli, Robert C; McClelland, Collin M; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2015-10-01

    Ocular neuromyotonia (ONM) is a neuro-ophthalmic disorder characterized by episodic diplopia caused by contraction of one or more ocular muscles due to spontaneous excitation of the respective ocular motor nerve. We report a patient whose ocular neuromyotonia arose in the setting of a subacute demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and subsequently resolved following the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for her neuropathy. Our patient provides additional evidence towards the role of demyelination and ephaptic neurotransmission in ocular neuromyotonia and also represents the first reported case of ocular neuromyotonia associated with a systemic neurological condition.

  2. Generating a Corpus of Mobile Forensic Images for Masquerading user Experimentation.

    PubMed

    Guido, Mark; Brooks, Marc; Grover, Justin; Katz, Eric; Ondricek, Jared; Rogers, Marcus; Sharpe, Lauren

    2016-11-01

    The Periodic Mobile Forensics (PMF) system investigates user behavior on mobile devices. It applies forensic techniques to an enterprise mobile infrastructure, utilizing an on-device agent named TractorBeam. The agent collects changed storage locations for later acquisition, reconstruction, and analysis. TractorBeam provides its data to an enterprise infrastructure that consists of a cloud-based queuing service, relational database, and analytical framework for running forensic processes. During a 3-month experiment with Purdue University, TractorBeam was utilized in a simulated operational setting across 34 users to evaluate techniques to identify masquerading users (i.e., users other than the intended device user). The research team surmises that all masqueraders are undesirable to an enterprise, even when a masquerader lacks malicious intent. The PMF system reconstructed 821 forensic images, extracted one million audit events, and accurately detected masqueraders. Evaluation revealed that developed methods reduced storage requirements 50-fold. This paper describes the PMF architecture, performance of TractorBeam throughout the protocol, and results of the masquerading user analysis.

  3. Disseminated nocardiosis masquerading as metastatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Rajalakshmi; Padmanabhan, Arjun; Reddy Attunuru, Bhanu Prakash; Gupta, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon gram-positive bacterial infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia. It can be localized or systemic and is regarded as an opportunistic infection that is commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a patient with underlying malignancy in whom the clinical presentation was highly suggestive of a metastatic disease. PMID:27578940

  4. Botfly infestation (myiasis) masquerading as furunculosis.

    PubMed

    Gewirtzman, A; Rabinovitz, H

    1999-02-01

    With air travel so prevalent, diseases endemic to certain regions may appear anywhere. The botfly (Dermatobia hominis) is not native to North America. We describe a case of a young boy and his father who presented with furunculosis secondary to infestation with the botfly. The infected patients live in South Florida and had been vacationing in Central America. Standard surgical treatment as well as multiple native remedies are described.

  5. Multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and treatment complications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Qiang; Ringrose, Jennifer; Gross, Donald; Emery, Derek; Blevins, Gregg; Power, Christopher

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both autoimmune diseases that share similar pathogenesis, but the development of MS in RA patients without the treatment of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha is rarely reported, which might be attributed to the use of other medications with potential immunosuppressive effects in the treatment of RA. Since MS can be clinically silent and autopsy examination of the central nervous system in RA patients is rarely described, the association of MS with RA may be possibly under-recognized. We report an autopsy case revealing multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a RA patient who had a prolonged use of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine resulting in hydroxychloroquine-induced myopathies and heart failure. The neuropathological features of this case are consistent with MS, although there are some altered inflammatory demyelinating features such as relatively smaller lesions and less infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly T-cells. Our present case, in combination with literature review, suggests that the RA treatment especially with hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate is likely to alter the characteristics of inflammatory demyelination and disease course. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Visual Evoked Potential Recording in a Rat Model of Experimental Optic Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K.; Chitranshi, Nitin; Reedman, Brittany; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) recording is widely used in clinical practice to assess the severity of optic neuritis in its acute phase, and to monitor the disease course in the follow-up period. Changes in the VEP parameters closely correlate with pathological damage in the optic nerve. This protocol provides a detailed description about the rodent model of optic nerve microinjection, in which a partial demyelination lesion is produced in the optic nerve. VEP recording techniques are also discussed. Using skull implanted electrodes, we are able to acquire reproducible intra-session and between-session VEP traces. VEPs can be recorded on individual animals over a period of time to assess the functional changes in the optic nerve longitudinally. The optic nerve demyelination model, in conjunction with the VEP recording protocol, provides a tool to investigate the disease processes associated with demyelination and remyelination, and can potentially be employed to evaluate the effects of new remyelinating drugs or neuroprotective therapies. PMID:26273963

  7. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  8. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  9. Relationship between chronic demyelination of the optic nerve and short term axonal loss.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A; Garrick, R; Paine, M; Graham, S L; Arvind, H; Van Der Walt, A; Tsonis, S; Yiannikas, C

    2012-03-01

    Axonal loss is a major determinant of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). While acute inflammatory demyelination is a principal cause of axonal transection and subsequent axonal degeneration in acute disease, the nature of chronic axonal loss is less well understood. In the current study, the relationship between degree of chronic demyelination and axonal degeneration was investigated using optic neuritis (ON) as a model. 25 patients with a first episode of unilateral ON, good recovery of visual function and concurrent brain or spinal cord MRI lesions were enrolled. Axonal loss was assessed using change in retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness between 1 and 3 years after ON. Optic nerve conduction was evaluated using latency of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP). The level of mfVEP latency delay at 12 and 36 months was considered indicative of the degree of permanent demyelination. Data from 25 age and gender matched normal controls were used for comparison. RNFL thickness was significantly reduced in ON eyes at 12 months compared with controls but remained unchanged in fellow eyes. Average RNFL thickness demonstrated a small but significant reduction between 12 and 36 months for both ON and fellow eyes. Change in RNFL thickness between 12 and 36 months, however, did not correlate with the degree of mfVEP latency delay. The results, therefore, show no association between the degree of permanent optic nerve demyelination (as measured by latency delay) and progressive axonal degeneration, at least in the early stages of the disease. The fact that fellow eyes demonstrated a similar degree of progressive axonal loss supports this suggestion.

  10. An uncommon cause of bifacial weakness and non-length-dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, Mailankody; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare metabolic disorder that causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle-aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially diagnosed as leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26713019

  11. Prinzmetals Angina Masquerading as Acute Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Ashwal Adamane; Rao, Mugula Sudhakar; Padmakumar, R

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery spasm is an intense vasoconstriction of the coronary arteries and may be responsible for the myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction as well as sudden deaths. Coronary angiography is generally needed to identify the cause. Coronary artery spasm is a multifactorial disease with underlying mechanism still poorly understood. Here, we present case of a 48-year-old male with no significant past history who presented with acute episodic onset chest pain. Clinical, Electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiographic findings suggested pericarditis but a diagnostic coronary angiography revealed significant coronary vasospasm. Patient’s symptoms significantly improved with calcium channel blockers and Nitroglycerine (NTG). PMID:28273995

  12. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP. PMID:25677463

  14. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Steve; Hamilton, Laura K; Vaugeois, Alexandre; Beaudoin, Stéfanny; Breault-Dugas, Christian; Pineau, Isabelle; Lévesque, Sébastien A; Grégoire, Catherine-Alexandra; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2014-01-01

    The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE), remyelination (LPC) and significant locomotor defects (EAE). Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  15. Oxidative Stress and Proinflammatory Cytokines Contribute to Demyelination and Axonal Damage in a Cerebellar Culture Model of Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    di Penta, Alessandra; Moreno, Beatriz; Reix, Stephanie; Fernandez-Diez, Begoña; Villanueva, Maite; Errea, Oihana; Escala, Nagore; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Comella, Joan X.; Villoslada, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Demyelination and axonal damage are critical processes in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines elicited by inflammation mediates tissue damage. Methods/Principal Findings To monitor the demyelination and axonal injury associated with microglia activation we employed a model using cerebellar organotypic cultures stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Microglia activated by LPS released pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα), and increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This activation was associated with demyelination and axonal damage in cerebellar cultures. Axonal damage, as revealed by the presence of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments, mitochondrial accumulation in axonal spheroids, and axonal transection, was associated with stronger iNOS expression and concomitant increases in ROS. Moreover, we analyzed the contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in demyelination and axonal degeneration using the iNOS inhibitor ethyl pyruvate, a free-scavenger and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol, as well as via blockage of pro-inflammatory cytokines using a Fc-TNFR1 construct. We found that blocking microglia activation with ethyl pyruvate or allopurinol significantly decreased axonal damage, and to a lesser extent, demyelination. Blocking TNFα significantly decreased demyelination but did not prevented axonal damage. Moreover, the most common therapy for MS, interferon-beta, was used as an example of an immunomodulator compound that can be tested in this model. In vitro, interferon-beta treatment decreased oxidative stress (iNOS and ROS levels) and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS stimulation, reducing axonal damage. Conclusion The model of neuroinflammation using cerebellar culture stimulated with endotoxin mimicked myelin and axonal damage mediated by the combination of

  16. Astrocytes Are an Early Target in Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise, Charles; Soupart, Alain; Boom, Alain; Schiettecatte, Johan; Pochet, Roland; Brion, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Abrupt osmotic changes during rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia result in demyelinative brain lesions, but the sequence of events linking rapid osmotic changes to myelin loss is not yet understood. Here, in a rat model of osmotic demyelination syndrome, we found that massive astrocyte death occurred after rapid correction of hyponatremia, delineating the regions of future myelin loss. Astrocyte death caused a disruption of the astrocyte-oligodendrocyte network, rapidly upregulated inflammatory cytokines genes, and increased serum S100B, which predicted clinical manifestations and outcome of osmotic demyelination. These results support a model for the pathophysiology of osmotic brain injury in which rapid correction of hyponatremia triggers apoptosis in astrocytes followed by a loss of trophic communication between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, secondary inflammation, microglial activation, and finally demyelination. PMID:21885671

  17. Pinworm infection masquerading as colorectal liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, KJ; Hubscher, S; Mangat, K; Sutcliffe, R; Marudanayagam, R

    2012-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is responsible for a variety of diseases but rarely affects the liver. Accurate characterisation of suspected liver metastases is essential to avoid unnecessary surgery. In the presented case, following a diagnosis of rectal cancer, a solitary liver nodule was diagnosed as a liver metastasis due to typical radiological features and subsequently resected. At pathological assessment, however, a necrotic nodule containing E vermicularis was identified. Solitary necrotic nodules of the liver are usually benign but misdiagnosed frequently as malignant due to radiological features. It is standard practice to diagnose colorectal liver metastases solely on radiological evidence. Without obtaining tissue prior to liver resection, misdiagnosis of solitary necrotic nodules of the liver will continue to occur. PMID:22943320

  18. Eosinophilic mastitis masquerading as breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Garg, M; Kumar, S; Neogi, S

    2012-01-01

    We report the sixth case of Eosinophilic Mastitis, presenting similarly enough to be confused with breast carcinoma. A 50 year old lady presented with a six month history of progressively enlarging asymptomatic breast lump, cough and breathlessness. Clinical examination, mammography and axillary lymphadenopathy suggested malignant disease. Ronchi were heard on chest auscultation. Needle cytology was twice inconclusive and Tru-cut biopsy showed acute on chronic inflammation. Blood investigations revealed significant peripheral eosinophilia. Open biopsy reported eosinophilic mastits, correlating with peripheral eosinophilia and pulmonary symptoms. The patient responded to conservative management. Eosinophilic infiltration of the breast is a rare manifestation of tissue involvement in peripheral eosinophilia. Asthma, Churgh-Strauss Syndrome and hyper-eosinophilic syndromes are associated. Importantly, if a clinically and radiologically malignant breast lump in asthmatic ladies with peripheral eosinophilia is not confirmed on cytology, this entity could be a diagnosis, potentially saving the patient from surgery. PMID:24960670

  19. Eosinophilic mastitis masquerading as breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Garg, M; Kumar, S; Neogi, S

    2012-06-01

    We report the sixth case of Eosinophilic Mastitis, presenting similarly enough to be confused with breast carcinoma. A 50 year old lady presented with a six month history of progressively enlarging asymptomatic breast lump, cough and breathlessness. Clinical examination, mammography and axillary lymphadenopathy suggested malignant disease. Ronchi were heard on chest auscultation. Needle cytology was twice inconclusive and Tru-cut biopsy showed acute on chronic inflammation. Blood investigations revealed significant peripheral eosinophilia. Open biopsy reported eosinophilic mastits, correlating with peripheral eosinophilia and pulmonary symptoms. The patient responded to conservative management. Eosinophilic infiltration of the breast is a rare manifestation of tissue involvement in peripheral eosinophilia. Asthma, Churgh-Strauss Syndrome and hyper-eosinophilic syndromes are associated. Importantly, if a clinically and radiologically malignant breast lump in asthmatic ladies with peripheral eosinophilia is not confirmed on cytology, this entity could be a diagnosis, potentially saving the patient from surgery.

  20. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Anupriya; Alexander, Anika; Bal, Simerpreet; Sivadasan, Ajith; Aaron, Sanjith

    2014-01-01

    Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome). These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient's presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease. PMID:24817748

  1. Adenocarcinoma of lung masquerading as systemic auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Naha, Kushal; Thakare, Sayali; Vivek, G; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana

    2012-06-14

    A 40-year-old previously healthy male presented with acute onset painless dimness of vision in both eyes since the past week and low-grade fever, anorexia and weight loss for the past 1 month. He had been evaluated at a local hospital and diagnosed to have a posterior cerebral artery territory infarct on the left side on the strength of cranial CT. Shortly after receiving antiplatelets and warfarin he had developed severe coagulopathy as evidenced by haematemesis, epistaxis and haematuria. Preliminary investigation revealed prolonged clotting parameters, renal failure and anaemia. Cerebral MRI showed multiple areas of cortical haemorrhage. In the course of his hospital stay, he developed further stigmata of auto-immunity including Coomb's positive haemolytic anaemia, recurrent venous thromboses and a palpable purpuric truncal rash. He was eventually diagnosed to have an adenocarcinoma of the lung, and was subsequently referred to an oncologist for further therapy.

  2. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  3. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Donofrio, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immuno-modulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP. PMID:23117943

  4. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Donofrio, Peter D

    2012-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immunomodulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP.

  5. HCV-related central and peripheral nervous system demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered.

  6. HCV-Related Central and Peripheral Nervous System Demyelinating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered. PMID:25198705

  7. Rare adipose disorders (RADs) masquerading as obesity.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L

    2012-02-01

    Rare adipose disorders (RADs) including multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), lipedema and Dercum's disease (DD) may be misdiagnosed as obesity. Lifestyle changes, such as reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity are standard care for obesity. Although lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery work effectively for the obesity component of RADs, these treatments do not routinely reduce the abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of RADs. RAD SAT likely results from the growth of a brown stem cell population with secondary lymphatic dysfunction in MSL, or by primary vascular and lymphatic dysfunction in lipedema and DD. People with RADs do not lose SAT from caloric limitation and increased energy expenditure alone. In order to improve recognition of RADs apart from obesity, the diagnostic criteria, histology and pathophysiology of RADs are presented and contrasted to familial partial lipodystrophies, acquired partial lipodystrophies and obesity with which they may be confused. Treatment recommendations focus on evidence-based data and include lymphatic decongestive therapy, medications and supplements that support loss of RAD SAT. Associated RAD conditions including depression, anxiety and pain will improve as healthcare providers learn to identify and adopt alternative treatment regimens for the abnormal SAT component of RADs. Effective dietary and exercise regimens are needed in RAD populations to improve quality of life and construct advanced treatment regimens for future generations.

  8. Rare adipose disorders (RADs) masquerading as obesity

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Rare adipose disorders (RADs) including multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), lipedema and Dercum's disease (DD) may be misdiagnosed as obesity. Lifestyle changes, such as reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity are standard care for obesity. Although lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery work effectively for the obesity component of RADs, these treatments do not routinely reduce the abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of RADs. RAD SAT likely results from the growth of a brown stem cell population with secondary lymphatic dysfunction in MSL, or by primary vascular and lymphatic dysfunction in lipedema and DD. People with RADs do not lose SAT from caloric limitation and increased energy expenditure alone. In order to improve recognition of RADs apart from obesity, the diagnostic criteria, histology and pathophysiology of RADs are presented and contrasted to familial partial lipodystrophies, acquired partial lipodystrophies and obesity with which they may be confused. Treatment recommendations focus on evidence-based data and include lymphatic decongestive therapy, medications and supplements that support loss of RAD SAT. Associated RAD conditions including depression, anxiety and pain will improve as healthcare providers learn to identify and adopt alternative treatment regimens for the abnormal SAT component of RADs. Effective dietary and exercise regimens are needed in RAD populations to improve quality of life and construct advanced treatment regimens for future generations. PMID:22301856

  9. [Jawbone metastasis masquerading as dental pain].

    PubMed

    Goldman, Y; Yarom, N

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are rare. However, in 25% of cases, oral symptoms will be the first sign of metastatic disease. The incidence of jaws metastases is twice as high as the incidence of metastases to the soft tissues of the oral cavity. In some cases, jaws metastases can mimic dental or periodontal pain. We report a case of a 67 year old female who was referred to our clinic because of severe pain on her left posterior mandible which was not relieved by endodontic treatment of the first and second molar. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and had been treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Seven years later, lung metastases were found and she was treated with chemotherapy. Later on, brain metastases developed which had been treated with radiotherapy. On presentation, she complained of pain on the posterior left mandible which was accompanied by a burning sensation of the lower left lip and chin. CT scan revealed a soft tissue mass perforating the lingual and buccal plates of the posterior left mandible, which was compatible with a diagnosis of metastasis. Radiotherapy rapidly relieved the pain. Unfortunately, the patient passed away one month later. Dentists should be able to recognize the signs and symptoms associated with metastases to the jaws and should include it in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients with oncologic background.

  10. Thyrotoxicosis and Choledocholithiasis Masquerading as Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Short, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    A 26-year-old female, thirteen months postpartum, presented to the emergency department for four weeks of epigastric abdominal pain, pruritus, new onset jaundice, and 11.3 kgs (25 lbs) unintentional weight loss. On examination, she was afebrile, tachycardic, alert, and oriented and had jaundice with scleral icterus. Labs were significant for undetectable TSH, FT4 that was too high to measure, and elevated total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and transaminases. Abdominal ultrasound revealed cholelithiasis without biliary ductal dilation. Treatment for presumed thyroid storm was initiated. Further work-up with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) revealed an obstructing cholelith within the distal common bile duct. With the presence of choledocholithiasis explaining the jaundice and abdominal pain, plus the absence of CNS alterations, the diagnosis of thyroid storm was revised to thyrotoxicosis complicated by choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP) with sphincterotomy was performed to alleviate the biliary obstruction, with prompt symptomatic improvement. Thyroid storm is a rare manifestation of hyperthyroidism with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical examination, and abnormal thyroid function tests do not correlate with disease severity. Knowledge of the many manifestations of thyroid storm will facilitate a quick and accurate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28912821

  11. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release.

  12. Lacrimal and nasal masquerades of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstructions: etiology, management, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Saurabh; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Gupta, Adit; Naik, Milind N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to report various conditions masquerading as congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO). Retrospective review was designed in a tertiary hospital setting. 92 eyes of 65 consecutive patients were included in this study. All patients presenting with CNLDO symptomatology but where the diagnosis of CNLDO was subsequently ruled out were included in the study. The study patients were recruited from a single surgeon's (MJA) tertiary eye care practice over a 3-year period from 2011 to 2013. A detailed clinical evaluation and a further lacrimal system evaluation were performed under general anesthesia. The main outcome measure was other lacrimal and nasal conditions masquerading as CNLDO. Average age at presentation was 43.49 ± 31.78 months. All cases had symptoms of either watering or discharge with an increase tear meniscus or abnormal fluorescein dye disappearance test. The commonest masquerades of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction include incomplete punctal canalisation (27.2 %), functional epiphora (14.1 %), punctal agenesis (14.1 %), monocanalicular obstructions (10.8 %), and presaccal stenosis (8.7 %). Each masquerade was managed specifically and at the last follow-up of 5.85 ± 10.85 months, 63 % eyes (58/92) had no epiphora and 2.2 % (2/92) eyes had occasional epiphora. Parents of patients with punctal agenesis were counseled for option of conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy in future. Incomplete punctal canalisation is the commonest masquerade among many conditions that may mimic CNLDO and mandates a careful evaluation. Specific management of each masquerade results in satisfactory outcomes.

  13. A Unified Frequency Domain Model to Study the Effect of Demyelination on Axonal Conduction.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Saurabh; Goodwin, Shikha J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease caused by demyelination of nerve fibers. In order to determine the loss of signal with the percentage of demyelination, we need to develop models that can simulate this effect. Existing time-based models does not provide a method to determine the influences of demyelination based on simulation results. Our goal is to develop a system identification approach to generate a transfer function in the frequency domain. The idea is to create a unified modeling approach for neural action potential propagation along the length of an axon containing number of Nodes of Ranvier (N). A system identification approach has been used to identify a transfer function of the classical Hodgkin-Huxley equations for membrane voltage potential. Using this approach, we model cable properties and signal propagation along the length of the axon with N node myelination. MATLAB/Simulink platform is used to analyze an N node-myelinated neuronal axon. The ability to transfer function in the frequency domain will help reduce effort and will give a much more realistic feel when compared to the classical time-based approach. Once a transfer function is identified, the conduction as a cascade of each linear time invariant system-based transfer function can be modeled. Using this approach, future studies can model the loss of myelin in various parts of nervous system.

  14. Tamoxifen accelerates the repair of demyelinated lesions in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ginez A.; Hofer, Matthias P.; Syed, Yasir A.; Amaral, Ana I.; Rundle, Jon; Rahman, Saifur; Zhao, Chao; Kotter, Mark R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing central nervous system (CNS) myelin regeneration is recognized as an important strategy to ameliorate the devastating consequences of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Previous findings have indicated that myelin proteins, which accumulate following demyelination, inhibit remyelination by blocking the differentiation of rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) via modulation of PKCα. We therefore screened drugs for their potential to overcome this differentiation block. From our screening, tamoxifen emerges as a potent inducer of OPC differentiation in vitro. We show that the effects of tamoxifen rely on modulation of the estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ, and GPR30. Furthermore, we demonstrate that administration of tamoxifen to demyelinated rats in vivo accelerates remyelination. Tamoxifen is a well-established drug and is thus a promising candidate for a drug to regenerate myelin, as it will not require extensive safety testing. In addition, Tamoxifen plays an important role in biomedical research as an activator of inducible genetic models. Our results highlight the importance of appropriate controls when using such models. PMID:27554391

  15. A Unified Frequency Domain Model to Study the Effect of Demyelination on Axonal Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Saurabh; Goodwin, Shikha J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease caused by demyelination of nerve fibers. In order to determine the loss of signal with the percentage of demyelination, we need to develop models that can simulate this effect. Existing time-based models does not provide a method to determine the influences of demyelination based on simulation results. Our goal is to develop a system identification approach to generate a transfer function in the frequency domain. The idea is to create a unified modeling approach for neural action potential propagation along the length of an axon containing number of Nodes of Ranvier (N). A system identification approach has been used to identify a transfer function of the classical Hodgkin–Huxley equations for membrane voltage potential. Using this approach, we model cable properties and signal propagation along the length of the axon with N node myelination. MATLAB/Simulink platform is used to analyze an N node-myelinated neuronal axon. The ability to transfer function in the frequency domain will help reduce effort and will give a much more realistic feel when compared to the classical time-based approach. Once a transfer function is identified, the conduction as a cascade of each linear time invariant system-based transfer function can be modeled. Using this approach, future studies can model the loss of myelin in various parts of nervous system. PMID:27103847

  16. Stressful life events and the risk of initial central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Saul, Alice; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lucas, Robyn M; Taylor, Bruce V; Simpson, Steve; Valery, Patricia; Dwyer, Terence; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Pender, Michael P; van der Mei, Ingrid Af

    2017-06-01

    There is substantial evidence that stress increases multiple sclerosis disease activity, but limited evidence on its association with the onset of multiple sclerosis. To examine the association between stressful life events and risk of first demyelinating event (FDE). This was a multicentre incident case-control study. Cases ( n = 282 with first diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, including n = 216 with 'classic FDE') were aged 18-59 years. Controls without CNS demyelination ( n = 558) were matched to cases on age, sex and study region. Stressful life events were assessed using a questionnaire based on the Social Readjustment Rating Scale. Those who suffered from a serious illness in the previous 12 months were more likely to have an FDE (odds ratio (OR) = 2.35 (1.36, 4.06), p = 0.002), and when we limited our reference group to those who had no stressful life events, the magnitude of effect became stronger (OR = 5.41 (1.80, 16.28)). The total stress number and stress load were not convincingly associated with the risk of an FDE. Cases were more likely to report a serious illness in the previous 12 months, which could suggest that a non-specific illness provides an additional strain to an already predisposed immune system.

  17. Selective inhibitors of nuclear export avert progression in preclinical models of inflammatory demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Herbin, Olivier; de la Hera, Belén; Vidaurre, Oscar G.; Moy, Gregory A.; Sun, Qingxiang; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Albrecht, Stephanie; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; McCauley, Dilara; Chook, Yuh Min; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Kidd, Grahame J.; Shacham, Sharon; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Axonal damage has been associated with aberrant protein trafficking. This study characterizes a novel class of compounds targeting nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling, by binding to the catalytic groove of the nuclear export protein XPO1/CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance protein1). Oral administration of novel reversible CRM1 inhibitors in preclinical murine models of demyelination significantly attenuated disease progression, even when started after the onset of paralysis. Clinical efficacy was associated with decreased proliferation of immune cells, characterized by nuclear accumulation of cell cycle inhibitors, and preservation of cytoskeletal integrity even in demyelinated axons. Neuroprotection was not limited to models of demyelination, but observed also in other mouse models of axonal damage (i.e. kainic acid injection) and detected in cultured neurons after knockdown of Xpo1, the gene encoding for CRM1. A proteomic screen for target molecules revealed that CRM1 inhibitors in neurons prevented nuclear export of molecules associated with axonal damage while retaining transcription factors modulating neuroprotection. PMID:25706475

  18. Astrocyte-derived tissue Transglutaminase affects fibronectin deposition, but not aggregation, during cuprizone-induced demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Espitia Pinzon, Nathaly; Sanz-Morello, Berta; Brevé, John J. P.; Bol, John G. J. M.; Drukarch, Benjamin; Bauer, Jan; Baron, Wia; van Dam, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Astrogliosis as seen in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) develops into astroglial scarring, which is beneficial because it seals off the site of central nervous system (CNS) damage. However, astroglial scarring also forms an obstacle that inhibits axon outgrowth and (re)myelination in brain lesions. This is possibly an important cause for incomplete remyelination in the CNS of early stage MS patients and for failure in remyelination when the disease progresses. In this study we address whether under demyelinating conditions in vivo, tissue Transglutaminase (TG2), a Ca2+ -dependent enzyme that catalyses posttranslational modification of proteins, contributes to extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and/or aggregation. We used the cuprizone model for de- and remyelination. TG2 immunoreactivity and enzymatic activity time-dependently appeared in astrocytes and ECM, respectively, in the corpus callosum of cuprizone-treated mice. Enhanced presence of soluble monomeric and multimeric fibronectin was detected during demyelination, and fibronectin immunoreactivity was slightly decreased in cuprizone-treated TG2−/− mice. In vitro TG2 overexpression in astrocytes coincided with more, while knock-down of TG2 with less fibronectin production. TG2 contributes, at least partly, to fibronectin production, and may play a role in fibronectin deposition during cuprizone-induced demyelination. Our observations are of interest in understanding the functional implications of TG2 during astrogliosis. PMID:28128219

  19. Occurrence and long-term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, C; Splendiani, A; Torlone, S; Patriarca, L; Carrocci, C; Sciamanna, S; Marini, C; Carolei, A

    2016-07-01

    Although tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a well recognized variant of multiple sclerosis, prognostic uncertainty still exists about long term prognosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and long term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients. We reviewed brain MRI of 443 patients referred to our MS clinic. All patients meeting the McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis and showing at least one TDL were included. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival in patient cohort were compared with control group without TDLs using a log-rank test. Seven cases with TDLs were identified (occurrence 1.58 %). Tumefactive demyelinating lesion recurrence was 16.6 %. Cumulative proportion of patients free from clinical relapse and from new T2 lesions was lower in the control group although not reaching statistical significance (30 vs 50 %; P = 0.666 and 21.7 vs 33.3 %; P = 0.761, respectively). Disability progression analysis showed a not significant trend towards lower probability of remaining progression free for TDL patients (50 vs 61 %; P = 0.295). Occurrence of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in our cohort was higher than those reported in other studies. Overall, TDLs were not predictive of poor outcome in terms of disability progression.

  20. White matter changes in paediatric multiple sclerosis and monophasic demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Giulia; Brown, Robert A; MomayyezSiahkal, Parya; Elliott, Colm; Narayanan, Sridar; Bar-Or, Amit; Ann Marrie, Ruth; Ann Yeh, E; Filippi, Massimo; Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L

    2017-03-14

    Most children who experience an acquired demyelinating syndrome of the central nervous system will have a monophasic disease course, with no further clinical or radiological symptoms. A subset will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a life-long disorder. Using linear mixed effects models we examined longitudinal diffusion properties of normal-appearing white matter in 505 serial scans of 132 paediatric participants with acquired demyelinating syndromes followed for a median of 4.4 years, many from first clinical presentation, and 106 scans of 80 healthy paediatric participants. Fifty-three participants with demyelinating syndromes eventually received a diagnosis of paediatric-onset multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging measures properties of water diffusion through tissue, which normally becomes increasingly restricted and anisotropic in the brain during childhood and adolescence, as fibre bundles develop and myelinate. In the healthy paediatric participants, our data demonstrate the expected trajectory of more restricted and anisotropic white matter diffusivity with increasing age. However, in participants with multiple sclerosis, fractional anisotropy decreased and mean diffusivity of non-lesional, normal-appearing white matter progressively increased after clinical presentation, suggesting not only a failure of age-expected white matter development but also a progressive loss of tissue integrity. Surprisingly, patients with monophasic disease failed to show age-expected changes in diffusion parameters in normal-appearing white matter, although they did not show progressive loss of integrity over time. Further analysis demonstrated that participants with monophasic disease experienced different post-onset trajectories in normal-appearing white matter depending on their presenting phenotype: those with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis demonstrated abnormal trajectories of diffusion parameters compared to healthy paediatric participants, as did

  1. Acceleration in the rate of CNS remyelination in lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Pavelko, K D; van Engelen, B G; Rodriguez, M

    1998-04-01

    One important therapeutic goal during CNS injury from trauma or demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis is to develop methods to promote remyelination. We tested the hypothesis that spontaneous remyelination in the toxic nonimmune model of lysolecithin-induced demyelination can be enhanced by manipulating the inflammatory response. In PBS-treated SJL/J mice, the number of remyelinating axons per square millimeter of lesion area increased significantly 3 and 5 weeks after lysolecithin injection in the spinal cord. However, methylprednisolone or a monoclonal antibody (mAb), SCH94.03, developed for its ability to promote remyelination in the Theiler's virus murine model of demyelination, further increased the number of remyelinating axons per lesion area at 3 weeks by a factor of 2.6 and 1.9, respectively, but did not increase the ratio of myelin sheath thickness to axon diameter or the number of cells incorporating tritiated thymidine in the lesion. After 3 weeks, the number of remyelinating axons in the methylprednisolone or mAb SCH94.03 treatment groups was similar to the spontaneous remyelination in the 5 week PBS control-treated group, indicating that these treatments promoted remyelination by increasing its rate rather than its extent. To address a mechanism for promoting remyelination, through an effect on scavenger function, we assessed morphometrically the number of macrophages in lesions after methylprednisolone and mAb SCH94.03 treatment. Methylprednisolone reduced the number of macrophages, but SCH94.03 did not, although both enhanced remyelination. This study supports the hypothesis that even in toxic nonprimary immune demyelination, manipulating the inflammatory response is a benefit in myelin repair.

  2. Thyroid hormone alleviates demyelination induced by cuprizone through its role in remyelination during the remission period.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Zhan, Xiao L; Ma, Zi Y; Chen, Xing S; Cai, Qi Y; Yao, Zhong X

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease induced by demyelination in the central nervous system, and the remission period of MS is crucial for remyelination. In addition, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone (TH) have been identified in MS. However, in the clinic, insufficient attention has been paid to the role of TH in the remission period. Indeed, TH not only functions in the development of the brain but also affects myelination. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of TH on remyelination during this period. A model of demyelination induced by cuprizone (CPZ) was used to observe the function of TH in remyelination during the remission period of MS. Through weighing and behavioral tests, we found that TH improved the physical symptoms of mice impaired by CPZ. Supplementation of TH led to the repair of myelin as detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot. In addition, a sufficient TH supply resulted in an increase in myelinated axons without affecting myelin thickness and g ratio in the corpus callosum, as detected by electron microscopy. Double immunostaining with myelin basic protein and neurofilament 200 (NF200) showed that the CPZ-induced impairment of axons was alleviated by TH. Conversely, insufficient TH induced by 6-propyl-2-thiouracil resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that an adequate supply of TH promoted the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells by immunofluorescence, which was beneficial to remyelination. Further, we found that TH reduced the number of astrocytes without affecting microglia. Conclusively, it was shown that TH alleviated demyelination induced by CPZ by promoting the development of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and remyelination. The critical time for remyelination is the remission period of MS. TH plays a significant role in alleviating demyelination during the remission period in the clinical treatment of MS.

  3. Zebrafish regenerate full thickness optic nerve myelin after demyelination, but this fails with increasing age.

    PubMed

    Münzel, Eva Jolanda; Becker, Catherina G; Becker, Thomas; Williams, Anna

    2014-07-15

    In the human demyelinating central nervous system (CNS) disease multiple sclerosis, remyelination promotes recovery and limits neurodegeneration, but this is inefficient and always ultimately fails. Furthermore, these regenerated myelin sheaths are thinner and shorter than the original, leaving the underlying axons potentially vulnerable. In rodent models, CNS remyelination is more efficient, so that in young animals (but not old) the number of myelinated axons is efficiently restored to normal, but in both young and old rodents, regenerated myelin sheaths are still short and thin. The reasons for these differences in remyelination efficiency, the thinner remyelinated myelin sheaths compared to developmental myelin and the subsequent effect on the underlying axon are unclear. We studied CNS remyelination in the highly regenerative adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), to better understand mechanisms of what we hypothesised would be highly efficient remyelination, and to identify differences to mammalian CNS remyelination, as larval zebrafish are increasingly used for high throughput screens to identify potential drug targets to improve myelination and remyelination. We developed a novel method to induce a focal demyelinating lesion in adult zebrafish optic nerve with no discernible axonal damage, and describe the cellular changes over time. Remyelination is indeed efficient in both young and old adult zebrafish optic nerves, and at 4 weeks after demyelination, the number of myelinated axons is restored to normal, but internode lengths are short. However, unlike in rodents or in humans, in young zebrafish these regenerated myelin sheaths were of normal thickness, whereas in aged zebrafish, they were thin, and remained so even 3 months later. This inability to restore normal myelin thickness in remyelination with age was associated with a reduced macrophage/microglial response. Zebrafish are able to efficiently restore normal thickness myelin around optic nerve axons after

  4. Up-regulation of the hyaluronate receptor CD44 in canine distemper demyelinated plaques.

    PubMed

    Alldinger, S; Fonfara, S; Kremmer, E; Baumgärtner, W

    2000-02-01

    CD44 antigen (CD44), the principle cell surface receptor for hyaluronate, is up-regulated in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis on fibrous astrocytes. As astrocytes are the main target cell of canine distemper virus (CDV), the consequences of a CDV infection on the CD44 expression and distribution in brains with spontaneous demyelinating canine distemper encephalitis (CDE) were of interest. Thirteen acute, 35 subacute, and 11 chronic plaques of nine dogs with immunohistologically confirmed CDE and brains of control dogs were included in the study. For light microscopy, 5-micron-thick serial sections were stained with H&E and incubated with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD44 and canine distemper virus nucleoprotein and polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and myelin basic protein (MBP). For immunoelectron microscopy, 90-nm-thick sections were double stained with anti-GFAP and anti-CD44 mAbs to specify CD44-expressing structures. In controls, CD44 was diffusely distributed in the white matter and single meningeal cells exhibited a marginal expression of the antigen. In acute and more prominently in subacute demyelinating encephalitis, there was a plaque-associated up-regulation of CD44 which paralleled GFAP. In chronic demyelinating lesions, a reduction of CD44 associated with a loss of GFAP-positive astrocytes was noted. Additionally, in chronic plaques, CD44 was expressed on the cell membrane of perivascular mononuclear cells. Immunoelectron microscopically, in controls, CD44 was rarely demonstrated on astrocytic cell processes. In contrast, in brains with CDE CD44 was found on the cell membrane of broadened astrocytic cell processes. In summary, CD44 is up-regulated on astrocytes in the early phase of CDE and seems to represent a marker for the activation of immune cells in the late phase of the infection.

  5. Movement disorders and the osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    With the advent of MRI, osmotic demyelination syndromes (ODS) are increasingly recognised to affect varied sites in the brain in addition to the classical central pontine lesion. Striatal involvement is seen in a large proportion of cases and results in a wide variety of movement disorders. Movement disorders and cognitive problems resulting from ODS affecting the basal ganglia may occur early in the course of the illness, or may present as delayed manifestations after the patient survives the acute phase. Such delayed symptoms may evolve over time, and may even progress despite treatment. Improved survival of patients in the last few decades due to better intensive care has led to an increase in the incidence of such delayed manifestations of ODS. While the outcome of ODS is not as dismal as hitherto believed - with the acute akinetic-rigid syndrome associated with striatal myelinolysis often responding to dopaminergic therapy - the delayed symptoms often prove refractory to medical therapy. This article presents a review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, imaging, and therapy of movement disorders associated with involvement of the basal ganglia in ODS. A comprehensive review of 54 previously published cases of movement disorders due to ODS, and a video recording depicting the spectrum of delayed movement disorders seen after recovery from ODS are also presented.

  6. Characterization of a new rat model for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brun, Susana; Beaino, Wissam; Kremer, Laurent; Taleb, Omar; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy; Lam, Chanh D; Greer, Judith M; de Seze, Jérôme; Trifilieff, Elisabeth

    2015-01-15

    Our objective was to develop a chronic model of EAN which could be used as a tool to test treatment strategies for CIDP. Lewis rats injected with S-palmitoylated P0(180-199) peptide developed a chronic, sometimes relapsing-remitting type of disease. Our model fulfills electrophysiological criteria of demyelination with axonal degeneration, confirmed by immunohistopathology. The late phase of the chronic disease was characterized by accumulation of IL-17(+) cells and macrophages in sciatic nerves and by high serum IL-17 levels. In conclusion, we have developed a reliable and reproducible animal model resembling CIDP that can now be used for translational drug studies.

  7. When DLB, PD, and PSP masquerade as MSA: an autopsy study of 134 patients.

    PubMed

    Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Uitti, Ryan J; van Gerpen, Jay A; Cheshire, William P; Josephs, Keith A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Langston, J William; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-08-04

    To determine ways to improve diagnostic accuracy of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we assessed the diagnostic process in patients who came to autopsy with antemortem diagnosis of MSA by comparing clinical and pathologic features between those who proved to have MSA and those who did not. We focus on likely explanations for misdiagnosis. This is a retrospective review of 134 consecutive patients with an antemortem clinical diagnosis of MSA who came to autopsy with neuropathologic evaluation of the brain. Of the 134 patients, 125 had adequate medical records for review. Clinical and pathologic features were compared between patients with autopsy-confirmed MSA and those with other pathologic diagnoses, including dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson disease (PD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Of the 134 patients with clinically diagnosed MSA, 83 (62%) had the correct diagnosis at autopsy. Pathologically confirmed DLB was the most common misdiagnosis, followed by PSP and PD. Despite meeting pathologic criteria for intermediate to high likelihood of DLB, several patients with DLB did not have dementia and none had significant Alzheimer-type pathology. Autonomic failure was the leading cause of misdiagnosis in DLB and PD, and cerebellar ataxia was the leading cause of misdiagnosis in PSP. The diagnostic accuracy for MSA was suboptimal in this autopsy study. Pathologically confirmed DLB, PD, and PSP were the most common diseases to masquerade as MSA. This has significant implications not only for patient care, but also for research studies in MSA cases that do not have pathologic confirmation. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  9. [Correlation between demyelinating lesions and executive function decline in a sample of Mexican patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Aldrete Cortez, V R; Duriez-Sotelo, E; Carrillo-Mora, P; Pérez-Zuno, J A

    2013-09-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is characterised by several neurological symptoms including cognitive impairment, which has recently been the subject of considerable study. At present, evidence pointing to a correlation between lesion characteristics and specific cognitive impairment is not conclusive. To investigate the presence of a correlation between the characteristics of demyelinating lesions and performance of basic executive functions in a sample of MS patients. We included 21 adult patients with scores of 0 to 5 on the Kurtzke scale and no exacerbations of the disease in at least 3 months prior to the evaluation date. They completed the Stroop test and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The location of the lesions was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed by a blinded expert in neuroimaging. Demyelinating lesions were more frequently located in the frontal and occipital lobes. The Stroop test showed that as cognitive demand increased on each of the sections in the test, reaction time and number of errors increased. On the WCST, 33.33% of patients registered as having moderate cognitive impairment. No correlation could be found between demyelinating lesion characteristics (location, size, and number) and patients' scores on the tests. Explanations of the causes of cognitive impairment in MS should examine a variety of biological, psychological, and social factors instead of focusing solely on demyelinating lesions. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Infradiaphragmatic Extralobar Pulmonary Sequestration: Masquerading as Suprarenal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kalenahalli, Kiran V.; Garg, Navneet; Goolahally, Lakshmikantha N.; Reddy, Somasekhara P.; Iyengar, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is a rare malformation, wherein a portion of lung is non-functional and is not in normal continuity with the tracheo-bronchial tree, and may derive its blood supply from systemic vessels. Two types are described: Intralobar and extralobar types. Intralobar sequestration is more common type, which shares visceral pleura of the involved lobe and is localized within the normal pulmonary parenchyma. Whereas extralobar forms are uncommon and are totally separate from the lung and usually have own covering. Infra-diaphragmatic pulmonary sequestration is of extralobar type and is extremely rare, and usually is associated with other congenital malformations. We present an extremely rare case of isolated infra-diaphragmatic pulmonary sequestration which was antenatally detected and followed up with postnatal CT scan, where it masqueraded as suprarenal mass, and was surgically treated. This case emphasises to add a differential diagnosis of malformation in congenital supra-renal masses, which remain stable in size and appearance, and hence avoid immediate surgery. PMID:24251262

  11. Crypsis via leg clustering: twig masquerading in a spider.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shichang; Mao, Kuei-Kai; Lin, Po-Ting; Ho, Chiu-Ju; Hung, Wei; Piorkowski, Dakota; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I-Min

    2015-03-01

    The role of background matching in camouflage has been extensively studied. However, contour modification has received far less attention, especially in twig-mimicking species. Here, we studied this deceptive strategy by revealing a special masquerade tactic, in which the animals protract and cluster their legs linearly in the same axis with their bodies when resting, using the spider Ariamnes cylindrogaster as a model. We used cardboard papers to construct dummies resembling spiders in appearance and colour. To differentiate the most important factors in the concealment effect, we manipulated body size (long or short abdomen) and resting postures (leg clustered or spread) of the dummies and recorded the responses of predators to different dummy types in the field. The results showed that dummies with clustered legs received significantly less attention from predators, regardless of the body length. Thus, we conclude that A. cylindrogaster relies on the resting posture rather than body size for predator avoidance. This study provides, to the best of our knowledge, empirical evidence for the first time that twig-mimicking species can achieve effective camouflage by contour modification.

  12. Crypsis via leg clustering: twig masquerading in a spider

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shichang; Mao, Kuei-Kai; Lin, Po-Ting; Ho, Chiu-Ju; Hung, Wei; Piorkowski, Dakota; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I-Min

    2015-01-01

    The role of background matching in camouflage has been extensively studied. However, contour modification has received far less attention, especially in twig-mimicking species. Here, we studied this deceptive strategy by revealing a special masquerade tactic, in which the animals protract and cluster their legs linearly in the same axis with their bodies when resting, using the spider Ariamnes cylindrogaster as a model. We used cardboard papers to construct dummies resembling spiders in appearance and colour. To differentiate the most important factors in the concealment effect, we manipulated body size (long or short abdomen) and resting postures (leg clustered or spread) of the dummies and recorded the responses of predators to different dummy types in the field. The results showed that dummies with clustered legs received significantly less attention from predators, regardless of the body length. Thus, we conclude that A. cylindrogaster relies on the resting posture rather than body size for predator avoidance. This study provides, to the best of our knowledge, empirical evidence for the first time that twig-mimicking species can achieve effective camouflage by contour modification. PMID:26064622

  13. Recurrent angio-fibroma of breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai K; Alam, Feroz; Shadan, Mariam; Naim, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A young Indian female presented with a recurring tumor in the right breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor. Patient had history of five times excision and recurrences of the tumor, diagnosed as fibrous phyllodes of the breast. Presently, a well-circumscribed tumor of about 10 cm size, comprising of benign fibrous-angiomatous tissue with evidence of foci of pyogenic vasculitis was observed. Immuno-histochemical markers for the myo-epithelial and epithelial elements excluded the possibility of fibrous phyllodes, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, desmoid fibromatosis, and metaplastic carcinoma. The present findings were diagnostic of an inflammatory angio-fibroma of the right breast, not reported in the earlier literature. The observations indicated that the female breast may be susceptible to spontaneous productive and common-antibiotic-resistant focal septic vascular inflammation giving rise to angio-fibromatous proliferation producing a well-defined tumor mass in the breast, distinguishable from the other breast lesions by the connective tissue stains and immuno-histochemical markers.

  14. Rare Anterior Segment Retinoblastoma Masquerading as Corneal Endotheliitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Alla; Kaufman, Stephen C; Ali, Rasha; Grajewski, Alana; Anderson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    We present a unique case involving a 6-year-old female with a unilateral corneal endotheliitis-like finding, who was ultimately found to have a form of anterior diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma with no evidence of retinal involvement. The patient's presumed endotheliitis was initially treated with topical dexamethasone and oral acyclovir without improvement. She then underwent multiple fine-needle aspirations of anterior chamber fluid, which were negative for abnormal findings of viral polymerase chain reaction, viral cultures, and flow cytometry. Months after initial presentation, an anterior chamber angle mass developed and a biopsy identified retinoblastoma cells. The patient underwent plaque radiotherapy of the cornea and systemic chemotherapy. The patient regained good vision and is tumor-free at 13 months. Anterior inflammation is a rare form of masquerade syndrome associated with retinoblastoma; however, it tends to be associated with diffuse posterior segment retinoblastoma when it does occur. Diffuse anterior retinoblastoma is a rare form of retinoblastoma with no apparent focus in the retina. Ultimately, our patient developed an anterior chamber angle lesion, which was biopsied and proven to be retinoblastoma. Unusual corneal endotheliitis-like findings in children that are not responsive to conventional treatment should raise the clinician's suspicion of malignancy, even when no retinal lesion is detected.

  15. Arteries masquerading as varicose veins: A trap for phlebologists.

    PubMed

    Jones, L; Parsi, K

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound guided sclerotherapy may be complicated by intra-arterial injections resulting in significant tissue necrosis. Here, we present a 69-year-old man with a history of right small saphenous vein "stripping", presenting for the treatment of symptomatic lower limb varicose veins. Duplex ultrasound of the right lower limb outlined the pathway of venous incompetence. Despite the history of "stripping", the small saphenous vein was present but the sapheno-popliteal junction was ligated at the level of the knee crease. No other unusual findings were reported at the time. During ultrasound guided sclerotherapy, subcutaneous vessels of the right posterior calf were noted to be pulsatile on B-mode ultrasound. Treatment was interrupted. Subsequent angiography and sonography showed absence of the right distal popliteal artery. A cluster of subcutaneous vessels of the right medial and posterior calf were found to be arterial collaterals masquerading as varicose veins. Injection sclerotherapy of these vessels would have resulted in significant tissue loss. This case highlights the importance of vigilance at the time of treatment and the invaluable role of ultrasound in guiding endovenous interventions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Cross-reactivity and masqueraders in seafood reactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Taylor A; Gada, Satyen M

    2013-01-01

    Confounding variables play a significant role in many adverse seafood reactions and a clear understanding of these factors is important in properly characterizing reactions associated with potential masqueraders and mimics. Although the medical literature is replete with reviews of seafood hypersensitivity and reports of cross-reactive and newly characterized allergens, there has not been a recent effort to provide an updated overview of the several processes that may lead clinicians to draw incorrect conclusions in evaluating reported reactions to seafood. Ranging from seafood intoxications to other nonallergic or complex seafood reactions, these events can easily be misconstrued as representing a seafood IgE-mediated allergy. Among these are the more familiar topics of cross-reactivity and scombroid intoxication, and those with a still evolving understanding such as ciguatera fish poisoning and Anisakis reactions. This article seeks to provide an accessible but comprehensive summary of the relevant information surrounding these confounders in assessing adverse reactions to seafood. Such knowledge may be instrumental in unraveling complex or otherwise unclear presentations and aid clinicians in accurately evaluating and managing patients with reported seafood reactions.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy.

  18. AngioVac extraction of intra-atrial hepatoma masquerading as PICC-associated thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Samir; Raparia, Kirtee; Ubago, Julianne M.; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus associated with peripherally inserted central catheterization is not uncommon. Treatment is typically conservative; however, more aggressive therapies can be considered in patients with tenuous medical condition. The authors present a patient with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma masquerading as peripherally inserted central catheter-associated intra-atrial thrombus, subsequently removed via vacuum-assisted mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:26509915

  19. AngioVac extraction of intra-atrial hepatoma masquerading as PICC-associated thrombus.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Samir; Raparia, Kirtee; Ubago, Julianne M; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus associated with peripherally inserted central catheterization is not uncommon. Treatment is typically conservative; however, more aggressive therapies can be considered in patients with tenuous medical condition. The authors present a patient with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma masquerading as peripherally inserted central catheter-associated intra-atrial thrombus, subsequently removed via vacuum-assisted mechanical thrombectomy.

  20. Neuromyelitis Optica Masquerading as Lumbosacral Radiculopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) is a demyelinating syndrome of the central nervous system. This case report describes a 31-year-old woman whose electromyography revealed radiculopathy in the left L5-S1 spinal segment without anatomical abnormalities on lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). She was diagnosed with NMOSD based on gadolinium contrast whole spine and brain MRI and anti-aquaporin-4 antibody findings. Her peripheral nervous system might have been damaged during the early course of NMOSD. Therefore, it is necessary to consider NMOSD for patients who have radiculopathy in electromyography if lumbosacral MRI shows no abnormalities. PMID:27847726

  1. [Are there arguments for initiating an etiological treatment at the onset of the first demyelinating episode?].

    PubMed

    Vermersch, Patrick

    2004-02-14

    The arrival of immunomodulating treatments The pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS) took benefit from progresses of magnetic resonance-based and immunological studies, leading to the introduction of immunomodulatory agents and notably interferon beta (IFNbeta). The therapeutic impact of such treatments in the relapsing-remitting forms of the disease, and our improved knowledge on the natural history of the disease, raise the possibility of treating patients after the first demyelinating episode. This strategy may be more relevant in patients presenting poor prognostic criteria. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data The clinical characteristics of the first episode do not help to predict the mean or long term progression. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the progression of the disease is partly infra-clinical. Other than data revealing demyelination involvement and inflammation, MRI has also provided arguments suggesting early axonal distress. In a patient, the presence of high lesion load at onset on weighted T2 sequences, of black holes and gadolinium enhancing lesions s on T1 sequences, or the presence of new lesions on MRI conducted a few Months later are all predictive factors of clinical progression and suggest that treatment should be initiated early. The interest of interferon beta Two clinical trials have shown that treatment with IFNbeta treatment after a first demyelinating event significantly decreased the risk of a second episode in the short term. The aim of such treatment would be to limit the irreversible axonal lesions, notably in the form of axonal sections often associated with inflammatory lesions. An early reduction in the inflammatory response could lead to a lesser number of axons and, consequently, reduced clinical disability.

  2. Multifocal sensory demyelinating neuropathy: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shin J

    2017-10-01

    Multifocal sensory demyelinating neuropathy has not been adequately reported in the literature. A 42-year-old man with numbness of the left hand for 3 years and of the right hand for 6 months had a pure multifocal sensory neuropathy involving both hands, most prominently affecting 2-point discrimination, number writing, and object recognition of the left hand. Near-nerve needle sensory and mixed nerve conduction studies were performed on the left ulnar nerve. Studies of the left ulnar nerve documented a demyelinating neuropathy characterized by temporal dispersion and marked decrease in the amplitudes of the sensory and mixed compound nerve potentials in the above-elbow-axilla segment. With intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, there was improvement in his neuropathic condition. In this study I describe a case of multifocal sensory demyelinating neuropathy as a counterpart of multifocal motor neuropathy. Muscle Nerve 56: 825-828, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ken-ya; Ishiguchi, Hiroshi; Ando, Ryuki; Miwa, Hideto; Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2013-12-01

    We report a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Except for minimal biochemical abnormalities, clinical symptoms of PBC were not observed, and we diagnosed our patient with asymptomatic PBC from the results of a liver biopsy. Although the patient noticed little muscle weakness, an electrophysiological study demonstrated slow conduction velocities and prolonged distal latencies, with definite conduction blocks in the median, ulnar, and tibial nerves. The disturbed sensory pattern was asymmetrical, and sensory nerve action potentials were not evoked. From these observations, we diagnosed this patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Neuropathy associated with PBC is very rare. We must differentiate demyelinating neuropathy with PBC in patients with asymmetrical sensory dominant neuropathy with high immunoglobulin M titers, and investigate for the presence of anti-mitochondrial antibodies to rule out a complication of asymptomatic PBC.

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N

    2009-01-21

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials concerning the efficacy and safety of IVIg in CIDP. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI from January 1985 to May 2008. Randomised controlled studies testing any dose of IVIg versus placebo, plasma exchange or corticosteroids in definite or probable CIDP. Two authors reviewed literature searches to identify potentially relevant trials, scored their quality and extracted data independently. We contacted authors for additional information. Seven randomised controlled trials were considered eligible including 287 participants. These trials were homogeneous and overall quality was high. Five studies on 235 participants compared IVIg against placebo. One trial with 20 participants compared IVIg with plasma exchange and one trial compared IVIg with prednisolone in 32 participants. A significantly higher proportion of participants improved in disability within one month after IVIg treatment as compared with placebo (relative risk 2.40, 95% confidence interval 1.72 to 3.36). Whether all these improvements are equally clinically relevant cannot be deduced from this analysis because each trial used different disability scales and definitions of significant improvement. In three trials including 84 participants the disability could be transformed to the modified Rankin score, on which significantly more patients improved one point after IVIg treatment compared to placebo (relative risk 2.40, 95% confidence interval 0.98 to 5.83). Only one study included in this review had a long-term follow-up. The results of this study suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin improves disability more than placebo over 24 and 48 weeks. The

  5. Diffusion kurtosis imaging probes cortical alterations and white matter pathology following cuprizone induced demyelination and spontaneous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, C; Veraart, J; Roelant, E; Mai, Z; Daans, J; Van Audekerke, J; Naeyaert, M; Vanhoutte, G; Delgado Y Palacios, R; Praet, J; Fieremans, E; Ponsaerts, P; Sijbers, J; Van der Linden, A; Verhoye, M

    2016-01-15

    cuprizone and control groups, hence highlighting their ability to detect both acute and long lasting changes. Interestingly, WMTI-derived metrics showed the aptitude to distinguish between the different stages of the disease. Both the intra-axonal diffusivity (Da) and the AWF were found to be decreased in the cuprizone treated group, Da specifically decreased during the acute inflammatory demyelinating phase whereas the AWF decrease was associated to the spontaneous remyelination and the recovery period. Altogether our results demonstrate that DKI is sensitive to alterations of cortical areas and provides, along with WMTI metrics, information that is complementary to DT-derived metrics for the characterization of demyelination in both white and grey matter and subsequent inflammatory processes associated with a demyelinating event.

  6. Diffusion kurtosis imaging probes cortical alterations and white matter pathology following cuprizone induced demyelination and spontaneous remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, C.; Veraart, J.; Roelant, E.; Mai, Z.; Daans, J.; Van Audekerke, J.; Naeyaert, M.; Vanhoutte, G.; Delgado y Palacios, R.; Praet, J.; Fieremans, E.; Ponsaerts, P.; Sijbers, J.; Van der Linden, A.; Verhoye, M.

    2016-01-01

    cuprizone and control groups, hence highlighting their ability to detect both acute and long lasting changes. Interestingly, WMTI-derived metrics showed the aptitude to distinguish between the different stage of the disease. Both the intra-axonal diffusivity (Da) and the AWF were found to be decreased in the cuprizone treated group, Da specifically decreased during the acute inflammatory demyelinating phase whereas the AWF decrease was associated to the spontaneous remyelination and the recovery period. Altogether our results demonstrate that DKI is sensitive to alterations of cortical areas and provides, along with WMTI metrics, information that is complementary to DT-derived metrics for the characterization of demyelination in both white and grey matter and subsequent inflammatory processes associated with a demyelinating event. PMID:26525654

  7. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Tantsis, Esther M; Earl, John; Bandodkar, Sushil; Prelog, Kristina; Tea, Fiona; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab) associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination. Aim To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS) and -negative (NEG) groups. Methods We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8), transverse myelitis (TM = 2) n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9) demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls. Results The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19) as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF) compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01). In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets

  8. Motor variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Durriyah D; Darras, Basil T; Yamout, Bassem I; Rebeiz, Jean G; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2008-06-01

    Only 2 cases of pure motor chronic demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy in the pediatric age group have been reported in the literature. We report on a motor variant of chronic demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy with anti-ganglioside antibodies, diagnosed in a 5-year-old girl who presented with progressive motor weakness over a period of 12 months with no sensory involvement. She initially responded partially to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (1 gm/kg/month for 6 months), and then demonstrated sustained but incomplete improvement on chronic prednisone therapy (1-2 mg/kg/day), on which she has continued since 1 year and 4 months after her initial presentation 3 years ago.

  9. Electrophysiologic features of inherited demyelinating neuropathies: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1999-09-14

    The observation that inherited demyelinating neuropathies tend to have uniform conduction slowing and acquired disorders (CIDP and variants) have nonuniform or multifocal slowing was made before the identification of genetic defects of specific myelin constituents that cause the different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth and other inherited disorders involving peripheral nerve myelin. It is becoming clear that the electrophysiologic aspects of these disorders are more complex than previously realized. We review the current information available on the electrophysiologic features of the inherited demyelinating neuropathies in hopes of clarifying the clinical electrodiagnostic features of these disorders as well as to shed light on the physiologic consequences of the different genetic mutations.

  10. Clinical and electrophysiological parameters distinguishing acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Annie; Nicolle, Michael W; Hahn, Angelika F

    2010-02-01

    Up to 16% of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients may present acutely. We performed a retrospective chart review on 30 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and 15 acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP) patients looking for any clinical or electrophysiological parameters that might differentiate AIDP from acutely presenting CIDP. A-CIDP patients were significantly more likely to have prominent sensory signs. They were significantly less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or need for mechanical ventilation. With regard to electrophysiological features, neither sural-sparing pattern, sensory ratio >1, nor the presence of A-waves was different between the two groups. This study suggests that patients presenting acutely with a demyelinating polyneuropathy and the aforementioned clinical features should be closely monitored as they may be more likely to have CIDP at follow-up.

  11. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  12. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Johanna; Karacivi, Aylin; Stormanns, Eva R; Recks, Mascha S; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Lack of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute useful instruments to study the diverse histopathological

  13. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S.; Grist, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of the ELR+ chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G+CD11b+ neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  14. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A; Raddatz, Barbara B; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease.

  15. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. 10 years' experience in a Mexican centre].

    PubMed

    San-Juan, O D; Castro-Macías, J I

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic, but potentially treatable, acquired autoimmune neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that few studies have been conducted on its epidemiology, presenting symptoms and long-term functional prognosis. To describe the clinical and neurophysiological forms of patients with CIDP at the outset and their follow-up at one year. We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study of patients who were hospitalised in our unit between 1995 and 2005. The cases were defined in accordance with Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) group criteria. Data gathered included demographic characteristics, forms of clinical presentation, neurophysiological findings, cerebrospinal fluid and functional prognosis at one year. A statistical descriptive analysis was performed. The sample consisted of 26 patients--12 males (46.15%) and 14 females (53.84%)--between 15 and 71 years of age (40.17 +/- 15.7 years). CIDP was associated with other autoimmune diseases in 20.8% of the patients. The predominant features at the outset of the disease were paresis and distal symmetrical paresthesias in the four limbs, high protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid and demyelination with axonal degeneration. Prednisone was administered in 43% of the cases. At one year, five patients remained asymptomatic (22.72%), there was a partial improvement in 13 (59.09%) and no improvement was seen in four cases (18.18%). The most frequent initial form of clinical presentation of CIDP in our population is quadriparesis and distal symmetrical paresthesias, high protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid and demyelination with axonal degeneration, which are related to a good functional prognosis at one year.

  16. Combined central and peripheral demyelination: Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Franciotta, D; Alfonsi, E; Visigalli, N; Zardini, E; Diamanti, L; Prunetti, P; Osera, C; Gastaldi, M; Berzero, G; Pichiecchio, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Piscosquito, G; Salsano, E; Ceroni, M; Moglia, A; Bono, G; Pareyson, D; Marchioni, E

    2016-04-15

    Combined central and peripheral demyelination (CCPD) is rare, and current knowledge is based on case reports and small case series. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic results, treatment and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with CCPD. Thirty-one patients entered this retrospective, observational, two-center study. In 20 patients (65%) CCPD presented, after an infection, as myeloradiculoneuropathy, encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, length-dependent peripheral neuropathy, or pseudo-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Demyelinating features of peripheral nerve damage fulfilling European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP were found in 23 patients (74%), and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions on brain MRI fulfilling the 2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 11 (46%). Two thirds of the patients had a relapsing or progressive disease course, usually related to the appearance of new spinal cord lesions or worsening of the peripheral neuropathy, and showed unsatisfactory responses to high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The clinical presentation of CCPD was severe in 22 patients (71%), who were left significantly disabled. Our data suggest that CCPD has heterogeneous features and shows frequent post-infectious onset, primary peripheral nervous system or central nervous system involvement, a monophasic or chronic disease course, inadequate response to treatments, and a generally poor outcome. We therefore conclude that the current diagnostic criteria for MS and CIDP may not fully encompass the spectrum of possible manifestations of CCPD, whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A.; Raddatz, Barbara B.; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  18. A 71-nucleotide deletion in the periaxin gene in a Romani patient with early-onset slowly progressive demyelinating CMT.

    PubMed

    Baránková, L; Sisková, D; Hühne, K; Vyhnálková, E; Sakmaryová, I; Bojar, M; Rautenstrauss, B; Seeman, P

    2008-06-01

    Mutations in the periaxin (PRX) gene cause autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 4F. To date, 10 non-sense or frameshift PRX mutations have been reported in patients with early-onset neuropathy and further disease course consistent with either Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or slow-progressive demyelinating CMT. We sequenced 59 patients from 55 Czech families including four unrelated patients of Romani (Gypsy) origin with early-onset CMT displaying decreased nerve conduction velocities. We identified a novel homozygous mutation c.3286_3356del71 (K1095fsX18) in one Romani patient showing very slow disease progression. Amongst non-Romani Czech CMT patients, PRX mutations have been proven to be very rare.

  19. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with pulsed oral steroids.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Kelkar, Praful; Parry, Gareth J

    2008-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated neuropathy that responds to various immunosuppressive treatments. Oral daily prednisone therapy is effective and inexpensive, but the long-term treatment that is usually necessary leads to serious adverse effects. Consequently, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange have been widely used to treat CIDP, making treatment expensive and inconvenient. A steroid regimen that reduces adverse effects but preserves efficacy would simplify treatment. Pulsed steroids have nongenomic actions not seen with low-dose steroids, including rapid inhibition of arachidonic acid release and of calcium and sodium cycling across plasma membranes of immune cells. To study the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pulsed oral methylprednisolone therapy in patients with CIDP. Open-label prospective study. University of Minnesota Neuropathy Center, Minneapolis. Ten patients (3 women and 7 men) with CIDP followed up for at least 22 months. Neuromuscular score and Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) disability score were used as outcome measures for efficacy; weight, blood pressure, changes in bone density, and steroid-related adverse effect questionnaire were used as outcome measures for safety. This steroid regimen leads to significant improvement in weakness and disability in all patients treated and to off-treatment remission in 60% of patients. Treatment was fairly well tolerated, and only 1 patient discontinued treatment because of adverse effects. Steroid-induced osteoporosis remained a problem, especially in older patients. Pulsed oral methylprednisolone may be efficacious in the long-term treatment of CIDP and is relatively well tolerated. Remission can be induced in most patients, especially those with a shorter duration of disease.

  20. Noninvasive Detection and Differentiation of Axonal Injury/Loss, Demyelination, and Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    spectrum imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, EAE, inflammation, axonal injury, curizone, demyelination, optic neuritis, axonal loss 16. SECURITY...diffusion basis spectrum imaging (DBSI) to simultaneously quantify axonal injury, demyelination, and inflammation in CNS white matter, correlating with...Multiple sclerosis, diffusion basis spectrum imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, EAE, inflammation, axonal injury, demyelination, axonal loss, optic

  1. Heterozygous peripheral myelin protein 22-deficient mice are affected by a progressive demyelinating tomaculous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Adlkofer, K; Frei, R; Neuberg, D H; Zielasek, J; Toyka, K V; Suter, U

    1997-06-15

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is associated with a heterozygous 1.5 megabase deletion on chromosome 17 that includes the peripheral myelin protein (PMP) gene PMP22. We show that heterozygous PMP22 knock-out mice, which carry only one functional pmp22 allele and thus genetically mimic HNPP closely, display similar morphological and electrophysiological features as observed in HNPP nerves. As reported previously, focal hypermyelinating structures called tomacula, the pathological hallmarks of HNPP, develop progressively in young PMP22(+/0) mice. By following the fate of tomacula during aging, we demonstrate now that these mutant animals are also interesting models for examining HNPP disease mechanisms. Subtle electrophysiological abnormalities are detected in PMP22(+/0) mice >1 year old, and a significant number of abnormally swollen and degenerating tomacula are present. Thinly myelinated axons and supernumerary Schwann cells forming onion bulbs as fingerprints of repeated cycles of demyelination and remyelination are also encountered frequently. Quantitative analyses using electron microscopy on cross sections and light microscopy on single teased nerve fibers suggest that tomacula are intrinsically unstable structures that are prone to degeneration; however, the severity of morphological and electrophysiological abnormalities in PMP22(+/0) mice is variable. These combined findings are reminiscent of the disease progression in HNPP and offer a possible explanation about why some HNPP patients develop a chronic motor and sensory neuropathy later in life that resembles demyelinating forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease by both morphological and clinical criteria.

  2. Experimental Demyelination and Remyelination of Murine Spinal Cord by Focal Injection of Lysolecithin

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Jensen, Samuel K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by plaque formation containing lost oligodendrocytes, myelin, axons, and neurons. Remyelination is an endogenous repair mechanism whereby new myelin is produced subsequent to proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, and is necessary to protect axons from further damage. Currently, all therapeutics for the treatment of multiple sclerosis target the aberrant immune component of the disease, which reduce inflammatory relapses but do not prevent progression to irreversible neurological decline. It is therefore imperative that remyelination-promoting strategies be developed which may delay disease progression and perhaps reverse neurological symptoms. Several animal models of demyelination exist, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and curprizone; however, there are limitations in their use for studying remyelination. A more robust approach is the focal injection of toxins into the central nervous system, including the detergent lysolecithin into the spinal cord white matter of rodents. In this protocol, we demonstrate that the surgical procedure involved in injecting lysolecithin into the ventral white matter of mice is fast, cost-effective, and requires no additional materials than those commercially available. This procedure is important not only for studying the normal events involved in the remyelination process, but also as a pre-clinical tool for screening candidate remyelination-promoting therapeutics. PMID:25867716

  3. Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Veronika M; Czub, Markus; Schreiner, Nicole; Moore, Peter F; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Tipold, Andrea

    2004-08-01

    Microglia cells are the principal immune effector elements of the brain responding to any pathological event. To elucidate the possible role of microglia in initial non-inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, microglia from experimentally CDV infected dogs were isolated ex vivo by density gradient centrifugation and characterized immunophenotypically and functionally using flow cytometry. Results from dogs with demyelinating lesions were compared to results from recovered dogs and two healthy controls. CDV antigen could be detected in microglia of dogs with histopathologically confirmed demyelination. Microglia of these dogs showed marked upregulation of the surface molecules CD18, CD11b, CD11c, CD1c, MHC class I and MHC class II and a tendency for increased expression intensity of ICAM-1 (CD54), B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), whereas no increased expression was found for CD44 and CD45. Functionally, microglia exhibited distinctly enhanced phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was concluded that in CDV infection, there is a clear association between microglial activation and demyelination. This strongly suggests that microglia contribute to acute myelin destruction in distemper.

  4. Late central demyelination after Fischer's syndrome: MRI studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, X; Ellie, E; Larrivière, M; Deleplanque, B; Lagueny, A; Julien, J

    1993-01-01

    The case of a patient who presented with clinical, electrophysiological, and MRI evidence of central demyelination is described. The patient had been admitted to hospital for Fischer's syndrome a few years previously. The association of these two events suggests that central and peripheral myelinopathy may be related in Fischer's syndrome. PMID:8509787

  5. Subacute CNS Demyelination after Treatment with Nivolumab for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Catherine; Schneider, Raphael; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Bavi, Prashant; Roehrl, Michael H A; Mason, Warren P; Hogg, David

    2015-12-01

    Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) or programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) has improved the survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. These agents carry a certain risk of adverse immune-related events. We present a patient with widely metastatic melanoma who was initially treated with ipilimumab and subsequently with nivolumab. After four infusions of nivolumab, he developed subacute multifocal central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Nivolumab was discontinued and, despite immunosuppressive therapy, the largest lesion progressed significantly, whereas another lesion showed radiographic improvement. After further progression, the patient succumbed to his CNS lesions 4 months later. Autopsy revealed extensive demyelination, a mild multifocal T-cell-rich perivascular lymphoid infiltrate, abundant macrophages, and necrosis. There was no metastatic melanoma in the brain. CNS demyelination has not been described in association with nivolumab. We hypothesize that the combination therapy of ipilimumab and subsequent nivolumab accounted for the severity of the demyelinating process in this patient. This case, with comprehensive clinical, molecular, and neuropathologic characterization, illustrates the need for awareness of these potential CNS complications with the use of multiple checkpoint inhibitors.

  6. Therapeutic Value or Harm of Neuregulin 1 in Demyelinating Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Abberant neuregulin 1 signaling in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis . J Neuropath Exp Neurol, 71:104-15. APPENDICES: none SUPPORTING OAT A: Here is some new...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is still not clear whether the primary process in multiple sclerosis is degenerative... sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Neuregulin, Multiple sclerosis , myelin, axogilial interactions, therapeutics. 16

  7. Reversible Demyelination, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown, and Pronounced Neutrophil Recruitment Induced by Chronic IL-1 Expression in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Depino, Amaicha M.; Prada, Federico; Muraro, Nara; Campbell, Sandra; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Perry, V. Hugh; Anthony, Daniel C.; Pitossi, Fernando J.

    2004-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1) expression is associated with a spectrum of neuroinflammatory processes related to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. The single-bolus microinjection of IL-1 into the central nervous system (CNS) parenchyma gives rise to delayed and localized neutrophil recruitment, transient blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, but no overt damage to CNS integrity. However, acute microinjections of IL-1 do not mimic the chronic IL-1 expression, which is a feature of many CNS diseases. To investigate the response of the CNS to chronic IL-1 expression, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing IL-1 into the striatum. At the peak of IL-1 expression (days 8 and 14 post-injection), there was a marked recruitment of neutrophils, vasodilatation, and breakdown of the BBB. Microglia and astrocyte activation was evident during the first 14 days post-injection. At days 8 and 14, extensive demyelination was observed but the number of neurons was not affected by any treatment. Finally, at 30 days, signs of inflammation were no longer present, there was evidence of tissue reorganization, the BBB was intact, and the process of remyelination was noticeable. In summary, our data show that chronic expression of IL-1, in contrast to its acute delivery, can reversibly damage CNS integrity and implicates this cytokine or downstream components as major mediators of demyelination in chronic inflammatory and demyelinating diseases. PMID:15509551

  8. Changes of CXCL12, CXCL14 and PDGF levels in the brain of patients with idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Tingjun, Chen; Zhaohui, Li; Zhaocai, Jiang; Zihao, Liu; Quangang, Xu; Dehui, Huang; Qing, Lin; Shihui, Wei

    2015-02-15

    The CXC chemokines (CXC-motif ligand 12 and CXC-motif ligand 14) and platelet-derived growth factor are suggested to modulate remyelination in the course of many demyelinating diseases. The present study compared the difference in the brain levels of these chemokines between patients with idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (IDON) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) by measuring their concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Our data indicate that the prognosis of neuritis depends on the remyelinating process that is impaired due to decreased chemokines. The much lower levels of chemokines would specifically indicate the severe neuritis, such as NMO.

  9. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  10. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  11. Inflammatory demyelination induces ependymal modifications concomitant to activation of adult (SVZ) stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh; Gil-Perotín, Sara; Garcia-Belda, Paula; Dauphin, Aurelien; Mozafari, Sabah; Tepavcevic, Vanja; Manuel Garcia Verdugo, Jose; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2017-05-01

    Ependymal cells (E1/E2) and ciliated B1cells confer a unique pinwheel architecture to the ventricular surface of the subventricular zone (SVZ), and their cilia act as sensors to ventricular changes during development and aging. While several studies showed that forebrain demyelination reactivates the SVZ triggering proliferation, ectopic migration, and oligodendrogenesis for myelin repair, the potential role of ciliated cells in this process was not investigated. Using conventional and lateral wall whole mount preparation immunohistochemistry in addition to electron microscopy in a forebrain-targeted model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (tEAE), we show an early decrease in numbers of pinwheels, B1 cells, and E2 cells. These changes were transient and simultaneous to tEAE-induced SVZ stem cell proliferation. The early drop in B1/E2 cell numbers was followed by B1/E2 cell recovery. While E1 cell division and ependymal ribbon disruption were never observed, E1 cells showed important morphological modifications reflected by their enlargement, extended cytoskeleton, and reinforced cell-cell junction complexes overtime, possibly reflecting protective mechanisms against ventricular insults. Finally, tEAE disrupted motile cilia planar cell polarity and cilia orientation in ependymal cells. Therefore, significant ventricular modifications in ciliated cells occur early in response to tEAE suggesting a role for these cells in SVZ stem cell signalling not only during development/aging but also during inflammatory demyelination. These observations may have major implications for understanding pathophysiology of and designing therapeutic approaches for inflammatory demyelinating diseases such as MS.

  12. MiR-146a promotes remyelination in a cuprizone model of demyelinating injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Lu, Mei; Wang, Xinli; Shang, Xia; Elias, Stanton B; Chopp, Michael

    2017-04-21

    The death of mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) which are the sole myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS), leads to demyelination and functional deficits. Currently, there is lack of effective remyelination therapies for patients with demyelinating diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate OL function. We hypothesized that miR-146a, by inactivating interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and thereby enhances remyelination. To test this hypothesis, a demyelination model induced by a cuprizone (CPZ) diet was employed, in which C57BL/6J mice were fed with a CPZ diet for 5weeks. After termination of CPZ diet, the mice were randomly treated with continuous infusion of miR-146a mimics or mimic controls into the corpus callosum for 7days. Compared to the mimic control, infusion of miR-146a mimics facilitated remyelination assessed by increased myelin basic proteins in the corpus callosum, which was associated with augmentation of newly generated mature OLs. Infusion of miR-146a mimics also substantially elevated miR-146a levels in the corpus callosum and fluorescently tagged miR-146a mimics were mainly detected in OPCs. Western blot and double immmunofluorescent staining analysis showed that the miR-146a treatment considerably reduced IRAK1 protein levels and the number of IRAK1-positive cells, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that exogenous miR-146a enhances remyelination, possibly by promoting OPCs to differentiate into myelinated OLs via targeting IRAK1.

  13. Pharmacological approaches to intervention in hypomyelinating and demyelinating white matter pathology.

    PubMed

    Chew, Li-Jin; DeBoy, Cynthia A

    2016-11-01

    White matter disease afflicts both developing and mature central nervous systems. Both cell intrinsic and extrinsic dysregulation result in profound changes in cell survival, axonal metabolism and functional performance. Experimental models of developmental white matter (WM) injury and demyelination have not only delineated mechanisms of signaling and inflammation, but have also paved the way for the discovery of pharmacological approaches to intervention. These reagents have been shown to enhance protection of the mature oligodendrocyte cell, accelerate progenitor cell recruitment and/or differentiation, or attenuate pathological stimuli arising from the inflammatory response to injury. Here we highlight reports of studies in the CNS in which compounds, namely peptides, hormones, and small molecule agonists/antagonists, have been used in experimental animal models of demyelination and neonatal brain injury that affect aspects of excitotoxicity, oligodendrocyte development and survival, and progenitor cell function, and which have been demonstrated to attenuate damage and improve WM protection in experimental models of injury. The molecular targets of these agents include growth factor and neurotransmitter receptors, morphogens and their signaling components, nuclear receptors, as well as the processes of iron transport and actin binding. By surveying the current evidence in non-immune targets of both the immature and mature WM, we aim to better understand pharmacological approaches modulating endogenous oligodendroglia that show potential for success in the contexts of developmental and adult WM pathology. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Oligodendrocytes in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kallikrein 6 regulates early CNS demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scarisbrick, Isobel A; Yoon, Hyesook; Panos, Michael; Larson, Nadya; Blaber, Sachiko I; Blaber, Michael; Rodriguez, Moses

    2012-09-01

    Kallikrein 6 (Klk6) is a secreted serine protease that is elevated in active multiple sclerosis lesions and patient sera. To further evaluate the involvement of Klk6 in chronic progressive demyelinating disease, we determined its expression in the brain and spinal cord of SJL mice infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and assessed the effects of Klk6-neutralizing antibodies on disease progression. Klk6 RNA expression was elevated in the brain and spinal cord by 7 days postinfection (dpi). Thereafter, Klk6 expression persisted primarily in the spinal cord reaching a peak of fivefold over controls at mid-chronic stages (60 dpi-120 dpi). Significant elevations in Klk6 RNA were also induced in splenocytes stimulated with viral capsid proteins in vitro and in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. Klk6-neutralizing antibodies reduced TMEV-driven brain and spinal cord pathology and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses when examined at early chronic time points (40 dpi). Reductions in spinal cord pathology included a decrease in activated monocytes/microglia and reductions in the loss of myelin basic protein (MBP). By 180 dpi, pathology scores no longer differed between groups. These findings point to regulatory activities for Klk6 in the development and progression of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and demyelination that can be effectively targeted through the early chronic stages with neutralizing antibody.

  15. Lineage tracing reveals dynamic changes in oligodendrocyte precursor cells following cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Emily G; DeBruin, Joseph; Jin, Jing; Strasburger, Hayley J; Smith, Matthew D; Orthmann-Murphy, Jennifer L; Schott, Jason T; Fairchild, Amanda N; Bergles, Dwight E; Calabresi, Peter A

    2017-09-22

    The regeneration of oligodendrocytes is a crucial step in recovery from demyelination, as surviving oligodendrocytes exhibit limited structural plasticity and rarely form additional myelin sheaths. New oligodendrocytes arise through the differentiation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that are widely distributed throughout the CNS. Although there has been detailed investigation of the behavior of these progenitors in white matter, recent studies suggest that disease burden in multiple sclerosis (MS) is more strongly correlated with gray matter atrophy. The timing and efficiency of remyelination in gray matter is distinct from white matter, but the dynamics of OPCs that contribute to these differences have not been defined. Here, we used in vivo genetic fate tracing to determine the behavior of OPCs in gray and white matter regions in response to cuprizone-induced demyelination. Our studies indicate that the temporal dynamics of OPC differentiation varies significantly between white and gray matter. While OPCs rapidly repopulate the corpus callosum and mature into CC1 expressing mature oligodendrocytes, OPC differentiation in the cingulate cortex and hippocampus occurs much more slowly, resulting in a delay in remyelination relative to the corpus callosum. The protracted maturation of OPCs in gray matter may contribute to greater axonal pathology and disease burden in MS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. T lymphocyte-derived demyelinating activity in multiple sclerosis patients in relapse.

    PubMed Central

    Selmaj, K; Alam, R; Perkin, G D; Rose, F C

    1987-01-01

    Supernatants of cultured T lymphocytes of multiple sclerosis patients were tested for a demyelinating activity in rat cerebellum explant cultures. Supernatants of unstimulated T lymphocytes in seven out of 10 multiple sclerosis patients in relapse produced demyelination when checked by phase contrast microscopy. Supernatants of unstimulated T lymphocytes from healthy subjects did not produce demyelination, but when T cells were stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), 50% of tested supernatants produced demyelination, which was, however, never as advanced as in multiple sclerosis supernatant treated cerebellum cultures. The demyelinating activity proved to be heat labile. Gel filtration study revealed two fractions of the demyelinating activity 12.5-29.0 kD and 43.0-66.0 kD. The results suggest that lymphokines can be directly involved in the pathogenesis of demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:3495638

  17. Invasive amebiasis and ameboma formation presenting as a rectal mass: An uncommon case of malignant masquerade at a western medical center

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Rosemarie E; Ferzli, George S; Zenilman, Michael E; Gadangi, Pratap K; Bowne, Wilbur B

    2007-01-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with rectal pain and bleeding secondary to ulcerated, necrotic rectal and cecal masses that resembled colorectal carcinoma upon colonoscopy. These masses were later determined to be benign amebomas caused by invasive Entamoeba histolytica, which regressed completely with medical therapy. In Western countries, the occurrence of invasive protozoan infection with formation of amebomas is very rare and can mistakenly masquerade as a neoplasm. Not surprisingly, there have been very few cases reported of this clinical entity within the United States. Moreover, we report a patient that had an extremely rare occurrence of two synchronous lesions, one involving the rectum and the other situated in the cecum. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis of invasive E. histolytica infection and ameboma formation, as well as management of this rare disease entity at a western medical center. PMID:17948943

  18. Novel insight into Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polineuropathy in APECED syndrome: molecular mechanisms and clinical implications in children.

    PubMed

    Valenzise, Mariella; Aversa, Tommaso; Salzano, Giuseppina; Zirilli, Giuseppina; De Luca, Filippo; Su, Maureen

    2017-01-19

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy (APECED) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder typically caused by homozygous AIRE gene mutation. It is characterized by the association of multiple autoimmune diseases, with a classical triad including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenocortical failure. Its clinical spectrum has significantly enlarged in the last years with the apparence of new entities. One of these novel manifestations is the chronic inflammatory demyelinating polineuropathy (CIDP), that is characterized by involvement of peripheral nervous system, with nerve demyelination, progressive muscular weakness of both arms and legs and sensory loss. The identification of myelin protein zero as an important autoantigen (Ag) in CIDP may suggest the development of Ag-based therapies, such as Ag-specific DNA vaccination or infusion of Ag-coupled cells.

  19. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Fleetwood, Thomas; Cantello, Roberto; Comi, Cristoforo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues. PMID:24527207

  20. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353–358, 2016.—Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk. PMID:27768392

  1. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  2. T-cell lymphoma masquerading as extrapulmonary tuberculosis: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Piyush; Dutta, Sourabh; Kakkar, Aanchal; Goyal, Ankur; Vikram, Naval K.; Sharma, Mehar C.; Sood, Rita

    2015-01-01

    It is often difficult to establish confirmatory diagnosis in cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) because of its paucibacillary nature and difficulty in accessing the involved organs. In several cases, empirical anti-tubercular treatment is started, and the patient is followed-up closely for response. In countries with high prevalence of TB, it is a reasonably good strategy and works most of the times. However, catastrophe may occur when aggressive lymphomas masquerade as TB. PMID:25949984

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis to Plectranthus amboinicus masquerading as chronic leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyue-Luen; Chang, Ya-Ching; Yang, Chin-Hsun; Hong, Hong-Shang

    2005-12-01

    This report discusses a case of a 69-year-old woman who developed chronic non-healing leg ulcers after long-term topical use of Plectranthus amboinicus. The ulcer was proven to be allergic contact dermatitis to P. amboinicus by a patch test. The ulcer healed after discontinuation of P. amboinicus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of allergic contact dermatitis to P. amboinicus masquerading as chronic leg ulcer.

  4. Evidence of bird dropping masquerading by a spider to avoid predators

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min-Hui; Blamires, Sean J.; Liao, Chen-Pan; -Min Tso, I.

    2014-01-01

    Masquerading comes at various costs and benefits. The principal benefit being the avoidance of predators. The orb-web spider Cyclosa ginnaga has a silver body and adds a white discoid-shaped silk decoration to its web. The size, shape and colour of C. ginnaga's body resemble, when viewed by the human eye against its decoration, a bird dropping. We therefore hypothesized that their body colouration might combine with its web decoration to form a bird dropping masquerade to protect it from predators. We measured the spectral reflectance of: (i) the spider's body, (ii) the web decoration, and (iii) bird droppings, in the field against a natural background and found that the colour of the spider bodies and decorations were indistinguishable from each other and from bird droppings when viewed by hymentopteran predators. We monitored the predatory attacks on C. ginnaga when the spider's body and/or its decorations were blackened and found that predator attack probabilities were greater when only the decorations were blackened. Accordingly, we concluded that C. ginnaga's decoration and body colouration forms a bird dropping masquerade, which reduces its probability of predation. PMID:24875182

  5. The use of background matching vs. masquerade for camouflage in cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Buresch, Kendra C; Mäthger, Lydia M; Allen, Justine J; Bennice, Chelsea; Smith, Neal; Schram, Jonathan; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Chubb, Charles; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-12-08

    Cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, commonly use their visually-guided, rapid adaptive camouflage for multiple tactics to avoid detection or recognition by predators. Two common tactics are background matching and resembling an object (masquerade) in the immediate area. This laboratory study investigated whether cuttlefish preferentially camouflage themselves to resemble a three-dimensional (3D) object in the immediate visual field (via the mechanism of masquerade/deceptive resemblance) rather than the 2D benthic substrate surrounding them (via the mechanisms of background matching or disruptive coloration). Cuttlefish were presented with a combination of benthic substrates (natural rocks or artificial checkerboard and grey printouts) and 3D objects (natural rocks or cylinders with artificial checkerboards and grey printouts glued to the outside) with visual features known to elicit each of three camouflage body pattern types (Uniform, Mottle and Disruptive). Animals were tested for a preference to show a body pattern appropriate for the 3D object or the benthic substrate. Cuttlefish responded by masquerading as the 3D object, rather than resembling the benthic substrate, only when presented with a high-contrast object on a substrate of lower contrast. Contrast is, therefore, one important cue in the cuttlefish's preference to resemble 3D objects rather than the benthic substrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. TREM2 regulates microglial cell activation in response to demyelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Claudia; Bollman, Bryan; Licastro, Danilo; Xie, Mingqiang; Mikesell, Robert; Schmidt, Robert; Yuede, Carla M.; Galimberti, Daniela; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Klein, Robyn S.; Cross, Anne H.; Otero, Karel; Piccio, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are phagocytic cells that survey the brain and perform neuroprotective functions in response to tissue damage, but their activating receptors are largely unknown. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) is a microglial immunoreceptor whose loss-of-function mutations in humans cause presenile dementia, while genetic variants are associated with increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases. In myeloid cells, TREM2 has been involved in the regulation of phagocytosis, cell proliferation and inflammatory responses in vitro. However, it is unknown how TREM2 contributes to microglia function in vivo. Here, we identify a critical role for TREM2 in the activation and function of microglia during cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination. TREM2-deficient (TREM2−/−) mice had defective clearance of myelin debris and more axonal pathology, resulting in impaired clinical performances compared to wild-type (WT) mice. TREM2−/− microglia proliferated less in areas of demyelination and were less activated, displaying a more resting morphology and decreased expression of the activation markers MHC II and inducible nitric oxide synthase as compared to WT. Mechanistically, gene expression and ultrastructural analysis of microglia suggested a defect in myelin degradation and phagosome processing during CPZ intoxication in TREM2−/− microglia. These findings place TREM2 as a key regulator of microglia activation in vivo in response to tissue damage. PMID:25631124

  7. A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young Se; Kwak, Geon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ja; Mo, Won Min; Nam, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sung Min; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, we identified p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterized the clinical features. The age at onset was the first to second decades and muscle atrophy started in the distal portion of the leg. Predominant fatty replacement in the anterior and lateral compartment was similar to that in CMT1A caused by PMP22 duplication. Sural nerve biopsy showed onion bulbs and degenerating fibers with various myelin abnormalities. The relevance of PMP2 mutation as a genetic cause of dominant CMT1 was assessed using transgenic mouse models. Transgenic mice expressing wild type or mutant (p.I43N) PMP2 exhibited abnormal motor function. Electrophysiological data revealed that both mice had reduced motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV). Electron microscopy revealed that demyelinating fibers and internodal lengths were shortened in both transgenic mice. These data imply that overexpression of wild type as well as mutant PMP2 also causes the CMT1 phenotype, which has been documented in the PMP22. This report might expand the genetic and clinical features of CMT and a further mechanism study will enhance our understanding of PMP2-associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26828946

  8. Ozone Therapy in Ethidium Bromide-Induced Demyelination in Rats: Possible Protective Effect.

    PubMed

    Salem, Neveen A; Assaf, Naglaa; Ismail, Manal F; Khadrawy, Yasser A; Samy, Mohga

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is characterized by excessive demyelination. The study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of ozone (O3) therapy in ethidium bromide (EB)-induced demyelination in rats either alone or in combination with corticosteroids in order to decrease the dose of steroid therapy. Rats were divided into Group (1) normal control rats received saline, Group (2) Sham-operated rats received saline, Group (3) Sham-operated rats received vehicle (oxygen), Group (4) EB-treated rats received EB, Group (5) EB-treated rats received O3, Group (6) EB-treated rats received methylprednisolone (MP), and Group (7) EB-treated rats received half the dose of MP concomitant with O3. EB-treated rats showed a significant increase in the number of footfalls in the grid walk test, decreased brain GSH, and paraoxonase-1 enzyme activity, whereas brain MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β, INF-γ, Cox-2 immunoreactivity, and p53 protein levels were increased. A significant decline in brain serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and MBP immunoreactivity was also reported. Significant improvement of the above-mentioned parameters was demonstrated with the administration of either MP or O3, whereas best amelioration was achieved by combining half the dose of MP with ozone.

  9. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    PubMed

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

  10. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Özlem; Okan, Mehmet S; Kilic, Sara S

    2012-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency comprises a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies with complex clinical and immunologic phenotypes. Immune dysregulation leads to the generation of multiple autoantibodies against various antigenic targets in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a heterogeneous disorder that indicates an autoimmune response against peripheral nerve myelin. We describe a 7-year-old girl with common variable immunodeficiency who developed chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy. A 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (500 mg/kg/day) improved her neurologic disorder. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy should be added to the broadening spectrum of neurologic complications in common variable immunodeficiency. Early detection and consequent treatment may reverse the neurologic sequelae.

  11. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-01-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12–20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  12. A Case of Osmotic Demyelination Presenting with Severe Hypernatremia

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min Jee; Kim, Do Hyoung; Kim, Young Hwa; Yang, In Mo; Park, Joon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome is a demyelinating disorder associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia. But, it rarely occurs in acute hypernatremia, and it leads to permanent neurologic symptoms and is associated with high mortality. A 44-year-old woman treated with alternative medicine was admitted with a history of drowsy mental status. Severe hypernatremia (197mEq/L) with hyperosmolality (415mOsm/kgH2O) was evident initially and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal intensity lesion in the pons, consistent with central pontine myelinolysis. She was treated with 0.45% saline and 5% dextrose water and intravenous corticosteroids. Serum sodium normalized and her clinical course gradually improved. Brain lesion of myelinolysis also improved in a follow-up imaging study. This is the first report of a successful treatment of hypernatremia caused by iatrogenic salt intake, and it confirms the importance of adequate fluid supplementation in severe hypernatremia. PMID:26240598

  13. [A clinical case of demyelinating disease with basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Gasparini, A; Sterlicchio, M; Castiglioni, E; Raimondi, E

    1994-11-01

    The authors report a clinical case of a 48-year-old female patient admitted to the Neurological Division following acute symptoms characterised by generalised asthenia, motory disorders (incoordination, equilibrium or gait deficit) accompanied by diplopia. Instrumental (medullary and encephalic NMR) and laboratory tests revealed a malformation of the atlo-occpital hinge with basilar impression and areas of corticosubcortical demyelinisation signifying multiple sclerosis. The liquor test was also positive for the presence of oligoclonal bands of IgG with a Link index of 0.97 (lower v.n. at 0.7). The association between these two pathologies is rare, whereas the need for a differential diagnosis between them often arises. Therefore, two pathologies which are mutually exclusive in many cases were present in an associated form in this case.

  14. Orthostatic intolerance in multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tramontozzi, Louis A; Russell, James A

    2012-09-01

    We report a patient with orthostatic intolerance and syncope as a major clinical manifestation of an acquired multifocal neuropathy with the clinical, electrodiagnostic, and cerebrospinal fluid features of multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy or the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Immunomodulatory therapy led to clinical remission of both somatic and autonomic signs and symptoms. We are unaware of a previous description of symptomatic dysautonomia in this disorder.

  15. Multiple Myeloma Associated Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: The Importance of Continued Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Loncharich, Michael F; Gandhi, Viral; Rana, Sandeep; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease presenting with weakness and numbness in a remitting or chronic progressive course. It is known to have several clinical presentations and several associated diseases. CIDP has been associated with multiple myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and other paraproteinemias. We present a case of refractory CIDP in which the initial workup for multiple myeloma was negative, and multiple myeloma was then diagnosed two and half years later. Treatment of the multiple myeloma led to clinical improvement. This case is instructive in that perhaps more frequent surveillance for paraproteinemia in patients with CIPD, even after a negative initial workup, could lead to a better clinical outcome. PMID:28070468

  16. Treatment of pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Challenges, controversies and questions.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon acquired disorder of unknown cause, presumed to have an immunological basis. We report 20 patients seen at Children's Hospital Los Angeles over a period of 10 years. The outcome of our patients was favorable in a vast majority with good response to various treatments instituted. However, residual neurologic deficit was common. The choice of treatment modality was empirical and selected by the treating neurologist. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and corticosteroids were most commonly utilized for treatment. Plasmapheresis, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and abatacept were added if the patients were refractory to IVIG or became corticosteroid dependent. The spectrum of disease severity ranged from a single monophasic episode, to multiphasic with infrequent relapses with good response to IVIG, to progressive disease refractory to multiple therapies.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin inhibits BAFF production in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy - a new mechanism of action?

    PubMed

    Bick, Sandra; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Karg, Anne; Fuehlhuber, Verena; Trenczek, Tina E; Faltermeier, Kathrin; Hackstein, Holger; Kaps, Manfred; Blaes, Franz

    2013-03-15

    Chronic-inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disease treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). The underlying mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. The B-cell activating factor BAFF contributes to B-cell homeostasis and (auto-)antibody production. BAFF was recently identified as one key molecule in the development of autoimmune diseases. Herein, we demonstrate that BAFF serum levels are elevated in CIDP patients. IVIg treatment resulted in a significant decrease of BAFF serum level. In vitro, IVIg inhibited BAFF in monocytes. Consequently, we identified BAFF as a new target for IVIg in CIDP treatment and provide a new, Fcγ-receptor independent, mechanism of action for IVIg.

  18. POEMS Syndrome in a Juvenile Initially Diagnosed as Treatment Resistant Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Krish, Sonia N; Nguyen, Thy; Biliciler, Suur; Kumaravel, Manickam; Wahed, Amer; Risin, Semyon; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2015-12-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) is a disorder that mainly affects adults. We report a pediatric patient, initially considered to have Guillain-Barré syndrome, who continued to have progression of neuropathic disease leading to the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Diagnosis of POEMS was established by an abnormal bone marrow biopsy, prompted by laboratory and imaging findings, which became abnormal later in the course of the disease. POEMS syndrome is extremely rare in children, and neuropathic features in this age group have not been previously described. This case illustrates that "Guillain-Barré syndrome-like" initial presentation for POEMS, which has not been previously reported. It also emphasizes that in children with progressive acquired neuropathies that are treatment unresponsive, POEMS syndrome should be considered.

  19. Demyelinating CMT--what's known, what's new and what's in store?

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kathryn M; Bai, Yunhong; Shy, Michael E

    2015-06-02

    Inherited neuropathies known collectively as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are one of the most common inherited neurological conditions affecting ∼1 in 2500 people. A heterogenous disorder, CMT is divided into subtypes based on the pattern of inheritance and also by neurophysiological studies. Despite the clinical similarities among patients with demyelinating CMT, it is recognized that this group of disorders is both genetically and phenotypically heterogenous. Understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders requires an intimate knowledge of normal myelin development and homeostasis. Improvements in genetic testing techniques over the last 20 years have contributed majorly to the identification of specific genes, proteins, and molecular pathways that are providing the basis for understanding the disease processes and developing rational approaches to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with nonuniform pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xinghua; Zheng, Riliang; Chen, Bin; Yuan, Yun

    2010-08-01

    Nonuniform pathologic changes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy were previously reported only in adult humans. We analyzed the pathologic features of 12 children, aged 2-17 years, with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Six patients manifested a preceding illness. Five patients presented a chronic, monophasic course, and seven presented a relapsing-remitting course. Three patients exhibited multiple cranial-nerve involvement. Five of 12 (41.7%) patients presented nonuniform features. Two subtypes of nonuniform lesions were revealed. One exhibited varying myelinated fiber content between nerve fascicles, and one exhibited onion bulbs involving a variable number of fascicles. Macrophages were evident in 11 patients, and the number of CD3-positive T cells in the nonuniform group was greater compared with the uniform group (P = 0.045). Our results demonstrate that childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy exhibits pathologically nonuniform features, thus providing more evidence to assist in differential diagnoses of pediatric patients. However, clinical and electrophysiologic features, as well as responses to treatment, were similar in the nonuniform and uniform groups.

  1. Predicting response to treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y-C; Allen, D C; Fialho, D; Mills, K R; Hughes, R A C

    2006-01-01

    To discover whether Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) electrophysiological criteria for demyelinating neuropathy predict response to immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). This was a retrospective case note study of patients who had attended Guy's Hospital Peripheral Nerve Clinic between January 2001 and March 2004, been diagnosed as having CIDP, and given treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), or plasma exchange (PE). Patients' nerve conduction studies (NCS) were reviewed for evidence of demyelination and whether the abnormalities fulfilled modified INCAT electrophysiological criteria. Patients whose NCS fulfilled the criteria were assigned to the neurophysiologically definite CIDP group, while those that did not were labelled as neurophysiologically probable CIDP. Responses to any of the three immunotherapy agents were compared between the two groups. Out of 50 patients, 27 (54%) were classified as neurophysiologically definite and 23 (46%) as neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients. Twenty (74%) neurophysiologically definite and 17 (73.9%) neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients responded to treatment. INCAT electrophysiological criteria did not predict a higher rate of response to immunotherapy. Neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients should be given a trial of immunotherapy.

  2. Predicting response to treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y‐C; Allen, D C; Fialho, D; Mills, K R; Hughes, R A C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To discover whether Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) electrophysiological criteria for demyelinating neuropathy predict response to immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Methods This was a retrospective case note study of patients who had attended Guy's Hospital Peripheral Nerve Clinic between January 2001 and March 2004, been diagnosed as having CIDP, and given treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), or plasma exchange (PE). Patients' nerve conduction studies (NCS) were reviewed for evidence of demyelination and whether the abnormalities fulfilled modified INCAT electrophysiological criteria. Patients whose NCS fulfilled the criteria were assigned to the neurophysiologically definite CIDP group, while those that did not were labelled as neurophysiologically probable CIDP. Responses to any of the three immunotherapy agents were compared between the two groups. Results Out of 50 patients, 27 (54%) were classified as neurophysiologically definite and 23 (46%) as neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients. Twenty (74%) neurophysiologically definite and 17 (73.9%) neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients responded to treatment. Conclusions INCAT electrophysiological criteria did not predict a higher rate of response to immunotherapy. Neurophysiologically probable CIDP patients should be given a trial of immunotherapy. PMID:16361609

  3. Systematic reviews of treatment for inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, RAC

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the progress made in preparing Cochrane systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials for Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and the demyelinating neuropathies associated with paraproteins. The discovery of antibodies against myelin andaxolemmal glycolipids and proteins has not yet replaced the clinicopathological classificationon which treatment trials have been based. Systematic reviews have endorsed the equivalence of plasma exchange (PE) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and the lack of efficacy of steroids in GBS. Systematic reviews have also endorsed the value of steroids, PE and IVIg in CIDP butrandomized controlled trials have only shown benefit from IVIg in MMN. There is a paucity of evidence concerning the efficacy of treatments in paraproteinaemic demyelinating neuropathy apartment from small trials showing short-term benefit from PE or IVIg. There is a lack of good quality controlled trials of immunosuppressive agents in any of these conditions. As the numberof treatment trials increases, Cochrane systematic reviews will be an increasingly valuable resource for summarizing the evidence from randomised controlled trials on which to base clinical practice. They already demonstrate major deficiencies in the existing evidence base. PMID:12090400

  4. Are electrophysiological criteria useful in distinguishing childhood demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Aragon-Gawinska, Karolina; Kabzinska, Dagmara; Seroka, Andrzej; Lipowska, Marta; Kaminska, Anna M; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) needs to be differentiated from hereditary neuropathy. We aimed to validate existing CIDP nerve conduction study (NCS) criteria in a group of children with demyelinating neuropathies of chronic or subacute onset. Retrospective analysis of clinical and NCS results in 18 children with CIDP, 7 with hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsy (HNPP), and 24 with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1a (CMT1a). AAN and EFNS electrodiagnostic CIDP criteria were fulfilled in 17 of 18 CIDP, 3 of 7 HNPP, and 23 of 24 CMT1a patients. A distal compound muscle action potential (dCMAP) of >9 ms was observed in 14 of 18 CIDP patients but not in any patients with HNPP. Abnormal median/normal sural SNAP (AMNS) and a 10 m/s difference between conduction velocities (CV) of two corresponding nerves were not observed in any CMT1a patients. NCS in CMT1a, HNPP, and CIDP reflect demyelination. dCMAP duration, sensory AMNS, and a 10 m/s CV difference parameter are most useful in the differential diagnosis of pediatric CIDP.

  5. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page NINDS Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Information Page NINDS Chronic Pain Information Page NINDS Coma Information Page NINDS ... Marie-Tooth Disease Information Page Chorea Information Page Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Information Page Coffin Lowry ...

  6. Transplanted miR-219-overexpressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells promoted remyelination and improved functional recovery in a chronic demyelinated model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong-Bin; Chen, Li-Xia; Qu, Xue-Bin; Ren, Chuan-Lu; Wu, Xiu-Xiang; Dong, Fu-Xing; Zhang, Bao-Le; Gao, Dian-Shuai; Yao, Rui-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have the ability to repair demyelinated lesions by maturing into myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Recent evidence suggests that miR-219 helps regulate the differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes. We performed oligodendrocyte differentiation studies using miR-219-overexpressing mouse embryonic stem cells (miR219-mESCs). The self-renewal and multiple differentiation properties of miR219-mESCs were analyzed by the expression of the stage-specific cell markers Nanog, Oct4, nestin, musashi1, GFAP, Tuj1 and O4. MiR-219 accelerated the differentiation of mESC-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) into OPCs. We further transplanted OPCs derived from miR219-mESCs (miR219-OPCs) into cuprizone-induced chronically demyelinated mice to observe remyelination, which resulted in well-contained oligodendrocyte grafts that migrated along the corpus callosum and matured to express myelin basic protein (MBP). Ultrastructural studies further confirmed the presence of new myelin sheaths. Improved cognitive function in these mice was confirmed by behavioral tests. Importantly, the transplanted miR219-OPCs induced the proliferation of endogenous NPCs. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that miR-219 rapidly transforms mESCs into oligodendrocyte lineage cells and that the transplantation of miR219-OPCs not only promotes remyelination and improves cognitive function but also enhances the proliferation of host endogenous NPCs following chronic demyelination. These results support the potential of a therapeutic role for miR-219 in demyelinating diseases. PMID:28145507

  7. Transplanted miR-219-overexpressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells promoted remyelination and improved functional recovery in a chronic demyelinated model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong-Bin; Chen, Li-Xia; Qu, Xue-Bin; Ren, Chuan-Lu; Wu, Xiu-Xiang; Dong, Fu-Xing; Zhang, Bao-Le; Gao, Dian-Shuai; Yao, Rui-Qin

    2017-02-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have the ability to repair demyelinated lesions by maturing into myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Recent evidence suggests that miR-219 helps regulate the differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes. We performed oligodendrocyte differentiation studies using miR-219-overexpressing mouse embryonic stem cells (miR219-mESCs). The self-renewal and multiple differentiation properties of miR219-mESCs were analyzed by the expression of the stage-specific cell markers Nanog, Oct4, nestin, musashi1, GFAP, Tuj1 and O4. MiR-219 accelerated the differentiation of mESC-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) into OPCs. We further transplanted OPCs derived from miR219-mESCs (miR219-OPCs) into cuprizone-induced chronically demyelinated mice to observe remyelination, which resulted in well-contained oligodendrocyte grafts that migrated along the corpus callosum and matured to express myelin basic protein (MBP). Ultrastructural studies further confirmed the presence of new myelin sheaths. Improved cognitive function in these mice was confirmed by behavioral tests. Importantly, the transplanted miR219-OPCs induced the proliferation of endogenous NPCs. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that miR-219 rapidly transforms mESCs into oligodendrocyte lineage cells and that the transplantation of miR219-OPCs not only promotes remyelination and improves cognitive function but also enhances the proliferation of host endogenous NPCs following chronic demyelination. These results support the potential of a therapeutic role for miR-219 in demyelinating diseases.

  8. Segmental somatosensory-evoked potentials as a diagnostic tool in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies, and other sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Koutlidis, R M; Ayrignac, X; Pradat, P-F; Le Forestier, N; Léger, J-M; Salachas, F; Maisonobe, T; Fournier, E; Viala, K

    2014-09-01

    Somatosensory-evoked potentials with segmental recordings were performed with the aim of distinguishing chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from other sensory neuropathies. Four groups of 20 subjects each corresponded to patients with (1) possible sensory chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, (2) patients with sensory polyneuropathy of unknown origin, (3) patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and (4) normal subjects. The patients selected for this study had preserved sensory potentials on electroneuromyogram and all waves were recordable in evoked potentials. Somatosensory-evoked potentials evaluations were carried out by stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle, recording peripheral nerve potential in the popliteal fossa, radicular potential and spinal potential at the L4-L5 and T12 levels, and cortical at C'z, with determination of distal conduction time, proximal and radicular conduction time and central conduction time. In the group of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, 80% of patients had abnormal conduction in the N8-N22 segment and 95% had abnormal N18-N22 conduction time. In the group of neuropathies, distal conduction was abnormal in most cases, whereas 60% of patients had no proximal abnormality. None of the patients in the group of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis had an abnormal N18-N22 conduction time. Somatosensory-evoked potentials with segmental recording can be used to distinguish between atypical sensory chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and other sensory neuropathies, at the early stage of the disease. Graphical representation of segmental conduction times provides a rapid and accurate visualization of the profile of each patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic inactivation of PERK signaling in mouse oligodendrocytes: normal developmental myelination with increased susceptibility to inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussien, Yassir; Cavener, Douglas R; Popko, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The immune-mediated central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disease in young adults. One important goal of MS research is to identify strategies that will preserve oligodendrocytes (OLs) in MS lesions. During active myelination and remyelination, OLs synthesize large quantities of membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which may result in ER stress. During ER stress, pancreatic ER kinase (PERK) phosphorylates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (elF2α), which activates the integrated stress response (ISR), resulting in a stress-resistant state. Previous studies have shown that PERK activity is increased in OLs within the demyelinating lesions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. Moreover, our laboratory has shown that PERK protects OLs from the adverse effects of interferon-γ, a key mediator of the CNS inflammatory response. Here, we have examined the role of PERK signaling in OLs during development and in response to EAE. We generated OL-specific PERK knockout (OL-PERK(ko/ko) ) mice that exhibited a lower level of phosphorylated elF2α in the CNS, indicating that the ISR is impaired in the OLs of these mice. Unexpectedly, OL-PERK(ko/ko) mice develop normally and show no myelination defects. Nevertheless, EAE is exacerbated in these mice, which is correlated with increased OL loss, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. These data indicate that although not needed for developmental myelination, PERK signaling provides protection to OLs against inflammatory demyelination and suggest that the ISR in OLs could be a valuable target for future MS therapeutics.

  10. The Effect of Stereotactic Injections on Demyelination and Remyelination: a Study in the Cuprizone Model.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Laura Salinas; Wostradowski, Tanja; Gingele, Stefan; Skripuletz, Thomas; Gudi, Viktoria; Stangel, Martin

    2017-01-26

    Remyelination is the natural repair mechanism in demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) such as multiple sclerosis. Several animal models have been used to study demyelination and remyelination. Among toxic animal models, oral administration of the toxin cuprizone leads to white and gray matter demyelination. In contrast, focal demyelination models include the stereotactic application of a toxin such as lysolecithin or ethidium bromide. The injection procedure generates a local disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and might thus trigger a local inflammatory reaction and consequently may influence demyelination and remyelination. In order to study such consequences, we applied stereotactic injections in the cuprizone model where demyelination and remyelination are mediated independent of this procedure. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the presence of lymphocytes and activated glial cells in the injection area. Blood protein stainings were used to assess the integrity of the BBB and myelin staining to evaluate demyelination and remyelination processes. Stereotactic injection led to a local disruption of the BBB as shown by local extravasation of blood proteins. Along the injection canal, T and B lymphocytes could be detected and there was a tendency of a higher microgliosis and astrocytosis. However, these changes did not influence demyelination and remyelination processes at the site of injection, in the corpus callosum, or in the cerebral cortex. Our results suggest that a local stereotactic injection has no major impact on CNS demyelination and remyelination.

  11. Lyme disease in athletes.

    PubMed

    DuPrey, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, a bacterial infection transmitted by ticks, is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. Athletes who train or compete in wooded environments in endemic regions are at increased risk of contracting Lyme disease. Variability in clinical presentation, masquerading symptoms, and limitations in testing may lead to misdiagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment result in full recovery for most patients with Lyme disease; however symptoms may persist for months to years, especially when diagnosis is delayed. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lyme disease, with focus on the athletic population.

  12. Absence of CCL2 and CCL3 Ameliorates Central Nervous System Grey Matter But Not White Matter Demyelination in the Presence of an Intact Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Katharina; Rickert, Mira; Clarner, Tim; Beyer, Cordian; Kipp, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A broad spectrum of diseases is characterized by myelin abnormalities, oligodendrocyte pathology, and concomitant glia activation, among multiple sclerosis (MS). Our knowledge regarding the factors triggering gliosis and demyelination is scanty. Chemokines are pivotal for microglia and astrocyte activation and orchestrate critical steps during the formation of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating lesions. Redundant functions of chemokines complicate, however, the study of their functional relevance. We used the cuprizone model to study redundant functions of two chemokines, CCL2/MCP1 and CCL3/MIP1α, which are critically involved in the pathological process of cuprizone-induced demyelination. First, we generated a mutant mouse strain lacking functional genes of both chemokines and demonstrated that double-mutant animals are viable, fertile, and do not present with gross abnormalities. Astrocytes and peritoneal macrophages, cultured form tissues of these animals did neither express CCL2 nor CCL3. Exposure to cuprizone resulted in increased CCL2 and CCL3 brain levels in wild-type but not mutant animals. Cuprizone-induced demyelination, oligodendrocyte loss, and astrogliosis were significantly ameliorated in the cortex but not corpus callosum of chemokine-deficient animals. In summary, we provide a novel powerful model to study the redundant function of two important chemokines. Our study reveals that chemokine function in the CNS redounds to region-specific pathophysiological events.

  13. Time-dependent changes in proinflammatory and neurotrophic responses of microglia and astrocytes in a rat model of osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Haruyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Murase, Takashi; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Arima, Hiroshi; Murata, Yoshiharu; Sawada, Makoto; Oiso, Yutaka

    2011-03-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a serious demyelinating disease in the central nervous system usually caused by rapid correction of hyponatremia. In an animal model of ODS, we previously reported microglial accumulation expressing proinflammatory cytokines. Microglia and astrocytes secreting proinflammatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors are reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinative diseases. Therefore, to clarify the role of microglial and astrocytic function in ODS, we examined the time-dependent changes in distribution, morphology, proliferation, and mRNA/protein expression of proinflammatory cytokines, neurotrophic factors, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in microglia and astrocytes 2 days (early phase) and 5 days (late phase) after the rapid correction of hyponatremia in ODS rats. The number of microglia time dependently increased at demyelinative lesion sites, proliferated, and expressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and MMP2, 9, and 12 at the early phase. Microglia also expressed leukemia inhibitory factor (a neurotrophic factor) and phagocytosed myelin debris at the late phase. The number of astrocytes time dependently increased around demyelinative lesions, extended processes to lesions, proliferated, and expressed nerve growth factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor at the late phase. Moreover, treatment with infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF-α, significantly attenuated neurological impairments. Our results suggest that the role of microglia in ODS is time dependently shifted from detrimental to protective and that astrocytes play a protective role at the late phase. Modulation of excessive proinflammatory responses in microglia during the early phase after rapid correction may represent a therapeutic target for ODS.

  14. Transient auditory nerve demyelination as a new mechanism for hidden hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoqiang; Corfas, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Hidden hearing loss (HHL) is a recently described auditory neuropathy believed to contribute to speech discrimination and intelligibility deficits in people with normal audiological tests. Animals and humans with HHL have normal auditory thresholds but defective cochlear neurotransmission, that is, reduced suprathreshold amplitude of the sound-evoked auditory nerve compound action potential. Currently, the only cellular mechanism known for HHL is loss of inner hair cell synapses (synaptopathy). Here we report that transient loss of cochlear Schwann cells results in permanent auditory deficits characteristic of HHL. This auditory neuropathy is not associated with synaptic loss, but rather with disruption of the first heminodes at the auditory nerve peripheral terminal. Thus, this study identifies a new mechanism for HHL, highlights the long-term consequences of transient Schwann cell loss on hearing and might provide insights into the causes of the auditory deficits reported in patients that recover from acute demyelinating diseases such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. PMID:28211470

  15. Probiotics Lactobacillus plantarum and bifidobacterium B94: cognitive function in demyelinated model

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Rasouli koohi, Samira; Khodaii, Zohreh; Soleymanzadeh Moghadam, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the immune system that creates damage of Learning and memory in that. Using probiotic supplements is recommended for preventing MS disease and improving memory. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) and bifidobacterium B94 (BB94), on acquisition phase of spatial memory in the local demyelination of rats` hippocampus. Methods: In this study, 32 male Wistar rats were divided into control, damage group and treatment groups. Treatment groups were including (LP) and (BB94). After the induction of demyelination by 3 μl of EB into the right dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in treatment groups, 1.5×108 probiotic bacteria were administered by gavage for 28 days. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests (p≤0.05). Results: Findings demonstrated that injection of EB caused a significant increase in traveled distance (p<0.01) and also escape latency (p<0.05) compared with control group. Also, effect administrations of (LP) and (BB94) on traveled distance and escape latency were reviewed, and it was determined that administration of them do not cause significant reduction in the traveled distance compared with the lesion group. Also mentioned probiotics has no significant effect on swimming speed compared with lesion and saline groups. Conclusion: According to some studies, probiotics have a positive impact on improving the performance of spatial memory and learning, although the results of the current study could not indicate finality of this assumption. It seems that more researches is needed on this subject. PMID:27579282

  16. Age dependence of clinical and pathological manifestations of autoimmune demyelination. Implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, M E; Eller, N L; McFarland, H F; Racke, M K; Raine, C S

    1999-10-01

    A prominent feature of the clinical spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS) is its high incidence of onset in the third decade of life and the relative rarity of clinical manifestations during childhood and adolescence, features suggestive of age-related restriction of clinical expression. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune demyelination with many similarities to MS, has a uniform rapid onset and a high incidence of clinical and pathological disease in adult (mature) animals. Like MS, EAE is most commonly seen and studied in female adults. In this study, age-related resistance to clinical EAE has been examined with the adoptive transfer model of EAE in SJL mice that received myelin basic protein-sensitized cells from animals 10 days (sucklings) to 12 weeks (young adults) of age. A variable delay before expression of clinical EAE was observed between the different age groups. The preclinical period was longest in the younger (<14 days of age) animals, and shortest in animals 6 to 8 weeks old at time of transfer. Young animals initially resistant to EAE eventually expressed well-developed clinical signs by 6 to 7 weeks of age. This was followed by a remitting, relapsing clinical course. For each age at time of sensitization, increased susceptibility of females compared to males was observed. Examination of the CNS of younger animal groups during the preclinical period showed lesions of acute EAE. Older age groups developed onset of signs coincident with acute CNS lesions. This age-related resistance to clinical EAE in developing mice is reminiscent of an age-related characteristic of MS previously difficult to study in vivo. The associated subclinical CNS pathology and age-related immune functions found in young animals may be relevant to the increasing clinical expression of MS with maturation, and may allow study of factors associated with the known occasional poor correlation of CNS inflammation and

  17. The dilemma of diabetes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bril, Vera; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Noone, Joshua M.; Runken, M. Chris; Gelinas, Deborah; Russell, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We reviewed the literature on chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and explored real-world data on the prevalence and treatment of CIDP within DM. Methods: A literature search of Scopus was performed for the terms chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, CIDP, and prevalence, incidence, epidemiology, or diabetes; peripheral neuropathy and prevalence or diabetes. We also searched through the reference lists of the resulting publications for additional findings that may have been missed. Additional publications on guidelines for the diagnosis of CIDP and diabetic neuropathy were also included. A descriptive analysis of the 2009–2013 PharMetrics Plus™ Database was performed to estimate the prevalence and treatment of CIDP within the DM population. Results There is an increasing body of literature suggesting that the prevalence of CIDP tends to be higher in diabetic patients, especially in those of older age. Our real-world data seem to support published findings from the literature. For the total cohort (N = 101,321,694), the percent prevalence of CIDP (n = 8,173) was 0.008%; DM (n = 4,026,740) was 4%. The percent prevalence of CIDP without DM (n = 5,986) was 0.006%; CIDP with DM (n = 2,187) was 9-fold higher at 0.054%. For patients >50 years old, there was a significantly higher percentage of CIDP with DM than CIDP without DM. Approximately 50% of CIDP patients were treated with IVIg, 23%–24% with steroids, 1%–2% with PE, and 20%–23% received no treatment. Conclusions In addition to the growing evidence of higher prevalence of CIDP in DM, our findings reinforce the need for heightened awareness of the association of CIDP and DM. PMID:27389526

  18. Cognitive and Behavioral Functioning in Childhood Acquired Demyelinating Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Till, Christine; Noguera, Austin; Verhey, Leonard H; O'Mahony, Julia; Yeh, E Ann; Mah, Jean K; Sinopoli, Katia J; Brooks, Brian L; Aubert-Broche, Berengere; Collins, D Louis; Narayanan, Sridar; Arnold, Douglas L; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cognitive, academic, and psychosocial outcomes after an incident demyelinating event (acquired demyelinating syndromes, ADS) in childhood and to investigate the contribution of brain lesions and confirmed MS diagnosis on outcome. Thirty-six patients with ADS (mean age=12.2 years, SD=2.7, range: 7-16 years) underwent brain MRI scans at presentation and at 6-months follow-up. T2-weighted lesions on MRI were assessed using a binary classification. At 6-months follow-up, patients underwent neuropsychological evaluation and were compared with 42 healthy controls. Cognitive, academic, and behavioral outcomes did not differ between the patients with ADS and controls. Three of 36 patients (8.3%) were identified with cognitive impairment, as determined by performance falling ≤1.5 SD below normative values on more than four independent tests in the battery. Poor performance on a visuomotor integration task was most common, observed among 6/32 patients, but this did not differ significantly from controls. Twelve of 36 patients received a diagnosis of MS within 3 years post-ADS. Patients with MS did not differ from children with monophasic ADS in terms of cognitive performance at the 6-months follow-up. Fatigue symptoms were reported in 50% of patients, irrespective of MS diagnosis. Presence of brain lesions at onset and 6 months post-incident demyelinating event did not associate with cognitive outcome. Children with ADS experience a favorable short-term neurocognitive outcome, even those confirmed to have MS. Longitudinal evaluations of children with monophasic ADS and MS are required to determine the possibility of late-emerging sequelae and their time course. (JINS, 2016, 22, 1050-1060).

  19. Demyelinating Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Kenya; Fujimaki, Motoki; Kanai, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Yuta; Nakazato, Tomoko; Tanaka, Ryota; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients who develop a paraneoplastic syndrome may present with neuromuscular disorders. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old man who suffered from progressive gait disturbance and muscle weakness. The results of a nerve conduction study fulfilled the criteria of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. An abdominal CT scan detected RCC, the pathological diagnosis of which was clear cell type. After tumor resection and a single course of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, the patient's symptoms drastically improved over the course of one year. The patient's neurological symptoms preceded the detection of cancer. A proper diagnosis and the initiation of suitable therapies resulted in a favorable outcome. PMID:28049985

  20. Autoantibodies against vinculin in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Mori, Masahiro; Kazami, Takahiro; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ishibashi, Masumi; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    To identify the target molecules of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), we used proteomic-based approach in the extracted proteins from porcine cauda equina. Two of 31 CIDP patients had markedly elevated serum autoantibodies against vinculin, a cell adhesion protein. Both of the patients with anti-vinculin antibodies had similar clinical manifestation, which are compatible with those of "typical" CIDP. Immunocytochemistry showed that vinculin was stained at the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerves by serum samples. Our results suggest that vinculin is a possible immunological target molecule in a subpopulation of typical CIDP patients.

  1. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy after treatment with interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Makoto; Nakano, Hitoshi; Ura, Shigehisa; Yoshida, Kazuto; Niino, Masaaki; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), though widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis, may be associated with the occurrence of autoimmune disorders. In this case report, a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus infection had chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) after the initiation of IFN-alpha therapy. The neurological symptoms of this patient continued to progress even though the treatment with IFN-alpha had been withdrawn; the symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. This case may therefore provide an important clue to understand the immune mechanism of CIDP and IFN-alpha.

  2. Reconstruction magnetic resonance neurography in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Ito, Sho-ichi; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Iwai, Yuta; Watanabe, Keisuke; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Yokota, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-01

    To study distribution and patterns of nerve hypertrophy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), magnetic resonance neurography with 3-dimensional reconstruction of short tau inversion recovery images was performed in 33 patients. This technique clearly showed longitudinal morphological changes from the cervical roots to the nerve trunks in the proximal arm. Nerve enlargement was detected in 88% of the patients. According to the clinical subtype of CIDP, typical CIDP patients showed symmetric and root-dominant hypertrophy, whereas Lewis-Sumner syndrome patients had multifocal fusiform hypertrophy in the nerve trunks. The patterns of nerve hypertrophy presumably reflect the different pathophysiology of each CIDP subtype.

  3. Multiple giant angiokeratoma of Fordyce on the shaft of the penis masquerading as keratoacanthoma*

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Ghosh, Shouvik; Agarwal, Megha

    2015-01-01

    The term 'angiokeratoma' includes a wide range of dermatological conditions of hyperkeratotic vascular disorders with a similar histologic combination of hyperkeratosis and superficial dermal vascular ectasia. Angiokeratomas can be classified into localized and systemic forms. Angiokeratoma of Fordyce (AKF) is a localized form of angiokeratoma, clinically characterized by 1- to 6-mm, black, blue, or dark red, dome-shaped papules located on the scrotum, shaft of penis, labia majora, clitoris, inner thigh, and lower abdomen. We describe herein a case of giant angiokeratoma of Fordyce on shaft of the penis in an elderly man, clinically masquerading as keratoacanthoma. PMID:26312700

  4. Mycetoma clinically masquerading as squamous cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Momin, Saira B; Richardson, Blakely S; Bryan, Michael G; Del Rosso, James Q; Mobini, Narciss

    2009-02-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic and progressive subcutaneous granulomatous infection characterized by painless swelling and tumefaction, draining sinus tracts, and purulent discharge. The term eumycetoma is used to describe an infection caused by fungi, while an actinomycetoma is used to describe an infection caused by filamentous bacteria. An accurate identification of the pathogen plays a vital role in the treatment plan as well as a positive outcome for the patient. In this report, we present an elderly white female with an initial presentation of mycetoma masquerading as a squamous cell carcinoma. We also review microbiology, diagnostic modalities, and treatment for mycetoma.

  5. Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine for Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasalu, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic demyelinating disorders have multifactorial origin but common important physiologic and anaesthetic considerations. Choice of anaesthesia technique and the drugs used, undertanding the pros and cons of using central neuraxial blocks will help in successful management of such patients. We describe the anaesthetic management of a 34-year-old male with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy posted for cystolithotripsy. PMID:27790558

  6. Axonal and perikaryal involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, M; Terao, S; Misu, K; Li, M; Hattori, N; Ichimura, M; Sakai, M; Yamamoto, H; Watanabe, H; Riku, S; Ikeda, E; Hata, J; Oda, M; Satake, M; Nakamura, N; Matsuya, S; Hashizume, Y; Sobue, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the extent of loss of myelinated nerve fibres and spinal motor neuron loss in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), a clinicopathological study was conducted on biopsied sural nerves and necropsied spinal cords from patients with CIDP.
METHODS—The myelinated fibre pathology of 71 biopsied sural nerves and motor neuron pathology of nine necropsied spinal cords at L4 levels in patients with CIDP were quantitatively and immunohistochemically assessed.
RESULTS—Myelinated nerve fibre density was significantly diminished to 65.4% of the control values (p <0.0001), correlating inversely with the extent of segmental demyelination and remyelination (r = −0.43, p < 0.0005) and duration of illness (r = −0.31, p < 0.01). Numbers of large spinal motor neurons in CIDP were variably but significantly diminished (range from 46.0 to 97.6% of the age matched control value (p < 0.005)), and reactive astrogliosis was evident in the ventral horn in CIDP. The frequency of ventral horn neurons exhibiting central chromatolysis and the accumulation of phosphorylated high molecular weight neurofilament protein was significantly higher in CIDP than in controls (p<0.01 and p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—The loss of nerve axons and spinal motor neurons is common in CIDP, and extensive in some cases. These neuronal and axonal losses may influence the functional prognosis in CIDP.

 PMID:10329744

  7. Acute demyelinating lesions with restricted diffusion in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balashov, Konstantin E; Lindzen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives It is widely accepted that typical acute demyelinating lesions in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) exhibit vasogenic edema with increased diffusion, as demonstrated by an increased apparent diffusion coefficient on MRI. In contrast, acute ischemic lesions demonstrate cytotoxic edema with restricted diffusion. Recent reports have documented selected cases of acute demyelinating lesions exhibiting restricted diffusion (ADLRD) in MS. We aimed to assess the morphologies, distributions, signal characteristics and changes over time of nine ADLRD. An additional goal was to obtain clinical correlations and relate our findings to all previously published case reports describing ADLRD. Methods A retrospective case series study was performed at two academic centers. MRI characteristics of nine ADLRD found in six RRMS patients were compared with typical active symptomatic contrast-enhancing lesions with increased or normal diffusion in control RRMS patients. Results The average size of ADLRD was not significantly different from typical lesions. A periventricular location and faint signal on T2-weighted images were significantly more common for ADLRD compared with typical lesions. Two patients with ADLRD on initial MRI exhibited new ADLRD on their follow up scans. Conclusion Our results and review of prior published cases suggest that ADLRD represent a new variant of MS lesion. The restricted diffusion that is a characteristic of ADLRD on MRI is a new challenge in the differential diagnosis of stroke in young adults. The pathogenesis of ADLRD remains to be understood. PMID:22523157

  8. Diagnostic Value of the Near-Nerve Needle Sensory Nerve Conduction in Sensory Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Zeki; Oh, Shin J

    2017-08-10

    We report here the diagnostic value of the near-nerve needle sensory nerve conduction study (NNN-SNCS) in sensory inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (IDP) in which the routine nerve conduction study was normal or nondiagnostic. The NNN-SNCS was performed to identify demyelination in the plantar nerves in 14 patients and in the median or ulnar nerve in two patients with sensory IDP . In 16 patients with sensory IDP, routine NCSs were either normal or non-diagnostic for demyelination. Demyelination was identified by NNN-SNCS by dispersion and/or slow nerve conduction velocity (NCV) below the demyelination marker. Immunotherapy was initiated in 11 patients, 10 of whom improved or remained stable. NNN-SNCS played an essential role in identifying demyelinaton in 16 patients with sensory IDP, leading to proper treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. IL-27 limits central nervous system viral clearance by promoting IL-10 and enhances demyelination.

    PubMed

    de Aquino, Maria Teresa P; Kapil, Parul; Hinton, David R; Phares, Timothy W; Puntambekar, Shweta S; Savarin, Carine; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2014-07-01

    IL-27 is a pleiotropic member of the IL-6 and IL-12 cytokine family composed of the IL-27p28 and the EBV-induced gene 3. IL-27 and its receptor mRNA are both upregulated in the CNS during acute encephalomyelitis induced by the JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) and sustained during viral persistence. Contributions of IL-27 to viral pathogenesis were evaluated by infection of IL-27Rα-chain-deficient (IL-27Rα(-/-)) mice. The absence of IL-27 signaling accelerated virus control within the CNS associated with increased IFN-γ secreting virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Abrogation of IL-27 signaling did not affect virus-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated IL-10 production or cytolytic activity or Foxp3+ regulatory T cell populations. However, IL-10 production by virus-specific CD4+ T cells was reduced significantly. Despite increased T cell-mediated antiviral function in IL-27Rα(-/-) mice, the virus persisted in the CNS at similar levels as in wild-type mice. Nevertheless, IL-27Rα(-/-) mice exhibited decreased clinical disease during persistence, coincident with less severe demyelination, the hallmark tissue damage associated with JHMV infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that in contrast to viral infections at other sites, IL-27 does not play a proinflammatory role during JHMV-induced encephalomyelitis. Rather, it limits CNS inflammation and impairs control of CNS virus replication via induction of IL-10 in virus-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, in contrast to its protective role in limiting CNS autoimmunity and preventing immunopathology, these data define a detrimental role of IL-27 in promoting demyelination by delaying viral control. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. IL-27 Limits Central Nervous System Viral Clearance by Promoting IL-10 and Enhances Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Maria Teresa P.; Kapil, Parul; Hinton, David R.; Phares, Timothy W.; Puntambekar, Shweta S.; Savarin, Carine; Bergmann, Cornelia C.

    2014-01-01

    IL-27 is a pleiotropic member of the IL-6 and IL-12 cytokine family composed of the IL-27p28 and the EBV-induced gene 3. IL-27 and its receptor mRNA are both upregulated in the CNS during acute encephalomyelitis induced by the JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) and sustained during viral persistence. Contributions of IL-27 to viral pathogenesis were evaluated by infection of IL-27Rα-chain–deficient (IL-27Rα−/−) mice. The absence of IL-27 signaling accelerated virus control within the CNS associated with increased IFN-γ secreting virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Abrogation of IL-27 signaling did not affect virus-specific CD8+ T cell–mediated IL-10 production or cytolytic activity or Foxp3+ regulatory T cell populations. However, IL-10 production by virus-specific CD4+ T cells was reduced significantly. Despite increased T cell–mediated antiviral function in IL-27Rα−/− mice, the virus persisted in the CNS at similar levels as in wild-type mice. Nevertheless, IL-27Rα−/− mice exhibited decreased clinical disease during persistence, coincident with less severe demyelination, the hallmark tissue damage associated with JHMV infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that in contrast to viral infections at other sites, IL-27 does not play a proinflammatory role during JHMV-induced encephalomyelitis. Rather, it limits CNS inflammation and impairs control of CNS virus replication via induction of IL-10 in virus-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, in contrast to its protective role in limiting CNS autoimmunity and preventing immunopathology, these data define a detrimental role of IL-27 in promoting demyelination by delaying viral control. PMID:24890725

  11. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin Causes Selective Death of Mature Oligodendrocytes and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Jennifer R.; Ma, Yinghua; Zhao, Baohua; Harris, Jason Michael; Rumah, Kareem Rashid; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ε-toxin) is responsible for a devastating multifocal central nervous system (CNS) white matter disease in ruminant animals. The mechanism by which ε-toxin causes white matter damage is poorly understood. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ε-toxin causes pathological changes to white matter. In primary CNS cultures, ε-toxin binds to and kills oligodendrocytes but not astrocytes, microglia, or neurons. In cerebellar organotypic culture, ε-toxin induces demyelination, which occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while preserving neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. ε-Toxin specificity for oligodendrocytes was confirmed using enriched glial culture. Sensitivity to ε-toxin is developmentally regulated, as only mature oligodendrocytes are susceptible to ε-toxin; oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are not. ε-Toxin sensitivity is also dependent on oligodendrocyte expression of the proteolipid myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL), as MAL-deficient oligodendrocytes are insensitive to ε-toxin. In addition, ε-toxin binding to white matter follows the spatial and temporal pattern of MAL expression. A neutralizing antibody against ε-toxin inhibits oligodendrocyte death and demyelination. This study provides several novel insights into the action of ε-toxin in the CNS. (i) ε-Toxin causes selective oligodendrocyte death while preserving all other neural elements. (ii) ε-Toxin-mediated oligodendrocyte death is a cell autonomous effect. (iii) The effects of ε-toxin on the oligodendrocyte lineage are restricted to mature oligodendrocytes. (iv) Expression of the developmentally regulated proteolipid MAL is required for the cytotoxic effects. (v) The cytotoxic effects of ε-toxin can be abrogated by an ε-toxin neutralizing antibody. PMID:26081637

  12. Vitamin D3 attenuates oxidative stress and cognitive deficits in a model of toxic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Tarbali, Sepideh; Khezri, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease. The prevalence of MS is highest where environmental supplies of vitamin D are low. Cognitive deficits have been observed in patients with MS. Oxidative damage may contribute to the formation of MS lesions. Considering the involvement of hippocampus in MS, an attempt is made in this study to investigate the effects of vitamin D3 on behavioral process and the oxidative status in the dorsal hippocampus (CA1 area) following the induction of experimental demyelination in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into six groups. Control group: animals received no surgery and treatment; saline group: animals received normal saline; sham group: animals received 150 μl sesame oil IP; vitamin D3 group: animals received 5 μg/kg vitamin D3 IP; lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) group (toxic demyelination’s model): animals received LPC by stereotaxic intra-hippocampal injection of 2 μl LPC in CA1 area; Vitamin D3- treated group: animals were treated with vitamin D3 at doses of 5 μg/kg IP for 7 and 21 days post lesion. The spatial memory, biochemical parameters including catalase (CAT) activities and lipid peroxidation levels were investigated. Results: Animals in LPC group had more deficits in spatial memory than the control group in radial arm maze. Vitamin D3 significantly improved spatial memory compared to LPC group. Also, results indicated that vitamin D3 caused a decrease in lipid peroxidation levels and an increase in CAT activities. Conclusion: Current findings suggest that vitamin D3 may have a protective effect on cognitive deficits and oxidative stress in toxic demyelination’s model. PMID:27096068

  13. Health-care use before a first demyelinating event suggestive of a multiple sclerosis prodrome: a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, José M A; Kingwell, Elaine; Zhu, Feng; Zhao, Yinshan; Högg, Tanja; Stadnyk, Karen; Ekuma, Okechukwu; Lu, Xinya; Evans, Charity; Fisk, John D; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Tremlett, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Degenerative processes in neurodegenerative diseases can start years before clinical manifestation. We aimed to establish whether a multiple sclerosis prodromal period exists by examining patterns of health-care use before a first demyelinating event. In this matched cohort study, we used data from linked health administrative and clinical databases from four Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Nova Scotia) to compare hospital, physician, and prescription use data from people with multiple sclerosis and matched general population controls in the 5 years before the first demyelinating disease claim (health administrative index date) or clinically reported symptom onset (clinical index date). Rate ratios (RRs) were estimated using negative binomial regression and combined across provinces using random effect models. The primary outcome was all-cause use of health care during each of the 5 years before the health administrative or clinical index date. The health administrative cohort included 14 428 multiple sclerosis cases and 72 059 matched controls for whom data were available between April, 1984, and April, 2014. Annual health-care use increased steadily between 5 years and 1 year before the first demyelinating disease claim in people with multiple sclerosis compared with controls (from RR 1·26 [95% CI 1·16-1·36] to 1·78 [1·50-2·10] for hospital admissions; from 1·24 [1·16-1·32] to 1·88 [1·72-2·07] for physician claims; and from 1·23 [1·06-1·41] to 1·49 [1·41-1·59] for prescriptions, assessed as drug classes). Similar patterns for physician claims and prescriptions were observed in the cohort with available clinical symptom onset (3202 individuals with multiple sclerosis and 16 006 controls), although the differences in use in each of the 5 years mostly did not reach statistical significance. More frequent use of health care in patients with multiple sclerosis than in controls in the 5 years before a first

  14. Electrodiagnostic criteria for polyneuropathy and demyelination: application in 135 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dutch Guillain-Barré Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Meulstee, J; van der Meché, F G

    1995-01-01

    Since the development of effective but expensive therapeutic strategies for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, early confirmation of the diagnosis has become very important. Electrodiagnostic criteria were developed for the discrimination of polyneuropathy and in particular for demyelination. The sensitivity and specificity of these criteria were determined in 135 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome in an early stage of the disease, along with 45 healthy volunteers. The algorithms used to develop our criteria consisted of sets of selected electrodiagnostic variables, each of them relevant to the detection of polyneuropathy. Each set was applied on all of three consecutive electrodiagnostic examinations within one month of disease onset. Application of the best set resulted in 85% of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome fulfilling the criteria for polyneuropathy at the first examination (mean time interval six days of disease onset), whereas none of the healthy volunteers fulfilled the criteria (sensitivity 85%, specificity 100%). The set of criteria for the detection of demyelination was fulfilled by 60% during the first examination (by 66% and 72% during the second and third examination). Application of criteria for demyelinating polyneuropathy as defined by others resulted in substantially lowered incidence (3%-46%). It is concluded that these criteria for the electrodiagnostic delineation of polyneuropathy are the most sensitive to date, with respect to the early confirmation of the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:8530930

  15. [Treatment's initiation in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP)].

    PubMed

    Uzenot, D; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J

    2007-09-01

    Treatment's initiation in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP) remains a difficult medical decision. Only plasma exchanges, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) and corticosteroids are proven effective treatments. Immunosuppressors are actually not first-line treatments in CIDP. Particular CIDP forms are associated with different response to treatments: pure motor CIDP should be treated by IVIg, and corticosteroids should only carefully be used in Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Otherwise, IVIg are first-line treatment in diabetic patients. Patients must be informed of side's effects and expected clinical effects. Early treatment was actually not proved to prevent axonal damages in CIDP patients, and waiting seems to be the best therapeutic option in poorly symptomatic patients. Recently, clinical guidelines were proposed to help clinician in this treatment choice, but there is no consensus about the best dose, duration or administration way to CIDP treatments. Further studies should be performed to clarify these points and to determine immunosuppressor agents place in treatment strategy.

  16. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Magy, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic immune-mediated neuropathy: it is clinically heterogeneous (relapsing-remitting form, chronic progressive form, monophasic form or CIDP having a Guillain-Barré syndrome-like onset), but potentially treatable. Although its pathophysiology remains largely unknown, CIDP is considered an immune-mediated neuropathy. Therefore, many immunotherapies have been proposed in this peripheral nervous system disorder, the most known efficient treatments being intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange. However, these therapies remain unsatisfactory for many patients, so numerous other immunotherapeutic strategies have been evaluated, based on their immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory potency. We have performed a large review of the literature about treatment in CIDP, with a special emphasis on novel and alternative immunotherapeutic strategies.

  17. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Stavroula; Lindefeldt, Marie; Bartocci, Marco; Wickström, Ronny

    2016-09-01

    Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), also known as Guillain-Barré syndrome, is an immune-mediated polyneuropathy usually triggered by infections or vaccinations. In childhood AIDP is commonly described after the first year of life. Here, we present a case of a newborn infant with AIDP manifestation directly after delivery. A newborn girl with a healthy mother, without known exposure to immunomodulating factors, was admitted to the neuropediatric department due to ascending hypotonia, weakness, pain and areflexia in the lower extremities. The clinical presentation, laboratory and neurophysiological studies supported the diagnosis of AIDP. The infant showed first signs of clinical improvement following administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and her recovery was complete at one year. AIDP should be considered as a differential diagnosis in ascending hypotonia also in the neonatal period. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Standard and escalating treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Chan, Andrew; Gold, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired, immune-mediated polyradiculoneuritis that is progressive or relapsing over a period of at least 8 weeks. Although the exact pathogenesis is unclear, it is thought to be mediated by both cellular and humoral immune reactions directed against the peripheral nerve myelin or axon. CIDP also involves spinal nerve roots. Early medical treatment of CIDP is important to prevent axonal loss. Only three treatment regimens for CIDP have demonstrated benefit in randomized, controlled studies: corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). Approximately 25% of patients respond inadequately to corticosteroids, plasma exchange or IVIg. Large placebo-controlled trials with alternative immunosuppressive compounds, e.g. mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, or monoclonal antibodies, are lacking. PMID:21694819

  19. Intractable chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy treated successfully with ciclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, M; Tatsumoto, M; Susuki, K; Hirata, K; Yuki, N

    2005-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a heterogeneous disorder and both clinical course and response to treatment vary widely. Because of the propensity for relapse, CIDP requires maintenance therapy after the initial response to treatment. There is no consensus regarding this in the published literature. Present report: A patient with CIDP was treated with oral prednisolone and cyclophosphamide pulse therapy but required repeated plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Treatment with ciclosporin freed the patient from repeated IVIg administration. Therapeutic responses in 14 subsequent cases including three patients who showed improvement with ciclosporin are also presented along with an algorithm of the authors' suggested protocol for treatment. Conclusion: Ciclosporin should be considered for patients with intractable CIDP who require repeated IVIg. PMID:16024890

  20. Microglial Hv1 proton channel promotes cuprizone-induced demyelination through oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Tian, Daishi; Murugan, Madhuvika; Eyo, Ukpong B; Dreyfus, Cheryl F; Wang, Wei; Wu, Long-Jun

    2015-10-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in inflammatory cells including microglia plays an important role in demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism underlying microglial ROS production and demyelination remains largely unknown. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in the brain. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of microglial Hv1 proton channels in a mouse model of cuprizone-induced demyelination, a model for MS. Following cuprizone exposure, wild-type mice presented obvious demyelination, decreased myelin basic protein expression, loss of mature oligodendrocytes, and impaired motor coordination in comparison to mice on a normal chow diet. However, mice lacking Hv1 (Hv1(-/-) ) are partially protected from demyelination and motor deficits compared with those in wild-type mice. These rescued phenotypes in Hv1(-/-) mice in cuprizone-induced demyelination is accompanied by reduced ROS production, ameliorated microglial activation, increased oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (NG2) proliferation, and increased number of mature oligodendrocytes. These results demonstrate that the Hv1 proton channel is required for cuprizone-induced microglial oxidative damage and subsequent demyelination. Our study suggests that the microglial Hv1 proton channel is a unique target for controlling NOX-dependent ROS production in the pathogenesis of MS.

  1. Idiopathic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an epidemiological study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiò, A; Cocito, D; Bottacchi, E; Buffa, C; Leone, M; Plano, F; Mutani, R; Calvo, A

    2007-01-01

    Aim The clinical and epidemiological characteristics of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in an Italian population were assessed. Subjects and methods All subjects with a diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy after 1990 in Piemonte and Valle d'Aosta (4 334 225 inhabitants) were considered. The diagnosis of CIDP was based on the research criteria of the American Academy of Neurology. 165 of 294 patients met the diagnostic criteria. Results The crude prevalence rate was 3.58/100 000 population (95% CI 3.02 to 4.20). At the prevalence day, 76 (49.0%) cases had definite, 67 (43.2%) probable and 12 (7.7%) possible CIDP; disability was mild in 105 (67.7%) cases, moderate in 32 (20.6%) and severe in 18 (11.6%). The course was remitting–relapsing in 40 cases (25.8%), chronic progressive in 96 (61.9%) and monophasic in 19 (12.3%). Considering the 95 patients whose disorder presented in the period 1995–2001, the mean annual crude incidence rate was 0.36/100 000 population (95% CI 0.29 to 0.44), with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. 14 cases were affected by diabetes mellitus. In multivariate analysis, factors related to severe disability at the prevalence day were: age>60 years; failure of immunomodulating therapies at the time of diagnosis; worse disability at nadir; and chronic course. Conclusion Incidence and prevalence rates of CIDP in Italy were higher than those observed in most previous studies. At the prevalence day, more than 80% of cases had a mild or moderate disability, indicating either a good response to immunomodulating therapy or a tendency of CIDP to have a mild course in most cases. PMID:17494979

  2. Analysis of neural crest cells from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease patients demonstrates disease-relevant molecular signature.

    PubMed

    Kitani-Morii, Fukiko; Imamura, Keiko; Kondo, Takayuki; Ohara, Ryo; Enami, Takako; Shibukawa, Ran; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sekiguchi, Kazuya; Toguchida, Junya; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2017-09-06

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuropathy. The majority of CMT is demyelinating type (demyelinating CMT) caused by Schwann cell involvement. Although a large number of genes responsible for demyelinating CMT have been found, the common molecular target of the pathophysiology caused by these different genes in demyelinating CMT is still unknown. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from healthy controls and patients with demyelinating CMT caused by duplication in peripheral myelin protein 22 kDa (PMP22) or point mutations in myelin protein zero (MPZ) or early growth response 2 (EGR2). iPSCs were differentiated into neural crest cells, progenitors of Schwann cells, followed by purification using the neural crest cell markers p75 and human natural killer-1. To identify a disease-relevant molecular signature at the early stage of demyelinating CMT, we conducted global gene expression analysis of iPSC-derived neural crest cells and found that a glutathione-mediated detoxification pathway was one of the related pathways in demyelinating CMT. mRNA expression of glutathione S-transferase theta 2 (GSTT2), encoding an important enzyme for glutathione-mediated detoxification, and production of reactive oxygen species were increased in demyelinating CMT. Our study suggested that patient-iPSC-derived neural crest cells could be a cellular model for investigating genetically heterogeneous disease CMT and might provide a therapeutic target for the disease.

  3. A spectrum of inflammation and demyelination in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) of children.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Di Pietro, Giada Maria; Madini, Barbara; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Rigante, Donato

    2015-10-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that involves multifocal areas of the white matter, rarely the gray matter and spinal cord, mainly affecting children and mostly occurring 1-2weeks after infections or more rarely after vaccinations. Though a specific etiologic agent is not constantly identified, to evaluate carefully patient's clinical history and obtain adequate samples for the search of a potential ADEM causal agent is crucial. In the case of a prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment, most children with ADEM have a favorable outcome with full recovery, but in the case of diagnostic delays or inappropriate treatment some patients might display neurological sequelae and persistent deficits or even show an evolution to multiple sclerosis. The suspicion of ADEM rises on a clinical basis and derives from systemic and neurologic signs combined with magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. Other advanced imaging techniques may help an appropriate differential diagnosis and definition of exact disease extension. Although there is no standardized protocol or management for ADEM, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis have been successfully used. There is no marker that permits to identify the subset of children with worse prognosis and future studies should try to detect any biological clue for prevision of neurologic damage as well as should optimize treatment strategies using an approach based on the effective risk of negative evolution.

  4. Adaptive human immunity drives remyelination in a mouse model of demyelination

    PubMed Central

    El Behi, Mohamed; Sanson, Charles; Bachelin, Corinne; Guillot-Noël, Léna; Fransson, Jennifer; Stankoff, Bruno; Maillart, Elisabeth; Sarrazin, Nadège; Guillemot, Vincent; Abdi, Hervé; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Fontaine, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Abstract One major challenge in multiple sclerosis is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to disease severity progression. The recently demonstrated correlation between disease severity and remyelination emphasizes the importance of identifying factors leading to a favourable outcome. Why remyelination fails or succeeds in multiple sclerosis patients remains largely unknown, mainly because remyelination has never been studied within a humanized pathological context that would recapitulate major events in plaque formation such as infiltration of inflammatory cells. Therefore, we developed a new paradigm by grafting healthy donor or multiple sclerosis patient lymphocytes in the demyelinated lesion of nude mice spinal cord. We show that lymphocytes play a major role in remyelination whose efficacy is significantly decreased in mice grafted with multiple sclerosis lymphocytes compared to those grafted with healthy donors lymphocytes. Mechanistically, we demonstrated in vitro that lymphocyte-derived mediators influenced differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells through a crosstalk with microglial cells. Among mice grafted with lymphocytes from different patients, we observed diverse remyelination patterns reproducing for the first time the heterogeneity observed in multiple sclerosis patients. Comparing lymphocyte secretory profile from patients exhibiting high and low remyelination ability, we identified novel molecules involved in oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and validated CCL19 as a target to improve remyelination. Specifically, exogenous CCL19 abolished oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation observed in patients with high remyelination pattern. Multiple sclerosis lymphocytes exhibit intrinsic capacities to coordinate myelin repair and further investigation on patients with high remyelination capacities will provide new pro-regenerative strategies. PMID:28334918

  5. The connectomics of brain demyelination: Functional and structural patterns in the cuprizone mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Neele S; Mechling, Anna E; Lee, Hsu-Lei; Reisert, Marco; Bienert, Thomas; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Harsan, Laura-Adela

    2017-02-01

    Connectomics of brain disorders seeks to reveal how altered brain function emerges from the architecture of cerebral networks; however the causal impact of targeted cellular damage on the whole brain functional and structural connectivity remains unknown. In the central nervous system, demyelination is typically the consequence of an insult targeted at the oligodendrocytes, the cells forming and maintaining the myelin. This triggered perturbation generates cascades of pathological events that most likely alter the brain connectome. Here we induced oligodendrocyte death and subsequent demyelinating pathology via cuprizone treatment in mice and combining mouse brain resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and diffusion tractography we established functional and structural pathology-to-network signatures. We demonstrated that demyelinated brain fundamentally reorganizes its intrinsic functional connectivity paralleled by widespread damage of the structural scaffolding. We evidenced default mode-like network as core target of demyelination-induced connectivity modulations and hippocampus as the area with strongest connectional perturbations.

  6. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Krutenkova, E. Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M.

    2015-11-17

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  7. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutenkova, E.; Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M.

    2015-11-01

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  8. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy as a novel method to detect demyelination in rat sciatic nerve in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Senapati, Arun; Peng, Yuan Bo; Kashyap, Dheerendra; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    This study was done to use near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to bring out differences in the anatomical substructures in the rat spinal cord and further to differentiate scattering between demyelinated and normal sciatic nerves in rat models, thereby exploring a new methodology to localize MS (multiple Sclerosis) lesions in vivo for animal studies. The experimental setup consisted of a tungsten light source, CCD array spectrometer, and bifurcated optical fibers for light delivery and detection of back scattered light from tissue. The measurement system was calibrated with reflectance standard. The spinal cord of 14 rats was exposed by laminectomy, and the measurements were taken on 8 points at intervals of 1 mm on the right and left lumbar-sacral regions and the central blood vessel. For measurements on the sciatic nerve, the spinal nerves of 84 rats were ligated according to the Chung Model. Measurements were taken on five points on both the ligated and the control nerve side after 1, 4, 7 and 14 days. The reduced scattering coefficient, μs', was found to be higher in the lumbar-sacral regions (34.17 +/- 2.05 cm-1) than that near the central blood vessel (19.9 +/- 3.8 cm-1). Statistically, there was significant difference in scattering between the control side and the ligated side on postoperative days 4, 7, and 14. This study shows a promising diagnostic value in the future for monitoring of demyelinated CNS (central nervous system) diseases, like Multiple Sclerosis.

  9. Severity of Demyelinating and Axonal Neuropathy Mouse Models Is Modified by Genes Affecting Structure and Function of Peripheral Nodes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Kathryn H; Seburn, Kevin L; Schroeder, David G; Spaulding, Emily L; Dionne, Loiuse A; Cox, Gregory A; Burgess, Robert W

    2017-03-28

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited polyneuropathies. Mutations in 80 genetic loci can cause forms of CMT, resulting in demyelination and axonal dysfunction. The clinical presentation, including sensory deficits, distal muscle weakness, and atrophy, can vary greatly in severity and progression. Here, we used mouse models of CMT to demonstrate genetic interactions that result in a more severe neuropathy phenotype. The cell adhesion molecule Nrcam and the Na(+) channel Scn8a (NaV1.6) are important components of nodes. Homozygous Nrcam and heterozygous Scn8a mutations synergized with both an Sh3tc2 mutation, modeling recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4C, and mutations in Gars, modeling dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D. We conclude that genetic variants perturbing the structure and function of nodes interact with mutations affecting the cable properties of axons by thinning myelin or reducing axon diameter. Therefore, genes integral to peripheral nodes are candidate modifiers of peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Uptake of environmental toxicants by the locus ceruleus: a potential trigger for neurodegenerative, demyelinating and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the locus ceruleus, with a subsequent decrease of CNS noradrenaline, occurs in a wide range of neurodegenerative, demyelinating and psychiatric disorders. The cause of the initial locus ceruleus damage remains unknown. Recently, inorganic mercury was found to enter human locus ceruleus neurons selectively. This has led to the formulation of a new hypothesis as to the cause of these disorders. Toxicants enter locus ceruleus neurons selectively, aided by the extensive exposure these neurons have to CNS capillaries, as well as by stressors that upregulate locus ceruleus activity. The resulting noradrenaline dysfunction affects a wide range of CNS cells and can trigger a number of neurodegenerative (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and motor neuron disease), demyelinating (multiple sclerosis), and psychiatric (major depression and bipolar disorder) conditions. This hypothesis proposes that environmental toxicants entering the locus ceruleus can give rise to a variety of CNS disorders. Proposals are made for experiments to gain further evidence for this hypothesis. If it is shown that toxicants in the locus ceruleus are responsible for these conditions, attempts can be made to prevent the toxicant exposures or to remove the toxicants from the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Disease mechanisms in MS: the potassium channel KIR4.1--a potential autoantigen in MS.

    PubMed

    Racke, Michael K

    2012-11-05

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease in which antigens of the myelin sheath have been considered the autoimmune target. A recent study suggests that the potassium channel KIR4.1 is another potential autoantigen in some patients with multiple sclerosis, and might also be a target in other demyelinating diseases.

  12. Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma-Associated Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia Masquerading as Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mahsa; Azmoodeh Ardalan, Farid; Najafi, Masoumeh; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Ghanadan, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell malignancy with atypical CD30 positive lymphocytes. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is an uncommon finding in primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and may mimic squamous cell carcinoma as pseudomalignancy. Careful attention of a pathologist to correct diagnosis of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and its underlying causes will help physicians to avoid inappropriate management. Here, we present a 22-year-old man referred to our hospital with a solitary nodule persistent on his forearm which was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma in the first biopsy. The lesion recurred after two months and histopathologic and immunohistochemistry examination revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma with florid pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia which masquerading as well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia must guide the pathologist to search for underlying causes, such as primary cutaneous lymphoma. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia may mimic squamous cell carcinoma and this can result in inappropriate diagnosis and management.

  13. Severe bleeding after antithrombotic therapy in urosepsis masquerading as myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kuo-Wei; Shih, Hsin-Chin; How, Chorng-Kuang; Lin, Yang-Ying; Hung-Tsang Yen, David; Huang, Mu-Shun

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is common in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. We present a 71-year-old woman with Escherichia coli urosepsis and sepsis-induced myocardial injury masquerading as non-ST elevated myocardial ischemia. Spontaneous psoas hematoma requiring blood transfusion and intracranial hemorrhage developed after antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, even in therapeutic doses. The patient was managed conservatively and recovered well with minor residual hemiparesis. Bleeding complications are a common risk of antithrombotic therapy. It is therefore crucial to weigh the impact of efficacy against safety. Old age, female gender, renal insufficiency and sepsis character increased the risk of bleeding in this patient. A misinterpretation of elevated cardiac troponin I may give rise to a diagnostic dilemma and cause unnecessary morbidity.

  14. Retained soft contact lens masquerading as a chalazion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pankaj Kumar; Ahmed, Taha Y; Diaper, Charles J M

    2013-02-01

    A misplaced contact lens is a common ocular emergency presenting to the eye casualty. We report a case of lost soft contact lens which migrated in the lid and presented 13 years later with symptomatic eye lid swelling. Authors in the past have reported migration and subsequent retention of lost hard lenses in locations such as the superior fornix and eyelid. To the best of our knowledge, misplaced soft contact lens masquerading as a chalazion has not been reported in the literature. Consideration should be given to the possibility of a retained contact lens in a patient with a history of a lost or misplaced lens, and examination of the ocular surface with double eversion of the upper lid should be performed.

  15. Sporadic bilateral synchronous multicentric papillary renal cell carcinoma masquerading as bilateral multifocal pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, V S; Dorairajan, L N; Kumar, S; Vijayakumar, A R; Ramesh, A; Ganesh Rajesh, N; Halanaik, D; Gupta, S

    2014-07-01

    Pyelonephritis is defined as an inflammation of the kidney and renal pelvis. The diagnosis is usually clinical. Acute multifocal bacterial nephritis is a rare form of pyelonephritis that is more severe and sepsis is more common. We report a patient who presented with fever and right-sided abdominal pain associated with right flank tenderness, suggesting right acute pyelonephritis. Bilateral multifocal pyelonephritis was diagnosed on ultrasonography, radionuclide renal scintigraphy and computed tomography. However, owing to non-resolution of symptoms, a biopsy was performed, which showed bilateral papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). PRCC is known to exhibit multicentricity. To our knowledge, a case of bilateral multicentric PRCC masquerading as bilateral multifocal pyelonephritis has not been reported in the English literature. This case highlights the need to be vigilant while treating patients with focal lesions of the kidney as an inflammatory condition lest a malignancy should be missed.

  16. Sporadic bilateral synchronous multicentric papillary renal cell carcinoma masquerading as bilateral multifocal pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, VS; Kumar, S; Vijayakumar, AR; Ramesh, A; Ganesh Rajesh, N; Halanaik, D; Gupta, A

    2014-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is defined as an inflammation of the kidney and renal pelvis. The diagnosis is usually clinical. Acute multifocal bacterial nephritis is a rare form of pyelonephritis that is more severe and sepsis is more common. We report a patient who presented with fever and right-sided abdominal pain associated with right flank tenderness, suggesting right acute pyelonephritis. Bilateral multifocal pyelonephritis was diagnosed on ultrasonography, radionuclide renal scintigraphy and computed tomography. However, owing to non-resolution of symptoms, a biopsy was performed, which showed bilateral papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). PRCC is known to exhibit multicentricity. To our knowledge, a case of bilateral multicentric PRCC masquerading as bilateral multifocal pyelonephritis has not been reported in the English literature. This case highlights the need to be vigilant while treating patients with focal lesions of the kidney as an inflammatory condition lest a malignancy should be missed. PMID:24992402

  17. Sebaceous carcinoma: the great masquerader: emgerging concepts in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, William; Joseph, Aaron K

    2008-01-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is a rare tumor with a high rate of local recurrence and metastasis to lymph nodes and organs. The majority of SCs occur in the periocular region frequently presenting as painless, round subcutaneous nodules with a high tendency of diffuse and invasive growth in the eyelid and conjunctiva. It frequently masquerades as inflammatory conditions or as other tumors leading to delay in diagnosis, inappropriate treatment and increased morbidity and mortality. Sebaceous carcinoma is associated with Muir-Torre syndrome, a genetic condition presenting with sebaceous skin tumors associated with internal malignancy. Therefore, SC patients must be carefully evaluated and referred to an internist or gastroenterologist when indicated. Surgery is the definitive therapy for SC. In recent years, less radical surgical strategies are being used with improved outcomes. Current studies demonstrate that Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) provides maximal tissue conservation and lower recurrence rates. Greater awareness and understanding of SC and its behavior has led to earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  18. Retained soft contact lens masquerading as a chalazion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pankaj Kumar; Ahmed, Taha Y; Diaper, Charles J M

    2013-01-01

    A misplaced contact lens is a common ocular emergency presenting to the eye casualty. We report a case of lost soft contact lens which migrated in the lid and presented 13 years later with symptomatic eye lid swelling. Authors in the past have reported migration and subsequent retention of lost hard lenses in locations such as the superior fornix and eyelid. To the best of our knowledge, misplaced soft contact lens masquerading as a chalazion has not been reported in the literature. Consideration should be given to the possibility of a retained contact lens in a patient with a history of a lost or misplaced lens, and examination of the ocular surface with double eversion of the upper lid should be performed. PMID:23412528

  19. Thoracic exophytic ependymoma masquerading as a benign extra-axial tumor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Charlotte Y; Koffie, Robert M; Dewitt, John C; Aronson, Joshua P

    2016-11-01

    Spinal tumors are conventionally differentiated based on location in relation to the spinal cord. Benign spinal tumors such as schwannomas and meningiomas are typically extra-axial (intradural extramedullary) lesions, whereas more aggressive primary spinal tumors such as ependymomas are typically intramedullary masses. Rarely, ependymomas can have both intramedullary and extramedullary components (typically referred to as exophytic ependymomas). We report a case of a spinal exophytic ependymoma that radiographically masqueraded as a benign intradural extramedullary lesion causing cord compression and neurologic deficit in a 47-year-old man. The diagnosis of exophytic ependymoma was made intra-operatively, with resultant gross total resection of the extramedullary portion and subtotal resection of the intramedullary portion. Histopathological examination confirmed ependymoma with World Health Organization grade II/IV. Pre-operative suspicion of an exophytic ependymoma influences operative planning and clinical management. We review the literature and discuss clinical management strategies for these interesting spinal tumors.

  20. Lauren Slater and the Experts: Malingering, Masquerade, and the Disciplinary Control of Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    The work of psychologist and author Lauren Slater has elicited strong reactions from both medical professionals and disability studies theorists, ranging from criticism to high praise. Attending to these responses, I argue that her work, in perhaps perverse fashion, can provide a narrative touch point for attempts from both fields to complicate the outdated binary division of the medical and social models. I illustrate the need for this collaboration through the example of malingering, suggesting that reading Slater's work through the lens of Tobin Siebers's theory of "masquerade" can open progressive conversations about "illness deception," which is an issue of central importance in disability rights, psychiatry, and political conversations. By using Slater's work and research on malingering as a test case, I point to potentially productive convergences among academic, medical, and social fields.

  1. Hepatitis B vaccination and central nervous system demyelination: an immunological approach.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, E; Ben Younes, A; Desbois, S; Gout, O; Tourbah, A; Lyon-Caen, O; Liblau, R S

    2005-02-01

    Demyelination events or multiple sclerosis following hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination have been reported. We therefore compared the T-cell response to HBsAg in patients with CNS demyelination following HBV vaccination and in HBV-vaccinated healthy individuals. Our data showed no differences in terms of T-cell proliferation or cytokine production between these groups and may help to allay concerns that HBV vaccination might trigger a deleterious immune response.

  2. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti–N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Titulaer, Maarten J; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Cobo Calvo, Alvaro; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S; Wirtz, Paul W; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-03-01

    To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti–Nmethyl- D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Clinical and radiological analysis was done of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4 positive) or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4 positive, 2 MOG positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis; NMDAR antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG antibodies in 3 of 50 anti-NMDAR and 1 of 56 NMO patients, and AQP4 antibodies in 48 of 56 NMO and 1 of 50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1 of 23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18 of 50 anti-NMDAR controls (p50.011). Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (eg, dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  3. Effects of deep heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound on demyelinating nerves

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Elif; Tastaban, Engin; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Turan, Yasemin; Şendur, Ömer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physiotherapeutic heating agents are classified into two groups: superficial-heating agents and deep-heating agents. Therapeutic ultrasound is a deep-heating agent used to treat various musculosketal disorders. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the impact of ultrasound on healthy nerve conduction parameters. However, the instantaneous effects of deep heating via ultrasound on demyelinating nerves do not appear to have been described previously. The present study aimed to assess and compare the impact of ultrasound on demyelinating nerve and healthy nerve conduction parameters. [Subjects and Methods] Carpal tunnel syndrome was used as a focal demyelination model. Thirty-two hands of 25 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in the study. Ultrasound parameters were 3.3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 8 minutes, and continuous wave. Electrodiagnostic studies were performed initially, at the midpoint (4th min), and immediately after (8th min) ultrasound application. [Results] Reduced motor conduction velocity was found in demyelinating nerves at the 4th and 8th minutes. Ulnar nerve onset latency was significantly prolonged in the 8th minute recording, compared to the initial value. There were no significant differences in relative velocity and latency changes between demyelinating and normal nerves. [Conclusion] Deep heating via ultrasound may inversely affect conduction velocity in demyelinating nerves. PMID:27190467

  4. Experimental immunological demyelination enhances regeneration in autograft-repaired long peripheral nerve gaps

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jun; Zhu, Shu; Yang, Yafeng; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, Xueyu; Huang, Liangliang; Quan, Xin; Wang, Meng; Huang, Jinghui; Li, Yunqing; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve long gap defects are a clinical challenge in the regeneration field. Despite the wide variety of surgical techniques and therapies, autografting is the “gold standard” for peripheral nerve gap reconstruction. The pathological process of Wallerian degeneration from the time of acute injury to efficient regeneration requires several weeks. Regeneration time is critical for nerve reconstruction. Immunological demyelination induced by anti-galactocerebroside antibodies plus guinea pig complement was used to shorten the treatment time. Based on an antigen-antibody complex reaction, the demyelinating agent induced an acute and severe demyelination, leading to the pathological process of Wallerian degeneration during the demyelinating period. This method was used to treat a 12 mm-long sciatic nerve defect in rats. The control groups were injected with one of the demyelinating agent components. The results indicated that anti-galactocerebroside antibodies plus guinea pig complement can significantly shorten treatment time and promote nerve regeneration and functional recovery. In addition, the demyelinating agent can increase the mRNA levels of nerve growth factors and can regulate inflammation. In conclusion, treatment with anti-galactocerebroside antibodies plus guinea pig complement can promote axonal regeneration. This therapy provides a novel method to improve functional recovery in the treatment of long nerve defects. PMID:28008990

  5. Neurodegenerative disorder masquerading as psychosis in a forensic psychiatry setting.

    PubMed

    Sommerlad, Andrew; Lee, James; Warren, Jason; Price, Gary

    2014-06-13

    A man presenting in his 50s, following conviction for a non-violent crime, to forensic psychiatric services, and then to a neuropsychiatry service with an unusual presentation of psychosis: second person auditory hallucinations, grandiose delusions and somatic delusions. Detailed collateral and family history revealed a background of progressive cognitive deficit and a family history of motor neuron disease. MRI of the brain revealed asymmetrical parieto-occipital volume loss and genetic testing demonstrated a pathogenic expansion of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene consistent with familial frontotemporal dementia caused by a hexanucleotide repeat expansion at C9ORF72, a recently discovered cause of familial frontotemporal dementia/motor neuron disease. This form of frontotemporal dementia should be considered as an important potential differential diagnosis for patients presenting with psychotic symptoms in later life, in whom a detailed family history and thorough cognitive assessment is essential.

  6. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection Masquerading as Benign Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sara Wei-Fen; Lin, Weiqin; Chan, Koo Hui; Seow, Swee-Chong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of acute coronary syndrome. Diagnosis of coronary artery dissection is made on coronary angiogram and prompt revascularisation is the key in management. We present a case of coronary artery dissection with an atypical presentation of cardiac arrhythmia mimicking benign fascicular ventricular tachycardia. A high index of suspicion and early coronary angiogram allowed us to diagnose and treat this potentially life-threatening disease.

  7. Toxicity of cuprizone a Cu(2+) chelating agent on isolated mouse brain mitochondria: a justification for demyelination and subsequent behavioral dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Salimi, Ahmad; Seydi, Enayatolla; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Kouhnavard, Mehdi; Rahimi, Atena; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2016-05-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with an unknown etiology and no effective cure, despite decades of extensive research that led to the development of several partially effective treatments. In this study we aimed to investigate brain mitochondrial dysfunction in demyelination induced by cuprizone in mice. Cuprizone was used for induction of demyelination in mice through a diet containing 0.2% w/w cuprizone for 5 weeks. Behavioral tests for proving of MS was performed and then mitochondria from brain of animals were isolated and afterwards parameters of mitochondrial dysfunction examined. Results of mitochondrial dysfunction parameters such as mitochondrial swelling, production ROS, collapse of the membrane potential showed that isolated mitochondria from cuprizone treated mice have been damaged compared to those of untreated control mice. It is likely that demyelination induced mitochondrial damage led to increased mitochondrial ROS formation and progression of oxidative damages in neurons. It is suggested that cuprizone which is a Cu(2+) chelating agent causes impairment of electron transport chain (complex IV) and antioxidant system (SOD) in mitochondria leading to decreased ATP production and increased ROS formation.

  8. Endogenous Nkx2.2+/Olig2+ oligodendrocyte precursor cells fail to remyelinate the demyelinated adult rat spinal cord in the absence of astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Talbott, Jason F.; Loy, David N.; Liu, Ying; Qiu, Mengsheng S.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Rao, Mahendra S.; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic demyelination is a pathophysiologic component of compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and a characteristic finding in demyelinating diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). A better characterization of endogenous cells responsible for successful remyelination is essential for designing therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring functional myelin. The present study examined the spatiotemporal response of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) following ethidium bromide (EB)-induced demyelination of the adult rat spinal cord. Beginning at 2 days post-EB injection (dpi), a robust mobilization of highly proliferative NG2+ cells within the lesion was observed, none of which expressed the oligodendrocyte lineage-associated transcription factor Nkx2.2. At 7 dpi, a significant up-regulation of Nkx2.2 by OPCs within the lesion was observed, 90% of which coexpressed NG2 and virtually all of which coexpressed the bHLH transcription factor Olig2. Despite successful recruitment of Nkx2.2+/Olig2+ OPCs within the lesion, demyelinated axons were not remyelinated by these OPCs in regions lacking astrocytes. Rather, Schwann cell remyelination predominated throughout the central core of the lesion, particularly around blood vessels. Oligodendrocyte remyelination was observed in the astrogliotic perimeter, suggesting a necessary role for astrocytes in oligodendrocyte maturation. In addition, reexpression of the radial glial antigen, RC-1, by reactive astrocytes and ependymal cells was observed following injury. However, these cells did not express the neural stem cell (NSC)-associated transcription factors Sox1 or Sox2, suggesting that the endogenous response is primarily mediated by glial progenitors. In vivo electrophysiology demonstrated a limited and unsustained functional recovery concurrent with endogenous remyelination following EB-induced lesions. PMID:15698615

  9. Antibody responses to peptides of peripheral nerve myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, H R; Csurhes, P A; McCombe, P A

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibodies with reactivity to peripheral nerve myelin have previously been found in the serum, and bound to peripheral nerves of patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Aim To investigate the presence of antibodies reactive to specific peptide sequences within the myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with GBS, in patients with CIDP, in healthy controls and in patients with other neuropathies (ON). Methods Blood was obtained from 48 patients with GBS, 36 with CIDP, 48 with ON and 38 controls. ELISA was used to detect antibody responses to peptides of the human peripheral myelin proteins P0 and P2. Blood samples were collected from patients with GBS in early, peak and recovery stages of GBS to analyse antibody levels throughout the course of the disease. Results Significantly increased total IgG levels were found in patients with GBS compared with other groups. A higher percentage of patients with GBS at the peak of disease had antibody reactivity to P214–25 compared with patients with CIDP and control groups. In patients with GBS and CIDP, the percentages of patients with antibody reactivity to P261–70, and peptides derived from P0, were comparable to the control groups. Although some individual patients with GBS had high titres of reactivity to the peptide antigens tested, most patients with GBS and CIDP had levels of antibody similar to controls. Conclusion Our data suggest that increased IgG levels and increased antibody reactivity to P2 14–25 in patients with GBS at the peak of disease may play a contributory role in the disease process in some patients with demyelinating forms of GBS. PMID:17158557

  10. Stance Postural Strategies in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Trompetto, Carlo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy leads to postural instability and an increased risk of falling. We investigated how impaired motor impairment and proprioceptive input due to neuropathy influences postural strategies. Methods Platformless bisegmental posturography data were recorded in healthy subjects and patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Each subject stood on the floor, wore a head and a hip electromagnetic tracker. Sway amplitude and velocity were recorded and the mean direction difference (MDD) in the velocity vector between trackers was calculated as a flexibility index. Results Head and hip postural sway increased more in patients with CIDP than in healthy controls. MDD values reflecting hip strategies also increased more in patients than in controls. In the eyes closed condition MDD values in healthy subjects decreased but in patients remained unchanged. Discussion Sensori-motor impairment changes the balance between postural strategies that patients adopt to maintain upright quiet stance. Motor impairment leads to hip postural strategy overweight (eyes open), and prevents strategy re-balancing when the sensory context predominantly relies on proprioceptive input (eyes closed). PMID:26977594

  11. A nationwide survey of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kira, R.; Ishizaki, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Sanefuji, M.; Ichiyama, T.; Oka, A.; Kishi, T.; Kimura, S.; Kubota, M.; Takanashi, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Tamai, H.; Natsume, J.; Hamano, S.; Hirabayashi, S.; Maegaki, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Minagawa, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kira, J.; Kusunoki, S.; Hara, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the CNS in Japan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide survey and collected clinical data on children with ADS aged 15 years or younger, who visited hospitals between 2005 and 2007. Results: Among 977 hospitals enrolled, 723 (74.0%) responded to our inquiries and reported a total of 439 patients as follows: 244 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 117 with multiple sclerosis (MS), 14 with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and 64 with other ADS. We collected and analyzed detailed data from 204 cases, including those with ADEM (66), MS (58), and NMO (10). We observed the following: (1) the estimated annual incidence rate of pediatric ADEM in Japan was 0.40 per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34–0.46), with the lowest prevalence in the north; (2) the estimated prevalence rate of MS was 0.69 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.58–0.80), with the lowest prevalence in the south; (3) NMO in Japan was rare, with an estimated prevalence of 0.06 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.04–0.08); and (4) the sex ratio and mean age at onset varied by ADS type, and (5) male/female ratios correlated with ages at onset in each ADS group. Conclusions: Our results clarify the characteristic clinical features of pediatric ADS in the Japanese population. PMID:27742816

  12. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome.

  13. Occupational exposure and risk of central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Valery, P C; Lucas, R M; Williams, D B; Pender, M P; Chapman, C; Coulthard, A; Dear, K; Dwyer, T; Kilpatrick, T J; McMichael, A J; van der Mei, I; Taylor, B V; Ponsonby, A-L

    2013-05-01

    Inconsistent evidence exists regarding the association between work-related factors and risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). We examined the association between occupational exposures and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD), which is strongly associated with progression to MS, in a matched case-control study of 276 FCD cases and 538 controls conducted in Australia (2003-2006). Using a personal residence and work calendar, information on occupational history and exposure to chemicals and animals was collected through face-to-face interviews. Few case-control differences were noted. Fewer cases had worked as professionals (≥6 years) than controls (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.37, 0.96). After further adjustment for number of children, cases were more likely to have ever been exposed to livestock than controls (AOR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.29). Among women, there was an increase in FCD risk associated with 10 or more years of exposure to livestock (AOR = 2.78, 95% CI: 1.22, 6.33) or 6 or more years of farming (AOR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.23, 3.25; also adjusted for number of children). Similar findings were not evident among men. Thus, farming and exposure to livestock may be important factors in the development of FCD among women, with this finding further revealed after the confounding effect of parity or number of children is considered.

  14. Massive ethylene glycol poisoning triggers osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Tschetter, Paul A; Krasowski, Matthew D; Engelman, Amy

    2014-03-01

    Ethylene glycol is a toxic organic solvent implicated in thousands of accidental and intentional poisonings each year. Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is traditionally known as a complication of the rapid correction of hyponatremia. Our aim was to describe how patients with ethylene glycol toxicity may be at risk for developing ODS in the absence of hyponatremia. A 64-year old female patient was comatose upon presentation and laboratory results revealed an anion gap of 39, a plasma sodium of 150 mEq/L, a plasma potassium of 3.5 mEq/L, an osmolal gap of 218, an arterial blood gas pH of 7.02, whole blood lactate of 32 mEq/L, no measurable blood ethanol, and a plasma ethylene glycol concentration of 1055.5 mg/dL. The patient was treated for ethylene glycol poisoning with fomepizole and hemodialysis. Despite having elevated serum sodium levels, the patient's hospital course was complicated by ODS. Rapid changes in serum osmolality from ethylene glycol toxicity or its subsequent treatment can cause ODS independent of serum sodium levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pmp22 mutant allele-specific siRNA alleviates demyelinating neuropathic phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Su; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Koo, Ok Jae; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Mo, Won Min; Kwak, Geon; Moon, Hyo Won; Park, Hwan Tae; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2017-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a genetic disorder that can be caused by aberrations in >80 genes. CMT has heterogeneous modes of inheritance, including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, and X-linked recessive. Over 95% of cases are dominantly inherited. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of a mutant allele by an allele-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) can alleviate the demyelinating neuropathic phenotype of CMT. We designed 19 different allele-specific siRNAs for Trembler J (Tr-J) mice harboring a naturally occurring mutation (Leu16Pro) in Pmp22. Using a luciferase assay, we identified an siRNA that specifically and selectively reduced the expression level of the mutant allele and reversed the low viability of Schwann cells caused by mutant Pmp22 over-expression in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of the allele-specific siRNA was assessed by its intraperitoneal injection to postnatal day 6 of Tr-J mice. Administration of the allele-specific siRNA to Tr-J mice significantly enhanced motor function and muscle volume, as assessed by the rotarod test and magnetic resonance imaging analysis, respectively. Increases in motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials were also observed in the treated mice. In addition, myelination, as evidenced by toluidine blue staining and electron microscopy, was augmented in the sciatic nerves of the mice after allele-specific siRNA treatment. After validating suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele at the mRNA level in the Schwann cells of Tr-J mice, we observed increased expression levels of myelinating proteins such as myelin basic protein and myelin protein zero. These data indicate that selective suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele by non-viral delivery of siRNA alleviates the demyelinating neuropathic phenotypes of CMT in vivo, implicating allele-specific siRNA treatment as a potent therapeutic strategy for dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies

  16. Fasciculations masquerading as minipolymyoclonus in bulbospinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sushanth; Ma, Wei; Kozochonok, Elena; Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2015-01-01

    Minipolymyoclonus has been described in both anterior horn cell disorders and central nervous system degenerative conditions. While its etiology remains unclear and speculative, a central generator has been previously proposed. We describe a case of bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease), where minipolymyoclonus-like movements corresponded to fasciculations in neurophysiological studies. Our novel finding suggests that the etiologies of minipolymyoclonus in central and peripheral nervous system disorders are distinct, despite outward clinical similarity. The term “minipolyfasciculations” may be more reflective of the underlying process causing minipolymyoclonus-like movements in lower motor neuron disorders. PMID:26019432

  17. Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to ShirazPediatric Neurology Ward

    PubMed Central

    INALOO, Soroor; HAGHBIN, Saeedeh; MORADI, Mehrpoor; DASHTI, Hassan; SAFARI, Nazila

    2014-01-01

    Objective Incidence of CNS acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS), especially multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, appears to be on the rise worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, and prognosis of different types of ADS in Iranian children. Materials & Methods During the period 2002-2012, all the patients (aged 1-18 years) with ADS, such as MS, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), optic neurotic (ON), Devic disease, and transverse myelitis (TM), referred to the pediatric neurology ward, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, were included in this study. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, past and family history, preclinical findings, clinical course, and outcome were obtained. Results We identified 88 patients with ADS in our center. The most prevalent disease was MS with 36.5% (n=32), followed by AEDM 26.1% (n=31), ON 17% (n=13), TM 15.9% (n=14), and Devic disease 4.5% (n=4). MS, ON, TM were more common among females while ADEM was more common in males. Children with ADEM were significantly younger than those with other types of ADS. Family history was positive in 10% of patients with MS. Previous history of recent infection was considerably seen in cases with ADEM. Clinical presentation and prognosis in this study was in accordance with those in previous studies on children. Conclusion In this study, the most common type of ADS was MS, which was more common in female and older age cases. ADEM was more common in male and younger children. ADEM and ON had the best and Devic disease had the worst prognosis. PMID:24949046

  18. Hypothalamic germinoma masquerading as superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vethakkan, Shireene R; Venugopal, Yogeswari; Tan, Alexander T B; Paramasivam, Sharmila S; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Razak, Rohaya A; Alias, Azmi; Kassim, Fauziah; Choong, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome secondary to hypothalamic germinoma. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, management, and clinical course of a patient admitted with SMA syndrome who was subsequently found to have a hypothalamic germinoma. An adolescent boy was admitted to the surgical ward with progressive weight loss over a 2 year period and postprandial vomiting. He was diagnosed with SMA syndrome based on evidence of proximal duodenal dilatation, extrinsic compression of the distal duodenum, and a narrowed aortomesenteric angle (16°). Investigations performed to exclude thyrotoxicosis unexpectedly revealed secondary hypothyroidism and further evaluation demonstrated evidence of pan-hypopituitarism. Psychiatric evaluation excluded anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a heterogeneously enhancing hypothalamic lesion, but a normal pituitary gland. Hormone replacement with hydrocortisone, desmopressin, testosterone, and thyroxine resulted in weight gain and resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms. A transventricular endoscopic biopsy subsequently confirmed a hypothalamic germinoma and he was referred to an oncologist. SMA syndrome secondary to severe weight loss is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. While there have been reports of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and thyrotoxicosis manifesting as SMA syndrome, there are no published reports to date of SMA syndrome secondary to hypothalamic/pituitary disease. Management of SMA syndrome is conservative, as symptoms of intestinal obstruction resolve with weight gain following treatment of the underlying cause. Awareness of this uncommon presentation of endocrine cachexia/hypothalamic disease will prevent unnecessary laparotomies and a misdiagnosis of an eating disorder.

  19. The Mitochondrial m-AAA Protease Prevents Demyelination and Hair Greying

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemyn, Julie; Barth, Esther; Langer, Thomas; Niessen, Carien M.; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The m-AAA protease preserves proteostasis of the inner mitochondrial membrane. It ensures a functional respiratory chain, by controlling the turnover of respiratory complex subunits and allowing mitochondrial translation, but other functions in mitochondria are conceivable. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of the m-AAA protease have been linked to various neurodegenerative diseases in humans, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia and spinocerebellar ataxia. While essential functions of the m-AAA protease for neuronal survival have been established, its role in adult glial cells remains enigmatic. Here, we show that deletion of the highly expressed subunit AFG3L2 in mature mouse oligodendrocytes provokes early-on mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling, as previously shown in neurons, but causes only late-onset motor defects and myelin abnormalities. In contrast, total ablation of the m-AAA protease, by deleting both Afg3l2 and its paralogue Afg3l1, triggers progressive motor dysfunction and demyelination, owing to rapid oligodendrocyte cell death. Surprisingly, the mice showed premature hair greying, caused by progressive loss of melanoblasts that share a common developmental origin with Schwann cells and are targeted in our experiments. Thus, while both neurons and glial cells are dependant on the m-AA