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Sample records for dendritic cell-mediated induction

  1. In vivo induction of dendritic cell-mediated cytotoxicity against allogeneic pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Stift, Anton; Friedl, Josef; Dubsky, Peter; Bachleitner-Hofmann, Thomas; Benkoe, Thomas; Brostjan, Christine; Jakesz, Raimund; Gnant, Michael

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity and immunological response induced by autologous dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with allogeneic tumor lysate in a pancreatic cancer patient. The lack of available tumor peptides in pancreatic cancer strongly supports the idea to use allogeneic tumor cells as a source of antigens. The patient suffering from a stage IV pancreatic cancer received 1-2x10(7) autologous monocyte-derived DCs in three-week intervals injected into a groin lymph node. Monocytes from peripheral blood were isolated by magnetic bead selection. For the first ten vaccinations DCs were loaded with autologous tumor cell lysate obtained during surgical exploration. After consumption of the autologous lysate, equal numbers of DCs were pulsed with lysate of the tumor cell line AsPc-1 and BxPc-3 for a further five vaccinations. Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were harvested after the seventh and compared with PMNCs obtained after the fourteenth vaccination for immunological response. Delayed type hypersensitivity reactivity to DCs pulsed with autologous and allogeneic tumor lysate was also assessed. The patient received a total of fifteen vaccinations. There was no toxicity or evidence of autoimmunity observed. Delayed type hypersensitivity was found to be positive for the autologous as well as the allogeneic tumor lysate pulsed DCs. in vitro cytotoxicity assays demonstrated a dramatic increase of the PMNC killing capacity against the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPc-1 and BxPc-3 after the fourteenth compared to the seventh vaccination. CT scans revealed a stable disease for six months. The administration of autologous DCs pulsed with allogeneic tumor lysate is non-toxic and suitable for inducing an immunological anti-tumor response. Even though this study was confined to a single patient, the data might open a door for novel immunotherapeutical strategies.

  2. Triptolide regulates T cell-mediated immunity via induction of CD11c(low) dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-hong; Shang, Pei-zhong; Lu, Qing-jun; Wu, Xu

    2012-07-01

    Triptolide(TPT) isolated from one of the Chinese herbs, Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. F. (TWHF), are known to have a variety of immunomodulatory activities. This study was performed to investigate the effect of TPT on the differentiation of splenic DCs and its influence on T cell-mediated immunity regarding to DC subsets CD11c(low)I-a/e(low)CD45RB(+)(CD11c(low) DCs) and CD11c(high)I-a/e(high)CD45RB(-) (CD11c(high) DCs) in male C57BL/6 mice spleens in vitro. The percentage of CD11c(low) DCs was significantly increased after treatment with TPT compared to their counterparts (CD11c(high) DCs). It was found that unlike the gradually decreasing interleukin (IL)-12 secretion of CD11c(high) DCs induced by TPT, CD11c(low) DCs showed a obvious dose-dependent response between the increasing of IL-10 production and TPT stimulation. After treatment with anti-IL-12R or anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody in CD4(+) T cells+CD11c(high) DCs or CD11c(low) DCs mixed lymphocyte reaction, the induction of these DCs on T cells was inhibited dramatically. These data demonstrated that TPT might induce the differentiation of splenic DCs to CD11c(low) DCs followed by shifting of Th1 to Th2 with enhancement of T lymphocyte immune function in vitro. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neonatal Fc receptor expression in dendritic cells mediates protective immunity against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B; Arthur, Janelle C; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D; Odze, Robert D; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-12

    Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system that we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8(+) T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DCs) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8(+) T cells that drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DCs activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC), as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12, both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn-IgG IC interaction in murine and human DCs. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance.

  4. Dendritic Cell-Mediated In Vivo Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Follenzi, Antonia; Yaghoobian, Arash; Montagna, Cristina; Merlin, Simone; Cannizzo, Elvira S.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil; Stanley, E. Richard; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Osteoclasts are resident cells of the bone that are primarily involved in the physiological and pathological remodeling of this tissue. Mature osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells that are generated from the fusion of circulating precursors originating from the monocyte/macrophage lineage. During inflammatory bone conditions in vivo, de novo osteoclastogenesis is observed but it is currently unknown whether, besides increased osteoclast differentiation from undifferentiated precursors, other cell types can generate a multinucleated giant cell phenotype with bone resorbing activity. In this study, an animal model of calvaria-induced aseptic osteolysis was used to analyze possible bone resorption capabilities of dendritic cells (DCs). We determined by FACS analysis and confocal microscopy that injected GFP-labeled immature DCs were readily recruited to the site of osteolysis. Upon recruitment, the cathepsin K-positive DCs were observed in bone-resorbing pits. Additionally, chromosomal painting identified nuclei from female DCs, previously injected into a male recipient, among the nuclei of giant cells at sites of osteolysis. Finally, osteolysis was also observed upon recruitment of CD11c-GFP conventional DCs in Csf1r–/– mice, which exhibit a severe depletion of resident osteoclasts and tissue macrophages. Altogether, our analysis indicates that DCs may have an important role in bone resorption associated with various inflammatory diseases. PMID:20581147

  5. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  6. Dendritic Cell-Mediated Phagocytosis but Not Immune Activation Is Enhanced by Plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rachael J.; Samson, Andre L.; Au, Amanda E.-L.; Scholzen, Anja; Fuchsberger, Martina; Kong, Ying Y.; Freeman, Roxann; Mifsud, Nicole A.; Plebanski, Magdalena; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Removal of dead cells in the absence of concomitant immune stimulation is essential for tissue homeostasis. We recently identified an injury-induced protein misfolding event that orchestrates the plasmin-dependent proteolytic degradation of necrotic cells. As impaired clearance of dead cells by the innate immune system predisposes to autoimmunity, we determined whether plasmin could influence endocytosis and immune cell stimulation by dendritic cells – a critical cell that links the innate and adaptive immune systems. We find that plasmin generated on the surface of necrotic cells enhances their phagocytic removal by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Plasmin also promoted phagocytosis of protease-resistant microparticles by diverse mouse dendritic cell sub-types both in vitro and in vivo. Together with an increased phagocytic capacity, plasmin-treated dendritic cells maintain an immature phenotype, exhibit reduced migration to lymph nodes, increase their expression/release of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β, and lose their capacity to mount an allogeneic response. Collectively, our findings support a novel role for plasmin formed on dead cells and other phagocytic targets in maintaining tissue homeostasis by increasing the phagocytic function of dendritic cells while simultaneously decreasing their immunostimulatory capacity consistent with producing an immunosuppressive state. PMID:26132730

  7. Dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 infection of T-cells demonstrates a direct relationship to plasma viral RNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Reetakshi; Bull, Lara; Siwak, Edward B.; Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Arduino, Roberto C.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between infectivity of HIV-1 variants in dendritic cell-mediated in trans infection of T-cells and plasma viral RNA levels in infected subjects. Methods HIV-1 was isolated from PBMCs of chronically infected individuals, typed for coreceptor usage, and viral replication was examined in monocyte derived-dendritic cells-peripheral blood lymphocytes (DC-PBL) co-cultures. The rate of p24 antigen production during the logarithmic phase of viral replication was determined by ELISA. Additionally, nef variants were cloned and expressed in trans with a HIV-luciferase vector and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 envelope, and infectivity was measured in DC-mediated capture-transfer assays. Results Replication capacity of HIV-1 viral CCR5-tropic isolates in DC-PBL co-cultures was linearly associated with the plasma viral RNA levels in a cohort of HIV-1 infected individuals exhibiting an inverse relationship between plasma viral RNA and CD4 cell count. Furthermore, infectivity activity of Nef variants in context of DC-mediated enhanced infection of T-cells also showed a linear relationship to plasma viral RNA levels. Conclusion These results illustrate that replication capacity of HIV-1 in DC-T-cell cultures is a significant predictor of plasma viral RNA level. The data suggest that adaptation of HIV-1 to DC interactions with T-cells influences the level of viral replication in the host. PMID:20386455

  8. Resident corneal c-fms+ macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45+ cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. PMID:27185163

  9. Resident corneal c-fms(+) macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis.

    PubMed

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45(+) cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of Glycosphingolipids in Dendritic Cell-Mediated HIV-1 Trans-infection

    PubMed Central

    Puryear, Wendy Blay

    2013-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are components of the cell membrane that comprise a membrane bound lipid, ceramide, coupled to an extracellular carbohydrate. GSLs impact numerous aspects of membrane biology, including membrane fluidity, curvature, and organization. The role of these molecules in both chronic inflammation and infectious disease and underlying pathogenic mechanisms are just starting to be recognized. As a component of the cell membrane, GSLs are also incorporated into lipid bilayers of diverse enveloped viruses as they bud out from the host cell and can go on to have a significant influence on viral pathogenesis. Dendritic cell (DC) subsets located in the peripheral mucosal tissues are proposed to be one of the earliest cell types that encounter transmitted viruses and help initiate adaptive immune responses against the invading pathogen by interacting with T cells. In turn, viruses, as obligatory intracellular parasites, rely on host cells for completing their replication cycle, and not surprisingly, HIV has evolved to exploit DC biology for the initial transmission event as well as for its dissemination and propagation within the infected host. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which GSLs impact DC-mediated HIV trans-infection by either modulating virus infectivity, serving as a direct virus particle-associated host-derived ligand for specific interactions with DCs, or modulating the T cell membrane in such a way as to impact viral entry and thereby productive infection of CD4+ T cells. PMID:22975874

  11. Dendritic cell-mediated immune humanization of mice: implications for allogeneic and xenogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Gustavo; Daenthanasanmak, Anusara; Münz, Christian; Raykova, Ana; Guzmán, Carlos A; Riese, Peggy; Figueiredo, Constanca; Länger, Florian; Schneider, Andreas; Macke, Laura; Sundarasetty, Bala Sai; Witte, Torsten; Ganser, Arnold; Stripecke, Renata

    2014-05-15

    De novo regeneration of immunity is a major problem after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). HCT modeling in severely compromised immune-deficient animals transplanted with human stem cells is currently limited because of incomplete maturation of lymphocytes and scarce adaptive responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal for the organization of lymph nodes and activation of naive T and B cells. Human DC function after HCT could be augmented with adoptively transferred donor-derived DC. In this study, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of long-lived human DC coexpressing high levels of human IFN-α, human GM-CSF, and a clinically relevant Ag (CMV pp65 protein) promoted human lymphatic remodeling in immune-deficient NOD.Rag1(-/-).IL-2rγ(-/-) mice transplanted with human CD34(+) cells. After immunization, draining lymph nodes became replenished with terminally differentiated human follicular Th cells, plasma B cells, and memory helper and cytotoxic T cells. Human Igs against pp65 were detectable in plasma, demonstrating IgG class-switch recombination. Human T cells recovered from mice showed functional reactivity against pp65. Adoptive immunotherapy with engineered DC provides a novel strategy for de novo immune reconstitution after human HCT and a practical and effective tool for studying human lymphatic regeneration in vivo in immune deficient xenograft hosts.

  12. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Kelsall, Brian L; Clausen, Bjorn E; Farber, Joshua M

    2016-12-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6C(hi) blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells.

  13. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H.; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N.; Singh, Satya P.; Kelsall, Brian L.; Clausen, Bjorn E.; Farber, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6Chi blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells. PMID:27982014

  14. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  15. Inflammation in lung after acute myocardial infarction is induced by dendritic cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Hu, L J; Ren, W Y; Shen, Q J; Ji, H Y; Zhu, L

    2017-01-01

    The present study was performed to describe the changes of lung tissues in mice with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also explain the cell mechanism involved in inflammation in lung. AMI was established by left coronary ligation in mice. Then mice were divided into three groups: control group, MW1 group (sampling after surgery for one week) and MW2 group (sampling after surgery for two weeks). Afterwards, measurement of lung weight and lung histology, cell sorting in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and detection of several adhesive molecules, inflammatory molecules as well as enzyme associated with inflammation were performed. Moreover, dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated from bone marrow of C57B/L6 mice. After incubating with necrotic myocardium, the expression of antigen presenting molecules, co-stimulatory molecules and inflammatory molecules were detected by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry in DCs. We also detected T-cell proliferation after incubating with necrotic myocardium-treated DCs. AMI induced pathological changes of lung tissue and increased inflammatory cell amount in BAL fluid. AMI also increased the expression of several inflammatory factors, adhesive molecules and enzymes associated with inflammation. CD11c and TLR9, which are DC surface markers, showed a significantly increased expression in mice with AMI. Additionally, necrotic myocardium significantly increased the expression of co-stimulatory factors including CD83 and CD80, inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ and NF-κB in DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with necrotic myocardium also significantly promoted T-cell proliferation. AMI induced inflammation in lung and these pathological changes were mediated by DC-associated immune response.

  16. Layers of dendritic cell-mediated T cell tolerance, their regulation and the prevention of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian T; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The last decades of Nobel prize-honored research have unequivocally proven a key role of dendritic cells (DCs) at controlling both T cell immunity and tolerance. A tight balance between these opposing DC functions ensures immune homeostasis and host integrity. Its perturbation could explain pathological conditions such as the attack of self tissues, chronic infections, and tumor immune evasion. While recent insights into the complex DC network help to understand the contribution of individual DC subsets to immunity, the tolerogenic functions of DCs only begin to emerge. As these consist of many different layers, the definition of a "tolerogenic DC" is subjected to variation. Moreover, the implication of DCs and DC subsets in the suppression of autoimmunity are incompletely resolved. In this review, we point out conceptual controversies and dissect the various layers of DC-mediated T cell tolerance. These layers include central tolerance, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), anergy/deletion and negative feedback regulation. The mode and kinetics of antigen presentation is highlighted as an additional factor shaping tolerance. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between layers of tolerance as well as their differential regulation during inflammation. Furthermore, potential technical caveats of DC depletion models are considered. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of DC-mediated tolerance and its role for the suppression of autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance and their complex interplay is fundamental for the development of selective therapeutic strategies, e.g., for the modulation of autoimmune responses or for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  17. Layers of dendritic cell-mediated T cell tolerance, their regulation and the prevention of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian T.; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The last decades of Nobel prize-honored research have unequivocally proven a key role of dendritic cells (DCs) at controlling both T cell immunity and tolerance. A tight balance between these opposing DC functions ensures immune homeostasis and host integrity. Its perturbation could explain pathological conditions such as the attack of self tissues, chronic infections, and tumor immune evasion. While recent insights into the complex DC network help to understand the contribution of individual DC subsets to immunity, the tolerogenic functions of DCs only begin to emerge. As these consist of many different layers, the definition of a “tolerogenic DC” is subjected to variation. Moreover, the implication of DCs and DC subsets in the suppression of autoimmunity are incompletely resolved. In this review, we point out conceptual controversies and dissect the various layers of DC-mediated T cell tolerance. These layers include central tolerance, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), anergy/deletion and negative feedback regulation. The mode and kinetics of antigen presentation is highlighted as an additional factor shaping tolerance. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between layers of tolerance as well as their differential regulation during inflammation. Furthermore, potential technical caveats of DC depletion models are considered. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of DC-mediated tolerance and its role for the suppression of autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance and their complex interplay is fundamental for the development of selective therapeutic strategies, e.g., for the modulation of autoimmune responses or for the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:22783257

  18. Sulforaphane protects from T cell-mediated autoimmune disease by inhibition of IL-23 and IL-12 in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Julia; Brück, Jürgen; Glocova, Ivana; Dengler, Katja; Sinnberg, Tobias; Rothfuss, Oliver; Walter, Michael; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Röcken, Martin; Ghoreschi, Kamran

    2014-04-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate, is part of an important group of naturally occurring small molecules with anti-inflammatory properties. The published reports are best conceivable with an inhibition of T cell function, but the mode of action remains unknown. We therefore analyzed the effect of SFN on T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Feeding mice with SFN protected from severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Disease amelioration was associated with reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ expression in draining lymph nodes. In vitro, SFN treatment of T cells did not directly alter T cell cytokine secretion. In contrast, SFN treatment of dendritic cells (DCs) inhibited TLR4-induced IL-12 and IL-23 production, and severely suppressed Th1 and Th17 development of T cells primed by SFN-treated DCs. SFN regulated the activity of the TLR4-induced transcription factor NF-κB, without affecting the degradation of its inhibitor IκB-α. Instead, SFN treatment of DCs resulted in strong expression of the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which interacts with and thereby inhibits NF-κB p65. Consistent with these findings, HO-1 bound to p65 and subsequently inhibited the p65 activity at the IL23a and IL12b promoters. Importantly, SFN suppressed Il23a and Il12b expression in vivo and silenced Th17/Th1 responses within the CNS. Thus, our data show that SFN improves Th17/Th1-mediated autoimmune disease by inducing HO-1 and inhibiting NF-κB p65-regulated IL-23 and IL-12 expression.

  19. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  20. Genetic vaccines to potentiate the effective CD103+ dendritic cell-mediated cross-priming of antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Guo; Liu, Zuqiang; Tian, Shenghe; Zhang, Jiying; Carey, Cara D; Murphy, Kenneth M; Storkus, Walter J; Falo, Louis D; You, Zhaoyang

    2015-06-15

    The development of effective cancer vaccines remains an urgent, but as yet unmet, clinical need. This deficiency is in part due to an incomplete understanding of how to best invoke dendritic cells (DC) that are crucial for the induction of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells capable of mediating durable protective immunity. In this regard, elevated expression of the transcription factor X box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) in DC appears to play a decisive role in promoting the ability of DC to cross-present Ags to CD8(+) T cells in the therapeutic setting. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding XBP1 and tumor Ag to skin DC resulted in increased IFN-α production by plasmacytoid DC (pDC) from skin/tumor draining lymph nodes and the cross-priming of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses associated with therapeutic benefit. Antitumor protection was dependent on cross-presenting Batf3(+) DC, pDC, and CD8(+) T cells. CD103(+) DC from the skin/tumor draining lymph nodes of the immunized mice appeared responsible for activation of Ag-specific naive CD8(+) T cells, but were dependent on pDC for optimal effectiveness. Similarly, human XBP1 improved the capacity of human blood- and skin-derived DC to activate human T cells. These data support an important intrinsic role for XBP1 in DC for effective cross-priming and orchestration of Batf3(+) DC-pDC interactions, thereby enabling effective vaccine induction of protective antitumor immunity.

  1. Synthetic long peptide-based vaccine formulations for induction of cell mediated immunity: A comparative study of cationic liposomes and PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Varypataki, Eleni Maria; Silva, Ana Luisa; Barnier-Quer, Christophe; Collin, Nicolas; Ossendorp, Ferry; Jiskoot, Wim

    2016-03-28

    Nanoparticulate formulations for synthetic long peptide (SLP)-cancer vaccines as alternative to clinically used Montanide ISA 51- and squalene-based emulsions are investigated in this study. SLPs were loaded into TLR ligand-adjuvanted cationic liposomes and PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) to potentially induce cell-mediated immune responses. The liposomal and PLGA NP formulations were successfully loaded with up to four different compounds and were able to enhance antigen uptake by dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequent activation of T cells in vitro. Subcutaneous vaccination of mice with the different formulations showed that the SLP-loaded cationic liposomes were the most efficient for the induction of functional antigen-T cells in vivo, followed by PLGA NPs which were as potent as or even more than the Montanide and squalene emulsions. Moreover, after transfer of antigen-specific target cells in immunized mice, liposomes induced the highest in vivo killing capacity. These findings, considering also the inadequate safety profile of the currently clinically used adjuvant Montanide ISA-51, make these two particulate, biodegradable delivery systems promising candidates as delivery platforms for SLP-based immunotherapy of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Keiko; Terao, Yutaka; Gilbert, Rebekah S; Sekine, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Shigetada; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2011-01-01

    Native cholera toxin (nCT) as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab) responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs) and nasal passages (NPs). Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR) for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI) mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  3. Soluble β-glucan from Grifola frondosa induces tumor regression in synergy with TLR9 agonist via dendritic cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuki; Nawa, Daiki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells into more-immunostimulatory dendritic cells by stimulation with different combinations of immunologic agents is expected to provide efficient, adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Soluble β-glucan maitake D-fraction, extracted from the maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa, acts as a potent immunotherapeutic agent, eliciting innate and adoptive immune responses, thereby contributing to its antitumor activity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of maitake D-fraction, in combination with a Toll-like receptor agonist, to treat tumors in a murine model. Our results showed that maitake D-fraction, in combination with the Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide, synergistically increased the expression of dendritic cell maturation markers and interleukin-12 production in dendritic cells, but it did not increase interleukin-10 production, generating strong effector dendritic cells with an augmented capacity for efficiently priming an antigen-specific, T helper 1-type T cell response. Maitake D-fraction enhances cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide-induced dendritic cell maturation and cytokine responses in a dectin-1-dependent pathway. We further showed that a combination therapy using cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide and maitake D-fraction was highly effective, either as adjuvants for dendritic cell vaccination or by direct administration against murine tumor. Therapeutic responses to direct administration were associated with increased CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the tumor site and the induction of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Our results indicate that maitake D-fraction and cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide synergistically activated dendritic cells, resulting in tumor regression via an antitumor T helper cell 1-type response. Our findings provide the basis for a potent antitumor therapy using a novel combination of immunologic agents for

  4. Dendritic cell-derived IL-15 controls the induction of CD8 T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rückert, René; Brandt, Katja; Bulanova, Elena; Mirghomizadeh, Farhad; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-12-01

    The development and the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells are dependent on IL-15. Here, we have studied the source and mechanism of how IL-15 modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated Th1 immune responses by employing two delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) models. IL-15-deficient (IL-15(-/-)) mice or mice treated with soluble IL-15Ralpha as an IL-15 antagonist showed significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent DTH responses, while activation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell functions remained unaffected. Injection of antigen-labeled dendritic cells (DC) from IL-15(+/+), IL-15(-/-) or IL-15Ralpha(-/-) mice revealed that DC-derived IL-15 is an absolute requirement for the initiation of DTH response. The re-establishment of the interaction of IL-15 with the IL-15Ralpha by incubating IL-15(-/-) DC with IL-15 completely restored the capacity to prime T cells for DTH induction in vivo. Moreover, IL-15 also enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC and triggered in vitro CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 release. Taken together, the data suggest that an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Ralpha signaling loop in DC is essential for inducing CD8(+)-dependent Th1 immune responses in mice. Therefore, targeted manipulation of this loop promises to be an effective, novel strategy for therapeutic modulation of clinically relevant DTH reactions.

  5. The Role of Cell-Mediated Immunity in the Induction of Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stanley

    1977-01-01

    Reactions of cell-mediated immunity fall into two broad categories: those that involve direct participation of intact lymphocytes in the effector mechanism of the reaction and those that involve mediation by soluble lymphocyte-derived factors known as lymphokines. The first kind of reaction is essentially limited to lymphocyte-dependent cytotoxicity, although certain aspects of T cell-B cell cooperation may fall into this category as well. The second category appears to comprise the bulk of the so-called cell-mediated immune response and provides a link between this system and the inflammatory system. Various lymphokines have been shown to exert profound influence upon inflammatory cell metabolism, cell surface properties, patterns of cell migration, and the activation of cells for various biologic activities involved in host defense. Although substantial information is now available about various physicochemical as well as biologic properties of lymphokines, purification and characterization data are as yet too incomplete to allow us to ascribe all of these activities to discrete mediator molecules. Current work involving the development of antibody-based techniques for mediator assay may shed light on this issue. Information on the kinds of cells capable of lymphokine production is now available. Contrary to prior expectation, T cells are not unique in their capacity for lymphokine production. Under appropriate circumstances, B cells and even nonlymphoid cells can do so as well. The unique property of lymphocytes in this regard appears to relate to their ability to respond to certain specialized signals such as specific antigen or an appropriate mitogen. Mediator production per se may represent a general biologic phenomenon. Although lymphokines have been defined mainly in terms of in vitro assays, early speculations about their in vivo importance are proving correct. Evidence for the role of lymphokines comes from studies involving detection of lymphokines in

  6. Conventional and monocyte-derived CD11b(+) dendritic cells initiate and maintain T helper 2 cell-mediated immunity to house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Maud; Guilliams, Martin; Vanheerswynghels, Manon; Deswarte, Kim; Branco-Madeira, Filipe; Toussaint, Wendy; Vanhoutte, Leen; Neyt, Katrijn; Killeen, Nigel; Malissen, Bernard; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-02-21

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for mounting allergic airway inflammation, but it is unclear which subset of DCs performs this task. By using CD64 and MAR-1 staining, we reliably separated CD11b(+) monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) from conventional DCs (cDCs) and studied antigen uptake, migration, and presentation assays of lung and lymph node (LN) DCs in response to inhaled house dust mite (HDM). Mainly CD11b(+) cDCs but not CD103(+) cDCs induced T helper 2 (Th2) cell immunity in HDM-specific T cells in vitro and asthma in vivo. Studies in Flt3l(-/-) mice, lacking all cDCs, revealed that moDCs were also sufficient to induce Th2 cell-mediated immunity but only when high-dose HDM was given. The main function of moDCs was the production of proinflammatory chemokines and allergen presentation in the lung during challenge. Thus, we have identified migratory CD11b(+) cDCs as the principal subset inducing Th2 cell-mediated immunity in the LN, whereas moDCs orchestrate allergic inflammation in the lung.

  7. Dendritic Cell-Mediated T Cell Proliferation -A Functional Bioindicator of Inflammatory Source-Specific Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we found that dendritic cells (DC) were sensitive functional bioindicators of ambient PM (APM) exposure mediating Th2-allergic inflammation in the draining lymph nodes. Here, the ability of bone-marrow-derived DC (DC) and putative BM-derived basophils (Ba) to present a...

  8. Dendritic Cell-Mediated T Cell Proliferation -A Functional Bioindicator of Inflammatory Source-Specific Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we found that dendritic cells (DC) were sensitive functional bioindicators of ambient PM (APM) exposure mediating Th2-allergic inflammation in the draining lymph nodes. Here, the ability of bone-marrow-derived DC (DC) and putative BM-derived basophils (Ba) to present a...

  9. High mobility group box 1 protein suppresses T cell-mediated immunity via CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-yang; Yao, Yong-ming; Yan, Yong-hong; Dong, Ning; Sheng, Zhi-yong

    2011-05-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has been identified as a late proinflammatory cytokine and plays a key role in immune regulation. However, it is not yet clear whether HMGB1 can induce the activation and differentiation of dendritic cell (DC) subsets and subsequently modulate immune function of T cells. This study was performed to investigate the effect of HMGB1 on the differentiation of splenic DCs and its influence on T cell-mediated immunity in terms of DC subsets CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs and CD11c(high)CD45RB(low) DCs in male BALB/c mice spleens in vitro. MACS microbeads were used to isolate splenic DCs, CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs, CD11c(high)CD45RB(low) DCs and CD4(+) T cells. The percentage of CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs was significantly increased after treatment with HMGB1 compared to their counterparts (CD11c(high)CD45RB(low) DCs). It was found that unlike the gradually increasing interleukin (IL)-12 secretion of CD11c(high)CD45RB(low) DCs induced by HMGB1, CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs showed a obvious dose-dependent response between IL-10 production and HMGB1 stimulation. In order to verify whether the alteration of CD4(+) T cells was mainly associated with the differentiation of splenic DCs mediated by HMGB1 to CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs, anti-IL-12 receptor (IL-12R) or anti-IL-10R monoclonal antibody was used to inhibit the effect of CD11c(high)CD45RB(low) DCs or CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs in CD4(+) T cells mixed lymphocyte reaction culture. After treatment with anti-IL-12R or anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody in CD4(+) T cells+CD11c(high)CD45RB(low) DCs or CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs mixed lymphocyte reaction, the induction of these DCs on T cells was inhibited dramatically. These data demonstrated that HMGB1 might induce the differentiation of splenic DCs to CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) DCs followed by shifting of Th1 to Th2 with enhancement of T lymphocyte immune function in vitro. Also, the effect of HMGB1 on T cell differentiation to Th2 was not

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate tolerance induction in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Anja; Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C

    2017-01-31

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) T cells aberrantly recognize self-peptides of the myelin sheath and attack the central nervous system (CNS). Antigen-specific peptide immunotherapy, which aims to restore tolerance while avoiding the use of non-specific immunosuppressive drugs, is a promising approach to combat autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanisms behind successful therapy remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been studied intensively in the field of cancer and to a lesser extent in autoimmunity. Because of their suppressive effect on the immune system in cancer, we hypothesized that the development of MDSCs and their interaction with CD4(+) T cells could be beneficial for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Hence, changes in the quantity, phenotype and function of MDSCs during tolerance induction in our model of MS were evaluated. We reveal, for the first time, an involvement of a subset of MDSCs, known as polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs, in the process of tolerance induction. PMN-MDSCs were shown to adopt a more suppressive phenotype during peptide immunotherapy and inhibit CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in a cell-contact-dependent manner, mediated by arginase-1. Moreover, increased numbers of tolerogenic PMN-MDSCs, such as observed over the course of peptide immunotherapy, were demonstrated to provide protection from disease in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  11. Cytokine induction during T-cell-mediated clearance of mouse hepatitis virus from neurons in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, B D; Hobbs, M V; McGraw, T S; Buchmeier, M J

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which viruses are cleared from neurons in the central nervous system, we have utilized a mouse model involving infection with a neurotropic variant of mouse hepatitis virus (OBLV60). After intranasal inoculation, OBLV60 grew preferentially in the olfactory bulbs of BALB/c mice. Using in situ hybridization, we found that viral RNA localized primarily in the outer layers of the olfactory bulb, including neurons of the mitral cell layer. Virus was cleared rapidly from the olfactory bulb between 5 and 11 days. Athymic nude mice failed to eliminate the virus, demonstrating a requirement for T lymphocytes. Immunosuppression of normal mice with cyclophosphamide also prevented clearance. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets were important, as depletion of either of these subsets delayed viral clearance. Gliosis and infiltrates of CD4+ and CD8+ cells were detected by immunohistochemical analysis at 6 days. The role of cytokines in clearance was investigated by using an RNase protection assay for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta, and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). In immunocompetent mice there was upregulation of RNA for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma at the time of clearance. Nude mice had comparable increases in these cytokine messages, with the exception of IFN-gamma. Induction of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on cells in infected brains was demonstrated by immunohistochemical analyses in normal and nude mice, suggesting that IFN-gamma may not be necessary for induction of MHC-I on neural cells in vivo. Images PMID:8057431

  12. Rhamnogalacturonan II is a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist that inhibits tumor growth by activating dendritic cell-mediated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Nam; Noh, Kyung Tae; Jeong, Young-Il; Jung, In Duk; Kang, Hyun Kyu; Cha, Gil Sun; Lee, Su Jung; Seo, Jong Keun; Kang, Dae Hwan; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Byungsuk; Park, Yeong-Min

    2013-02-08

    We evaluated the effectiveness of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II)-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) vaccination on the induction of antitumor immunity in a mouse lymphoma model using EG7-lymphoma cells expressing ovalbumin (OVA). BMDCs treated with RG-II had an activated phenotype. RG-II induced interleukin (IL)-12, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production during dendritic cell (DC) maturation. BMDCs stimulated with RG-II facilitate the proliferation of CD8+ T cells. Using BMDCs from the mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLRs), we revealed that RG-II activity is dependent on TLR4. RG-II showed a preventive effect of immunization with OVA-pulsed BMDCs against EG7 lymphoma. These results suggested that RG-II expedites the DC-based immune response through the TLR4 signaling pathway.

  13. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  14. C-type lectin-like receptor LOX-1 promotes dendritic cell-mediated class-switched B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern-recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration toward lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, enabling their exit from germinal centers and migration toward local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses.

  15. p38 MAPK-inhibited dendritic cells induce superior antitumor immune responses and overcome regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Siqing; Hong, Bangxing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Haiyan; Zheng, Yuhuan; Yang, Jing; Davis, Richard E.; Qian, Jianfei; Hou, Jian; Yi, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising method but so far has demonstrated limited clinical benefits. Regulatory T cells (Treg) represent a major obstacle to cancer immunotherapy approaches. Here we show that inhibiting p38 MAPK during DC differentiation enables DCs to activate tumor-specific effector T cells (Teff), inhibiting the conversion of Treg and compromising Treg inhibitory effects on Teff. Inhibition of p38 MAPK in DCs lowers expression of PPARγ, activating p50 and upregulation of OX40L expression in DCs. OX40L/OX40 interactions between DCs and Teff and/or Treg are critical for priming effective and therapeutic antitumor responses. Similarly, p38 MAPK inhibition also augments the T cell-stimulatory capacity of human monocyte-derived DCs in the presence of Treg. These findings contribute to ongoing efforts to improve DC-based immunotherapy in human cancers. PMID:24957461

  16. The molecule of DC-SIGN captures enterovirus 71 and confers dendritic cell-mediated viral trans-infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease that occurs in young children. Neither antiviral agents nor vaccines are available for efficiently combating viral infection. Study of EV71–host interplay is important for understanding viral infection and developing strategies for prevention and therapy. Here the interactions of EV71 with human dendritic cells were analyzed. Methods EV71 capture, endocytosis, infection, and degradation in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were detected by Flow cytometry or real-time (RT-) PCR, and MDDCs-mediated EV71 trans-infection of RD cells was determined via coculture system. Cell morphology or viability was monitored with microscopy or flow cytometry. SiRNA interference was used to knock down gene expression. Results MDDCs can bind EV71, but these loaded-EV71 particles in MDDCs underwent a rapid degradation in the absence of efficient replication; once the captured EV71 encountered susceptible cells, MDDCs efficiently transferred surface-bound viruses to target cells. The molecule of DC-SIGN (DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin) mediated viral binding and transfer, because interference of DC-SIGN expression with specific siRNAs reduced EV71 binding and impaired MDDC-mediated viral trans-infection, and exogenous expression of DC-SIGN molecule on Raji cell initiated viral binding and subsequent transmission. Conclusion MDDCs could bind efficiently EV71 viruses through viral binding to DC-SIGN molecule, and these captured-viruses could be transferred to susceptible cells for robust infection. The novel finding of DC-mediated EV71 dissemination might facilitate elucidation of EV71 primary infection and benefit searching for new clues for preventing viruses from initial infection. PMID:24620896

  17. Requirement of dendritic calcium spikes for induction of spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kampa, Björn M; Letzkus, Johannes J; Stuart, Greg J

    2006-01-01

    Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) by definition requires the temporal association of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials (APs). Yet, in cortical pyramidal neurons pairing unitary EPSPs with single APs at low frequencies is ineffective at generating plasticity. Using recordings from synaptically coupled layer 5 pyramidal neurons, we show here that high-frequency (200 Hz) postsynaptic AP bursts, rather than single APs, are required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and NMDA channel activation during EPSP–AP pairing at low frequencies. Furthermore, we find that AP bursts can lead to LTP induction and NMDA channel activation during EPSP–AP pairing at both positive and negative times. High-frequency AP bursts generated supralinear calcium signals in basal dendrites suggesting the generation of dendritic calcium spikes, as has been observed previously in apical dendrites during AP burst firing at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. Consistent with a role of these dendritic calcium spikes in LTP induction, pairing EPSPs with low frequency (50 Hz) AP bursts was ineffective in generating LTP. Furthermore, supralinear calcium signals in basal dendrites during AP bursts were blocked by low concentrations of the T- and R-type calcium channel antagonist nickel, which also blocked LTP and NMDA channel activation. These data suggest an important role of dendritic calcium spikes during AP bursts in determining both the efficacy and time window for STDP induction. PMID:16675489

  18. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; de Jong, Marein A W P; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2008-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an attractive target to prevent interactions with DCs and subsequent viral transmission. Here, we have investigated whether the structural homologue of DC-SIGN, the nematode C-type lectin Mermaid can be used to prevent HIV-1 transmission by DCs. Our data demonstrate that Mermaid interacts with high mannose structures present on HIV-1 gp120 and thereby inhibits HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN on DCs. Moreover, Mermaid inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission from DC to T cells. We have identified Mermaid as a non-cytotoxic agent that shares the glycan specificity with DC-SIGN and inhibits DC-SIGN-gp120 interaction. The results are important for the anti-HIV-1 microbicide development directed at preventing DC-HIV-1 interactions.

  19. NK cells modulate the lung dendritic cell-mediated Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Joyee, Antony G; Wang, Shuhe; Bai, Hong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yang, Xi

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the interaction between NK cells and lung dendritic cells (LDCs) on the outcome of respiratory infections is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of NK cells on the function of LDCs during intracellular bacterial lung infection of Chlamydia muridarum in mice. We found that the naive mice receiving LDCs from C. muridarum-infected NK-cell-depleted mice (NK-LDCs) showed more serious body weight loss, bacterial burden, and pathology upon chlamydial challenge when compared with the recipients of LDCs from infected sham-treated mice (NK+LDCs). Cytokine analysis of the local tissues of the former compared with the latter exhibited lower levels of Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17), but higher levels of Th2 (IL-4), cytokines. Consistently, NK-LDCs were less efficient in directing C. muridarum-specific Th1 and Th17 responses than NK+LDCs when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells. In NK cell/LDC coculture experiments, the blockade of NKG2D receptor reduced the production of IL-12p70, IL-6, and IL-23 by LDCs. The neutralization of IFN-γ in the culture decreased the production of IL-12p70 by LDCs, whereas the blockade of TNF-α resulted in diminished IL-6 production. Our findings demonstrate that NK cells modulate LDC function to elicit Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

  20. Targeted antigen delivery to dendritic cells elicits robust antiviral T cell-mediated immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Volckmar, Julia; Gereke, Marcus; Ebensen, Thomas; Riese, Peggy; Philipsen, Lars; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Wohlleber, Dirk; Klopfleisch, Robert; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Müller, Andreas J.; Gruber, Achim D.; Knolle, Percy; Guzman, Carlos A.; Bruder, Dunja

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis C virus cause life-threatening chronic liver infections in millions of people worldwide. Targeted in vivo antigen-delivery to cross-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stimulating antigen-specific T cell responses. To determine whether this approach would as well be suitable to induce local antiviral effector T cells in the liver we compared different vaccine formulations based on either the targeting of DEC-205 or TLR2/6 on cross-presenting DCs or formulations not involving in vivo DC targeting. As read-outs we used in vivo hepatotropic adenovirus challenge, histology and automated multidimensional fluorescence microscopy (MELC). We show that targeted in vivo antigen delivery to cross-presenting DCs is highly effective in inducing antiviral CTLs capable of eliminating virus-infected hepatocytes, while control vaccine formulation not involving DC targeting failed to induce immunity against hepatotropic virus. Moreover, we observed distinct patterns of CD8+ T cell interaction with virus-infected and apoptotic hepatocytes in the two DC-targeting groups suggesting that the different vaccine formulations may stimulate distinct types of effector functions. Our findings represent an important step toward the future development of vaccines against hepatotropic viruses and the treatment of patients with hepatic virus infection after liver transplantation to avoid reinfection. PMID:28266658

  1. 4-Tertiary butyl phenol exposure sensitizes human melanocytes to dendritic cell-mediated killing: relevance to vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Tara M; Bommiasamy, Hemamalini; Boissy, Raymond E; Hernandez, Claudia; Nickoloff, Brian J; Mestril, Ruben; Caroline Le Poole, I

    2005-04-01

    The trigger initiating an autoimmune response against melanocytes in vitiligo remains unclear. Patients frequently experience stress to the skin prior to depigmentation. 4-tertiary butyl phenol (4-TBP) was used as a model compound to study the effects of stress on melanocytes. Heat shock protein (HSP)70 generated and secreted in response to 4-TBP was quantified. The protective potential of stress proteins generated following 4-TBP exposure was examined. It was studied whether HSP70 favors dendritic cell (DC) effector functions as well. Melanocytes were more sensitive to 4-TBP than fibroblasts, and HSP70 generated in response to 4-TBP exposure was partially released into the medium by immortalized vitiligo melanocyte cell line PIG3V. Stress protein HSP70 in turn induced membrane tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression and activation of DC effector functions towards stressed melanocytes. Melanocytes exposed to 4-TBP demonstrated elevated TRAIL death receptor expression. DC effector functions were partially inhibited by blocking antibodies to TRAIL. TRAIL expression and infiltration by CD11c+ cells was abundant in perilesional vitiligo skin. Stressed melanocytes may mediate DC activation through release of HSP70, and DC effector functions appear to play a previously unappreciated role in progressive vitiligo.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides modulate dendritic cell-mediated T cell polarization in a sialic acid linkage-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bax, Marieke; Kuijf, Mark L; Heikema, Astrid P; van Rijs, Wouter; Bruijns, Sven C M; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Crocker, Paul R; Jacobs, Bart C; van Vliet, Sandra J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2011-07-01

    Carbohydrate mimicry between Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides (LOS) and host neural gangliosides plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Campylobacter jejuni LOS may mimic various gangliosides, which affects the immunogenicity and the type of neurological deficits in GBS patients. Previous studies have shown the interaction of LOS with sialic acid-specific siglec receptors, although the functional consequences remain unknown. Cells that express high levels of siglecs include dendritic cells (DCs), which are crucial for initiation and differentiation of immune responses. We confirm that α2,3-sialylated GD1a/GM1a mimic and α2,8-sialylated GD1c mimic LOS structures interact with recombinant Sn and siglec-7, respectively. Although the linkage of the terminal sialic acid of LOS did not regulate expression of DC maturation markers, it displayed clear opposite expression levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and OX40L, molecules involved in DC-mediated Th cell differentiation. Accordingly, targeting DC-expressed siglec-7 with α2,8-linked sialylated LOS resulted in Th1 responses, whereas Th2 responses were induced by targeting with LOS containing α2,3-linked sialic acid. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that depending on the sialylated composition of Campylobacter jejuni LOS, specific Th differentiation programs are initiated, possibly through targeting of distinct DC-expressed siglecs.

  3. Betamethasone, but Not Tacrolimus, Suppresses the Development of Th2 Cells Mediated by Langerhans Cell-Like Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuhiko; Tamai, Saki; Ikeda, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Langerhans cells (LCs) work as the primary orchestrators in the polarization of the immune milieu towards a T helper type 1 (Th1) or T helper type 2 (Th2) response. In this study, we investigated the effects of tacrolimus and betamethasone, each used as topical applications in atopic dermatitis (AD), on Th2 cell development mediated by LCs. LC-like dendritic cells (LDCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow cells and used as substitutes for LCs. Mice were primed with ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone, via the hind footpad. After 5 d, the cytokine response in the popliteal lymph nodes was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of cell surface molecules on LDCs was investigated via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Administration of OVA peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with betamethasone, inhibited Th2 cell development, as represented by the down-regulation of interleukin-4 production, and also inhibited Th1 cell development, represented by the down-regulation of interferon-γ production. However, tacrolimus-treated LDCs did not induce such inhibition of the development of Th1 and Th2 cells. The inhibition of Th1 and Th2 cell development was associated with the suppression of CD40 and T-cell immunoglobulin, and mucin domain-containing protein (TIM)-4 expression, respectively, in LDCs. These results suggest that the topical application of betamethasone to skin lesions of patients with AD acts on epidermal LCs, and may inhibit the development of Th2 cells, thus being of benefit for the control of AD.

  4. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Mediate Synergistic Effects of HIV and Lipopolysaccharide on CD27+ IgD– Memory B Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lumin; Luo, Zhenwu; Sieg, Scott F.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Yu, Xiaocong; Fu, Pingfu; Wu, Hao; Jiao, Yanmei; Gao, Yong; Greenspan, Neil S.; Harding, Clifford V.; Kilby, J. Michael; Li, Zihai; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of heightened microbial translocation on B cells during HIV infection are unknown. We examined the in vitro effects of HIV and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on apoptosis of CD27+ IgD− memory B (mB) cells from healthy controls. In vivo analysis was conducted on a cohort of 82 HIV+ donors and 60 healthy controls. In vitro exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to LPS and HIV led to mB cell death via the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) pathway. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) produced FasL in response to HIV via binding to CD4 and chemokine coreceptors. HIV and LPS increased Fas expression on mB cells in PBMCs, which was dependent on the presence of pDCs and monocytes. Furthermore, mB cells purified from PBMCs and pretreated with both HIV and LPS were more sensitive to apoptosis when cocultured with HIV-treated pDCs. Blocking the interferon receptor (IFNR) prevented HIV-stimulated FasL production in pDCs, HIV-plus-LPS-induced Fas expression, and apoptosis of mB cells. In vivo or ex vivo, HIV+ donors have higher levels of plasma LPS, Fas expression on mB cells, and mB cell apoptosis than controls. Correspondingly, in HIV+ donors, but not in controls, a positive correlation was found between plasma FasL and HIV RNA levels and between Fas expression on mB cells and plasma LPS levels. This work reveals a novel mechanism of mB cell apoptosis mediated by LPS and HIV through the Fas/FasL pathway, with key involvement of pDCs and type I IFN, suggesting a role for microbial translocation in HIV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE This study demonstrates that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and type I interferon (IFN) play an important role in memory B cell apoptosis in HIV infection. It reveals a previously unrecognized role of microbial translocation in HIV pathogenesis. PMID:25056888

  5. Computational implications of cooperative plasticity induction at nearby dendritic sites.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kenji

    2009-01-06

    Recent studies have revealed that plasticity is not regulated independently at individual synapses but rather that there is cooperativity or associativity between nearby synapses in the dendritic tree of individual cortical pyramidal cells. Here, I summarize experimental results regarding such cooperative plasticity and its underlying mechanisms and consider their computational implications.

  6. Lymphopenia associated with highly virulent H5N1 virus infection due to plasmacytoid dendritic cell mediated apoptosis of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Vogel, Leatrice; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Legge, Kevin L.; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-01-01

    Although lymphopenia is a hallmark of severe infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 and the newly emerged H7N9 influenza viruses in humans, the mechanism(s) by which lethal H5N1 viruses cause lymphopenia in mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. Because influenza-specific T cell responses are initiated in the lung draining lymph nodes, and lymphocytes subsequently traffic to the lungs or peripheral circulation, we compared the immune responses in the lung draining lymph nodes following infection with a lethal A/HK/483/97 or non-lethal A/HK/486/97 (H5N1) virus in a mouse model. We found that lethal H5N1, but not non-lethal H5N1 virus infection in mice enhances Fas ligand (FasL) expression on plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), resulting in apoptosis of influenza-specific CD8+ T cells via a Fas-FasL mediated pathway. We also found that pDCs, but not other DC subsets, preferentially accumulate in the lung draining lymph nodes of lethal H5N1 virus-infected mice and that the induction of FasL expression on pDCs correlates with high levels of IL-12p40 monomer/homodimer in the lung draining lymph nodes. Our data suggest that one of the mechanisms of lymphopenia associated with lethal H5N1 virus infection involves a deleterious role for pDCs. PMID:24829418

  7. TLR3 or TLR4 Activation Enhances Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Mediated Treg Induction via Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Rashedi, Iran; Gómez-Aristizábal, Alejandro; Wang, Xing-Hua; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Keating, Armand

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the subject of numerous clinical trials, largely due to their immunomodulatory and tissue regenerative properties. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLR3 and TLR4, are highly expressed on MSCs and their activation can significantly modulate the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory functions of MSCs. While MSCs can recruit and promote the generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs), the effect of TLR activation on MSC-mediated Treg induction is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of ligand-mediated activation of TLR3 and TLR4 on Treg induction by human MSCs. We found that generation of Tregs in human CD4(+) lymphocyte and MSC cocultures was enhanced by either TLR3 or TLR4 activation of MSCs and that the increase was abolished by TLR3 and TLR4 gene-silencing. Augmented Treg induction by TLR-activated MSCs was cell contact-dependent and associated with increased gene expression of the Notch ligand, Delta-like 1. Moreover, inhibition of Notch signaling abrogated the augmented Treg levels in the MSC cocultures. Our data show that TLR3 or TLR4 activation of MSCs increases Treg induction via the Notch pathway and suggest new means to enhance the potency of MSCs for treating disorders with an underlying immune dysfunction, including steroid resistant acute graft-versus-host disease. Stem Cells 2017;35:265-275.

  8. Involvement of peritoneal dendritic cells in the induction of autoimmune prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Correa, S G; Riera, C M; Iribarren, P

    1997-04-01

    We have been working within a model of autoimmune prostatitis induced by the intraperitoneal administration of saline extract of rat male accessory glands (RAG) associated to liposomes. The intraperitoneal administration of RAG-liposomes elicits both primary and secondary cellular autoimmune responses to RAG as well as organ-specific lesions. To evaluate the participation of dendritic cells (DC) in the induction of the autoimmune response, we purified peritoneal DC (PDC) after a single injection of RAG-liposomes and we characterized this population by morphology and phenotype. Based on adherence and morphologic criteria, we determined that PDC comprised approximately 1% of the total peritoneal cells. The ultrastructure of the dendritic cell enriched fraction was assessed by electron microscopy. By FACS analysis, PDC showed a two to three-fold increase in expression of the IA molecule compared to macrophages. They expressed low but positive levels of the CD14 marker, and intermediate levels of both CD11b (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) adhesion molecules. In addition, PDC transferred either intravenously or intraperitoneally efficiently elicited the autoimmune response to RAG in normal receptors. These results support the involvement of peritoneal dendritic cells in the induction of autoimmune prostatitis, modifying the idea of macrophages as the single antigen presenting cell in the peritoneal cavity.

  9. ONCOGENIC BRAF(V600E) PROMOTES STROMAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNOSUPPRESSION VIA INDUCTION OF INTERLEUKIN-1 IN MELANOMA

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Jahan S.; Liu, Shujuan; Rodríguez-Cruz, Tania G.; Whittington, Mayra; Wardell, Seth; Liu, Chengwen; Zhang, Minying; Cooper, Zachary A.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Min; Joseph, Richard W.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth; Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Davis, Richard E.; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Hwu, Patrick; Lizée, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we assessed the specific role of BRAF(V600E) signaling in modulating the expression of immune regulatory genes in melanoma, in addition to analyzing downstream induction of immune suppression by primary human melanoma tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs). Experimental Design Primary human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines were transduced to express WT or V600E forms of BRAF, followed by gene expression analysis. The BRAF(V600E) inhibitor vemurafenib was used to confirm targets in BRAF(V600E)-positive melanoma cell lines and in tumors from melanoma patients undergoing inhibitor treatment. TAF lines generated from melanoma patient biopsies were tested for their ability to inhibit the function of tumor antigen-specific T-cells, prior to and following treatment with BRAF(V600E)-upregulated immune modulators. Transcriptional analysis of treated TAFs was conducted to identify potential mediators of T-cell suppression. Results Expression of BRAF(V600E) induced transcription of IL-1α and IL-1β in melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, vemurafenib reduced the expression of IL-1 protein in melanoma cell lines and most notably in human tumor biopsies from 11 of 12 melanoma patients undergoing inhibitor treatment. Treatment of melanoma-patient-derived TAFs with IL-1α/β significantly enhanced their ability to suppress the proliferation and function of melanoma-specific cytotoxic T cells, and this inhibition was partially attributable to upregulation by IL-1 of COX-2 and the PD-1 ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 in TAFs. Conclusions This study reveals a novel mechanism of immune suppression sensitive to BRAF(V600E) inhibition, and suggests that clinical blockade of IL-1 may benefit patients with BRAF wild-type tumors and potentially synergize with immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:22850568

  10. Usage of Murine T-cell Hybridoma Cells as Responder Cells Reveals Interference of Helicobacter Pylori with Human Dendritic Cell-mediated Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Viveros, Pablo Renner; Moos, Verena; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni; Ignatius, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Direct effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on human CD4+ T-cells hamper disentangling a possible bacterial-mediated interference with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation to these cells. To overcome this limitation, we employed a previously described assay, which enables assessing human antigen-processing cell function by using murine T-cell hybridoma cells restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. HLA-DR1+ monocyte-derived dendritic cells were exposed to H. pylori and pulsed with the antigen 85B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by AG85Baa97-112-specific hybridoma cells was then evaluated as an integral reporter of cognate antigen presentation. This methodology enabled revealing of interference of H. pylori with the antigen-presenting capacity of human dendritic cells. PMID:27980859

  11. HIV Blocks Interferon Induction in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages by Dysregulation of TBK1

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Andrew N.; Nasr, Najla; Feetham, Alexandra; Galoyan, Ani; Alshehri, Abdullateef A.; Rambukwelle, Dharshini; Botting, Rachel A.; Hiener, Bonnie M.; Diefenbach, Eve; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Kim, Min; Mansell, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are present in the tissues of the anogenital tract, where HIV-1 transmission occurs in almost all cases. These cells are both target cells for HIV-1 and represent the first opportunity for the virus to interfere with innate recognition. Previously we have shown that both cell types fail to produce type I interferons (IFNs) in response to HIV-1 but that, unlike T cells, the virus does not block IFN induction by targeting IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) for cellular degradation. Thus, either HIV-1 inhibits IFN induction by an alternate mechanism or, less likely, these cells fail to sense HIV-1. Here we show that HIV-1 (but not herpes simplex virus 2 [HSV-2] or Sendai virus)-exposed DCs and macrophages fail to induce the expression of all known type I and III IFN genes. These cells do sense the virus, and pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-induced signaling pathways are triggered. The precise stage in the IFN-inducing signaling pathway that HIV-1 targets to block IFN induction was identified; phosphorylation but not K63 polyubiquitination of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) was completely inhibited. Two HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vpr and Vif, were shown to bind to TBK1, and their individual deletion partly restored IFN-β expression. Thus, the inhibition of TBK1 autophosphorylation by binding of these proteins appears to be the principal mechanism by which HIV-1 blocks type I and III IFN induction in myeloid cells. IMPORTANCE Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are key HIV target cells. Therefore, definition of how HIV impairs innate immune responses to initially establish infection is essential to design preventative interventions, especially by restoring initial interferon production. Here we demonstrate how HIV-1 blocks interferon induction by inhibiting the function of a key kinase in the interferon signaling pathway, TBK1, via two different viral accessory proteins. Other viral proteins have been shown to target the

  12. PI3Kγ Is Critical for Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD8+ T Cell Priming and Viral Clearance during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobs, Samuel Philip; Schneider, Christoph; Heer, Alex Kaspar; Huotari, Jatta; Helenius, Ari; Kopf, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinases have been shown to be involved in influenza virus pathogenesis. They are targeted directly by virus proteins and are essential for efficient viral replication in infected lung epithelial cells. However, to date the role of PI3K signaling in influenza infection in vivo has not been thoroughly addressed. Here we show that one of the PI3K subunits, p110γ, is in fact critically required for mediating the host’s antiviral response. PI3Kγ deficient animals exhibit a delayed viral clearance and increased morbidity during respiratory infection with influenza virus. We demonstrate that p110γ is required for the generation and maintenance of potent antiviral CD8+ T cell responses through the developmental regulation of pulmonary cross-presenting CD103+ dendritic cells under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The defect in lung dendritic cells leads to deficient CD8+ T cell priming, which is associated with higher viral titers and more severe disease course during the infection. We thus identify PI3Kγ as a novel key host protective factor in influenza virus infection and shed light on an unappreciated layer of complexity concerning the role of PI3K signaling in this context. PMID:27030971

  13. Herbal preparation (HemoHIM) enhanced functional maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells mediated toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Jin; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Jeong, Gil-Yeon; Jo, Sung-kee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae-Ran; Yee, Sung-Tae

    2016-02-19

    HemoHIM, which is an herbal preparation of three edible herbs (Angelicam gigas Nakai, Cnidium offinale Makino, and Peaonia japonica Miyabe), is known to have various biological and immunological activities, but the modulatory effects of this preparation on dendritic cells (DCs)-mediated immune responses have not been examined previously. DCs are a unique group of white blood cells that initiate primary immune responses by capturing, processing, and presenting antigens to T cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HemoHIM on the functional and phenotypic maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) both in vitro and in vivo. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86, MHC I, and MHC II) and the production of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p70, and TNF-α) were increased by HemoHIM in BMDCs. Furthermore, the antigen-uptake ability of BMDCs was decreased by HemoHIM, and the antigen-presenting ability of HemoHIM-treated mature BMDCs increased TLR4-dependent CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. Our findings demonstrated that HemoHIM induces TLR4-mediated BMDCs functional and phenotypic maturation through in vivo and in vitro. And our study showed the antigen-presenting ability that HemoHIM-treated mature BMDCs increase CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses by in vitro. These results suggest that HemoHIM has the potential to mediate DC immune responses.

  14. TLR5 mediates CD172α(+) intestinal lamina propria dendritic cell induction of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Chen, Feidi; Wu, Wei; Cao, Anthony T; Xue, Xiaochang; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Li, Yan-Qing; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-02-24

    Multiple mechanisms exist in regulation of host responses to massive challenges from microbiota to maintain immune homeostasis in the intestines. Among these is the enriched Th17 cells in the intestines, which regulates intestinal homeostasis through induction of antimicrobial peptides and secretory IgA among others. However, the means by which Th17 cells develop in response to microbiota is still not completely understood. Although both TLR5 and CD172α(+) lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDC) have been shown to promote Th17 cell development, it is still unclear whether TLR5 mediates the CD172α(+)LPDC induction of Th17 cells. By using a microbiota antigen-specific T cell reporter mouse system, we demonstrated that microbiota antigen-specific T cells developed into Th17 cells in the intestinal LP, but not in the spleen when transferred into TCRβxδ(-/-) mice. LPDCs expressed high levels of TLR5, and most CD172α(+)LPDCs also co-expressed TLR5. LPDCs produced high levels of IL-23, IL-6 and TGFβ when stimulated with commensal flagellin and promoted Th17 cell development when cultured with full-length CBir1 flagellin but not CBir1 peptide. Wild-type CD172α(+), but not CD172α(-), LPDCs induced Th17 cells, whereas TLR5-deficient LPDC did not induce Th17 cells. Our data thereby demonstrated that TLR5 mediates CD172α(+)LPDC induction of Th17 cells in the intestines.

  15. Induction of JAM-A during differentiation of human THP-1 dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Noriko; Kojima, Takashi; Go, Mitsuru; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2009-11-20

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A is not only localized at tight junctions of endothelial and epithelial cells but is also expressed on circulating leukocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). In the present study, to investigate the regulation of JAM-A in DCs, mature DCs were differentiated from the human monocytic cell THP-1 by treatment with IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and ionomycin, and some cells were pretreated with the PPAR-gamma agonists. In the THP-1 monocytes, mRNAs of tight junction molecules, occludin, tricellulin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-4, -7, -8, and -9 were detected by RT-PCR. In mature DCs that had elongated dendrites, mRNA and protein of JAM-A were significantly increased compared to the monocytes. PPAR-gamma agonists prevented the elongation of dentrites but not upregulation of JAM-A in mature DCs. These findings indicated that the induction of JAM-A occurred during differentiation of human THP-1 DCs and was independent of PPAR-gamma and the p38 MAPK pathway.

  16. The Role of Dendritic Cell Maturation in the Induction of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nieves, Hector A.; Torrez, Timothy W.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the dominant class of antigen-presenting cells in humans and are largely responsible for the initiation and guidance of innate and adaptive immune responses involved in maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Immature dendritic cells (iDCs) phagocytize pathogens and toxic proteins and in endosomal vesicles degrade them into small fragments for presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II receptor molecules to naïve cognate T cells (Th0). In addition to their role in stimulation of immunity, DCs are involved in the induction and maintenance of immune tolerance toward self-antigens. During activation, the iDCs become mature. Maturation begins when the DCs cease taking up antigens and begin to migrate from their location in peripheral tissues to adjacent lymph nodes or the spleen where during their continued maturation the DCs present stored antigens on surface MHCII receptor molecules to naive Th0 cells. During antigen presentation, the DCs upregulate the biosynthesis of costimulatory receptor molecules CD86, CD80, CD83, and CD40 on their plasma membrane. These activated DC receptor molecules bind cognate CD28 receptors presented on the Th0 cell membrane, which triggers DC secretion of IL-12 or IL-10 cytokines resulting in T cell differentiation into pro- or anti-inflammatory T cell subsets. Although basic concepts involved in the process of iDC activation and guidance of Th0 cell differentiation have been previously documented, they are poorly defined. In this review, we detail what is known about the process of DC maturation and its role in the induction of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus autoimmunity. PMID:28396662

  17. Dendrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have found that as melted metals and alloys (combinations of metals) solidify, they can form with different arrangements of atoms, called microstructures. These microstructures depend on the shape of the interface (boundary) between the melted metal and the solid crystal it is forming. There are generally three shapes that the interface can take: planar, or flat; cellular, which looks like the cells of a beehive; and dendritic, which resembles tiny fir trees. Convection at this interface can affect the interface shape and hide the other phenomena (physical events). To reduce the effects of convection, researchers conduct experiments that examine and control conditions at the interface in microgravity. Microgravity also helps in the study of alloys composed of two metals that do not mix. On Earth, the liquid mixtures of these alloys settle into different layers due to gravity. In microgravity, the liquid metals do not settle, and a solid more uniform mixture of both metals can be formed.

  18. Enhancement of dendritic cell-based vaccine potency by anti-apoptotic siRNAs targeting key pro-apoptotic proteins in cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kang, Tae Heung; Noh, Kyung Hee; Bae, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Seok-Ho; Yoo, Young Do; Seong, Seung-Yong; Kim, Tae Woo

    2009-01-29

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have become an important measure for the treatment of malignancies. Current DC preparations, however, generate short-lived DCs because they are subject to cell death from various apoptotic pressures. Antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is one of the main obstacles to limit the DC-mediated immune priming since CTLs can recognize the target antigen expressing DCs as target cells and kill the DCs. CTLs secret perforin and serine protease granzymes during CTL killing. Perforin and serine protease granzymes induce the release of a number of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic factors, which are controlled by members of the BCL-2 family, such as BAK, BAX and BIM. FasL linking to Fas on DCs triggers the activation of caspase-8, which eventually leads to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis via truncation of BID. In this study, we tried to enhance the DC priming capacity by prolonging DC survival using anti-apoptotic siRNA targeting these key pro-apoptotic molecules in CTL killing. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E7 antigen presenting DCs that were transfected with these anti-apoptotic siRNAs showed increased resistance to T cell-mediated death, leading to enhanced E7-specific CD8(+) T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Among them, siRNA targeting BIM (siBIM) generated strongest E7-specific E7-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity. More importantly, vaccination with E7 presenting DCs transfected with siBIM was capable of generating a marked therapeutic effect in vaccinated mice. Our data indicate that ex vivo manipulation of DCs with siBIM may represent a plausible strategy for enhancing dendritic cell-based vaccine potency.

  19. The Effect of Noise on CaMKII Activation in a Dendritic Spine During LTP Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shangyou

    2010-01-01

    Activation of calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is a series of complicated stochastic processes that are affected by noise. There are two main sources of noise affecting CaMKII activation within a dendritic spine. One is the noise associated with stochastic opening of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels and the other is the noise associated with the stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics leading to CaMKII activation. Many models have been developed to simulate CaMKII activation, but there is no fully stochastic model that studies the effect of noise on CaMKII activation. Here we construct a fully stochastic model to study these effects. Our results show that noise has important effects on CaMKII activation variability, with the effect from stochastic opening of NMDA receptor channels being 5–10 times more significant than that from stochastic reactions involving CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII activation levels and the variability of activation are greatly affected by small changes in NMDA receptor channel number at the synapse. One reason LTP induction protocols may require tetanic or repeated burst stimulation is that there is a need to overcome inherent variability to provide sufficiently large calcium signals through NMDA receptor channels; with meaningful physiological stimuli, noise may allow the calcium signal to exceed threshold for CaMKII activation when it might not do so otherwise. PMID:20107130

  20. Insulin-like growth factors inhibit dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity through regulating ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Ting; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chen, Tsung-Ching; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can promote tumorigenesis via inhibiting the apoptosis of cancer cells. The relationship between IGFs and dendritic cell (DC)-mediated immunity were investigated. Advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma patients were first evaluated to show higher IGF-1 and IGF-2 concentrations in their ascites than early-stage patients. IGFs could suppress DCs' maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell. IGF-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10 and TNF-α. IGF-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The percentages of matured DCs in the ascites were significantly lower in the IGF-1 or IGF-2 highly-expressing WF-3 tumor-bearing mice. The IGF1R inhibitor - NVP-AEW541, could block the effects of IGFs to rescue DCs' maturation and to restore DC-mediated antigen-specific immunity through enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. IGFs can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity through suppressing maturation and function and the IGF1R inhibitor could restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of IGFs could be a potential strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Suppression of Conventional T-Cells and Dendritic Cells by Different cAMP Intracellular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cesar M; Jackson, Courtney M; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediate their suppressive action by acting directly on conventional T-cells (Tcons) or dendritic cells (DCs). One mechanism of Treg suppression is the increase of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in target cells. Tregs utilize cAMP to control Tcon responses, such as proliferation and cytokine production. Tregs also exert their suppression on DCs, diminishing DC immunogenicity by downmodulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and actin polymerization at the immunological synapse. The Treg-mediated usage of cAMP occurs through two major mechanisms. The first involves the Treg-mediated influx of cAMP in target cells through gap junctions. The second is the conversion of adenosine triphosphate into adenosine by the ectonucleases CD39 and CD73 present on the surface of Tregs. Adenosine then binds to receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels in these targets. Downstream, cAMP can activate the canonical protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and the exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP (EPAC) non-canonical pathway. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings related to cAMP activation of PKA and EPAC, which are implicated in Treg homeostasis as well as the functional alterations induced by cAMP in cellular targets of Treg suppression.

  2. Helper role of NK cells during the induction of anticancer responses by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kalinski, Pawel; Giermasz, Adam; Nakamura, Yutaro; Basse, Per; Storkus, Walter J; Kirkwood, John M; Mailliard, Robbie B

    2005-02-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DC) support each other's activity in a positive feedback. We observed that activated NK cells induce the maturation of DCs into stable type-1 polarized DCs (DC1), characterized by up to 100-fold enhanced ability to produce IL-12p70 in response to subsequent interaction with Th cells. DC1 induction depends on NK cell-produced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, with a possible involvement of additional factors. DC1, induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related soluble factors, are stable, resistant to tumor-related suppressive factors, and show strongly enhanced ability to induce Th1 and CTL responses. In analogy to resting T cells, the induction of "helper" function of NK cells relies on a two-signal activation paradigm. While NKG2D-dependent tumor cell recognition is sufficient to induce the cytotoxic "effector" function of NK cells, the induction of "NK cell help" requires additional signals from type-1 IFNs, products of virally-infected cells, or from IL-2. Compared to non-polarized DCs currently-used in clinical trials, DC1s act as superior inducers of anti-cancer CTL responses during in vitro sensitization. The current data provides rationale for the clinical use of DC1s in cancer and chronic infections (such as HIV), as a new generation DC-based vaccines, uniquely combining fully mature DC status with an elevated, rather than "exhausted" ability to produce bioactive IL-12p70. We are currently implementing stage I/II clinical trials, testing the effectiveness of DC1s induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related factors, as therapeutic vaccines against melanoma.

  3. Clinical applications of dendritic cells-cytokine-induced killer cells mediated immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucai; Zhang, Xiaorui; Zhang, Anqi; Li, Ke; Qu, Kai

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of dendritic cells-cytokine-induced killer (DC-CIK) cells immunotherapy in treating pancreatic cancer (PC) patients. Data were collected from published articles of clinical trials. Databases including Web of Science, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Wanfang, and CNKI were searched. The main outcome measures in this research included the overall response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), patients' quality of life (QoL), immune function, and adverse events. Comparative analysis was conducted between DC-CIK immunotherapy and chemotherapy (combined therapy) and chemotherapy alone. This analysis covered 14 trials with 1,088 PC patients involved. The combined therapy showed advantages over chemotherapy alone in ORR (odds ratio [OR] =1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.20-2.38, P=0.003), DCR (OR =2.33, 95% CI =1.63-3.33, P<0.00001), OS (1-year OS, OR =3.61, 95% CI =2.41-5.40, P<0.00001; 3-year OS, OR =2.65, 95% CI =1.56-4.50, P=0.0003) and patients' QoL (P<0.01) with statistical significance. After immunotherapy, lymphocyte subsets' percentages of CD3(+) (P<0.00001), CD4(+) (P=0.01), CD3(+)CD56(+) (P<0.00001), and cytokine levels of IFN-γ (P<0.00001) were significantly increased, and the percentages of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) (P<0.00001) and levels of IL-4 (P<0.0001) were significantly decreased, whereas analysis on CD8(+) (P=0.59) and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio (P=0.64) did not show a significant difference. The combination of DC-CIK immunotherapy and chemotherapy is effective for PC treatment, indicated by prolonging the PC patients' survival time, which benefit from reconstructed immune function of patients.

  4. Dendritic cell-mediated, DNA-based vaccination against hepatitis C induces the multi-epitope-specific response of humanized, HLA transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sasmita; Lavelle, Bianca J; Desrosiers, Joe; Ardito, Matt T; Terry, Frances; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S; Gregory, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the etiologic agent of chronic liver disease, hepatitis C. Spontaneous resolution of viral infection is associated with vigorous HLA class I- and class II-restricted T cell responses to multiple viral epitopes. Unfortunately, only 20% of patients clear infection spontaneously, most develop chronic disease and require therapy. The response to chemotherapy varies, however; therapeutic vaccination offers an additional treatment strategy. To date, therapeutic vaccines have demonstrated only limited success. Vector-mediated vaccination with multi-epitope-expressing DNA constructs alone or in combination with chemotherapy offers an additional treatment approach. Gene sequences encoding validated HLA-A2- and HLA-DRB1-restricted epitopes were synthesized and cloned into an expression vector. Dendritic cells (DCs) derived from humanized, HLA-A2/DRB1 transgenic (donor) mice were transfected with these multi-epitope-expressing DNA constructs. Recipient HLA-A2/DRB1 mice were vaccinated s.c. with transfected DCs; control mice received non-transfected DCs. Peptide-specific IFN-γ production by splenic T cells obtained at 5 weeks post-immunization was quantified by ELISpot assay; additionally, the production of IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-α were quantified by cytokine bead array. Splenocytes derived from vaccinated HLA-A2/DRB1 transgenic mice exhibited peptide-specific cytokine production to the vast majority of the vaccine-encoded HLA class I- and class II-restricted T cell epitopes. A multi-epitope-based HCV vaccine that targets DCs offers an effective approach to inducing a broad immune response and viral clearance in chronic, HCV-infected patients.

  5. [T-cell immunity against autologous leukemic cell mediated by in vitro bone marrow-derived dendritic cell from patients with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission].

    PubMed

    He, X; You, S; Bian, S

    2001-12-01

    To explore if a specific cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) response could be in vitro generated by using autogenous-leukemic cells lysates (ACL) pulsed dendritic cells ( DCs ) from AML-CR patients. T-cell depleted bone marrow mononuclear cells (TD-BMNC) were isolated from AML-CR patients with E-rosetting procedure, and then were cultured in vitro in the presence of combined cytokines ( GM-CSF, IL-4, SCF/TNF-alpha) for generation of mature DCs, and pulsed with ACL on day 5. After 7-day culture, the cells were harvested and the expression of mature DC marker was determined by FACS. For generation of a specific CTL to the respective AML cells, the cells were co-cultured with pre-activated auto-T lymphocytes by McAb anti-CD3 in the presence of low concentration of IL-2 for 7 days. Cytotoxicity was determined with LDH release. Cultured TD-BMNCs from 12 AML-CR patients developed morphologic and phenotypic characteristics of mature DCs. CTL assay was performed in 6 out of the 12 samples. At effector/target ratio of 20:1, auto-T lymphocytes primed with ACL pulsed DC exhibited significant killing activity to auto-AML cells but not to K562 cells as compared with that stimulated by IL-2 alone or primed by non-pulsed DC (P = 0.001). AML cell associated antigen specific CTL responses can be in vitro generated by priming auto-T lymphocytes with ACL pulsed DCs. These findings might prove useful for immunotherapy of AML.

  6. Ethanol extract from birch bark (Betula pubescens) suppresses human dendritic cell mediated Th1 responses and directs it towards a Th17 regulatory response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Freysdottir, Jona; Sigurpalsson, Marino Boas; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Olafsdottir, Elin S; Vikingsson, Arnor; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg

    2011-04-30

    Extracts and fractions from birch bark have been used to treat various diseases, such as skin disorders and rheumatism, and for analgesic effects. Results from studies in vitro and in vivo have shown that birch bark extracts can have immunoregulatory effects. These effects have mainly been attributed to the various triterpenes found in birch bark. The effects of birch bark from Betula pubescens on immune responses have not been reported. Ethanol extract was prepared from dry birch bark (DBBEE) and five fractions made using various ratios of dichloromethane and methanol (fractions I-V). Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were matured with or without DBBEE or fractions I-V at several concentrations. The effects of the extract and fractions on DC maturation were determined by measuring cytokine secretion by ELISA and expression of surface molecules by flow cytometry. DBBEE and fractions III and IV reduced DC secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12p40 and expression of CD83, CD86, CCR7 and DC-SIGN compared with control DCs. Proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with DCs matured with fraction IV, as measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation, was similar to proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with control DCs. However, IFN-γ secretion was reduced and IL-10 and IL-17 secretion was increased, a cytokine profile consistent with a Th17 regulatory phenotype. These results indicate that bark from Betula pubescens contains compound(s) that can modulate DCs so that their interaction with T cells leads to an immunoregulatory response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendritic cell-activated cytokine-induced killer cell-mediated immunotherapy is safe and effective for cancer patients >65 years old

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Hausheng; He, Pengcheng; Li, Jing; Liu, Xin; Chen, Limei; Wang, Mengchang; Xi, Jiejing; Wang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Haitao; Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Wei; Ning, Jing; Guo, Caili; Sun, Chunhong; Zhang, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Individuals >65 years old account for a large proportion of cancer patients, and usually have poor prognoses due to relative weaker physiological function and lower drug tolerance. To characterize the efficacy and safety of dendritic cell (DC)-activated cytokine-induced killer cell (CIK)-mediated treatment, and develop an adoptive immunotherapy for cancer patients >65 years old, a retrospective study was performed in 58 cancer sufferers who received 1–4 cycles of DC-activated CIK (DC-CIK) treatment and evaluated the response (tumor remission rate) and toxicity (side effects to the treatment). The present results showed that DCs and CIKs could be expanded rapidly in vitro, and following co-culture with DCs, the population of cluster of differentiation (CD) 3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD56+ CIKs was significantly increased compared to CIKs without DC activation (P=0.044). In addition, DC-CIK infusion produced marked clinical outcomes, resulting in an objective remission rate, overall clinical benefit rate and Karnofsky performance status of 44.83, 75.86 and 87.28±5.46%, respectively, which was significantly improved compared with prior to treatment (P<0.05). Additionally, subsequent to two cycles of this immunotherapy, several tumor marker expression levels declined, returning to the normal range. The proportion of CD3+CD4+ (P=0.017) and CD3+CD8+ (P=0.023) lymphocytes, and the population of CD4/CD8 cells (P=0.024) were also increased. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the immunotherapy mediated by DC-CIK is safe and effective for cancer patients aged >65 years. PMID:28105230

  8. Inhibition of JAK/STAT pathway restrains TSLP-activated dendritic cells mediated inflammatory T helper type 2 cell response in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhaohui; Jiang, Weihong; Wang, Min; Wang, Xiaocheng; Li, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Qiao, Li

    2017-06-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been implicated as a key molecule for initiating allergic rhinitis (AR) at the cell-dendritic cell (DC) interface. Previous studies demonstrated that TSLP activated DCs to express more OX40 ligand (OX40L), which is associated with the initiation of T helper type 2 (Th2) cell responses. STAT phosphorylation has been reported to be promoted by TSLP. Thus, we investigated if the JAK/STAT pathway inhibitor CYT387 could affect TSLP-DC-mediated Th2 cell response in naive T cell and AR mice model. Western blot showed that the levels of phosphorylated JAK1, JAK2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were increased in TSLP-DCs, which can be offset by CYT387. Flow cytometry indicated that CYT387 had obviously down-regulated the surface maturation co-stimulatory molecules (CD11c, CD80, CD86, and MHCII) in DCs, which were increased by TSLP. Moreover, CYT387 markedly reduced the ability of TSLP-DCs to promote the differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells into IL-4-expressing Th2 cells. The histological examination showed that the CYT387-treated group showed less epithelial disruption, epithelial cell proliferation, and reduced eosinophil infiltration compared with AR group. Western blot and RT-PCR demonstrated that the expression of OX40L was increased in AR mice, but that it was decreased by CYT387. Furthermore, CYT387 treatment resulted in the reduction of IL-4 and IL-5 expression and increased IFN-γ level in AR mice, which was consistent with the levels of intracellular cytokine in Th2 cell. In conclusion, we suggest that blockading the JAK/STAT pathway restrains inflammatory Th2 cell response induced by TSLP-DCs in AR.

  9. Induction of anti-leukemic cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusion of patient-derived dendritic cells with autologous myeloblasts.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo; Kato, Yoko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Chen, Dongshu; Jonas, Anna; Galinsky, Ilene; DeAngelo, Daniel; Avigan, David; Kufe, Donald; Stone, Richard

    2004-12-01

    Presentation of AML antigens by dendritic cells (DC) could potentially induce a T cell-mediated anti-leukemic immune response. In the present study, we generated DC from adherent (AD-DC) and non-adherent (NAD-DC) myeloblasts obtained from bone marrows of AML patients. Both cell populations displayed morphological, phenotypic and functional properties of DC. The functions of NAD-DC were compared to AD-DC that had been fused with autologous AML blasts (FC/AML). The FC/AML induced greater T cell proliferation and CTL activity against autologous AML blasts (9/10 cases) as compared to NAD-DC. FC/AML may thus represent a promising strategy for DC-based immunotherapy of patients with AML.

  10. AIRE is not essential for the induction of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Katherine L; Abinun, Mario; Arkwright, Peter D; Cheetham, Timothy D; Pearce, Simon H; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Lilic, Desa

    2016-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene results in organ-specific autoimmunity and disease Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy type 1 (APS1)/Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED). The AIRE protein is crucial in the induction of central tolerance, promoting ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells and enabling removal of self-reactive T-cells. AIRE expression has recently been detected in myeloid dendritic cells (DC), suggesting AIRE may have a significant role in peripheral tolerance. DC stimulation of T-cells is critical in determining the initiation or lack of an immune response, depending on the pattern of costimulation and cytokine production by DCs, defining immunogenic/inflammatory (inflDC) and tolerogenic (tolDC) DC. In AIRE-deficient patients and healthy controls, we validated the role of AIRE in the generation and function of monocyte-derived inflDC and tolDCs by determining mRNA and protein expression of AIRE and comparing activation markers (HLA-DR/DP/DQ,CD83,CD86,CD274(PDL-1),TLR-2), cytokine production (IL-12p70,IL-10,IL-6,TNF-α,IFN-γ) and T-cell stimulatory capacity (mixed lymphocyte reaction) of AIRE+ and AIRE- DCs. We show for the first time that: (1) tolDCs from healthy individuals express AIRE; (2) AIRE expression is not significantly higher in tolDC compared to inflDC; (3) tolDC can be generated from APECED patient monocytes and (4) tolDCs lacking AIRE retain the same phenotype and reduced T-cell stimulatory function. Our findings suggest that AIRE does not have a role in the induction and function of monocyte-derived tolerogenic DC in humans, but these findings do not exclude a role for AIRE in peripheral tolerance mediated by other cell types.

  11. Induction of Wnt-inducible signaling protein-1 correlates with invasive breast cancer oncogenesis and reduced type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Klinke, David J

    2014-01-01

    Innate and type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity function as important extracellular control mechanisms that maintain cellular homeostasis. Interleukin-12 (IL12) is an important cytokine that links innate immunity with type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity. We recently observed in vitro that tumor-derived Wnt-inducible signaling protein-1 (WISP1) exerts paracrine action to suppress IL12 signaling. The objective of this retrospective study was three fold: 1) to determine whether a gene signature associated with type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity was correlated with overall survival, 2) to determine whether WISP1 expression is increased in invasive breast cancer, and 3) to determine whether a gene signature consistent with inhibition of IL12 signaling correlates with WISP1 expression. Clinical information and mRNA expression for genes associated with anti-tumor immunity were obtained from the invasive breast cancer arm of the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Patient cohorts were identified using hierarchical clustering. The immune signatures associated with the patient cohorts were interpreted using model-based inference of immune polarization. Reverse phase protein array, tissue microarray, and quantitative flow cytometry in breast cancer cell lines were used to validate observed differences in gene expression. We found that type 1 cell-mediated cytotoxic immunity was correlated with increased survival in patients with invasive breast cancer, especially in patients with invasive triple negative breast cancer. Oncogenic transformation in invasive breast cancer was associated with an increase in WISP1. The gene expression signature in invasive breast cancer was consistent with WISP1 as a paracrine inhibitor of type 1 cell-mediated immunity through inhibiting IL12 signaling and promoting type 2 immunity. Moreover, model-based inference helped identify appropriate immune signatures that can be used as design constraints in genetically engineering better pre

  12. Tussilagone inhibits dendritic cell functions via induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yunsoo; Ryu, Hwa Sun; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Ji Sung; Yun, Jieun; Kang, Jong Soon; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Sesquiterpenoid tussilagone (TUS) has a variety of pharmacological activities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of TUS on dendritic cell (DC) functions and the underlying mechanisms. TUS inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of DCs, as shown by decrease in surface molecule expression, cytokine production, cell migration, and allo-T cell activation. In addition, TUS inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB, MAPKs, and IRF-3 signalings in DCs, although it did not directly affect kinase activities of IRAK1/4, TAK1, and IKK, which suggests that TUS might indirectly inhibit TLR signaling in DCs. As a critical mechanism, we showed that TUS activated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which degrades heme to immunosuppressive products, such as carbon monoxide and bilirubin. HO-1 inhibitor reversed the inhibitory activity of TUS in DCs. In conclusion, this study suggests that TUS inhibits DC function through the induction of HO-1.

  13. Induction of Immunological Tolerance to Adenoviral Vectors by Using a Novel Dendritic Cell-Based Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Oliver, Jordan R.; Duan, Rongqi; Zhang, Li; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    The success of helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector-mediated lung gene therapy is hampered by the host immune response, which limits pulmonary transgene expression following multiple rounds of vector readminstration. Here, we show that HD-Ad-mediated pulmonary gene expression is sustained even upon three rounds of readministration to immunodeficient mice, highlighting the need to suppress the adaptive immune response for sustained gene expression following vector readministration. Therefore, we devised a dendritic cell (DC)-based strategy for induction of immunological tolerance toward HD-Ad vectors. DCs derived in the presence of interleukin-10 (IL-10) are refractory to HD-Ad-induced maturation and instead facilitate generation of IL-10-producing Tr1 regulatory T cells which suppress HD-Ad-induced T cell proliferation. Delivery of HD-Ad-pulsed, IL-10-modified DCs to mice induces long-lasting immunological tolerance to HD-Ad vectors, whereby pulmonary DC maturation, the T cell response, and antibody response to HD-Ad vectors are suppressed even after three rounds of pulmonary HD-Ad readministration. Moreover, sustained transgene expression is also observed in the lungs of mice immunized with HD-Ad-pulsed, IL-10-modified DCs even after three rounds of pulmonary HD-Ad delivery. Taken together, these studies identify the use of DCs generated in the presence of IL-10 as a novel strategy to induce long-lasting immune tolerance to HD-Ad vectors. PMID:22258241

  14. Suppression of antigen-specific adaptive immunity by IL-37 via induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuchun; Cai, Xiangna; Liu, Sucai; Wang, Sen; Nold-Petry, Claudia A.; Nold, Marcel F.; Bufler, Philip; Norris, David; Dinarello, Charles A.; Fujita, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    IL-1 family member IL-37 limits innate inflammation in models of colitis and LPS-induced shock, but a role in adaptive immunity remains unknown. Here, we studied mice expressing human IL-37b isoform (IL-37tg) subjected to skin contact hypersensitivity (CHS) to dinitrofluorobenzene. CHS challenge to the hapten was significantly decreased in IL-37tg mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice (−61%; P < 0.001 at 48 h). Skin dendritic cells (DCs) were present and migrated to lymph nodes after antigen uptake in IL-37tg mice. When hapten-sensitized DCs were adoptively transferred to WT mice, antigen challenge was greatly impaired in mice receiving DCs from IL-37tg mice compared with those receiving DCs from WT mice (−60%; P < 0.01 at 48 h). In DCs isolated from IL-37tg mice, LPS-induced increase of MHC II and costimulatory molecule CD40 was reduced by 51 and 31%, respectively. In these DCs, release of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 was reduced whereas IL-10 secretion increased (37%). Consistent with these findings, DCs from IL-37tg mice exhibited a lower ability to stimulate syngeneic and allogeneic naive T cells as well as antigen-specific T cells and displayed enhanced induction of T regulatory (Treg) cells (86%; P < 0.001) in vitro. Histological analysis of CHS skin in mice receiving hapten-sensitized DCs from IL-37tg mice revealed a marked reduction in CD8+ T cells (−74%) but an increase in Treg cells (2.6-fold). Together, these findings reveal that DCs expressing IL-37 are tolerogenic, thereby impairing activation of effector T-cell responses and inducing Treg cells. IL-37 thus emerges as an inhibitor of adaptive immunity. PMID:25294929

  15. Suppression of antigen-specific adaptive immunity by IL-37 via induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuchun; Cai, Xiangna; Liu, Sucai; Wang, Sen; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Nold, Marcel F; Bufler, Philip; Norris, David; Dinarello, Charles A; Fujita, Mayumi

    2014-10-21

    IL-1 family member IL-37 limits innate inflammation in models of colitis and LPS-induced shock, but a role in adaptive immunity remains unknown. Here, we studied mice expressing human IL-37b isoform (IL-37tg) subjected to skin contact hypersensitivity (CHS) to dinitrofluorobenzene. CHS challenge to the hapten was significantly decreased in IL-37tg mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice (-61%; P < 0.001 at 48 h). Skin dendritic cells (DCs) were present and migrated to lymph nodes after antigen uptake in IL-37tg mice. When hapten-sensitized DCs were adoptively transferred to WT mice, antigen challenge was greatly impaired in mice receiving DCs from IL-37tg mice compared with those receiving DCs from WT mice (-60%; P < 0.01 at 48 h). In DCs isolated from IL-37tg mice, LPS-induced increase of MHC II and costimulatory molecule CD40 was reduced by 51 and 31%, respectively. In these DCs, release of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 was reduced whereas IL-10 secretion increased (37%). Consistent with these findings, DCs from IL-37tg mice exhibited a lower ability to stimulate syngeneic and allogeneic naive T cells as well as antigen-specific T cells and displayed enhanced induction of T regulatory (Treg) cells (86%; P < 0.001) in vitro. Histological analysis of CHS skin in mice receiving hapten-sensitized DCs from IL-37tg mice revealed a marked reduction in CD8(+) T cells (-74%) but an increase in Treg cells (2.6-fold). Together, these findings reveal that DCs expressing IL-37 are tolerogenic, thereby impairing activation of effector T-cell responses and inducing Treg cells. IL-37 thus emerges as an inhibitor of adaptive immunity.

  16. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  17. Gene induction during differentiation of human monocytes into dendritic cells: an integrated study at the RNA and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Angénieux, Catherine; Fricker, Dominique; Strub, Jean-Marc; Luche, Sylvie; Bausinger, Huguette; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Hanau, Daniel; de la Salle, Henri; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Changes in gene expression occurring during differentiation of human monoytes into dendritic cells were studied at the RNA and protein levels. These studies showed the induction of several gene classes corresponding to various biological functions. These functions encompass of course antigen processing and presentation, cytoskeleton, cell signalling and signal transduction, but also an increase of mitochondrial function and of the protein synthesis machinery, including some, but not all, chaperones. These changes put in perspective the events occurring during this differentiation process. On a more technical point, it appears that the studies carried out at the RNA and protein levels are highly complementary. PMID:11793251

  18. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated peripheral regulatory T cell and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses towards innocuous foreign antigens via peripheral regulatory T cells (pTreg cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure to instruct naïve CD4+ T cells to differentiate into pTreg cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs are dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for pTreg cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b− cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pTreg cells, and conversely, loss of IRF8-dependent CD11b− cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in pTreg cell induction and their redundancy during oral tolerance development. PMID:27019226

  19. Characterization of dermal dendritic cells in psoriasis. Autostimulation of T lymphocytes and induction of Th1 type cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Nestle, F O; Turka, L A; Nickoloff, B J

    1994-01-01

    Local activation of T lymphocytes is regarded as an important immunological component of psoriatic skin lesions. Within psoriatic plaques (PP) there are large numbers of dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) immediately beneath the hyperplastic epidermis surrounded by T cells. In this study we investigated the ability of DDCs isolated from PP skin to support immune responses to resting peripheral blood T cells. For comparison, other dendritic cells were obtained from blood of the same psoriatic patients, as well as DDCs from skin of normal healthy individuals (designated NN skin). All dendritic cells studied had high surface expression of HLA-DR, B7, and lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 molecules. T cell proliferative responses and cytokine production profiles to these various dendritic cells were measured in the absence and presence of PHA or bacterial-derived superantigens. In the absence of exogenous mitogens, PP skin-derived DDCs were much more effective stimulators of spontaneous T cell proliferation compared with either psoriatic blood-derived or NN skin-derived dendritic cells. Antibody blocking studies revealed involvement of HLA-DR, B7, and lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 on PP skin-derived DDCs. Cytokine profiles revealed that in the absence of exogenous stimuli PP skin-derived DDCs mediated a T cell response with high levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 or IL-10. NN skin-derived DDCs produced a similar qualitative response, but quantitative amounts of all cytokines measured were lower. Upon addition of PHA or superantigens, both PP skin-derived and NN skin-derived DDCs mediated high levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, with induction of IL-4 particularly evident for PHA reactions. Addition of conditioned medium from psoriatic dermal fragments did not enhance the autostimulatory capacity of blood-derived dendritic cells. These findings highlight the potent autostimulatory potential of PP skin-derived DDCs and suggest an important

  20. CD45R, CD44 and MHC class II are signaling molecules for the cytoskeleton-dependent induction of dendrites and motility in activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Partida-Sánchez, S; Garibay-Escobar, A; Frixione, E; Parkhouse, R M; Santos-Argumedo, L

    2000-09-01

    Anti-CD44 or anti-MHC II antibodies bound to tissue culture plates have previously been shown to induce a dramatic generation of dendritic processes in activated murine B cells. In this study, we demonstrate a similar generation of dendrites and cell motility in activated B cells through CD45R. The dynamic formation of dendritic processes and associated induction of cell motility were analyzed by video microscopy and were characterized by a rapid, and multidirectional emission of dendrites with retractile behavior. The addition of cytochalasin E totally blocked dendrites formation and motility induced through either CD45R, CD44 or MHC II, suggesting that the necessary cytoskeletal rearrangements require active polymerization of actin. Confocal microscopy showed an accumulation of F-actin in the dendrites, as long as cells were elongating. In contrast, G-actin was localized in the perinuclear area and also accumulated in sites where dendrites originated. Preincubation of B cells with staurosporine (a PKC inhibitor) or BAPTA-AM (a calcium chelator) prevented these morphological changes, indicating additionally a requirement for a PKC-calcium-dependent activity. Dendrite formation and cellular motility, therefore, seem to be two manifestations of the same phenomenon, and CD44, CD45R and MHC II appear to be signaling molecules for the observed cytoskeleton-dependent morphological changes.

  1. Toll-like receptor-dependent IL-12 production by dendritic cells is required for activation of natural killer cell-mediated Type-1 immunity induced by Chrysanthemum coronarium L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Koizumi, Shin-ichi; Masuko, Kazutaka; Makiuchi, Naoko; Aoyagi, Yuka; Quivy, Emi; Mitamura, Rieko; Kano, Tsutomu; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Wakita, Daiko; Chamoto, Kenji; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Nishimura, Takashi

    2011-02-01

    Type-1 immunity has an essential role for our host defenses against cancer and outer pathogens such as bacteria and virus. We demonstrated here that the edible plant extract of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (C. coronarium) remarkably activates Type-1 immunity in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-, TLR4-, and TLR9-dependent manner. In the present experiments, the extract of C. coronarium significantly induces interferon (IFN)-γ production by mouse spleen cells. In addition, the IFN-γ production by spleen cells was completely blocked by the addition of anti-Interleukin (IL)-12 monoclonal antibodies. We confirmed that NK1.1(+) natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells, and CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DC) were immediately activated after the stimulation with the extract of C. coronarium and the IFN-γ production was abolished in NK1.1(+) cell-depleted spleen cells. The stimulation with the extract of C. coronarium caused DC maturation involving with up-regulations of surface expression levels of MHC class I, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86 as well as induction of IL-12 production. The IFN-γ production induced by the extract was significantly reduced in the spleen cells depleted CD11c(+) cells. Furthermore, the IFN-γ production after the stimulation was strongly reduced in TLR4- and partially in TLR2- and TLR9-deficient spleen cells. Thus, we demonstrated the cellular mechanism for the activation of Type-1 immunity via NK cells, NKT cells, and DC by the extract of C. coronarium. These findings strongly suggest that C. coronarium would be a promising immuno-improving adjuvant, which might be useful for prevention of infectious, cancer, and allergic diseases through the activation of Type-1 immunity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Deletion of Kv4.2 gene eliminates dendritic A-type K+ current and enhances induction of long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xixi; Yuan, Li-Lian; Zhao, Cuiping; Birnbaum, Shari G; Frick, Andreas; Jung, Wonil E; Schwarz, Thomas L; Sweatt, J David; Johnston, Daniel

    2006-11-22

    Dendritic, backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) facilitate the induction of Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP). Although bAPs in distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are attenuated when propagating from the soma, their amplitude can be increased greatly via downregulation of dendritic A-type K+ currents. The channels that underlie these currents thus may represent a key regulatory component of the signaling pathways that lead to synaptic plasticity. We directly tested this hypothesis by using Kv4.2 knock-out mice. Deletion of the Kv4.2 gene and a loss of Kv4.2 protein resulted in a specific and near-complete elimination of A-type K+ currents from the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The absence of dendritic Kv4.2-encoded A-type K+ currents led to an increase of bAP amplitude and an increase of concurrent Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons lacking dendritic A-type K+ currents from Kv4.2 knock-out mice exhibited a lower threshold than those of wild-type littermates for LTP induction with the use of a theta burst pairing protocol. LTP triggered with the use of a saturating protocol, on the other hand, remained indistinguishable between Kv4.2 knock-out and wild-type neurons. Our results support the hypothesis that dendritic A-type K+ channels, composed of Kv4.2 subunits, regulate action potential backpropagation and the induction of specific forms of synaptic plasticity.

  3. Induction of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Human Dendritic Cells by a Cholera Toxin B Subunit—Proinsulin Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N.; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  4. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3+ CD4+ Treg cells that inhibit CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced Kb/A12-21-monospecific CD8+ T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical Kb/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1−/− hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76–90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells in this diabetes model. PMID:27406624

  5. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3(+) CD4(+) Treg cells that inhibit CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-07-11

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3(+) CD25(+) CD4(+) Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced K(b)/A12-21-monospecific CD8(+) T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical K(b)/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1(-/-) hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76-90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells in this diabetes model.

  6. [Response surface methodology for optimizing the technology of induction and isolation of dendritic cells by multiple cytokines].

    PubMed

    Duan, Xunwei; Xiao, Guiqing; Zhao, Yanlan; Wang, Lixing; Zheng, Chenna; Dong, Le; Wu, Wenlin

    2017-07-01

    Objective To promote the induction and separation efficiency of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in vitro through optimizing the inducing and isolating process by multiple cytokines. Methods The factors to be optimized in single factor tests included recombinant mouse granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF), recombinant mouse interleukine 4 (rmIL-4), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), recombinant mouse tumor necrosis factor α (rmTNF-α) and inducing time. The numbers of immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and mature dendritic cells (mDCs) were investigated as the indicators. Box-Behnken experimental design-response surface methodology was used to analyze and verify the data. Morphological changes were observed using the inverted microscopy and the transmission electron microscopy. Surface molecules including CD11c and CD86 were detected using the flow cytometry. Results The optimum inducing conditions for imDCs were obtained as follows: rmGM-CSF was 46 ng/mL, rmIL-4 was 24 ng/mL, inducing time was 6 days, and the number of imDCs was (4.58±0.28)×10(6) cells, and the relative deviation was 4.00%. The optimum inducing conditions for mDCs were as follows: LPS was 1.4 μg/mL, rmTNF-α was 30 ng/mL, inducing time was 1 day, and the number of mDCs was (4.21±0.15)×10(6) cells, and the relative deviation was 3.80%. Sufficient typical imDCs and mDCs were obtained within 5-7 days of induction in vitro. Also, flow cytometry showed that the amplified imDCs had a high expression of CD11c (68.62%±2.3%) and a low expression of CD86 (37.95%±1.8%), and the mDCs had high expressions of both CD86 (90.34%±1.4%) and CD11c (82.05%±1.6%). Conclusion The combination of single factor tests and Box-Behnken design -response surface methodology could optimize the inducing and isolating method for DCs in vitro by multiple cytokines rapidly and efficiently, which provided basic experiment materials for further studies.

  7. Ubiquitous Over-Expression of Chromatin Remodeling Factor SRG3 Ameliorates the T Cell-Mediated Exacerbation of EAE by Modulating the Phenotypes of both Dendritic Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Won; Park, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Sung Ho; Lee, Changjin; Seong, Rho Hyun; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2015-01-01

    Although SWI3-related gene (SRG3), a chromatin remodeling factor, is critical for various biological processes including early embryogenesis and thymocyte development, it is unclear whether SRG3 is involved in the differentiation of CD4+ T cells, the key mediator of adaptive immune responses. Because it is known that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) development is determined by the activation of CD4+ T helper cells, here, we investigated the role of SRG3 in EAE development using SRG3 transgenic mouse models exhibiting two distinct SRG3 expression patterns: SRG3 expression driven by either the CD2 or β-actin promoter. We found that the outcome of EAE development was completely different depending on the expression pattern of SRG3. The specific over-expression of SRG3 using the CD2 promoter facilitated EAE via the induction of Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 using the β-actin promoter inhibited EAE by promoting Th2 differentiation and suppressing Th1 and Th17 differentiation. In addition, the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 polarized CD4+ T cell differentiation towards the Th2 phenotype by converting dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages to Th2 types. SRG3 over-expression not only reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs but also shifted macrophages from the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-expressing M1 phenotype to the arginase-1-expressing M2 phenotype during EAE. In addition, Th2 differentiation in β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice during EAE was associated with an increase in the basophil and mast cell populations and in IL4 production. Furthermore, the increased frequency of Treg cells in the spinal cord of β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice might induce the suppression of and accelerate the recovery from EAE symptoms. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence supporting the development of a new therapeutic strategy for EAE involving the modulation of SRG3 expression to induce M2 and Th2 polarization

  8. A Crucial Role for Host APCs in the Induction of Donor CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Suppression of Experimental Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tawara, Isao; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Jones, Angela; Zou, Weiping; Nieves, Evelyn; Liu, Chen; Toubai, Tomomi; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Sun, Yaping; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Evers, Rebecca; Lowler, Kathleen P.; Levy, Robert B.; Reddy, Pavan

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is an effective treatment for a number of malignant and nonmalignant diseases (Applebaum. 2001. Nature. 411: 385–389 and Copelan. 2006. N Engl J Med. 354: 1813–1826). However, the application of this therapeutic modality has been impeded by a number of confounding side effects, the most frequent and severe of which is the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (Copelan. 2006. N Engl J Med. 354: 1813–1826 and Blazar and Murphy. 2005. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 360: 1747–1767). Alloreactive donor T cells are critical for causing GVHD (Fowler. 2006. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 57: 225–244 and Ferrara and Reddy. 2006. Semin Hematol. 43: 3–10), whereas recent data demonstrated a significant role for the naturally occurring thymic-derived donor CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) (Bluestone and Abbas. 2003. Nat Rev Immunol. 3: 253–257 and Shevach. 2006. Immunity. 25: 195–201) in suppressing experimental GVHD after bone marrow transplantation (Blazar and Taylor. 2005. Biol Blood Marrow Transpl. 11: 46–49 and Joffe and van Meerwijk. 2006. Semin Immunol. 18: 128–135). Host APCs are required for induction of GVHD by the conventional donor T cells. However, it is not known whether they are also obligatory for donor Treg-mediated suppression of GVHD. Using multiple clinically relevant MHC-matched and -mismatched murine models of GVHD, we investigated the role of host APCs in the suppression of GVHD by donor Tregs. We found that alloantigen expression by the host APCs is necessary and sufficient for induction of GVHD protection by donor Tregs. This requirement was independent of their effect on the maintenance of Treg numbers and the production of IL-10 or IDO by the host APCs. PMID:20810991

  9. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIV{sub KU2} infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    SciTech Connect

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Hill, Lori; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Feng Lei; Simmons, Johnny; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2008-01-05

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-{gamma}-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIV{sub KU2}. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-{gamma} production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-{gamma} producing CD4{sup +} cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies.

  10. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders.

  11. Comparative activity of biodegradable nanoparticles with aluminum adjuvants: antigen uptake by dendritic cells and induction of immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomofumi; Akagi, Takami; Toyama, Masaaki; Nishi, Yosuke; Shima, Fumiaki; Akashi, Mitsuru; Baba, Masanori

    2011-10-30

    Biodegradable poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to be an excellent antigen carrier. Antigen-carrying γ-PGA NPs were examined for their uptake by murine dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequent induction of antigen-specific immune responses in mice and compared with aluminum (AL) adjuvants. Ovalbumin (OVA)-carrying NPs (FITC-OVA-NPs) were taken up much more efficiently by DCs than OVA alone or its AL-associated form. Both OVA-NPs and OVA+AL were detected in an intracellular lysosome compartment of DCs. Furthermore, the uptake of γ-PGA NPs was inhibited in the presence of pinocytosis and phagocytosis inhibitors. Significantly higher induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells was observed in mice immunized with OVA-carrying γ-PGA NPs than in those immunized with OVA alone, OVA+AL, OVA+3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and OVA+AL+MPL. Thus, γ-PGA NPs may have great potential as an effective vaccine carrier and adjuvant for clinical use.

  12. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated induction of peripheral T(reg) cells and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens by peripheral regulatory T cells (pT(reg) cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure for the 'instruction' of naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into pT(reg) cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs were dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) were critical, for pT(reg) cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b(-) cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pT(reg) cells and, conversely, loss of transcription factor IRF8-dependent CD11b(-) cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in the induction of pT(reg) cells and their redundancy during the development of oral tolerance.

  13. Induction of antigen-specific regulatory T lymphocytes by human dendritic cells expressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Haifa; Godot, Véronique; Maillot, Marie-Christine; Prejean, Maria Victoria; Cohen, Nicolas; Krzysiek, Roman; Lemoine, François M; Zou, Weiping; Emilie, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) determine whether antigen presentation leads to immune activation or to tolerance. Tolerance-inducing DCs (also called regulatory DCs) act partly by generating regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The mechanism used by DCs to switch toward regulatory DCs during their differentiation is unclear. We show here that human DCs treated in vitro with glucocorticoids produce the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Antigen presentation by GILZ-expressing DCs generates CD25(high)FOXP3(+)CTLA-4/CD152(+) and interleukin-10-producing Tregs inhibiting the response of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This inhibition is specific to the antigen presented, and only proliferating CD4(+) T lymphocytes express the Treg markers. Interleukin-10 is required for Treg induction by GILZ-expressing DCs. It is also needed for the suppressive function of Tregs. Antigen-presenting cells from patients treated with glucocorticoids generate interleukin-10-secreting Tregs ex vivo. These antigen-presenting cells produce GILZ, which is needed for Treg induction. Therefore, GILZ is critical for commitment of DCs to differentiate into regulatory DCs and to the generation of antigen-specific Tregs. This mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids.

  14. From The Cover: Induction of antiviral immunity requires Toll-like receptor signaling in both stromal and dendritic cell compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ayuko; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2004-11-01

    Pattern recognition by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to be important for the induction of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. DCs, in turn, are critically important in the initiation of T cell responses. However, most viruses do not infect DCs. This recognition system poses a biological problem in ensuring that most viral infections be detected by pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, it is unknown what, if any, is the contribution of TLRs expressed by cells that are infected by a virus, versus TLRs expressed by DCs, in the initiation of antiviral adaptive immunity. Here we address these issues using a physiologically relevant model of mucosal infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. We demonstrate that innate immune recognition of viral infection occurs in two distinct stages, one at the level of the infected epithelial cells and the other at the level of the noninfected DCs. Importantly, both TLR-mediated recognition events are required for the induction of effector T cells. Our results demonstrate that virally infected tissues instruct DCs to initiate the appropriate class of effector T cell responses and reveal the critical importance of the stromal cells in detecting infectious agents through their own pattern recognition receptors. mucosal immunity | pattern recognition | viral infection

  15. Dendritic GIRK Channels Gate the Integration Window, Plateau Potentials, and Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Dorsal But Not Ventral CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Johnston, Daniel

    2017-04-05

    Studies comparing neuronal activity at the dorsal and ventral poles of the hippocampus have shown that the scale of spatial information increases and the precision with which space is represented declines from the dorsal to ventral end. These dorsoventral differences in neuronal output and spatial representation could arise due to differences in computations performed by dorsal and ventral CA1 neurons. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differences in dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity between dorsal and ventral CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus. Using a combination of somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we show that the threshold for LTP induction is higher in dorsal CA1 neurons and that a G-protein-coupled inward-rectifying potassium channel mediated regulation of dendritic plateau potentials and dendritic excitability underlies this gating. By contrast, similar regulation of LTP is absent in ventral CA1 neurons. Additionally, we show that generation of plateau potentials and LTP induction in dorsal CA1 neurons depends on the coincident activation of Schaffer collateral and temporoammonic inputs at the distal apical dendrites. The ventral CA1 dendrites, however, can generate plateau potentials in response to temporally dispersed excitatory inputs. Overall, our results highlight the dorsoventral differences in dendritic computation that could account for the dorsoventral differences in spatial representation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dorsal and ventral parts of the hippocampus encode spatial information at very different scales. Whereas the place-specific firing fields are small and precise at the dorsal end of the hippocampus, neurons at the ventral end have comparatively larger place fields. Here, we show that the dorsal CA1 neurons have a higher threshold for LTP induction and require coincident timing of excitatory synaptic inputs for the generation of dendritic plateau potentials. By contrast, ventral CA1

  16. Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Mwangi, Waithaka; Hernandez, Jesus

    2009-05-10

    Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-alpha treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells is dependent on TGF-beta but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-alpha treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

  17. TGF-β-induced Myelin Peptide-Specific Regulatory T Cells Mediate Antigen-Specific Suppression of Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Podojil, Joseph R.; Chang, Judy; Luo, Xunrong; Miller, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    The low number of natural regulatory T cells (nTreg cells) in the circulation specific for a particular antigen and concerns about the bystander suppressive capacity of expanded nTregs presents a major clinical challenge for nTreg-based therapeutic treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we demonstrate that naïve CD4+CD25-Foxp3- T cells specific for the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139-151 peptide, can be converted into CD25+Foxp3+ induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) when stimulated in the presence of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), retinoic acid and interleukin-2. These PLP139-151-specific iTreg cells (139-iTreg cells) have a phenotype similar to natural Treg cells, but additionally express an intermediate level of CD62L and a high level of CD103. Upon transfer into SJL/J mice, 139-iTreg cells undergo antigen-driven proliferation and are effective at suppressing induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by the cognate PLP139-151 peptide, but not PLP178-191 or a mixture of the two peptides. Furthermore, 139-iTregs inhibit delayed-type-hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to PLP139-151, but not PLP178-191, MOG35-55 or OVA323-339 in mice primed with a mixture of PLP139-151 and the other respective peptides. Additionally, 139-iTreg cells suppress the proliferation and activation of PLP139-151-, but not MOG35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in SJL/B6 F1 mice primed with a combination of PLP139-151 and MOG35-55. These findings suggest that antigen-specific-iTreg cells are amplified in vivo when exposed to cognate antigen under inflammatory conditions, and these activated iTreg cells suppress CD4+ responder T cells in an antigen-specific manner. PMID:20483764

  18. [Induction of monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation by asthmatic serum in a transendothelial trafficking model].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin-fu; Wang, Wen-lu; Li, Hong-yan; Zhang, Ming-shun; Ji, Xiao-hui; He, Shao-heng; Huang, Mao; Yin, Kai-sheng

    2011-03-01

    To explore the effect of asthmatic and healthy serum on differentiation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in a transendothelial trafficking model. The sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated from 12 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy volunteers, and monocytes were selected from PBMC using magnetic beads. The trypsin-digested human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at passage 2 from 5 healthy lying-in women were used to construct the transendothelial trafficking model under asthmatic or healthy serum, wherein MDDC were identified by silver nitrate staining and scanning electron microscopy. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Flow cytometry, ELISA and mixed leukocyte reaction were relevantly utilized to detect the phenotype, cytokine and T cell proliferation. (1) Monocytes traversed through HUVEC monolayer after 2 h, and reverse-transmigrated to develop into DC 48 h later. (2) The healthy serum stimulated monocytes into immature MDDC with lower CD(14) [(20 ± 5)%] (F = 49.01, P < 0.05), and higher HLA-DR, CD(80), CD(86) and CD(83) [(43 ± 4)%, (17.9 ± 3.5)%, (43 ± 11)% and (6.7 ± 1.8)%, respectively] (F = 10.35 - 40.17, all P < 0.05) than monocytes did before transmigration at 0 h [CD(14) (81 ± 6)%, HLA-DR (24 ± 5)%, CD(80) (2.8 ± 2.0)%, CD(86) (14 ± 4)% and CD(83) (0.9 ± 0.8)%, respectively]. (3) The asthmatic serum stimulated monocytes into mature MDDC, characteristic of dendrites, with similar HLA-DR and CD(86) [(55 ± 6)% and (59 ± 12)%] (F = 15.29 and 35.97, all P > 0.05), higher CD(80) and CD(83) [(49.7 ± 10.2)% and (30.2 ± 6.8)%] (F = 4.01 and 20.68, all P < 0.05), accompanied by increased levels of NF-κB activity, IL-12 p70 and T cell proliferation [(100 ± 11)%, (568 ± 43) ng/L and (2033 ± 198) cpm, respectively] (F = 49.23 - 350.84, all P < 0.05) relative to the healthy serum-stimulated immature MDDC [(12 ± 3)%, (220 ± 35) ng/L and

  19. Induction of protective CTL immunity against peptide transporter TAP-deficient tumors through dendritic cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Benedict; Grufman, Per; Fredriksson, Vanoohi; Andersson, Kenth; Roseboom, Marjet; Laban, Sandra; Camps, Marcel; Wolpert, Elisabeth Z; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Offringa, Rienk; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; van Hall, Thorbald

    2007-09-15

    A large proportion of human cancers show deficiencies in the MHC class I antigen-processing machinery. Such defects render tumors resistant to immune eradication by tumoricidal CTLs. We recently identified a unique population of CTL that selectively targets tumor immune-escape variants through recognition of MHC-presented peptides, termed TEIPP (T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing), expressed on cells lacking functional TAP-peptide transporters. Previously, we showed that vaccination with TEIPP peptides mediates protection against TAP-deficient tumors. Here, we further explored the concept of TEIPP-targeted therapy using a dendritic cell (DC)-based cellular vaccine. Impairment of TAP function in DC induced the presentation of endogenous TEIPP antigens by MHC class I molecules, and immunization with these DCs protected mice against the outgrowth of TAP-deficient lymphomas and fibrosarcomas. Immune analysis of vaccinated mice revealed strong TEIPP-specific CTL responses, and a crucial role for CD8(+) cells in tumor resistance. Finally, we show that TEIPP antigens could be successfully induced in wild-type DC by introducing the viral TAP inhibitor UL49.5. Our results imply that immune intervention strategies with TAP-inhibited DC could be developed for the treatment of antigen processing-deficient cancers in humans.

  20. Dendritic cells derived exosomes migration to spleen and induction of inflammation are regulated by CCR7

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Gao; Jie, Yuan; Haibo, Liu; Chaoneng, Wu; Dong, Huang; Jianbing, Zhu; Junjie, Guo; Leilei, Ma; Hongtao, Shi; Yunzeng, Zou; Junbo, Ge

    2017-01-01

    Mature dendritic cells (DCs) home to secondary lymphoid organs through CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7). Exosomes derived from DCs (DC-exos) are reported to migrate to spleen and induce inflammation in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that mature bone marrow DC-exos can activate immature DC and T cells in vitro. Then we intravenously injected DC-exos into C57BL/6 mice, observing that mature DC-exos accumulated more in spleen than immature DC-exos. These DC-exos in spleen could be uptaken by splenetic DCs and T cells and induce an inflammatory response. We further showed that the increased accumulation of mature DC-exos in spleen was regulated by CCR7, whose reduction led to a decrease of accumulation in spleen and attenuated inflammatory response in serum. These data provide us a new perspective to comprehensively understand exosomes, which might inherit some special functions from their parent cells and exert these functions in vivo. PMID:28223684

  1. Induction of human dendritic cell maturation using transfection with RNA encoding a dominant positive toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Abdel-Wahab, Zeinab; Dannull, Jens; Nair, Smita; Tyler, Douglas S; Gilboa, Eli; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Pruitt, Scott K

    2004-06-01

    Maturation of dendritic cells (DC) is critical for the induction of Ag-specific immunity. Ag-loaded DC matured with LPS, which mediates its effects by binding to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induce Ag-specific CTL in vitro and in vivo in animal models. However, clinical use of LPS is limited due to potential toxicity. Therefore, we sought to mimic the maturation-inducing effects of LPS on DC by stimulating TLR4-mediated signaling in the absence of exogenous LPS. We developed a constitutively active TLR4 (caTLR4) and demonstrated that transfection of human DC with RNA encoding caTLR4 led to IL-12 and TNF-alpha secretion. Transfection with caTLR4 RNA also induced a mature DC phenotype. Functionally, transfection of DC with caTLR4 RNA enhanced allostimulation of CD4(+) T cells. DC transfected with RNA encoding the MART (Melan-A/MART-1) melanoma Ag were then used to stimulate T cells in vitro. Cotransfection of these DC with caTLR4 RNA enhanced the generation of MART-specific CTL. This CTL activity was superior to that seen when DC maturation was induced using either LPS or a standard mixture of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1beta, and PGE(2)). We conclude that transfection of DC with RNA encoding a functional signaling protein, such as caTLR4, may provide a new tool for studying TLR signaling in DC and may be a promising approach for the induction of DC maturation for tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Lentiviral vectors for induction of self-differentiation and conditional ablation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pincha, M; Salguero, G; Wedekind, D; Sundarasetty, B S; Lin, A; Kasahara, N; Brugman, M H; Jirmo, A C; Modlich, U; Gutzmer, R; Büsche, G; Ganser, A; Stripecke, R

    2011-01-01

    Development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) in the field of immunotherapy and immune regeneration will strongly rely on biosafety of the gene transfer. We demonstrated previously the feasibility of ex vivo genetic programming of mouse bone marrow precursors with LVs encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), which induced autonomous differentiation of long-lived dendritic cells (DCs), referred to as self-differentiated myeloid-derived antigen-presenting-cells reactive against tumors (SMART-DCs). Here, LV biosafety was enhanced by using a DC-restricted and physiological promoter, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II promoter, and including co-expression of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (sr39HSV-TK) conditional suicide gene. Tricistronic vectors co-expressing sr39HSV-TK, GM-CSF and IL-4 transcriptionally regulated by the MHCII promoter or the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were compared. Despite the different gene transfer effects, such as the kinetics, levels of transgene expression and persistency of integrated vector copies, both vectors induced highly viable SMART-DCs, which persisted for at least 70 days in vivo and could be ablated with the pro-drug Ganciclovir (GCV). SMART-DCs co-expressing the tyrosine-related protein 2 melanoma antigen administered subcutaneously generated antigen-specific, anti-melanoma protective and therapeutic responses in the mouse B16 melanoma model. GCV administration after immunotherapy did not abrogate DC vaccination efficacy. This demonstrates proof-of-principle of genetically programmed DCs that can be ablated pharmacologically. PMID:21412283

  3. Induction of Dendritic Cell Maturation and Activation by a Potential Adjuvant, 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) is a chemically modified cyclic oligosaccharide produced from starch that is commonly used as an excipient. Although HP-β-CD has been suggested as a potential adjuvant for vaccines, its immunological properties and mechanism of action have yet to be characterized. In the present study, we investigated the maturation and activation of human dendritic cells (DCs) treated with HP-β-CD. We found that DCs stimulated with HP-β-CD exhibited a remarkable upregulation of costimulatory molecules, MHC proteins, and PD-L1/L2. In addition, the production of cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, was modestly increased in DCs when treated with HP-β-CD. Furthermore, HP-β-CD-sensitized DCs markedly induced the proliferation and activation of autologous T lymphocytes. HP-β-CD also induced a lipid raft formation in DCs. In contrast, filipin, a lipid raft inhibitor, attenuated HP-β-CD-induced DC maturation, the cytokine expression, and the T lymphocyte-stimulating activities. To determine the in vivo relevance of the results, we investigated the adjuvanticity of HP-β-CD and the modulation of DCs in a mouse footpad immunization model. When mice were immunized with ovalbumin in the presence of HP-β-CD through a hind footpad, serum ovalbumin-specific antibodies were markedly elevated. Concomitantly, DC populations expressing CD11c and MHC class II were increased in the draining lymph nodes, and the expression of costimulatory molecules was upregulated. Collectively, our data suggest that HP-β-CD induces phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs mainly mediated through lipid raft formation, which might mediate the adjuvanticity of HP-β-CD. PMID:27812358

  4. PD-L2 induction on dendritic cells exposed to Mycobacterium avium downregulates BCG-specific T cell response.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Coronel, Elizabeth; Camacho-Sandoval, Rosa; Bonifaz, Laura C; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The exposure to certain species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) can modulate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Mycobacterium avium has been postulated as a weak inducer of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. However, how the DC exposure to M. avium could contribute to the modulation of a BCG-specific CD4+ T cell response and the molecules involved remain unknown. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. avium either prior to exposure to BCG or as a unique stimulus. We found that M. avium induces high expression of PD-L2 (B7-DC) in BMDCs. This was dependent on IL-10 production through the TLR2-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Exposure to M. avium prior to BCG results in BMDCs that do not express co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the expression of PD-L2 and IL-10 was maintained. BMDCs exposed to M. avium impaired the activation of BCG-specific T cells through the PD-1: PD-L interaction. This suggests that a M. avium-induced phenotype in DCs might be implicated in the induction of mechanisms of tolerance that could impact the T cell response induced by BCG vaccination.

  5. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trevor RF; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  6. Aire regulates the transfer of antigen from mTECs to dendritic cells for induction of thymic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hubert, François-Xavier; Kinkel, Sarah A; Davey, Gayle M; Phipson, Belinda; Mueller, Scott N; Liston, Adrian; Proietto, Anna I; Cannon, Ping Z F; Forehan, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Wu, Li; Goodnow, Christopher C; Carbone, Francis R; Scott, Hamish S; Heath, William R

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the role of Aire in thymic selection, we examined the cellular requirements for generation of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in mice expressing OVA under the control of the rat insulin promoter. Aire deficiency reduced the number of mature single-positive OVA-specific CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in the thymus, independent of OVA expression. Importantly, it also contributed in 2 ways to OVA-dependent negative selection depending on the T-cell type. Aire-dependent negative selection of OVA-specific CD8 T cells correlated with Aire-regulated expression of OVA. By contrast, for OVA-specific CD4 T cells, Aire affected tolerance induction by a mechanism that operated independent of the level of OVA expression, controlling access of antigen presenting cells to medullary thymic epithelial cell (mTEC)-expressed OVA. This study supports the view that one mechanism by which Aire controls thymic negative selection is by regulating the indirect presentation of mTEC-derived antigens by thymic dendritic cells. It also indicates that mTECs can mediate tolerance by direct presentation of Aire-regulated antigens to both CD4 and CD8 T cells.

  7. Chaetocin enhances dendritic cell function via the induction of heat shock protein and cancer testis antigens in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ju; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Nu-Ri; Hoang, My-Dung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC)-based vaccines are considered useful in cancer immuno-therapy, and the interactions of DC and dying tumor cells are important and promising for cancer immunotherapy. We investigated whether chaetocin could be used to induce death of myeloma cells, for loading onto DCs can affect DCs function. In this study, we show that the dying myeloma cells treated with chaetocin resulted in the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 90, which was inhibited by antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, and showed an increase in the expression of MAGE-A3 and MAGE-C1/CT7. DCs loaded with chaetocin-treated dying myeloma cells produced low levels of IL-10 and enhanced the cross presentation of DCs. Additionally, these DCs most potently inhibited regulatory T cells, induced Th1 polarization and activated myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes compared with DCs loaded with UVB-irradiated dying myeloma cells. These results suggest that the pretreatment of myeloma cells with chaetocin can enhance DC function through the up-regulation of HSP90 and cancer testis antigens in dying myeloma cells and can potently induce the Th1 polarization of DCs and myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:28512265

  8. The Role of Plasmacytoid and Myeloid Dendritic Cells in Induction of Asthma in a Mouse Model and the Effect of a TLR9 Agonist on Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ji-Hun; Chung, Young-Jun; Hayashi, Tomoko; Lee, Jongdae; Raz, Eyal

    2011-07-01

    To determine the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) in priming effector T cells to induce allergy, and to evaluate the effect of immunostimulatory sequences (ISS, TLR9 agonist) on dendritic cells. Cultured mDC and pDC with/without ISS were injected intratracheally into sensitized Balb/C mice. Mice were sacrificed, and then pulmonary function tests, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), cell counts, and cytokine levels were evaluated. Migration of dendritic cells was also evaluated after ISS administration. In mice injected with mDC, airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil counts, and Th2 cytokine levels in BAL increased with increasing numbers of mDC injected. However, in mice injected with pDC, none of these changed, suggesting poor priming of T cells by pDC. In addition, mDC pulsed with ISS inhibited asthmatic reactions, and ISS administration inhibited migration of DC to the lung. We suggest that pDC played a limited role in priming T cells in this asthma model and that mDC played a major role in inducing asthma. In addition, ISS inhibited migration of DC to the lung.

  9. Serum amyloid A chemoattracts immature dendritic cells and indirectly provokes monocyte chemotaxis by induction of cooperating CC and CXC chemokines.

    PubMed

    Gouwy, Mieke; De Buck, Mieke; Pörtner, Noëmie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Proost, Paul; Struyf, Sofie; Van Damme, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase protein that is upregulated in inflammatory diseases and chemoattracts monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes via its G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor like 1/formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPRL1/FPR2). Here, we demonstrated that the SAA1α isoform also chemoattracts monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (DCs) in the Boyden and μ-slide chemotaxis assay and that its chemotactic activity for monocytes and DCs was indirectly mediated via rapid chemokine induction. Indeed, SAA1 induced significant amounts (≥5 ng/mL) of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CC chemokine ligand 3 (MIP-1α/CCL3) and interleukin-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 (IL-8/CXCL8) in monocytes and DCs in a dose-dependent manner within 3 h. However, SAA1 also directly activated monocytes and DCs for signaling and chemotaxis without chemokine interference. SAA1-induced monocyte migration was nevertheless significantly prevented (60-80% inhibition) in the constant presence of desensitizing exogenous MIP-1α/CCL3, neutralizing anti-MIP-1α/CCL3 antibody, or a combination of CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) and CCR5 antagonists, indicating that this endogenously produced CC chemokine was indirectly contributing to SAA1-mediated chemotaxis. Further, anti-IL-8/CXCL8 antibody neutralized SAA1-induced monocyte migration, suggesting that endogenous IL-8/CXCL8 acted in concert with MIP-1α/CCL3. This explained why SAA1 failed to synergize with exogenously added MIP-1α/CCL3 or stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)/CXCL12 in monocyte and DC chemotaxis. In addition to direct leukocyte activation, SAA1 induces a chemotactic cascade mediated by expression of cooperating chemokines to prolong leukocyte recruitment to the inflammatory site.

  10. The role of ICOS in directing T cell responses: ICOS-dependent induction of T cell anergy by tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Huter, Eva; Hubo, Mario; Horn, Julia; Knop, Jürgen; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kroczek, Richard A; Stoll, Sabine; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2009-03-15

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance in steady-state conditions through induction of anergic, IL-10-producing T cells with suppressive properties. ICOS, an activation-induced member of the CD28 family on T cells, is involved in the induction of IL-10, which itself could contribute to induction of anergy and development of suppressive T cells. Therefore, we analyzed the functional role of ICOS in the differentiation process of human CD4(+) T cells upon their interaction with tolerogenic DC. We compared the functional properties of CD4(+) T cells from healthy volunteers and ICOS-deficient patients after stimulation with tolerogenic DC. We report that induction of T cell anergy and suppressive capacity is completely blocked after knockdown of ICOS expression in T cells as well as after blocking of ICOS-ICOS ligand interaction in DC/T cell cocultures. Moreover, CD4(+) T cells from ICOS-deficient patients were completely resistant to anergy induction and differentiation into suppressive T cells even after supplementation of IL-10. Furthermore, ICOS/ICOS ligand interaction stabilizes IL-10R expression on T cells and thus renders them sensitive to IL-10 effects. Taken together, these results indicate a crucial role for ICOS in the induction of peripheral tolerance maintained by tolerogenic DC mediated mostly via an IL-10-independent mechanism.

  11. Gene expression profiles identify both MyD88-independent and MyD88-dependent pathways involved in the maturation of dendritic cells mediated by heparan sulfate: A novel adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meini; Wang, Haixuan; Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Li, Yanhan; Li, Jianfang; Hu, Ningzhu; Wei, Yiju; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yunzhang

    2015-01-01

    The traditional vaccine adjuvant research is mainly based on the trial and error method, and the mechanisms underlying the immune system stimulation remaining largely unknown. We previously demonstrated that heparan sulfate (HS), a TLR-4 ligand and endogenous danger signal, effectively enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses in mice immunized by HBsAg. This study aimed to evaluate whether HS induces better humoral immune responses against inactivated Hepatitis A or Rabies Vaccines, respectively, compared with traditional adjuvants (e.g. Alum and complete Freund's adjuvant). In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of its adjuvanticity, the gene expression pattern of peripheral blood monocytes derived DCs (dendritic cells) stimulated with HS was analyzed at different times points. Total RNA was hybridized to Agilent SurePrint G3 Human Gene Expression 8 × 60 K one-color oligo-microarray. Through intersection analysis of the microarray results, we found that the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway was significantly activated, and NF-kB, TRAF3 and IRF7 were activated as early as 12 h, and MyD88 was activated at 48 h post-stimulation. Furthermore, the expression of the surface marker CD83 and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was up-regulated as early as 24 h. Therefore, we speculated that HS-induced human monocyte-derived DC maturation may occur through both MyD88-independent and dependent pathways, but primarily through the former (TRIF pathway). These data provide an important basis for understanding the mechanisms underlying HS enhancement of the immune response. PMID:25668674

  12. Gene expression profiles identify both MyD88-independent and MyD88-dependent pathways involved in the maturation of dendritic cells mediated by heparan sulfate: a novel adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meini; Wang, Haixuan; Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Li, Yanhan; Li, Jianfang; Hu, Ningzhu; Wei, Yiju; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-01-01

    The traditional vaccine adjuvant research is mainly based on the trial and error method, and the mechanisms underlying the immune system stimulation remaining largely unknown. We previously demonstrated that heparan sulfate (HS), a TLR-4 ligand and endogenous danger signal, effectively enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses in mice immunized by HBsAg. This study aimed to evaluate whether HS induces better humoral immune responses against inactivated Hepatitis A or Rabies Vaccines, respectively, compared with traditional adjuvants (e.g. Alum and complete Freund's adjuvant). In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of its adjuvanticity, the gene expression pattern of peripheral blood monocytes derived DCs (dendritic cells) stimulated with HS was analyzed at different times points. Total RNA was hybridized to Agilent SurePrint G3 Human Gene Expression 8×60 K one-color oligo-microarray. Through intersection analysis of the microarray results, we found that the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway was significantly activated, and NF-kB, TRAF3 and IRF7 were activated as early as 12 h, and MyD88 was activated at 48 h post-stimulation. Furthermore, the expression of the surface marker CD83 and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was up-regulated as early as 24 h. Therefore, we speculated that HS-induced human monocyte-derived DC maturation may occur through both MyD88-independent and dependent pathways, but primarily through the former (TRIF pathway). These data provide an important basis for understanding the mechanisms underlying HS enhancement of the immune response.

  13. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  14. An essential protective role of IL-10 in the immunological mechanism underlying resistance vs susceptibility to lupus induction by dendritic cells and dying cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Guang-Sheng; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To define the role of IL-10 in lupus pathogenesis, and to understand the immunological mechanisms underlying resistance vs susceptibility to lupus disease induction by dendritic cells (DCs) and dying cells. Methods. Groups of IL-10-deficient and normal C57BL/6 mice were injected with syngenic DCs that had ingested necrotic cells prepared by either freeze–thaw cycle (DC/necF/T) or heat shock (DC/necH/S) procedures, or with DC or necrotic cells alone, or with PBS only. Disease development, including proteinuria and renal pathological changes, was monitored. Levels of autoantibodies against different lupus-associated nuclear antigens were measured by ELISAs, and IC deposition in the kidneys was confirmed by immunostaining. Results. No significant proteinuria was detected in the mice. However, striking renal pathological changes typical of IC-mediated GN were consistently observed in the DC/necF/T-treated IL-10−/− mice. These included glomerular hypercellularity and macrophage infiltration, renal IC deposition, circulating kidney-reactive autoantibodies and the presence of immunoglobulin G2 isotype-specific antibody complexes in the diseased kidneys. We demonstrated further that host-derived IL-10 was primarily responsible for protecting against the induction of pathogenic Th1 type of autoantibody responses in the mice. Conclusion. IL-10 protects against the induction of lupus-like renal end-organ damage by down-regulating pathogenic Th1 responses. PMID:21727182

  15. Generation of IL-23 Producing Dendritic Cells (DCs) by Airborne Fungi Regulates Fungal Pathogenicity via the Induction of TH-17 Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Lande, Roberto; Gregorio, Josh; Meller, Stephan; Goldman, William E.; Gilliet, Michel; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) producing T helper cells (TH-17) comprise a newly recognized T cell subset with an emerging role in adaptive immunity to a variety of fungi. Whether different airborne fungi trigger a common signaling pathway for TH-17 induction, and whether this ability is related to the inherent pathogenic behavior of each fungus is currently unknown. Here we show that, as opposed to primary pathogenic fungi (Histoplasma capsulatum), opportunistic fungal pathogens (Aspergillus and Rhizopus) trigger a common innate sensing pathway in human dendritic cells (DCs) that results in robust production of IL-23 and drives TH-17 responses. This response requires activation of dectin-1 by the fungal cell wall polysaccharide b-glucan that is selectively exposed during the invasive growth of opportunistic fungi. Notably, unmasking of b-glucan in the cell wall of a mutant of Histoplasma not only abrogates the pathogenicity of this fungus, but also triggers the induction of IL-23 producing DCs. Thus, b-glucan exposure in the fungal cell wall is essential for the induction of IL-23/TH-17 axis and may represent a key factor that regulates protective immunity to opportunistic but not pathogenic fungi. PMID:20886035

  16. Generation of IL-23 producing dendritic cells (DCs) by airborne fungi regulates fungal pathogenicity via the induction of T(H)-17 responses.

    PubMed

    Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Lande, Roberto; Gregorio, Josh; Meller, Stephan; Goldman, William E; Gilliet, Michel; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2010-09-23

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) producing T helper cells (T(H)-17) comprise a newly recognized T cell subset with an emerging role in adaptive immunity to a variety of fungi. Whether different airborne fungi trigger a common signaling pathway for T(H)-17 induction, and whether this ability is related to the inherent pathogenic behavior of each fungus is currently unknown. Here we show that, as opposed to primary pathogenic fungi (Histoplasma capsulatum), opportunistic fungal pathogens (Aspergillus and Rhizopus) trigger a common innate sensing pathway in human dendritic cells (DCs) that results in robust production of IL-23 and drives T(H)-17 responses. This response requires activation of dectin-1 by the fungal cell wall polysaccharide b-glucan that is selectively exposed during the invasive growth of opportunistic fungi. Notably, unmasking of b-glucan in the cell wall of a mutant of Histoplasma not only abrogates the pathogenicity of this fungus, but also triggers the induction of IL-23 producing DCs. Thus, b-glucan exposure in the fungal cell wall is essential for the induction of IL-23/T(H)-17 axis and may represent a key factor that regulates protective immunity to opportunistic but not pathogenic fungi.

  17. Protein kinase Mζ is essential for the induction and maintenance of dopamine-induced long-term potentiation in apical CA1 dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Sacktor, Todd Charlton; Frey, Julietta U.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic D1/D5-receptor-mediated processes are important for certain forms of memory as well as for a cellular model of memory, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. D1/D5-receptor function is required for the induction of the protein synthesis-dependent maintenance of CA1-LTP (L-LTP) through activation of the cAMP/PKA-pathway. In earlier studies we had reported a synergistic interaction of D1/D5-receptor function and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptors for L-LTP. Furthermore, we have found the requirement of the atypical protein kinase C isoform, protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ) for conventional electrically induced L-LTP, in which PKMζ has been identified as a LTP-specific plasticity-related protein (PRP) in apical CA1-dendrites. Here, we investigated whether the dopaminergic pathway activates PKMζ. We found that application of dopamine (DA) evokes a protein synthesis-dependent LTP that requires synergistic NMDA-receptor activation and protein synthesis in apical CA1-dendrites. We identified PKMζ as a DA-induced PRP, which exerted its action at activated synaptic inputs by processes of synaptic tagging. PMID:21084457

  18. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  19. Induction of Regulatory Dendritic Cells by Lactobacillus paracasei L9 Prevents Allergic Sensitization to Bovine β-Lactoglobulin in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ren, Fazheng; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Lu; Hao, Yanling; Luo, Xugang

    2015-10-01

    Supplementation with probiotics can protect against the development of food allergies by modulating the host immune response; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the allergy-reducing effects of regulatory dendritic cells (regDCs) induced by Lactobacillus paracasei L9 (L9) in β-lactoglobulin (BLG)- sensitized mice. The L9 supplement suppressed the aberrant balance of Th1/Th2 responses to BLG in mice, via upregulation of the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cell responses. The amount of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in mesenteric lymph nodes increased by 51.85%. Furthermore, administration of L9 significantly induced the expression of CD103 and reduced the maturation status of DCs in mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and spleen. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) were activated by L9 in vitro, with an approximate 1.31-fold and 19.57-fold increase in expression of CD103 in CD11c+DCs and the level of IL-10 production, respectively, while the expression of CD86 did not change significantly. These data demonstrate that L9 reduced the BLG allergic sensitization, likely through regDCs mediated active suppression.

  20. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus shows poor replication but significant induction of antiviral responses in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Westenius, Veera; Rönkkö, Esa; Munster, Vincent J.; Melén, Krister; Österlund, Pamela; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    In this study we assessed the ability of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) to replicate and induce innate immunity in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (MDDCs), and compared it with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Assessments of viral protein and RNA levels in infected cells showed that both viruses were impaired in their ability to replicate in these cells. Some induction of IFN-λ1, CXCL10 and MxA mRNAs in both macrophages and MDDCs was seen in response to MERS-CoV infection, but almost no such induction was observed in response to SARS-CoV infection. ELISA and Western blot assays showed clear production of CXCL10 and MxA in MERS-CoV-infected macrophages and MDDCs. Our data suggest that SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV replicate poorly in human macrophages and MDDCs, but MERS-CoV is nonetheless capable of inducing a readily detectable host innate immune response. Our results highlight a clear difference between the viruses in activating host innate immune responses in macrophages and MDDCs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of infection. PMID:26602089

  1. Interleukin-27 Enhances the Potential of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation from Monocyte-derived Macrophages and Dendritic cells by Induction of p47phox

    PubMed Central

    Sowrirajan, Bharatwaj; Saito, Yoshiro; Poudyal, Deepak; Chen, Qian; Sui, Hongyan; DeRavin, Suk See; Imamichi, Hiromi; Sato, Toyotaka; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Noguchi, Noriko; Malech, Harry L.; Lane, H. Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-27, a member of the IL-12 cytokine family, plays an important and diverse role in the function of the immune system. We have previously demonstrated that IL-27 is an anti-viral cytokine which inhibits HIV-1, HIV-2, Influenza virus and herpes simplex virus infection, and enhances the potential of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating activity during differentiation of monocytes to macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of the enhanced potential for ROS generation by IL-27. Real time PCR, western blot and knock down assays demonstrate that IL-27 is able to enhance the potential of superoxide production not only during differentiation but also in terminally differentiated-macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDC) in association with the induction of p47phox, a cytosolic component of the ROS producing enzyme, NADPH oxidase, and the increase in amounts of phosphorylated p47phox upon stimulation. We also demonstrate that IL-27 is able to induce extracellular superoxide dismutase during differentiation of monocytes but not in terminal differentiated macrophages. Since ROS plays an important role in a variety of inflammation, our data demonstrate that IL-27 is a potent regulator of ROS induction and may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:28240310

  2. A critical role for Syk protein tyrosine kinase in Fc receptor-mediated antigen presentation and induction of dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, Christine; Orbach, Daniel; Veron, Philippe; Schweighoffer, Edina; Colucci, Francesco; Gamberale, Romina; Ioan-Facsinay, Andrea; Verbeek, Sjef; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Bonnerot, Christian; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Di Santo, James; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2003-01-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the only APCs capable of initiating adaptive immune responses. The initiation of immune responses requires that DCs 1) internalize and present Ags; and 2) undergo a differentiation process, called "maturation", which transforms DCs into efficient APCs. DC maturation may be initiated by the engagement of different surface receptors, including certain cytokine receptors (such as TNFR), Toll-like receptors, CD40, and FcRs. The early activation events that link receptor engagement and DC maturation are not well characterized. We found that FcR engagement by immune complexes induced the phosphorylation of Syk, a protein tyrosine kinase acting immediately downstream of FcRs. Syk was dispensable for DC differentiation in vitro and in vivo, but was strictly required for immune complexes internalization and subsequent Ag presentation to T lymphocytes. Importantly, Syk was also required for the induction of DC maturation and IL-12 production after FcR engagement, but not after engagement of other surface receptors, such as TNFR or Toll-like receptors. Therefore, protein tyrosine phosphorylation by Syk represents a novel pathway for the induction of DC maturation.

  3. Rapid dendritic cell activation and resistance to allotolerance induction in anti-CD154-treated mice receiving CD47-deficient donor-specific transfusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuantao; Wang, Hui; Bronson, Roderick; Fu, Yaowen; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2014-03-01

    CD47-SIRPα signaling plays an important role in regulating macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) activation. Here we investigated the role of CD47 expression on donor cells in tolerance induction by combined treatment with donor-specific transfusion (DST) plus anti-CD154 mAb in a mouse model of fully MHC-mismatched heart allotransplantation. The majority of BALB/c recipient mice that received anti-CD154 and CD47(+/+) B6 splenocytes (DST) showed indefinite donor heart survival (median survival time, MST > 150 days). Donor heart survival was improved in anti-CD154-treated BALB/c mice that received CD47(+/-) (MST = 90 days) or CD47(-/-) B6 DST (MST = 42 days) when compared to the nontreated (MST = 7 days) and anti-CD154 alone-treated (MST = 15 days) controls, but significantly reduced when compared to mice receiving anti-CD154 plus CD47(+/+) B6 DST. Recipient mice treated with anti-CD154 plus CD47(-/-) or CD47(+/-) DST also showed significantly increased antidonor, but not anti-third-party, MLR responses compared to those receiving anti-CD154 and CD47(+/+) DST. Furthermore, CD47(-/-) DST induced rapid activation of CD11c(hi)SIRPα(hi)CD8α(-) DCs via a mechanism independent of donor alloantigens. These results demonstrated that CD47 expression on donor cells is essential to the success of tolerance induction by combined therapy with DST and CD40/CD154 blockade.

  4. Therapeutic reversal of food allergen sensitivity by mature retinoic acid-differentiated dendritic cell induction of LAG3(+)CD49b(-)Foxp3(-) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Dawicki, Wojciech; Li, Chunyan; Town, Jennifer; Zhang, Xiaobei; Gordon, John R

    2017-05-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening condition for which we have limited therapeutic options. Although specific immunotherapy for food allergies is becoming more effective, it is still laborious and carries substantial risk of adverse events. On the other hand, regulatory dendritic cell (DC) therapy is effective in mouse models of allergic disease and has been shown to work with TH2 cells from atopic asthmatic patients. We assessed whether DC immunotherapy could reverse food allergen sensitivity in mouse models to provide proof of concept relating to their use in the clinic. We generated and characterized mature retinoic acid-skewed dendritic cells (DC-RAs) and assessed their abilities to reverse ovalbumin or peanut allergies in mouse models, as well as their operative mechanisms. DC-RAs displayed a mature yet tolerogenic phenotype, expressing IL-10, TGF-β, IL-27, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A2 but not IL-12 or IL-35; IL-10 and TGF-β together drove their suppression of TH2 cell proliferation. Delivery of specific allergen-presenting DC-RAs to half-maximally sensitized mice with ovalbumin or peanut allergy reduced anaphylactic responses to oral allergen challenge by 84% to 90%, as well as diarrhea, mast cell activation, and TH2 cytokine responses and serum allergen-specific IgE/IgG1 levels. DC-RA expression of IL-27 was important to their induction of CD25(+) lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3)(+), CD49b(-), forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)(-) regulatory T cells in vitro, such that β subunit of IL-27 (Ebi)(-/-) (ie, IL-27-incompetent) DC-RAs were ineffective in inducing food allergen tolerance. Our data indicate that regulatory DC immunotherapy can be effective for food allergies and suggest that induction of Foxp3(-) regulatory T cells might be a useful strategy for tolerance induction in this context. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction of leukemia-specific cytotoxic response by cross-presentation of late-apoptotic leukemic blasts by autologous dendritic cells of nonleukemic origin.

    PubMed

    Spisek, Radek; Chevallier, Patrice; Morineau, Nadine; Milpied, Noël; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Meflah, Khaled; Gregoire, Marc

    2002-05-15

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are monoclonal proliferations of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors in blood and bone marrow. Long-term remissions are achieved in <50% of patients. There is hope that activation of specific antileukemic immune responses could efficiently eliminate minimal residual disease at the end of chemotherapy and decrease the frequency of relapses. It was demonstrated that AML leukemic blasts can acquire the morphology and phenotype of dendritic cells (DCs), i.e., differentiate into leukemic DCs. However, this method has limitations as a potential immunotherapy. The alternative approach for the induction of leukemia-specific cytotoxicity we explored in this study consisted of using DCs of nonleukemic origin, pulsed with autologous apoptotic leukemic blasts. We show that mature pulsed nonleukemic DCs were successfully generated from remission samples of all tested patients with minimal interindividual differences. Mature pulsed DCs were used as antigen-presenting cells for leukemia-specific CTL induction. Specific cytotoxic activity against autologous AML blasts was demonstrated. Tumor lysis was autologous blast specific, with no killing activity against allogeneic leukemic cells or autologous mature unpulsed DCs and was MHC class I and class II restricted. In one patient, autologous CTLs stimulated by leukemic DCs or pulsed nonleukemic DCs showed similar significant cytotoxic activity against autologous AML cells. These findings demonstrate the induction of leukemia-specific cytotoxic response by nonleukemic mature DCs cross-presenting apoptotic leukemic blasts and offer a complementary approach to the use of leukemic DCs. We believe that this strategy permits the generation of DC vaccines for the majority of patients with hematological malignancies.

  6. CpG and double-stranded RNA trigger human NK cells by Toll-like receptors: Induction of cytokine release and cytotoxicity against tumors and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sivori, Simona; Falco, Michela; Chiesa, Mariella Della; Carlomagno, Simona; Vitale, Massimo; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors responible for triggering cells of innate immunity. In this study we investigated the expression and function of TLRs 3 and 9 in human natural killer (NK) cells. In the presence of IL-12, freshly isolated NK cells responded to double-stranded RNA or unmethylated CpG DNA and expressed CD69 and CD25 activation markers. Because both markers were expressed by virtually all NK cells, this would suggest that most of them can be triggered by TLRs. Remarkably, NK cell stimulation also resulted in the induction of their functional program as revealed by IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α release and by up-regulation of cytolytic activity against tumor cells. IL-8 could efficiently substitute IL-12 in supporting NK cell responses to TLR-mediated stimulation. Importantly, freshly isolated NK cells acquired the ability to lyse immature dendritic cells after stimulation with double-stranded RNA and IL-12. However, responses to these stimuli were not restricted to fresh NK cells, because significant responses were also detected in polyclonal NK cells cultured in the presence of exogenous IL-2 for several weeks. The analysis of NK cell clones revealed some degree of heterogeneity in the ability to respond to TLR stimulation also among NK clones derived from a single donor. These data suggest that stimuli acting on TLR not only activate immature dendritic cells to release IL-12 but also render NK cells capable of receiving triggering signals from pathogen-associated molecules, thus exerting a regulatory control on the early steps of innate immune responses against infectious agents. PMID:15218108

  7. CpG and double-stranded RNA trigger human NK cells by Toll-like receptors: induction of cytokine release and cytotoxicity against tumors and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sivori, Simona; Falco, Michela; Della Chiesa, Mariella; Carlomagno, Simona; Vitale, Massimo; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2004-07-06

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors responsible for triggering cells of innate immunity. In this study we investigated the expression and function of TLRs 3 and 9 in human natural killer (NK) cells. In the presence of IL-12, freshly isolated NK cells responded to double-stranded RNA or unmethylated CpG DNA and expressed CD69 and CD25 activation markers. Because both markers were expressed by virtually all NK cells, this would suggest that most of them can be triggered by TLRs. Remarkably, NK cell stimulation also resulted in the induction of their functional program as revealed by IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha release and by up-regulation of cytolytic activity against tumor cells. IL-8 could efficiently substitute IL-12 in supporting NK cell responses to TLR-mediated stimulation. Importantly, freshly isolated NK cells acquired the ability to lyse immature dendritic cells after stimulation with double-stranded RNA and IL-12. However, responses to these stimuli were not restricted to fresh NK cells, because significant responses were also detected in polyclonal NK cells cultured in the presence of exogenous IL-2 for several weeks. The analysis of NK cell clones revealed some degree of heterogeneity in the ability to respond to TLR stimulation also among NK clones derived from a single donor. These data suggest that stimuli acting on TLR not only activate immature dendritic cells to release IL-12 but also render NK cells capable of receiving triggering signals from pathogen-associated molecules, thus exerting a regulatory control on the early steps of innate immune responses against infectious agents.

  8. Dendritic Cell Subsets in Type 1 Diabetes: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell mediated autoimmune disease characterized by immune mediated destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. Dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of T1D and are also used as immunotherapeutic agents. Plasmacytoid (p)DC have been shown to have both protective and pathogenic effects and a newly described merocytic DC population has been shown to break tolerance in the mouse model of T1D, the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. We have used DC populations to prevent the onset of T1D in NOD mice and clinical trials of DC therapy in T1D diabetes have been initiated. In this review we will critically examine the recent published literature on the role of DC subsets in the induction and regulation of the autoimmune response in T1D. PMID:24367363

  9. Induction of innate and adaptive immunity by delivery of poly dA:dT to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbuto, Scott; Idoyaga, Juliana; Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Longhi, Maria P; Breton, Gaëlle; Steinman, Ralph M; Muir, Tom W

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) is a promising vaccination strategy. However, to ensure immunity, the approach depends on coadministration of an adjuvant. Here we ask whether targeting of both adjuvant and antigen to DCs is sufficient to induce immunity. Using a protein ligation method, we develop a general approach for linking the immune stimulant, poly dA:dT (pdA:dT), to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for DEC205 (DEC). We show that DEC-specific mAbs deliver pdA:dT to DCs for the efficient production of type I interferon in human monocyte-derived DCs and in mice. Notably, adaptive T-cell immunity is elicited when mAbs specific for DEC–pdA:dT are used as the activation stimuli and are administered together with a DC-targeted antigen. Collectively, our studies indicate that DCs can integrate innate and adaptive immunity in vivo and suggest that dual delivery of antigen and adjuvant to DCs might be an efficient approach to vaccine development. PMID:23416331

  10. Induction of innate and adaptive immunity by delivery of poly dA:dT to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Barbuto, Scott; Idoyaga, Juliana; Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Longhi, Maria P; Breton, Gaëlle; Steinman, Ralph M; Muir, Tom W

    2013-04-01

    Targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) is a promising vaccination strategy. However, to ensure immunity, the approach depends on coadministration of an adjuvant. Here we ask whether targeting of both adjuvant and antigen to DCs is sufficient to induce immunity. Using a protein ligation method, we develop a general approach for linking the immune stimulant, poly dA:dT (pdA:dT), to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for DEC205 (DEC). We show that DEC-specific mAbs deliver pdA:dT to DCs for the efficient production of type I interferon in human monocyte-derived DCs and in mice. Notably, adaptive T-cell immunity is elicited when mAbs specific for DEC-pdA:dT are used as the activation stimuli and are administered together with a DC-targeted antigen. Collectively, our studies indicate that DCs can integrate innate and adaptive immunity in vivo and suggest that dual delivery of antigen and adjuvant to DCs might be an efficient approach to vaccine development.

  11. Induction of specific antitumor immunity in the mouse with the electrofusion product of tumor cells and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Siders, William M; Vergilis, Kristin L; Johnson, Carrie; Shields, Jacqueline; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2003-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells capable of inducing primary T-cell responses. Several immunotherapy treatment strategies involve manipulation of DCs, both in vivo and ex vivo, to promote the immunogenic presentation of tumor-associated antigens. In this study, an electrofusion protocol was developed to induce fusion between tumor cells and allogeneic bone marrow-derived DCs. Preimmunization with irradiated electrofusion product was found to provide partial to complete protection from tumor challenge in the murine Renca renal cell carcinoma model and the B16 and M3 melanoma models. Vaccinated survivors developed specific immunological memory and were able to reject a subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor cells but not a syngeneic unrelated tumor line. Antitumor protection in the B16 model was accompanied by the development of a polyclonal cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against defined melanoma-associated antigens. The therapeutic potential of this type of approach was suggested by the ability of a Renca-DC electrofusion product to induce tumor rejection in a substantial percentage of hosts (60%) bearing pre-established tumor cells. These results indicate that treatment with electrofused tumor cells and allogeneic DCs is capable of inducing a potent antitumor response and could conceivably be applied to a wide range of cancer indications for which tumor-associated antigens have not been identified.

  12. TLR-independent induction of dendritic cell maturation and adaptive immunity by negative-strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    López, Carolina B; Moltedo, Bruno; Alexopoulou, Lena; Bonifaz, Laura; Flavell, Richard A; Moran, Thomas M

    2004-12-01

    TLR signaling leads to dendritic cell (DC) maturation and immunity to diverse pathogens. The stimulation of TLRs by conserved viral structures is the only described mechanism leading to DC maturation after a virus infection. In this report, we demonstrate that mouse myeloid DCs mature normally after in vivo and in vitro infection with Sendai virus (SeV) in the absence of TLR3, 7, 8, or 9 signaling. DC maturation by SeV requires virus replication not necessary for TLR-mediated triggering. Moreover, DCs deficient in TLR signaling efficiently prime for Th1 immunity after infection with influenza or SeV, generating IFN-gamma-producing T cells, CTLs and antiviral Abs. We have previously demonstrated that SeV induces DC maturation independently of the presence of type I IFN, which has been reported to mature DCs in a TLR-independent manner. The data presented here provide evidence for the existence of a novel intracellular pathway independent of TLR-mediated signaling responsible for live virus triggering of DC maturation and demonstrate its critical role in the onset of antiviral immunity. The revelation of this pathway should stimulate invigorating research into the mechanism for virus-induced DC maturation and immunity.

  13. Interleukin 10 (IL-10)-mediated Immunosuppression: MARCH-I INDUCTION REGULATES ANTIGEN PRESENTATION BY MACROPHAGES BUT NOT DENDRITIC CELLS.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sharad K; Cho, Kyung-Jin; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-11-06

    Efficient immune responses require regulated antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. IL-10 inhibits the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages to stimulate antigen-specific CD4 T cells; however, the mechanisms by which IL-10 suppresses antigen presentation remain poorly understood. We now report that IL-10 stimulates expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I in activated macrophages, thereby down-regulating MHC-II, CD86, and antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. By contrast, IL-10 does not stimulate March-I expression in DCs, does not suppress MHC-II or CD86 expression on either resting or activated DCs, and does not affect antigen presentation by activated DCs. IL-10 does, however, inhibit the process of DC activation itself, thereby reducing the efficiency of antigen presentation in a March-I-independent manner. Thus, IL-10 suppression of antigen presenting cell function in macrophages is March-I-dependent, whereas in DCs, suppression is March- I-independent. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Extranodal induction of therapeutic immunity in the tumor microenvironment after intratumoral delivery of Tbet gene-modified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Taylor, J L; Sabins, N C; Lowe, D B; Qu, Y; You, Z; Storkus, W J

    2013-08-01

    Murine dendritic cells (DC) transduced to express the Type-1 transactivator T-bet (i.e. mDC.Tbet) and delivered intratumorally as a therapy are superior to control wild-type DC in slowing the growth of established subcutaneous MCA205 sarcomas in vivo. Optimal antitumor efficacy of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy was dependent on host natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells, and required mDC.Tbet expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, but was independent of the capacity of the injected mDC.Tbet to produce proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-12 family members or interferon-γ) or to migrate to tumor-draining lymph nodes based on CCR7 ligand chemokine recruitment. Conditional (CD11c-DTR) or genetic (BATF3(-/-)) deficiency in host antigen-crosspresenting DC did not diminish the therapeutic action of intratumorally delivered wild-type mDC.Tbet. Interestingly, we observed that intratumoral delivery of mDC.Tbet (versus control mDC.Null) promoted the acute infiltration of NK cells and naive CD45RB(+) T cells into the tumor microenvironment (TME) in association with elevated expression of NK- and T-cell-recruiting chemokines by mDC.Tbet. When taken together, our data support a paradigm for extranodal (cross)priming of therapeutic Type-1 immunity in the TME after intratumoral delivery of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy.

  15. Transient systemic inflammation does not alter the induction of tolerance to gastric autoantigens by migratory dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Dorothée; Ross, Ellen M; Allen, Stacey; Read, Simon; Houghton, Fiona J; Bedoui, Sammy; Boon, Louis; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that activation of dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigens during inflammation may lead to activation of autoreactive T cells and the development of autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, we examined the presentation of the autoantigen recognized in autoimmune gastritis, gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase, which is naturally expressed in the stomach and is constitutively presented in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. Systemic administration to mice of the TLR9 agonist CpG DNA, agonist anti-CD40 Ab, or TLR4 agonist LPS all failed to abrogate the process of peripheral clonal deletion of H(+)/K(+) ATPase-specific CD4 T cells or promote the development of autoimmune gastritis. We demonstrated that migratory DCs from the stomach-draining lymph nodes are the only DC subset capable of constitutively presenting the endogenous gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase autoantigen in its normal physiological context. Analysis of costimulatory molecules indicated that, relative to resident DCs, migratory DCs displayed a partially activated phenotype in the steady state. Furthermore, migratory DCs were refractory to stimulation by transient exposure to TLR agonists, as they failed to upregulate costimulatory molecules, secrete significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, or induce differentiation of effector T cells. Together, these data show that transient systemic inflammation failed to break tolerance to the gastric autoantigen, as migratory DCs presenting the gastric autoantigen remain tolerogenic under such conditions, demonstrating the robust nature of peripheral tolerance.

  16. Route of administration modulates the induction of dendritic cell vaccine-induced antigen-specific T cells in advanced melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lesterhuis, W Joost; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty; Lambeck, Annechien J A; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Jacobs, Joannes F M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; de Boer, Annemiek J; Croockewit, Sandra; van Rossum, Michelle M; Mus, Roel; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Lucas, Sophie; Adema, Gosse J; Punt, Cornelis J A; Figdor, Carl G

    2011-09-01

    It is unknown whether the route of administration influences dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. We compared the effect of intradermal versus intranodal administration of a DC vaccine on induction of immunologic responses in melanoma patients and examined whether concomitant administration of interleukin (IL)-2 increases the efficacy of the DC vaccine. HLA-A2.1(+) melanoma patients scheduled for regional lymph node dissection were vaccinated four times biweekly via intradermal or intranodal injection with 12 × 10⁶ to 17 × 10⁶ mature DCs loaded with tyrosinase and gp100 peptides together with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Half of the patients also received low-dose IL-2 (9 MIU daily for 7 days starting 3 days after each vaccination). KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses were monitored in blood. gp100- and tyrosinase-specific T-cell responses were monitored in blood by tetramer analysis and in biopsies from delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests by tetramer and functional analyses with (51)Cr release assays or IFNγ release, following coculture with peptide-pulsed T2 cells or gp100- or tyrosinase-expressing tumor cells. In 19 of 43 vaccinated patients, functional tumor antigen-specific T cells could be detected. Although significantly more DCs migrated to adjacent lymph nodes upon intranodal vaccination, this was also highly variable with a complete absence of migration in 7 of 24 intranodally vaccinated patients. Intradermal vaccinations proved superior in inducing functional tumor antigen-specific T cells. Coadministration of IL-2 did not further augment the antigen-specific T-cell response but did result in higher regulatory T-cell frequencies. Intradermal vaccination resulted in superior antitumor T-cell induction when compared with intranodal vaccination. No advantage of additional IL-2 treatment could be shown. ©2011 AACR.

  17. Tolerogenic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Control Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection by Inducting Regulatory T Cells in an IDO-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Eliseu Frank; Medeiros, Daniella Helena; Condino-Neto, Antônio

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), considered critical for immunity against viruses, were recently associated with defense mechanisms against fungal infections. However, the immunomodulatory function of pDCs in pulmonary paracoccidiodomycosis (PCM), an endemic fungal infection of Latin America, has been poorly defined. Here, we investigated the role of pDCs in the pathogenesis of PCM caused by the infection of 129Sv mice with 1 x 106 P. brasiliensis-yeasts. In vitro experiments showed that P. brasiliensis infection induces the maturation of pDCs and elevated synthesis of TNF-α and IFN-β. The in vivo infection caused a significant influx of pDCs to the lungs and increased levels of pulmonary type I IFN. Depletion of pDCs by a specific monoclonal antibody resulted in a less severe infection, reduced tissue pathology and increased survival time of infected mice. An increased influx of macrophages and neutrophils and elevated presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressing IFN-γ and IL-17 in the lungs of pDC-depleted mice were also observed. These findings were concomitant with decreased frequency of Treg cells and reduced levels of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IL-10, TGF-β, IL-27 and IL-35. Importantly, P. brasilienis infection increased the numbers of pulmonary pDCs expressing indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO), an enzyme with immunoregulatory properties, that were reduced following pDC depletion. In agreement, an increased immunogenic activity of infected pDCs was observed when IDO-deficient or IDO-inhibited pDCs were employed in co-cultures with lymphocytes Altogether, our results suggest that in pulmonary PCM pDCs exert a tolerogenic function by an IDO-mediated mechanism that increases Treg activity. PMID:27992577

  18. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Tina L; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2012-10-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, that is, dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. In this article, we report that murine liver DCs colocalize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MΙP-1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared with that of either cell population alone. Coculture also resulted in enhanced expression of costimulatory (CD80, CD86) and coinhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MΙP-1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and, in part, on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite upregulation of costimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent upregulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity.

  19. HIV-1 gp120 impairs the induction of B cell responses by TLR9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nancy P Y; Matthews, Katie; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P

    2012-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a central role in innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infections, including HIV type 1 (HIV-1). pDCs produce substantial quantities of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines upon stimulation via TLRs, specifically TLR7 or TLR9. The HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, exemplified by the gp120 monomer, are the focus of vaccines aimed at inducing B cell responses. We have studied how the interactions of gp120 with various receptors on human pDCs affect the activation of these cells via TLR9 and their subsequent ability to stimulate B cells. We observed that IFN-α production by pDCs in response to TLR9, but not TLR7, stimulation was reduced by exposure to gp120. Specifically, gp120 inhibited the CpG-induced maturation of pDCs and their expression of TNF-α, IL-6, TLR9, IFN regulatory factor 7, and BAFF. Receptor-blocking and cross-linking studies showed that these inhibitory effects of gp120 were mediated by interactions with CD4 and mannose-binding C-type lectin receptors, but not with the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. Of note is that gp120 inhibited the activation of B cells by TLR9-stimulated pDCs. Taken together, our data show that HIV-1 gp120 impairs pDC functions, including activation of B cell responses, and imply that TLR9 ligands may not be good adjuvants to use in combination with envelope glycoprotein vaccines.

  20. Induction of suppressive phenotype in monocyte-derived dendritic cells by leukemic cell products and IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Sperandio, Aline; Castelo-Branco, Morgana Teixeira Lima; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2014-07-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in controlling tumors. It is known that solid tumor cell products inhibit DC differentiation. Recently a similar effect produced by leukemic cell products has been demonstrated. In this case, leukemic cell products induced the secretion of IL-1β by monocytes undergoing differentiation. The aim of the present work was to characterize and to compare the development of monocyte-derived DCs under the influence of leukemic cell products (K562 supernatant) or exogenous IL-1β. It became clear that leukemic cell products and IL-1β differentially modulate some of the parameters studied on monocytes stimulated to differentiate into DCs. In the presence of K562 supernatant, the expression of the macrophage markers CD16 and CD68 were higher than in immature DCs control. Contrasting with IL-1β, leukemic cell products possibly favor the development of cells with macrophage markers. In addition, CD80 and CD83 expressions were also higher in the presence of tumor supernatant whereas HLA-DR was lower. In the presence of IL-1β, only CD80 was increased. Furthermore, it was observed that when monocytes were induced to differentiate into DCs in the presence of tumor supernatant and then activated, they expressed less CD80 and CD83 than activated DCs control. A reduced expression of CD83 following activation was also seen in cells differentiated with IL-1β. TGF-β and VEGF were found in the tumor supernatants. Moreover, the exposure to tumor supernatant or IL-1β stimulated IL-10 production while decreased IL-12 production by activated DCs. Finally, these results suggest that the addition of products released by leukemic cells or, more discreetly, the addition of IL-1β affects DC differentiation, inducing a suppressive phenotype.

  1. Induction of Protective Immunity against Eimeria tenella, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria acervulina Infections Using Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Margarita; Lee, Sung Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun Soon; Quilez, Joaquin; Lillehoj, Erik P.; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a novel immunization strategy against avian coccidiosis using exosomes derived from Eimeria parasite antigen (Ag)-loaded dendritic cells (DCs). Chicken intestinal DCs were isolated and pulsed in vitro with a mixture of sporozoite-extracted Ags from Eimeria tenella, E. maxima, and E. acervulina, and the cell-derived exosomes were isolated. Chickens were nonimmunized or immunized intramuscularly with exosomes and subsequently noninfected or coinfected with E. tenella, E. maxima, and E. acervulina oocysts. Immune parameters compared among the nonimmunized/noninfected, nonimmunized/infected, and immunized/infected groups were the numbers of cells secreting Th1 cytokines, Th2 cytokines, interleukin-16 (IL-16), and Ag-reactive antibodies in vitro and in vivo readouts of protective immunity against Eimeria infection. Cecal tonsils, Peyer's patches, and spleens of immunized and infected chickens had increased numbers of cells secreting the IL-16 and the Th1 cytokines IL-2 and gamma interferon, greater Ag-stimulated proliferative responses, and higher numbers of Ag-reactive IgG- and IgA-producing cells following in vitro stimulation with the sporozoite Ags compared with the nonimmunized/noninfected and nonimmunized/infected controls. In contrast, the numbers of cells secreting the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were diminished in immunized and infected chickens compared with the nonimmunized/noninfected and the nonimmunized/infected controls. Chickens immunized with Ag-loaded exosomes and infected in vivo with Eimeria oocysts had increased body weight gains, reduced feed conversion ratios, diminished fecal oocyst shedding, lessened intestinal lesion scores, and reduced mortality compared with the nonimmunized/infected controls. These results suggest that successful field vaccination against avian coccidiosis using exosomes derived from DCs incubated with Ags isolated from Eimeria species may be possible. PMID:22354026

  2. Induction of protective immunity against Eimeria tenella, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria acervulina infections using dendritic cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    del Cacho, Emilio; Gallego, Margarita; Lee, Sung Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun Soon; Quilez, Joaquin; Lillehoj, Erik P; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad

    2012-05-01

    This study describes a novel immunization strategy against avian coccidiosis using exosomes derived from Eimeria parasite antigen (Ag)-loaded dendritic cells (DCs). Chicken intestinal DCs were isolated and pulsed in vitro with a mixture of sporozoite-extracted Ags from Eimeria tenella, E. maxima, and E. acervulina, and the cell-derived exosomes were isolated. Chickens were nonimmunized or immunized intramuscularly with exosomes and subsequently noninfected or coinfected with E. tenella, E. maxima, and E. acervulina oocysts. Immune parameters compared among the nonimmunized/noninfected, nonimmunized/infected, and immunized/infected groups were the numbers of cells secreting T(h)1 cytokines, T(h)2 cytokines, interleukin-16 (IL-16), and Ag-reactive antibodies in vitro and in vivo readouts of protective immunity against Eimeria infection. Cecal tonsils, Peyer's patches, and spleens of immunized and infected chickens had increased numbers of cells secreting the IL-16 and the T(h)1 cytokines IL-2 and gamma interferon, greater Ag-stimulated proliferative responses, and higher numbers of Ag-reactive IgG- and IgA-producing cells following in vitro stimulation with the sporozoite Ags compared with the nonimmunized/noninfected and nonimmunized/infected controls. In contrast, the numbers of cells secreting the T(h)2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were diminished in immunized and infected chickens compared with the nonimmunized/noninfected and the nonimmunized/infected controls. Chickens immunized with Ag-loaded exosomes and infected in vivo with Eimeria oocysts had increased body weight gains, reduced feed conversion ratios, diminished fecal oocyst shedding, lessened intestinal lesion scores, and reduced mortality compared with the nonimmunized/infected controls. These results suggest that successful field vaccination against avian coccidiosis using exosomes derived from DCs incubated with Ags isolated from Eimeria species may be possible.

  3. Disruption of TIM-4 in dendritic cell ameliorates hepatic warm IR injury through the induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Huanqiu

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic ischaemia reperfusion (IR) injury results from the infiltration of multiple immune cells especially dendritic cells (DC). T-cell immunoglobulin-domain and mucin-domain 4 (TIM-4) is a type I cell-surface glycoprotein which is extensively expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) like DC and macrophages. TIM-4 has been demonstrated to be implicated in mucosal allergy, skin allograft rejection and tumour-immune tolerance. However, the role of TIM-4 expressed on DC in hepatic IR injury remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether and how DC expressed TIM-4 was involved in hepatic IR injury. With segmental hepatic warm ischaemia mice models, we demonstrated that promoted DC infiltration and increased TIM-4 expression were induced by hepatic IR. Blockade of TIM-4 by anti-TIM-4 mAb (0.35mg/mouse) markedly ameliorated hepatic injury and reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion. Furthermore, in a DC:CD4+ T cell co-culture system, blockade of TIM-4 on DC significantly inhibited T helper-2 cell differentiation and facilitated induced CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cell (iTreg) expansion. Interleukin-4 (IL-4)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (Stat 6) signalling was shown to be impeded by TIM-4 blockade and involved in iTreg generation. Additionally, adoptive transfer of iTreg produced by TIM-4 blockade into hepatic IR mice models remarkably attenuated liver injury. We conclude that TIM-4 on DC play a critical role in hepatic IR injury and may be an efficient target for the prevention of liver or other organ IR injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Healthy Volunteers and Allogeneic Stem Cell Recipients Using Vaccination With Messenger RNA–Transfected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Smits, Evelien L.J.; Anguille, Sébastien; Van de Velde, Ann; Stein, Barbara; Braeckman, Tessa; Van Camp, Kirsten; Nijs, Griet; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi N.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Van Damme, Pierre; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Methods The present study explored the safety, feasibility, and immunogenicity of CMV pp65 messenger RNA–loaded autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as a cellular vaccine for active immunization in healthy volunteers and allogeneic HSCT recipients. Four CMV-seronegative healthy volunteers and three allogeneic HSCT recipients were included in the study. Four clinical-grade autologous monocyte-derived DC vaccines were prepared after a single leukapheresis procedure and administered intradermally at a weekly interval. Results De novo induction of CMV-specific T-cell responses was detected in three of four healthy volunteers without serious adverse events. Of the HSCT recipients, none developed CMV disease and one of two patients displayed a remarkable threefold increase in CMV pp65-specific T cells on completion of the DC vaccination trial. Conclusion In conclusion, our DC vaccination strategy induced or expanded a CMV-specific cellular response in four of six efficacy-evaluable study subjects, providing a base for its further exploration in larger cohorts. PMID:25050468

  5. Host-derived CD8+ dendritic cells are required for induction of optimal graft-versus-tumor responses after experimental allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Toubai, Tomomi; Sun, Yaping; Luker, Gary; Liu, Jun; Luker, Kathryn E.; Tawara, Isao; Evers, Rebecca; Liu, Chen; Mathewson, Nathan; Malter, Chelsea; Nieves, Evelyn; Choi, Sung; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective form of immunotherapy against many malignancies. Meaningful separation of the potentially curative GVT responses from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the most serious toxicity following T-cell replete allo-HCT, has been an elusive goal. GVHD is initiated by alloantigens, although both alloantigens and tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) initiate GVT responses. Emerging data have illuminated a role for antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in inducing alloantigen-specific responses. By using multiple clinically relevant murine models, we show that a specific subset of host-derived APCs—CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs)—enhances TSA responses and is required for optimal induction of GVT. Stimulation of TLR3, which among host hematopoietic APC subsets is predominantly expressed on CD8+ DCs, enhanced GVT without exacerbating GVHD. Thus, strategies that modulate host APC subsets without direct manipulation of donor T cells could augment GVT responses and enhance the efficacy of allo-HCT. PMID:23520337

  6. Rapid Induction of Tumor-specific Type 1 T Helper Cells in Metastatic Melanoma Patients by Vaccination with Mature, Cryopreserved, Peptide-loaded Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Schultz, Erwin S.; Berger, Thomas G.; Weinlich, Georg; Ebner, Susanne; Woerl, Petra; Bender, Armin; Feuerstein, Bernadette; Fritsch, Peter O.; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold

    2002-01-01

    There is consensus that an optimized cancer vaccine will have to induce not only CD8+ cytotoxic but also CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, particularly interferon (IFN)-γ–producing, type 1 Th cells. The induction of strong, ex vivo detectable type 1 Th cell responses has not been reported to date. We demonstrate now that the subcutaneous injection of cryopreserved, mature, antigen-loaded, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) rapidly induces unequivocal Th1 responses (ex vivo detectable IFN-γ–producing effectors as well as proliferating precursors) both to the control antigen KLH and to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–restricted tumor peptides (melanoma-antigen [Mage]-3.DP4 and Mage-3.DR13) in the majority of 16 evaluable patients with metastatic melanoma. These Th1 cells recognized not only peptides, but also DCs loaded with Mage-3 protein, and in case of Mage-3DP4–specific Th1 cells IFN-γ was released even after direct recognition of viable, Mage-3–expressing HLA-DP4+ melanoma cells. The capacity of DCs to rapidly induce Th1 cells should be valuable to evaluate whether Th1 cells are instrumental in targeting human cancer and chronic infections. PMID:12021308

  7. CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and prevent the induction of airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Vincent; Speak, Anneliese O.; Kerzerho, Jérôme; Szely, Natacha; Akbari, Omid

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) control the balance between protection against pathogens and tolerance to innocuous or self-antigens. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that mouse plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be segregated into three distinct populations, exhibiting phenotypic and functional differences, according to their surface expression of CD8α or CD8β as CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− or CD8α+β+. In a mouse model of lung inflammation, adoptive transfer of CD8α+β− or CD8α+β+ pDCs prevents the development of airway hyperreactivity. The tolerogenic features of these subsets are associated with increased production of retinoic acid, which leads to the enhanced induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells compared to CD8α−β− pDCs. Our data thus identify subsets of pDCs with potent tolerogenic functions that may contribute to the maintenance of tolerance in mucosal sites such as the lungs. PMID:22472775

  8. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4⁺ effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo.

  9. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses.

  10. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted.

  11. Interleukin-15 and its Receptor Augment Dendritic Cell Vaccination Against the neu Oncogene Through the Induction of Antibodies Partially Independent of CD4-help

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Jason C.; Ramlogan, Charmaine A.; Yu, Ping; Sakai, Yoshio; Forni, Guido; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Morris, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) stimulates the differentiation and proliferation of T, B and NK cells, enhances CD8+ cytolytic T cell activity, helps maintain CD44hiCD8+ memory T cells, and stimulates immunoglobulin synthesis by B cells. IL-15 is trans-presented to effector cells by its receptor, IL-15Rα, expressed on dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes. We examined the anti-tumor effect of adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of IL-15 and IL-15Rα to augment a DC vaccine directed against the NEU (ErbB2) oncoprotein. Transgenic BALB-neuT mice vaccinated in late stage tumor development with a DC vaccine expressing a truncated NEU antigen, IL-15 and its receptor (DCAd.Neu+Ad.mIL-15+Ad.mIL-15Rα) were protected from mammary carcinomas with 70% of animals tumor-free at 30 weeks compared to none of the animals vaccinated with NEU alone (DCAd.Neu). The combination of neu, IL-15 and IL-15Rα gene transfer lead to a significantly greater anti-NEU antibody response compared to mice treated with DCAd.Neu, or DCAd.Neu combined with either IL-15 (DCAd.Neu+Ad.mIL-15), or IL-15Rα (DCAd.Neu+Ad.mIL-15Rα). The anti-tumor effect was antibody mediated and involved modulation of NEU expression and signaling. Depletion of CD4+ cells did not abrogate the anti-tumor effect of the vaccine, nor did it inhibit the induction of anti-NEU antibodies. Co-expression of IL-15 and IL-15Rα in an anticancer vaccine enhanced immune responses against the NEU antigen and may overcome impaired CD4+ T-helper function. PMID:20086176

  12. CCN Family 2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2/CTGF) Promotes Osteoclastogenesis via Induction of and Interaction with Dendritic Cell–Specific Transmembrane Protein (DC-STAMP)

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Takashi; Emura, Kenji; Kubota, Satoshi; Lyons, Karen M; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    CCN family 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) promotes endochondral ossification. However, the role of CCN2 in the replacement of hypertrophic cartilage with bone is still unclear. The phenotype of Ccn2 null mice, having an expanded hypertrophic zone, indicates that the resorption of the cartilage extracellular matrix is impaired therein. Therefore, we analyzed the role of CCN2 in osteoclastogenesis because cartilage extracellular matrix is resorbed mainly by osteoclasts during endochondral ossification. Expression of the Ccn2 gene was upregulated in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 on day 6 after treatment of glutathione S transferase (GST) fusion mouse receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (GST-RANKL), and a combination of recombinant CCN2 (rCCN2) and GST-RANKL significantly enhanced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP)–positive multinucleated cell formation compared with GST-RANKL alone. Therefore, we suspected the involvement of CCN2 in cell-cell fusion during osteoclastogenesis. To clarify the mechanism, we performed real-time PCR analysis of gene expression, coimmunoprecipitation analysis, and solid-phase binding assay of CCN2 and dendritic cell–specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), which is involved in cell-cell fusion. The results showed that CCN2 induced and interacted with DC-STAMP. Furthermore, GST-RANKL–induced osteoclastogenesis was impaired in fetal liver cells from Ccn2 null mice, and the impaired osteoclast formation was rescued by the addition of exogenous rCCN2 or the forced expression of DC-STAMP by a retroviral vector. These results suggest that CCN2 expressed during osteoclastogenesis promotes osteoclast formation via induction of and interaction with DC-STAMP. PMID:20721934

  13. Ex vivo induction of anti-leukemia cytotoxic T cell effect by dendritic cells from human umbilical cord blood cell origin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huo; Zeng, Lin-Juan; Ye, Xu

    2005-06-01

    To explore the possibility of in vitro induction of cord blood cell-derived lymphocytes into cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with anti-leukemia specificity, umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mononuclear cells were cultured with multiple cytokines to generate dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Leukemia cells were irradiated with (137)Cs and activated by premature cytokines. The characteristics of maturation of DC were evaluated through morphology examination and flow cytometry. DC pulsed with leukemic antigens were co-cultured with lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity of the CTL to corresponding leukemic cells was measured with lactate dehydrogenase-release assay. The results showed that UCB-derived monocytes could be induced into typical DC in all of the 12 samples. Expression of immunological markers such as CD1a(+), HLA-DR(+), CD86(+), CD83(+) on DC were significantly up-regulated (P < 0.05). DC presenting leukemic antigens generated leukemia-specific CTL with a killing rate of (44.76 +/- 17.42)% at the E:T ratio of 50:1 against AML cells and a killing rate of (8.50 +/- 4.25)% at the E:T ratio of 50:1 against ALL cells. Whereas, these CTL present almost no killing effect on the mononuclear cells collected from the same patients in complete remission phase. It is concluded that (1) it is possible to induce UCB-derived monocytes into mature DC with typical morphology. (2) Cord blood derived mature DC presenting leukemia antigen can generate leukemia-specific CTL with vigorous cytotoxic activity against the same leukemia blasts and low killing activity against bone marrow cells of the same patients in complete remission phase.

  14. Anti-prostate cancer effects of CTL cell induction in vitro by recombinant adenovirus mediated PSMA/4-1BBL dendritic cells: an immunotherapy study.

    PubMed

    Sui, C-G; Wu, D; Meng, F-D; Yang, M-H; Jiang, Y-H

    2015-06-29

    This study aimed to examine anti-prostate cancer immune response induced by dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with PSMA/4-1BBL recombinant adenoviruses in vitro. Ad-PSMA, Ad-4-1BBL, and Ad-GFP were transfected into DCs derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Ad-PSMA/4-1BBL-DC, Ad-PSMA-DC, Ad-4-1BBL-DC, Ad-GFP-DC, and normal-DC, PSMA and 4-1BBL protein levels in DCs were detected by western blot. IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. Mixed lymphocyte reaction and the cytotoxicity of each group targeted to LNCap, Du145, and 22RV prostate cancer cells were determined by CCK-8 assay. PSMA and 4-1BBL protein could express on DC successfully, the IL-12 supernatant content (134.29 ± 2.22 pg) was higher than others (P < 0.05). The ability to stimulate autologous T lymphocyte proliferation in the co-transfection group was higher than others (P < 0.05). When the DCs were co-cultured with CTLs, the PSMA/4-1BBL-DC-CTL group showed the highest content of IFN-γ (1176.10 ± 14.37pg/5 x 10(6) cells), but the lowest IL-10 content (75.14 ± 2.01 pg/5 x 10(6) cells) (P < 0.05), and the strongest anti-tumor effect when the effector to target ratio was 40:1, along with a higher killing ratio of LNCap cells than others (P < 0.05). Overall, Mature DCs transfected with Ad-PSMA/4- 1BBL not only showed high secretion of IL-12, but also induced CTLs to stimulate and enhance the killing effect of PSMA specific effector cells to PSMA positively expressing prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the DCs infected with two kinds of tumor-associated antigens would induce more effective tumor-specific CTL induction.

  15. Decreased expression of MHC class II and cathepsin E in dendritic cells might contribute to impaired induction of antigen-specific T cell response in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tohru; Shuto, Emi; Taki, Tomoyo; Imamura, Honami; Kioka, Miku; Nakamoto, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Seiji; Amano, Shouko; Kawano, Yukari; Nakamoto, Mariko; Tsutumi, Rie; Hosaka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    NC/Nga (NC) mice are an animal model for human atopic dermatitis. We found that induction of antigen (Ag)-specific T cell response is diminished in ovalbumin (OVA)-immunized NC mice. Ability of Ag presentation in NC mouse dendritic cells (DCs) was significantly weaker than that in BALB/c and DBA/2 mouse DCs. Expression levels of MHC class II molecules and cathepsin E in NC mouse DCs were significantly lower that those in BALB/c and DBA/2 mouse DCs. These results indicate that low expression levels of MHC class II and cathepsin E might contribute to the defect in induction of Ag-specific T cells in NC mice.

  16. IL-6 and IL-10 induction from dendritic cells in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is predominantly dependent on TLR2-mediated recognition.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sihyug; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Salgame, Padmini

    2004-09-01

    The initial TLR-mediated interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and dendritic cells is critical, since the cytokine production that ensues can greatly influence the class of adaptive immunity that is generated to the pathogen. In this study, we therefore determined the dependency on TLR2 and TLR4 for M. tuberculosis-induced cytokine production by murine dendritic cells. A key new finding of this study is that production of IL-6 and IL-10 from dendritic cells in response to M. tuberculosis is principally dependent on TLR2. The study also indicates that M. tuberculosis can induce IL-12 production in the absence of either TLR2 or TLR4, suggesting redundancy or possibly involvement of other receptors in IL-12 production. In addition, the data also reveal that lack of TLR2 or TLR4 does not impact on dendritic cell maturation or on their ability to influence the polarity of differentiating naive T cells. Collectively, data presented here provide a mechanistic insight for the contribution of TLR2 and TLR4 to tuberculosis disease progression and offer strategies for regulating IL-6 and IL-10 production in dendritic cell-based vaccine strategies.

  17. In vivo targeting of antigens to maturing dendritic cells via the DEC-205 receptor improves T cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Bonnyay, David P; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M; Steinman, Ralph M

    2004-03-15

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic alpha-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the alphaDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models.

  18. Saponin-based adjuvants induce cross-presentation in dendritic cells by intracellular lipid body formation

    PubMed Central

    den Brok, Martijn H.; Büll, Christian; Wassink, Melissa; de Graaf, Annemarie M.; Wagenaars, Jori A.; Minderman, Marthe; Thakur, Mayank; Amigorena, Sebastian; Rijke, Eric O.; Schrier, Carla C.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2016-01-01

    Saponin-based adjuvants (SBAs) are being used in animal and human (cancer) vaccines, as they induce protective cellular immunity. Their adjuvant potency is a factor of inflammasome activation and enhanced antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs), but how antigen cross-presentation is induced is not clear. Here we show that SBAs uniquely induce intracellular lipid bodies (LBs) in the CD11b+ DC subset in vitro and in vivo. Using genetic and pharmacological interference in models for vaccination and in situ tumour ablation, we demonstrate that LB induction is causally related to the saponin-dependent increase in cross-presentation and T-cell activation. These findings link adjuvant activity to LB formation, aid the application of SBAs as a cancer vaccine component, and will stimulate development of new adjuvants enhancing T-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27819292

  19. Excitatory synapses on dendritic shafts of the caudal basal amygdala exhibit elevated levels of GABAA receptor α4 subunits following the induction of activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Wable, Gauri S; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Chowdhury, Tara G; Sabaliauskas, Nicole A; Farb, Claudia R; Aoki, Chiye

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by self-imposed severe starvation, excessive exercise, and anxiety. The onset of AN is most often at puberty, suggesting that gonadal hormonal fluctuations may contribute to AN vulnerability. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is an animal model that reproduces some of the behavioral phenotypes of AN, including the paradoxical increase in voluntary exercise following food restriction. The basal amygdala as well as the GABAergic system regulate trait anxiety. We therefore examined the subcellular distribution of GABA receptors (GABARs) in the basal amygdala of female pubertal rats and specifically of their α4 subunits, because expression of α4-containing GABARs is regulated by gonadal hormone fluctuations. Moreover, because these GABARs reduce neuronal excitability through shunting of EPSPs, we quantified the frequency of occurrence of these GABARs adjacent to excitatory synapses. Electron microscopic immunoctychemistry revealed no change in the frequency of association of α4 subunits with excitatory synapses on dendritic spines, whether in the anterior (Bregma -2.8 mm) or caudal (Bregma -3.8 mm) portion of the basal amygdala. Sholl analysis of golgi-stained neurons also revealed no change in the extent of dendritic branching by these densely spiny, pyramidal-like neurons. However, there was an increase of membranous α4 subunits near excitatory synapses on dendritic shafts, specifically in the caudal basal amygdala, and this was accompanied by a rise of α4 subunits intracellularly. Because most dendritic shafts exhibiting excitatory synapses are GABAergic interneurons, the results predict disinhibition, which would increase excitability of the amygdaloid network, in turn augmenting ABA animals' anxiety.

  20. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  1. VZV T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Levin, Myron J

    2010-01-01

    Primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection (varicella) induces VZV-specific antibody and VZV-specific T cell-mediated immunity. T cell-mediated immunity, which is detected within 1-2 weeks after appearance of rash, and consists of both CD4 and CD8 effector and memory T cells, is essential for recovery from varicella. Administration of a varicella vaccine also generates VZV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The memory cell responses that develop during varicella or after vaccination contribute to protection following re-exposure to VZV. These responses are subsequently boosted either by endogenous re-exposure (silent reactivation of latent virus) or exogenous re-exposure (environmental). VZV-specific T cell-mediated immunity is also necessary to maintain latent VZV in a subclinical state in sensory ganglia. When these responses decline, as occurs with aging or iatrogenic immune suppression, reactivation of VZV leads to herpes zoster. Similarly, the magnitude of these responses early after the onset of herpes zoster correlates with the extent of zoster-associated pain. These essential immune responses are boosted by the VZV vaccine developed to prevent herpes zoster.

  2. Active dendrites, potassium channels and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Christie, Brian R; Frick, Andreas; Gray, Richard; Hoffman, Dax A; Schexnayder, Lalania K; Watanabe, Shigeo; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2003-01-01

    The dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus express numerous types of voltage-gated ion channel, but the distributions or densities of many of these channels are very non-uniform. Sodium channels in the dendrites are responsible for action potential (AP) propagation from the axon into the dendrites (back-propagation); calcium channels are responsible for local changes in dendritic calcium concentrations following back-propagating APs and synaptic potentials; and potassium channels help regulate overall dendritic excitability. Several lines of evidence are presented here to suggest that back-propagating APs, when coincident with excitatory synaptic input, can lead to the induction of either long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). The induction of LTD or LTP is correlated with the magnitude of the rise in intracellular calcium. When brief bursts of synaptic potentials are paired with postsynaptic APs in a theta-burst pairing paradigm, the induction of LTP is dependent on the invasion of the AP into the dendritic tree. The amplitude of the AP in the dendrites is dependent, in part, on the activity of a transient, A-type potassium channel that is expressed at high density in the dendrites and correlates with the induction of the LTP. Furthermore, during the expression phase of the LTP, there are local changes in dendritic excitability that may result from modulation of the functioning of this transient potassium channel. The results support the view that the active properties of dendrites play important roles in synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity of these neurons. PMID:12740112

  3. Dendritic Ion Channel Trafficking and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mala M.; Hammond, Rebecca S.; Hoffman, Dax

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites, the elaborate processes emerging from neuronal cell bodies, receive most excitatory synaptic inputs. Voltage- and calcium-gated ion channels are abundant in dendrites and modify the shape, propagation and integration of synaptic signals. These ion channels also determine intrinsic dendritic excitability and are therfore important for the induction and manifestation of Hebbian and non-Hebbian plasticity. Revealingly, dendritic channels have distinct expression patterns and biophysical properties from those present in other neuronal compartments. Recent evidence suggests that dendritic ion channels are locally regulated, perhaps contributing to different forms of plasticity. In this review, we will discuss the implications of regulating dendritic ion channel function and trafficking in the context of plasticity and information processing. PMID:20363038

  4. Induction of strong and persistent MelanA/MART-1-specific immune responses by adjuvant dendritic cell-based vaccination of stage II melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Becker, Christian; Huter, Eva; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2006-05-15

    A significant percentage of stage II melanoma patients (tumor thickness>1 mm) remain at risk of tumor recurrence after primary tumor excision. In this study, we used tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cells as an adjuvant for immunization of these "high-risk" melanoma patients after resection of the primary tumor. A total of 13 patients were included and vaccinated 6 times every 14 days with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with a MelanA/MART-1 peptide in combination with a recall antigen. Antigen-specific immune responses were monitored before, during and up to 1 year after the last vaccination. The majority of patients exhibited increased recall antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses upon vaccination. MelanA/MART-1-specific CD8+ T cells were expanded in 9/13 patients resulting in increased frequencies of memory cells in these patients. CD8+ T cells acquired the capacity to secrete IFN-gamma, to proliferate in culture in response to the tumor antigen used for vaccination and postvaccine samples contained MelanA/MART-1-specific T cells that recognized also the natural MelanA/MART-1-antigen expressed by tumor cells. Moreover, vaccination induced a long-lived tumor antigen-specific DTH-reactivity in the majority of the patients, detectable even 12 months after the last immunization. These data demonstrate for the first time that vaccination with tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cells in a clinically adjuvant setting induces strong and persistent antigen-specific T-cell responses in tumor-free stage II melanoma patients, suggesting that tumor protective T cell immunity can be achieved.

  5. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd.

  6. Colonic tolerance develops in the iliac lymph nodes and can be established independent of CD103(+) dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Veenbergen, S; van Berkel, L A; du Pré, M F; He, J; Karrich, J J; Costes, L M M; Luk, F; Simons-Oosterhuis, Y; Raatgeep, H C; Cerovic, V; Cupedo, T; Mowat, A M; Kelsall, B L; Samsom, J N

    2016-07-01

    Tolerance to harmless exogenous antigens is the default immune response in the gastrointestinal tract. Although extensive studies have demonstrated the importance of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and intestinal CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in driving small intestinal tolerance to protein antigen, the structural and immunological basis of colonic tolerance remain poorly understood. We show here that the caudal and iliac lymph nodes (ILNs) are inductive sites for distal colonic immune responses and that colonic T cell-mediated tolerance induction to protein antigen is initiated in these draining lymph nodes and not in MLNs. In agreement, colonic tolerance induction was not altered by mesenteric lymphadenectomy. Despite tolerance development, CD103(+)CD11b(+) DCs, which are the major migratory DC population in the MLNs, and the tolerance-related retinoic acid-generating enzyme RALDH2 were virtually absent from the ILNs. Administration of ovalbumin (OVA) to the distal colon did increase the number of CD11c(+)MHCII(hi) migratory CD103(-)CD11b(+) and CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs in the ILNs. Strikingly, colonic tolerance was intact in Batf3-deficient mice specifically lacking CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs, suggesting that CD103(-) DCs in the ILNs are sufficient to drive tolerance induction after protein antigen encounter in the distal colon. Altogether, we identify different inductive sites for small intestinal and colonic T-cell responses and reveal that distinct cellular mechanisms are operative to maintain tolerance at these sites.

  7. Induction of interferon-gamma from natural killer cells by immunostimulatory CpG DNA is mediated through plasmacytoid-dendritic-cell-produced interferon-alpha and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jason D; Heeke, Darren S; Abbate, Christi; Yee, Priscilla; Van Nest, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) that contain CpG motifs have been demonstrated to exert antipathogen and antitumour immunity in animal models through several mechanisms, including the activation of natural killer (NK) cells to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and to exert lytic activity. Since NK cells lack the ISS receptor TLR9, the exact pathway by which NK cells are activated by ISS is unclear. We determined that ISS-induced IFN-gamma from NK cells is primarily dependent upon IFN-alpha release from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs), which directly activates the NK cell. However, further analysis indicated that other PDC-released soluble factor(s) may contribute to IFN-gamma induction. Indeed, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was identified as a significant contributor to ISS-mediated activation of NK cells and was observed to act in an additive fashion with IFN-alpha in the induction of IFN-gamma from NK cells and to up-regulate CD69 expression on NK cells. This activity of TNF-alpha, however, was dependent upon the presence of PDC-derived factors such as type I interferon. These results illustrate an important function for type I interferon in innate immunity, which is not only to activate effectors like NK cells directly, but also to prime them for enhanced activation by other factors such as TNF-alpha.

  8. Induction of interferon-γ from natural killer cells by immunostimulatory CpG DNA is mediated through plasmacytoid-dendritic-cell-produced interferon-α and tumour necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jason D; Heeke, Darren S; Abbate, Christi; Yee, Priscilla; Van Nest, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) that contain CpG motifs have been demonstrated to exert antipathogen and antitumour immunity in animal models through several mechanisms, including the activation of natural killer (NK) cells to secrete interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and to exert lytic activity. Since NK cells lack the ISS receptor TLR9, the exact pathway by which NK cells are activated by ISS is unclear. We determined that ISS-induced IFN-γ from NK cells is primarily dependent upon IFN-α release from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs), which directly activates the NK cell. However, further analysis indicated that other PDC-released soluble factor(s) may contribute to IFN-γ induction. Indeed, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was identified as a significant contributor to ISS-mediated activation of NK cells and was observed to act in an additive fashion with IFN-α in the induction of IFN-γ from NK cells and to up-regulate CD69 expression on NK cells. This activity of TNF-α, however, was dependent upon the presence of PDC-derived factors such as type I interferon. These results illustrate an important function for type I interferon in innate immunity, which is not only to activate effectors like NK cells directly, but also to prime them for enhanced activation by other factors such as TNF-α. PMID:16423039

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in autoimmune diabetes - potential tools for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Tatjana; Welzen-Coppens, Jojanneke M C; Leenen, Pieter J M; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Versnel, Marjan A

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which a T-cell-mediated attack destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreatic islets. Despite insulin supplementation severe complications ask for novel treatments that aim at cure or delay of the onset of the disease. In spontaneous animal models for diabetes like the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, distinct steps in the pathogenesis of the disease can be distinguished. In the past 10 years it became evident that DC and macrophages play an important role in all three phases of the pathogenesis of T1D. In phase 1, dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages accumulate at the islet edges. In phase 2, DC and macrophages are involved in the activation of autoreactive T cells that accumulate in the pancreas. In the third phase the islets are invaded by macrophages, DC and NK cells followed by the destruction of the beta-cells. Recent data suggest a role for a new member of the DC family: the plasmacytoid DC (pDC). pDC have been found to induce tolerance in experimental models of asthma. Several studies in humans and the NOD mouse support a similar role for pDC in diabetes. Mechanisms found to be involved in tolerance induction by pDC are inhibition of effector T cells, induction of regulatory T cells, production of cytokines and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The exact mechanism of tolerance induction by pDC in diabetes remains to be established but the intrinsic tolerogenic properties of pDC provide a promising, yet underestimated target for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid.

  11. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.

    1988-06-07

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid. 2 figs.

  12. The CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by HPV-E6 Uploaded in Engineered Exosomes Is Improved by ISCOMATRIXTM Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, Francesco; di Bonito, Paola; Ridolfi, Barbara; Anticoli, Simona; Arenaccio, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Federico, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We recently described the induction of an efficient CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) uploaded in engineered exosomes used as an immunogen delivery tool. This immune response cleared tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controlled the growth of tumors implanted before immunization. We looked for new protocols aimed at increasing the CD8+ T cell specific response to the antigen uploaded in engineered exosomes, assuming that an optimized CD8+ T cell immune response would correlate with a more effective depletion of tumor cells in the therapeutic setting. By considering HPV-E6 as a model of TAA, we found that the in vitro co-administration of engineered exosomes and ISCOMATRIXTM adjuvant, i.e., an adjuvant composed of purified ISCOPREPTM saponin, cholesterol, and phospholipids, led to a stronger antigen cross-presentation in both B- lymphoblastoid cell lines ( and monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells compared with that induced by the exosomes alone. Consistently, the co-inoculation in mice of ISCOMATRIXTM adjuvant and engineered exosomes induced a significant increase of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells compared to mice immunized with the exosomes alone. This result holds promise for effective usage of exosomes as well as alternative nanovesicles in anti-tumor therapeutic approaches. PMID:27834857

  13. Uptake of synthetic naked RNA by skin-resident dendritic cells via macropinocytosis allows antigen expression and induction of T-cell responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Abderraouf; Vascotto, Fulvia; Kautz-Neu, Kordula; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur; von Stebut, Esther; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Intradermal administration of antigen-encoding RNA has entered clinical testing for cancer vaccination. However, insight into the underlying mechanism of RNA uptake, translation and antigen presentation is still limited. Utilizing pharmacologically optimized naked RNA, the dose-response kinetics revealed a rise in reporter signal with increasing RNA amounts and a prolonged RNA translation of reporter protein up to 30 days after intradermal injection. Dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis were shown to engulf RNA, and the signal arising from the reporter RNA was significantly diminished after DC depletion. Macropinocytosis was relevant for intradermal RNA uptake and translation in vitro and in vivo. By combining intradermal RNA vaccination and inhibition of macropinocytosis, we show that effective priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells also relies on this uptake mechanism. This report demonstrates that direct antigen translation by dermal DCs after intradermal naked RNA vaccination is relevant for efficient priming of antigen-specific T-cells.

  14. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects.

    PubMed

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J A; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-06-19

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects.

  15. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects

    PubMed Central

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J.A.; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects. PMID:26091097

  16. Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Artur; McCullough, Kenneth C.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are major players in both innate and adaptive immune responses against influenza virus. These immune responses, as well as the important interface between the innate and adaptive systems, are orchestrated by specialized subsets of DC, including conventional steady-state DC, migratory DC and plasmacytoid DC. The characteristics and efficacy of the responses are dependent on the relative activity of these DC subsets, rendering DC crucial for the development of both naïve and memory immune responses. However, due to their critical role, DC also contribute to the immunopathological processes observed during acute influenza, such as that caused by the pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Therein, the role of different DC subsets in the induction of interferon type I, pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses is important for the outcome of interaction between the virus and host immune defences. The present review will present current knowledge on this area, relating to the importance of DC activity for the induction of efficacious humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. This will include the main viral elements associated with the triggering or inhibition of DC activation. Finally, the current knowledge on understanding how differences in various vaccines influence the manner of immune defence induction will be presented. PMID:21994580

  17. Protein Kinase M[Zeta] Is Essential for the Induction and Maintenance of Dopamine-Induced Long-Term Potentiation in Apical CA1 Dendrites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Sacktor, Todd Charlton; Frey, Julietta U.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic D1/D5-receptor-mediated processes are important for certain forms of memory as well as for a cellular model of memory, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. D1/D5-receptor function is required for the induction of the protein synthesis-dependent maintenance of CA1-LTP (L-LTP) through activation…

  18. Protein Kinase M[Zeta] Is Essential for the Induction and Maintenance of Dopamine-Induced Long-Term Potentiation in Apical CA1 Dendrites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Sacktor, Todd Charlton; Frey, Julietta U.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic D1/D5-receptor-mediated processes are important for certain forms of memory as well as for a cellular model of memory, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. D1/D5-receptor function is required for the induction of the protein synthesis-dependent maintenance of CA1-LTP (L-LTP) through activation…

  19. The role of dendritic action potentials and Ca2+ influx in the induction of homosynaptic long-term depression in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, B R; Magee, J C; Johnston, D

    1996-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic efficacy at CA1 synapses is believed to be a Ca(2+)-dependent process. We used high-speed fluorescence imaging and patch-clamp techniques to quantify the spatial distribution of changes in intracellular Ca2+ accompanying the induction of LTD at Schaffer collateral synapses in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Low-frequency stimulation (3 Hz), which was subthreshold for action potentials, produced small changes in [Ca2+]i and failed to elicit LTD. Increasing the stimulus strength so that action potentials were generated produced both robust LTD and increases in [Ca2+]i. Back-propagating action potentials at 3 Hz in the absence of synaptic stimulation also produced increases in [Ca2+]i, but failed to induce LTD. When subthreshold synaptic stimulation was paired with back-propagating action potentials, however, large increases in [Ca2+]i were observed and robust LTD was induced. The LTD was blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) antagonist APV, and stimulus-induced increases in [Ca2+]i were reduced throughout the neuron under these conditions. The LTD was also dependent on Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), because LTD was severely attenuated or blocked by both nimodipine and Ni2+. These findings suggest that back-propagating action potentials can exert a powerful control over the induction of LTD and that both VGCCs and NMDArs are involved in the induction of this form of plasticity.

  20. Induction of Th17 Lymphocytes and Treg Cells by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Hernández-Castro, Berenice; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana; Alvarez-Quiroga, Crisol; Layseca-Espinosa, Esther; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Baranda, Lourdes; Urzainqui, Ana; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have a key role in the regulation of immune response. We herein explored, in patients with inflammatory diseases, the role of monocyte derived DC's (mo-DCs) on the generation of Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Peripheral blood was obtained from thirty-five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), twelve with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and twenty healthy subjects. Mo-DCs were generated under standard (IL-4/GM-CSF) or tolerogenic (IL-4/GM-CSF plus recombinant P-selectin or PD-1 or IL-10) conditions, and their ability to induce Th17 and Treg lymphocytes was tested. We detected that mo-DCs from patients with RA showed an enhanced release of IL-6 and IL-23 as well as an increased capability to induce Th17 cells. Although mo-DCs from SLE patients also released high levels of IL-6/IL-23, it did not show an increased ability to induce Th17 lymphocytes. In addition, mo-DCs, from patients with RA and SLE generated under the engagement of PSGL-1, showed a defective capability to induce Foxp3+ Treg cells. A similar phenomenon was observed in SLE, when DC's cells were generated under PDL-1 engagement. Our data indicate that DCs from patients with rheumatic inflammatory disease show an aberrant function that may have an important role in the pathogenesis of these conditions. PMID:24288552

  1. A dominant role for the methyl-CpG-binding protein Mbd2 in controlling Th2 induction by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Peter C.; Owen, Heather; Deaton, Aimée M.; Borger, Jessica G.; Brown, Sheila L.; Clouaire, Thomas; Jones, Gareth-Rhys; Jones, Lucy H.; Lundie, Rachel J.; Marley, Angela K.; Morrison, Vicky L.; Phythian-Adams, Alexander T.; Wachter, Elisabeth; Webb, Lauren M.; Sutherland, Tara E.; Thomas, Graham D.; Grainger, John R.; Selfridge, Jim; McKenzie, Andrew N. J.; Allen, Judith E.; Fagerholm, Susanna C.; Maizels, Rick M.; Ivens, Alasdair C.; Bird, Adrian; MacDonald, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) direct CD4+ T-cell differentiation into diverse helper (Th) subsets that are required for protection against varied infections. However, the mechanisms used by DCs to promote Th2 responses, which are important both for immunity to helminth infection and in allergic disease, are currently poorly understood. We demonstrate a key role for the protein methyl-CpG-binding domain-2 (Mbd2), which links DNA methylation to repressive chromatin structure, in regulating expression of a range of genes that are associated with optimal DC activation and function. In the absence of Mbd2, DCs display reduced phenotypic activation and a markedly impaired capacity to initiate Th2 immunity against helminths or allergens. These data identify an epigenetic mechanism that is central to the activation of CD4+ T-cell responses by DCs, particularly in Th2 settings, and reveal methyl-CpG-binding proteins and the genes under their control as possible therapeutic targets for type-2 inflammation. PMID:25908537

  2. Potential role of Mycoplasma hominis in interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD4+ T-cell generation via induction of IL-23 secretion by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Beven, Laure; Renaudin, Hélène; Douchet, Isabelle; Férandon, Cyril; Charron, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Bébéar, Cécile

    2011-12-01

    Mycoplasma hominis, a human urogenital pathogen, is involved in genital and extragenital infections and arthritis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The interleukin (IL) 23/T helper (Th) 17 axis is associated with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the IL-23 response to M. hominis in human dendritic cells (DCs) and the CD4(+) T-cell differentiation in response to M. hominis-infected DCs. Human monocyte-derived DCs were cultured with phosphate-buffered saline, lipopolysaccharide, or M. hominis PG21. Cocultures with heterologous T cells were performed. Extracts from M. hominis were separated and incubated with DCs. Isolates from different clinical syndromes were tested. M. hominis induced the maturation of human DCs with predominant IL-23 secretion in a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent manner. The in vitro immunomodulatory capacity of M. hominis was contained in a lipoprotein-enriched fraction from the mycoplasma. M. hominis-activated DCs induced IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells. Interestingly, clinical isolates differed in their ability to promote IL-23 secretion by DCs. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a major role for the IL-23/Th17 axis in the defense against M. hominis and indicate a potential role for these bacteria in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  3. The presence of T cell epitopes is important for induction of antibody responses against antigens directed to DEC205+ dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Kelly N. S.; Rampazo, Eline V.; Antonialli, Renan; Yamamoto, Marcio M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Soares, Irene S.; Boscardin, Silvia B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo antigen targeting to dendritic cells (DCs) has been used as a way to improve immune responses. Targeting is accomplished with the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to receptors present on the DC surface fused with the antigen of interest. An anti-DEC205 mAb has been successfully used to target antigens to the DEC205+CD8α+ DC subset. The administration of low doses of the hybrid mAb together with DC maturation stimuli is able to activate specific T cells and induce production of high antibody titres for a number of different antigens. However, it is still not known if this approach would work with any fused protein. Here we genetically fused the αDEC205 mAb with two fragments (42-kDa and 19-kDa) derived from the ~200 kDa Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), known as MSP142 and MSP119, respectively. The administration of two doses of αDEC-MSP142, but not of αDEC-MSP119 mAb, together with an adjuvant to two mouse strains induced high anti-MSP119 antibody titres that were dependent on CD4+ T cells elicited by peptides present in the MSP133 sequence, indicating that the presence of T cell epitopes in antigens targeted to DEC205+ DCs increases antibody responses. PMID:28000705

  4. Fusion of dendritic cells and CD34+CD38- acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells potentiates targeting AML-initiating cells by specific CTL induction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhang; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Hong, Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua; Huang, Bo

    2009-05-01

    Distinct leukemia-initiating cells (L-ICs) represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A potential strategy to eradicate L-ICs is to generate L-IC-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, owing to rarity and immortality of L-ICs, it is difficult for antigen-presenting cells to capture L-ICs for specific antigen presentation. Here, we report a novel approach by fusing allogeneic dendritic cells (DCs) and CD34CD38 AML progenitor cells, through which specific CTLs were effectively induced, leading to the cytolysis to AML-initiating cells. Fusion of either DC/CD34CD38 AML cell or DC/CD34 AML cell could effectively induce the proliferation and activation of CTLs. However, only the former CTLs could effectively attack AML progenitor cells, and result in the unkilled progenitor/initiating cells losing the abilities of active proliferation in vitro and engraftment in NOD-SCID mice. These findings suggest that AML progenitor/initiating cell-specific CTLs may be generated based on allogeneic DC/progenitor cell fusion strategy; the induced CTLs may potentially eradicate AML by targeting L-ICs directly or indirectly.

  5. Influenza Virus–induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Is Associated with the Induction of Strong T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered, Normally Nonimmunogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brimnes, Marie K.; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the proposal that during microbial infection, dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation and present a mixture of peptides derived from the microbe as well as harmless environmental antigens. Mice were exposed to an aerosol of endotoxin free ovalbumin (OVA) in the absence or presence of influenza virus. In its absence, OVA failed to induce B and T cell responses and even tolerized, but with influenza, OVA-specific antibodies and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes developed. With or without infection, OVA was presented selectively in the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, as assessed by the comparable proliferation of infused, CD8+ and CD4+, TCR transgenic T cells. In the absence of influenza, these OVA-specific T cells produced little IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, but with infection, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells made high levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. The OVA plus influenza-treated mice also showed accelerated recovery to a challenge with recombinant vaccinia OVA virus. CD11c+ DCs from the mediastinal lymph nodes of infected mice selectively stimulated both OVA- and influenza-specific T cells and underwent maturation, with higher levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 molecules. The relatively slow (2–3 d) kinetics of maturation correlated closely to the time at which OVA inhalation elicited specific antibodies. Therefore respiratory infection can induce DC maturation and simultaneously B and T cell immunity to an innocuous antigen inhaled concurrently. PMID:12847140

  6. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  7. Co-transfection of dendritic cells with AFP and IL-2 genes enhances the induction of tumor antigen-specific antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Yue; Li, Xiao; Gao, Li; Teng, Zeng-Hui; Liu, Wen-Chao

    2012-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly efficient, specialized antigen-presenting cells and DCs transfected with tumor-related antigens are regarded as promising vaccines in cancer immunotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether DCs co-transfected with the α-fetoprotein (AFP) and human interleukin-2 (IL-2) genes were able to induce stronger therapeutic antitumor immunity in transfected DCs. In this study, DCs from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients were co-transfected with the IL-2 gene and/or the AFP gene. The reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) data revealed that the DCs transfected with the adenovirus AdAFP/IL-2 expressed AFP and IL-2. The DCs co-transfected with IL-2 and AFP (AFP/IL-2-DCs) enhanced the cytotoxicities of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and increased the production of IL-2 and interferon-γ significantly compared with their AFP-DC, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-DC, DC or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) counterparts. In vivo data suggested that immunization with AFP-DCs enhances antigen-specific antitumor efficacy more potently than immunization with IL-2-DCs or AFP-DCs. These findings provide a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based tumor vaccines.

  8. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  9. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  10. Recognition of viral antigens in 6/94 virus-induced T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pickel, K; Solvay, M J

    1979-01-24

    Distinct events in the virus-stimulated T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity (V-CMC) have been investigated: 1.) The induction of V-CMC is possible by immunizing mice with infectious as well as UV-inactivated virus (parainfluenza type 1 strain 6/94), or with virus-infected cells either compatible or imcompatible with the recipient. 2). Recognition of viral antigens by the effector cells occurs independently of the H2 environment: Fractionation of effector cells on columns loaded with virus-infected cells eliminates virus-specific cytotoxic cells. Effector cells and cells on the column need not share H-2 antigens. The findings are discussed with regard to the H2 restriction of the virus induced T-cells mediated cytotoxicity.

  11. Resting Respiratory Tract Dendritic Cells Preferentially Stimulate T Helper Cell Type 2 (Th2) Responses and Require Obligatory Cytokine Signals for Induction of  Th1 Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Stumbles, Philip A.; Thomas, Jennifer A.; Pimm, Carolyn L.; Lee, Peter T.; Venaille, Thierry J.; Proksch, Stephen; Holt, Patrick G.

    1998-01-01

    Consistent with their role in host defense, mature dendritic cells (DCs) from central lymphoid organs preferentially prime for T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-polarized immunity. However, the “default” T helper response at mucosal surfaces demonstrates Th2 polarity, which is reflected in the cytokine profiles of activated T cells from mucosal lymph nodes. This study on rat respiratory tract DCs (RTDCs) provides an explanation for this paradox. We demonstrate that freshly isolated RTDCs are functionally immature as defined in vitro, being surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II lo, endocytosishi, and mixed lymphocyte reactionlo, and these cells produce mRNA encoding interleukin (IL)-10. After ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsing and adoptive transfer, freshly isolated RTDCs preferentially stimulated Th2-dependent OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 responses, and antigen-stimulated splenocytes from recipient animals produced IL-4 in vitro. However, preculture with granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor increased their in vivo IgG priming capacity by 2–3 logs, inducing production of both Th1- and Th2-dependent IgG subclasses and high levels of IFN-γ by antigen-stimulated splenocytes. Associated phenotypic changes included upregulation of surface MHC II and B7 expression and IL-12 p35 mRNA, and downregulation of endocytosis, MHC II processing– associated genes, and IL-10 mRNA expression. Full expression of IL-12 p40 required additional signals, such as tumor necrosis factor α or CD40 ligand. These results suggest that the observed Th2 polarity of the resting mucosal immune system may be an inherent property of the resident DC population, and furthermore that mobilization of Th1 immunity relies absolutely on the provision of appropriate microenvironmental costimuli. PMID:9841916

  12. Induction of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes by immunization with syngeneic irradiated HIV-1 envelope derived peptide-pulsed dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Nakagawa, Y; Yokomuro, K; Berzofsky, J A

    1993-08-01

    Based on the evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTL) precursors do not appear to distinguish between virus-infected cells and viral peptide-pulsed syngeneic cells, we have developed methods for priming class I MHC molecule restricted CD8+ CTL with such peptides without using any adjuvant. We were able to prime in vivo such CTL immunity lasting at least 6 months with a single i.v. injection of syngeneic 2200-3300 rad irradiated peptide-pulsed spleen cells, and even more efficiently with a very small number of irradiated class II MHC molecule expressing splenic dendritic cells (DC). No foreign serum source was necessary during the pulsing. Interestingly, we could not generate significant CTL activity with unirradiated or low dose (< 1100 rad) irradiated spleen cells. Because even purified DC required irradiation for optimal activity, because unirradiated B cells did not significantly inhibit the immunization with DC, and because B cell depletion did not substitute for irradiation, we believe that the effect of irradiation is more to determine homing of the cells than to eliminate interference by B cells. Intravenous immunization was much more effective than s.c. or i.p. immunization. CTL generated by this method could kill both peptide-pulsed syngeneic targets and targets endogenously expressing the whole gp160 gene. Moreover, we found that we could prime CD8+ CTL with the minimal 10-residue core peptide (RGPGRAFVTI) for optimal presentation by class I MHC molecules as efficiently as the original p18. These results suggested that DC bearing antigenic peptide may prime antigen-specific CD8+ CTL in vivo. These results offer useful information for development of synthetic peptide vaccines and immunotherapy.

  13. Induction of antitumor immunity ex vivo using dendritic cells transduced with fowl pox vector expressing MUC1, CEA, and a triad of costimulatory molecules (rF-PANVAC).

    PubMed

    Vasir, Baldev; Zarwan, Corrine; Ahmad, Rehan; Crawford, Keith D; Rajabi, Hassan; Matsuoka, Ken-Ichi; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Wu, Zekui; Mills, Heidi; Kufe, Donald; Avigan, David

    2012-09-01

    The fowl pox vector expressing the tumor-associated antigens, mucin-1 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the context of costimulatory molecules (rF-PANVAC) has shown promise as a tumor vaccine. However, vaccine-mediated expansion of suppressor T-cell populations may blunt clinical efficacy. We characterized the cellular immune response induced by ex vivo dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with (rF)-PANVAC. Consistent with the functional characteristics of potent antigen-presenting cells, rF-PANVAC-DCs demonstrated strong expression of mucin-1 and carcinoembryonic antigen and costimulatory molecules, CD80, CD86, and CD83; decreased levels of phosphorylated STAT3, and increased levels of Tyk2, Janus kinase 2, and STAT1. rF-PANVAC-DCs stimulated expansion of tumor antigen-specific T cells with potent cytolytic capacity. However, rF-PANVAC-transduced DCs also induced the concurrent expansion of FOXP3 expressing CD4CD25 regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibited T-cell activation. Moreover, Tregs expressed high levels of Th2 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13] together with phosphorylated STAT3 and STAT6. In contrast, the vaccine-expanded Treg population expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines IL-2 and interferon-γ and the proinflammatory receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and IL-17A suggesting that these cells may share effector functions with conventional TH17 T cells. These data suggest that Tregs expanded by rF-PANVAC-DCs, exhibit immunosuppressive properties potentially mediated by Th2 cytokines, but simultaneous expression of Th1 and Th17-associated factors suggests a high degree of plasticity.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. © 2016 Henry et al.

  15. A novel and simple method for generation of human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2013-01-01

    Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1)-stimulating human DCs directly from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were cultivated in the presence of 20 ng/ml of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, 20 ng/ml of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and 1,000 U/ml of interferon-β for 24 h followed by 24 h maturation with a cytokine cocktail containing 10 ng/ml of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), 10 ng/ml of IL-1β and 1 μg/ml of prostaglandin E2. The phenotype and biological activity of these new DCs for induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation and cytokine production were comparable to those of the MDDCs. Importantly, these new DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV-1 could generated HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cell responses in humanized mice reconstituted with autologous PBMCs from HIV-1-negative donors. This simple and quick method for generation of functional DCs will be useful for future studies on DC-mediated immunotherapies.

  16. Lung dendritic cells and the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Mitchell H

    2006-05-01

    To discuss the role of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in inducing and modulating immune responses in the lung. The primary literature and selected review articles studying the role of dendritic cells in both rodent and human lungs as identified via a PubMed/MEDLINE search using the keywords dendritic cell, antigen-presenting cell, viral airway disease, asthma, allergy, and atopy. The author's knowledge of the field was used to identify studies that were relevant to the stated objective. Dendritic cells are well positioned in the respiratory tract and other mucosal surfaces to respond to any foreign protein. These cells are crucial to the initiation of the adaptive immune response through induction of antigen specific T-cell responses. These cells also play an important role in the regulation of developing and ongoing immune responses, an area that is currently under intense investigation. This review discusses the various subsets of human and rodent dendritic cells and the pathways involved in antigen processing and subsequent immune regulation by dendritic cells in the lung using both viral and nonviral allergenic protein exposure as examples. Conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells are uniquely situated in the immune cascade to not only initiate but also modulate immune responses. Therapeutic interventions in allergic and asthmatic diseases will likely be developed to take advantage of this exclusive position of the dendritic cell.

  17. Inflammatory dendritic cells—not basophils—are necessary and sufficient for induction of Th2 immunity to inhaled house dust mite allergen

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Maud; Deswarte, Kim; Pouliot, Philippe; Willart, Monique A.M.; Kool, Mirjam; Muskens, Femke

    2010-01-01

    It is unclear how Th2 immunity is induced in response to allergens like house dust mite (HDM). Here, we show that HDM inhalation leads to the TLR4/MyD88-dependent recruitment of IL-4 competent basophils and eosinophils, and of inflammatory DCs to the draining mediastinal nodes. Depletion of basophils only partially reduced Th2 immunity, and depletion of eosinophils had no effect on the Th2 response. Basophils did not take up inhaled antigen, present it to T cells, or express antigen presentation machinery, whereas a population of FceRI+ DCs readily did. Inflammatory DCs were necessary and sufficient for induction of Th2 immunity and features of asthma, whereas basophils were not required. We favor a model whereby DCs initiate and basophils amplify Th2 immunity to HDM allergen. PMID:20819925

  18. Resolution of cell-mediated airways diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    "Inflammation resolution" has of late become a topical research area. Activation of resolution phase mechanisms, involving select post-transcriptional regulons, transcription factors, 'autacoids', and cell phenotypes, is now considered to resolve inflammatory diseases. Critical to this discourse on resolution is the elimination of inflammatory cells through apoptosis and phagocytosis. For major inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD we propose an alternative path to apoptosis for cell elimination. We argue that transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes, followed by mucociliary clearance, efficiently and non-injuriously eliminates pro-inflammatory cells from diseased airway tissues. First, it seems clear that numerous infiltrated granulocytes and lymphocytes can be speedily transmitted into the airway lumen without harming the epithelial barrier. Then there are a wide range of 'unexpected' findings demonstrating that clinical improvement of asthma and COPD is not only associated with decreasing numbers of airway wall inflammatory cells but also with increasing numbers of these cells in the airway lumen. Finally, effects of inhibition of transepithelial migration support the present hypothesis. Airway inflammatory processes have thus been much aggravated when transepithelial exit of leukocytes has been inhibited. In conclusion, the present hypothesis highlights risks involved in drug-induced inhibition of transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes. It helps interpretation of common airway lumen data, and suggests approaches to treat cell-mediated airway inflammation. PMID:20540713

  19. TLR7 and TLR8 ligands and antiphospholipid antibodies show synergistic effects on the induction of IL-1beta and caspase-1 in monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Julia; Prinz, Nadine; Lorenz, Mareike; Bauer, Stefan; Chapman, Joab; Lackner, Karl J; von Landenberg, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    TLRs represent the first line of defense against invading pathogens in the innate immune system. Certain cytokines are important mediators and essentially necessary to assure an appropriately regulated immune response. Recent data gave initial evidence that IL-1beta is one of the most relevant members of these regulating cytokines. We investigated the induction of IL-1beta production in monocytes and pDCs stimulated with ligands for TLR7 and TLR8 and with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Using human monocytes and pDCs for stimulation with specific TLR7 and TLR8 ligands such as resiquimod (R848) and single stranded RNA (RNA42) as well as with a human monoclonal aPL HL5B resulted in a specific upregulation of IL-1beta mRNA and protein in these cells. Determination of expression-levels using real-time RT-PCR showed significantly augmented TLR-dependent IL-1beta and caspase-1 expression. This increase could be substantially enhanced by adding the monoclonal aPL HL5B. To demonstrate the direct dependency between TLR stimulation and IL-1beta production, specific TLR inhibitors were applied and the IL-1beta and caspase-1 secretion could be explicitly decreased. The respective protein levels were determined using Western Blot, FACS analysis or ELISA assays. In conclusion we demonstrated that the downstream signaling pathway of TLR7 and TLR8 in monocytes and pDCs after stimulation with specific ligands included not only the secretion of cytokines such as TNFalpha and IL-1beta but as well the activation of necessary regulating proteins like caspase-1. APL seem to enforce this process hinting that endogenous stimulation of TLRs in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) patients resulted in enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

  20. Early Immune Regulatory Changes in a Primary Controlled Human Plasmodium vivax Infection: CD1c(+) Myeloid Dendritic Cell Maturation Arrest, Induction of the Kynurenine Pathway, and Regulatory T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Woodberry, Tonia; Loughland, Jessica R; Minigo, Gabriela; Burel, Julie G; Amante, Fiona H; Piera, Kim A; McNeil, Yvette; Yeo, Tsin W; Good, Michael F; Doolan, Denise L; Engwerda, Christian R; McCarthy, James S; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-06-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria remains a major public health problem. The requirements for acquisition of protective immunity to the species are not clear. Dendritic cells (DC) are essential for immune cell priming but also perform immune regulatory functions, along with regulatory T cells (Treg). An important function of DC involves activation of the kynurenine pathway via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Using a controlled human experimental infection study with blood-stage P. vivax, we characterized plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and myeloid DC (mDC) subset maturation, CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) Treg activation, and IDO activity. Blood samples were collected from six healthy adults preinoculation, at peak parasitemia (day 14; ∼31,400 parasites/ml), and 24 and 48 h after antimalarial treatment. CD1c(+) and CD141(+) mDC and pDC numbers markedly declined at peak parasitemia, while CD16(+) mDC numbers appeared less affected. HLA-DR expression was selectively reduced on CD1c(+) mDC, increased on CD16(+) mDC, and was unaltered on pDC. Plasma IFN-γ increased significantly and was correlated with an increased kynurenine/tryptophan (KT) ratio, a measure of IDO activity. At peak parasitemia, Treg presented an activated CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) CD45RA(-) phenotype and upregulated TNFR2 expression. In a mixed-effects model, the KT ratio was positively associated with an increase in activated Treg. Our data demonstrate that a primary P. vivax infection exerts immune modulatory effects by impairing HLA-DR expression on CD1c(+) mDC while activating CD16(+) mDC. Induction of the kynurenine pathway and increased Treg activation, together with skewed mDC maturation, suggest P. vivax promotes an immunosuppressive environment, likely impairing the development of a protective host immune response. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Inability of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells To Directly Lyse HIV-Infected Autologous CD4+ T Cells despite Induction of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chehimi, Jihed; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Tomescu, Costin; Gekonge, Bethsebah; Abdulhaqq, Shaheed; Raymond, Andrea; Hancock, Aidan; Vinekar, Kavita; Carty, Craig; Reynolds, Griffin; Pistilli, Maxwell; Mounzer, Karam; Kostman, Jay; Montaner, Luis J.

    2010-01-01

    The function of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) in chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains controversial with regard to its potential for sustained alpha interferon (IFN-α) production and induction of PDC-dependent tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated cytotoxicity of HIV-infected cells. We address these areas by a study of chronically HIV-1-infected subjects followed through antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption and by testing PDC cytolytic function against autologous HIV-infected CD4+ T cells. Rebound in viremia induced by therapy interruption showed a positive association between TRAIL and viral load or T-cell activation, but comparable levels of plasma IFN-α/β were found in viremic ART-treated and control subjects. While PDC from HIV-infected subjects expressed less interferon regulator factor 7 (IRF-7) and produced significantly less IFN-α upon Toll-like receptor 7/9 (TLR7/9) engagement than controls, membrane TRAIL expression in PDC from HIV+ subjects was increased. Moreover, no significant increase in death receptor 5 (DR5) expression was seen in CD4+ T cells from viremic HIV+ subjects compared to controls or following in vitro infection/exposure to infectious and noninfectious virus or exogenous IFN-α, respectively. Although activated PDC killed the DR5-expressing HIV-infected Sup-T1 cell line, PDC did not lyse primary autologous HIV+ CD4+ T cells yet could provide accessory help for NK cells in killing HIV-infected autologous CD4+ T cells. Taken together, our data show a lack of sustained high levels of soluble IFN-α in chronic HIV-1 infection in vivo and document a lack of direct PDC cytolytic activity against autologous infected or uninfected CD4+ T cells. PMID:20042498

  2. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier.

    PubMed

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    The ability of carbonate apatite (CO(3)Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO(3)Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO(3)Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO(3)Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-γ by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO(3)Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO(3)Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO(3)Ap. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  4. Classical dendritic cells mediate fibrosis directly via the retinoic acid pathway in severe eye allergy

    PubMed Central

    Ahadome, Sarah D.; Mathew, Rose; Reyes, Nancy J.; Mettu, Priyatham S.; Cousins, Scott W.; Calder, Virginia L.; Saban, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a shared end-stage pathway to lung, liver, and heart failure. In the ocular mucosa (conjunctiva), fibrosis leads to blindness in trachoma, pemphigoid, and allergy. The indirect fibrogenic role of DCs via T cell activation and inflammatory cell recruitment is well documented. However, here we demonstrate that DCs can directly induce fibrosis. In the mouse model of allergic eye disease (AED), classical CD11b+ DCs in the ocular mucosa showed increased activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), the enzyme required for retinoic acid synthesis. In vitro, CD11b+ DC–derived ALDH was associated with 9-cis-retinoic acid ligation to retinoid x receptor (RXR), which induced conjunctival fibroblast activation. In vivo, stimulating RXR led to rapid onset of ocular mucosal fibrosis, whereas inhibiting ALDH activity in DCs or selectively depleting DCs markedly reduced fibrosis. Collectively, these data reveal a profibrotic ALDH-dependent pathway by DCs and uncover a role for DC retinoid metabolism. PMID:27595139

  5. Olfactory Bulb Deep Short-Axon Cells Mediate Widespread Inhibition of Tufted Cell Apical Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Burton, Shawn D; LaRocca, Greg; Liu, Annie; Cheetham, Claire E J; Urban, Nathaniel N

    2017-02-01

    In the main olfactory bulb (MOB), the first station of sensory processing in the olfactory system, GABAergic interneuron signaling shapes principal neuron activity to regulate olfaction. However, a lack of known selective markers for MOB interneurons has strongly impeded cell-type-selective investigation of interneuron function. Here, we identify the first selective marker of glomerular layer-projecting deep short-axon cells (GL-dSACs) and investigate systematically the structure, abundance, intrinsic physiology, feedforward sensory input, neuromodulation, synaptic output, and functional role of GL-dSACs in the mouse MOB circuit. GL-dSACs are located in the internal plexiform layer, where they integrate centrifugal cholinergic input with highly convergent feedforward sensory input. GL-dSAC axons arborize extensively across the glomerular layer to provide highly divergent yet selective output onto interneurons and principal tufted cells. GL-dSACs are thus capable of shifting the balance of principal tufted versus mitral cell activity across large expanses of the MOB in response to diverse sensory and top-down neuromodulatory input. The identification of cell-type-selective molecular markers has fostered tremendous insight into how distinct interneurons shape sensory processing and behavior. In the main olfactory bulb (MOB), inhibitory circuits regulate the activity of principal cells precisely to drive olfactory-guided behavior. However, selective markers for MOB interneurons remain largely unknown, limiting mechanistic understanding of olfaction. Here, we identify the first selective marker of a novel population of deep short-axon cell interneurons with superficial axonal projections to the sensory input layer of the MOB. Using this marker, together with immunohistochemistry, acute slice electrophysiology, and optogenetic circuit mapping, we reveal that this novel interneuron population integrates centrifugal cholinergic input with broadly tuned feedforward sensory input to modulate principal cell activity selectively. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371117-22$15.00/0.

  6. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-06-08

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors.

  7. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  8. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    PubMed

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4(+) T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3(+) Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3(+) Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Dendritic spikes veto inhibition.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Greg J

    2012-09-06

    How inhibition regulates dendritic excitability is critical to an understanding of the way neurons integrate the many thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. In this issue of Neuron, Müller et al. (2012) show that inhibition blocks the generation of weak dendritic spikes, leaving strong dendritic spikes intact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient induction of a Her2-specific anti-tumor response by dendritic cells pulsed with a Hsp70L1–Her2341–456 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Wu, Yanfeng; Yan, Fang; Wang, Ning; Wang, Wenying; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Yajie; Wan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been shown to interact with antigen-presenting cells (APCs), especially dendritic cells (DCs). HSPs act as potent adjuvants, inducing a Th1 response, as well as antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) via cross-presentation. Our previous work has demonstrated that Hsp70-like protein 1 (Hsp70L1), a new member of the Hsp70 subfamily, can act as a powerful Th1 adjuvant in a DC-based vaccine. Here we report the efficient induction of tumor antigen-specific T cell immune response by DCs pulsed with recombinant fusion protein of Hsp70L1 and Her2341–456, the latter of which is a fragment of Her2/neu (Her2) containing E75 (a HLA-A2 restricted CTL epitope). The fusion protein Hsp70L1–Her2341–456 promotes the maturation of DCs and activates them to produce cytokines, such as IL-12 and TNF-α, and chemokines, such as MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES. Taken together, these results indicate that the adjuvant activity of Hsp70L1 is maintained in the fusion protein. Her2-specific HLA-A2.1-restricted CD8+ CTLs can be generated efficiently either from the Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of healthy donors or from the splenocytes of immunized HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice by in vitro stimulation or immunization with DCs pulsed with the Hsp70L1–Her2341–456 fusion protein. This results in more potent target cell killing in an antigen-specific and HLA-A2.1-restricted manner. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from transgenic mice immunized with Hsp70L1–Her2341–456-pulsed DCs can markedly inhibit tumor growth and prolong the survival of nude mice with Her2+/HLA-A2.1+ human carcinomas. These results suggest that Hsp70L1–Her2341–456-pulsed DCs could be a new therapeutic vaccine for patients with Her2+ cancer. PMID:21785448

  11. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  12. Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity depends on dendritic location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froemke, Robert C.; Poo, Mu-ming; Dan, Yang

    2005-03-01

    In the neocortex, each neuron receives thousands of synaptic inputs distributed across an extensive dendritic tree. Although postsynaptic processing of each input is known to depend on its dendritic location, it is unclear whether activity-dependent synaptic modification is also location-dependent. Here we report that both the magnitude and the temporal specificity of spike-timing-dependent synaptic modification vary along the apical dendrite of rat cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. At the distal dendrite, the magnitude of long-term potentiation is smaller, and the window of pre-/postsynaptic spike interval for long-term depression (LTD) is broader. The spike-timing window for LTD correlates with the window of action potential-induced suppression of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors; this correlation applies to both their dendritic location-dependence and pharmacological properties. Presynaptic stimulation with partial blockade of NMDA receptors induced LTD and occluded further induction of spike-timing-dependent LTD, suggesting that NMDA receptor suppression underlies LTD induction. Computer simulation studies showed that the dendritic inhomogeneity of spike-timing-dependent synaptic modification leads to differential input selection at distal and proximal dendrites according to the temporal characteristics of presynaptic spike trains. Such location-dependent tuning of inputs, together with the dendritic heterogeneity of postsynaptic processing, could enhance the computational capacity of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  13. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  14. Early immunisation with dendritic cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation elicits graft vs tumour reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gigi, V; Stein, J; Askenasy, N; Yaniv, I; Ash, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perspectives of immunotherapy to cancer mediated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with dendritic cell (DC)-mediated immune sensitisation have yielded modest success so far. In this study, we assessed the impact of DC on graft vs tumour (GvT) reactions triggered by allogeneic BMT. Methods: H2Ka mice implanted with congenic subcutaneous Neuro-2a neuroblastoma (NB, H2Ka) tumours were irradiated and grafted with allogeneic H2Kb bone marrow cells (BMC) followed by immunisation with tumour-inexperienced or tumour-pulsed DC. Results: Immunisation with tumour-pulsed donor DC after allogeneic BMT suppressed tumour growth through induction of T cell-mediated NB cell lysis. Early post-transplant administration of DC was more effective than delayed immunisation, with similar efficacy of DC inoculated into the tumour and intravenously. In addition, tumour inexperienced DC were equally effective as tumour-pulsed DC in suppression of tumour growth. Immunisation of DC did not impact quantitative immune reconstitution, however, it enhanced T-cell maturation as evident from interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion, proliferation in response to mitogenic stimulation and tumour cell lysis in vitro. Dendritic cells potentiate GvT reactivity both through activation of T cells and specific sensitisation against tumour antigens. We found that during pulsing with tumour lysate DC also elaborate a factor that selectively inhibits lymphocyte proliferation, which is however abolished by humoral and DC-mediated lymphocyte activation. Conclusion: These data reveal complex involvement of antigen-presenting cells in GvT reactions, suggesting that the limited success in clinical application is not a result of limited efficacy but suboptimal implementation. Although DC can amplify soluble signals from NB lysates that inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, early administration of DC is a dominant factor in suppression of tumour growth. PMID:23511628

  15. Dendritic cell tumor killing activity and its potential applications in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Neale; Alizadeh, Darya; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Universally viewed as the sentinels and messengers of the immune system and traditionally referred to as professional antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) play a fundamental role in antitumor immunity. DCs are uniquely equipped with the ability to acquire, process, and present to T lymphocytes tumor-derived antigens. They can drive the differentiation of naive T cells into activated tumor-specific effector lymphocytes. DCs also dictate the type and regulate the strength and duration of T-cell responses. In addition, they contribute to natural killer and natural killer T-cell antitumoral function and to B-cell-mediated immunity. Besides this cardinal role as orchestrators of innate and adaptive immune responses, many studies have provided evidence that DCs can also function as direct cytotoxic effectors against tumors. This less conventional aspect of DC function has, however, raised controversy as it relates to the origin of these cells and the induction, regulation, and mechanisms underlying their tumoricidal activity. The possible impact of the cytotoxic function of DCs on their capability to present antigens also has been the focus of intensive research. This review examines these questions and discusses the biological significance of this nontraditional property and possible strategies to exploit the killing potential of DCs in cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Epitope specificity plays a critical role in regulating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    He, Wenqian; Tan, Gene S; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Lee, Amanda J; Lam, Mannie Man Wai; Krammer, Florian; Henry, Carole; Wilson, Patrick C; Ashkar, Ali A; Palese, Peter; Miller, Matthew S

    2016-10-18

    The generation of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies against influenza A virus is known to confer potent protection against homologous infections. The majority of these antibodies bind to the hemagglutinin (HA) head domain and function by blocking the receptor binding site, preventing infection of host cells. Recently, elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies which target the conserved HA stalk domain has become a promising "universal" influenza virus vaccine strategy. The ability of these antibodies to elicit Fc-dependent effector functions has emerged as an important mechanism through which protection is achieved in vivo. However, the way in which Fc-dependent effector functions are regulated by polyclonal influenza virus-binding antibody mixtures in vivo has never been defined. Here, we demonstrate that interactions among viral glycoprotein-binding antibodies of varying specificities regulate the magnitude of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity induction. We show that the mechanism responsible for this phenotype relies upon competition for binding to HA on the surface of infected cells and virus particles. Nonneutralizing antibodies were poor inducers and did not inhibit antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, anti-neuraminidase antibodies weakly induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and enhanced induction in the presence of HA stalk-binding antibodies in an additive manner. Our data demonstrate that antibody specificity plays an important role in the regulation of ADCC, and that cross-talk among antibodies of varying specificities determines the magnitude of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions.

  17. Epitope specificity plays a critical role in regulating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenqian; Tan, Gene S.; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Lee, Amanda J.; Lam, Mannie Man Wai; Krammer, Florian; Henry, Carole; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ashkar, Ali A.; Palese, Peter; Miller, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies against influenza A virus is known to confer potent protection against homologous infections. The majority of these antibodies bind to the hemagglutinin (HA) head domain and function by blocking the receptor binding site, preventing infection of host cells. Recently, elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies which target the conserved HA stalk domain has become a promising “universal” influenza virus vaccine strategy. The ability of these antibodies to elicit Fc-dependent effector functions has emerged as an important mechanism through which protection is achieved in vivo. However, the way in which Fc-dependent effector functions are regulated by polyclonal influenza virus-binding antibody mixtures in vivo has never been defined. Here, we demonstrate that interactions among viral glycoprotein-binding antibodies of varying specificities regulate the magnitude of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity induction. We show that the mechanism responsible for this phenotype relies upon competition for binding to HA on the surface of infected cells and virus particles. Nonneutralizing antibodies were poor inducers and did not inhibit antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, anti-neuraminidase antibodies weakly induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and enhanced induction in the presence of HA stalk-binding antibodies in an additive manner. Our data demonstrate that antibody specificity plays an important role in the regulation of ADCC, and that cross-talk among antibodies of varying specificities determines the magnitude of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions. PMID:27698132

  18. A convergent and essential interneuron pathway for Mauthner-cell-mediated escapes.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Alix M B; Schoppik, David; Robson, Drew N; Haesemeyer, Martin; Portugues, Ruben; Li, Jennifer M; Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-06-01

    The Mauthner cell (M-cell) is a command-like neuron in teleost fish whose firing in response to aversive stimuli is correlated with short-latency escapes [1-3]. M-cells have been proposed as evolutionary ancestors of startle response neurons of the mammalian reticular formation [4], and studies of this circuit have uncovered important principles in neurobiology that generalize to more complex vertebrate models [3]. The main excitatory input was thought to originate from multisensory afferents synapsing directly onto the M-cell dendrites [3]. Here, we describe an additional, convergent pathway that is essential for the M-cell-mediated startle behavior in larval zebrafish. It is composed of excitatory interneurons called spiral fiber neurons, which project to the M-cell axon hillock. By in vivo calcium imaging, we found that spiral fiber neurons are active in response to aversive stimuli capable of eliciting escapes. Like M-cell ablations, bilateral ablations of spiral fiber neurons largely eliminate short-latency escapes. Unilateral spiral fiber neuron ablations shift the directionality of escapes and indicate that spiral fiber neurons excite the M-cell in a lateralized manner. Their optogenetic activation increases the probability of short-latency escapes, supporting the notion that spiral fiber neurons help activate M-cell-mediated startle behavior. These results reveal that spiral fiber neurons are essential for the function of the M-cell in response to sensory cues and suggest that convergent excitatory inputs that differ in their input location and timing ensure reliable activation of the M-cell, a feedforward excitatory motif that may extend to other neural circuits.

  19. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  20. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  1. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  2. Targeting dendritic cells--why bother?

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Martin; Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2013-04-11

    Vaccination is among the most efficient forms of immunotherapy. Although sometimes inducing lifelong protective B-cell responses, T-cell-mediated immunity remains challenging. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) is an extensively explored concept aimed at improving cellular immunity. The identification of various DC subsets with distinct functional characteristics now allows for the fine-tuning of targeting strategies. Although some of these DC subsets are regarded as superior for (cross-) priming of naive T cells, controversies still remain about which subset represents the best target for immunotherapy. Because targeting the antigen alone may not be sufficient to obtain effective T-cell responses, delivery systems have been developed to target multiple vaccine components to DCs. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of targeting DCs: if targeting is beneficial at all and which vaccine vehicles and immunization routes represent promising strategies to reach and activate DCs.

  3. Dendritic polyurea polymers.

    PubMed

    Tuerp, David; Bruchmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic polymers, subsuming dendrimers as well as hyperbranched or highly branched polymers are well established in the field of polymer chemistry. This review article focuses on urea based dendritic polymers and summarizes their synthetic routes through both isocyanate and isocyanate-free processes. Furthermore, this article highlights applications where dendritic polyureas show their specific chemical and physical potential. For these purposes scientific publications as well as patent literature are investigated to generate a comprehensive overview on this topic.

  4. Self-adjuvanting influenza candidate vaccine presenting epitopes for cell-mediated immunity on a proteinaceous multivalent nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Szurgot, Inga; Szolajska, Ewa; Laurin, David; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Chaperot, Laurence; Schoehn, Guy; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2013-09-13

    We exploit the features of a virus-like particle, adenoviral dodecahedron (Ad Dd), for engineering a multivalent vaccination platform carrying influenza epitopes for cell-mediated immunity. The delivery platform, Ad Dd, is a proteinaceous, polyvalent, and biodegradable nanoparticle endowed with remarkable endocytosis activity that can be engineered to carry 60 copies of a peptide. Influenza M1 is the most abundant influenza internal protein with the conserved primary structure. Two different M1 immunodominant epitopes were separately inserted in Dd external positions without destroying the particles' dodecahedric structure. Both kinds of DdFluM1 obtained through expression in baculovirus system were properly presented by human dendritic cells triggering efficient activation of antigen-specific T cells responses. Importantly, the candidate vaccine was able to induce cellular immunity in vivo in chickens. These results warrant further investigation of Dd as a platform for candidate vaccine, able to stimulate cellular immune responses.

  5. Arthrofibrosis is the result of a T cell mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Bosch, U; Zeichen, J; Skutek, M; Haeder, L; van Griensven, M

    2001-09-01

    It is thought that an excessive fibrotic healing response with diffuse intra-articular scarring leads to arthrofibrosis after trauma and surgery around joints. To clarify the specific cellular mechanism of arthrofibrosis during arthrolysis we took fibrotic tissue samples from 18 patients at varying periods after knee trauma or surgery. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to study the overall histopathological changes. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expressing cells as well as CD3, CD4, CD25, CD28, CD68, CD80, and CD83 positive cells were localized immunohistologically. The results demonstrated synovial hyperplasia with fibrotic enlargement of the subintima and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The number of MHC class II expressing cells was increased. Mainly, intimal macrophages and dendritic cells showed positive immunostaining for MHC class II antigens. In the subintima moderate infiltration of T cells including activated T cells (CD25), CD4+ T helper (Th) cells and Th1 and Th2 subsets was detected. There was a slight polarization of the Th1/Th2 balance towards Th1 differentiation. Positive immunostaining for CD80/CD28 indicated the costimulatory signal for T cell activation and clonal expansion. These findings strongly support an immune response as the cause of capsulitis leading to formation of diffuse scar tissue within the knee joint. Based on our immunohistological study we conclude that a T cell mediated immune response plays a crucial role in the mechanism of arthrofibrosis.

  6. Protective roles of B and T lymphocyte attenuator in NKT cell-mediated experimental hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Arifumi; Watanabe, Norihiko; Oya, Yoshihiro; Owada, Takayoshi; Ikeda, Kei; Suto, Akira; Kagami, Shin-ichiro; Hirose, Koichi; Kanari, Hiroko; Kawashima, Saki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Taniguchi, Masaru; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Although B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) was originally identified as an inhibitory coreceptor selectively expressed on Th1 cells and B cells, recent studies have revealed that BTLA is expressed on a variety of cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and NK cells, and modulates their functions. However, the role of BTLA in the regulation of NKT cell function remains unknown. In this study, we found that BTLA was expressed on NKT cells at the levels similar to those on T cells and that BTLA-deficient (BTLA(-/-)) NKT cells produced larger amounts of IL-4 and IFN-gamma upon alpha-glactosylceramide stimulation as compared with wild-type (WT) NKT cells. In vivo, BTLA(-/-) mice produced larger amounts of IL-4 and IFN-gamma upon Con A injection and were more susceptible to Con A-induced hepatitis than WT mice. In addition, the augmentation of Con A-induced hepatitis in BTLA(-/-) mice was not observed in BTLA/NKT-double deficient mice. Moreover, NKT(-/-) mice reconstituted with BTLA(-/-) NKT cells were significantly more susceptible to Con A-induced hepatitis as compared with NKT (-/-) mice reconstituted with WT NKT cells. These results suggest that BTLA functions as the inhibitory coreceptor of NKT cells and plays a critical role in the prevention of NKT cell-mediated liver injury.

  7. The PD-L1/CD86 ratio is increased in dendritic cells co-infected with porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and the PD-L1/PD-1 axis is associated with anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Richmond, O; Cecere, T E; Erdogan, E; Meng, X J; Piñeyro, P; Subramaniam, S; Todd, S M; LeRoith, T

    2015-11-18

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continue to have a negative economic impact on global swine production operations. Host immune modulations that potentiate disease during PCV2 and/or PRRSV infections are important areas of ongoing research. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of PD-L1, CD86, and IL-10 in order to phenotype dendritic cells following viral infection with PCV2b and/or PRRSV. The results showed that the inhibitory marker PD-L1 was significantly increased in monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDC) in both singular PCV2 infection and PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. MoDC expression of stimulatory marker CD86 was significantly increased during singular PCV2 infections, while it was significantly decreased in the treatment groups co-infected with both PCV2 and PRRSV. IL-10 production was highest among MoDCs that were co-infected with PCV2 and PRRSV. These results indicate that dendritic cells develop a regulatory phenotype following PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. We further investigated the role of the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in lymphocyte anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine mononuclear cell populations. Lymphocyte populations with normal PD-1 expression had higher percentages of anergic, apoptotic lymphocytes and CD4(+)CD25(HIGH)FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cells when compared to a PD-1 deficient lymphocyte population. These results implicate the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in negative regulation of lymphocyte responses in pigs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. TH1 and TH2 lymphocyte development and regulation of TH cell-mediated immune responses of the skin.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Tilo; Röcken, Martin; Carballido, José M

    2004-01-01

    Since the first description of the subpopulations of TH1 and TH2 cells, insights into the development and control of these cells as two polarized and physiologically balanced subsets have been generated. In particular, implications of the TH1-TH2 concept for TH cell-mediated skin disorders have been discovered. This article will review the basic factors that control the development of TH1 and TH2 cells, such as the cytokines IL-12 and IL-4 and transcription factors, the possible role of costimulatory molecules, and specialized dendritic cell populations. These regulatory mechanisms will be discussed in the context of polarized TH1 or TH2 skin disorders such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Also presented are the principles that govern how chemokines and chemokine receptors recruit TH1 and TH2 cells to inflammatory sites and how they amplify these polarized TH cell responses. All of these concepts, including a novel role for IL-4-inducing TH1 responses, can contribute to the design of better therapeutic strategies to modulate TH cell-mediated immune responses.

  9. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  10. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  11. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces the migration of cutaneous dendritic cells by a CCR7-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Ryan J; Gerber, Scott A; Judge, Jennifer L; Ryan, Julie L; Pentland, Alice P; Lord, Edith M

    2012-11-01

    In the event of a deliberate or accidental radiological emergency, the skin would likely receive substantial ionizing radiation (IR) poisoning, which could negatively impact cellular proliferation, communication, and immune regulation within the cutaneous microenvironment. Indeed, as we have previously shown, local IR exposure to the murine ear causes a reduction of two types of cutaneous dendritic cells (cDC), including interstitial dendritic cells of the dermis and Langerhans cells of the epidermis, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These APCs are critical regulators of skin homeostasis, immunosurveillance, and the induction of T and B cell-mediated immunity, as previously demonstrated using conditional cDC knockout mice. To mimic a radiological emergency, we developed a murine model of sublethal total body irradiation (TBI). Our data would suggest that TBI results in the reduction of cDC from the murine ear that was not due to a systemic response to IR, as a loss was not observed in shielded ears. We further determined that this reduction was due, in part, to the upregulation of the chemoattractant CCL21 on lymphatic vessels as well as CCR7 expressed on cDC. Migration as a potential mechanism was confirmed using CCR7(-/-) mice in which cDC were not depleted following TBI. Finally, we demonstrated that the loss of cDC following TBI results in an impaired contact hypersensitivity response to hapten by using a modified contact hypersensitivity protocol. Taken together, these data suggest that IR exposure may result in diminished immunosurveillance in the skin, which could render the host more susceptible to pathogens.

  12. Impairment in natural killer cells editing of immature dendritic cells by infection with a virulent Trypanosoma cruzi population.

    PubMed

    Batalla, Estela I; Pino Martínez, Agustina M; Poncini, Carolina V; Duffy, Tomás; Schijman, Alejandro G; González Cappa, Stella M; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2013-01-01

    Early interactions between natural killer (NK) and dendritic cells (DC) shape the immune response at the frontier of innate and adaptive immunity. Activated NK cells participate in maturation or deletion of DCs that remain immature. We previously demonstrated that infection with a high virulence (HV) population of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi downmodulates DC maturation and T-cell activation capacity. Here, we evaluated the role of NK cells in regulating the maturation level of DCs. Shortly after infection with HV T. cruzi, DCs in poor maturation status begin to accumulate in mouse spleen. Although infection induces NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production, NK cells from mice infected with HV T. cruzi exhibit reduced ability to lyse and fail to induce maturation of bone marrow-derived immature DCs (iDCs). NK-mediated lysis of iDCs is restored by in vitro blockade of the IL-10 receptor during NK-DC interaction or when NK cells are obtained from T. cruzi-infected IL-10 knockout mice. These results suggest that infection with a virulent T. cruzi strain alters NK cell-mediated regulation of the adaptive immune response induced by DCs. This regulatory circuit where IL-10 appears to participate might lead to parasite persistence but can also limit the induction of a vigorous tissue-damaging T-cell response.

  13. Dendrite Model Explained

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Angie Jackman, a NASA project manager in microgravity research, explains a model of a dendrite to a visitor to the NASA exhibit at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI. The model depicts microscopic dendrites that grow as molten metals solidify. NASA sponsored three experiments aboard the Space Shuttle that used the microgravity environment to study the formation of large (1 to 4 mm) dendrites without Earth's gravity disrupting their growth. Three advanced follow-on experiments, managed by Jackman, are being developed for the International Space Station (ISS).

  14. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  15. Imbalance of Clara cell-mediated homeostatic inflammation is involved in lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, T; Sakurai, Y; Ishibashi, S; Maru, Y

    2011-08-04

    We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α produced from primary tumor-induced expression of two endogenous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands, S100A8 and serum amyloid A3 (SAA3), in pre-metastatic lungs. However, mechanistic details of the signaling network and relevance to pulmonary physiology are poorly understood. Here, we identify Clara cells as a control tower of the network. Clara cell ablation by naphthalene suppressed pulmonary recruitment of CD11b+TLR4+ cells and spontaneous lung metastasis. Clara cells turned out to express TLR4 through which SAA3 was auto-amplified. Reciprocal bone marrow transplantation between wild-type and TLR4 knockout mice demonstrated that pulmonary TLR4+ Clara cells could be derived from bone marrow. SAA3-induced TNFα expression in both alveolar type II cells and macrophages. Primary co-cultures of alveolar type II cells and Clara cells revealed that the induction of TNFα in alveolar type II cells was dependent on the Clara cell-mediated amplification of SAA3. SAA3 induction by bacterial endotoxin also required both Clara cells and TLR4. Thus, pulmonary metastatic soil may feature deregulation of homeostatic inflammatory responses to constant assaults of microbes with endotoxin.

  16. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  17. Comparative measurement of cell-mediated immune responses of swine to the M and N proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun-Jeong; Song, Young-Jo; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Ha, Gun-Woo; Oh, Jin-Sik; Oh, Youn-Kyoung; Choi, In-Soo

    2010-04-01

    the induction of cell-mediated immunity.

  18. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  19. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michelle; Koup, Richard A.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs) in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m), VP35 (EBOV/VP35m) or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as compared to wt

  20. Dendritic Synapse Location and Neocortical Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.; Letzkus, Johannes J.; Kampa, Björn M.; Hang, Giao B.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    While it has been appreciated for decades that synapse location in the dendritic tree has a powerful influence on signal processing in neurons, the role of dendritic synapse location on the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity has only recently been explored. Here, we review recent work revealing how learning rules for spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) in cortical neurons vary with the spatial location of synaptic input. A common principle appears to be that proximal synapses show conventional STDP, whereas distal inputs undergo plasticity according to novel learning rules. One crucial factor determining location-dependent STDP is the backpropagating action potential, which tends to decrease in amplitude and increase in width as it propagates into the dendritic tree of cortical neurons. We discuss additional location-dependent mechanisms as well as the functional implications of heterogeneous learning rules at different dendritic locations for the organization of synaptic inputs. PMID:21423515

  1. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  2. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  3. Lid for improved dendritic web growth

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles S.; Kochka, Edgar L.; Piotrowski, Paul A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.

    1992-03-24

    A lid for a susceptor in which a crystalline material is melted by induction heating to form a pool or melt of molten material from which a dendritic web of essentially a single crystal of the material is pulled through an elongated slot in the lid and the lid has a pair of generally round openings adjacent the ends of the slot and a groove extends between each opening and the end of the slot. The grooves extend from the outboard surface of the lid to adjacent the inboard surface providing a strip contiguous with the inboard surface of the lid to produce generally uniform radiational heat loss across the width of the dendritic web adjacent the inboard surface of the lid to reduce thermal stresses in the web and facilitate the growth of wider webs at a greater withdrawal rate.

  4. Protamine and mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, A.; Sörbo, J.; Norrby, K.

    1990-01-01

    Different doses of protamine sulphate (PS) given s.c. (at 12-h intervals) were tested for signs of non-specific toxicity measured as effect on body weight and small-gut proliferation as well as on mast-cell secretion and mast-cell-mediated mitogenesis in the mesenteric windows following i.p. injection of Compound 48/80, a potent mast cell secretagogue, in normal rats. In a non-toxic dose range, the effect of PS on mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis, effected by 48/80, was quantified as the number of vessels per mm of mesenteric window in histological sections at x 400. No intelligible dose-effect relationship was discernible between the dose of PS given and the effect on angiogenesis. Only in a tight interval, at 40 mg PS/kg but not at 20 or 60 mg PS/kg, was the angiogenesis statistically significantly suppressed. Hence, it was concluded that PS can be angiostatic but does not exert a more general angiostatic effect in the autogenous systems used. PMID:1691920

  5. Fitness of cell-mediated immunity independent of repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Rebrovich, Michelle; Wettstein, Peter J; Vuk-Pavlovic, Zvezdana; Limper, Andrew H; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2007-03-01

    Fitness of cell-mediated immunity is thought to depend on TCR diversity; however, this concept has not been tested formally. We tested the concept using JH(-/-) mice that lack B cells and have TCR Vbeta diversity <1% that of wild-type mice and quasimonoclonal (QM) mice with oligoclonal B cells and TCR Vbeta diversity 7% that of wild-type mice. Despite having a TCR repertoire contracted >99% and defective lymphoid organogenesis, JH(-/-) mice rejected H-Y-incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild-type mice. JH(-/-) mice exhibited T cell priming by peptide and delayed-type hypersensitivity, although these responses were less than normal owing either to TCR repertoire contraction or defective lymphoid organogenesis. QM mice with TCR diversity contracted >90%, and normal lymphoid organs rejected H-Y incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild type mice and exhibited normal T cell priming and normal delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. QM mice also resisted Pneumocystis murina like wild-type mice. Thus, cell-mediated immunity can function normally despite contractions of TCR diversity >90% and possibly >99%.

  6. Nimotuzumab Induces NK Cell Activation, Cytotoxicity, Dendritic Cell Maturation and Expansion of EGFR-Specific T Cells in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Mazorra, Zaima; Lavastida, Anabel; Concha-Benavente, Fernando; Valdés, Anet; Srivastava, Raghvendra M; García-Bates, Tatiana M; Hechavarría, Esperanza; González, Zuyen; González, Amnely; Lugiollo, Martha; Cuevas, Iván; Frómeta, Carlos; Mestre, Braulio F; Barroso, Maria C; Crombet, Tania; Ferris, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Survival benefit and long-term duration of clinical response have been seen using the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted monoclonal antibody (mAb) nimotuzumab. Blocking EGFR signaling may not be the only mechanism of action underlying its efficacy. As an IgG1 isotype mAb, nimotuzumab's capacity of killing tumor cells by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and to induce an immune response in cancer patients have not been studied. ADCC-induced by nimotuzumab was determined using a (51)Cr release assay. The in vitro effect of nimotuzumab on natural killer (NK) cell activation and dendritic cell (DC) maturation and the in vivo frequency of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs) and NK cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Cytokine levels in supernatants were determined by ELISA. ELISpot was carried out to quantify EGFR-specific T cells in nimotuzumab-treated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) patients. Nimotuzumab was able to kill EGFR+ tumor cells by NK cell-mediated ADCC. Nimotuzumab-activated NK cells promoted DC maturation and EGFR-specific CD8+ T cell priming. Interestingly, nimotuzumab led to upregulation of some immune checkpoint molecules on NK cells (TIM-3) and DC (PD-L1), to a lower extent than another EGFR mAb, cetuximab. Furthermore, circulating EGFR-specific T cells were identified in nimotuzumab-treated HNSCC patients. Notably, nimotuzumab combined with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiation increased the frequency of peripheral CD4+CD39+FOXP3+Tregs which otherwise were decreased to baseline values when nimotuzumab was used as monotherapy. The frequency of circulating NK cells remained constant during treatment. Nimotuzumab-induced, NK cell-mediated DC priming led to induction of anti-EGFR specific T cells in HNSCC patients. The association between EGFR-specific T cells and patient clinical benefit with nimotuzumab treatment should be investigated.

  7. Nimotuzumab Induces NK Cell Activation, Cytotoxicity, Dendritic Cell Maturation and Expansion of EGFR-Specific T Cells in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazorra, Zaima; Lavastida, Anabel; Concha-Benavente, Fernando; Valdés, Anet; Srivastava, Raghvendra M.; García-Bates, Tatiana M.; Hechavarría, Esperanza; González, Zuyen; González, Amnely; Lugiollo, Martha; Cuevas, Iván; Frómeta, Carlos; Mestre, Braulio F.; Barroso, Maria C.; Crombet, Tania; Ferris, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Survival benefit and long-term duration of clinical response have been seen using the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted monoclonal antibody (mAb) nimotuzumab. Blocking EGFR signaling may not be the only mechanism of action underlying its efficacy. As an IgG1 isotype mAb, nimotuzumab’s capacity of killing tumor cells by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and to induce an immune response in cancer patients have not been studied. ADCC-induced by nimotuzumab was determined using a 51Cr release assay. The in vitro effect of nimotuzumab on natural killer (NK) cell activation and dendritic cell (DC) maturation and the in vivo frequency of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs) and NK cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Cytokine levels in supernatants were determined by ELISA. ELISpot was carried out to quantify EGFR-specific T cells in nimotuzumab-treated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) patients. Nimotuzumab was able to kill EGFR+ tumor cells by NK cell-mediated ADCC. Nimotuzumab-activated NK cells promoted DC maturation and EGFR-specific CD8+ T cell priming. Interestingly, nimotuzumab led to upregulation of some immune checkpoint molecules on NK cells (TIM-3) and DC (PD-L1), to a lower extent than another EGFR mAb, cetuximab. Furthermore, circulating EGFR-specific T cells were identified in nimotuzumab-treated HNSCC patients. Notably, nimotuzumab combined with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiation increased the frequency of peripheral CD4+CD39+FOXP3+Tregs which otherwise were decreased to baseline values when nimotuzumab was used as monotherapy. The frequency of circulating NK cells remained constant during treatment. Nimotuzumab-induced, NK cell-mediated DC priming led to induction of anti-EGFR specific T cells in HNSCC patients. The association between EGFR-specific T cells and patient clinical benefit with nimotuzumab treatment should be investigated. PMID:28674498

  8. Enterovirus-71 virus-like particles induce the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells through TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Li; Hu, Yu-Chen; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has a high mortality rate among young children. We recently demonstrated potent induction of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response in monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs), with a morphology resembling that of infectious EV71 virions but not containing a viral genome, which could potentially be safe as a vaccine for EV71. To elucidate the mechanisms through which EV71 VLPs induce cell-mediated immunity, we studied the immunomodulatory effects of EV71 VLPs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), which bind to and incorporate EV71 VLPs. DC treatment with EV71 VLPs enhanced the expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40, CD54, and HLA-DR on the cell surface; increased the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs; and suppressed the capacity of DCs for endocytosis. Treatment with EV71 VLPs also enhanced the ability of DCs to stimulate naïve T cells and induced secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ by T cells and Th1 cell responses. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 suppressed the capacity of EV71 VLPs to induce the production of IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs and inhibited EV71 VLPs binding to DCs. Our study findings clarified the important role for TLR4 signaling in DCs in response to EV71 VLPs and showed that EV71 VLPs induced inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) degradation and nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-κB) activation.

  9. Enterovirus-71 Virus-Like Particles Induce the Activation and Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through TLR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Li; Hu, Yu-Chen; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has a high mortality rate among young children. We recently demonstrated potent induction of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response in monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs), with a morphology resembling that of infectious EV71 virions but not containing a viral genome, which could potentially be safe as a vaccine for EV71. To elucidate the mechanisms through which EV71 VLPs induce cell-mediated immunity, we studied the immunomodulatory effects of EV71 VLPs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), which bind to and incorporate EV71 VLPs. DC treatment with EV71 VLPs enhanced the expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40, CD54, and HLA-DR on the cell surface; increased the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs; and suppressed the capacity of DCs for endocytosis. Treatment with EV71 VLPs also enhanced the ability of DCs to stimulate naïve T cells and induced secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ by T cells and Th1 cell responses. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 suppressed the capacity of EV71 VLPs to induce the production of IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs and inhibited EV71 VLPs binding to DCs. Our study findings clarified the important role for TLR4 signaling in DCs in response to EV71 VLPs and showed that EV71 VLPs induced inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) degradation and nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-κB) activation. PMID:25360749

  10. CD8+ immunoregulatory cells in the graft-versus-host reaction: CD8 T cells activate dendritic cells to secrete interleukin-12/interleukin-18 and induce T helper 1 autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Alistair; Leggat, Jamie A; Inderberg, Else M

    2003-01-01

    Initiation of cell-mediated immunity or autoimmunity requires secretion of interleukin (IL)-12 from dendritic cells (DC), which drives the generation of T helper 1 (Th1) effector cells in synergy with IL-18. Induction of IL-12 can be triggered by microbial stimuli but also requires signals from activated T cells. We investigated interactions between alloreactive CD4 and CD8 T cells in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) in vitro and in the graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) in vivo. In a parent-into-F1 model of GVHR, donor CD8 cells were found to suppress the hyper-immunoglobulin E (IgE) syndrome, anti-DNA immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) autoantibodies and donor CD4-cell expansion, but were essential for Th1-dependent immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) autoantibody production and release of serum IL-12 p40. In vitro, addition of alloreactive CD8 cells to CD4 cells and mature DC enhanced Th1 development. CD4 and CD8 T cells induced IL-18 from DC and primed for IL-12 p70 secretion via interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). However CD8 T cells, but not CD4 cells, released IFN-γ/TNF-α after primary stimulation. The data suggest that rapid release of inflammatory cytokines from central memory-type CD8 cells early in immunity is critical for induction of Th1 cells via DC activation and IL-12 production. This pathway could provide a means for amplification of cell-mediated autoimmunity in the absence of microbial stimuli. PMID:12871213

  11. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  12. Dendritic Polymers for Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Mou, Quanbing; Wang, Dali; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic polymers are highly branched polymers with controllable structures, which possess a large population of terminal functional groups, low solution or melt viscosity, and good solubility. Their size, degree of branching and functionality can be adjusted and controlled through the synthetic procedures. These tunable structures correspond to application-related properties, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, stimuli-responsiveness and self-assembly ability, which are the key points for theranostic applications, including chemotherapeutic theranostics, biotherapeutic theranostics, phototherapeutic theranostics, radiotherapeutic theranostics and combined therapeutic theranostics. Up to now, significant progress has been made for the dendritic polymers in solving some of the fundamental and technical questions toward their theranostic applications. In this review, we briefly summarize how to control the structures of dendritic polymers, the theranostics-related properties derived from their structures and their theranostics-related applications. PMID:27217829

  13. Comparative analyses of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses upon vaccination with different commercially available single-dose porcine circovirus type 2 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hwi Won; Lee, Jeehoon; Han, Kiwon; Park, Changhoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the induction of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses by four commercially available single-dose porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) vaccines. A total of 50 3-week-old piglets were assigned to five groups (10 pigs per group). Four commercial PCV-2 vaccines were administered according to the manufacturer's instructions and the piglets were observed for 154 days post vaccination (dpv). Inactivated chimeric PCV-1-2 vaccines induced higher levels of PCV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) and interferon-γ-secreting cells (IFN-γ-SC) in pigs than did the other three commercial PCV-2 vaccines. The proportions of CD4(+) cells were significantly higher in animals vaccinated with inactivated chimeric PCV-1-2 and PCV-2 vaccines than in animals vaccinated with the two subunit vaccines. To our knowledge, this is the first comparison of humoral and cell-mediated immunity induced by four commercial single-dose PCV-2 vaccines under the same conditions. The results of this study demonstrated quantitative differences in the induction of humoral and cell-mediated immunity following vaccination.

  14. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Dendritic Cells in Murine Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  15. Dendritic Release of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Mike; Apps, David; Menzies, John; Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2016-12-06

    Release of neuroactive substances by exocytosis from dendrites is surprisingly widespread and is not confined to a particular class of transmitters: it occurs in multiple brain regions, and includes a range of neuropeptides, classical neurotransmitters, and signaling molecules, such as nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, ATP, and arachidonic acid. This review is focused on hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells that release vasopressin and oxytocin and midbrain neurons that release dopamine. For these two model systems, the stimuli, mechanisms, and physiological functions of dendritic release have been explored in greater detail than is yet available for other neurons and neuroactive substances. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:235-252, 2017.

  16. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  17. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  18. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  19. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  20. Archaeosome Vaccine Adjuvants Induce Strong Humoral, Cell-Mediated, and Memory Responses: Comparison to Conventional Liposomes and Alum†

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lakshmi; Dicaire, Chantal J.; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Sprott, G. Dennis

    2000-01-01

    Ether glycerolipids extracted from various archaeobacteria were formulated into liposomes (archaeosomes) possessing strong adjuvant properties. Mice of varying genetic backgrounds, immunized by different parenteral routes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) entrapped in archaeosomes (∼200-nm vesicles), demonstrated markedly enhanced serum anti-BSA antibody titers. These titers were often comparable to those achieved with Freund's adjuvant and considerably more than those with alum or conventional liposomes (phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylglycerol-cholesterol, 1.8:0.2:1.5 molar ratio). Furthermore, antigen-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, and IgG2b isotype antibodies were all induced. Association of BSA with the lipid vesicles was required for induction of a strong response, and >80% of the protein was internalized within most archaeosome types, suggesting efficient release of antigen in vivo. Encapsulation of ovalbumin and hen egg lysozyme within archaeosomes showed similar immune responses. Antigen-archaeosome immunizations also induced a strong cell-mediated immune response: antigen-dependent proliferation and substantial production of cytokines gamma interferon (Th1) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) (Th2) by spleen cells in vitro. In contrast, conventional liposomes induced little cell-mediated immunity, whereas alum stimulated only an IL-4 response. In contrast to alum and Freund's adjuvant, archaeosomes composed of Thermoplasma acidophilum lipids evoked a dramatic memory antibody response to the encapsulated protein (at ∼300 days) after only two initial immunizations (days 0 and 14). This correlated with increased antigen-specific cell cycling of CD4+ T cells: increase in synthetic (S) and mitotic (G2/M) and decrease in resting (G1) phases. Thus, archaeosomes may be potent vaccine carriers capable of facilitating strong primary and memory humoral, and cell-mediated immune responses to the entrapped antigen. PMID:10603368

  1. Reactive oxygen species induced by therapeutic CD20 antibodies inhibit natural killer cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against primary CLL cells.

    PubMed

    Werlenius, Olle; Aurelius, Johan; Hallner, Alexander; Akhiani, Ali A; Simpanen, Maria; Martner, Anna; Andersson, Per-Ola; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B

    2016-05-31

    The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of natural killer (NK) cells is assumed to contribute to the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other hematopoietic malignancies of B cell origin. We sought to determine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing monocytes regulate the ADCC of NK cells against primary CLL cells using anti-CD20 as the linking antibody. The monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab were found to trigger substantial release of ROS from monocytes. Antibody-exposed monocytes induced NK cell apoptosis and restricted NK cell-mediated ADCC against autologous CLL cells. The presence of inhibitors of ROS formation and scavengers of ROS preserved NK cell viability and restored NK cell-mediated ADCC against primary CLL cells. We propose that limiting the antibody-induced induction of immunosuppressive ROS may improve the anti-leukemic efficacy of anti-CD20 therapy in CLL.

  2. Toll-like receptor–mediated induction of type I interferon in plasmacytoid dendritic cells requires the rapamycin-sensitive PI(3)K-mTOR-p70S6K pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weiping; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Tang, Hua; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Pirani, Ali; Murthy, Niren; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Robust production of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is crucial for antiviral immunity. Here we show involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in regulating interferon production by pDCs. Inhibition of mTOR or its ‘downstream’ mediators, the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinases p70S6K1 and p70S6K2, during pDC activation by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) blocked the interaction of TLR9 with the adaptor MyD88 and subsequent activation of the interferon-regulatory factor IRF7, which resulted in impaired IFN-α/β production. Microarray analysis confirmed that inhibition of mTOR by the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin suppressed antiviral and anti-inflammatory gene expression. Consistent with this, targeting rapamycin-encapsulated microparticles to antigen-presenting cells in vivo resulted in less IFN-α/β production in response to CpG DNA or the yellow fever vaccine virus strain 17D. Thus, mTOR signaling is crucial in TLR-mediated IFN-α/β responses by pDCs. PMID:18758466

  3. A mixture of bacterial mechanical lysates is more efficient than single strain lysate and of bacterial-derived soluble products for the induction of an activating phenotype in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Barbara; Agazzi, Alessia; D'Agostino, Antonella; Antonini, Francesca; Costa, Gregorio; Sabatini, Federica; Ferlazzo, Guido; Melioli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), following an optimal maturation, are able to drive an efficient immune-response. For this, both co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), activation molecules (CD83) and peptide presenting molecules (HLA) are over-expressed. The in vitro treatment of immature DC with fragments of bacterial strains, obtained by using a mechanical lysis as well as with bacterial-derived molecules (such as lipopolysaccharide and protido-glycan), induced the maturation of DCs and the secretion of a panel of cytokines and chemokines. Of note, ex vivo treated circulating DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were also activated by these bacterial bodies. However, while the particulate fraction of single bacterial strains or soluble bacterial-derived molecules induced a sub-optimal maturation (as evaluated by the expression of an activating phenotype on DCs and the amount of cytokine secretion), the addition of the mixture of the particulate fractions of the different bacterial strains was able to mediate an optimal maturation. These results were also confirmed by using the secretion of both cytokines and chemokines as markers of DC activation. All these findings suggest that the particulate fraction of bacterial lysate mixtures, because of their ability to interact with different surface structures, might be exploited not only as an immunogen, but also as an adjuvant treatment to boost an immune-response to poorly "antigenic" proteins, such as cancer antigens or allergens.

  4. Effect of morphine on cell-mediated immune responses of human lymphocytes against allogeneic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Fuggetta, M P; Di Francesco, P; Falchetti, R; Cottarelli, A; Rossi, L; Tricarico, M; Lanzilli, G

    2005-06-01

    Opioid drugs, including morphine, are largely used as pain control in cancer patients at different stages of neoplastic growth and progression. Therefore, the possible influence of these drugs on host immunity appears to be of considerable interest. We have examined in vitro the effect of morphine on the generation of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against HTLV-I induced T-cell leukemia cells (MT-2 line). The results show that the drug, at graded concentrations (from 3 pg/ml to 32 microg/ml), that include those detectable in treated patients, enhances CTL activity whereas natural killer cell activity was unaffected. The enhancing effect is particularly evident when morphine was present at the onset of lymphocyte/MT-2 co-culture. On the contrary, the drug was ineffective when added on the last day of co-culture, thus indicating that morphine operates during the generation phase of CTL, but not on mature CTL. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular cytokine expression showed that morphine increases the percentage of interferon gamma-producing CD8+ T cells in co-culture assay. Collectively, these results suggest that in our experimental model morphine enhances CTL responses by directly affecting the induction phase of T-dependent cell-mediated immunity.

  5. MHC-I expression renders catecholaminergic neurons susceptible to T-cell-mediated degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián, Carolina; Zucca, Fabio A.; Mauri, Pierluigi; Steinbeck, Julius A.; Studer, Lorenz; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Kanter, Ellen; Budhu, Sadna; Mandelbaum, Jonathan; Vonsattel, Jean P.; Zecca, Luigi; Loike, John D.; Sulzer, David

    2014-01-01

    Subsets of rodent neurons are reported to express major histocompatibilty complex class I (MHC-I), but such expression has not been reported in normal adult human neurons. Here we provide evidence from immunolabel, RNA expression, and mass spectrometry analysis of postmortem samples that human catecholaminergic substantia nigra and locus coeruleus neurons express MHC-I, and that this molecule is inducible in human stem cell derived dopamine (DA) neurons. Catecholamine murine cultured neurons are more responsive to induction of MHC-I by gamma-interferon than other neuronal populations. Neuronal MHC-I is also induced by factors released from microglia activated by neuromelanin or alpha-synuclein, or high cytosolic DA and/or oxidative stress. DA neurons internalize foreign ovalbumin and display antigen derived from this protein by MHC-I, which triggers DA neuronal death in the presence of appropriate cytotoxic T-cells. Thus, neuronal MHC-I can trigger antigenic response, and catecholamine neurons may be particularly susceptible to T cell-mediated cytotoxic attack. PMID:24736453

  6. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arikkath, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Dendrites are key integrators of synaptic information in neurons and play vital roles in neuronal plasticity. Hence, it is necessary that dendrite arborization is precisely controlled and coordinated with synaptic activity to ensure appropriate functional neural network integrity. In the past several years, it has become increasingly clear that several cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms contribute to dendritic arborization. In this review, we will discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that regulate dendrite morphogenesis, particularly in cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons and some of the implications of aberrant dendritic morphology for human disease. Finally, we will discuss the current challenges and future directions in the field. PMID:23293584

  8. Modification of dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  9. Diverse HLA-I Peptide Repertoires of the APC Lines MUTZ3-Derived Immature and Mature Dendritic Cells and THP1-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nyambura, Lydon Wainaina; Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Baleeiro, Renato Brito; Walden, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are specialized APCs that process and present self-Ags for induction of tolerance and foreign Ags to initiate T cell-mediated immunity. Related to differentiation states they have specific phenotypes and functions. However, the impact of these differentiations on Ag processing and presentation remains poorly defined. To gain insight into this, we analyzed and compared the HLA-I peptidomes of MUTZ3-derived human immature and mature DC lines and THP1-derived macrophages by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We found that the HLA-I peptidomes were heterogeneous and individualized and were dominated by nonapeptides with similar HLA-I binding affinities and anchor residues. MUTZ3-derived DCs and THP1-derived macrophages were able to sample peptides from source proteins of almost all subcellular locations and were involved in various cellular functions in similar proportion, with preference to proteins involved in cell communication, signal transduction, protein metabolism, and transcription factor/regulator activity.

  10. The dominant roles of ICAM-1-encoding gene in DNA vaccination against Japanese encephalitis virus are the activation of dendritic cells and enhancement of cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yong-Zhen; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Li; Feng, Guo-He

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cellular immune responses elicited by a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding prM-E protein from the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) with or without various forms of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 gene to maximize the immune responses evoked by the JE DNA vaccine. We observed that co-immunization with the construct containing murine ICAM-1 gene (pICAM-1) resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of CD4(+)T cells, high level of JEV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, and high production of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cytokines in splenic T cells. Furthermore, the co-expression of ICAM-1 and DNA immunogens was found to be more effective in generating T cell-mediated immune responses than those induced by immunization with pJME in combination with pICAM-1. Our results suggested that ICAM-1 enhanced T cell receptor signaling and activated Th1 immune responses in the JEV model system by increasing the induction of CD4(+)Th1 cell subset and activating dendritic cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunotherapy with myeloid cells for tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-García, Mercedes; Boros, Peter; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Understanding the interplay between myeloid dendritic cells and T cells under tolerogenic conditions, and whether their interactions induce the development of antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) is critical to uncover the mechanisms involved in the induction of indefinite allograft survival. Recent findings Myeloid dendritic cell–T-cell interactions are seminal events that determine the outcome of the immune response, and multiple in-vitro protocols suggest the generation of tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells that modulate T-cell responses, and determine the outcome of the immune response to an allograft following adoptive transfer. We believe that identifying specific conditions that lead to the generation of tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells and Tregs are critical for the manipulation the immune response towards the development of transplantation tolerance. Summary We summarize recent findings regarding specific culture conditions that generate tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells that induce T-cell hyporesponsiveness and Treg development, and represents a novel immunotherapeutic approach to promote the induction of indefinite graft survival prolongation. The interpretations presented here illustrate that different mechanisms govern the generation tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells, and we discuss the concomitant therapeutic implications. PMID:20616727

  12. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity Ex Vivo Using Dendritic Cells Transduced with Fowl Pox Vector Expressing MUC1, CEA, and a Triad of Costimulatory Molecules (rF-PANVAC)1

    PubMed Central

    Vasir, Baldev; Zarwan, Corrine; Ahmad, Rehan; Crawford, Keith D; Rajabi, Hassan; Matsuoka, Ken-Ichi; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Wu, Zekui; Mills, Heidi; Kufe, Donald; Avigan, David

    2012-01-01

    The fowl pox vector expressing the tumor associated antigens MUC1 and CEA in the context of costimulatory molecules (rF-PANVAC) has shown promise as a tumor vaccine. However, vaccine mediated expansion of suppressor T cell populations may blunt clinical efficacy. We characterized the cellular immune response induced by ex-vivo dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with (rF)-PANVAC. Consistent with the functional characteristics of potent antigen presenting cells, rF-PANVAC-DCs demonstrated strong expression of MUC1 and CEA and costimulatory molecules, CD80, CD86, and CD83; decreased levels of phosphorylated STAT3, and increased levels of Tyk2, JAK2 and STAT1. rF-PANVAC-DCs stimulated expansion of tumor antigen specific T cells with potent cytolytic capacity. However, rF-PANVAC transduced DCs also induced the concurrent expansion of FOXP3 expressing CD4+CD25+high regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibited T cell activation. Moreover, Tregs expressed high levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) together with phosphorylated STAT3 and STAT6. In contrast, the vaccine expanded Treg population expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ and the proinflammatory RORγt and IL-17A suggesting that these cells may share effector functions with conventional TH17 T cells. These data suggest that Tregs expanded by rF-PANVAC-DCs, exhibit immunosuppressive properties potentially mediated by Th2 cytokines, but simultaneous expression of Th1 and Th17 associated factors suggests a high degree of plasticity. PMID:22892452

  13. Follicular dendritic cell–dependent drug resistance of non-Hodgkin lymphoma involves cell adhesion–mediated Bim down-regulation through induction of microRNA-181a

    PubMed Central

    Lwin, Tint; Lin, Jianhong; Choi, Yong Sung; Zhang, Xinwei; Moscinski, Lynn C.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; Dalton, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), an essential component of the lymph node microenvironment, regulate and support B-lymphocyte differentiation, survival, and lymphoma progression. Here, we demonstrate that adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma and other non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells to FDCs reduces cell apoptosis and is associated with decreased levels of the proapoptotic protein, Bim. Bim down-regulation is posttranscriptionally regulated via up-regulation of microRNA-181a (miR-181a). miR-181a overexpression decreases, whereas miR-181a inhibition increases Bim levels by directly targeting Bim. Furthermore, we found that cell adhesion–up-regulated miR-181a contributes to FDC-mediated cell survival through Bim down-regulation, implicating miR-181a as an upstream effector of the Bim-apoptosis signaling pathway. miR-181a inhibition and Bim upregulation significantly suppressed FDC-mediated protection against apoptosis in lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma cells. Thus, FDCs protect B-cell lymphoma cells against apoptosis, in part through activation of a miR-181a–dependent mechanism involving down-regulation of Bim expression. We demonstrate, for the first time, that cell-cell contact controls tumor cell survival and apoptosis via microRNA in mantle cell and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Regulation of microRNAs by B-cell–FDC interaction may support B-cell survival, representing a novel molecular mechanism for cell adhesion–mediated drug resistance and a potential therapeutic target in B-cell lymphomas. PMID:20841506

  14. Dendritic cell interactions with Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Sharanjeet K; Taborda, Carlos P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are among the most common microbes encountered by humans. More than 100, 000 fungal species have been described in the environment to date, however only a few species cause disease in humans. Fungal infections are of particular importance to immunocompromised hosts in whom disease is often more severe, especially in those with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as individuals with HIV infection, hematologic malignancies, or those receiving TNF-α inhibitors. Nevertheless, environmental disturbances through natural processes or as a consequence of deforestation or construction can expose immunologically competent people to a large number of fungal spores resulting in asymptomatic acquisition to life-threatening disease. In recent decades, the significance of the innate immune system and more importantly the role of dendritic cells (DC) have been found to play a fundamental role in the resolution of fungal infections, such as in dimorphic fungi like Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides. In this review article the general role of DCs will be illustrated as the bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as their specific interactions with these 2 dimorphic fungi. PMID:25933034

  15. Dendritic cell interactions with Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Thind, Sharanjeet K; Taborda, Carlos P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are among the most common microbes encountered by humans. More than 100, 000 fungal species have been described in the environment to date, however only a few species cause disease in humans. Fungal infections are of particular importance to immunocompromised hosts in whom disease is often more severe, especially in those with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as individuals with HIV infection, hematologic malignancies, or those receiving TNF-α inhibitors. Nevertheless, environmental disturbances through natural processes or as a consequence of deforestation or construction can expose immunologically competent people to a large number of fungal spores resulting in asymptomatic acquisition to life-threatening disease. In recent decades, the significance of the innate immune system and more importantly the role of dendritic cells (DC) have been found to play a fundamental role in the resolution of fungal infections, such as in dimorphic fungi like Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides. In this review article the general role of DCs will be illustrated as the bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as their specific interactions with these 2 dimorphic fungi.

  16. Arsenic Exposure and Cell-Mediated Immunity in Pre-School Children in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sultan; Moore, Sophie E.; Kippler, Maria; Gardner, Renee; Hawlader, M. D. H.; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Raqib, Rubhana; Vahter, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal arsenic exposure has been associated with reduced thymic index and increased morbidity in infants, indicating arsenic-related impaired immune function. We aimed at elucidating potential effects of pre- and postnatal arsenic exposure on cell-mediated immune function in pre-school aged children. Children born in a prospective mother-child cohort in rural Bangladesh were followed up at 4.5 years of age (n = 577). Arsenic exposure was assessed by concentrations of arsenic metabolites (U-As) in child urine and maternal urine during pregnancy, using high-performance liquid chromatography online with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For assessment of delayed type hypersensitivity response, an intradermal injection of purified protein derivative (PPD) was given to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccinated children. The diameter (mm) of induration was measured after 48–72 h. Plasma concentrations of 27 cytokines were analyzed by a multiplex cytokine assay. Children's concurrent, but not prenatal, arsenic exposure was associated with a weaker response to the injected PPD. The risk ratio (RR) of not responding to PPD (induration <5 mm) was 1.37 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.74) in children in the highest quartile of U-As (range 126–1228 μg/l), compared with the lowest (range 12–34 μg/l). The p for trend across the quartiles was 0.003. The association was stronger in undernourished children. Children's U-As in tertiles was inversely associated with two out of 27 cytokines only, i.e., IL-2 and TNF-α, both Th1 cytokines (in the highest tertile, regression coefficients (95% CI): −1.57 (−2.56, −0.57) and −4.53 (−8.62, −0.42), respectively), but not with Th2 cytokines. These associations were particularly strong in children with recent infections. In conclusion, elevated childhood arsenic exposure appeared to reduce cell-mediated immunity, possibly linked to reduced concentrations of Th1 cytokines. PMID:24924402

  17. Rat bladder cell-mediated mutagenesis of Chinese hamster V79 cells and metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbach, R.; Malick, L.; Nesnow, S.

    1981-05-01

    Primary rat bladder epithelial cells were cocultivated with Chinese hamster V79 cells in the presence of carcinogens, and the induction of 6-thioguanine resistance in the V79 cells was used as a market of cell-mediated mutagenesis. The carcinogens dimethylnitrosamine, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, and benzo(a)pyrene (BP) were mutagenic to V79 cells in the presence of bladder cells but not in their absence. Analysis of BP metabolites (formed by bladder cells indicated that 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene-3,6-quinone, and 9-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene were the major organic-soluble metabolites formed. The finding that rat bladder peithelium can metabolize some carcinogens offers new possibilities for the mechanism of initiation of bladder cancer.

  18. Bystander cytotoxicity in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells mediated by fusion yeast cytosine deaminase and 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Matuskova, Miroslava; Hlubinova, Kristina; Bohovic, Roman; Feketeova, Lucia; Janega, Pavol; Babal, Pavel; Poturnajova, Martina

    2011-12-01

    In our work, we have evaluated efficiency of gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT) based on combination of fusion yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) on model human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line TT. We determined the efficiency of this GDEPT approach in suicide and bystander cytotoxicity induction. We have shown significant bystander effect in vitro and 5FC administration resulted in potent antitumor effect in vivo. Furthermore, we have unraveled high efficiency of cell-mediated GDEPT, when human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were used as delivery vehicles in direct cocultures in vitro. Nevertheless, effector MSC exhibited inhibitory effect on TT cell proliferation and abrogated TT xenotransplant growth in vivo. We suggest that yCD/5FC combination represents another experimental treatment modality to be tested in MTC and our data further support the exploration of MSC antitumor potential for future use in metastatic MTC therapy.

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells mediate anti-inflammatory responses to a gut commensal molecule via both innate and adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Ochoa-Reparaz, Javier; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-04-09

    Polysaccharide A (PSA), the archetypical immunomodulatory molecule of the gut commensal Bacteroides fragilis, induces regulatory T cells to secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). The cellular mediators of PSA's immunomodulatory properties are incompletely understood. In a mouse model of colitis, we find that PSA requires both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to generate protection. Plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) exposed to PSA do not produce proinflammatory cytokines, but instead they specifically stimulate IL-10 secretion by CD4+ T cells and efficiently mediate PSA-afforded immunoprotection. PSA induces and preferentially ligates Toll-like receptor 2 on PDCs but not on conventional DCs. Compared with other TLR2 ligands, PSA is better at enhancing PDC expression of costimulatory molecules required for protection against colitis. PDCs can thus orchestrate the beneficial immunoregulatory interaction of commensal microbial molecules, such as PSA, through both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Normal dendrite growth in Drosophila motor neurons requires the AP-1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Cortnie L; Worrell, Jason; Levine, Richard B; Ramaswami, Mani; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2008-09-01

    During learning and memory formation, information flow through networks is regulated significantly through structural alterations in neurons. Dendrites, sites of signal integration, are key targets of activity-mediated modifications. Although local mechanisms of dendritic growth ensure synapse-specific changes, global mechanisms linking neural activity to nuclear gene expression may have profound influences on neural function. Fos, being an immediate-early gene, is ideally suited to be an initial transducer of neural activity, but a precise role for the AP-1 transcription factor in dendrite growth remains to be elucidated. Here we measure changes in the dendritic fields of identified Drosophila motor neurons in vivo and in primary culture to investigate the role of the immediate-early transcription factor AP-1 in regulating endogenous and activity-induced dendrite growth. Our data indicate that (a) increased neural excitability or depolarization stimulates dendrite growth, (b) AP-1 (a Fos, Jun hetero-dimer) is required for normal motor neuron dendritic growth during development and in response to activity induction, and (c) neuronal Fos protein levels are rapidly but transiently induced in motor neurons following neural activity. Taken together, these results show that AP-1 mediated transcription is important for dendrite growth, and that neural activity influences global dendritic growth through a gene-expression dependent mechanism gated by AP-1.

  1. Dendritic Spikes in Sensory Perception.

    PubMed

    Manita, Satoshi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Kitamura, Kazuo; Murayama, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    What is the function of dendritic spikes? One might argue that they provide conditions for neuronal plasticity or that they are essential for neural computation. However, despite a long history of dendritic research, the physiological relevance of dendritic spikes in brain function remains unknown. This could stem from the fact that most studies on dendrites have been performed in vitro. Fortunately, the emergence of novel techniques such as improved two-photon microscopy, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), and optogenetic tools has provided the means for vital breakthroughs in in vivo dendritic research. These technologies enable the investigation of the functions of dendritic spikes in behaving animals, and thus, help uncover the causal relationship between dendritic spikes, and sensory information processing and synaptic plasticity. Understanding the roles of dendritic spikes in brain function would provide mechanistic insight into the relationship between the brain and the mind. In this review article, we summarize the results of studies on dendritic spikes from a historical perspective and discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the role of dendritic spikes in sensory perception.

  2. Dendritic Spikes in Sensory Perception

    PubMed Central

    Manita, Satoshi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Kitamura, Kazuo; Murayama, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    What is the function of dendritic spikes? One might argue that they provide conditions for neuronal plasticity or that they are essential for neural computation. However, despite a long history of dendritic research, the physiological relevance of dendritic spikes in brain function remains unknown. This could stem from the fact that most studies on dendrites have been performed in vitro. Fortunately, the emergence of novel techniques such as improved two-photon microscopy, genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), and optogenetic tools has provided the means for vital breakthroughs in in vivo dendritic research. These technologies enable the investigation of the functions of dendritic spikes in behaving animals, and thus, help uncover the causal relationship between dendritic spikes, and sensory information processing and synaptic plasticity. Understanding the roles of dendritic spikes in brain function would provide mechanistic insight into the relationship between the brain and the mind. In this review article, we summarize the results of studies on dendritic spikes from a historical perspective and discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the role of dendritic spikes in sensory perception. PMID:28261060

  3. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  4. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  5. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  6. Human cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L; Schmidt, L; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Jawetz, E

    1979-02-01

    A reproducible method was developed to determine the ability of chlamydial antigens to stimulate lymphocytes from volunteers. In tests repeated 4 to 14 times, the cells from a given volunteer gave a relatively narrow range of responses, but there were great differences in the mean response of different volunteers. In the entire group of 52 volunteers, lymphocyte stimulation was significantly associated with the presence of antibody, but in a given individual results of one test did not aid in predicting the results of the other. A majority of persons with either antichlamydial antibody or elevated lymphocyte stimulation, or both, did not have a history of signs or symptoms within a spectrum of chlamydial diseases. This may reflect the great frequency of asymptomatic infection with these organisms. The lymphocytes of some individuals were stimulated to a significantly greater degree by antigens of one chlamydial species (Chlamydia trachomatis or C. psittaci) than by the other. These and other cell-mediated reactions in human chlamydial infections, and their possible medical significance, are under continued study.

  7. Silibinin attenuates mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Ho; Yan, Guang Hai

    2009-05-01

    Silibinin is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, roles of silibinin in the immediate-type allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have not fully been investigated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that silibinin attenuated mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions involved in allergic diseases. Oral administration of silibinin inhibited compound 48/80-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reaction in mice. Silibinin also attenuated anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis. Silibinin had no cytotoxicity on rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC). Silibinin dose-dependently reduced histamine release from RPMC activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Moreover, silibinin inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in RPMC. Pretreatment of silibinin suppressed the antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in RPMC. Furthermore, silibinin increased the intracellular cAMP level. Increased cAMP, decreased calcium uptake and suppressed NF-kappaB activity might be involved in the inhibitory effect of silibinin on the secretory response. Our findings provide possibility that silibinin may serve as an effective therapeutic agent for allergic diseases.

  8. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  10. Endothelial cells mediate the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Bailey, Alexis S.; Jiang, Shuguang; Liu, Bin; Goldman, Devorah C.; Fleming, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endothelial cells are a critical component of the normal hematopoietic microenvironment. Therefore, we sought to determine whether primary endothelial cells have the capacity to repair damaged hematopoietic stem cells. Highly purified populations of primary CD31+ microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the brain or lung did not express the pan hematopoietic marker CD45, hematopoietic lineage markers, or the progenitor marker c-kit and did not give rise hematopoietic cells in vitro or in vivo. Remarkably, the transplantation of small numbers of these microvascular endothelial cells consistently restored hematopoiesis following bone marrow lethal doses of irradiation. Analysis of the peripheral blood of rescued recipients demonstrated that both short term and long term multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution was exclusively of host origin. Secondary transplantation studies revealed that microvascular endothelial cell-mediated hematopoietic regeneration also occurs at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell. These findings suggest a potential therapeutic role for microvascular endothelial cells in the self-renewal and repair of adult hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:19720572

  11. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  12. HIV-1 adaptation to NK cell mediated immune pressure

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Galit; Heckerman, David; Schneidewind, Arne; Fadda, Lena; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Martin, Maureen; Li, Bin; Khakoo, Salim I.; Carrington, Mary; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play an important role in the control of viral infections, recognizing virally infected cells through a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors1–3. Epidemiological and functional studies have recently suggested that NK cells can also contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection through recognition of virally infected cells by both activating and inhibitory Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)4–7. However, it remains unknown whether NK cells can directly mediate antiviral immune pressure in vivo in humans. Here we describe KIR-associated amino acid polymorphisms in the HIV-1 sequence of chronically infected individuals on a population level. We show that these KIR-associated HIV-1 sequence polymorphisms can enhance the binding of inhibitory KIRs to HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, leading to reduced antiviral activity of KIR+ NK cells. These data demonstrate that KIR+ NK cells can place immunological pressure on HIV-1, and that the virus can evade such NK cell mediated immune pressure by selecting for sequence polymorphisms, as previously described for virus-specific T cells and neutralizing antibodies8. NK cells might therefore play a previously underappreciated role in contributing to viral evolution. PMID:21814282

  13. Suppression of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Experimental African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Wallace, John H.

    1974-01-01

    Adult New Zealand white rabbits were experimentally infected with a parasitic African hemoflagellate, Trypanosoma congolense, and were subsequently tested for in vivo and in vitro aspects of cell-mediated immune function. Chronically infected rabbits were sensitized to mycobacterial protein and skin-tested with purified protein derivative; all infected animals demonstrated much milder skin-test responses to antigen than control groups. Similarly, peripheral blood lymphocyte responses in vitro to purified protein derivative and, as well, to phytohemagglutinin were markedly suppressed. Supernatant fluids of antigen-stimulated lymph node cell cultures from T. congolense-infected rabbits failed to demonstrate migration inhibitory factor activity but did possess normal levels of blastogenic factor activity. An active infection was necessary for demonstration of suppressed immune responses, and components present in infected rabbit serum were apparently not responsible for the observed abnormalities. Suppression of T-lymphocyte subpopulations may well explain the occurrence of numerous immunological aberrations arising during human and animal infections with the African trypanosomes. PMID:4854532

  14. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research.

  15. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Cytotoxic Responses in the Tasmanian Devil

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gabriella K.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A. Bruce; Woods, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  16. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  17. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  18. Dendritic Materials Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-22

    2-hydroxyethyl)-e-caprolactone,” Macromolecules, 32, 6881-4, (1999). Yu, D.; Vladimirov, N.; Fréchet, J.M.J. “ MALDI - TOF in the Characterization of...Mat Sci. Eng., (1999). Yu, D.; Vladimirov, N.; Fréchet, J. M. J. “ MALDI - TOF Mass Spectrometry in the Characterization of Dendritic-Linear Block and...with long endgroups capable of chain entanglements providing uniform continuous films. We found that the surface properties of polyetherimide ( PEI

  19. Human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; McGovern, Naomi; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells are highly adapted to their role of presenting antigen and directing immune responses. Developmental studies indicate that DCs originate independently from monocytes and tissue macrophages. Emerging evidence also suggests that distinct subsets of DCs have intrinsic differences that lead to functional specialisation in the generation of immunity. Comparative studies are now allowing many of these properties to be more fully understood in the context of human immunology. PMID:23621371

  20. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  1. The Spread of Ras Activity Triggered by Activation of a Single Dendritic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Christopher D.; Yasuda, Ryohei; Zhong, Haining; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-01-01

    In neurons, individual dendritic spines isolate NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ accumulations from the dendrite and other spines. However, it is not known to what extent spines compartmentalize signaling events downstream of Ca2+ influx. We combined two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with two-photon glutamate uncaging to image the activity of the small GTPase Ras following NMDA receptor activation at individual spines. Induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered robust Ca2+-dependent Ras activation in single spines that decayed in approximately 5 minutes. Ras activity spread over approximately 10 micrometers of dendrite and invaded neighboring spines by diffusion. The spread of Ras-dependent signaling was necessary for the local regulation of the threshold for LTP induction. Thus Ca2+-dependent synaptic signals can spread to couple multiple synapses on short stretches of dendrite. PMID:18556515

  2. Selective dendritic susceptibility to bioenergetic, excitotoxic and redox perturbations in cortical neurons☆

    PubMed Central

    Hasel, Philip; Mckay, Sean; Qiu, Jing; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative and neurological disorders are often characterised by pathological changes to dendrites, in advance of neuronal death. Oxidative stress, energy deficits and excitotoxicity are implicated in many such disorders, suggesting a potential vulnerability of dendrites to these situations. Here we have studied dendritic vs. somatic responses of primary cortical neurons to these types of challenges in real-time. Using a genetically encoded indicator of intracellular redox potential (Grx1-roGFP2) we found that, compared to the soma, dendritic regions exhibited more dramatic fluctuations in redox potential in response to sub-lethal ROS exposure, and existed in a basally more oxidised state. We also studied the responses of dendritic and somatic regions to excitotoxic NMDA receptor activity. Both dendritic and somatic regions experienced similar increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+. Interestingly, while mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and initial mitochondrial depolarisation were similar in both regions, secondary delayed mitochondrial depolarisation was far weaker in dendrites, potentially as a result of less NADH depletion. Despite this, ATP levels were found to fall faster in dendritic regions. Finally we studied the responses of dendritic and somatic regions to energetically demanding action potential burst activity. Burst activity triggered PDH dephosphorylation, increases in oxygen consumption and cellular NADH:NAD ratio. Compared to somatic regions, dendritic regions exhibited a smaller degree of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, lower fold-induction of NADH and larger reduction in ATP levels. Collectively, these data reveal that dendritic regions of primary neurons are vulnerable to greater energetic and redox fluctuations than the cell body, which may contribute to disease-associated dendritic damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:25541281

  3. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  4. Dendritic cells: sentinels of immunity and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kubach, Jan; Becker, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Huter, Eva; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2005-04-01

    The induction of effective antigen-specific T-cell immunity to pathogens without the initiation of autoimmunity has evolved as a sophisticated and highly balanced immunoregulatory mechanism. This mechanism assures the generation of antigen-specific effector cells as well as the induction and maintenance of antigen-specific tolerance to self-structures of the body. As professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, dendritic cells (DC) are ideally positioned throughout the entire body and equipped with a unique capability to transport antigens from the periphery to lymphoid tissues. There is growing evidence that DC, besides their well-known immunostimulatory properties, also induce and regulate T-cell tolerance in the periphery. This regulatory function of DC is strictly dependent on their different stages of maturation and activation. Additionally, immunosuppressive agents and cytokines further influence the functions of maturing DC. The regulatory properties of DC include induction of T-cell anergy, apoptosis, and the generation of T-cells with regulatory capacities. This brief review summarizes the current knowledge about the immunoregulatory role of DC as guardians for the induction of T-cell immunity and tolerance.

  5. Tissue requirements for establishing long-term CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity following Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Bunn, Patrick T; Stanley, Amanda C; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Mulherin, Alexander; Sheel, Meru; Alexander, Clare E; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Amante, Fiona H; Montes De Oca, Marcela; Best, Shannon E; James, Kylie R; Kaye, Paul M; Haque, Ashraful; Engwerda, Christian R

    2014-04-15

    Organ-specific immunity is a feature of many infectious diseases, including visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani. Experimental visceral leishmaniasis in genetically susceptible mice is characterized by an acute, resolving infection in the liver and chronic infection in the spleen. CD4+ T cell responses are critical for the establishment and maintenance of hepatic immunity in this disease model, but their role in chronically infected spleens remains unclear. In this study, we show that dendritic cells are critical for CD4+ T cell activation and expansion in all tissue sites examined. We found that FTY720-mediated blockade of T cell trafficking early in infection prevented Ag-specific CD4+ T cells from appearing in lymph nodes, but not the spleen and liver, suggesting that early CD4+ T cell priming does not occur in liver-draining lymph nodes. Extended treatment with FTY720 over the first month of infection increased parasite burdens, although this associated with blockade of lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid tissue, as well as with more generalized splenic lymphopenia. Importantly, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are required for the establishment and maintenance of antiparasitic immunity in the liver, as well as for immune surveillance and suppression of parasite outgrowth in chronically infected spleens. Finally, although early CD4+ T cell priming appeared to occur most effectively in the spleen, we unexpectedly revealed that protective CD4+ T cell-mediated hepatic immunity could be generated in the complete absence of all secondary lymphoid tissues.

  6. The TNF-family receptor DR3 is essential for diverse T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Meylan, Françoise; Davidson, Todd S; Kahle, Erin; Kinder, Michelle; Acharya, Krishika; Jankovic, Dragana; Bundoc, Virgilio; Hodges, Marcus; Shevach, Ethan M; Keane-Myers, Andrea; Wang, Eddie C Y; Siegel, Richard M

    2008-07-18

    DR3 (TRAMP, LARD, WSL-1, TNFRSF25) is a death-domain-containing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-family receptor primarily expressed on T cells. TL1A, the TNF-family ligand for DR3, can costimulate T cells, but the physiological function of TL1A-DR3 interactions in immune responses is not known. Using DR3-deficient mice, we identified DR3 as the receptor responsible for TL1A-induced T cell costimulation and dendritic cells as the likely source for TL1A during T cell activation. Despite its role in costimulation, DR3 was not required for in vivo T cell priming, for polarization into T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, or Th17 effector cell subtypes, or for effective control of infection with Toxoplasma gondii. Instead, DR3 expression was required on T cells for immunopathology, local T cell accumulation, and cytokine production in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) and allergic lung inflammation, disease models that depend on distinct effector T cell subsets. DR3 could be an attractive therapeutic target for T cell-mediated autoimmune and allergic diseases.

  7. Immunisation with ID83 fusion protein induces antigen-specific cell mediated and humoral immune responses in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth J.; Steinbach, Sabine; Clifford, Derek; Baldwin, Susan L.; Ireton, Gregory C.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.; Vordermeier, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the potential of mycobacterial proteins as candidate subunit vaccines for bovine tuberculosis. In addition, we have explored the use of TLR-ligands as potential adjuvants in cattle. In vitro screening assays with whole blood from M. bovis-infected and BCG-vaccinated cattle demonstrated that fusion protein constructs were most commonly recognised, and the ID83 fusion protein was selected for further immunisation studies. Furthermore, glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) and resiquimod (R848), agonists for TLR4 and TLR7/8 respectively, stimulated cytokine production (IL-12, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-10) in bovine dendritic cell cultures, and these were formulated as novel oil-in-water emulsions (GLA-SE and R848-SE) for immunisation studies. Immunisation with ID83 in a water-in-oil emulsion adjuvant (ISA70) induced both cell mediated and humoral immune responses, as characterised by antigen-specific IFN-γ production, cell proliferation, IgG1 and IgG2 antibody production. In comparison, ID83 immunisation with the novel adjuvants induced weaker (ID83/R848-SE) or no (ID83/GLA-SE) antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell proliferation. However, both did induce ID83-specific antibody production, which was restricted to IgG1 antibody isotype. Overall, these results provide encouraging preliminary data for the further development of ID83 in vaccine strategies for bovine TB. PMID:24012566

  8. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  9. Engineering nanomaterials to address cell-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sean; Liu, Yu-Gang; Scott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder with a pathophysiology driven by both innate and adaptive immunity and a primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) worldwide. Vascular inflammation and accumulation of foam cells and their products induce maturation of atheromas, or plaques, which can rupture by metalloprotease action, leading to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. Diverse immune cell populations participate in all stages of plaque maturation, many of which directly influence plaque stability and rupture via inflammatory mechanisms. Current clinical treatments for atherosclerosis focus on lowering serum levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using therapeutics such as statins, administration of antithrombotic drugs, and surgical intervention. Strategies that address cell-mediated inflammation are lacking, and consequently have recently become an area of considerable research focus. Nanomaterials have emerged as highly advantageous tools for these studies, as they can be engineered to target specific inflammatory cell populations, deliver therapeutics of wide-ranging solubilities and enhance analytical methods that include imaging and proteomics. Furthermore, the highly phagocytic nature of antigen presenting cells (APCs), a diverse cell population central to the initiation of immune responses and inflammation, make them particularly amenable to targeting and modulation by nanoscale particulates. Nanomaterials have therefore become essential components of vaccine formulations and treatments for inflammation-driven pathologies like autoimmunity, and present novel opportunities for immunotherapeutic treatments of CVD. Here, we review recent progress in the design and use of nanomaterials for therapeutic assessment and treatment of atherosclerosis. We will focus on promising new approaches that utilize nanomaterials for cell-specific imaging, gene therapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27135051

  10. Organ-derived dendritic cells have differential effects on alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Theo D; Terwey, Theis H; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Suh, David; Kochman, Adam A; Chen, Megan E; King, Chris G; Borsotti, Chiara; Grubin, Jeremy; Smith, Odette M; Heller, Glenn; Liu, Chen; Murphy, George F; Alpdogan, Onder; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2008-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered critical for the induction of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In addition to their priming function, dendritic cells have been shown to induce organ-tropism through induction of specific homing molecules on T cells. Using adoptive transfer of CFSE-labeled cells, we first demonstrated that alloreactive T cells differentially up-regulate specific homing molecules in vivo. Host-type dendritic cells from the GVHD target organs liver and spleen or skin- and gut-draining lymph nodes effectively primed naive allogeneic T cells in vitro with the exception of liver-derived dendritic cells, which showed less stimulatory capacity. Gut-derived dendritic cells induced alloreactive donor T cells with a gut-homing phenotype that caused increased GVHD mortality and morbidity compared with T cells stimulated with dendritic cells from spleen, liver, and peripheral lymph nodes in an MHC-mismatched murine BMT model. However, in vivo analysis demonstrated that the in vitro imprinting of homing molecules on alloreactive T cells was only transient. In conclusion, organ-derived dendritic cells can efficiently induce specific homing molecules on alloreactive T cells. A gut-homing phenotype correlates with increased GVHD mortality and morbidity after murine BMT, underlining the importance of the gut in the pathophysiology of GVHD.

  11. Cell-Mediated Immunity and Its Role in Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Edward J.; Remington, Jack S.

    1977-01-01

    The recently acquired knowledge of the importance of cell-mediated immunity in many illnesses and the discovery of a variety of substances that can restore certain cell-mediated immune functions has served to focus the attention of physicians on this area of immunity. It is important for practicing physicians to have a clear understanding of current knowledge of the role of cell-mediated immunity in resistance to infection and how this arm of the immune system relates to the diagnosis and therapy of infectious diseases. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:318786

  12. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  13. Dendritic K+ channels contribute to spike-timing dependent long-term potentiation in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeo; Hoffman, Dax A.; Migliore, Michele; Johnston, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the role of A-type K+ channels for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of Schaffer collateral inputs to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. When low-amplitude excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were paired with two postsynaptic action potentials in a theta-burst pattern, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor-dependent LTP was induced. The amplitudes of the back-propagating action potentials were boosted in the dendrites only when they were coincident with the EPSPs. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors PD 098059 or U0126 shifted the activation of dendritic K+ channels to more hyperpolarized potentials, reduced the boosting of dendritic action potentials by EPSPs, and suppressed the induction of LTP. These results support the hypothesis that dendritic K+ channels and the boosting of back-propagating action potentials contribute to the induction of LTP in CA1 neurons. PMID:12048251

  14. Selective and efficient generation of functional Batf3-dependent CD103+ dendritic cells from mouse bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian Thomas; Ghorbani, Peyman; Nandan, Amrita; Dudek, Markus; Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Hesse, Christina; Berod, Luciana; Stüve, Philipp; Puttur, Franz; Merad, Miriam; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-11-13

    Multiple subsets of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3L)-dependent dendritic cells (DCs) control T-cell tolerance and immunity. In mice, Batf3-dependent CD103(+) DCs efficiently enter lymph nodes and cross-present antigens, rendering this conserved DC subset a promising target for tolerance induction or vaccination. However, only limited numbers of CD103(+) DCs can be isolated with current methods. Established bone marrow culture protocols efficiently generate monocyte-derived DCs or produce a mixture of FLT3L-dependent DC subsets. We show that CD103(+) DC development requires prolonged culture time and continuous action of both FLT3L and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), explained by a dual effect of GM-CSF on DC precursors and differentiating CD103(+) DCs. Accordingly, we established a novel method to generate large numbers of CD103(+) DCs (iCD103-DCs) with limited presence of other DC subsets. iCD103-DCs develop in a Batf3- and Irf8-dependent fashion, express a CD8α/CD103 DC gene signature, cross-present cell-associated antigens, and respond to TLR3 stimulation. Thus, iCD103-DCs reflect key features of tissue CD103(+) DCs. Importantly, iCD103-DCs express high levels of CCR7 upon maturation and migrate to lymph nodes more efficiently than classical monocyte-derived DCs. Finally, iCD103-DCs induce T cell-mediated protective immunity in vivo. Our study provides insights into CD103(+) DC development and function.

  15. Targeting Dendritic Cells in vivo for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caminschi, Irina; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Heath, William Ross

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC) for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumor immunity elicited using this immunization strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialization of DC subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumor CD4 and CD8 T cell responses that can recognize tumor-specific antigens. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress toward targeting human DC in vivo. PMID:22566899

  16. Oral administration of paeoniflorin attenuates allergic contact dermatitis by inhibiting dendritic cell migration and Th1 and Th17 differentiation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongmei; Li, Xuefeng; Li, Dongmei; Zhao, Quanjing; Shen, Yongnian; Yan, Hongxia; Fu, Hongjun; Zheng, Hailin; Lu, Guixia; Qiu, Ying; Liu, Weida

    2015-04-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a hapten-specific CD4(+) T-cells mediated inflammatory response of the skin. Its pathomechanism involves 2 phases, an induction phase and an elicitation phase. Langerhans cells (LCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) in the skin play key roles in presenting low molecular weight chemicals (haptens) to the lymph nodes. Therefore, inhibition of the migration of LCs or DCs and T-cell proliferation is each expected to control ACD disease. To explore the effectiveness of paeoniflorin (PF) on the migration of LCs and T-cell proliferation in vivo, we establish a murine model of ACD, promoted by repeated exposure to an allergen (specifically 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB)). Administration of PF inhibits DC migration in this DNCB-induced model in the induction phase. As a result, epidermal LC density in the elicitation phase increased in PF-treated mice when compared to PF-untreated mice. At the same time, PF reduced IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) and IL-17(+)CD4(+) T cells proliferation (but not IL-4(+)CD4(+) T cells proliferation), leading to an attenuated cutaneous inflammatory response. Consistent with this T-cell proliferation profile, secretions of IFN-γ and IL-17 were reduced and IL-10 secretion increased in PF-treated mice, but production of IL-4 and IL-5 remained unchanged in the skin and blood samples. These results suggest that oral administration of PF can treat and prevent ACD effectively through inhibition of DC migration, and thus decrease the capacity of DCs to stimulate Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation and cytokine production.

  17. TLR4-mediated podosome loss discriminates gram-negative from gram-positive bacteria in their capacity to induce dendritic cell migration and maturation.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Suzanne F G; van den Dries, Koen; Oud, Machteld M; Raymakers, Reinier A P; Netea, Mihai G; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Figdor, Carl G

    2010-02-01

    Chronic infections are caused by microorganisms that display effective immune evasion mechanisms. Dendritic cell (DC)-dependent T cell-mediated adaptive immunity is one of the mechanisms that have evolved to prevent the occurrence of chronic bacterial infections. In turn, bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to evade immune recognition. In this study, we show that gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria differ in their ability to activate DCs and that gram-negative bacteria are far more effective inducers of DC maturation. Moreover, we observed that only gram-negative bacteria can induce loss of adhesive podosome structures in DCs, a response necessary for the induction of effective DC migration. We demonstrate that the ability of gram-negative bacteria to trigger podosome turnover and induce DC migration reflects their capacity to selectively activate TLR4. Examining mice defective in TLR4 signaling, we show that this DC maturation and migration are mainly Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFNbeta-dependent. Furthermore, we show that these processes depend on the production of PGs by these DCs, suggesting a direct link between TLR4-mediated signaling and arachidonic metabolism. These findings demonstrate that gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria profoundly differ in their capacity to activate DCs. We propose that this inability of gram-positive bacteria to induce DC maturation and migration is part of the armamentarium necessary for avoiding the induction of an effective cellular immune response and may explain the frequent involvement of these pathogens in chronic infections.

  18. Developing dendrites demonstrate unexpected specificity.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Leo M

    2006-11-22

    Our knowledge of how developing dendrites attain their mature state is still rudimentary. In this issue of Neuron, Mumm et al. rely on time-lapsed analysis of ingrowing dendrites of retinal ganglion cells in transgenic zebrafish to show that this process is much more specific than has been suspected.

  19. Double-bromo and extraterminal (BET) domain proteins regulate dendrite morphology and mechanosensory function

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Joshua A.; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Wildonger, Jill

    2014-01-01

    A complex array of genetic factors regulates neuronal dendrite morphology. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression represents a plausible mechanism to control pathways responsible for specific dendritic arbor shapes. By studying the Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons, we discovered a role of the double-bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family proteins in regulating dendrite arbor complexity. A loss-of-function mutation in the single Drosophila BET protein encoded by female sterile 1 homeotic [fs(1)h] causes loss of fine, terminal dendritic branches. Moreover, fs(1)h is necessary for the induction of branching caused by a previously identified transcription factor, Cut (Ct), which regulates subtype-specific dendrite morphology. Finally, disrupting fs(1)h function impairs the mechanosensory response of class III da sensory neurons without compromising the expression of the ion channel NompC, which mediates the mechanosensitive response. Thus, our results identify a novel role for BET family proteins in regulating dendrite morphology and a possible separation of developmental pathways specifying neural cell morphology and ion channel expression. Since the BET proteins are known to bind acetylated histone tails, these results also suggest a role of epigenetic histone modifications and the “histone code,” in regulating dendrite morphology. PMID:25184680

  20. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  1. New generation of dendritic cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Radford, Kristen J; Caminschi, Irina

    2013-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in the induction and regulation of immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses. These are essential for the eradication of cancers and pathogens including HIV and malaria, for which there are currently no effective vaccines. New developments in our understanding of DC biology have identified the key DC subset responsible for CTL induction, which is now an attractive candidate to target for vaccination. These DC are characterized by expression of novel markers Clec9A and XCR1, and a specialized capacity to cross-present antigen (Ag) from tumors and pathogens that do not directly infect DC. New generation DC vaccines that specifically target the cross-presenting DC in vivo have already demonstrated potential in preclinical animal models but the challenge remains to translate these findings into clinically efficacous vaccines in man. This has been greatly facilitated by the recent identification of the equivalent Clec9A(+) XCR1(+) cross-presenting DC in human lymphoid tissues and peripheral tissues that are key sites for vaccination administration. These findings combined with further studies on DC subset biology have important implications for the design of new CTL-mediated vaccines.

  2. Adaptive immune-mediated host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii is governed by the NF-κB regulator Bcl-3 in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Ilaria; Claudio, Estefania; Wang, Hongshan; Tang, Wanhu; Ha, Hye-Lin; Saret, Sun; Sher, Alan; Jankovic, Dragana; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The atypical IκB family member Bcl-3 associates with p50/NF-κB1 or p52/NF-κB2 homodimers in nuclei, thereby either positively or negatively modulating transcription in a context-dependent manner. Previously we reported that Bcl-3 was critical for host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii. Bcl-3-deficient mice succumbed within 3-5 weeks after infection, correlating with an apparently impaired Th1-type adaptive immune response. However in which cell type(s) Bcl-3 functioned to assure resistance remained unknown. We now show that Bcl-3 expression in dendritic cells is required to generate a protective Th1-type immune response and confer resistance to T. gondii. Surprisingly, mice lacking Bcl-3 in dendritic cells were as susceptible as mice globally deficient for Bcl-3. Furthermore, early innate defenses were not compromised by the absence of Bcl-3, as initial production of IL-12 by dendritic cells and IFN-γ by NK cells were preserved. However, subsequent production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells was compromised when dendritic cells lacked Bcl-3, and these mice succumbed at a time when T-cell-mediated IFN-γ production was essential for host resistance. These findings demonstrate that Bcl-3 is required in dendritic cells to prime protective T-cell-mediated immunity to T. gondii. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Maturation-Resistant Dendritic Cells Ameliorate Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keunhee; Kim, Yon Su

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous uveitis is a chronic inflammatory eye disease of human, which frequently leads to blindness. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) is an animal disease model of human endogenous uveitis and can be induced in susceptible animals by immunization with retinal antigens. EAU resembles the key immunological characteristics of human disease in that both are CD4+ T-cell mediated diseases. Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that are uniquely capable of activating naïve T cells. Regulation of immune responses through modulation of DCs has thus been tried extensively. Recently our group reported that donor strain-derived immature DC pretreatment successfully controlled the adverse immune response during allogeneic transplantation. Methods EAU was induced by immunization with human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) peptide1-20. Dendritic cells were differentiated from bone marrow in the presence of recombinant GM-CSF. Results In this study, we used paraformaldehyde-fixed bone marrow-derived DCs to maintain them in an immature state. Pretreatment with fixed immature DCs, but not fixed mature DCs, ameliorated the disease progression of EAU by inhibiting uveitogenic CD4+ T cell activation and differentiation. Conclusion Application of iBMDC prepared according to the protocol of this study would provide an important treatment modality for the autoimmune diseases and transplantation rejection. PMID:22346781

  4. Dendritic cell vaccination in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anguille, Sébastien; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-07-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains dismal, with a 5-year overall survival rate of only 5.2% for the continuously growing subgroup of AML patients older than 65 years. These patients are generally not considered eligible for intensive chemotherapy and/or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation because of high treatment-related morbidity and mortality, emphasizing the need for novel, less toxic, treatment alternatives. It is within this context that immunotherapy has gained attention in recent years. In this review, we focus on the use of dendritic cell (DC) vaccines for immunotherapy of AML. DC are central orchestrators of the immune system, bridging innate and adaptive immunity and critical to the induction of anti-leukemic immunity. We discuss the rationale and basic principles of DC-based therapy for AML and review the clinical experience that has been obtained so far with this form of immunotherapy for patients with AML.

  5. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  6. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Steinbach, I.; Karma, A.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during solidification of an assemblage of equiaxed dendritic crystals. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology (i.e., tip radii, branch spacings, etc.) and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of initial supercoolings and, thus, interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment thus extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and coworkers for steady growth of a single dendrite [Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), first flown on USMP-2] to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation more close to actual casting conditions. Corresponding earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will primarily be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  7. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during equiaxed dendritic solidification. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion-dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and co-workers isothermal dendritic growth experiment (IDGE) for steady growth of a single dendrite to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation closer to actual casting conditions. Corresponding Earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  8. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  9. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  10. Gravitational induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Chicone, Carmen; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2008-11-01

    We study the linear post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity known as gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM); in particular, we examine the similarities and differences between GEM and electrodynamics. Notwithstanding some significant differences between them, we find that a special nonstationary metric in GEM can be employed to show explicitly that it is possible to introduce gravitational induction within GEM in close analogy with Faraday's law of induction and Lenz's law in electrodynamics. Some of the physical implications of gravitational induction are briefly discussed.

  11. Ca2+ signalling in postsynaptic dendrites and spines of mammalian neurons in brain slice.

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Connor, J A

    1992-01-01

    Postsynaptic Ca2+ changes are involved in control of cellular excitability and induction of synaptic long-term changes. We monitored Ca2+ changes in dendrites and spines during synaptic and direct stimulation using high resolution microfluorometry of fura-2 injected into CA3 pyramidal neurons in guinea pig hippocampal slice. When driven by current injection from an intracellular electrode or with synaptic stimulation, postsynaptic Ca2+ accumulations were highest in the proximal dendrites with a pronounced fall-off towards the soma and some fall-off towards more distal dendrites. Muscarinic activation by low concentrations of carbachol strongly increased intradendritic Ca2+ accumulation during directly-evoked repetitive firing. This enhancement occurred in large part because muscarinic activation suppressed the normal Ca(2+)-dependent activation of K-channels that mediates adaptation of firing. Repetitive firing of cholinergic fibers in the slice reproduced the effects of carbachol. Inhibition of acetylcholine-esterase activity by eserine enhanced the effects of repetitive stimulation of chlolinergic fibers. All effects were reversible and were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Ca2+ accumulations in postsynaptic spines might be the basis of specificity of synaptic plasticity. With selective stimulation of few associative/comissural fibers, Ca2+ accumulated in single postsynaptic spines but not in the parent dendrite. With strong stimulation, dendrite levels also increased but spine levels were considerably higher. The NMDA-receptor antagonist AP-5 blocked Ca(2+)-peaks in spines, but left Ca2+ changes in dendrite shafts largely unaffected. Sustained steep Ca2+ gradients between single spines and the parent dendrite, often lasting several minutes, developed with repeated stimulation. Our results demonstrate a spine entity that can act independent from the dendrite with respect to Ca(2+)-dependent processes. Muscarinic augmentation of dendritic Ca2+ levels

  12. Inductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Swendsen, Haruka

    2010-03-01

    Inductive reasoning entails using existing knowledge or observations to make predictions about novel cases. We review recent findings in research on category-based induction as well as theoretical models of these results, including similarity-based models, connectionist networks, an account based on relevance theory, Bayesian models, and other mathematical models. A number of touchstone empirical phenomena that involve taxonomic similarity are described. We also examine phenomena involving more complex background knowledge about premises and conclusions of inductive arguments and the properties referenced. Earlier models are shown to give a good account of similarity-based phenomena but not knowledge-based phenomena. Recent models that aim to account for both similarity-based and knowledge-based phenomena are reviewed and evaluated. Among the most important new directions in induction research are a focus on induction with uncertain premise categories, the modeling of the relationship between inductive and deductive reasoning, and examination of the neural substrates of induction. A common theme in both the well-established and emerging lines of induction research is the need to develop well-articulated and empirically testable formal models of induction. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Functions of TGF-β-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Saas, Philippe; Perruche, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) belong to the family of dendritic cells and possess specific features that distinguish them from conventional dendritic cells. For instance, pDC are the main interferon-alpha-secreting cells. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells exert both proinflammatory and regulatory functions. This is attested by the involvement of pDC through interferon-alpha secretion in several autoimmune diseases, and by the implication of pDC in tolerance. The same is true for TGF-β that plays a dual role in inflammation. In this review, we discuss recent data on pDC and TGF-β interactions. As with many cell types, pDCs are able to respond to TGF-β using the classic Smad signaling pathway. In addition, pDCs are capable to secrete TGF-β, in particular in response to TGF-β exposure. Exposure of pDCs to TGF-β prevents type I interferon secretion in response to TLR7/9 ligands. In contrast, the consequences of TGF-β on the antigen-presenting cell capacities of pDC are less clear, since TGF-β-exposed pDCs may lead to both regulatory T-cell and interleukin-17-secreting cell polarization. Here, we discuss the factors that may influence this polarization. We also discuss how pDCs exposed to TGF-β may participate in tolerance induction and maintenance, or, on the contrary, in autoimmune diseases.

  14. Dendritic oligoguanidines as intracellular translocators.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun-Ho; Harms, Guido; Seong, Churl Min; Choi, Byung Hyune; Min, Changhee; Taulane, Joseph P; Goodman, Murray

    2004-01-01

    A series of polyguanidylated dendritic structures that can be used as molecular translocators have been designed and synthesized based on nonpeptide units. The dendritic oligoguanidines conjugated with fluorescein or with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) mutant as cargos were isolated and characterized. Quantification and time-course analyses of the cellular uptake of the conjugates using HeLa S3 and human cervical carcinoma cells reveal that the polyguanidylated dendrimers have comparable translocation efficiency to the Tat(49-57) peptide. Furthermore, the deconvolution microscopy image analysis shows that they are located inside the cells. These results clearly show that nonlinear, branched dendritic oligoguanidines are capable of translocation through the cell membrane. This work also demonstrates the potential of these nonpeptidic dendritic oligoguanidines as carriers for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs, bioactive peptides, and proteins. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci), 2004

  15. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  16. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  17. Immunisation with ID83 fusion protein induces antigen-specific cell mediated and humoral immune responses in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth J; Steinbach, Sabine; Clifford, Derek; Baldwin, Susan L; Ireton, Gregory C; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2013-10-25

    In this study we have investigated the potential of mycobacterial proteins as candidate subunit vaccines for bovine tuberculosis. In addition, we have explored the use of TLR-ligands as potential adjuvants in cattle. In vitro screening assays with whole blood from Mycobacterium bovis-infected and BCG-vaccinated cattle demonstrated that fusion protein constructs were most commonly recognised, and the ID83 fusion protein was selected for further immunisation studies. Furthermore, glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) and resiquimod (R848), agonists for TLR4 and TLR7/8 respectively, stimulated cytokine production (IL-12, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-10) in bovine dendritic cell cultures, and these were formulated as novel oil-in-water emulsions (GLA-SE and R848-SE) for immunisation studies. Immunisation with ID83 in a water-in-oil emulsion adjuvant (ISA70) induced both cell mediated and humoral immune responses, as characterised by antigen-specific IFN-γ production, cell proliferation, IgG1 and IgG2 antibody production. In comparison, ID83 immunisation with the novel adjuvants induced weaker (ID83/R848-SE) or no (ID83/GLA-SE) antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell proliferation. However, both did induce ID83-specific antibody production, which was restricted to IgG1 antibody isotype. Overall, these results provide encouraging preliminary data for the further development of ID83 in vaccine strategies for bovine TB. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Periodic F-actin structures shape the neck of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Julia; Kobler, Oliver; van Bommel, Bas; Mikhaylova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the excitatory synapses on principal neurons of the forebrain are located on specialized structures called dendritic spines. Their morphology, comprising a spine head connected to the dendritic branch via a thin neck, provides biochemical and electrical compartmentalization during signal transmission. Spine shape is defined and tightly controlled by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Alterations in synaptic strength correlate with changes in the morphological appearance of the spine head and neck. Therefore, it is important to get a better understanding of the nanoscale organization of the actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines. A periodic organization of the actin/spectrin lattice was recently discovered in axons and a small fraction of dendrites using super-resolution microscopy. Here we use a small probe phalloidin-Atto647N, to label F-actin in mature hippocampal primary neurons and in living hippocampal slices. STED nanoscopy reveals that in contrast to β-II spectrin antibody labelling, phalloidin-Atto647N stains periodic actin structures in all dendrites and the neck of nearly all dendritic spines, including filopodia-like spines. These findings extend the current view on F-actin organization in dendritic spines and may provide new avenues for understanding the structural changes in the spine neck during induction of synaptic plasticity, active organelle transport or tethering. PMID:27841352

  19. Periodic F-actin structures shape the neck of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Bär, Julia; Kobler, Oliver; van Bommel, Bas; Mikhaylova, Marina

    2016-11-14

    Most of the excitatory synapses on principal neurons of the forebrain are located on specialized structures called dendritic spines. Their morphology, comprising a spine head connected to the dendritic branch via a thin neck, provides biochemical and electrical compartmentalization during signal transmission. Spine shape is defined and tightly controlled by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Alterations in synaptic strength correlate with changes in the morphological appearance of the spine head and neck. Therefore, it is important to get a better understanding of the nanoscale organization of the actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines. A periodic organization of the actin/spectrin lattice was recently discovered in axons and a small fraction of dendrites using super-resolution microscopy. Here we use a small probe phalloidin-Atto647N, to label F-actin in mature hippocampal primary neurons and in living hippocampal slices. STED nanoscopy reveals that in contrast to β-II spectrin antibody labelling, phalloidin-Atto647N stains periodic actin structures in all dendrites and the neck of nearly all dendritic spines, including filopodia-like spines. These findings extend the current view on F-actin organization in dendritic spines and may provide new avenues for understanding the structural changes in the spine neck during induction of synaptic plasticity, active organelle transport or tethering.

  20. LTP is accompanied by an enhanced local excitability of pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Frick, Andreas; Magee, Jeffrey; Johnston, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    The propagation and integration of signals in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons is regulated, in part, by the distribution and biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. It is thus possible that any modification of these channels in a specific part of the dendritic tree might locally alter these signaling processes. Using dendritic and somatic whole-cell recordings, combined with calcium imaging in rat hippocampal slices, we found that the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) was accompanied by a local increase in dendritic excitability that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These changes favored the back-propagation of action potentials into this dendritic region with a subsequent boost in the Ca(2+) influx. Dendritic cell-attached patch recordings revealed a hyperpolarized shift in the inactivation curve of transient, A-type K(+) currents that can account for the enhanced excitability. These results suggest an important mechanism associated with LTP for shaping signal processing and controlling dendritic function.

  1. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  2. Siglecs as targets for therapy in immune cell mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Mary K.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprise a family of receptors that are differentially expressed on leukocytes and other immune cells. The restricted expression of several siglecs to one or a few cell types makes them attractive targets for cell-directed therapies. The anti-CD33 (Siglec-3) antibody Gemtuzumab (Mylotarg™) is approved for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and antibodies targeting CD22 (Siglec-2) are currently in clinical trials for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Because siglecs are endocytic receptors, they are well suited for a ‘Trojan horse’ strategy, whereby therapeutic agents conjugated to an antibody, or multimeric glycan ligand, bind to the siglec and are efficiently carried into the cell. Although the rapid internalization of unmodified siglec antibodies reduces their utility for induction of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody binding of Siglec-8, Siglec-9, and CD22 have been demonstrated to induce apoptosis of eosinophils, neutrophils, and depletion of B cells, respectively. Here we review the properties of siglecs that make them attractive for cell-targeted therapies. PMID:19359050

  3. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies.

  4. Tumor's other immune targets: dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Esche, C; Lokshin, A; Shurin, G V; Gastman, B R; Rabinowich, H; Watkins, S C; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    1999-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis in T cells is one of several mechanisms by which tumors escape immune recognition. We have investigated whether tumors induce apoptosis in dendritic cells (DC) by co-culture of murine or human DC with different tumor cell lines for 4-48 h. Analysis of DC morphological features, JAM assay, TUNEL, caspase-3-like and transglutaminase activity, Annexin V binding, and DNA fragmentation assays revealed a time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in DC by tumor-derived factors. This finding is both effector and target specific. The mechanism of tumor-induced DC apoptosis involved regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. Double staining of both murine and human tumor tissues confirmed that tumor-associated DC undergo apoptotic death in vivo. DC isolated from tumor tissue showed significantly higher levels of apoptosis as determined by TUNEL assay when compared with DC isolated from spleen. These findings demonstrate that tumors induce apoptosis in DC and suggest a new mechanism of tumor escape from immune recognition. DC protection from apoptosis will lead to improvement of DC-based immunotherapies for cancer and other immune diseases.

  5. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  6. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin αM (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  7. Reconsideration of macrophage and dendritic cell classification.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Takeshi; Shimada, Misato; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that the activation of innate immune cells, especially antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, can ameliorate or exacerbate various diseases, including cancer. Currently, the macrophages and dendritic cells are categorized into several groups by their cell surface and intracellular molecules. However, the detailed classification of the differences between macrophages and dendritic cells has still not been established. Here, we summarized and reviewed the previous studies on the classification of macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition, the previous classification of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells is discussed based on our findings of macrophage activation, which has both conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cell phenotype.

  8. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  9. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Brewer, J.

    1983-12-21

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; means for applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and means for detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  10. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Brewer, John

    1986-01-01

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge circuit, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  11. Homophilic Dscam interactions control complex dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael E.; Bortnick, Rachel; Tsubouchi, Asako; Bäumer, Philipp; Kondo, Masahiro; Uemura, Tadashi; Schmucker, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Summary The morphogenesis of complex dendritic fields requires highly specific patterning and dendrite-dendrite recognition mechanisms. Alternative splicing of the Drosophila cell surface receptor Dscam results in up to 38,016 different receptor isoforms and in vitro binding studies suggested that sequence variability in immunoglobulin-like ecto-domains determines the specificity of strictly homophilic interactions. We report that diverse Dscam receptors play an important role in controlling cell-intrinsic aspects of dendrite guidance. We examined the function of Dscam during morphogenesis of dendrite arborization neurons (“da” neurons) and found that loss of Dscam in single neurons causes abnormal dendritic fasciculation and a strong increase in self-crossing of dendritic branches of da neurons. Restriction of dendritic fields of neighboring class III neurons appeared intact in Dscam deficient neurons suggesting that dendritic self-avoidance but not hetero-neuronal tiling may depend on Dscam function. Over-expression of the same Dscam isoforms in two da neurons with normally overlapping dendritic fields forced a spatial segregation of the two dendritic fields. Taken together, our results suggest that dendritic branches of all four classes of da neurons use isoform-specific homophilic interactions of Dscam to ensure minimal overlap of dendrites. The large pool of Dscam’s extracellular recognition domains may allow the same ‘core’ repulsion mechanism to be used in every da neuron without interfering with hetero-neuronal interactions. PMID:17481395

  12. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity. PMID:27698654

  14. Bruton's tyrosine kinase defect in dendritic cells from X-linked agammaglobulinaemia patients does not influence their differentiation, maturation and antigen-presenting cell function

    PubMed Central

    GAGLIARDI, M C; FINOCCHI, A; ORLANDI, P; CURSI, L; CANCRINI, C; MOSCHESE, V; MIYAWAKI, T; ROSSI, P

    2003-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by very low levels or even absence of circulating antibodies. The immunological defect is caused by deletions or mutations of Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene (Btk), whose product is critically involved in the maturation of pre-B lymphocytes into mature B cells. Btk is expressed not only in B lymphocytes but also in cells of the myeloid lineage, including dendritic cells (DC). These cells are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) that play a fundamental role in the induction and regulation of T-cell responses. In this study, we analysed differentiation, maturation, and antigen-presenting function of DC derived from XLA patients (XLA-DC) as compared to DC from age-matched healthy subjects (healthy-DC). We found that XLA-DC normally differentiate from monocyte precursors and mature in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as assessed by de novo expression of CD83, up-regulation of MHC class II, B7·1 and B7·2 molecules as well as interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-10 production. In addition, we demonstrated that LPS stimulated XLA-DC acquire the ability to prime naïve T cells and to polarize them toward a Th1 phenotype, as observed in DC from healthy donors stimulated in the same conditions. In conclusion, these data indicate that Btk defect is not involved in DC differentiation and maturation, and that XLA-DC can act as fully competent antigen presenting cells in T cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:12823285

  15. Invariant natural killer T-cell control of type 1 diabetes: a dendritic cell genetic decision of a silver bullet or Russian roulette.

    PubMed

    Driver, John P; Scheuplein, Felix; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Wilson, S Brian; Serreze, David V

    2010-02-01

    In part, activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT)-cells with the superagonist alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) inhibits the development of T-cell-mediated autoimmune type 1 diabetes in NOD mice by inducing the downstream differentiation of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) to an immunotolerogenic state. However, in other systems iNKT-cell activation has an adjuvant-like effect that enhances rather than suppresses various immunological responses. Thus, we tested whether in some circumstances genetic variation would enable activated iNKT-cells to support rather than inhibit type 1 diabetes development. We tested whether iNKT-conditioned DCs in NOD mice and a major histocompatibility complex-matched C57BL/6 (B6) background congenic stock differed in capacity to inhibit type 1 diabetes induced by the adoptive transfer of pathogenic AI4 CD8 T-cells. Unlike those of NOD origin, iNKT-conditioned DCs in the B6 background stock matured to a state that actually supported rather than inhibited AI4 T-cell-induced type 1 diabetes. The induction of a differing activity pattern of T-cell costimulatory molecules varying in capacity to override programmed death-ligand-1 inhibitory effects contributes to the respective ability of iNKT-conditioned DCs in NOD and B6 background mice to inhibit or support type 1 diabetes development. Genetic differences inherent to both iNKT-cells and DCs contribute to their varying interactions in NOD and B6.H2(g7) mice. This great variability in the interactions between iNKT-cells and DCs in two inbred mouse strains should raise a cautionary note about considering manipulation of this axis as a potential type 1 diabetes prevention therapy in genetically heterogeneous humans.

  16. CXCL10 Is Critical for the Generation of Protective CD8 T Cell Response Induced by Antigen Pulsed CpG-ODN Activated Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Saikat; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Majumdar, Subrata

    2012-01-01

    The visceral form of leishmaniasis is the most severe form of the disease and of particular concern due to the emerging problem of HIV/visceral leishmaniasis (VL) co-infection in the tropics. Till date miltefosine, amphotericin B and pentavalent antimony compounds remain the main treatment regimens for leishmaniasis. However, because of severe side effects, there is an urgent need for alternative improved therapies to combat this dreaded disease. In the present study, we have used the murine model of leishmaniasis to evaluate the potential role played by soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) pulsed-CpG-ODN stimulated dendritic cells (SLA-CpG-DCs) in restricting the intracellular leishmanial growth. We found that mice vaccinated with a single dose of SLA-pulsed DC stimulated by CpG-ODN were protected against a subsequent leishmanial challenge and had a dramatic reduction in parasite burden along with the generation of parasite specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the induction of protective immunity conferred by SLA-CpG-DCs depends entirely on the CXC chemokine IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (CXCL10; IP-10). CXCL10 is directly involved in the generation of a parasite specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response. We observed significant reduction of CD8+ T cells in mice depleted of CXCL10 suggesting a direct role of CXCL10 in the generation of CD8+ T cells in SLA-CpG-DCs vaccinated mice. CXCL10 also contributed towards the generation of perforin and granzyme B, two important cytolytic mediators of CD8+ T cells, following SLA-CpG-DCs vaccination. Together, these findings strongly demonstrate that CXCL10 is critical for rendering a protective cellular immunity during SLA-CpG-DC vaccination that confers protection against Leishmania donovani infection. PMID:23144947

  17. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 induce functional serotype-specific cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lázaro; Bernardo, Lídice; Pavón, Alequis; Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Lazo, Laura; Marcos, Ernesto; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2012-06-01

    The interplay of different inflammatory cytokines induced during dengue virus infection plays a role in either protection or increased disease severity. In this sense, vaccine strategies incorporating whole virus are able to elicit both functional and pathological responses. Therefore, an ideal tetravalent vaccine candidate against dengue should be focused on serotype-specific sequences. In the present work, a new formulation of nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) obtained from the recombinant dengue-2 capsid protein was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against homologous and heterologous viral challenge and to measure the cytotoxicity and cytokine-secretion profiles induced upon heterologous viral stimulation. As a result, a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus, which was dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In turn, no protection was observed after heterologous challenge. In accordance, in vitro-stimulated spleen cells from mice immunized with NLPs from the four dengue serotypes showed a serotype-specific response of gamma interferon- and tumour necrosis factor alpha-secreting cells. A similar pattern was detected when spleen cells from dengue-immunized animals were stimulated with the capsid protein. Taking these data together, we can assert that NLPs constitute an attractive vaccine candidate against dengue. They induce a functional immune response mediated by CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in mice, which is protective against viral challenge. In turn, they are potentially safe due to two important facts: induction of serotype specific cell-mediated immunity and lack of induction of antiviral antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  19. Crucial role of IL-4/STAT6 in T cell-mediated hepatitis: up-regulating eotaxins and IL-5 and recruiting leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jaruga, Barbara; Hong, Feng; Sun, Rui; Radaeva, Svetlana; Gao, Bin

    2003-09-15

    T cell-mediated immune responses are implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Con A injection is a widely accepted mouse model to study T cell-mediated liver injury, in which STAT6 is rapidly activated. Disruption of the IL-4 and STAT6 gene by way of genetic knockout abolishes Con A-mediated liver injury without affecting IFN-gamma/STAT1, IL-6/STAT3, or TNF-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling or affecting NKT cell activation. Infiltration of neutrophils and eosinophils in Con A-induced hepatitis is markedly suppressed in IL-4 (-/-) and STAT6(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-4 treatment induces expression of eotaxins in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells isolated from wild-type mice but not from STAT6(-/-) mice. Con A injection induces expression of eotaxins in the liver and elevates serum levels of IL-5 and eotaxins; such induction is markedly attenuated in IL-4(-/-) and STAT6(-/-) mice. Finally, eotaxin blockade attenuates Con A-induced liver injury and leukocyte infiltration. Taken together, these findings suggest that IL-4/STAT6 plays a critical role in Con A-induced hepatitis, via enhancing expression of eotaxins in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells, and induces IL-5 expression, thereby facilitating recruitment of eosinophils and neutrophils into the liver and resulting in hepatitis.

  20. Gravitational effects in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.; Chopra, M.

    1983-01-01

    The theories of diffusion-controlled dendritic crystallization will be reviewed briefly, along with recently published critical experiments on the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth in pure substances. The influence of the gravitational body force on dendrite growth kinetics will be shown to be highly dependent on the growth orientation with respect to the gravity vector and on the level of the thermal supercooling. In fact, an abrupt transition occurs at a critical supercooling, above which diffusional transport dominates the growth process and below which convective transport dominates. Our most recent work on binary mixtures shows that dilute solute additions influence the crystallization process indirectly, by altering the interfacial stability, rather than by directly affecting the transport mode. Directions for future studies in this field will also be discussed.

  1. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  2. Genetic diversity predicts pathogen resistance and cell-mediated immunocompetence in house finches

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, George V; Dhondt, André A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that genetic variation within individual hosts can influence their susceptibility to pathogens. However, there have been few opportunities to experimentally test this relationship, particularly within outbred populations of non-domestic vertebrates. We performed a standardized pathogen challenge in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) to test whether multilocus heterozygosity across 12 microsatellite loci predicts resistance to a recently emerged strain of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We simultaneously tested whether the relationship between heterozygosity and pathogen susceptibility is mediated by differences in cell-mediated or humoral immunocompetence. We inoculated 40 house finches with MG under identical conditions and assayed both humoral and cell-mediated components of the immune response. Heterozygous house finches developed less severe disease when infected with MG, and they mounted stronger cell-mediated immune responses to phytohaemagglutinin. Differences in cell-mediated immunocompetence may, therefore, partly explain why more heterozygous house finches show greater resistance to MG. Overall, our results underscore the importance of multilocus heterozygosity for individual pathogen resistance and immunity. PMID:17148199

  3. Dengue virus-infected human dendritic cells reveal hierarchies of naturally expressed novel NS3 CD8 T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Piazza, P; Campbell, D; Marques, E; Hildebrand, W H; Buchli, R; Mailliard, R; Rinaldo, C R

    2014-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of dengue virus (DENV) cell-mediated immunity is limited. In this study we characterize CD8(+) T lymphocytes recognizing three novel and two known non-structural protein 3 peptide epitopes in DENV-infected dendritic cells. Three epitopes displayed high conservation (75-100%), compared to the others (0-50%). A hierarchy ranking based on magnitude and polyfunctionality of the antigen-specific response showed that dominant epitopes were both highly conserved and cross-reactive against multiple DENV serotypes. These results are relevant to DENV pathogenesis and vaccine design.

  4. HIV is trapped and masked in the cytoplasm of lymph node follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tacchetti, C.; Favre, A.; Moresco, L.; Meszaros, P.; Luzzi, P.; Truini, M.; Rizzo, F.; Grossi, C. E.; Ciccone, E.

    1997-01-01

    To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, lymph nodes from seven asymptomatic HIV+ subjects were analyzed during the latent phase of disease. Both ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that, in all of the cases, plasma cells producing IgM/gamma were present in germinal centers. Secreted immunoglobulins formed extracellular deposits mimicking the follicular dendritic cell network. Immunoglobulin produced by germinal center plasma cells are specific for HIV because they bind the HIV env protein gp 120. Plasma cells producing antibodies with the same specificity were also abundant in the extrafollicular regions of lymph nodes. During the latent phase of infection, the virus largely accumulates within the germinal centers. Therefore, extracellular immunoglobulin may form immune complexes, as shown by the presence of HIV-specific antibodies, HIV particles, and complement components C3c, C3d, and C1q in the interdendritic spaces. When the ultrastructural localization of HIV in germinal centers was analyzed, abundant virus particles were found in the interdendritic spaces. In addition to this extracellular localization of HIV, receptor-mediated endocytosis of viral particles by follicular dendritic cells was observed. Complete HIV particles were found within the endosomal compartment of the follicular dendritic cells and, as complete viral particles, free in the cytoplasm, indicating that the virus may escape from the endocytic compartment. As the virus is abundant in the cytoplasm, this event leads to formation of a hidden reservoir within follicular dendritic cells. In this location, HIV escapes recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In contrast, virus budding indicating a productive infection of follicular dendritic cells that would render them susceptible to T-cell-mediated lysis has been seldom observed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9033269

  5. An Inverse Approach for Elucidating Dendritic Function

    PubMed Central

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Stiefel, Klaus M.

    2010-01-01

    We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function–structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a “hypothesis generator” in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a “function confirmation” by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions. PMID:21258425

  6. An inverse approach for elucidating dendritic function.

    PubMed

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Stiefel, Klaus M

    2010-01-01

    We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function-structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a "hypothesis generator" in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a "function confirmation" by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions.

  7. The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Dendrite irritator control for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  8. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  9. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  10. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  11. The potential role of CD16+ Vγ2Vδ2 T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in control of HIV type 1 disease.

    PubMed

    He, Xuan; Liang, Hua; Hong, Kunxue; Li, Haishan; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Jia, Manxue; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that HIV infection severely damages the Vγ2Vδ2 (Vδ2) T cells that play an important role in the first-line host response to infectious disease. However, little is known about Vδ2 T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in HIV disease. We found that although the CD16(+) Vδ2 T cell subset hardly participated in phosphoantigen responses dominated by the CD16(-) Vδ2 T cell subset, the potency of the ADCC function of Vδ2 T cells was correlated with the frequency of the CD16(+) subset. Thus, two distinct and complementary Vδ2 T cell subsets discriminated by CD16 were characterized to explore the respective impacts of HIV-1 infection on them. HIV-1 disease progression was not only associated with the phosphoantigen responsiveness of the CD16(-) Vδ2 subset, but also with the ability of the CD16(+) Vδ2 subset to kill antibody-coated target cells. Furthermore, both of the two Vδ2 functional subsets could be partially restored in HIV-infected patients with antiretroviral therapy. Notably, in the context of an overall HIV-mediated Vδ2 T cell depletion, despite the decline of phosphoantigen-responsive CD16(-) Vδ2 cells, CD16(+) Vδ2 cell-mediated ADCC was not compromised but exhibited a functional switch with dramatic promotion of degranulation in the early phase of HIV infection and chronic infection with slower disease progression. Our study reveals functional characterizations of the two Vδ2 T cell subsets with different activation pathways during HIV-1 infection and provides a rational direction for activating the CD16(+) Vδ2 T cells capable of mediating ADCC as a means to control HIV-1 disease.

  12. The impacts of geometry and binding on CaMKII diffusion and retention in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal

    2013-01-01

    We used a particle-based Monte Carlo simulation to dissect the regulatory mechanism of molecular translocation of CaMKII, a key regulator of neuronal synaptic function. Geometry was based upon measurements from EM reconstructions of dendrites in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Three types of simulations were performed to investigate the effects of geometry and other mechanisms that control CaMKII translocation in and out of dendritic spines. First, the diffusional escape rate of CaMKII from model spines of varied morphologies was examined. Second, a postsynaptic density (PSD) was added to study the impact of binding sites on this escape rate. Third, translocation of CaMKII from dendrites and trapping in spines was investigated using a simulated dendrite. Based on diffusion alone, a spine of average dimensions had the ability to retain CaMKII for duration of ~4 s. However, binding sites mimicking those in the PSD controlled the residence time of CaMKII in a highly nonlinear manner. In addition, we observed that F-actin at the spine head/neck junction had a significant impact on CaMKII trapping in dendritic spines. We discuss these results in the context of possible mechanisms that may explain the experimental results that have shown extended accumulation of CaMKII in dendritic spines during synaptic plasticity and LTP induction. PMID:21104309

  13. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-01-01

    The complex, branched morphology of dendrites is a cardinal feature of neurons and has been used as a criterion for cell type identification since the beginning of neurobiology. Regulated dendritic outgrowth and branching during development form the basis of receptive fields for neurons and are essential for the wiring of the nervous system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis have been an intensely studied area. In this review, we summarize the major experimental systems that have contributed to our understandings of dendritic development as well as the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that instruct the neurons to form cell type-specific dendritic arbors.

  14. Regulation of dendrite morphogenesis by extrinsic cues.

    PubMed

    Valnegri, Pamela; Puram, Sidharth V; Bonni, Azad

    2015-07-01

    Dendrites play a central role in the integration and flow of information in the nervous system. The morphogenesis and maturation of dendrites is hence an essential step in the establishment of neuronal connectivity. Recent studies have uncovered crucial functions for extrinsic cues in the development of dendrites. We review the contribution of secreted polypeptide growth factors, contact-mediated proteins, and neuronal activity in distinct phases of dendrite development. We also highlight how extrinsic cues influence local and global intracellular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis. Finally, we discuss how these studies have advanced our understanding of neuronal connectivity and have shed light on the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  16. A lectin from Chinese mistletoe increases gammadelta T cell-mediated cytotoxicity through induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fang; Ma, Yanhui; Ma, Anlun; Yu, Qiwen; Zhang, Jiying; Nie, Hong; Chen, Xuehua; Shen, Baihua; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Dongqing

    2007-06-01

    In this study, a mistletoe lectin (ML) was purified from Chinese mistletoe and the effect of this 60 kDa Chinese ML on human gammadelta T cell cytotoxicity, apoptosis and modulation of the cytokine network was studied. The cytotoxic properties of delta T cells was evaluated by using a (51)Cr release test and employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to quantify translocation of the cell membrane phospholipid, phosphatidylserine and nuclear DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. It was found that: (i) ML effectively stimulated gammadelta T cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner; (ii) ML increased gammadelta T cell cytotoxicity; (iii) ML could modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release in a pro-inflammatory manner by increasing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release and inhibiting the release of anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10; (iv) ML induced apoptosis in caspase-dependent and CD95-independent manner. The results indicated that ML is a potent immunomodulator to human gammadelta T cell cytotoxicity, apoptos is and cytokine production.

  17. Induction of foetal haemoglobin synthesis in erythroid progenitor stem cells: mediated by water-soluble components of Terminalia catappa.

    PubMed

    Aimola, I A; Inuwa, H M; Nok, A J; Mamman, A I

    2014-06-01

    Current novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) focus on increasing foetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels in SCA patients. Unfortunately, the only approved HbF-inducing agent, hydroxyurea, has long-term unpredictable side effects. Studies have shown the potential of plant compounds to modulate HbF synthesis in primary erythroid progenitor stem cells. We isolated a novel HbF-inducing Terminalia catappa distilled water active fraction (TCDWF) from Terminalia catappa leaves that induced the commitment of erythroid progenitor stem cells to the erythroid lineage and relatively higher HbF synthesis of 9.2- and 6.8-fold increases in both erythropoietin (EPO)-independent and EPO-dependent progenitor stem cells respectively. TCDWF was differentially cytotoxic to EPO-dependent and EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase release from the cells. TCDWF demonstrated a protective effect on EPO-dependent and not EPO-independent progenitor cells. TCDWF induced a modest increase in caspase 3 activity in EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures compared with a significantly higher (P˂0.05) caspase 3 activity in EPO-dependent ones. The results demonstrate that TCDWF may hold promising HbF-inducing compounds, which work synergistically, and suggest a dual modulatory effect on erythropoiesis inherent in this active fraction.

  18. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  19. Pattern selection in dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Kotliar, B. G.; Langer, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the dynamically selected velocity and tip radius of dendrites in the boundary-layer model of solidification have the special values which permit the existence of steady-state needle-crystal solutions. This result, in conjunction with considerations of stability, provides new insight concerning the validity of the marginal-stability hypothesis.

  20. Chronic stress-induced hippocampal dendritic retraction requires CA3 NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Kimberly M.; Miracle, Angela D.; Wellman, Cara L.; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2010-01-01

    Chronic stress induces dendritic retraction in the hippocampal CA3 subregion, but the mechanisms responsible for this retraction and its impact on neural circuitry are not well understood. To determine the role of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) receptor (NMDAR)-mediated signaling in this process, we compared the effects of chronic immobilization stress (CIS) on hippocampal dendritic morphology, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, and anxiety-related and hippocampus-dependent behaviors, in transgenic male mice in which the NMDAR had been selectively deleted in CA3 pyramidal cells and in non-mutant littermates. We found that CIS exposure for 10 consecutive days in non-mutant mice effectively induces HPA axis activation and dendritic retraction of CA3 short-shaft pyramidal neurons, but not CA3 long-shaft pyramidal neurons, suggesting a differential cellular stress response in this region. Dendritic reorganization of short-shaft neurons occurred throughout the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus and, in particular, in the ventral pole of this structure. We also observed a robust retraction of dendrites in dorsal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the non-mutant C57BL/6 mouse strain. Strikingly, chronic stress-induced dendritic retraction was not evident in any of the neurons in either CA3 or CA1 in the mutant mice that had a functional lack of NMDARs restricted to CA3 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the prevention of dendritic retraction in the mutant mice had a minimal effect on HPA axis activation and behavioral alterations that were induced by chronic stress. These data support a role for NMDAR-dependent glutamatergic signaling in CA3 in the cell-type specific induction of dendritic retraction in two hippocampal subregions following chronic stress. PMID:21108993

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fen-Biao

    2008-01-01

    Summary Dendrites exhibit unique cell-type specific branching patterns and targeting specificity that are critically important for neuronal function and connectivity. Recent evidence indicates that highly complex transcriptional regulatory networks dictate various aspects of dendritic outgrowth, branching, and routing. In addition to other intrinsic molecular pathways such as membrane protein trafficking, interactions between neighboring dendritic branches also contribute to the final specification of dendritic morphology. Nonredundant coverage by dendrites of same type of neurons, known as tiling, requires the actions of the Tricornered/Furry (Sax-1/Sax-2) signaling pathway. However, the dendrites of a neuron do not cross over each other, a process called self-avoidance that is mediated by Down’s syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam). Those exciting findings have enhanced significantly our understanding of dendritic morphogenesis and revealed the magnitude of complexity in the underlying molecular regulatory networks. PMID:17933513

  2. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  3. Novel Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Based Vaccine Induces Robust CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Derouazi, Madiha; Di Berardino-Besson, Wilma; Belnoue, Elodie; Hoepner, Sabine; Walther, Romy; Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Teta, Patrick; Dufour, Yannick; Yacoub Maroun, Céline; Salazar, Andres M; Martinvalet, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Walker, Paul R

    2015-08-01

    Vaccines that can coordinately induce multi-epitope T cell-mediated immunity, T helper functions, and immunologic memory may offer effective tools for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we report the development of a new class of recombinant protein cancer vaccines that deliver different CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell epitopes presented by MHC class I and class II alleles, respectively. In these vaccines, the recombinant protein is fused with Z12, a novel cell-penetrating peptide that promotes efficient protein loading into the antigen-processing machinery of dendritic cells. Z12 elicited an integrated and multi-epitopic immune response with persistent effector T cells. Therapy with Z12-formulated vaccines prolonged survival in three robust tumor models, with the longest survival in an orthotopic model of aggressive brain cancer. Analysis of the tumor sites showed antigen-specific T-cell accumulation with favorable modulation of the balance of the immune infiltrate. Taken together, the results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of Z12-formulated vaccines as a versatile platform for the development of effective cancer vaccines.

  4. Perinatal undernutrition attenuates field excitatory postsynaptic potentials and influences dendritic spine density and morphology in hippocampus of male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Wei, J; Yang, Z

    2013-08-06

    Perinatal undernutrition affects the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for learning and memory. However, far less is known about the changes of dendritic spine density and morphology related to hippocampal synaptic plasticity. As dendritic spines are dynamic structures essential for synaptic plasticity and serve as the primary post-synaptic location of the excitatory neurotransmission that underlies learning and memory, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether the perinatal undernutrition affected hippocampal synaptic plasticity accompanied by the change of dendritic spines in anesthetized rats. An input-output curve was first determined using the measurements of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) slope in response to a series of stimulation intensities. Long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by high-frequency stimulation was recorded in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway. Post-tetanic potentiation derived from the fEPSP slope was also measured immediately after LTP induction. Quantitative data of dendritic spines from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were obtained using Golgi staining. The results showed that 50% perinatal food restriction (FR50) impaired the magnitude of LTP of the fEPSP slope in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway. Additionally, FR50 reduced overall spine densities in both basal dendrites and apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. Moreover, FR50 reduced type densities of thin and mushroom spines in apical dendrites, whereas a reduction in the type of mushroom spines was only observed in the basal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. These findings suggested that perinatal undernutrition decreased excitatory synaptic input and further affected the processing of information in a given network by selectively reducing the number of special dendritic spines. Thus, these changes in the density and the types of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons may partly explain the impaired hippocampal

  5. The DC-SIGN-CD56 interaction inhibits the anti-dendritic cell cytotoxicity of CD56 expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; Raginov, Ivan S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify interactions of the pattern-recognition receptor DC-SIGN with cells from the HIV-infected peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. Cells from control and HIV-infected peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures were tested for the surface expression of DC-SIGN ligands. The DC-SIGN ligand expressing cells were analyzed for the role of DC-SIGN-ligand interaction in their functionality. In the vast majority of experiments HIV-infected lymphocytes did not express detectable DC-SIGN ligands on their cell surfaces. In contrast, non-infected cells, carrying NK-specific marker CD56, expressed cell surface DC-SIGN ligands. The weakly polysialylated CD56 was identified as a novel DC-SIGN ligand. The treatment of DC-SIGN expressing dendritic cells with anti-DC-SIGN antibodies increased the anti-dendritic cell cytotoxicity of CD56(pos) cells. The treatment of CD56(pos) cells with a peptide, blocking the weakly polysialylated CD56-specifc trans-homophilic interactions, inhibited their anti-dendritic cells cytotoxicity. The interaction between DC-SIGN and CD56 inhibits homotypic intercellular interactions of CD56(pos) cells and protects DC-SIGN expressing dendritic cells against CD56(pos) cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This finding can have an impact on the development of approaches to HIV infection and cancer therapy as well as in transplantation medicine.

  6. Induction of antigen-positive cell death by the expression of perforin, but not DTa, from a DNA vaccine enhances the immune response.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Garrod, Tamsin J; Yu, Wenbo; Miller, Darren; Major, Lee; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    The failure of traditional protein-based vaccines to prevent infection by viruses such as HIV or hepatitis C highlights the need for novel vaccine strategies. DNA vaccines have shown promise in small animal models, and are effective at generating anti-viral T cell-mediated immune responses; however, they have proved to be poorly immunogenic in clinical trials. We propose that the induction of necrosis will enhance the immune response to vaccine antigens encoded by DNA vaccines, as necrotic cells are known to release a range of intracellular factors that lead to dendritic cell (DC) activation and enhanced cross-presentation of antigen. Here we provide evidence that induction of cell death in DNA vaccine-targeted cells provides an adjuvant effect following intradermal vaccination of mice; however, this enhancement of the immune response is dependent on both the mechanism and timing of cell death after antigen expression. We report that a DNA vaccine encoding the cytolytic protein, perforin, resulted in DC activation, enhanced broad and multifunctional CD8 T-cell responses to the HIV-1 antigen GAG and reduced viral load following challenge with a chimeric virus, EcoHIV, compared with the canonical GAG DNA vaccine. This effect was not observed for a DNA vaccine encoding an apoptosis-inducing toxin, DTa, or when the level of perforin expression was increased to induce cell death sooner after vaccination. Thus, inducing lytic cell death following a threshold level of expression of a viral antigen can improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines, whereas apoptotic cell death has an inhibitory effect on the immune response.

  7. Cell Mediated Immunity to Herpesvirus Type 1 in Carcinoma and Pre-cancerous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T.; Shillitoe, E. J.; Wilton, J. M. A.; Ivanyi, L.

    1973-01-01

    The response of lymphocytes to Herpesvirus hominis type 1 (HVH1), Candida albicans and phytohaemagglutinin was studied sequentially over a period of 3 years in patients with leukoplakia and carcinoma. In the keratosis-acanthosis group of leukoplakia there was a significant decrease in stimulation of lymphocytes by HVH1, in contrast to epithelial atypia which yielded both increased stimulation indices and macrophage migration inhibition to HVH1. Non-specific depressed cell mediated immune responses were found in carcinoma. Sequential data revealed major fluctuations in stimulation indices to HVH1 during the course of epithelial atypia and a fall in the stimulation indices from > 7 to < 2 was associated with carcinomatous transformation. These changes argue in favour of participation of HVH1 in the pathogenesis of some leukoplakias, and the development of epithelial atypia with subsequent carcinoma might be a function of the cell mediated immune responses to the virus. PMID:4374226

  8. Noninvasive Imaging of Cell-Mediated Therapy for Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akins, Elizabeth J.; Dubey, Purnima

    2013-01-01

    Cell-mediated therapy (immunotherapy) for the treatment of cancer is an active area of investigation in animal models and clinical trials. Despite many advances, objective responses to immunotherapy are observed in a small number of cases, for certain tumor types. To better understand differences in outcomes, it is critical to develop assays for tracking effector cell localization and function in situ. The fairly recent use of molecular imaging techniques to track cell populations has presented researchers and clinicians with a powerful diagnostic tool for determining the efficacy of cell-mediated therapy for the treatment of cancer. This review highlights the application of whole-body noninvasive radioisotopic, magnetic, and optical imaging methods for monitoring effector cells in vivo. Issues that affect sensitivity of detection, such as methods of cell marking, efficiency of cell labeling, toxicity, and limits of detection of imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:18523073

  9. Neutrophils as effector cells of T-cell-mediated, acquired immunity in murine listeriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Silva, M T

    1994-01-01

    The control of the infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes, considered an example of an intracellular parasite, is thought to involve co-operation between antigen-specific T cells and activated macrophages. Here we investigated the participation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the mechanisms of resistance during the immune phase of the antimicrobial response to L. monocytogenes infection. We found that BALB/c mice were unable to express T-cell-mediated (acquired) immunity to this pathogen in the absence of granulocytes. We propose that neutrophils should be included in the concept of cell-mediated immunity and that their antimicrobial role is not exclusively expressed during the early phases of a primary infection. PMID:7835951

  10. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  11. Impaired cell mediated immunity in haemophilia in the absence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Madhok, R; Gracie, A; Lowe, G D; Burnett, A; Froebel, K; Follett, E; Forbes, C D

    1986-01-01

    The cell mediated immune response was evaluated in vivo in 29 patients with clinically severe haemophilia by means of the dinitrochlorobenzene skin test. All patients had a response below the median normal value, and in 19 the response was on or below the lower limit of the normal range. There was no difference in skin response between patients positive and negative for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; formerly known as human T cell lymphotropic virus III or lymphadenopathy associated virus). In the whole group, and in seronegative patients (n = 17), there was an inverse relation between exposure to clotting factor and skin response. In seropositive patients (n = 12) no such association was apparent. This study shows that clotting factor concentrate impairs the cell mediated immune response to a new antigen in the absence of infection with HIV. PMID:3094762

  12. Cell-mediated and humoral immune response in diabetic patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Anil, S; Remani, P; Vijayakumar, T; Hari, S

    1990-07-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed in 50 patients with type II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 50 nondiabetic patients with periodontitis. The values were compared with those of 50 age and sex-matched control subjects. The cell-mediated immunity assessed by enumerating the total and high-affinity rosette-forming cells of the patient did not show any significant variation from that of the normal control subjects. The humoral immune response was assessed by estimating serum immunoglobulins G, A, M, D, and E by single radial immunodiffusion. Except IgD, all other immunoglobulins were found to be elevated significantly in both diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. The alteration in humoral immune response may be the cause or the effect of periodontitis. The defective host response reported in diabetic patients may be responsible for the increased incidence of periodontitis in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetic patients.

  13. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in patients with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Anil, S; Hari, S; Remani, P; Vijayakumar, T; Ankathil, R

    1990-03-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed in 21 patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and in an equal number of control subjects. The cell-mediated immunity, assessed by enumeration of total rosette forming cells [TRFC] and high affinity rosette forming cells [HARFC], was found to be depressed in LJP patients compared to controls. Estimation of serum immunoglobulins G,A,M,D and E levels were done using single radial immunodiffusion. All the immunoglobulins except IgD were found to be elevated significantly in LJP patients. The defective immune response found in LJP patients may be the cause or effect of the disease process. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these defects are genetically controlled.

  14. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  15. Dendritic Cell Interactions with Lymphatic Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Erica; Nitschké, Maximilian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Afferent lymphatic vessels fulfill essential immune functions by transporting leukocytes and lymph-borne antigen to draining lymph nodes (dLNs). An important cell type migrating through lymphatic vessels are dendritic cells (DCs). DCs reside in peripheral tissues like the skin, where they take up antigen and transport it via the lymphatic vascular network to dLNs for subsequent presentation to T cells. As such, DCs play a key role in the induction of adaptive immune responses during infection and vaccination, but also for the maintenance of tolerance. Although the migratory pattern of DCs has been known for long time, interactions between DCs and lymphatic vessels are only now starting to be unraveled at the cellular level. In particular, new tools for visualizing lymphatic vessels in combination with time-lapse microscopy have recently generated valuable insights into the process of DC migration to dLNs. In this review we summarize and discuss current approaches for visualizing DCs and lymphatic vessels in tissues for imaging applications. Furthermore, we review the current state of knowledge about DC migration towards, into and within lymphatic vessels, particularly focusing on the cellular interactions that take place between DCs and the lymphatic endothelium. PMID:24044757

  16. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  17. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  18. [Dendritic cell-based therapeutic cancer vaccines].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manglio; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo D

    In recent years immunotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. The increased knowledge in the tumor immune-biology has allowed developing rational treatments by manipulation of the immune system with significant clinical impact. This rapid development has significantly changed the prognosis of many tumors without treatment options up to date. Other strategies have explored the use of therapeutic vaccines based on dendritic cells (DC) by inducing antitumor immunity. DC are cells of hematopoietic origin, constitutively expressing molecules capable to present antigens, that are functionally the most potent inducers of the activation and proliferation of antigen specific T lymphocytes. The CD8+ T cells proliferate and acquire cytotoxic capacity after recognizing their specific antigen presented on the surface of DC, although only some types of DC can present antigens internalized from outside the cell to precursors of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (this function is called cross-presentation) requiring translocation mechanisms of complex antigens. The induction of an effective adaptive immune response is considered a good option given its specificity, and prolonged duration of response. The DC, thanks to its particular ability of antigen presentation and lymphocyte stimulation, are able to reverse the poor antitumor immune response experienced by patients with cancer. The DC can be obtained from various sources, using different protocols to generate differentiation and maturation, and are administered by various routes such as subcutaneous, intravenous or intranodal. The wide variety of protocols resulted in heterogeneous clinical responses.

  19. Cell mediated and humoral immunity and light-chain proteinuria in rifampicin-treated tuberculous patients.

    PubMed

    Galal, S H; Khalil, S H; el Husseiny, W; Brock, J

    1988-01-01

    The present study was devoted to assess the humoral and cell mediated immune responsiveness in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis before and after rifampicin therapy. Skin test using PPD and PHA; Rosette forming cells test, serum IgG, M and A; and light chain proteinuria have been tested for 15 newly diagnosed tuberculous patients and 15 normal controls. Rifampicin showed an immunosuppressive effect on both cellular and humoral immune responses as well as by the advent of light chain proteinuria.

  20. RB mutation and RAS overexpression induce resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier; Golán-Cancela, Irene; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Costoya, Jose A; de la Cruz, Verónica Pérez; Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Several theories aim to explain the malignant transformation of cells, including the mutation of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Deletion of Rb (a tumor suppressor), overexpression of mutated Ras (a proto-oncogene), or both, are sufficient for in vitro gliomagenesis, and these genetic traits are associated with their proliferative capacity. An emerging hallmark of cancer is the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system. Whether specific mutations are related with this, remains to be analyzed. To address this issue, three transformed glioma cell lines were obtained (Rb(-/-), Ras(V12), and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12)) by in vitro retroviral transformation of astrocytes, as previously reported. In addition, Ras(V12) and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12) transformed cells were injected into SCID mice and after tumor growth two stable glioma cell lines were derived. All these cells were characterized in terms of Rb and Ras gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity, expression of MHC I, Rae1δ, and Rae1αβγδε, mult1, H60a, H60b, H60c, as ligands for NK cell receptors, and their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results show that transformation of astrocytes (Rb loss, Ras overexpression, or both) induced phenotypical and functional changes associated with resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, the transfer of cell lines of transformed astrocytes into SCID mice increased resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, thus suggesting that specific changes in a tumor suppressor (Rb) and a proto-oncogene (Ras) are enough to confer resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells and therefore provide some insight into the ability of tumor cells to evade immune responses.

  1. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization on collagen gels: Effect of densification and bioglass incorporation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gengbo; Pastakia, Meet; Fenn, Michael B; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-05-01

    Plastic compression is a collagen densification process that has been widely used for the development of mechanically robust collagen-based materials. Incorporation of bioglass within plastically compressed collagen gels has been shown to mimic the microstructural properties of native bone and enhance in vitro cell-mediated mineralization. The current study seeks to decouple the effects of collagen densification and bioglass incorporation to understand the interplay between collagen packing density and presence of bioglass on cell-mediated mineralization. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization was assessed as a measure of the osteoconductivity of four different collagen gels: (1) uncompressed collagen gel (UC), (2) bioglass incorporated uncompressed collagen gel (UC + BG), (3) plastically compressed collagen gel (PC), and (4) bioglass incorporated plastically compressed collagen gel (PC + BG). The results indicated that collagen densification enhanced mineralization as shown by SEM, increased alkaline phosphatase activity and produced significantly higher amounts of mineralized nodules on PC gels compared to UC gels. Further, the amount of nodule formation on PC gels was significantly higher compared to UC + BG gels indicating that increase in matrix stiffness due to collagen densification had a greater effect on cell-mediated mineralization compared to bioglass incorporation into loosely packed UC gels. Incorporation of bioglass into PC gels further enhanced mineralization as evidenced by significantly larger nodule size and higher amount of mineralization on PC + BG gels compared to PC gels. In conclusion, collagen densification via plastic compression improves the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. Further, incorporation of bioglass within PC gels has an additive effect and further enhances the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dendritic cell analysis in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Venetia; Barge, Dawn; Collin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Dendritic cells are specialized antigen-presenting cells which link innate and adaptive immunity, through recognition and presentation of antigen to T cells. Although the importance of dendritic cells has been demonstrated in many animal models, their contribution to human immunity remains relatively unexplored in vivo. Given their central role in infection, autoimmunity, and malignancy, dendritic cell deficiency or dysfunction would be expected to have clinical consequences. Recent findings Human dendritic cell deficiency disorders, related to GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) mutations, have highlighted the importance of dendritic cells and monocytes in primary immunodeficiency diseases and begun to shed light on their nonredundant roles in host defense and immune regulation in vivo. The contribution of dendritic cell and monocyte dysfunction to the pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency disease phenotypes is becoming increasingly apparent. However, dendritic cell analysis is not yet a routine part of primary immunodeficiency disease workup. Summary Widespread uptake of dendritic cell/monocyte screening in clinical practice will facilitate the discovery of novel dendritic cell and monocyte disorders as well as advancing our understanding of human dendritic cell biology in health and disease. PMID:27755182

  3. Fibrin facilitates both innate and T cell-mediated defense against Yersinia pestis.1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Lin, Shiuan; Parent, Michelle A.; Kanevsky, Isis Mullarky; Szaba, Frank M.; Kummer, Lawrence W.; Duso, Debra K.; Tighe, Michael; Hill, Jim; Gruber, Andras; Mackman, Nigel; Gailani, David; Smiley, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis causes plague, a rapidly progressing and often fatal disease. The formation of fibrin at sites of Y. pestis infection supports innate host defense against plague, perhaps by providing a non-diffusible spatial cue that promotes the accumulation of inflammatory cells expressing fibrin-binding integrins. This report demonstrates that fibrin is an essential component of T cell-mediated defense against plague but can be dispensable for antibody-mediated defense. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of fibrin abrogated innate and T cell-mediated defense in mice challenged intranasally with Y. pestis. The fibrin-deficient mice displayed reduced survival, increased bacterial burden, and exacerbated hemorrhagic pathology. They also showed fewer neutrophils within infected lung tissue and reduced neutrophil viability at sites of liver infection. Depletion of neutrophils from wild type mice weakened T cell-mediated defense against plague. The data suggest that T cells combat plague in conjunction with neutrophils, which require help from fibrin in order to withstand Y. pestis encounters and effectively clear bacteria. PMID:23487423

  4. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  5. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext.

  6. Differential effect of pancreatectomy on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, N; Piantanelli, L

    1977-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune reactions, such as allogenic skin-graft rejection and PHA or MLC responses, and antibody synthesis against different antigens (sheep erythrocytes, Brucella antigen, bovine serum albumin) have been evaluated in rats suffering from experimentally-induced diabetes and in age-matched sham-treated controls. Cell-mediated immune reactions are strongly depressed diabetic rats. The cellularity of the thymus and of thymus-dependent areas and the number of peripheral blood lymphocytes is significantly reduced in pancreatectomized rats. Moreover, the immunological recovery from heavy cortisonization is also greatly impaired. Daily treatment with insulin may prevent these immunological alterations. By contrast, antibody responses in diabetic rats are not quantitatively altered in respect to either the number of antibody producing cells in the spleen or the circulating antibody titres. The discrepancy between the abnormality of cell-mediated immune reactions in diabetic rats and their physiological capacity to synthetize antibodies suggests that the sensitivity to an insulin-deprived environment is present only in a definite, although yet undefined, subpopulation of lymphoid cells rather than in the whole lymphoid system. Images Fig. 4 PMID:141353

  7. Temporal synchrony and gamma to theta power conversion in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Sachin P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Timing is a crucial aspect of synaptic integration. For pyramidal neurons that integrate thousands of synaptic inputs spread across hundreds of microns, it is thus a challenge to maintain the timing of incoming inputs at the axo-somatic integration site. Here we show that pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus use a gradient of inductance in the form of HCN channels as an active mechanism to counteract location-dependent temporal differences of dendritic inputs at the soma. Using simultaneous multi-site whole cell recordings complemented by computational modeling, we find that this intrinsic biophysical mechanism produces temporal synchrony of rhythmic inputs in the theta and gamma frequency ranges across wide regions of the dendritic tree. While gamma and theta oscillations are known to synchronize activity across space in neuronal networks, our results identify a novel mechanism by which this synchrony extends to activity within single pyramidal neurons with complex dendritic arbors. PMID:24185428

  8. Induction synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Kishiro, Junichi

    2000-08-01

    A novel proton synchrotron employing induction cells instead of radio frequency cavities is proposed. The major feature of the barrier bucket acceleration, where acceleration and longitudinal focusing are independently achieved is theoretically discussed with the help of multi-particle simulations. It is proved that barrier bucket acceleration allows ultimate use of longitudinal phase-space and is quite effective to substantially increase the beam intensity in synchrotrons. Engineering aspects of key devices to realize the novel synchrotron, a ferri/ferro-magnetic material loaded induction cell and a modulator being rapidly switched in synchronization with beam acceleration are described in detail. The idea is applied to an existing machine (the KEK 12 GeV-PS) and high-intensity proton rings such as JHF, ESS, and SNS and their predicted improvement in machine performance is given with numerical values for each case.

  9. Method of inhibiting dislocation generation in silicon dendritic webs

    DOEpatents

    Spitznagel, John A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.; McHugh, James P.

    1990-11-20

    A method of tailoring the heat balance of the outer edge of the dendrites adjacent the meniscus to produce thinner, smoother dendrites, which have substantially less dislocation sources contiguous with the dendrites, by changing the view factor to reduce radiation cooling or by irradiating the dendrites with light from a quartz lamp or a laser to raise the temperature of the dendrites.

  10. Induction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, W.H.

    1980-10-14

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizes, a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  11. Induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Whitney H.

    1980-01-01

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  12. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity. PMID:25152717

  13. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  14. Dendritic Spine Pathology in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Glausier, Jill R.; Lewis, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder whose clinical features include impairments in perception, cognition and motivation. These impairments reflect alterations in neuronal circuitry within and across multiple brain regions that are due, at least in part, to deficits in dendritic spines, the site of most excitatory synaptic connections. Dendritic spine alterations have been identified in multiple brain regions in schizophrenia, but are best characterized in layer 3 of the neocortex, where pyramidal cell spine density is lower. These spine deficits appear to arise during development, and thus are likely the result of disturbances in the molecular mechanisms that underlie spine formation, pruning, and/or maintenance. Each of these mechanisms may provide insight into novel therapeutic targets for preventing or repairing the alterations in neural circuitry that mediate the debilitating symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:22546337

  15. Dendritic cells in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Purnamasari, Dyah; Soewondo, Pradana; Djauzi, Samsuridjal

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells are major antigen-presenting cells (APC) that stimulate naive T cells, which induce adaptive immune responses. Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR). The autoantibodies bind with TSHR and stimulate thyroid hormone production. Dendritic cells are still the major APC in GD immune response although thyrocytes in GD can also express Major Histocompatibility Class (MHC) class II molecule. Studies about DC in GD have been conducted by isolating intra-thyroid DC or DC in peripheral circulation. Results of DC studies in GD are still controversial. Changes in number and profile of DC are found, which indicate altered immune response activity and defects of regulator T cell (Treg) in GD.

  16. The novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 promotes the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Kauttu, Tuuli; Seppänen, Hanna; Vainionpää, Sanna; Wang, Shan; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli

    2013-02-01

    Kindlin-2 is a novel focal adhesion gene mediating the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in linking chronic inflammation to cancer progression. Both kindlin-2 and TAMs have been found to promote the invasion of gastric cancer cells in our previous studies. However, the correlation between kindlin-2 and TAMs remains unclear. Real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate kindlin-2 expression in the AGS, NCI and Hs-746T gastric cancer cell lines co-cultured with TAMs under normal or hypoxic conditions. IL8, IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL18, IL22 and IL24 expressions were measured by real-time RT-PCR in the gastric cancer lines with varying levels of kindlin-2 expression, as well as after downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA expression by the siRNA method. We found that kindlin-2 was upregulated in all three gastric cancer cell lines when co-cultured with TAMs under normal conditions. Under hypoxic conditions, the induction of kindlin-2 expression induced by macrophages was significantly downregulated in the Hs-746T cell line. IL8, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression was significantly higher in gastric cell lines with high kindlin-2 expression. Downregulation of kindlin-2 mRNA decreased IL10, IL11, IL17b, IL22 and IL24 expression but IL8 and IL18 expression was upregulated. Therefore, the novel focal adhesion gene kindlin-2 may play an important role in promoting the invasion of gastric cancer cells mediated by TAMs through regulating interleukin expression.

  17. Cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puram, Sidharth V; Bonni, Azad

    2013-12-01

    The proper formation and morphogenesis of dendrites is fundamental to the establishment of neural circuits in the brain. Following cell cycle exit and migration, neurons undergo organized stages of dendrite morphogenesis, which include dendritic arbor growth and elaboration followed by retraction and pruning. Although these developmental stages were characterized over a century ago, molecular regulators of dendrite morphogenesis have only recently been defined. In particular, studies in Drosophila and mammalian neurons have identified numerous cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis that include transcriptional regulators, cytoskeletal and motor proteins, secretory and endocytic pathways, cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligases, and components of other signaling cascades. Here, we review cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite patterning and discuss how the characterization of such crucial regulators advances our understanding of normal brain development and pathogenesis of diverse cognitive disorders.

  18. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  19. Active Dendrites Enhance Neuronal Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Kinouchi, Osame; Copelli, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range. PMID:19521531

  20. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-03-18

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively.

  2. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-11-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, healing is mediated by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Thus, an efficacious vaccine should induce Th1 and Tc1 cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exogenous proteins primarily induce strong CD4-dependent immunity; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C kinase), as TAT-fusion proteins facilitate major histocompatibility complex class I-dependent antigen presentation. In vitro, TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs induced stronger proliferation of Leishmania-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with DCs incubated with LACK alone. Vaccination with TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs or fusion proteins plus adjuvant in vivo significantly improved disease outcome in Leishmania major-infected mice and was superior to vaccination with DCs treated with LACK alone. Vaccination with DC+TAT-LACK resulted in stronger proliferation of CD8(+) T cells when compared with immunization with DC+LACK. Upon depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, TAT-LACK-mediated protection was lost. TAT-LACK-pulsed IL-12p40-deficient DCs did not promote protection in vivo. In summary, these data show that TAT-fusion proteins are superior in activating Leishmania-specific Tc1 cells when compared with antigen alone and suggest that IL-12-dependent preferential induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cells promotes significant protection against this important human pathogen.

  3. The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Dendrites growing at .4 supercooling from a 2 stinger growth chamber for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  4. Uterine Epithelial Cell Regulation of DC-SIGN Expression Inhibits Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Trans Infection by Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ochiel, Daniel O.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexual transmission accounts for the majority of HIV-1 infections. In over 75% of cases, infection is initiated by a single variant (transmitted/founder virus). However, the determinants of virus selection during transmission are unknown. Host cell-cell interactions in the mucosa may be critical in regulating susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized in this study that specific immune modulators secreted by uterine epithelial cells modulate susceptibility of dendritic cells (DC) to infection with HIV-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that uterine epithelial cell secretions (i.e. conditioned medium, CM) decreased DC-SIGN expression on immature dendritic cells via a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mechanism. Further, CM inhibited dendritic cell-mediated trans infection of HIV-1 expressing envelope proteins of prototypic reference. Similarly, CM inhibited trans infection of HIV-1 constructs expressing envelopes of transmitted/founder viruses, variants that are selected during sexual transmission. In contrast, whereas recombinant TGF- β1 inhibited trans infection of prototypic reference HIV-1 by dendritic cells, TGF-β1 had a minimal effect on trans infection of transmitted/founder variants irrespective of the reporter system used to measure trans infection. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide the first direct evidence for uterine epithelial cell regulation of dendritic cell transmission of infection with reference and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants. These findings have immediate implications for designing strategies to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21179465

  5. Dendritic NMDA spikes are necessary for timing-dependent associative LTP in CA3 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandalise, Federico; Carta, Stefano; Helmchen, Fritjof; Lisman, John; Gerber, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The computational repertoire of neurons is enhanced by regenerative electrical signals initiated in dendrites. These events, referred to as dendritic spikes, can act as cell-intrinsic amplifiers of synaptic input. Among these signals, dendritic NMDA spikes are of interest in light of their correlation with synaptic LTP induction. Because it is not possible to block NMDA spikes pharmacologically while maintaining NMDA receptors available to initiate synaptic plasticity, it remains unclear whether NMDA spikes alone can trigger LTP. Here we use dendritic recordings and calcium imaging to analyse the role of NMDA spikes in associative LTP in CA3 pyramidal cells. We show that NMDA spikes produce regenerative branch-specific calcium transients. Decreasing the probability of NMDA spikes reduces LTP, whereas increasing their probability enhances LTP. NMDA spikes and LTP occur without back-propagating action potentials. However, action potentials can facilitate LTP induction by promoting NMDA spikes. Thus, NMDA spikes are necessary and sufficient to produce the critical postsynaptic depolarization required for associative LTP in CA3 pyramidal cells. PMID:27848967

  6. Replicating viral vector platform exploits alarmin signals for potent CD8+ T cell-mediated tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kallert, Sandra M.; Darbre, Stephanie; Bonilla, Weldy V.; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Page, Nicolas; Müller, Philipp; Kreuzaler, Matthias; Lu, Min; Favre, Stéphanie; Kreppel, Florian; Löhning, Max; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Zippelius, Alfred; Merkler, Doron; Pinschewer, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections lead to alarmin release and elicit potent cytotoxic effector T lymphocyte (CTLeff) responses. Conversely, the induction of protective tumour-specific CTLeff and their recruitment into the tumour remain challenging tasks. Here we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can be engineered to serve as a replication competent, stably-attenuated immunotherapy vector (artLCMV). artLCMV delivers tumour-associated antigens to dendritic cells for efficient CTL priming. Unlike replication-deficient vectors, artLCMV targets also lymphoid tissue stroma cells expressing the alarmin interleukin-33. By triggering interleukin-33 signals, artLCMV elicits CTLeff responses of higher magnitude and functionality than those induced by replication-deficient vectors. Superior anti-tumour efficacy of artLCMV immunotherapy depends on interleukin-33 signalling, and a massive CTLeff influx triggers an inflammatory conversion of the tumour microenvironment. Our observations suggest that replicating viral delivery systems can release alarmins for improved anti-tumour efficacy. These mechanistic insights may outweigh safety concerns around replicating viral vectors in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28548102

  7. Intravital imaging of dendritic spine plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sau Wan Lai, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Recent works have suggested that the structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines have been associated with information coding and memories. Advances in imaging and labeling techniques enable the study of dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of dendritic spine plasticity in the neocortex. I will introduce imaging tools for studying spine dynamics and will further review current findings on spine structure and function under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28243511

  8. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  9. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  10. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-02-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  11. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-03-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  12. Precipitation dendrites in turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, Luiza; Hawkins, Christopher; Hammer, Øyvind; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Surface precipitation in pipelines, as well as freezing in water pipes is of great concern in many industrial applications where scaling phenomena becomes a control problem of pipe-clogging or an efficiency reduction in transport. Flow blockage often occurs even when only a small fraction is deposited non-uniformly on the walls in the form of dendrites. Dendritic patterns are commonly encountered in surface precipitation from supersaturated solutions, e.g. calcite dendrites, as well as in solidification from undercooled liquids, e.g. freezing of water into ice dendrites. We explore the mathematical similarities between precipitation and freezing processes and, in particular, investigate the effect of fluid flow on the precipitation dendrites on pipe walls. We use a phase field approach to model surface growth coupled with a lattice Boltzmann method that simulates a channel flow at varying Reynolds number. The dendrites orientation and shape depend non-trivially on the ratio between advection and diffusion, i.e. the Peclet number, as well as the Reynolds number. Roughness induced vortices near growing dendrites at high flow rates further affect the branch splitting of dendrites. We show how the transport rate in a pipeline may depend on the different dendritic morphologies, and provide estimates for the flow conditions that correspond to most efficient transport regimes.

  13. The renal microenvironment modifies dendritic cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chessa, Federica; Mathow, Daniel; Wang, Shijun; Hielscher, Thomas; Atzberger, Ann; Porubsky, Stefan; Gretz, Norbert; Burgdorf, Sven; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Popovic, Zoran V

    2016-01-01

    Renal dendritic cells are a major component of the renal mononuclear phagocytic system. In the renal interstitium, these cells are exposed to an osmotic gradient, mainly sodium, whose concentration progressively increases towards inner medulla. Renal allograft rejection affects predominantly the cortex, suggesting a protective role of the renal medullary micromilieu. Whether osmolar variations can modulate the function of renal dendritic cells is currently undefined. Considering the central role of dendritic cells in promoting allorejection, we tested whether the biophysical micromilieu, particularly the interstitial osmotic gradient, influences their alloreactivity. There was a progressive depletion of leukocytes towards the medulla of homeostatic kidney. Only macrophages opposed this tendency. Flow cytometry of homeostatic and post-transplant medullary dendritic cells revealed a switch towards a macrophage-like phenotype. Similarly, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells developed ex vivo in sodium chloride-enriched medium acquired a M2-like signature. Microarray analysis of allotransplant dendritic cells posed a medullary downregulation of genes mainly involved in alloantigen recognition. Gene expression profiles of both medullary dendritic cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells matured in hyperosmolar medium had an overlap with the macrophage M2 signature. Thus, the medullary environment inhibits an alloimmune response by modulating the phenotype and function of dendritic cells.

  14. Reciprocal Interaction of Dendrite Geometry and Nuclear Calcium-VEGFD Signaling Gates Memory Consolidation and Extinction.

    PubMed

    Hemstedt, Thekla J; Bengtson, C Peter; Ramírez, Omar; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-07-19

    Nuclear calcium is an important signaling end point in synaptic excitation-transcription coupling that is critical for long-term neuroadaptations. Here, we show that nuclear calcium acting via a target gene, VEGFD, is required for hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation and extinction in mice. Nuclear calcium-VEGFD signaling upholds the structural integrity and complexity of the dendritic arbor of CA1 neurons that renders those cells permissive for the efficient generation of synaptic input-evoked nuclear calcium transients driving the expression of plasticity-related genes. Therefore, the gating of memory functions rests on the reciprocally reinforcing maintenance of an intact dendrite geometry and a functional synapse-to-nucleus communication axis. In psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic application of VEGFD may help to stabilize dendritic structures and network connectivity, which may prevent cognitive decline and could boost the efficacy of extinction-based exposure therapies.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study uncovers a reciprocal relationship between dendrite geometry, the ability to generate nuclear calcium transients in response to synaptic inputs, and the subsequent induction of expression of plasticity-related and dendritic structure-preserving genes. Insufficient nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 hippocampal neurons and, consequently, reduced expression of the nuclear calcium target gene VEGFD, a dendrite maintenance factor, leads to reduced-complexity basal dendrites of CA1 neurons, which severely compromises the animals' consolidation of both memory and extinction memory. The structure-protective function of VEGFD may prove beneficial in psychiatric disorders as well as neurodegenerative and aging-related conditions that are associated with loss of neuronal structures, dysfunctional excitation-transcription coupling, and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376946-10$15.00/0.

  15. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte- rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection. PMID:7276828

  16. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon.

    PubMed

    Casali, P; Sissons, J G; Buchmeier, M J; Oldstone, M B

    1981-09-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte-rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection.

  17. Acquisition of tumor cell phenotypic diversity along the EMT spectrum under hypoxic pressure: Consequences on susceptibility to cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Terry, Stéphane; Buart, Stéphanie; Tan, Tuan Zea; Gros, Gwendoline; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Lorens, James B; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Thiery, Jean Paul; Chouaib, Salem

    2017-01-01

    Tumor escape to immunosurveillance and resistance to immune attacks present a major hurdle in cancer therapy, especially in the current era of new cancer immunotherapies. We report here that hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumors, orchestrates carcinoma cell heterogeneity through the induction of phenotypic diversity and the acquisition of distinct epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) states. Using lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from a non-metastatic patient, we demonstrated that hypoxic stress induced phenotypic diversity along the EMT spectrum, with induction of EMT transcription factors (EMT-TFs) SNAI1, SNAI2, TWIST1, and ZEB2 in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1A)-dependent or -independent manner. Analysis of hypoxia-exposed tumor subclones, with pronounced epithelial or mesenchymal phenotypes, revealed that mesenchymal subclones exhibited an increased propensity to resist cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell-mediated lysis by a mechanism involving defective immune synapse signaling. Additionally, targeting EMT-TFs, or inhibition of TGF-β signaling, attenuated mesenchymal subclone susceptibility to immune attack. Together, these findings uncover hypoxia-induced EMT and heterogeneity as a novel driving escape mechanism to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity, with the potential to provide new therapeutic opportunities for cancer patients.

  18. Earlier low-dose TBI or DST overcomes CD8+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance to allogeneic marrow in recipients of anti-CD40L.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Kurtz, Josef; Wekerle, Thomas; Ho, Leon; Sykes, Megan

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with a single injection of anti-CD40L (CD154) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and fully mismatched allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) allows rapid tolerization of CD4+ T cells to the donor. The addition of in vivo CD8 T-cell depletion leads to permanent mixed hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance. We now describe two approaches that obviate the requirement for CD8 T-cell depletion by rapidly tolerizing recipient CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 cells. Administration of donor-specific transfusion (DST) to mice receiving 3 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), BMT and anti-CD40L mAb on day 0 uniformly led to permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance, compared with only 40% of mice receiving similar treatment without DST. In the absence of DST, moving the timing of 3 Gy TBI to day -1 or day -2 instead of day 0 led to rapid (by 2 weeks) induction of CD8+ cell tolerance, and also permitted uniform achievement of permanent mixed chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in recipients of anti-CD40L and BMT on day 0. These nontoxic regimens overcome CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance without requiring host T-cell depletion, permitting the induction of permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance.

  19. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  20. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells identified as booster of T follicular helper cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants play an essential role in the induction of acquired immunity upon vaccination with protein antigen. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, a classical type of adjuvant made of DNA oligonucleotide containing CpG motifs, which has already been used in humans, is shown to boost humoral immunity primarily by acting on monocyte-derived dendritic cells. This study provides novel insight on the mode of action of adjuvant targeting Toll-like receptors. PMID:24803394

  2. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: can cell mediated immunity markers predict clinical outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Meliconi, R; Lalli, E; Borzì, R M; Sturani, C; Galavotti, V; Gunella, G; Miniero, R; Facchini, A; Gasbarrini, G

    1990-01-01

    Most of the cells found in lung parenchyma in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are activated T lymphocytes and macrophages. The serum levels of three markers of cell mediated immunity were measured in 20 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in 20 normal subjects and in 12 patients with sarcoidosis to evaluate their clinical and prognostic significance in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The three markers were: soluble CD8 (from activated suppressor-cytotoxic lymphocytes), soluble interleukin (IL)-2 receptors (from activated T cells and macrophages), and neopterin (from activated macrophages). Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis had higher levels of all three markers than the control subjects. Soluble IL-2 receptor and neopterin tended to be lower (though not significantly) in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis than in those with sarcoidosis, whereas soluble CD8 was similar in the two groups of patients. No correlation was found between soluble IL-2 receptors or soluble CD8 and the clinical, radiological, and physiological measures of disease activity or with clinical outcome (after a mean follow up of 23 months). Tumour necrosis factor levels were also determined. Only 30% of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or sarcoidosis had detectable circulating tumour necrosis factor; these patients had a lower percentage of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophils in their lavage fluid. Tumour necrosis factor levels did not correlate with clinical measures of severity or outcome. Thus our data support the hypothesis that cell mediated alveolitis occurs in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. They do not, however, provide evidence to support the use of these markers of cell mediated immunity to monitor the clinical course in these patients. PMID:2118691

  3. Cell-mediated Immunity and Antibodies to Herpesvirus hominis Type 1 in Oral Leukoplakia and Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T.; Wilton, J. M. A.; Shillitoe, E. J.; Ivanyi, L.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to Herpesvirus hominis type 1 (HVH1) and Candida albicans were studied in patients with leukoplakia, showing a histological spectrum of changes from epithelial keratosis to acanthosis and atypia, and in patients with carcinoma. The results were ranked according to increasing values of stimulation indices of lymphocyte transformation to HVH1, and the corresponding macrophage migration inhibition indices, and complement fixing antibody titres of each patient were correlated. This revealed that most patients with epithelial atypia were clustered to that end of the spectrum which had the highest stimulation and migration indices to HVH1; this relationship was not evident with C. albicans. In patients with keratosis and acanthosis there was a significant lack of correlation between lymphocyte transformation and migration inhibition to both HVH1 and C. albicans. In carcinoma the indices of lymphocyte transformation and migration inhibition to HVH1 and C. albicans were depressed. Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was found between lymphocyte transformation and migration inhibition to HVH1, unlike the positive correlation in control subjects. Complement fixing antibodies to HVH1, HVH2, cytomegalovirus and adenovirus, and fluorescent antibodies to C. albicans failed to show a significant change in titre in any one group of subjects tested. The results suggest a cell-mediated immune defect in leukoplakia, with a dissociation between lymphocyte transformation and macrophage migration inhibition to HVH1 and C. albicans in cases of keratosis or acanthosis. A specific increase in cell-mediated immunity to HVH1 in leukoplakia with epithelial atypia and the sequential changes argue in favour of a possible participation of HVH1 in carcinomatous transformation of some leukoplakias. PMID:4351511

  4. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  5. Cell mediated immunity after measles in Guinea-Bissau: historical cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, S. O.; Aaby, P.; Hall, A. J.; Barker, D. J.; Heyes, C. B.; Shiell, A. W.; Goudiaby, A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether children who have had measles have reduced general cell mediated immunity three years later compared with vaccinated children who have not had measles. DESIGN: Historical cohort study. SETTING: Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. SUBJECTS: 391 children aged 3-13 years who were living in Bissau during a measles epidemic in 1991 and still lived there. These included 131 primary cases and 139 secondary cases from the epidemic and 121 vaccinated controls with no history of measles. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: General cell mediated immunity assessed by measurement of delayed type hypersensitivity skin responses to seven recall antigens. Anergy was defined as a lack of response to all antigens. RESULTS: 82 out of 268 cases of measles (31%) were anergic compared with 20 of the 121 vaccinated controls (17%) (odds ratio adjusted for potential confounding variables 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.0); P 0.009). The prevalence of anergy was higher in secondary cases (33% (46/138)) than in primary cases (28% (36/130)), although this difference was not significant. Anergy was more common in the rainy season (unadjusted prevalence 31% (91/291) than in the dry season (11% (11/98)) (adjusted odds ratio 4.8 (2.2 to 10.3)). This seasonal increase occurred predominantly in the case of measles. CONCLUSION: Reduced general cell mediated immunity may contribute to the higher long term mortality in children who have had measles compared with recipients of standard measles vaccine and to the higher child mortality in the rainy season in west Africa. PMID:8892416

  6. Ornamental comb colour predicts T-cell-mediated immunity in male red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougeot, Francois

    2008-02-01

    Sexual ornaments might reliably indicate the ability to cope with parasites and diseases, and a better ability to mount a primary inflammatory response to a novel challenge. Carotenoid-based ornaments are amongst the commonest sexual signals of birds and often influence mate choice. Because carotenoids are immuno-stimulants, signallers may trade-off allocating these to ornamental colouration or using them for immune responses, so carotenoid-based ornaments might be particularly useful as honest indicators of immuno-compentence. Tetraonid birds, such as the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus, exhibit supra-orbital yellow red combs, a conspicuous ornament which functions in intra- and inter-sexual selection. The colour of combs is due to epidermal pigmentation by carotenoids, while their size is testosterone-dependent. In this study, I investigated whether comb characteristics, and in particular, comb colour, indicated immuno-competence in free-living male red grouse. I assessed T-cell-mediated immunity using a standardised challenge with phytohaemagglutinin. Red grouse combs reflect in the red and in the ultraviolet spectrum of light, which is not visible to humans but that grouse most likely see, so I measured comb colour across the whole bird visible spectrum (300 700 nm) using a reflectance spectrometer. I found that males with bigger and redder combs, but with less ultraviolet reflectance, had greater T-cell-mediated immune response. Comb colour predicted T-cell-mediated immune response better than comb size, indicating that the carotenoid-based colouration of this ornament might reliably signal this aspect of male quality.

  7. Ornamental comb colour predicts T-cell-mediated immunity in male red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus.

    PubMed

    Mougeot, Francois

    2008-02-01

    Sexual ornaments might reliably indicate the ability to cope with parasites and diseases, and a better ability to mount a primary inflammatory response to a novel challenge. Carotenoid-based ornaments are amongst the commonest sexual signals of birds and often influence mate choice. Because carotenoids are immuno-stimulants, signallers may trade-off allocating these to ornamental colouration or using them for immune responses, so carotenoid-based ornaments might be particularly useful as honest indicators of immuno-compentence. Tetraonid birds, such as the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus, exhibit supra-orbital yellow-red combs, a conspicuous ornament which functions in intra- and inter-sexual selection. The colour of combs is due to epidermal pigmentation by carotenoids, while their size is testosterone-dependent. In this study, I investigated whether comb characteristics, and in particular, comb colour, indicated immuno-competence in free-living male red grouse. I assessed T-cell-mediated immunity using a standardised challenge with phytohaemagglutinin. Red grouse combs reflect in the red and in the ultraviolet spectrum of light, which is not visible to humans but that grouse most likely see, so I measured comb colour across the whole bird visible spectrum (300-700 nm) using a reflectance spectrometer. I found that males with bigger and redder combs, but with less ultraviolet reflectance, had greater T-cell-mediated immune response. Comb colour predicted T-cell-mediated immune response better than comb size, indicating that the carotenoid-based colouration of this ornament might reliably signal this aspect of male quality.

  8. The PHA Test Reflects Acquired T-Cell Mediated Immunocompetence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Lemus, Jesús A.; Carrete, Martina; Blanco, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    Background cological immunology requires techniques to reliably measure immunocompetence in wild vertebrates. The PHA-skin test, involving subcutaneous injection of a mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) and measurement of subsequent swelling as a surrogate of T-cell mediated immunocompetence, has been the test of choice due to its practicality and ease of use in the field. However, mechanisms involved in local immunological and inflammatory processes provoked by PHA are poorly known, and its use and interpretation as an acquired immune response is currently debated. Methodology Here, we present experimental work using a variety of parrot species, to ascertain whether PHA exposure produces larger secondary than primary responses as expected if the test reflects acquired immunocompetence. Moreover, we simultaneously quantified T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD5+ and CD8+) and plasma proteins circulating in the bloodstream, potentially involved in the immunological and inflammatory processes, through flow cytometry and electrophoresis. Principal Findings Our results showed stronger responses after a second PHA injection, independent of species, time elapsed and changes in body mass of birds between first and second injections, thus supporting the adaptive nature of this immune response. Furthermore, the concomitant changes in the plasma concentrations of T-lymphocyte subsets and globulins indicate a causal link between the activation of the T-cell mediated immune system and local tissue swelling. Conclusions/Significance These findings justify the widespread use of the PHA-skin test as a reliable evaluator of acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in diverse biological disciplines. Further experimental research should be aimed at evaluating the relative role of innate immunocompetence in wild conditions, where the access to dietary proteins varies more than in captivity, and to ascertain how PHA responses relate to particular host-parasite interactions. PMID:18820730

  9. Concomitant detection of IFNα signature and activated monocyte/dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated subjects at early times after repeated local cytokine treatments.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Eleonora; Castiello, Luciano; Urbani, Francesca; Rizza, Paola; Panelli, Monica C; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Belardelli, Filippo

    2011-05-17

    Interferons alpha (IFNα) are the cytokines most widely used in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Among the immunomodulatory activities possibly involved in their therapeutic efficacy, the importance of IFNα effects on dendritic cells (DC) differentiation and activation has been considered. Despite several studies exploiting microarray technology to characterize IFNα mechanisms of action, there is currently no consensus on the core signature of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated individuals, as well as on the existence of blood genomic and proteomic markers of low-dose IFNα administered as a vaccine adjuvant. Gene profiling analysis with microarray was performed on PBMC isolated from melanoma patients and healthy individuals 24 hours after each repeated injection of low-dose IFNα, administered as vaccine adjuvant in two separate clinical trials. At the same time points, cytofluorimetric analysis was performed on CD14+ monocytes, to detect the phenotypic modifications exerted by IFNα on antigen presenting cells precursors. An IFNα signature was consistently observed in both clinical settings 24 hours after each repeated administration of the cytokine. The observed modulation was transient, and did not reach a steady state level refractory to further stimulations. The molecular signature observed ex vivo largely matched the one detected in CD14+ monocytes exposed in vitro to IFNα, including the induction of CXCL10 at the transcriptional and protein level. Interestingly, IFNα ex vivo signature was paralleled by an increase in the percentage and expression of costimulatory molecules by circulating CD14+/CD16+ monocytes, indicated as natural precursors of DC in response to danger signals. Our results provide new insights into the identification of a well defined molecular signature as biomarker of IFNα administered as immune adjuvants, and for the characterization of new molecular and cellular players

  10. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  11. A DEPRESSION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY TO MEASLES ANTIGEN IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Utermohlen, Virginia; Winfield, John B.; Zabriskie, John B.; Kunkel, Henry G.

    1974-01-01

    Using the direct migration inhibition test, response to measles antigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was found to be decreased when compared with that of normal subjects. No alteration was observed in similar experiments using parainfluenza type 1 and rubella antigens. The specific decrease in measles antigen effect showed no obvious correlation with activity of SLE or with the presence of lymphocytotoxic antibodies. Whether the specificity of the decrease in reactivity is due to some particular relationship between the measles virus or antigen and SLE, or to the possibility that measles reactivity is a more sensitive indicator of a generalized defect of cell-mediated immunity, remains unclear. PMID:4361242

  12. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity.

  13. In vivo dendrite regeneration after injury is different from dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2016-01-01

    Neurons receive information along dendrites and send signals along axons to synaptic contacts. The factors that control axon regeneration have been examined in many systems, but dendrite regeneration has been largely unexplored. Here we report that, in intact Drosophila larvae, a discrete injury that removes all dendrites induces robust dendritic growth that recreates many features of uninjured dendrites, including the number of dendrite branches that regenerate and responsiveness to sensory stimuli. However, the growth and patterning of injury-induced dendrites is significantly different from uninjured dendrites. We found that regenerated arbors cover much less territory than uninjured neurons, fail to avoid crossing over other branches from the same neuron, respond less strongly to mechanical stimuli, and are pruned precociously. Finally, silencing the electrical activity of the neurons specifically blocks injury-induced, but not developmental, dendrite growth. By elucidating the essential features of dendrites grown in response to acute injury, our work builds a framework for exploring dendrite regeneration in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27542831

  14. In vivo dendrite regeneration after injury is different from dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Peer, Katherine L; DeVault, Laura; Li, Tun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2016-08-01

    Neurons receive information along dendrites and send signals along axons to synaptic contacts. The factors that control axon regeneration have been examined in many systems, but dendrite regeneration has been largely unexplored. Here we report that, in intact Drosophila larvae, a discrete injury that removes all dendrites induces robust dendritic growth that recreates many features of uninjured dendrites, including the number of dendrite branches that regenerate and responsiveness to sensory stimuli. However, the growth and patterning of injury-induced dendrites is significantly different from uninjured dendrites. We found that regenerated arbors cover much less territory than uninjured neurons, fail to avoid crossing over other branches from the same neuron, respond less strongly to mechanical stimuli, and are pruned precociously. Finally, silencing the electrical activity of the neurons specifically blocks injury-induced, but not developmental, dendrite growth. By elucidating the essential features of dendrites grown in response to acute injury, our work builds a framework for exploring dendrite regeneration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Dendritic Growth in Undercooled Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic and morphological behavior of systems solidifying at small undercooling were investigated with emphasis on the role of convective and diffusive transport and the influence of gravity. A data base was established for pure succinonitrile which permits a comprehensive check on diffusional dendrite growth theory and the development of scaling laws to extend the theory to other material systems. A departure from diffusional-controlled growth was observed which becomes more significant at smaller undercoolings. A shuttle experiment is prepared to test the theory at the low undercoolings where convective effects begin to dominate.

  16. [Disseminated interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Ignacio M; Veltri, Mariano; Manzella, Diego J; Avagnina, María Alejandra; Pereyra, Pablo M; Chavín, Hernán C

    2017-01-01

    A 70 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a 3-month history of abdominal pain, weight loss and night sweats. On physical examination, she presented with a 5 cm diameter abdominal mass extended from epigastrium to the left flank, and at least three bilateral supraclavicular adenopathies. A disseminated interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma was diagnosed through a biopsy of the abdominal mass. After that, a CHOP regime (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) was iniciated. She died after completion of the first cycle of treatment, six months after diagnosis.

  17. Enhancement of immunologic tumor regression by intratumoral administration of dendritic cells in combination with cryoablative tumor pretreatment and Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall skeleton stimulation.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Kudo-Saito, Chie; Hasegawa, Go; Yano, Kazuhito; Yamamoto, Aiko; Yaguchi, Masae; Toda, Masahiro; Azuma, Ichiro; Iwai, Takehisa; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2006-12-15

    We developed an effective immunotherapy, which could induce antitumor immune responses against shared and unique tumor antigens expressed in autologous tumors. Intratumoral administration of dendritic cells is one of the individualized immunotherapies; however, the antitumor activity is relatively weak. In this study, we attempted to enhance the antitumor efficacy of the i.t. dendritic cell administration by combining dendritic cells stimulated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall skeleton (BCG-CWS) additionally with cryoablative pretreatment of tumors and analyzed the therapeutic mechanisms. These two modifications (cryoablation of tumors and BCG-CWS stimulation of dendritic cells) significantly increases the antitumor effect on both the treated tumor and the untreated tumor, which was distant at the opposite side, in a bilateral s.c. murine CT26 colon cancer model. Further analysis of the augmented antitumor effects revealed that the cryoablative pretreatment enhances the uptake of tumor antigens by the introduced dendritic cells, resulting in the induction of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells responsible for the in vivo tumor regression of both treated and remote untreated tumors. This novel combination i.t. dendritic cell immunotherapy was effective against well-established large tumors. The antitumor efficacy was further enhanced by depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. This novel dendritic cell immunotherapy with i.t. administration of BCG-CWS-treated dendritic cells following tumor cryoablation could be used for the therapy of cancer patients with multiple metastases.

  18. Increased levels of interleukin-10 in serum from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma correlate with profound numerical deficiencies and immature phenotype of circulating dendritic cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Beckebaum, Susanne; Zhang, Xia; Chen, Xiao; Yu, Zhengya; Frilling, Andrea; Dworacki, Grzegorz; Grosse-Wilde, Hans; Broelsch, Christoph Erich; Gerken, Guido; Cicinnati, Vito R

    2004-11-01

    Increased levels of interleukin (IL)-10 have been described as a negative prognostic indicator for survival in patients with various types of cancer. IL-10 exerts tolerogenic and immunosuppressive effects on dendritic cells, which are crucial for the induction of an antitumor immune response. Blood dendritic cell antigen (BDCA)-2 and BDCA-4 are specifically expressed by CD123(bright) CD11c- plasmacytoid dendritic cells; whereas BDCA-1 and BDCA-3 define 2 distinct subsets of CD11c+ myeloid dendritic cells. In this study, the T-helper cell (Th)1/Th2 cytokine serum profile of 65 hepatocellular carcinoma patients was assessed. We found that serum levels of IL-10 were substantially increased in hepatocellular carcinoma patients as compared with controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers were exposed to recombinant human (rh)IL-10 in vitro to additionally characterize its impact on distinct blood dendritic cell subsets. A dramatic decrease of all myeloid dendritic cell (MDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) subsets was detectable after 24 hours of continuous rhIL-10 exposure. Moreover, the expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86, was significantly reduced on rhIL-10-treated dendritic cell subsets. Direct ex vivo flow cytometric analysis of various dendritic cell subpopulations in peripheral blood from hepatocellular carcinoma patients revealed an immature phenotype and a substantial reduction of circulating dendritic cells that was associated with increased IL-10 concentrations in serum and with tumor progression. These findings confirm a predominantly immunosuppressive role of IL-10 for circulating dendritic cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and, thus, may indicate novel aspects of tumor immune evasion.

  19. Antigen-presenting dendritic cells rescue CD4-depleted CCR2-/- mice from lethal Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Wendy A; Deepe, George S

    2010-05-01

    Excessive production of interleukin-4 impairs clearance of the fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR2. An increase in the interleukin-4 level is associated with decreased recruitment of dendritic cells to lungs; therefore, we investigated the possibility that these cells influence interleukin-4 production. Adoptive transfer of wild-type or CCR2(-/-) bone marrow-derived dendritic cells loaded with heat-killed yeast cells to infected CCR2(-/-) mice suppressed interleukin-4 transcription. Surprisingly, transfer of cells did not reduce the fungal burden despite the fact that it limited interleukin-4 transcription. Yeast cell-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cell-mediated regulation of interleukin-4 transcription was dependent on major histocompatibility complex II antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells. We previously showed that CD4(+) T cells were a source of interleukin-4 in infected CCR2(-/-) mice, but their contribution to the TH2 phenotype was unclear. Here we demonstrated that these cells were functionally important since elimination of them prior to infection, but not elimination of them at the time of infection, reduced the interleukin-4 level in infected CCR2(-/-) mice. However, the fungal burden was reduced only in CD4-depleted CCR2(-/-) mice that received yeast cell-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Taken together, the data indicate that generation of excess interleukin-4 in lungs of H. capsulatum-infected CCR2(-/-) mice is at least partially a consequence of decreased recruitment of dendritic cells capable of antigen presentation. Furthermore, CD4(+) T cells had a deleterious impact on immunity in infected CCR2(-/-) mice.

  20. Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells Rescue CD4-Depleted CCR2−/− Mice from Lethal Histoplasma capsulatum Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Wendy A.; Deepe, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive production of interleukin-4 impairs clearance of the fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR2. An increase in the interleukin-4 level is associated with decreased recruitment of dendritic cells to lungs; therefore, we investigated the possibility that these cells influence interleukin-4 production. Adoptive transfer of wild-type or CCR2−/− bone marrow-derived dendritic cells loaded with heat-killed yeast cells to infected CCR2−/− mice suppressed interkeukin-4 transcription. Surprisingly, transfer of cells did not reduce the fungal burden despite the fact that it limited interleukin-4 transcription. Yeast cell-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cell-mediated regulation of interleukin-4 transcription was dependent on major histocompatibility complex II antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells. We previously showed that CD4+ T cells were a source of interleukin-4 in infected CCR2−/− mice, but their contribution to the TH2 phenotype was unclear. Here we demonstrated that these cells were functionally important since elimination of them prior to infection, but not elimination of them at the time of infection, reduced the interleukin-4 level in infected CCR2−/− mice. However, the fungal burden was reduced only in CD4-depleted CCR2−/− mice that received yeast cell-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Taken together, the data indicate that generation of excess interleukin-4 in lungs of H. capsulatum-infected CCR2−/− mice is at least partially a consequence of decreased recruitment of dendritic cells capable of antigen presentation. Furthermore, CD4+ T cells had a deleterious impact on immunity in infected CCR2−/− mice. PMID:20194586

  1. Convection and diffusion effects during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S.-C.

    1979-01-01

    A report is presented of the first quantitative measurements of dendritic growth at supercooling levels where convection instead of diffusion is the controlling heat transfer mechanism. Precautions similar to that used in an investigation conducted by Glicksman et al. (1976) were taken to insure 'free' dendritic growth conditions. Dendritic growth velocity was measured as a function of growth orientation at seventeen supercoolings which ranged from 0.043 C to 2 C. Selected but representative measurements of velocity versus orientation angle are shown in a graph. The relative growth velocity of a downward growing dendrite is found to be greater than that of a diffusion-limited dendrite. This result is consistent with that expected from the enhanced heat transfer arising from natural convection.

  2. Isolation and generation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita; Archer, Gerald E; Tedder, Thomas F

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells (APC), which may be isolated or generated from human blood mononuclear cells. Although mature blood dendritic cells normally represent ∼0.2% of human blood mononuclear cells, their frequency can be greatly increased using the cell enrichment methods described in this unit. More highly purified dendritic cell preparations can be obtained from these populations by sorting of fluorescence-labeled cells. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be generated from monocytes by culture with the appropriate cytokines, as described here. In addition, a negative selection approach is provided that may be employed to generate cell preparations that have been depleted of dendritic cells to be used for comparison in functional studies.

  3. Novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics but with combinations and probability: bystanders in bulk effector cells influence results of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2011-07-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays are widely implemented to evaluate cell-mediated cytotoxic activity, and some assays are analyzed using the analogy of enzyme kinetics. In the analogy, the effector cell is regarded as the enzyme, the target cell as the substrate, the effector cell-target cell conjugate as the enzyme-substrate complex and the dead target cell as the product. However, the assumptions analogous to those of enzyme kinetics are not always true in cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, and the parameter analogous to the Michaelis-Menten constant is not constant but is dependent on the number of effector cells. Therefore I present novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics. I instead use combinations and probability, because analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays by applying enzyme kinetics seems controversial. With my original models, I demonstrate simulations of the data in previously published papers. The results are exhibited in the same forms as the corresponding data. Comparing the simulation results with the published data, the results seem to agree well with the data. From simulations of cytotoxic assays with bulk effector cells, it appears that bystanders in bulk effector cells increase both the cytotoxic activity and the motility of effector cells.

  4. In vitro enhancement of human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity by purified influenza virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, D J; Houde, M; Justewicz, D M; Mandeville, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of the glycoproteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) in the in vitro stimulation of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) or natural killer activity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated with radiolabeled K562 cells as target cells in an overnight chromium release assay. Three different approaches were used. (i) Purified viral proteins were obtained by extraction with Nonidet P-40, separation on a sucrose gradient, and further purification by affinity chromatography. Ficoll-Hypaque-purified peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to HA or NA individually or to a mixture of both significantly increased NCMC (32 to 50%). (ii) Treatment of HA and NA with their respective homologous antisera or F(ab')2 antibody abrogated the stimulation of NCMC by these glycoproteins. (iii) Virions treated with proteolytic enzymes resulted in viral cores lacking either HA or NA or both activities. Compared to whole virions, viral cores devoid of HA activity only induced a 50% increase in NCMC, whereas viral cores lacking HA activity and with traces of NA activity stimulated only 10% of the NCMC. These results suggest that influenza virus-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity is largely due to its glycoproteins. PMID:6387178

  5. Cordyceps militaris Enhances Cell-Mediated Immunity in Healthy Korean Men.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Joon; Baik, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sang Jung; Lee, Seong Gyu; Ahn, Hong Yup; Park, Ju Sang; Park, Sang Jong; Jang, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang Woon; Choi, Jin Young; Sung, Ji Hee; Lee, Seung Min

    2015-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a mushroom traditionally used for diverse pharmaceutical purposes in East Asia, including China, and has been found to be effective for enhancing immunity through various types of animal testing. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of C. militaris for enhancing cell-mediated immunity and its safety in healthy male adults. Healthy male adults were divided into the experimental group (n = 39), given 1.5 g/day of ethanol treated C. militaris in capsules, and the control group (n = 40), given the same number of identical placebo capsules filled with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose for 4 weeks from February 13 to March 14, 2012; the natural killer (NK) cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation index (PI), and T-helper cell 1 (Th1) cytokine cluster (interferon [IFN]-γ, interleukin [IL]-12, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) were measured, along with stability test, at weeks 0, 2, and 4. The C. militaris group showed a statistically significant greater increase in NK200 (P = .0010), lymphocyte PI (P ≤ .0001), IL-2 (P = .0096), and IFN-γ (P = .0126), compared with the basal level, than the placebo group. There was no statistically significant adverse reaction. C. militaris enhanced the NK cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation and partially increased Th1 cytokine secretion. Therefore, C. militaris is safe and effective for enhancing cell-mediated immunity of healthy male adults.

  6. The role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Saparov, Arman; Chen, Chien-Wen; Beckman, Sarah A; Wang, Yadong; Huard, Johnny

    2013-08-06

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play major roles in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease including myocardial infarction (MI). The pathological progression following MI is very complex and involves a number of cell populations including cells localized within the heart, as well as cells recruited from the circulation and other tissues that participate in inflammatory and reparative processes. These cells, with their secretory factors, have pleiotropic effects that depend on the stage of inflammation and regeneration. Excessive inflammation leads to enlargement of the infarction site, pathological remodeling and eventually, heart dysfunction. Stem cell therapy represents a unique and innovative approach to ameliorate oxidative stress and inflammation caused by ischemic heart disease. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the crosstalk between stem cells and other cells involved in post-MI cardiac tissue repair, especially immune cells, in order to harness the beneficial effects of the immune response following MI and further improve stem cell-mediated cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the recent findings on the role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair following ischemic heart disease, particularly acute MI and focuses specifically on mesenchymal, muscle and blood-vessel-derived stem cells due to their antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties.

  7. Tetherin promotes the innate and adaptive cell-mediated immune response against retrovirus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sam X; Barrett, Bradley S; Heilman, Karl J; Messer, Ronald J; Liberatore, Rachel A; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Santiago, Mario L

    2014-07-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that could directly inhibit retroviral particle release by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, the immunological impact of Tetherin during retrovirus infection remains unknown. We now show that Tetherin influences antiretroviral cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast to the direct antiviral effects of Tetherin, which are dependent on cell surface expression, the immunomodulatory effects are linked to the endocytosis of the molecule. Mice encoding endocytosis-competent C57BL/6 Tetherin exhibited lower viremia and pathology at 7 d postinfection with Friend retrovirus (FV) compared with mice encoding endocytosis-defective NZW/LacJ Tetherin. Notably, antiretroviral protection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. In addition, Friend retrovirus infection levels were significantly lower in wild-type C57BL/6 mice than in Tetherin knockout mice at 2 wk postinfection, and antiretroviral protection correlated with stronger NK cell and virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The results demonstrate that Tetherin acts as a modulator of the cell-mediated immune response against retrovirus infection in vivo.

  8. Natural killer cell-mediated lysis of autologous cells modified by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, C; Capanni, M; Albi, N; Volpi, I; Urbani, E; Ruggeri, L; Mencarelli, A; Grignani, F; Velardi, A

    1999-06-21

    This study investigated the role of natural killer (NK) cells as effectors of an immune response against autologous cells modified by gene therapy. T lymphocytes were transduced with LXSN, a retroviral vector adopted for human gene therapy that carries the selectable marker gene neo, and the autologous NK response was evaluated. We found that (i) infection with LXSN makes cells susceptible to autologous NK cell-mediated lysis; (ii) expression of the neo gene is responsible for conferring susceptibility to lysis; (iii) lysis of neo-expressing cells is clonally distributed and mediated only by NK clones that exhibit human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-Bw4 specificity and bear KIR3DL1, a Bw4-specific NK inhibitory receptor; and (iv) the targets are cells from HLA-Bw4(+) individuals. Finally, neo peptides anchoring to the Bw4 allele HLA-B27 interfered with KIR3DL1-mediated recognition of HLA-B27, i.e., they triggered NK lysis. Moreover, neo gene mutations preventing translation of two of the four potentially nonprotective peptides reduced KIR3DL1(+) NK clone-mediated autologous lysis. Thus, individuals expressing Bw4 alleles possess an NK repertoire with the potential to eliminate autologous cells modified by gene therapy. By demonstrating that NK cells can selectively detect the expression of heterologous genes, these observations provide a general model of the NK cell-mediated control of viral infections.

  9. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  10. Fas and its ligand in a general mechanism of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Hanabuchi, S; Koyanagi, M; Kawasaki, A; Shinohara, N; Matsuzawa, A; Nishimura, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Yonehara, S; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, we estimated the involvement of apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule on the target cells and its ligand on the effector cells. When redirected by ConA or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a CD4+ T-cell clone, BK1, could lyse the target cells expressing wild-type Fas molecule but not those expressing death signaling-deficient mutants. This indicates the involvement of Fas-mediated signal transduction in the target cell lysis by BK1. Anti-CD3-activated but not resting BK1 expressed Fas ligand as detected by binding of a soluble Fas-Ig fusion protein, and the BK1-mediated cytotoxicity was blocked by the addition of Fas-Ig, implicating the inducible Fas ligand in the BK1 cytotoxicity. Ability to exert the Fas-mediated cytotoxicity was not confined to BK1, but splenic CD4+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD8+ T cells could also exert the Fas-dependent target cell lysis. This indicates that the Fas-mediated target cell lytic pathway can be generally involved in the T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, CD4+ T cells prepared from gld/gld mice did not mediate the Fas-mediated cytotoxicity, indicating defective expression of functional Fas ligand in gld mice. PMID:7515183

  11. ITIM-dependent negative signaling pathways for the control of cell-mediated xenogeneic immune responses.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Seebach, Jörg D; Fernández-Renedo, Carlos; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is an innovative field of research with the potential to provide us with an alternative source of organs to face the severe shortage of human organ donors. For several reasons, pigs have been chosen as the most suitable source of organs and tissues for transplantation in humans. However, porcine xenografts undergo cellular immune responses representing a major barrier to their acceptance and normal functioning. Innate and adaptive xenogeneic immunity is mediated by both the recognition of xenogeneic tissue antigens and the lack of inhibition due to molecular cross-species incompatibilities of regulatory pathways. Therefore, the delivery of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-dependent and related negative signals to control innate (NK cells, macrophages) and adaptive T and B cells might overcome cell-mediated xenogeneic immunity. The proof of this concept has already been achieved in vitro by the transgenic overexpression of human ligands of several inhibitory receptors in porcine cells resulting in their resistance against xenoreactivity. Consequently, several transgenic pigs expressing tissue-specific human ligands of inhibitory coreceptors (HLA-E, CD47) or soluble competitors of costimulation (belatacept) have already been generated. The development of these robust and innovative approaches to modulate human anti-pig cellular immune responses, complementary to conventional immunosuppression, will help to achieve long-term xenograft survival. In this review, we will focus on the current strategies to enhance negative signaling pathways for the regulation of undesirable cell-mediated xenoreactive immune responses.

  12. Listeria monocytogenes-Induced Cell Death Inhibits the Generation of Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Erin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influence of cell death on adaptive immunity has been studied for decades. Despite these efforts, the intricacies of how various cell death pathways shape immune responses in the context of infection remain unclear, particularly with regard to more recently discovered pathways such as pyroptosis. The emergence of Listeria monocytogenes as a promising immunotherapeutic platform demands a thorough understanding of how cell death induced in the context of infection influences the generation of CD8+ T-cell-mediated immune responses. To begin to address this question, we designed strains of L. monocytogenes that robustly activate necrosis, apoptosis, or pyroptosis. We hypothesized that proinflammatory cell death such as necrosis would be proimmunogenic while apoptosis would be detrimental, as has previously been reported in the context of sterile cell death. Surprisingly, we found that the activation of any host cell death in the context of L. monocytogenes infection inhibited the generation of protective immunity and specifically the activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Importantly, the mechanism of attenuation was unique for each type of cell death, ranging from deficits in costimulation in the context of necrosis to a suboptimal inflammatory milieu in the case of pyroptosis. Our results suggest that cell death in the context of infection is different from sterile-environment-induced cell death and that inhibition of cell death or its downstream consequences is necessary for developing effective cell-mediated immune responses using L. monocytogenes-based immunotherapeutic platforms. PMID:27821585