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Sample records for dengue em larvas

  1. Dengue virus detection in Aedes aegypti larvae from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cecílio, Samyra Giarola; Júnior, Willer Ferreira Silva; Tótola, Antônio Helvécio; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; de Magalhães, José Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The transmission of dengue, the most important arthropod-borne viral disease in Brazil, has been intensified over the past decades, along with the accompanying expansion and adaptation of its Aedes vectors. In the present study, we mapped dengue vectors in Ouro Preto and Ouro Branco, Minas Gerais, by installing ovitraps in 32 public schools. The traps were examined monthly between September, 2011 through July, 2012 and November, 2012 to April, 2013. The larvae were reared until the fourth stadium and identified according to species. The presence of dengue virus was detected by real time PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis. A total of 1,945 eggs was collected during the 17 months of the study. The Ovitrap Positivity Index (OPI) ranged from 0 to 28.13% and the Eggs Density Index (EDI) ranged from 0 to 59.9. The predominant species was Aedes aegypti, with 84.9% of the hatched larvae. Although the collection was low when compared to other ovitraps studies, vertical transmission could be detected. Of the 54 pools, dengue virus was detected in four Ae. aegypti pools. PMID:26047186

  2. Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue is an infection caused by a virus. You can get it if an infected mosquito bites you. Dengue does not spread from person to person. It ... the world. Outbreaks occur in the rainy season. Dengue is rare in the United States. Symptoms include ...

  3. Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology Transmission, information on epidemics and stats... Entomology & Ecology Mosquito that spreads dengue and its ecology... Clinical & Laboratory Guidance Tools for clinicians and laboratorians... ...

  4. Dengue.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2007-11-10

    The four dengue viruses are transmitted in tropical countries that circle the globe. All can cause syndromes that are self-limited or severe. The common severe syndrome--dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS)--is characterised by sudden vascular permeability generated by cytokines released when T cells attack dengue-infected cells. Dengue 1 virus became prevalent in Hawaii where it was transmitted by Aedes albopictus, producing a classic virgin soil epidemic, with clinical disease seen largely in adults. In Cuba and Singapore, sequential dengue infections at long intervals produced unusually severe disease in adults. Evidence suggests that enhancing and cross-reactive neutralising antibodies regulate dengue epidemics and disease severity. Classic DHF/DSS arises during initial dengue infections in infants with low circulating amounts of maternal dengue antibodies, an observation that precludes an exclusive causal role for secondary T-cell responses. Here, I review and discuss data on clinical diagnosis and pathophysiology of vascular permeability and coagulopathy, parenteral treatment of DHF/DSS, and new laboratory tests.

  5. DENGUE VIRUS. Cryo-EM structure of an antibody that neutralizes dengue virus type 2 by locking E protein dimers.

    PubMed

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Ibarra, Kristie D; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Smith, Scott A; Tan, Joanne L; Lim, Xin-Ni; Ooi, Justin S G; Kostyuchenko, Victor A; Wang, Jiaqi; de Silva, Aravinda M; Harris, Eva; Crowe, James E; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2015-07-01

    There are four closely-related dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. Infection with one serotype generates antibodies that may cross-react and enhance infection with other serotypes in a secondary infection. We demonstrated that DENV serotype 2 (DENV2)-specific human monoclonal antibody (HMAb) 2D22 is therapeutic in a mouse model of antibody-enhanced severe dengue disease. We determined the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of HMAb 2D22 complexed with two different DENV2 strains. HMAb 2D22 binds across viral envelope (E) proteins in the dimeric structure, which probably blocks the E protein reorganization required for virus fusion. HMAb 2D22 "locks" two-thirds of or all dimers on the virus surface, depending on the strain, but neutralizes these DENV2 strains with equal potency. The epitope defined by HMAb 2D22 is a potential target for vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26138979

  6. Bioactivity of seagrass against the dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M Syed; Ravikumar, S; Beula, J Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify the larvicidal activity of the seagrass extracts. Methods Seagrass extracts, Syringodium isoetifolium (S. isoetifolium), Cymodocea serrulata and Halophila beccarii, were dissolved in DMSO to prepare a graded series of concentration. Batches of 25 early 4th instars larvae of Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti) were transferred to 250 mL enamel bowl containing 199 mL of distilled water and 1 mL of plant extracts (0.01 mg – 0.1 mg). After 24 h the mortality rate was identified with the formulae [(% of test mortality – % of control mortality)/(100 – % of control mortality)] × 100. Each experiment was conducted with three replicates and a concurrent control group. A control group consisted of 1 mL of DMSO and 199 mL of distilled water only. Results : The root extract of S. isoetifolium showed maximum larvicidal activity with minimum concentration of extract of LC50= 0.0 604 ± 0.0 040)µg/mL with lower confidence limit (LCL) – upper confidence limit (UCL) = (0.051–0.071) and LC90=0.0 972µg/mL followed by leaf extract of S. isoetifolium showed LC50= (0.062 ± 0.005)µg/mL. The regression equation of root and leaf extract of S. isoetifolium for 4th instar larvae were Y= 4.909 + 1.32x (R2= 0.909) and Y= 2.066 + 1.21x (R2 =0.897) respectively. The results of the preliminary phytochemical constituents shows the presence of saponin, steroids, terpenoid, phenols, protein and sugars. Conclusions From the present study the ethanolic extracts of seagrass of S. isoetifolium possesses lead compound for development of larvicidal activity. PMID:23569973

  7. Effect of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles from filtrate of Trichoderma harzianum against larvae and pupa of dengue vector Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Sundaravadivelan, Chandran; Padmanabhan, Madanagopal Nalini

    2014-03-01

    Mosquitoes transmit dreadful diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. Therefore, screening for larvicidal and pupicidal activity of microbial extracts attributes could lead to development of new and improved mosquito control methods that are economical and safe for nontarget organisms and are ecofriendly. Synthetic chemical insecticides occupy predominant position in control strategies. These hazardous chemicals exert unwarranted toxicity and lethal effects on nontarget organisms, develop physiological resistance in target, and cause adverse environmental effect. For vector control, fungal-mediated natural products have been a priority in this area at present. In the current study, effective larvicidal and pupicidal effect of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using an entomopathogenic fungi Trichoderma harzianum against developmental stages of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti was investigated. An attractive possibility of green nanotechnology is to use microorganisms in the synthesis of nanosilver especially Ag NPs. The mycosynthesized Ag NPs were characterized to find their unique properties through UV-visible spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared, and surface characteristics by scanning electron microscopy. To analyze the bioefficacy, different test concentrations for extracellular filtrate (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 %) and Ag NPs (0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 %) were prepared to a final volume of 200 mL using deionized water; 20 larvae of each instars (I-IV) and pupa were exposed to each test concentration separately which included a set of control (distilled water) group with five replicates. Characterization of the synthesized Ag NPs were about 10-20 nm without aggregation. Susceptibility of larval instars to synthesized Ag NPs was higher than the extracellular filtrate of T. harzianum alone after 24-h exposure, where the highest mortality was recorded as 92 and 96 % for first and second instars and

  8. Effect of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles from filtrate of Trichoderma harzianum against larvae and pupa of dengue vector Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Sundaravadivelan, Chandran; Padmanabhan, Madanagopal Nalini

    2014-03-01

    Mosquitoes transmit dreadful diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. Therefore, screening for larvicidal and pupicidal activity of microbial extracts attributes could lead to development of new and improved mosquito control methods that are economical and safe for nontarget organisms and are ecofriendly. Synthetic chemical insecticides occupy predominant position in control strategies. These hazardous chemicals exert unwarranted toxicity and lethal effects on nontarget organisms, develop physiological resistance in target, and cause adverse environmental effect. For vector control, fungal-mediated natural products have been a priority in this area at present. In the current study, effective larvicidal and pupicidal effect of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using an entomopathogenic fungi Trichoderma harzianum against developmental stages of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti was investigated. An attractive possibility of green nanotechnology is to use microorganisms in the synthesis of nanosilver especially Ag NPs. The mycosynthesized Ag NPs were characterized to find their unique properties through UV-visible spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared, and surface characteristics by scanning electron microscopy. To analyze the bioefficacy, different test concentrations for extracellular filtrate (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 %) and Ag NPs (0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 %) were prepared to a final volume of 200 mL using deionized water; 20 larvae of each instars (I-IV) and pupa were exposed to each test concentration separately which included a set of control (distilled water) group with five replicates. Characterization of the synthesized Ag NPs were about 10-20 nm without aggregation. Susceptibility of larval instars to synthesized Ag NPs was higher than the extracellular filtrate of T. harzianum alone after 24-h exposure, where the highest mortality was recorded as 92 and 96 % for first and second instars and

  9. Detection of dengue virus in platelets isolated from dengue patients.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Gibbons, Robert V; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Jairungsri, Aroonroong; Ajariyakhajorn, Chuanpis; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G; Malasit, Prida; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2009-03-01

    Though thrombocytopenia or dysfunction of platelets is common in dengue virus infection, the role of platelets has not been established. We enrolled 33 hospitalized children with serologically confirmed dengue virus infection. Blood specimens were collected during hospitalization. Platelets and plasma were isolated from the whole blood. Detection of dengue virus in plasma and platelets was carried out by RT-PCR with primers that can differentiate different dengue serotypes simultaneously, and by electron transmission microscopy (EM). Dengue viral RNA was detected in the platelets and plasma by conventional RT-PCR. A significantly higher percentage of dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets than in plasma (p = 0.03). Platelets isolated 5 days after onset of fever were most likely positive for viral RNA. Concurrent infection or co-circulation with multiple dengue serotypes was observed in 12% of patients. Infrequently, negative-stranded dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets and in plasma. Importantly, EM confirmed the presence of dengue viral-like particles inside platelets prepared from dengue patients. Our findings suggest the presence of dengue virus in platelets may be associated with the dysfunction of platelets observed in dengue patients.

  10. Dengue Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... the southern U. S., dengue is endemic in northern Mexico, and the U.S. population has no immunity, the ... south Texas in 2005. (Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever - U.S.- Mexico Border, 2005 ) A small dengue outbreak occurred in ...

  11. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, ... Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect Repellents With DEET ...

  12. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Button Leading research to understand, treat, and prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases NIAID Home Health & ... NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Dengue Fever > Understanding Dengue Fever Understanding Cause Transmission Symptoms ...

  13. Dengue Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dengue Fever” will be included in “Health Information for International Travel, 2007-2008” which will be published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are viral diseases transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The disease is found in tropical and s...

  14. Multiple dengue virus types harbored by individual mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Angel, Bennet; Angel, Annette; Joshi, Vinod

    2015-10-01

    The existing knowledge on pathogenesis and aetiology of DHF establishes that Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) are caused by two subsequent infections of two different serotypes of dengue affecting a common human population with a time gap. Present studies have been undertaken on 212 laboratory reared infected individual mosquitoes from larvae collected from 31 dengue endemic towns of Rajasthan, India. Type specific DEN viruses were detected from individual mosquitoes employing RT-PCR. In 78.7% of 212 infected individual mosquitoes studied, vertically transmitted multiple DENV types were observed. We report for the first time that single mosquitoes contain multiple dengue virus types.

  15. Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ted M

    2010-03-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus affecting humans today. The virus group consists of 4 serotypes that manifest with similar symptoms. Dengue causes a spectrum of disease, ranging from a mild febrile illness to a life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. Breeding sites for the mosquitoes that transmit dengue virus have proliferated, partly because of population growth and uncontrolled urbanization in tropical and subtropical countries. Successful vector control programs have also been eliminated, often because of lack of governmental funding. Dengue viruses have evolved rapidly as they have spread worldwide, and genotypes associated with increased virulence have spread across Asia and the Americas. This article describes the virology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations and outcomes, and treatments/vaccines associated with dengue infection.

  16. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1998-07-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to develop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  17. Dengue conundrums.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Robert V

    2010-11-01

    Dengue virus is the most common arboviral infection of humans in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This review briefly describes some of the challenges it presents. Dengue is an emerging disease; it is increasing in geographical distribution and severity, despite being significantly underreported. The World Health Organization case definition for the generally more severe manifestation of infection, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), is controversial. The name DHF is something of a misnomer as the disease infrequently results in frank haemorrhage; the hallmark of DHF is actually plasma leakage. The existence of four closely related dengue virus serotypes contributes to difficulties in diagnosis and to original antigenic sin in the serological response to infection. The existence of multiple serotypes can result in more severe disease upon a second infection and complicates vaccine development. Nevertheless, a safe and effective vaccine is the greatest prospect for stemming the tide of dengue.

  18. [Dengue vaccines].

    PubMed

    Morita, Kouichi

    2008-10-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito borne virus infection in the tropics. Based on the effects of global warming, it is expected that dengue epidemic areas will further expand in the next decades unless effective and affordable vaccines are made available soon. At the moment, several vaccine developers have utilized live-attenuated live tetravalent vaccines and two of them have already completed phase two trials. However, the risk of antibody-dependent enhancement infection is not well elucidated and thus further and careful evaluation of the safety on proposed candidate vaccines are essential. At the moment, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation strongly support the vaccine development through the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

  19. Dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Payling, K J

    1997-04-01

    Dengue fever, and its more serious haemorrhagic form, is increasingly being found among UK travellers to tropical and sub-tropical countries. This Update examines transmission, the main symptoms and nursing care of affected people.

  20. Dengue fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... and netting can help reduce the risk of mosquito bites that can spread dengue fever and other infections. Limit outdoor activity during mosquito season, especially when they are most active, at ...

  1. [Dengue fever].

    PubMed

    Pick, N; Potasman, I

    1995-07-01

    Dengue fever is a viral disease, transmitted to man via mosquito bites. It is endemic in tropical regions (10 million infected annually) and is characterized by high fever, headache, myalgia, lethargy, vomiting, rash and neutropenia. The upward trend in the number of young Israelis visiting tropical countries increases the number of those potentially exposed to this disease. We present 4 Israelis who returned with dengue fever from Thailand.

  2. Dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria G; Gubler, Duane J; Izquierdo, Alienys; Martinez, Eric; Halstead, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics and local spatial variation in dengue virus transmission is strongly influenced by rainfall, temperature, urbanization and distribution of the principal mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. Currently, endemic dengue virus transmission is reported in the Eastern Mediterranean, American, South-East Asian, Western Pacific and African regions, whereas sporadic local transmission has been reported in Europe and the United States as the result of virus introduction to areas where Ae. aegypti and Aedes albopictus, a secondary vector, occur. The global burden of the disease is not well known, but its epidemiological patterns are alarming for both human health and the global economy. Dengue has been identified as a disease of the future owing to trends toward increased urbanization, scarce water supplies and, possibly, environmental change. According to the WHO, dengue control is technically feasible with coordinated international technical and financial support for national programmes. This Primer provides a general overview on dengue, covering epidemiology, control, disease mechanisms, diagnosis, treatment and research priorities. PMID:27534439

  3. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rigau-Pérez, J G; Clark, G G; Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Sanders, E J; Vorndam, A V

    1998-09-19

    The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue have greatly increased in recent years. Dengue is an acute mosquito-transmitted viral disease characterised by fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, rash, nausea, and vomiting. Some infections result in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), a syndrome that in its most severe form can threaten the patient's life, primarily through increased vascular permeability and shock. The case fatality rate in patients with dengue shock syndrome can be as high as 44%. For decades, two distinct hypotheses to explain the mechanism of DHF have been debated-secondary infection or viral virulence. However, a combination of both now seems to be the plausible explanation. The geographical expansion of DHF presents the need for well-documented clinical, epidemiological, and virological descriptions of the syndrome in the Americas. Biological and social research are essential to develop effective mosquito control, medications to reduce capillary leakage, and a safe tetravalent vaccine.

  4. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hayes, E B; Gubler, D J

    1992-04-01

    Hundreds of thousands of dengue cases are reported worldwide each year. Given the difficulty in obtaining full reporting, the actual number of human infections is probably much higher than the number reported. Dengue is usually a nonspecific febrile illness that resolves with supportive therapy but the clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe hemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. The pathophysiology of the severe forms of dengue may be related to sequential infection with different serotypes, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental and host factors or a combination of these factors. Control of dengue at the present time is dependent on control of the principal vector mosquito, A. aegypti. Efforts to achieve such control are now focusing on community education and action towards eliminating this mosquito's breeding sites near human dwellings. Vaccine development continues, but at present the only way to avoid dengue in an area where it is endemic or epidemic is to use repellents and mosquito barriers. The movement of people to and from tropical areas makes dengue an important differential diagnosis in any patient with an acute illness and history of recent travel to tropical areas. Because of continued infestation of the southeastern United States with A. aegypti, indigenous transmission in the continental United States remains a public health concern.

  5. Aedes aegypti Global Suitability Maps Using a Water Container Energy Balance Model for Dengue Risk Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, D.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue infections are estimated to total nearly 400 million per year worldwide, with both the geographic range and the magnitude of infections having increased in the past 50 years. The primary dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti is closely associated with humans. It lives exclusively in urban and semi-urban areas, preferentially bites humans, and spends its developmental stages in artificial water containers. Climate regulates the development of Ae. aegypti immature mosquitoes in artificial containers. Potential containers for Ae. aegypti immature development include, but are not limited to, small sundry items (e.g., bottles, cans, plastic containers), buckets, tires, barrels, tanks, and cisterns. Successful development of immature mosquitoes from eggs to larvae, pupae, and eventually adults is largely dependent on the availability of water and the thermal properties of the water in the containers. Recent work has shown that physics-based approaches toward modeling container water properties are promising for resolving the complexities of container water dynamics and the effects on immature mosquito development. An energy balance container model developed by the author, termed the Water Height And Temperature in Container Habitats Energy Model (WHATCH'EM), solves for water temperature and height for user-specified containers with readily available weather data. Here we use WHATCH'EM with NASA Earth Science products used as input to construct global suitability maps based on established water temperature ranges for immature Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. A proxy for dengue risk is provided from habitat suitability, but also population estimates, as Ae. aegypti is closely associated with human activity. NASA gridded Global Population of the World data is used to mask out rural areas with low dengue risk. Suitability maps are illustrated for a variety of containers (size, material, color) and shading scenarios.

  6. Dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Simasathien, Sriluck; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai

    2005-11-01

    Dengue is an expanding health problem. About two-fifths of the world population are at risk for acquiring dengue with 50-100 million cases of acute febrile illness yearly including about 500,000 cases of DHF/DSS. No antiviral drugs active against the flavivirus exist. Attempts to control mosquito vector has been largely unsuccessful. Vaccination remains the most hopeful preventive measure. Dengue vaccine has been in development for more than 30 years, yet none has been licensed. The fact that enhancing antibody from previous infection and high level of T cell activation during secondary infection contribute to immunopathology of DHF, the vaccine must be able to induce protective response to four dengue serotypes simultaneously. Inactivated vaccine is safe but needs a repeated booster thus, development is delayed. Tetravalent live attenuated vaccine and chimeric vaccine using yellow fever or dengue viruses as a backbone are being carried out in human trials. DNA vaccine and subunit vaccine are being carried out in animal trials.

  7. Dengue Fever Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MedlinePlus dengue site . Aegypti mosquito Credit: NIAID Biology & Transmission Dengue has emerged as a global health ... basic research activities aimed at better understanding the biology of the dengue virus, the progression of disease ...

  8. [Larva migrans].

    PubMed

    Chabasse, D; Le Clec'h, C; de Gentile, L; Verret, J L

    1995-01-01

    Larbish, cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruption, is a serpiginous cutaneous eruption caused by skin penetration of infective larva from various animal nematodes. Hookworms (Ancylostoma brasiliense, A. caninum) are the most common causative parasites. They live in the intestines of dogs and cats where their ova are deposited in the animal feces. In sandy and shady soil, when temperature and moisture are elevated, the ova hatch and mature into infective larva. Infection occurs when humans have contact with the infected soil. Infective larva penetrate the exposed skin of the body, commonly around the feet, hands and buttocks. In humans, the larva are not able to complete their natural cycle and remain trapped in the upper dermis of the skin. The disease is widespread in tropical or subtropical regions, especially along the coast on sandy beaches. The diagnosis is easy for the patient who is returning from a tropical or subtropical climate and gives a history of beach exposure. The characteristic skin lesion is a fissure or erythematous cord which is displaced a few millimeters each day in a serpiginous track. Scabies, the larva currens syndrome due to Strongyloides stercoralis, must be distinguished from other creeping eruptions and subcutaneous swelling lesions caused by other nematodes or myiasis. Medical treatments are justified because it shortens the duration of the natural evolution of the disease. Topical tiabendazole is safe for localized invasions, but prolonged treatment may be necessary. Oral thiabendazole treatment for three days is effective, but sometimes is associated with adverse effects. Trials using albendazole for one or four consecutive days appear more efficacious. More recent trials using ivermectine showed that a single oral dose can cure 100% of the patients; thus, this drug looks very promising as a new form of therapy. Individual prophylaxis consists of avoiding skin contact with soil which has been contaminated with dog or cat feces

  9. [Larva migrans].

    PubMed

    Chabasse, D; Le Clec'h, C; de Gentile, L; Verret, J L

    1995-01-01

    Larbish, cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruption, is a serpiginous cutaneous eruption caused by skin penetration of infective larva from various animal nematodes. Hookworms (Ancylostoma brasiliense, A. caninum) are the most common causative parasites. They live in the intestines of dogs and cats where their ova are deposited in the animal feces. In sandy and shady soil, when temperature and moisture are elevated, the ova hatch and mature into infective larva. Infection occurs when humans have contact with the infected soil. Infective larva penetrate the exposed skin of the body, commonly around the feet, hands and buttocks. In humans, the larva are not able to complete their natural cycle and remain trapped in the upper dermis of the skin. The disease is widespread in tropical or subtropical regions, especially along the coast on sandy beaches. The diagnosis is easy for the patient who is returning from a tropical or subtropical climate and gives a history of beach exposure. The characteristic skin lesion is a fissure or erythematous cord which is displaced a few millimeters each day in a serpiginous track. Scabies, the larva currens syndrome due to Strongyloides stercoralis, must be distinguished from other creeping eruptions and subcutaneous swelling lesions caused by other nematodes or myiasis. Medical treatments are justified because it shortens the duration of the natural evolution of the disease. Topical tiabendazole is safe for localized invasions, but prolonged treatment may be necessary. Oral thiabendazole treatment for three days is effective, but sometimes is associated with adverse effects. Trials using albendazole for one or four consecutive days appear more efficacious. More recent trials using ivermectine showed that a single oral dose can cure 100% of the patients; thus, this drug looks very promising as a new form of therapy. Individual prophylaxis consists of avoiding skin contact with soil which has been contaminated with dog or cat feces

  10. Dengue encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hendarto, S K; Hadinegoro, S R

    1992-06-01

    Dengue encephalopathy or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with CNS involvement used to be considered a relatively rare condition; but the number of cases reported in human studies has been increasing every year. Diagnosis of dengue encephalopathy is based on clinically diagnosed DHF according to the W.H.O. criteria (1980), with CNS manifestations consisting of abrupt onset of hyperpyrexia, non-transient alteration of consciousness, headache, vomiting--with or without seizures--and normal CSF. Many factors may be considered to be directly or indirectly associated with CNS signs and symptoms in DHF, the main pathology being leakage of plasma into serous spaces and abnormal hemostasis, leading to hypovolemic shock and hemorrhage in many organs of the body. Acute liver failure is considered to be one of the main factors causing brain pathology. One hundred fifty-two cases of dengue encephalopathy admitted during 3 periods at the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta were studied retrospectively. The overall incidence was 152 out of 2,441 DHF cases, or 6.2%. The most pronounced symptoms were hyperpyrexia, alteration of consciousness and convulsions. Laboratory examination showed an unusually high increase of serum transaminases, hyponatremia, and hypoxia. Neurologic abnormalities detected were hemiparesis and tetraparesis of the extremities, and second nerve atrophy; such abnormalities were found in 10 out of the 152 cases, or 6.5%.

  11. [Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Fonsmark, L; Poulsen, A; Heegaard, E D

    2000-09-18

    Dengue virus is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever throughout the tropical areas of the world. There is an increasing incidence of dengue infections. Because of increasing travel activity, infection among Danes travelling abroad as well as imported cases are expected to be seen more frequently. In this review we describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of the disease.

  12. Dengue Knowledge and Preventive Practices in Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldán, Valerie A; Morrison, Amy C; Cordova Lopez, Jhonny J; Lenhart, Audrey; Scott, Thomas W; Elder, John P; Sihuincha, Moises; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S; Astete, Helvio; McCall, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    As part of a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate insecticide-treated curtains for dengue prevention in Iquitos, Peru, we surveyed 1,333 study participants to examine knowledge and reported practices associated with dengue and its prevention. Entomological data from 1,133 of these households were linked to the survey. Most participants knew that dengue was transmitted by mosquito bite (85.6%), but only few (18.6%) knew that dengue vectors bite during daytime. Most commonly recognized dengue symptoms were fever (86.6%), headache (76.4%), and muscle/joint pain (67.9%). Most commonly reported correct practices for mosquito control were cleaning homes (61.6%), using insecticide sprays (23%), and avoiding having standing water at home (12.3%). Higher education was associated with higher knowledge about dengue, including transmission and vector control. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with increased reported use of preventive practices requiring money expenditure. We were less likely to find Aedes aegypti eggs, larvae, or pupae in households that had < 5-year-old children at home. Although dengue has been transmitted in Iquitos since the 1990s and the Regional Health Authority routinely fumigates households, treats domestic water containers with larvicide, and issues health education messages through mass media, knowledge of dengue transmission and household practices for prevention could be improved. PMID:26503276

  13. Dengue Knowledge and Preventive Practices in Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldán, Valerie A.; Morrison, Amy C.; Cordova Lopez, Jhonny J.; Lenhart, Audrey; Scott, Thomas W.; Elder, John P.; Sihuincha, Moises; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Halsey, Eric S.; Astete, Helvio; McCall, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate insecticide-treated curtains for dengue prevention in Iquitos, Peru, we surveyed 1,333 study participants to examine knowledge and reported practices associated with dengue and its prevention. Entomological data from 1,133 of these households were linked to the survey. Most participants knew that dengue was transmitted by mosquito bite (85.6%), but only few (18.6%) knew that dengue vectors bite during daytime. Most commonly recognized dengue symptoms were fever (86.6%), headache (76.4%), and muscle/joint pain (67.9%). Most commonly reported correct practices for mosquito control were cleaning homes (61.6%), using insecticide sprays (23%), and avoiding having standing water at home (12.3%). Higher education was associated with higher knowledge about dengue, including transmission and vector control. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with increased reported use of preventive practices requiring money expenditure. We were less likely to find Aedes aegypti eggs, larvae, or pupae in households that had < 5-year-old children at home. Although dengue has been transmitted in Iquitos since the 1990s and the Regional Health Authority routinely fumigates households, treats domestic water containers with larvicide, and issues health education messages through mass media, knowledge of dengue transmission and household practices for prevention could be improved. PMID:26503276

  14. Dengue Knowledge and Preventive Practices in Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldán, Valerie A; Morrison, Amy C; Cordova Lopez, Jhonny J; Lenhart, Audrey; Scott, Thomas W; Elder, John P; Sihuincha, Moises; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S; Astete, Helvio; McCall, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    As part of a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate insecticide-treated curtains for dengue prevention in Iquitos, Peru, we surveyed 1,333 study participants to examine knowledge and reported practices associated with dengue and its prevention. Entomological data from 1,133 of these households were linked to the survey. Most participants knew that dengue was transmitted by mosquito bite (85.6%), but only few (18.6%) knew that dengue vectors bite during daytime. Most commonly recognized dengue symptoms were fever (86.6%), headache (76.4%), and muscle/joint pain (67.9%). Most commonly reported correct practices for mosquito control were cleaning homes (61.6%), using insecticide sprays (23%), and avoiding having standing water at home (12.3%). Higher education was associated with higher knowledge about dengue, including transmission and vector control. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with increased reported use of preventive practices requiring money expenditure. We were less likely to find Aedes aegypti eggs, larvae, or pupae in households that had < 5-year-old children at home. Although dengue has been transmitted in Iquitos since the 1990s and the Regional Health Authority routinely fumigates households, treats domestic water containers with larvicide, and issues health education messages through mass media, knowledge of dengue transmission and household practices for prevention could be improved.

  15. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  16. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Fernando, S; Fernando, D J; Seneviratne, S L

    2004-10-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

  17. Dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Y K; Singh, S; Singh, T

    1998-02-01

    Dengue viral infection produces a spectrum of disease. For example, mild dengue disease is characterized by biphasic fever, myalgia, arthralgia, leukopenia, and lymphadenopathy, while dengue hemorrhagic fever is an often fatal disease characterized by hemorrhages and shock syndrome. The disease, especially in its severe form, is seen more often among children than among adults. With focus upon India, dengue's etiology, epidemiology, pathology, pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever, clinical manifestations of both the mild and severe forms of dengue viral infection, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis are discussed.

  18. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, U C; Nagar, Rachna

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of this country with dengue has been long and intense. The ?rst recorded epidemic of clinically dengue-like illness occurred at Madras in 1780 and the dengue virus was isolated for the ?rst time almost simultaneously in Japan and Calcutta in 1943-1944. After the ?rst virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever along the East Coast of India in 1963-1964, it spread to allover the country.The ?rst full-blown epidemic of the severe form of the illness,the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in North India in 1996. Aedes aegypti is the vector for transmission of the disease. Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti and prevent its bite. This country has few virus laboratories and some of them have done excellent work in the area of molecular epidemiology,immunopathology and vaccine development. Selected work done in this country on the problems of dengue is presented here.

  19. The dengue viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Henchal, E A; Putnak, J R

    1990-01-01

    Dengue, a major public health problem throughout subtropical and tropical regions, is an acute infectious disease characterized by biphasic fever, headache, pain in various parts of the body, prostration, rash, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia. In more severe or complicated dengue, patients present with a severe febrile illness characterized by abnormalities of hemostasis and increased vascular permeability, which in some instances results in a hypovolemic shock. Four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (dengue-1, dengue-2, dengue-3, and dengue-4) exist, with numerous virus strains found worldwide. Molecular cloning methods have led to a greater understanding of the structure of the RNA genome and definition of virus-specific structural and nonstructural proteins. Progress towards producing safe, effective dengue virus vaccines, a goal for over 45 years, has been made. Images PMID:2224837

  20. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... and sweaty. These symptoms are followed by a shock -like state. Bleeding appears as tiny spots of ...

  1. The dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Henchal, E A; Putnak, J R

    1990-10-01

    Dengue, a major public health problem throughout subtropical and tropical regions, is an acute infectious disease characterized by biphasic fever, headache, pain in various parts of the body, prostration, rash, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia. In more severe or complicated dengue, patients present with a severe febrile illness characterized by abnormalities of hemostasis and increased vascular permeability, which in some instances results in a hypovolemic shock. Four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (dengue-1, dengue-2, dengue-3, and dengue-4) exist, with numerous virus strains found worldwide. Molecular cloning methods have led to a greater understanding of the structure of the RNA genome and definition of virus-specific structural and nonstructural proteins. Progress towards producing safe, effective dengue virus vaccines, a goal for over 45 years, has been made. PMID:2224837

  2. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  3. Dengue reemergence in Argentina.

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, G.; Rangeón, G.; Vorndam, V.; Briones, A.; Baroni, P.; Enria, D.; Sabattini, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, eradicated from Argentina in 1963, has now reinfested the country as far south as Buenos Aires. In 1997, four persons with travel histories to Brazil, Ecuador, or Venezuela had confirmed dengue, and surveillance for indigenous transmission allowed the detection of 19 dengue cases in Salta Province. These cases of dengue are the first in Argentina since 1916 and represent a new southern extension of dengue virus. PMID:10460181

  4. Dengue in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Palmer, C J; Validum, L; Vorndam, V A; Clark, G G; Validum, C; Cummings, R; Lindo, J F; Ager, A L; Cuadrado, R R

    1999-07-24

    There have been dramatic increases in dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever in South America. Guyana has reported less than five cases per year for most of the past decade. We evaluated patients in a clinic in Georgetown, Guyana, over 2 days and found evidence of 50 cases of dengue infection.

  5. Describing the geographic spread of dengue disease by traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Norberto Aníbal; Yang, Hyun Mo

    2008-09-01

    Dengue is a human disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. For this reason geographical regions infested by this mosquito species are under the risk of dengue outbreaks. In this work, we propose a mathematical model to study the spatial dissemination of dengue using a system of partial differential reaction-diffusion equations. With respect to the human and mosquito populations, we take into account their respective subclasses of infected and uninfected individuals. The dynamics of the mosquito population considers only two subpopulations: the winged form (mature female mosquitoes), and an aquatic population (comprising eggs, larvae and pupae). We disregard the long-distance movement by transportation facilities, for which reason the diffusion is considered restricted only to the winged form. The human population is considered homogeneously distributed in space, in order to describe localized dengue dissemination during a short period of epidemics. The cross-infection is modeled by the law of mass action. A threshold value as a function of the model's parameters is obtained, which determines the rate of dengue dissemination and the risk of dengue outbreaks. Assuming that an area was previously colonized by the mosquitoes, the rate of disease dissemination is determined as a function of the model's parameters. This rate of dissemination of dengue disease is determined by applying the traveling wave solutions to the corresponding system of partial differential equations.

  6. Surveillance for dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1989-01-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are emerging as major public health problems in most tropical countries. Effective prevention and control programs will depend on improved surveillance designed to provide early warning of dengue epidemics. This article outlines a reasonable approach to dengue surveillance of this kind. Virologic surveillance should be considered the most important element in any such early warning system. Dengue virus transmission should be monitored to determine which serotypes are present, their distribution, and the type of illnesses associated with each. Other key components of an active surveillance system should include monitoring of fever activity and clinical surveillance for cases of severe and fatal disease associated with viral syndromes. Collectively, these three surveillance components can provide an early warning capability permitting emergency mosquito control measures to be implemented and major epidemics to be averted.

  7. Enhancing knowledge and awareness of dengue during a prospective study of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Charmagne G; Kosasih, Herman; Tan, Ratna; Widjaja, Susana; Listianingsih, Erlin; Ma'roef, Chairin; Wuryadi, Suharyono; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Rudiman, Irani; McArdle, James L; Porter, Kevin R

    2004-09-01

    In 1992, the Indonesian CDC implemented strategies to control and prevent dengue fever (DF) by including community involvement to reduce larva breeding sites and a mass health education program. To contribute to this effort, we incorporated an educational component into a prospective study of DF conducted at two textile factories in Bandung. This education provided: a lecture on the signs and symptoms of dengue and ways to prevent the disease, posters in the health clinic at each factory and handouts given to each volunteer with an explanation of symptoms. Upon enrollment, each participant completed a questionnaire to gather demographic information. Additionally they were given a brief (non-standardized) test (PRE-test) of their dengue knowledge, which was verbally administered by the study physicians. Five questions (15 point system) were designed to assess the participant's ability to recognize and describe aspects of dengue in lay terms. The subject material included: the symptoms of acute DF, transmission of dengue virus, and basic steps for disease prevention. The same questionnaire was re-administered 18 months later (POST-test), and the results were compared. A total of 2,340 participants completed both the PRE- and POST-tests; there were 1,373 males and 967 females, median age 36 years (range 18-59). Only 0.3% of participants scored EXCELLENT (15-14 points) on the PRE-test whereas 8.4% scored EXCELLENT on the POST-test. Fewer participants scored VERY BAD (2-0 points) on the POST-test compared to the PRE-test (1.4% vs 4.0%). The average raw scores for the PRE- and POST-tests were 7.8 and 10.1, respectively. Improvement of individual scores correlated highly with educational level. No significant correlation was identified for gender, age, factory location or a diagnosis of dengue during the study. These findings demonstrate that our prospective study enhanced knowledge and awareness of dengue in the volunteers.

  8. Dengue in children.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Lilly M; de Groot, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and increasing incidence. The vast majority of dengue cases are children less than 15 years of age. Dengue causes a spectrum of illness from mild fever to severe disease with plasma leakage and shock. Infants and children with secondary heterologous dengue infections are most at risk for severe dengue disease. Laboratory diagnosis of dengue can be established within five days of disease onset by direct detection of viral components in serum. After day five, serologic diagnosis provides indirect evidence of dengue. Currently, no effective antiviral agents are available to treat dengue infection. Therefore, treatment remains supportive, with emphasis on close hematological monitoring, recognition of warning signs of severe disease and fluid-replacement therapy and/or blood transfusions when required. Development of a dengue vaccine is considered a high public health priority. A safe and efficacious dengue vaccine would also be important for travelers. This review highlights the current understanding of dengue in children, including its clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnostic tests, management and prevention.

  9. Dengue in Java, Indonesia: Relevance of Mosquito Indices as Risk Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Wijayanti, Siwi P. M.; Sunaryo, Sunaryo; Suprihatin, Suprihatin; McFarlane, Melanie; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Dietrich, Isabelle; Schnettler, Esther; Biek, Roman; Kohl, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background No vaccine is currently available for dengue virus (DENV), therefore control programmes usually focus on managing mosquito vector populations. Entomological surveys provide the most common means of characterising vector populations and predicting the risk of local dengue virus transmission. Despite Indonesia being a country strongly affected by DENV, only limited information is available on the local factors affecting DENV transmission and the suitability of available survey methods for assessing risk. Methodology/principal findings We conducted entomological surveys in the Banyumas Regency (Central Java) where dengue cases occur on an annual basis. Four villages were sampled during the dry and rainy seasons: two villages where dengue was endemic, one where dengue cases occurred sporadically and one which was dengue-free. In addition to data for conventional larvae indices, we collected data on pupae indices, and collected adult mosquitoes for species identification in order to determine mosquito species composition and population density. Traditionally used larval indices (House indices, Container indices and Breteau indices) were found to be inadequate as indicators for DENV transmission risk. In contrast, species composition of adult mosquitoes revealed that competent vector species were dominant in dengue endemic and sporadic villages. Conclusions/significance Our data suggested that the utility of traditional larvae indices, which continue to be used in many dengue endemic countries, should be re-evaluated locally. The results highlight the need for validation of risk indicators and control strategies across DENV affected areas here and perhaps elsewhere in SE Asia. PMID:26967524

  10. Dengue fever: natural management.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Tahir, Madeha; Irfan, Muhammad; Raza Bukhari, Syeda Fiza; Ahmed, Bilal; Hanif, Muhammad; Rasul, Akhtar; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Dengue fever is caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4, and is the most common arboviral infection of humans in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Dengue virus infections can present with a spacious range of clinical signs, from a mild feverish illness to a life-threatening shock syndrome. Till now, there is no approved vaccine or drug against this virus. Therefore, there is an urgent need of development of alternative solutions for dengue. Several plant species have been reported with anti-dengue activity. Many herbal/natural drugs, most of which are commonly used as nutritional components, have been used as antiviral, larvicidal, mosquitocidal and mosquito repellents that may be used against dengue. The objective of this review article was to provide current approaches for the treatment and management/prevention of dengue fever by targeting viral proteins involved in replication cycle of the virus and different developmental stages of mosquito.

  11. Dengue in India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nivedita; Srivastava, Sakshi; Jain, Amita; Chaturvedi, Umesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus belongs to family Flaviviridae, having four serotypes that spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. It causes a wide spectrum of illness from mild asymptomatic illness to severe fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Approximately 2.5 billion people live in dengue-risk regions with about 100 million new cases each year worldwide. The cumulative dengue diseases burden has attained an unprecedented proportion in recent times with sharp increase in the size of human population at risk. Dengue disease presents highly complex pathophysiological, economic and ecologic problems. In India, the first epidemic of clinical dengue-like illness was recorded in Madras (now Chennai) in 1780 and the first virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever (DF) occurred in Calcutta (now Kolkata) and Eastern Coast of India in 1963-1964. During the last 50 years a large number of physicians have treated and described dengue disease in India, but the scientific studies addressing various problems of dengue disease have been carried out at limited number of centres. Achievements of Indian scientists are considerable; however, a lot remain to be achieved for creating an impact. This paper briefly reviews the extent of work done by various groups of scientists in this country. PMID:23041731

  12. DENGUE: GLOBAL THREAT.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease, which is currently an expanding global problem. Four closely related dengue serotypes cause the disease, which ranges from asymptomatic infection to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever (DF), and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF is characterized by fever, bleeding diathesis, and a tendency to develop a potentially fatal shock syndrome. Dengue infection with organ impairment mainly involves the central nervous system and the liver. Consistent hematological findings include vasculopathy, coagulopathy, and thrombocytopenia. Laboratory diagnosis includes virus isolation, serology, and detection of dengue ribonucleic acid. Successful treatment, which is mainly supportive, depends on early recognition of the disease and careful monitoring for shock. A severity-based revised dengue classification for medical interventions has been developed and validated in many countries. There is no specific dengue treatment, and prevention is currently limited to vector control measures. The world's first, large-scale dengue vaccine efficacy study demonstrated its efficacy and a reduction of dengue disease severity with a good safety profile in a study of more than 30,000 volunteers from Asia and Latin America.

  13. Dengue in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nivedita; Srivastava, Sakshi; Jain, Amita; Chaturvedi, Umesh C

    2012-09-01

    Dengue virus belongs to family Flaviviridae, having four serotypes that spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. It causes a wide spectrum of illness from mild asymptomatic illness to severe fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Approximately 2.5 billion people live in dengue-risk regions with about 100 million new cases each year worldwide. The cumulative dengue diseases burden has attained an unprecedented proportion in recent times with sharp increase in the size of human population at risk. Dengue disease presents highly complex pathophysiological, economic and ecologic problems. In India, the first epidemic of clinical dengue-like illness was recorded in Madras (now Chennai) in 1780 and the first virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever (DF) occurred in Calcutta (now Kolkata) and Eastern Coast of India in 1963-1964. During the last 50 years a large number of physicians have treated and described dengue disease in India, but the scientific studies addressing various problems of dengue disease have been carried out at limited number of centres. Achievements of Indian scientists are considerable; however, a lot remain to be achieved for creating an impact. This paper briefly reviews the extent of work done by various groups of scientists in this country.

  14. First outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Rahman, Khalilur; Siddque, A K; Shoma, Shereen; Kamal, A H M; Ali, K S; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F

    2002-07-01

    During the first countrywide outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Bangladesh, we conducted surveillance for dengue at a hospital in Dhaka. Of 176 patients, primarily adults, found positive for dengue, 60.2% had dengue fever, 39.2% dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 0.6% dengue shock syndrome. The Dengue virus 3 serotype was detected in eight patients.

  15. [Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever: research priorities].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, María G; García, Gissel; Kourí, Gustavo

    2006-03-01

    Dengue is one of the most important infectious diseases in tropical and subtropical countries. At present, the only strategy available to reduce the incidence of dengue is vector control. The World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization have called on all nations to take the needed steps to help diminish the burden of this disease and its medical and socioeconomic impact. It is hoped that it will be possible to reverse the increase in dengue and help control its spread through a coordinated, effective international response, along with epidemiological, clinical, and virological research that brings together the most advanced methods and techniques. This piece summarizes the most up-to-date information on dengue, analyzes current epidemiologic trends in the Region of the Americas, discusses the main global and Western Hemisphere initiatives to control the disease, and presents the main areas of research that should be developed in the immediate future.

  16. Identification of dengue virus in Aedes mosquitoes and patients' sera from Si Sa Ket Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Teerasut, Chai; Petphuwadee, Udom; Thammapalo, Suwich; Jampangern, Wipawee; Limkittikul, Kriengsak

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are the re-emerging infectious diseases caused by dengue (DEN) virus, transmitted by Aedes mosquito. There are more than 100,000 cases of dengue infection and more than 100 deaths annually in Thailand. Virological surveillance for DEN viruses is used as an early warning system to predict outbreaks. The seroprevalence of infection and serotypes of DEN virus in 116 pediatric patients at Si Sa Ket Province, Thailand were analyzed during June to September 2004. At the same period, Aedes mosquitoes were caught from patients' and their neighbors' houses, from control houses, located in villages with no report of dengue infection during the previous 3 years. The majority of DHF cases were secondary infections of DEN-2 and DEN-4 serotypes. Of the 1,652 Aedes mosquitoes collected 1,583 were Ae. aegypti and 69 Ae. albopictus. Ten mosquitoes from each house were pooled and dengue viruses were determined using RT-PCR assay; only 1 positive pooled was found. Although the dengue infection rate in the field caught mosquitoes was low, the existing dengue virus control program in transmission areas by aerial spraying to destroy the larva breeding sites should be continued.

  17. Mania in dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Jhanjee, Anurag; Bhatia, M. S.; Srivastava, Shruti

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as break bone fever, is a mosquito-borne infection that causes a severe flu-like illness. During the last few years, there had been increasing reports of dengue fever with unusual manifestations, primarily with neurological symptoms. Psychiatric morbidity during acute dengue infection has rarely been reported. There has not been any systemic study mentioning the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric sequelae. We report a 28-year-old male who after an acute dengue infection developed an episode of mania which was successfully treated. PMID:22969182

  18. Dengue: a global threat.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is currently an expanding global problem. The disease is caused by four closely related dengue serotypes; it ranges from asymptomatic infection to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF is characterized by fever, bleeding diathesis and a tendency to develop apotentially fatal shock syndrome. Dengue infection with organ impairment mainly involves the central nervous system and liver. Consistent hematological findings include vasculopathy, coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia. Laboratory diagnoses include virus isolation, serology, and detection ofdengue ribonucleic acid. Successful treatment, which is mainly supportive, depends on early recognition of the disease and careful monitoring for shock. A severity-based revised dengue classification for medical interventions has been developed and validated in many countries. So far however, there has not been any specific dengue treatment; prevention is currently limited to vector control measures. The world's first, large-scale dengue vaccine, efficacy study demonstrated its efficacy and a reduction of dengue's severity in a study of more than 10,000 volunteers in Asia. Initial safety data are consistent with a good safety profile.

  19. Dengue: a review.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tan, R S; Weir, M R

    1998-10-01

    Millions of dengue cases occur worldwide each year. Most recently, an outbreak occurred in Texas. Though usually a nonspecific febrile illness that resolves with supportive therapy, the clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic to severe hemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. The potential exists for the introduction of dengue virus into other parts of the United States, and for secondary transmission in areas with vector mosquitoes, because of increased travel to and from regions of the Americas where dengue is endemic. The discovery of Aedes (Ae) albopictus strains adapted to temperate conditions makes this threat much greater. With global warming, a more rapid distribution of the Aedes species may occur, moving northward, encompassing larger population centers and leading to increased vectorborne diseases. Control of dengue currently requires control of the principal vector mosquitoes. Vaccine development continues, but at present the only way to avoid dengue in an area where it is endemic or epidemic is to use repellents and mosquito barriers. Lifesaving intervention and management of a patient with dengue and its complications depend upon a complete history, to include travel and physical examination with a high level of suspicion. Physicians and other health care providers should learn to recognize this disease. Once a person is infected, the key to survival is early diagnosis and appropriate treatment for the severe, life-threatening complications of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

  20. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  1. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  2. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches.

  3. Detection of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Nagesh K; Shrivastava, Ambuj; Dash, Paban K; Jana, Asha M

    2011-01-01

    Global incidence of dengue has increased considerably over the past decade. Dengue fever (DF) is a self-limiting disease; however, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are fatal. Since there is no therapy and vaccine against dengue, timely diagnosis is therefore necessary for patient management. Laboratory diagnosis is carried out by virus isolation, demonstration of viral antigen, presence of viral nucleic acid, and antibodies. Further, recombinant dengue envelope protein can be used to detect specific antibodies, both IgG and IgM against all four serotypes of virus using an E. coli vector. The purified protein can then be used for detection of dengue specific IgG or IgM antibodies in patient serum with higher sensitivity and specificity, than that of traditional assays. Molecular detection can be accomplished by a one-step, single-tube, rapid, multiplex, RT-PCR for serotype determination. Despite many advantages of the modern techniques, isolation of virus is still considered as "gold-standard" in dengue diagnosis.

  4. [Dengue fever: clinical features].

    PubMed

    Dellamonica, P

    2009-10-01

    The vector for dengue fever and chikungunya, Aedes albopictus, was recently identified in Southeastern France, although the usual vector for dengue fever is Aedes aegypti, raising the possibility of cases occurring among the local population via viraemic individuals returning from endemic areas. Dengue fever is usually transmitted by Aedes aegypti. It is due to an arbovirus-flavivirus of which four different serotypes are known: Den 1 to 4. Each serotype is responsible for specific prolonged immunity but no cross-reactivity exists between serotypes. Clinically, the onset is abrupt with frontal headache, retro-orbital pain, myalgia, joint pain, prostration and, in many cases, a macular rash usually sparing the face and extremities. Haemorrhagic signs may occur, such as petechiae, purpura, epistaxis or bleeding gingivae. Two severe forms of dengue fever, particularly among children below 3 years of age, include dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and DHF with shock (dengue shock syndrome). If a case is suspected in metropolitan France, the diagnosis should be systematically confirmed by positive specific IgM, RT-PCR or viral isolation. Treatment of dengue fever, whether in its uncomplicated form or with hemorrhagic manifestations or shock, remains symptomatic. There is no specific anti-viral treatment. A case should be notified to allow French health authorities to take the appropriate measures for vector control.

  5. Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L

    1996-01-01

    Dengue has been known for more than 200 years. The first dengue viruses were isolated about 50 years ago. Prior to the 1950's, dengue was considered a mild febrile disease, though rare hemorrhagic and fatal cases were known to occur. After that date, the first epidemics of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) appeared in Southeast Asia, and DHF became the most important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in the region. The emergence of DHF epidemics was first explained by mutations affecting dengue viruses, making them more virulent, but this hypothesis was not retained. Then, the "secondary infection" or "immune enhancement" theory was proposed to explain the increased virulence of dengue viruses when children had a secondary infection. This second hypothesis is still actually favoured. However, observations in Southeast Asia, some Pacific islands, and Americas do not agree with the "secondary infection" hypothesis, which consequently has been modified several times. Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the recognition that some viral strains are more virulent than others. Another hypothesis is the selection of more virulent dengue strains by the new vector Ae. aegypti, replacing the local vector Ae. albopictus, when urbanization and modern transportation increased in Southeast Asia after the last war. Comparisons between epidemics are very difficult, because of the distinction between DHF cases according to WHO criteria and dengue fever (DF) cases with hemorrhages. This distinction has no pathogenic or prognostic grounds, and makes the task of clinicians more difficult. The actual situation in countries facing dengue epidemics makes clear that this disease will continue to be a public health problem for some time to come.

  6. Mosquitoes, models, and dengue.

    PubMed

    Lifson, A R

    1996-05-01

    In the last 10 years dengue has spread markedly through Latin America and the Caribbean (Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Barbados, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil). The mosquito Aedes aegypti has taken advantage of increased urbanization and crowding to transmit the dengue virus. The mosquito infests tires, cans, and water jars near dwellings. The female mosquito practices multiple, interrupted feeding. Thus, mosquito infesting and feeding practices facilitate dengue transmission in crowded conditions. Factors contributing to the spread of dengue include numbers of infected and susceptible human hosts, strain of dengue virus, size of mosquito population, feeding habits, time from infection to ability to transmit virus for both vector and host, likelihood of virus transmission from human to mosquito to human, and temperature (which affects vector distribution, size, feeding habits, and extrinsic incubation period). Public health models may use simulation models to help them plan or evaluate the potential impact of different intervention strategies and/or of environmental changes (e.g., global warming). Other factors contributing to the dengue epidemic are international travel, urbanization, population growth, crowding, poverty, a weakened public health infrastructure, and limited support for sustained disease control programs. Molecular epidemiology by nucleic acid sequence analysis is another sophisticated technique used to study infectious diseases. It showed that dengue type 3 isolated from Panama and Nicaragua in 1994 was identical to that responsible for the major dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemics in Sri Lanka and India in the 1980s. Public health officials must remember three priorities relevant to dengue and other emerging infections: the need to strengthen surveillance efforts, dedicated and sustained involvement in prevention and control needs at the local level, and a strong

  7. Dengue: a continuing global threat

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Maria G.; Halstead, Scott B.; Artsob, Harvey; Buchy, Philippe; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane J.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Kroeger, Axel; Margolis, Harold S.; Martínez, Eric; Nathan, Michael B.; Pelegrino, Jose Luis; Simmons, Cameron; Yoksan, Sutee; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ~50 million dengue infections and ~500,000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. Illness is produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes. A global strategy aimed at increasing the capacity for surveillance and outbreak response, changing behaviours and reducing the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently under development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future. PMID:21079655

  8. Dengue: a continuing global threat.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria G; Halstead, Scott B; Artsob, Harvey; Buchy, Philippe; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane J; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Kroeger, Axel; Margolis, Harold S; Martínez, Eric; Nathan, Michael B; Pelegrino, Jose Luis; Simmons, Cameron; Yoksan, Sutee; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ∼50 million dengue infections and ∼500,000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. Illness is produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes. A global strategy aimed at increasing the capacity for surveillance and outbreak response, changing behaviours and reducing the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently under development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future.

  9. Neurological complication of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Murthy, J M K

    2010-01-01

    Dengue infection is endemic in more than 100 countries, mostly in the developing world. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing, and that neurological manifestations are being reported more frequently. The exact incidence of various neurological complications is uncertain. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations is multiple and includes: neurotrophic effect of the dengue virus, related to the systemic effects of dengue infection, and immune mediated. In countries endemic to dengue, it will be prudent to investigate for dengue infection in patients with fever and acute neurological manifestations. There is need for understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurological manifestations.

  10. DENGUE INFECTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Tiawilai, Thawat; Tiawilai, Anongrat; Nunthanid, Somboon

    2015-01-01

    From 2005 to 2013, there were 15 dengue patients aged over 60 years old who were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Ten were females and five were males. Nine had dengue fever (DF), and 6 had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). A trending shift in age group towards adults has been seen during the past decades. No deaths were seen in these elderly patients with dengue disease, indicating early recognition and effective management of these dengue patients. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients is a problem of concern, which needs further elaboration.

  11. Ecology and control of dengue vector mosquitoes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Hwang, J S; Guo, Y J

    1994-12-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, industrialization and social changes in recent years, the use of packing materials and tires has dramatically increased in the Taiwan area. What is more is that some parts of southern Taiwan are short of water resources and water preservation with huge containers becomes part of custom in those areas. Storage water containers, waste vessels and tires are good habitats for Aedes. Meanwhile, some persons traveling to dengue endemic countries bring the dengue disease back to Taiwan. Surveys taken since 1988 show that dengue occurs mainly in the urban and coastal areas where Aedes aegypti is prevalent. This species is the most important, if not the only, vector of dengue in Taiwan. It appears that the types of Aedes breeding have changed quickly. In dengue fever epidemic areas, the most popular breeding sites are ornamental containers (38.8%), storage water containers (30.1%), discarded containers (25.4%), receptacles (3.3%) and water collection in the basement (2.2%). In dengue fever epidemic areas, those building basements, huge water containers, waste vessels and waste tires in open fields are most difficult to clean up and manage and become the most popular Aedes habitats. We established a waste recycling system and promoted a breeding site reduction campaign for waste management, including the application of Temephos in containers to kill larvae. For the drinking water management, fish were released in water containers to prevent larval breeding. It should be mentioned that with the integrated pest control and regular inspections of Aedes larvae in Taiwan the density figures 1, 2-5, and 6 or above for Aedes aegypti were 38.7%, 42.9%, and 18.4%, respectively, in 1988, and in 1993 were 90.8%, 9.2% and 0%. The incidence of dengue fever cases has 98% decreased since 1988. In 1990 and 1993, there was no indigenous cases. We have concluded that integrated pest control is the best and most effective method for dengue fever control, including

  12. Dengue disease outbreak detection.

    PubMed

    Dayama, Pankaj; Sampath, Kameshwaran

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of outbreak of a disease may help in timely and effective public health interventions. Our motivation for this work is to assist EHD planning officer to analyze the incidence data and based on it declare whether there is an outbreak or not. In this paper, we develop ensemble of multiple techniques for detecting dengue disease outbreak. These techniques are applied to dengue incidence data from Singapore and results are summarized.

  13. Dengue viruses - an overview.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Anne Tuiskunen; Lundkvist, Ake

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) cause the most common arthropod-borne viral disease in man with 50-100 million infections per year. Because of the lack of a vaccine and antiviral drugs, the sole measure of control is limiting the Aedes mosquito vectors. DENV infection can be asymptomatic or a self-limited, acute febrile disease ranging in severity. The classical form of dengue fever (DF) is characterized by high fever, headache, stomach ache, rash, myalgia, and arthralgia. Severe dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are accompanied by thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hypotension. DSS, which can be fatal, is characterized by systemic shock. Despite intensive research, the underlying mechanisms causing severe dengue is still not well understood partly due to the lack of appropriate animal models of infection and disease. However, even though it is clear that both viral and host factors play important roles in the course of infection, a fundamental knowledge gap still remains to be filled regarding host cell tropism, crucial host immune response mechanisms, and viral markers for virulence.

  14. DENGUE INFECTION IN PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Khamim, Kriangsak; Khamim, Boonluck; Pengsaa, Krisana

    2015-01-01

    While dengue infection is still on the increase in adults in Thailand, it also affects pregnant women, especially pregnant teenagers. This study was designed to investigate dengue infection during pregnancy. Seven cases of dengue infection in pregnant women were admitted to Ban Pong Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Dengue infection presented in all pregnancy trimesters. There were two severe cases: one was dengue hemorrhagic fever in the first trimester, and the second was at a critical stage of the infection during labor. There were three cases of abortion. These three cases included one complete, one incomplete, and one threatened abortion, with rising hematocrits of 22.8%, 17.1%, and 14.7%, respectively. Two out of the three teenage pregnancies experienced complete and threatened abortions, while the third abortion case was a threatened abortion pregnancy at the critical stage of infection during intrapartum. Leukopenia was identified in six out of seven women. Low baseline hematocrit and low maximum hematocrit were laboratory findings. Clinical management involved administration of intravenous fluids and antipyretics. Favorable outcomes can be obtained through early diagnosis and supportive treatment. The morbidity profile can be more serious in teenage pregnancies. Additional studies should be conducted to establish whether low baseline hematocrit, low percentages of rising hematocrit in pregnant women with dengue infection, and abortions (with a high degree of increasing hematocrit during the critical stage of the disease) are typical clinical signs.

  15. DENGUE INFECTION IN PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Khamim, Kriangsak; Khamim, Boonluck; Pengsaa, Krisana

    2015-01-01

    While dengue infection is still on the increase in adults in Thailand, it also affects pregnant women, especially pregnant teenagers. This study was designed to investigate dengue infection during pregnancy. Seven cases of dengue infection in pregnant women were admitted to Ban Pong Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Dengue infection presented in all pregnancy trimesters. There were two severe cases: one was dengue hemorrhagic fever in the first trimester, and the second was at a critical stage of the infection during labor. There were three cases of abortion. These three cases included one complete, one incomplete, and one threatened abortion, with rising hematocrits of 22.8%, 17.1%, and 14.7%, respectively. Two out of the three teenage pregnancies experienced complete and threatened abortions, while the third abortion case was a threatened abortion pregnancy at the critical stage of infection during intrapartum. Leukopenia was identified in six out of seven women. Low baseline hematocrit and low maximum hematocrit were laboratory findings. Clinical management involved administration of intravenous fluids and antipyretics. Favorable outcomes can be obtained through early diagnosis and supportive treatment. The morbidity profile can be more serious in teenage pregnancies. Additional studies should be conducted to establish whether low baseline hematocrit, low percentages of rising hematocrit in pregnant women with dengue infection, and abortions (with a high degree of increasing hematocrit during the critical stage of the disease) are typical clinical signs. PMID:26506742

  16. Dengue 3 Epidemic, Havana, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Otto; Kourí, Gustavo; Pérez, Raúl; San Martín, José L.; Vázquez, Susana; Rosario, Delfina; Mora, Regla; Quintana, Ibrahim; Bisset, Juan; Cancio, Reynel; Masa, Ana M; Castro, Osvaldo; González, Daniel; Avila, Luis C.; Rodríguez, Rosmari; Alvarez, Mayling; Pelegrino, Jose L.; Bernardo, Lídice; Prado, Irina

    2004-01-01

    In June 2001, dengue transmission was detected in Havana, Cuba; 12,889 cases were reported. Dengue 3, the etiologic agent of the epidemic, caused the dengue hemorrhagic fever only in adults, with 78 cases and 3 deaths. After intensive vector control efforts, no new cases have been detected. PMID:15200868

  17. Dengue 3 epidemic, Havana, 2001.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Otto; Guzmán, María G; Kourí, Gustavo; Pérez, Raúl; San Martín, José L; Vázquez, Susana; Rosario, Delfina; Mora, Regla; Quintana, Ibrahim; Bisset, Juan; Cancio, Reynel; Masa, Ana M; Castro, Osvaldo; González, Daniel; Avila, Luis C; Rodríguez, Rosmari; Alvarez, Mayling; Pelegrino, Jose L; Bernardo, Lídice; Prado, Irina

    2004-04-01

    In June 2001, dengue transmission was detected in Havana, Cuba; 12,889 cases were reported. Dengue 3, the etiologic agent of the epidemic, caused the dengue hemorrhagic fever only in adults, with 78 cases and 3 deaths. After intensive vector control efforts, no new cases have been detected.

  18. Leptospirosis during dengue outbreak, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    LaRocque, Regina C; Breiman, Robert F; Ari, Mary D; Morey, Roger E; Janan, Firdous Ara; Hayes, John Mosely; Hossain, M Anowar; Brooks, W Abdullah; Levett, Paul N

    2005-05-01

    We collected acute-phase serum samples from febrile patients at 2 major hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh, during an outbreak of dengue fever in 2001. A total of 18% of dengue-negative patients tested positive for leptospirosis. The case-fatality rate among leptospirosis patients (5%) was higher than among dengue fever patients (1.2%).

  19. Age and clinical dengue illness.

    PubMed

    Egger, Joseph R; Coleman, Paul G

    2007-06-01

    The relationship between age and risk for classic dengue fever has never been quantified. We use data from clinical patients to show that the relative risk of having classical disease after primary dengue virus infection increases with age. This relationship has implications for strategies aimed at controlling dengue fever.

  20. Preventing dengue through mobile phones: evidence from a field experiment in Peru.

    PubMed

    Dammert, Ana C; Galdo, Jose C; Galdo, Virgilio

    2014-05-01

    Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world (WHO, 2009). During the last two decades, the dramatic rise in the number of dengue infections has been particularly evident in Latin American and the Caribbean countries. This paper examines the experimental evidence of the effectiveness of mobile phone technology in improving households' health preventive behavior in dengue-endemic areas. The main results suggest that repeated exposure to health information encourages households' uptake of preventive measures against dengue. As a result, the Breteau Index in treatment households, an objective measure of dengue risk transmission, is 0.10 standard deviations below the mean of the control group, which shows a reduction in the number of containers per household that test positive for dengue larvae. The estimates also show marginally significant effects of the intervention on self-reported dengue symptoms. Moreover, we use a multiple treatment framework that randomly assigns households to one of the four treatment groups in order to analyze the impacts of framing on health behavior. Different variants emphasized information on monetary and non-monetary benefits and costs. The main results show no statistical differences among treatment groups. PMID:24681813

  1. Chlorophyll derivatives can be an efficient weapon in the fight against dengue.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Rehman, Zia Ur; Ali, Imran; Murad, Waheed; Muhammad, Noor; Ullah, Waheed; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral infection, is one of the major public health concerns in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Approximately, 2.5 billion people across the world are at risk from dengue and 50 to 100 million new infections of dengue occur annually. There is yet no vaccine or medicine available against dengue, and treatment remains only supportive. Targeting its vector by a combination of biological and chemical approaches and management of breeding sites are currently the only existing approaches to control or eliminate dengue. Chlorophyll derivatives like chlorophyllin and pheophorbide have been reported as effective natural photosensitizers against larvae of several insects including flies. Chlorophyll derivatives were also reported effective against larval stages of freshwater snails as well as against certain parasites of fish. This article briefly discusses the possible application of chlorophyll derivatives in controlling dengue vectors and hence the disease itself. Chlorophyll derivatives can prove to be a good contributor in an integrated approach against dengue.

  2. Preventing dengue through mobile phones: evidence from a field experiment in Peru.

    PubMed

    Dammert, Ana C; Galdo, Jose C; Galdo, Virgilio

    2014-05-01

    Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world (WHO, 2009). During the last two decades, the dramatic rise in the number of dengue infections has been particularly evident in Latin American and the Caribbean countries. This paper examines the experimental evidence of the effectiveness of mobile phone technology in improving households' health preventive behavior in dengue-endemic areas. The main results suggest that repeated exposure to health information encourages households' uptake of preventive measures against dengue. As a result, the Breteau Index in treatment households, an objective measure of dengue risk transmission, is 0.10 standard deviations below the mean of the control group, which shows a reduction in the number of containers per household that test positive for dengue larvae. The estimates also show marginally significant effects of the intervention on self-reported dengue symptoms. Moreover, we use a multiple treatment framework that randomly assigns households to one of the four treatment groups in order to analyze the impacts of framing on health behavior. Different variants emphasized information on monetary and non-monetary benefits and costs. The main results show no statistical differences among treatment groups.

  3. Incomplete surveillance of a dengue-2 epidemic in Ibagué, Colombia, 1995-1997.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Tania; de la Hoz, Fernando; Cárdenas, Victor; Sánchez, Carmen; de Calderón, Laura; Pérez, Ligia; Bermúdez, Antonio

    2004-06-01

    From April 1995 through November 1997 a dengue epidemic occurred in Ibagué (400,000 population), Colombia, where 3,419 cases were reported and DEN 2 virus was isolated from seven patients. A sero-survey conducted in 1996 found evidence of previous dengue infection in 9.6% of the population, indicating that many infections had not been reported. The dengue infections occurred in all age groups, but children under five years of age were most frequently infected. Forty-five percent of this Ibagué population were born after the re-appearance of dengue in Colombia in 1972, but have never been infected with dengue virus. Most of the cases reported as dengue hemorrhagic fever did not fulfill the current case definition. Aedes aegypti larvae were found in 19% of dwellings surveyed, most often in uncovered low tanks used for water storage. Many residents were not acquainted with the domestic nature of the mosquito vector. Health workers attributed the failure of the dengue control programs to lack of leadership and other administrative problems.

  4. Invited commentary: Dengue lessons from Cuba.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, D W

    2000-11-01

    An 18-year interval between a dengue virus type 1 outbreak in 1977-1979 and a dengue virus type 2 outbreak in 1997 in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, provided a unique opportunity to evaluate risk factors for dengue disease. All patients with symptomatic dengue, including 205 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 12 deaths, were adults born before the dengue virus type 1 epidemic, and nearly all (98%) experienced secondary dengue virus infections. In contrast, almost all of those who seroconverted without illness (97%) experienced primary dengue virus infection. This provides epidemiologic support for the immune enhancement theory of dengue pathogenesis. The Cuban experience suggests that immune enhancement can be seen even 20 years after the primary dengue virus infection. It also supports the contention that primary infections with dengue virus type 2 (and dengue virus type 4) are largely subclinical. These observations have implications for dengue vaccine development based on live-attenuated viruses.

  5. Scientists try new strategy to eradicate dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, G

    1999-02-27

    In a bid to reduce the risk of dengue fever in parts of Vietnam, the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific, an aid organization, recently completed a 3-year program using the mesocyclops crustacean, an organism about 1 mm long which eats the larvae of mosquitos which transmit dengue fever. The program appears to eradicated the larvae from the northern Vietnamese province of Phan Boi, and there was a 75% success rate in other provinces. The Queensland Institute of Medical Research and the Vietnam National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology were the organizations involved in coordinating drops of the organism into mosquito breeding areas such as wells, water tanks, and household water containers. A community education and clean-up program was also implemented to teach residents about the importance of throwing away unused buckets and other containers which could hold stagnant water and become potential breeding grounds for disease. It is important to prevent dengue because existing treatments are inadequate.

  6. Treatment of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Anoja

    2012-01-01

    The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decades at an alarming rate. In the endemic areas, waves of infection occur in epidemics, with thousands of individuals affected, creating a huge burden on the limited resources of a country's health care system. While the illness passes off as a simple febrile episode in many, a few have a severe illness marked by hypovolemic shock and bleeding. Iatrogenic fluid overload in the management may further complicate the picture. In this severe form dengue can be fatal. Tackling the burden of dengue is impeded by several issues, including a lack of understanding about the exact pathophysiology of the infection, inability to successfully control the vector population, lack of specific therapy against the virus, and the technical difficulties in developing a vaccine. This review provides an overview on the epidemiology, natural history, management strategies, and future directions for research on dengue, including the potential for development of a vaccine.

  7. [Dengue. A review].

    PubMed

    Teruel-López, E

    1991-01-01

    Dengue fever is an acute and infectious disease produced by a togavirus. This clinical syndrome being benign or severe like the Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), has been associated with a very high mortality rate specifically in children with different ages and those under 1 year of age from mothers having antibodies to dengue virus. Other groups with potential risk factors are those patients with chronic diseases like asthma, sickle cell anaemia and diabetes mellitus. Dengue virus show a highly tropism for endothelial reticulum system as the bone marrow, spleen, liver and lymph nodes where viral antigens can be demonstrated by several immunological methods. The pathogenesis of the DHF/DSS can be considered to result from a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction where antigen-activated T lymphocytes release a variety of biologically active chemical mediators (lymphokines) with further effects on blood clotting system and vascular permeability producing the symptoms of shock and hemorrhage seen in these cases. The rapid control and hospitalization of the patients allow them to get a fast recovery without any sequelae.

  8. Dengue encephalitis in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Hommel, D; Talarmin, A; Deubel, V; Reynes, J M; Drouet, M T; Sarthou, J L; Hulin, A

    1998-01-01

    Thousands of cases of dengue fever (DF) and several cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever were recorded in French Guiana during the recent outbreak of dengue-2 virus (1991-1992) and in subsequent years. One case with clinical signs typical of classical DF with neurological complications is reported in this study. The neurological features (encephalitis) appeared during the acute phase, 2 days after the onset of fever. Dengue-2 virus was detected in both the cerebrospinal fluid and blood sample. This case was fatal. This first reported case of classical DF with encephalitis in French Guiana is a new demonstration of the potential neurovirulence of dengue viruses.

  9. Dengue virus-mosquito interactions.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2008-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is more widely dispersed now than at any time in the past, placing billions of humans at risk of infection with one or more of the four dengue viruses. This review presents and discusses information on mosquito-dengue infection dynamics and describes the prominent role that temperature and rainfall play in controlling dengue viral transmission including discussions of the effect of interannual climate variations and the predicted effect of global warming. Complementary human determinants of dengue epidemiology include viremia titer, variation in viremic period, enhanced viremias, and threshold viremia. Topics covered include epidemiological phenomena such as traveling waves, the generation of genetic diversity of dengue viruses following virgin soil introductions and in hyperendemic settings, and evidence for and against viral virulence as a determinant of the severity of dengue infections. Also described is the crucial role of monotypic and heterotypic herd immunity in shaping dengue epidemic behavior.

  10. Progress towards a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel P; Farrar, Jeremy; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2009-11-01

    The spread of dengue virus throughout the tropics represents a major, rapidly growing public health problem with an estimated 2.5 billion people at risk of dengue fever and the life-threatening disease, severe dengue. A safe and effective vaccine for dengue is urgently needed. The pathogenesis of severe dengue results from a complex interaction between the virus, the host, and, at least in part, immune-mediated mechanisms. Vaccine development has been slowed by fears that immunisation might predispose individuals to the severe form of dengue infection. A pipeline of candidate vaccines now exists, including live attenuated, inactivated, chimeric, DNA, and viral-vector vaccines, some of which are at the stage of clinical testing. In this Review, we present what is understood about dengue pathogenesis and its implications for vaccine design, the progress that is being made in the development of a vaccine, and the future challenges.

  11. Dengue infection: a global concern.

    PubMed

    Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Kulwichit, Wanla; Tantawichien, Terapong; Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2002-06-01

    Dengue infection, one of the most important mosquito-borne viral diseases of humans, is now a significant problem in several tropical countries. The disease, caused by the four dengue virus serotypes, ranges from asymptomatic infection, undifferentiated fever, dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without shock. DHF is characterized by fever, bleeding diathesis and a tendency to develop a potentially fatal shock syndrome. Hematological findings include vasculopathy, coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia as the most constant findings. During the last twenty-five years, there have been increasing reports of dengue infection with unusual manifestations, mainly with cerebral and hepatic symptoms. Laboratory diagnosis includes virus isolation, serology and detection of dengue ribonucleic acid. Successful treatment, which is mainly supportive, depends on early recognition of the disease and careful monitoring for shock. Prevention depends on control of the mosquito vector. More efforts must be made to understand the pathogenesis of DHF in order to develop a safe and effective dengue vaccine.

  12. Micronutrients and dengue.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sundus; Finkelstein, Julia L; Stewart, Anna M; Kenneth, John; Polhemus, Mark E; Endy, Timothy P; Cardenas, Washington; Mehta, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Dengue virus infection is the most widespread mosquito-borne viral infection in humans and has emerged as a serious global health challenge. In the absence of effective treatment and vaccine, host factors including nutritional status, which may alter disease progression, need investigation. The interplay between nutrition and other infections is well-established, and modulation of nutritional status often presents a simple low-cost method of interrupting transmission, reducing susceptibility, and/or ameliorating disease severity. This review examines the evidence on the role of micronutrients in dengue virus infection. We found critical issues and often inconsistent results across studies; this finding along with the lack of sufficient literature in this field have limited our ability to make any recommendations. However, vitamins D and E have shown promise in small supplementation trials. In summary, the role of micronutrients in dengue virus infection is an exciting research area and needs to be examined in well-designed studies with larger samples.

  13. Ophthalmic complications of dengue.

    PubMed

    Chan, David P L; Teoh, Stephen C B; Tan, Colin S H; Nah, Gerard K M; Rajagopalan, Rajesh; Prabhakaragupta, Manjunath K; Chee, Caroline K L; Lim, Tock H; Goh, Kong Y

    2006-02-01

    We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.

  14. Dengue: an update.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, María G; Kourí, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    This review is an update of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) based on international and Cuban experience. We describe the virus characteristics and risk factors for dengue and DHF, and compare incidence and the case fatality rates in endemic regions (southeast Asia, western Pacific, and the Americas). The clinical picture and the pathogenesis of the severe disease are explained. We also discuss the viral, individual, and environmental factors that determine severe disease. Much more research is necessary to clarify these mechanisms. Also reviewed are methods for viral isolation and the serological, immunohistochemical, and molecular methods applied in the diagnosis of the disease. We describe the status of vaccine development and emphasise that the only alternative that we have today to control the disease is through control of its vector Aedes aegypti.

  15. [Dengue as haemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Olszyńska-Krowicka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is distributed in tropical and subtropical regions and transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. In September 2010 two cases of indigenous dengue fever were diagnosed in metropolitan France for the first time and next DENV infection was diagnosed in a German traveler returning from a trip to Croatia. The Aedes albopictus mosquitoes were found in several European countries (for example in greenhouses in Netherlands). The indigenous DENV infections in Europe are rare diseases, probably acquired after bites of infected mosquitoes imported by airplanes from endemic areas. Nonspecific symptoms including: fever (up to 39 degrees C), chills, arthralagia, headache, myalgia and abnormalities in laboratory tests such as: thrombocytopaenia, leukopaenia and liver tests cause problems with differential diagnosis ofhematologic and hepatologic syndromes. The most serious complications are associated with dengue shock syndrome with mortality rate of 50%.

  16. [Dengue in the Americas].

    PubMed

    Reiter, P

    1996-01-01

    Dengue fever is endemic from Argentina to Mexico, where serotypes 1, 2 and 4 are in wide circulation. After an absence of almost 20 years, serotype 3 arrived in Central America in late 1994. Over the past decade dengue has become a major public health problem in many of these countries, with an increase in the prevalence of dengue haemorrhagic fever and in the number of fatal cases. The situation is not new; there is evidence of a least eight pandemics from the early 19th century until the initiation of the Aedes aegypti eradication campaign in 1947. The resurgence of serious disease was predicted in the early 1980's, and has followed a pattern of increasing severity observed 20 years earlier in Asia.

  17. Dengue virus-infected Aedes aegypti in the home environment.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rejon, Julian; Loroño-Pino, Maria Alba; Farfan-Ale, Jose Arturo; Flores-Flores, Luis; Del Pilar Rosado-Paredes, Elsy; Rivero-Cardenas, Nubia; Najera-Vazquez, Rosario; Gomez-Carro, Salvador; Lira-Zumbardo, Victor; Gonzalez-Martinez, Pedro; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; Beaty, Barry J; Eisen, Lars

    2008-12-01

    We determined abundance of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and presence of dengue virus (DENV) in females collected from premises of laboratory-confirmed dengue patients over a 12-month period (March 2007 to February 2008) in Merida, Mexico. Backpack aspiration from 880 premises produced 1,836 females and 1,292 males indoors (predominantly from bedrooms) and 102 females and 108 males from patios/backyards. The mean weekly indoor catch rate per home peaked at 7.8 females in late August. Outdoor abundances of larvae or pupae were not predictive of female abundance inside the home. DENV-infected Ae. aegypti females were recovered from 34 premises. Collection of DENV-infected females from homes of dengue patients up to 27 days after the onset of symptoms (median, 14 days) shows the usefulness of indoor insecticide application in homes of suspected dengue patients to prevent their homes from becoming sources for dispersal of DENV by persons visiting and being bitten by infected mosquitoes. PMID:19052309

  18. [Dengue in Panama, 1993].

    PubMed

    Quiroz, E; Ortega, M; Guzmán, M G; Vázquez, S; Pelegrino, J L; Campos, C; Bayard, V; Vázquez, M; Kourí, G

    1997-01-01

    Up to 1993, Panama was the only country in Central America where the autochthonous transmission of dengue virus had been detected without experimenting an explosive epidemic despite being reinfected with the Aedes aegypti mosquito since 1985. The characteristics of this first outbreak reported on November 19, 1993, are described in this paper. It is shown that even when there is a Program for the Surveillance and Control of Dengue, which considers low levels of Aedes aegypti infection and a system for the early detection of the virus, the epidemics appear if the community does not take an active part as it happened in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The 14 cases reported were located in an area under the responsibility of the Health Center in San Isidro, Belisario Porras, Special District of San Miguelito, in Panama City (13 cases in 4 blocks of the sector of Santa Librada and 1 case in San Isidro Valley). 3 patients were under 15 and 8 over 36, the other 3 were between 15 and 24.9 were females. The dengue type 2 virus was isolated in 3 patients. The presence of IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue was demonstrated in 11 patients, whereas in 8 over 20 it was observed a secondary type answer. According to the clinical picture, the epidemic was classified as dengue fever. The seroepidemiological survey carried out in the sector of Santa Librada and its surroundings 5 months after the appearance of the symptoms in the first case showed a prevalence of antibodies to dengue of 5.7% (46/802), mainly among individuals over 44. These results confirmed that the outbreak was geographically limited.

  19. DENGUE FEVER AND DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN ADULTS.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are re-emerging diseases that are endemic in the Tropics. The global prevalence of dengue cases has increased in South-East Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific, and the Americas. The increasingly widespread distribution and the rising incidence of dengue virus infections are related to increased distribution of Aedes aegypti, an increasingly urban population, and increasing air travel. Several Southeast Asian countries show that the age of the reported dengue cases has increased from 5-9 years, to older children and young adults. Dengue infection in adolescents and adults has also been recognized as a potential hazard to international travelers returning from endemic areas, especially SoutheastAsia. Dengue is one disease entity with different clinical presentations; often with unpredictable clinical evolutions and outcomes. Bleeding manifestations in adult patients, including petechiae and menorrhagia were also frequently found; however, massive hematemesis may occur in adult patients because of peptic ulcer disease and may not be associated with profound shock as previously reported in children. Although shock and plasma leakage seem to be more prevalent as age decreases, the frequency of internal hemorrhage rises as age increases. Increase in liver enzymes found in both children and adults indicated liver involvement during dengue infections. Pre-existing liver diseases in adults such as chronic hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and hemoglobinopathies may aggravate the liver impairment in dengue infection. Fulminant hepatitis is a rare but well described problem in adult patients with dengue infection. Currently, no specific therapeutic agent exists for dengue. The early recognition of dengue infection, bleeding tendency, and signs of circulatory collapse would reduce mortality rates in adult patients with dengue infection.

  20. Fighting arboviral diseases: low toxicity on mammalian cells, dengue growth inhibition (in vitro), and mosquitocidal activity of Centroceras clavulatum-synthesized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Aruna, Palanimuthu; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Paulpandi, Manickam; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Wei, Hui; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Nicoletti, Marcello; Syuhei, Ban; Canale, Angelo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has rapidly spread in all regions of the world in recent years. Female mosquitoes, mainly Aedes aegypti, transmit dengue. Approximately 3,900 million people, in 128 countries, are at risk of dengue infection. Recently, a focus has been provided on the potential of green-synthesized nanoparticles as inhibitors of the production of dengue viral envelope (E) protein in Vero cells and downregulators of the expression of dengue viral E gene. Algae are an outstanding reservoir of novel compounds, which may help in the fight against mosquito-borne diseases. In this research, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were rapidly synthesized using a cheap extract of the alga Centroceras clavulatum. AgNP were characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In mosquitocidal assays, LC50 values of C. clavulatum extract against A. aegypti larvae and pupae were 269.361 ppm (larva I), 309.698 ppm (larva II), 348.325 ppm (larva III), 387.637 ppm (larva IV), and 446.262 ppm (pupa). C. clavulatum extract also exhibited moderate antioxidant activity, both in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging assays. LC50 values of C. clavulatum-synthesized AgNP were 21.460 ppm (larva I), 23.579 ppm (larva II), 25.912 ppm (larva III), 29.155 ppm (larva IV), and 33.877 ppm (pupa). Furthermore, C. clavulatum-synthesized AgNP inhibited dengue (serotype dengue virus type-2 (DEN-2)) viral replication in Vero cells. Notably, 50 μg/ml of green-synthesized AgNP showed no cytotoxicity on Vero cells while reduced DEN-2 viral growth of more than 80%; 12.5 μg/ml inhibited viral growth of more than 50%. Cellular internalization assays highlighted that untreated infected cells showed high intensity of fluorescence emission, which denotes high level of viral internalization. Conversely

  1. Dengue serosurvey in Sint Eustatius.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Teresa; Martin, Nicholas J; Jack-Roosberg, Carol; Odongo, George; Beausoleil, Edwin; Tuck, Jennifer; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2014-01-01

    Four distinct serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV) are the cause of re-emerging dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Dengue circulation in the Caribbean has gone from none or single serotype to multiple serotypes co-circulating with reports of continuing cycles of progressively more severe disease in the region. Few studies have investigated dengue on Sint Eustatius. Blood samples were collected to determine the prevalence of antibodies against dengue in the Sint Eustatius population. Greater than 90% of the serum samples (184 of 204) were positive for anti-flavivirus antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbance assay (ELISA). Plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), specific for dengue viruses, showed that 171 of these 184 flavivirus antibody positive sera had a neutralization titer against one or more DENV serotypes. A majority of the sera (62%) had neutralizing antibody to all four dengue serotypes. Only 26 PRNT positive sera (15%) had monotypic dengue virus neutralizing antibody, most of which (20 of 26) were against DENV2. Evidence of infection with all four serotypes was observed across all age groups except in the youngest age group (10-19 years) which contained only DENV2 positive individuals. In a multiple logistic regression model, only the length of residence on the island was a predictor of a positive dengue PRNT50 result. To our knowledge this is the first dengue serosurveillance study conducted on Sint Eustatius since the 1970s. The lack of antibodies to the DEN1, 3, and 4 in the samples collected from participants under 20 years of age suggests that only DEN2 has circulated on island since the early 1990s. The high prevalence of antibodies against dengue (83.8%) and the observation that the length of time on the island was the strongest predictor of infection suggests dengue is endemic on Sint Eustatius and a public health concern that warrants further investigation.

  2. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever, Brazil, 1981-2002.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, João Bosco; Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Simplicio, Ana Cristina da Rocha; Hatch, Douglas L

    2005-01-01

    In the last 5 years, Brazil has accounted for approximately 70% of reported dengue fever cases in the Americas. We analyzed trends of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) from the early 1980s to 2002 by using surveillance data from the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Two distinct epidemiologic patterns for dengue were observed: localized epidemics (1986-1993), and endemic and epidemic virus circulation countrywide (1994-2002). Currently, serotypes 1, 2, and 3 cocirculate in 22 of 27 states. Dengue and DHF affected mainly adults; however, an increase in occurrence of DHF among children has been recently detected in northern Brazil, which suggests a shift in the occurrence of severe disease to younger age groups. In 2002, hospitalizations increased, which points out the change in disease severity compared to that seen in the 1990s. We describe the epidemiology of dengue in Brazil, characterizing the changing patterns of it and DHF during the last 20 years.

  3. Baylisascaris larva migrans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kazacos, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    SummaryBaylisascaris procyonis, the common raccoon roundworm, is the most commonly recognized cause of clinical larva migrans (LM) in animals, a condition in which an immature parasitic worm or larva migrates in a host animal’s tissues, causing obvious disease. Infection with B. procyonis is best known as a cause of fatal or severe neurologic disease that results when the larvae invade the brain, the spinal cord, or both; this condition is known as neural larva migrans (NLM). Baylisascariasis is a zoonotic disease, that is, one that is transmissible from animals to humans. In humans, B. procyonis can cause damaging visceral (VLM), ocular (OLM), and neural larva migrans. Due to the ubiquity of infected raccoons around humans, there is considerable human exposure and risk of infection with this parasite. The remarkable disease-producing capability of B. procyonis in animals and humans is one of the most significant aspects of the biology of ascarids (large roundworms) to come to light in recent years. Infection with B. procyonis has important health implications for a wide variety of free-ranging and captive wildlife, zoo animals, domestic animals, as well as human beings, on both an individual and population level. This report, eighth in the series of U.S. Geological Survey Circulars on zoonotic diseases, will help us to better understand the routes of Baylisascaris procyonis infections and how best to adequately monitor this zoonotic disease.

  4. Baylisascaris larva migrans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kazacos, Kevin R.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Van Riper, Charles

    2016-05-26

    SummaryBaylisascaris procyonis, the common raccoon roundworm, is the most commonly recognized cause of clinical larva migrans (LM) in animals, a condition in which an immature parasitic worm or larva migrates in a host animal’s tissues, causing obvious disease. Infection with B. procyonis is best known as a cause of fatal or severe neurologic disease that results when the larvae invade the brain, the spinal cord, or both; this condition is known as neural larva migrans (NLM). Baylisascariasis is a zoonotic disease, that is, one that is transmissible from animals to humans. In humans, B. procyonis can cause damaging visceral (VLM), ocular (OLM), and neural larva migrans. Due to the ubiquity of infected raccoons around humans, there is considerable human exposure and risk of infection with this parasite. The remarkable disease-producing capability of B. procyonis in animals and humans is one of the most significant aspects of the biology of ascarids (large roundworms) to come to light in recent years. Infection with B. procyonis has important health implications for a wide variety of free-ranging and captive wildlife, zoo animals, domestic animals, as well as human beings, on both an individual and population level. This report, eighth in the series of U.S. Geological Survey Circulars on zoonotic diseases, will help us to better understand the routes of Baylisascaris procyonis infections and how best to adequately monitor this zoonotic disease.

  5. A Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-06-30

    Denvaxia is the first licensed vaccine for the prevention of dengue. It is a live vaccine developed using recombinant DNA technology. The vaccine is given as three doses over the course of a year and has the potential to prevent hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year. PMID:27368091

  6. [Dengue, Zika and Chikungunya].

    PubMed

    Kantor, Isabel N

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted by arthropods, including those responsible for the current pandemic: alphavirus (Chikungunya) and flaviviruses (dengue and Zika). Its importance increased in the Americas over the past 20 years. The main vectors are Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus. Dengue infection provides long lasting immunity against the specific serotype and temporary to the other three. Subsequent infection by another serotype determines more serious disease. There is a registered vaccine for dengue, Dengvaxia (Sanofi Pasteur). Other two (Butantan and Takeda) are in Phase III in 2016. Zika infection is usually asymptomatic or occurs with rash, conjunctivitis and not very high fever. There is no vaccine or specific treatment. It can be transmitted by parental, sexual and via blood transfusion. It has been associated with microcephaly. Chikungunya causes prolonged joint pain and persistent immune response. Two candidate vaccines are in Phase II. Dengue direct diagnosis is performed by virus isolation, RT-PCR and ELISA for NS1 antigen detection; indirect methods are ELISA-IgM (cross-reacting with other flavivirus), MAC-ELISA, and plaque neutralization. Zika is diagnosed by RT-PCR and virus isolation. Serological diagnosis cross-reacts with other flavivirus. For CHIKV culture, RT-PCR, MAC-ELISA and plaque neutralization are used. Against Aedes organophosphate larvicides (temephos), organophosphorus insecticides (malathion and fenitrothion) and pyrethroids (permethrin and deltamethrin) are usually employed. Resistance has been described to all these products. Vegetable derivatives are less expensive and biodegradable, including citronella oil, which microencapsulated can be preserved from evaporation.

  7. Dengue in Florida (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  8. Dengue in Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge R

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  9. Clustering, climate and dengue transmission.

    PubMed

    Junxiong, Pang; Yee-Sin, Leo

    2015-06-01

    Dengue is currently the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease, with an increasing burden over recent decades. Currently, neither a licensed vaccine nor an effective anti-viral therapy is available, and treatment largely remains supportive. Current vector control strategies to prevent and reduce dengue transmission are neither efficient nor sustainable as long-term interventions. Increased globalization and climate change have been reported to influence dengue transmission. In this article, we reviewed the non-climatic and climatic risk factors which facilitate dengue transmission. Sustainable and effective interventions to reduce the increasing threat from dengue would require the integration of these risk factors into current and future prevention strategies, including dengue vaccination, as well as the continuous support and commitment from the political and environmental stakeholders.

  10. Clustering, climate and dengue transmission.

    PubMed

    Junxiong, Pang; Yee-Sin, Leo

    2015-06-01

    Dengue is currently the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease, with an increasing burden over recent decades. Currently, neither a licensed vaccine nor an effective anti-viral therapy is available, and treatment largely remains supportive. Current vector control strategies to prevent and reduce dengue transmission are neither efficient nor sustainable as long-term interventions. Increased globalization and climate change have been reported to influence dengue transmission. In this article, we reviewed the non-climatic and climatic risk factors which facilitate dengue transmission. Sustainable and effective interventions to reduce the increasing threat from dengue would require the integration of these risk factors into current and future prevention strategies, including dengue vaccination, as well as the continuous support and commitment from the political and environmental stakeholders. PMID:25872683

  11. Outlook for a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Norrby, R

    2014-05-01

    Dengue is an increasing medical problem in subtropical and tropical countries. The search for a safe and effective vaccine is complicated by the fact that there are four types of dengue virus and that, if a vaccine is live attenuated, it should be proven not to cause the life-threatening form of dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever. So far one vaccine candidate, a four-valent chimeric vaccine constructed from a yellow fever vaccine strain, has reached large clinical trials and has been shown to offer protection against dengue types 1, 3 and 54 but not against dengue type 2. It is highly likely that an effective vaccine will be available in the next decade.

  12. Frequency and Clinical Features of Dengue Infection in a Schoolchildren Cohort from Medellin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Agudelo, Ivony Yireth; Parra-Henao, Gabriel; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the incidence of dengue infection, we established active surveillance of febrile episodes in a cohort of schoolchildren from three schools in Medellin, Colombia. We followed a cohort of 2,379 schoolchildren in 2010 and followed 1,840 of these children the following year. During the follow-up time, 264 schoolchildren displayed 297 febrile episodes; of these, 23 episodes (7.7%) were caused by acute dengue infection. All four dengue serotypes were found, and all of the cases were mild. The most common symptoms in the dengue cases compared with those in other febrile illness were asthenia (96% versus 87%), anorexia (78% versus 57%), rhinorrhea (65.2% versus 58%), abdominal pain (56.5% versus 47.8%), arthralgia (43% versus 33%), and positive tourniquet test (13% versus 3%). This difference was not statistically significant. Pulse was elevated, and systolic arterial pressure was lower in dengue cases compared with other febrile illness (P < 0.05). Mosquito indexes were determined in 8 children's houses and in the schools. Aedes aegypti adults were found in both households and in schools, whereas Aedes aegypti larvae were found only in schools. These results showed an elevated dengue frequency in children, with symptoms similar to those of other febrile illness and transmission risk in households and schools. PMID:23304167

  13. Factors associated with the spread of dengue fever in Jeddah Governorate, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Kholedi, A A N; Balubaid, O; Milaat, W; Kabbash, I A; Ibrahim, A

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever resurged sharply in Jeddah in 2004 and rose to 1308 cases in 2006. This case-control study determined factors potentiating the spread of the disease to provide an epidemiological baseline to help dengue control. All (650) suspected cases of dengue in Jeddah in 2007 were eligible for inclusion. Cases were those confirmed with dengue by laboratory investigations (n = 244) and controls those confirmed negative (n = 406). Of these, 129 cases and 240 controls could be contacted and were included in the study. Variables found significant in the bivariate analysis were included in a logistic regression analysis. The presence of stagnant water in indoor drainage holes (OR = 4.9), indoor larvae (OR = 2.2), nearby construction sites (OR = 2.2), and older age (OR = 1.2) were independent determinants of dengue infection (P<0.01 for all). Face-to-face health education significantly decreased the risk of dengue infection. Efforts are needed to control the modifiable factors identified in this study with emphasis on health education.

  14. Atypical manifestations of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pawaria, Arti; Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica; Meena, Jagdish

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed case records of 40 in-patients (22 boys) with serologically confirmed dengue fever between 1st October and 30th November, 2013. Severe dengue was seen in 30, out of which 12 (30%) had compensated shock. Splenomegaly (6,15%) and encephalopathy (4,10%) were the commonest atypical features. Atypical manifestations of dengue fever were more common than that reported in the past.

  15. Dengue research opportunities in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Catherine A; Morens, David M; Cassetti, M Cristina; Costero-Saint Denis, Adriana; San Martin, Jose-Luis; Whitehead, Stephen S; Fauci, Anthony S

    2012-10-01

    Dengue is a systemic arthropod-borne viral disease of major global public health importance. At least 2.5 billion people who live in areas of the world where dengue occurs are at risk of developing dengue fever (DF) and its severe complications, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Repeated reemergences of dengue in sudden explosive epidemics often cause public alarm and seriously stress healthcare systems. The control of dengue is further challenged by the lack of effective therapies, vaccines, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite years of study, even its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. This article discusses recent advances in dengue research and identifies challenging gaps in research on dengue clinical evaluation, diagnostics, epidemiology, immunology, therapeutics, vaccinology/clinical trials research, vector biology, and vector ecology. Although dengue is a major global tropical pathogen, epidemiologic and disease control considerations in this article emphasize dengue in the Americas. PMID:22782946

  16. Dengue Research Opportunities in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine A.; Morens, David M.; Cassetti, M. Cristina; Costero-Saint Denis, Adriana; San Martin, Jose-Luis; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a systemic arthropod-borne viral disease of major global public health importance. At least 2.5 billion people who live in areas of the world where dengue occurs are at risk of developing dengue fever (DF) and its severe complications, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Repeated reemergences of dengue in sudden explosive epidemics often cause public alarm and seriously stress healthcare systems. The control of dengue is further challenged by the lack of effective therapies, vaccines, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite years of study, even its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. This article discusses recent advances in dengue research and identifies challenging gaps in research on dengue clinical evaluation, diagnostics, epidemiology, immunology, therapeutics, vaccinology/clinical trials research, vector biology, and vector ecology. Although dengue is a major global tropical pathogen, epidemiologic and disease control considerations in this article emphasize dengue in the Americas. PMID:22782946

  17. Dengue research opportunities in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Catherine A; Morens, David M; Cassetti, M Cristina; Costero-Saint Denis, Adriana; San Martin, Jose-Luis; Whitehead, Stephen S; Fauci, Anthony S

    2012-10-01

    Dengue is a systemic arthropod-borne viral disease of major global public health importance. At least 2.5 billion people who live in areas of the world where dengue occurs are at risk of developing dengue fever (DF) and its severe complications, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Repeated reemergences of dengue in sudden explosive epidemics often cause public alarm and seriously stress healthcare systems. The control of dengue is further challenged by the lack of effective therapies, vaccines, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite years of study, even its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. This article discusses recent advances in dengue research and identifies challenging gaps in research on dengue clinical evaluation, diagnostics, epidemiology, immunology, therapeutics, vaccinology/clinical trials research, vector biology, and vector ecology. Although dengue is a major global tropical pathogen, epidemiologic and disease control considerations in this article emphasize dengue in the Americas.

  18. Costs of Three Wolbachia Infections on the Survival of Aedes aegypti Larvae under Starvation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Perran A.; Endersby, Nancy M.; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue virus, has recently been infected experimentally with Wolbachia: intracellular bacteria that possess potential as dengue biological control agents. Wolbachia depend on their hosts for nutrients they are unable to synthesize themselves. Consequently, competition between Wolbachia and their host for resources could reduce host fitness under the competitive conditions commonly experienced by larvae of Ae. aegypti in the field, hampering the invasion of Wolbachia into natural mosquito populations. We assess the survival and development of Ae. aegypti larvae under starvation conditions when infected with each of three experimentally-generated Wolbachia strains: wMel, wMelPop and wAlbB, and compare their fitness to wild-type uninfected larvae. We find that all three Wolbachia infections reduce the survival of larvae relative to those that are uninfected, and the severity of the effect is concordant with previously characterized fitness costs to other life stages. We also investigate the ability of larvae to recover from extended food deprivation and find no effect of Wolbachia on this trait. Aedes aegypti larvae of all infection types were able to resume their development after one month of no food, pupate rapidly, emerge at a large size, and exhibit complete cytoplasmic incompatibility and maternal transmission. A lowered ability of Wolbachia-infected larvae to survive under starvation conditions will increase the threshold infection frequency required for Wolbachia to establish in highly competitive natural Ae. aegypti populations and will also reduce the speed of invasion. This study also provides insights into survival strategies of larvae when developing in stressful environments. PMID:26745630

  19. Dengue vaccine: priorities and progress.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, María G; Muné, Mayra; Kourí, Gustavo

    2004-12-01

    Dengue transmission has increased considerably in the past 20 years. Currently, it can only be reduced by mosquito control; however, the application of vector-control methods are labor intensive, require discipline and diligence, and are hard to sustain. In this context, a safe dengue vaccine that confers long-lasting protection against infection with the four dengue viruses is urgently required. This review will discuss the requirements of a dengue vaccine, problems, and advances that have been made. Finally, new targets for research will be presented. PMID:15566333

  20. Dengue fever in international travelers.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, T

    2000-07-01

    Dengue virus infection is becoming increasingly recognized as one of the world's major emerging infectious diseases. Although only a few systematic studies have been conducted to assess the incidence and clinical course of dengue fever in travelers, it is now possible to estimate risk factors for travelers to areas of endemicity. Dengue virus and its vector, Aedes mosquitoes, benefit from human habitation and travel-related aspects of human behavior. Thus, travelers serve an important double role as potential victims of the disease and as vehicles for further spread of dengue.

  1. Odonate Nymphs: Generalist Predators and Their Potential in the Management of Dengue Mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Waseem; Ali-Khan, Hafiz Azhar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dengue is amongst the most serious mosquito-borne infectious disease with hot spots in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. Unfortunately, no licensed vaccine for the disease is currently available in medicine markets. The only option available is the management of dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Method: Predatory potential of five odonate nymphs namely Anax parthenope, Bradinopyga geminate, Ischnura forcipata, Rhinocypha quadrimaculata, and Orthetrum sabina were evaluated against the 4th instar larvae of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti, under laboratory conditions. The consumption of the mosquito larvae was evaluated at three water volume levels viz., 1 liter, 2 liter and 3 liter. Results: The number of Ae. aegypti larvae consumed varied significantly among the five species, and at different levels of water volume (P< 0.01). However, the interaction between odonate nymphs and the water volumes was statistically non-significant (P> 0.05). Ischnura forcipata consumed the highest number of Ae. aegypti larvae (n=56) followed by A. parthenope (n=47) and B. geminate (n=46). The number of larvae consumed was decreased with increasing search area or water volume, and the highest predation was observed at 1-liter water volume. Conclusion: The odonate nymphs could be a good source of biological agents for the management of the mosquitoes at larval stages. PMID:27308283

  2. Overview of current situation of dengue and dengue vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus of humans in the world. It is caused by one of four closely related virus serotypes whose primary vector is Aedes aegypti and secondarily by Ae. albopictus. A global dengue pandemic began in Southeast Asia after World War II and has intensified during the las...

  3. Dengue: update on epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary Elizabeth; Chen, Lin H

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of dengue fever has undergone major shifts in recent decades. The global distribution has expanded to include more geographic areas. The intensity of transmission and the severity of infections have increased in areas where infection was already endemic. Multiple studies provide a clearer picture of the epidemiology and allow mapping of its distribution and change over time. Despite major efforts to control transmission, competent vectors now infest most tropical and subtropical regions; Aedes albopictus, also a competent vector, is able to survive in temperate areas, placing parts of Europe and North America at risk for local transmission. Many research teams in dengue-endemic areas are working to identify key local weather, vector, and other variables that would allow prediction of a likely epidemic early enough to permit interventions to avert it or blunt its impact.

  4. Dengue eye disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Aaron W; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, a viral disease epidemic in some parts of the world, is of considerable international concern, with a growing incidence owing to developing urbanization, tourism, and trade. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever are uncommon, but of great significance. Proposed mechanisms include direct viral infection as well as immunologic phenomena. Common manifestations include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal hemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies such as foveolitis, hemorrhage, and edema. Main symptoms include blurring of vision, scotomata, metamorphopsia, and floaters. Diagnostic and monitoring investigations described included optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography, visual field analysis, and electrophysiologic tests. Management is based on clinical presentation and includes active surveillance as well as various anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies. There have been no prospective, randomized therapeutic trials, and it is unclear if the disease is self-limiting or if treatment is actually beneficial. Prognosis varies, ranging from full resolution to permanent vision loss despite intervention.

  5. [Active surveillance for dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1989-07-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are emerging as major public health problems in most tropical countries. Effective prevention and control programs will depend on improved surveillance. A new approach to active surveillance is outlined with emphasis on the interepidemic period. The objective is to develop an early warning surveillance system than can predict epidemic dengue. Virologic surveillance is the most important in an early warning system. Dengue virus transmission should be monitored to provide information on which serotypes are present, their distribution, and the type of illness associated with each serotype. Other components of the active surveillance system include fever alert and clinical surveillance for severe and fatal disease associated with viral syndrome. Individually, each component is not very sensitive, but collectively, they provide an early warning capability that allows detection of newly introduced dengue virus serotypes well in advance of epidemic transmission. With such information, emergency mosquito control can be implemented and major epidemics averted.

  6. DGV: Dengue Genographic Viewer.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akifumi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kengo; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kuroda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and their vectors are widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. An autochthonous case of DENV was reported in Tokyo, Japan, in 2014, for the first time in 70 years. A comprehensive database of DENV sequences containing both serotype and genotype data and epidemiological data is crucial to trace DENV outbreak isolates and promptly respond to outbreaks. We constructed a DENV database containing the serotype, genotype, year and country/region of collection by collecting all publically available DENV sequence information from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and assigning genotype information. We also implemented the web service Dengue Genographic Viewer (DGV), which shows the geographical distribution of each DENV genotype in a user-specified time span. DGV also assigns the serotype and genotype to a user-specified sequence by performing a homology search against the curated DENV database, and shows its homologous sequences with the geographical position and year of collection. DGV also shows the distribution of DENV-infected entrants to Japan by plotting epidemiological data from the Infectious Agents Surveillance Report (IASR), Japan. This overview of the DENV genotype distribution may aid in planning for the control of DENV infections. DGV is freely available online at: (https://gph.niid.go.jp/geograph/dengue/content/genomemap). PMID:27375595

  7. DGV: Dengue Genographic Viewer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akifumi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kengo; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kuroda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and their vectors are widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. An autochthonous case of DENV was reported in Tokyo, Japan, in 2014, for the first time in 70 years. A comprehensive database of DENV sequences containing both serotype and genotype data and epidemiological data is crucial to trace DENV outbreak isolates and promptly respond to outbreaks. We constructed a DENV database containing the serotype, genotype, year and country/region of collection by collecting all publically available DENV sequence information from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and assigning genotype information. We also implemented the web service Dengue Genographic Viewer (DGV), which shows the geographical distribution of each DENV genotype in a user-specified time span. DGV also assigns the serotype and genotype to a user-specified sequence by performing a homology search against the curated DENV database, and shows its homologous sequences with the geographical position and year of collection. DGV also shows the distribution of DENV-infected entrants to Japan by plotting epidemiological data from the Infectious Agents Surveillance Report (IASR), Japan. This overview of the DENV genotype distribution may aid in planning for the control of DENV infections. DGV is freely available online at: (https://gph.niid.go.jp/geograph/dengue/content/genomemap). PMID:27375595

  8. Prospects for dengue vaccines for travelers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sl-Ki; Lee, Yong Seok; Namkung, Suk; Lim, Jacqueline K; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    Travel-acquired dengue cases have been increasing as the overall global dengue burden has expanded. In Korea, imported dengue cases have been reported since 2000 when it first became a notifiable disease. During the first four months of 2016, three times more dengue cases were reported in Korea than during the same period the previous year. A safe and efficacious vaccine for travelers would be beneficial to prevent dengue disease in individual travelers and potentially decrease the risk of virus spread to non-endemic areas. Here, we summarize the characteristics of dengue vaccines for travelers and review dengue vaccines currently licensed or in clinical development. PMID:27489798

  9. Prospects for dengue vaccines for travelers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Travel-acquired dengue cases have been increasing as the overall global dengue burden has expanded. In Korea, imported dengue cases have been reported since 2000 when it first became a notifiable disease. During the first four months of 2016, three times more dengue cases were reported in Korea than during the same period the previous year. A safe and efficacious vaccine for travelers would be beneficial to prevent dengue disease in individual travelers and potentially decrease the risk of virus spread to non-endemic areas. Here, we summarize the characteristics of dengue vaccines for travelers and review dengue vaccines currently licensed or in clinical development. PMID:27489798

  10. Identification of Essential Containers for Aedes Larval Breeding to Control Dengue in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ferdousi, Farhana; Yoshimatsu, Shoji; Ma, Enbo; Sohel, Nazmul; Wagatsuma, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), one of the most important emerging arboviral diseases, is transmitted through the bite of container breeding mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. A household entomological survey was conducted in Dhaka from August through October 2000 to inspect water-holding containers in indoor, outdoor, and rooftop locations for Aedes larvae. The objective of this study was to determine mosquito productivity of each container type and to identify some risk factors of households infested with Aedes larvae. Of 9,222 households inspected, 1,306 (14.2%) were positive for Aedes larvae. Of 38,777 wet containers examined, 2,272 (5.8%) were infested with Aedes larvae. Containers used to hold water, such as earthen jars, tanks, and drums were the most common containers for larval breeding. Tires in outdoor and rooftop locations of the households were also important for larval breeding. Although present in abundance, buckets were of less importance. Factors such as independent household, presence of a water storage system in the house, and fully/partly shaded outdoors were found to be significantly associated with household infestation of Aedes larvae. Identification and subsequent elimination of the most productive containers in a given area may potentially reduce mosquito density to below a level at which dengue transmission may be halted. PMID:26865829

  11. Identification of Essential Containers for Aedes Larval Breeding to Control Dengue in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ferdousi, Farhana; Yoshimatsu, Shoji; Ma, Enbo; Sohel, Nazmul; Wagatsuma, Yukiko

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF), one of the most important emerging arboviral diseases, is transmitted through the bite of container breeding mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. A household entomological survey was conducted in Dhaka from August through October 2000 to inspect water-holding containers in indoor, outdoor, and rooftop locations for Aedes larvae. The objective of this study was to determine mosquito productivity of each container type and to identify some risk factors of households infested with Aedes larvae. Of 9,222 households inspected, 1,306 (14.2%) were positive for Aedes larvae. Of 38,777 wet containers examined, 2,272 (5.8%) were infested with Aedes larvae. Containers used to hold water, such as earthen jars, tanks, and drums were the most common containers for larval breeding. Tires in outdoor and rooftop locations of the households were also important for larval breeding. Although present in abundance, buckets were of less importance. Factors such as independent household, presence of a water storage system in the house, and fully/partly shaded outdoors were found to be significantly associated with household infestation of Aedes larvae. Identification and subsequent elimination of the most productive containers in a given area may potentially reduce mosquito density to below a level at which dengue transmission may be halted.

  12. Reemergence of dengue in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Pursem, Vidula N; Barkham, Timothy M S; Ng, Lee Ching; Inoue, Masafumi; Manraj, Shyam S

    2010-04-01

    Dengue reemerged in Mauritius in 2009 after an absence of >30 years, and >200 cases were confirmed serologically. Molecular studies showed that the outbreak was caused by dengue virus type 2. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope gene identified 2 clades of the virus. No case of hemorrhagic fever was recorded.

  13. Dengue-1 virus isolation during first dengue fever outbreak on Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-11-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1.

  14. Dengue infections in HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Siong, Wong Chia; Ching, Tan Huey; Jong, Go Chi; Pang, Chan Siew; Vernon, Lee Jian Ming; Sin, Leo Yee

    2008-03-01

    A retrospective review of hospital admission records was conducted on patients who were admitted to the Communicable Disease Center (CDC)/Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2005. There were 5 HIV patients who were admitted with dengue infection during the study period. Their symptoms were generally mild and recovery was uneventful. None of the patients developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. The symptoms and signs of dengue infection in HIV patients are nonspecific. It is important for healthcare workers to maintain a high index of suspicion in order to make the diagnosis. Interactions between pathogenesis pathways or with antiviral treatments may have contributed to the apparently less severe dengue infections in HIV patients. This observation needs to be explored further.

  15. Dengue fever among Swedish tourists.

    PubMed

    Wittesjö, B; Eitrem, R; Niklasson, B

    1993-01-01

    Serologically confirmed cases of dengue fever among Swedish tourists were studied retrospectively. Dengue fever was found to be the most commonly diagnosed imported arbovirus disease in Sweden during the period December 1989-November 1990. 24 cases were diagnosed. The geographical epidemiology showed that 17/23 who answered a questionnaire were infected in Thailand, most often during spring and early summer. 17 patients were admitted to hospital. All patients had high fever. Other common symptoms were myalgia, headache, fatigue/prostration and erythema. All patients but 1 with a long-standing ataxia recovered without sequelae. Low white blood cell and platelet counts were registered in all sampled patients. Depressed sodium levels and elevated liver enzymes were seen regularly. Dengue virus type 1 was isolated from 2 patients who suffered from dengue haemorrhagic fever grade II in the course of their primary dengue virus infection.

  16. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wong, H B

    1981-01-01

    The history of dengue haemorrhagic fever as distinct from dengue fever in South-East Asia is traced. The epidemiology of the disease in the various countries is contrasted with that in Singapore since DHF first appeared on the scene in South-East Asia. From this survey, it is concluded that the dengue haemorrhagic fever is a new disease presentation, and its fate in SE Asia depends on the immunological state of the community, attempts at vector control, and probably antigenic variation in the various types of dengue virus. The pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed in detail. Diagnosis is presented with a detailed discussion of diagnosis of the pre-shock stage. Finally, the management of dengue haemorrhagic fever is discussed.

  17. Dengue shock syndrome in an American traveler with primary dengue 3 infection.

    PubMed

    Morens, D M; Sather, G E; Gubler, D J; Rammohan, M; Woodall, J P

    1987-03-01

    A previously reported case of childhood dengue shock syndrome in an American traveler to India was investigated serologically. The original studies neither indicated the infecting serotype nor proved primary or secondary infection. However, BHK suspension PRNT of 6-year convalescent serum now indicates that the child had primary dengue type 3 infection. Dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome are potential hazards for American travelers and American residents of dengue-receptive areas.

  18. Dengue virus 3 genotype 1 associated with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Batista Cecílio, Alzira; Portela Ferreira, Gustavo; Paiva Drumond, Betânia; Germano de Oliveira, Jaquelline; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Peregrino Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2008-02-01

    Dengue serotype 3 viruses were isolated from patients in Brazil from 2002 through 2004. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, these isolates were assigned genotype 1. This genotype had never been reported in South America before. Its appearance indicates a major risk factor for dengue epidemics and severe disease.

  19. Mortality Predictors in Patients with Severe Dengue in the State of Amazonas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rosemary Costa; de Castro, Daniel Barros; de Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio; Sampaio, Vanderson de Souza; dos Passos, Ricardo Augusto; da Costa, Cristiano Fernandes; Sadahiro, Megumi; Braga, José Ueleres

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. There is a lack of information on the risk factors for death due to severe dengue fever in developing countries, including Brazil where the state of Amazonas is located. This knowledge is important for decision making and the implementation of effective measures for patient care. This study aimed to identify factors associated with death among patients with severe dengue, in Amazonas from 2001 to 2013. We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on secondary data from the epidemiological surveillance of dengue provided by the Fundação de Vigilância em Saúde do Amazonas, FVS (Health Surveillance Foundation) of the Secretaria de Saúde do Amazonas, SUSAM (Health Secretariat of the State of Amazonas). Data on dengue cases were obtained from the SINAN (Notifiable Diseases Information System) and SIM (Mortality Information System) databases. We selected cases of severe dengue with laboratory confirmation, including dengue-related deaths of residents in the state of Amazonas from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2013. The explanatory variables analyzed were sex, age, level of education, spontaneous hemorrhagic manifestations, plasma extravasation and platelet count. Patients who died due to severe dengue had more hematuria, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thrombocytopenia than the survivors. Considering the simultaneous effects of demographic and clinical characteristics with a multiple logistic regression model, it was observed that the factors associated with death were age >55 years (odds ratio [OR] 4.98), gastrointestinal bleeding (OR 10.26), hematuria (OR 5.07), and thrombocytopenia (OR 2.55). Gastrointestinal bleeding was the clinical sign most strongly associated with death, followed by hematuria and age >55 years. The study results showed that the best predictor of death from severe dengue is based on the characteristic of age >55 years, together with the clinical signs of

  20. Mortality Predictors in Patients with Severe Dengue in the State of Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rosemary Costa; Castro, Daniel Barros de; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Sampaio, Vanderson de Souza; Passos, Ricardo Augusto Dos; Costa, Cristiano Fernandes da; Sadahiro, Megumi; Braga, José Ueleres

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. There is a lack of information on the risk factors for death due to severe dengue fever in developing countries, including Brazil where the state of Amazonas is located. This knowledge is important for decision making and the implementation of effective measures for patient care. This study aimed to identify factors associated with death among patients with severe dengue, in Amazonas from 2001 to 2013. We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on secondary data from the epidemiological surveillance of dengue provided by the Fundação de Vigilância em Saúde do Amazonas, FVS (Health Surveillance Foundation) of the Secretaria de Saúde do Amazonas, SUSAM (Health Secretariat of the State of Amazonas). Data on dengue cases were obtained from the SINAN (Notifiable Diseases Information System) and SIM (Mortality Information System) databases. We selected cases of severe dengue with laboratory confirmation, including dengue-related deaths of residents in the state of Amazonas from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2013. The explanatory variables analyzed were sex, age, level of education, spontaneous hemorrhagic manifestations, plasma extravasation and platelet count. Patients who died due to severe dengue had more hematuria, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thrombocytopenia than the survivors. Considering the simultaneous effects of demographic and clinical characteristics with a multiple logistic regression model, it was observed that the factors associated with death were age >55 years (odds ratio [OR] 4.98), gastrointestinal bleeding (OR 10.26), hematuria (OR 5.07), and thrombocytopenia (OR 2.55). Gastrointestinal bleeding was the clinical sign most strongly associated with death, followed by hematuria and age >55 years. The study results showed that the best predictor of death from severe dengue is based on the characteristic of age >55 years, together with the clinical signs of

  1. Mortality Predictors in Patients with Severe Dengue in the State of Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rosemary Costa; Castro, Daniel Barros de; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Sampaio, Vanderson de Souza; Passos, Ricardo Augusto Dos; Costa, Cristiano Fernandes da; Sadahiro, Megumi; Braga, José Ueleres

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. There is a lack of information on the risk factors for death due to severe dengue fever in developing countries, including Brazil where the state of Amazonas is located. This knowledge is important for decision making and the implementation of effective measures for patient care. This study aimed to identify factors associated with death among patients with severe dengue, in Amazonas from 2001 to 2013. We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on secondary data from the epidemiological surveillance of dengue provided by the Fundação de Vigilância em Saúde do Amazonas, FVS (Health Surveillance Foundation) of the Secretaria de Saúde do Amazonas, SUSAM (Health Secretariat of the State of Amazonas). Data on dengue cases were obtained from the SINAN (Notifiable Diseases Information System) and SIM (Mortality Information System) databases. We selected cases of severe dengue with laboratory confirmation, including dengue-related deaths of residents in the state of Amazonas from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2013. The explanatory variables analyzed were sex, age, level of education, spontaneous hemorrhagic manifestations, plasma extravasation and platelet count. Patients who died due to severe dengue had more hematuria, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thrombocytopenia than the survivors. Considering the simultaneous effects of demographic and clinical characteristics with a multiple logistic regression model, it was observed that the factors associated with death were age >55 years (odds ratio [OR] 4.98), gastrointestinal bleeding (OR 10.26), hematuria (OR 5.07), and thrombocytopenia (OR 2.55). Gastrointestinal bleeding was the clinical sign most strongly associated with death, followed by hematuria and age >55 years. The study results showed that the best predictor of death from severe dengue is based on the characteristic of age >55 years, together with the clinical signs of

  2. A travel medicine view of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eyal; Schwartz, Eli

    2009-09-01

    Dengue fever is the most prevalent arboviral infection worldwide, with up to 40% of the world population living in endemic regions. Among travelers to tropical countries, dengue infection is increasingly reported, and it is now a leading cause of post-travel fever. Outbreaks of dengue-like illness were already described since the 18th century, but it is only in the last half century that a severe form of the disease - dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) has been described. Although the cause of DHF is not established, the prevailing theory attributes the disease to antibody-dependent enhancement of viral replication, in the presence of a secondary dengue infection. Comparative studies of primary vs. secondary infection are difficult to perform in endemic countries because of the rarity of primary infection except during early infancy. Travelers on the other hand are usually diagnosed with primary infection and are therefore a better study population. Data on dengue and DHF among travelers appears to suggest that severe dengue and DHF occur in similar rates among cases with primary and with secondary infections. Epidemiological and physiological data from travelers suggest that the prevailing theory on the causes of DHF needs to be reconsidered.

  3. Epidemiology and control of dengue virus infections in Thai villages in 1987.

    PubMed

    Eamchan, P; Nisalak, A; Foy, H M; Chareonsook, O A

    1989-07-01

    A severe epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand in August of 1987 prompted a field investigation. DHF rates of 0.4-6.5 cases per 1,000 residents in subdistricts and 2-15 cases per 1,000 residents in 10 villages investigated were reported. Epidemics peaked in neighboring villages at different times; in June and July, and in August before the rainy season began late in the month. In 4 primary schools representing 6 villages, sera from groups of randomly selected children were tested for dengue IgM with the antibody capture ELISA test. Rates of recent dengue infection were 10-65% in the schools and correlated closely with reported rates of DHF. In an effort to control vectors, malathion fog and temephos (1% abate sand granules) were applied. Villagers were educated in prevention and were urged to cover water receptacles. The percentage of houses with larvae dropped from 67 to 20, the percentage of containers with larvae decreased from 30 to 5, and the number of containers with larvae per 100 households decreased from 221 to 33. This was a serious epidemic in which conventional control measures were only moderately effective.

  4. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26424605

  5. [Epidemiology of dengue and hemorrhagic dengue in Santiago, Cuba 1997].

    PubMed

    Valdés, L; Guzmán, M G; Kourí, G; Delgado, J; Carbonell, I; Cabrera, M V; Rosario, D; Vázquez, S

    1999-07-01

    A dengue epidemic that Cuba reported in 1997 registered more than 500,000 cases of dengue fever produced by viral serotype 1. In 1981, there was an epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever produced by serotype 2 of the virus. This time 344,203 clinical cases were reported, 10,312 of which were severe cases of hemorrhagic fever that led to 158 fatalities (101 of them among children). The reintroduction of dengue, and specifically of dengue viral serotype 2 (Jamaica genotype), was quickly detected in January 1997 through an active surveillance system with laboratory confirmation of cases in the municipality of Santiago de Cuba, in the province of the same name. The main epidemiological features of this outbreak are reported in this paper. A total of 3,012 cases were reported and serologically confirmed. These included 205 cases classified as dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), 12 of which were case fatalities (all among adults). Secondary infection with dengue virus was one of the most important risk factors for DHF/DSS. Ninety-eight percent of the DHF/DSS cases and 92% of the fatal cases had contracted a secondary infection. It was the first time dengue hemorrhagic fever was documented as a secondary infection 16 to 20 years after initial infection. Belonging to the white racial group was another important risk factor for DHF/DSS, as had been observed during the 1981 epidemic. During the most recent epidemic it was demonstrated that the so called "fever alert" is not useful for early detection of an epidemic. Measures taken by the country's public health officials prevented spread of the epidemic to other municipalities plagued by Aedes aegypti.

  6. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics.

  7. Vertical infestation of the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in apartments in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Roslan, Muhammad Aidil; Shafie, Aziz; Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff Wan

    2013-12-01

    Dengue is a serious public health problem in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to compare the vertical infestation of Aedes population in 2 apartments in Kuala Lumpur with different status of dengue incidence (i.e., high-dengue-incidence area and area with no reported dengue cases). The study was also conducted to assess the relationship between environmental factors such as rainfall, temperature, and humidity and Aedes population that may influence Aedes infestation. Surveillance with a mosquito larvae trapping device was conducted for 28 continuous weeks (January to July 2012) in Vista Angkasa (VA) and Inderaloka (IL) apartments located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The results indicated that both Aedes spp. could be found from ground to higher floor levels of the apartments, with Aedes aegypti being more predominant than Ae. albopictus. Data based on mixed and single breeding of Aedes spp. on different floors did not show any significant difference. Both rainfall (R3; i.e., the amount of rainfall collected during the previous 3 wk before the surveillance period began) and RH data showed significant relationship with the number of Aedes larvae collected in VA and IL. No significant difference was found between the numbers of Aedes larvae in both study areas as well as maximum and minimum temperatures. Results also indicated adaptations of Ae. aegypti to the ecosystem at each elevation of high-rise buildings, with Ae. albopictus staying inside of apartment units.

  8. [Population genetics of dengue virus and transmission of dengue fever].

    PubMed

    Falcón-Lezama, Jorge; Sánchez-Burgos, Gilma Guadalupe; Ramos-Castañeda, José

    2009-01-01

    The endemic behavior of dengue fever in Mexico during the past five years is of major concern to every sector related with public health and the effort to control the transmission has been focused on vector control. However, regardless of the effectiveness of the intervention measures it is important to know which elements determine dengue transmission. With regard to the molecular basis for dengue transmission, a great deal of progress has been made due to the introduction of genomic and bioinformatic approaches. The goal of this review is to describe the most recent developments in this area with emphasis on the Mexican situation.

  9. Field observation on the efficacy of Toxorhynchites splendens (Wiedemann) as a biocontrol agent against Aedes albopictus (Skuse) larvae in a cemetery.

    PubMed

    Nyamah, M A; Sulaiman, S; Omar, B

    2011-08-01

    This study explored the efficacy of Toxorhynchites splendens, predator of Aedes albopictus as a biocontrol agent. There was a negative correlation between Ae. albopictus larval population and Tx. splendens larval population in ovitraps (r=-0.287, R²=0.0821). The correlation is higher between the mean number of Ae. albopictus larvae per ovitrap and the number of Tx. splendens larvae in an ovitrap (r=-0.987, R²=0.9737). Larvae of Tx. splendens were observed to co-exist with larvae of Ae. albopictus and Culex fuscocephala in the ovitraps placed in the study area. The existence of Tx. splendens larvae in the study area coincides with their habit, preferring to breed in bamboo stumps. A total of 480 ovitraps were inspected for 30-week study period and 281 ovitraps were positive with Ae. albopictus larvae respectively. There was a significant difference between numbers of ovitrap positive for Ae. albopictus larvae with number of Tx. splendens larvae in the ovitraps (ANOVA, F((4,475)) 2.655, p<0.05). Of 281 ovitraps positive with Ae. albopictus larvae, 255 ovitraps contained only one Tx. splendens larva each. Only one ovitrap contained four, the most number of Tx. splendens larvae (p< 0.05). Thus, Tx. splendens could be utilised as an alternative for dengue vector control programme. PMID:22041750

  10. Use of a geographic information system for defining spatial risk for dengue transmission in Bangladesh: role for Aedes albopictus in an urban outbreak.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Emch, Michael; Breiman, Robert F

    2003-12-01

    We used conventional and spatial analytical tools to characterize patterns of transmission during a community-wide outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 2000. A comprehensive household-level mosquito vector survey and interview was conducted to obtain data on mosquito species and breeding as well as illness consistent with dengue. Clusters of dengue illnesses and high-density vector populations were observed in a distinct sector of the city. Dengue clusters are less identifiable in areas further away from major hospitals, suggesting that proximity to hospitals determines whether cases of dengue are diagnosed. Focusing on those areas relatively close to hospitals, we found a spatial association between dengue clusters and vector populations. Households reporting a recent dengue illness were more likely to have Aedes albopictus larvae present in the home when compared with households not reporting cases. Households reporting a recent dengue illness were also more likely to have a neighbor with Ae. albopictus present in the home. In contrast, the presence of Aedes aegypti within the premises as well as the homes of neighbors (within 50 meters) was not associated with dengue illness. Given that the breeding habitats for Ae. albopictus are somewhat distinct from those of Ae. aegypti, the findings of this study have implications for control of dengue transmission in this urban setting where much of the focus has been on indoor mosquito breeding and transmission. Public health officials may find the disease-environment map useful for planning targeted interventions because it displays areas where transmission is most intense.

  11. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the "Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha" Herpetology Collection of the Emílio Goeldi Museum, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The aim of this study was to present the morphological study of the Acanthocephala larvae found in A. ameiva ameiva lizard. PMID:27027551

  12. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the "Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha" Herpetology Collection of the Emílio Goeldi Museum, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The aim of this study was to present the morphological study of the Acanthocephala larvae found in A. ameiva ameiva lizard.

  13. Dengue fever seroprevalence and risk factors, Texas-Mexico border, 2004.

    PubMed

    Brunkard, Joan Marie; Robles López, Jose Luis; Ramirez, Josue; Cifuentes, Enrique; Rothenberg, Stephen J; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Moore, Chester G; Brussolo, Regina M; Villarreal, Norma A; Haddad, Brent M

    2007-10-01

    Reported autochthonous dengue fever transmission in the United States has been limited to 5 south Texas border counties since 1980. We conducted a cross-sectional serosurvey in Brownsville, Texas, and Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico (n = 600), in 2004 to assess dengue seroprevalence. Recent dengue infection was detected in 2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5%-3.5%) and 7.3% (95% CI 4.3%-10.3%) of residents in Brownsville and Matamoros, respectively. Past infection was detected in 40% (95% CI 34%-45%) of Brownsville residents and 78% (95% CI 74%-83%) of Matamoros residents. For recent infection, only weekly family income dengue infection were presence of larval habitat, absence of air-conditioning and street drainage, and weekly family income larvae were present in 30% of households in both cities. Our results show that dengue fever is endemic in this area of the southern Texas-Mexico border.

  14. Dengue and other flavivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Choumet, V; Desprès, Ph

    2015-08-01

    Flaviviruses are responsible for yellow fever, Zika fever and dengue, all of which are major human diseases found in tropical regions of the globe. They are zoonoses with a transmission cycle that involves primates as reservoirs and mosquitoes of the genus Aedes as vectors. The recent upsurge of urban epidemics of yellow fever, Zika fever and dengue has involved human-to-human transmission with mosquitoes as the vector. This paper is primarily concerned with dengue, which has become the pre-eminent arbovirosis in terms of public health.

  15. Dengue: where are we today?

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria Guadalupe; Vázquez, Susana; Kouri, Gustavo

    2009-07-01

    Dengue is considered the main arthropod-borne viral disease of humans. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports of mild and severe cases have been reported. The growing dengue incidence observed in recent years has been accompanied by reports of new observations, findings and global initiatives with an improvement in our understanding of this phenomenon. The epidemiology and new clinical classification of dengue, advances in the diagnostic and pathogenesis knowledge, and vaccine development as well as control methods including new global initiatives are summarised here. PMID:22589659

  16. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of dengue virus isolates differentiates dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever from dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuiskunen, Anne; Monteil, Vanessa; Plumet, Sébastien; Boubis, Laetitia; Wahlström, Maria; Duong, Veasna; Buchy, Philippe; Lundkvist, Ake; Tolou, Hugues; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including 500,000 reported cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Viral factors have been proposed to influence the severity of the disease, but markers of virulence have never been identified on DENV. Three DENV serotype-1 isolates from the 2007 epidemic in Cambodia that are derived from patients experiencing the various clinical forms of dengue were characterized both phenotypically and genetically. Phenotypic characteristics in vitro, based on replication kinetics in different cell lines and apoptosis response, grouped isolates from DF and DHF patients together, whereas the virus isolate from a DSS patient showed unique features: a lower level of replication in mammalian cells and extensive apoptosis in mosquito cells. Genomic comparison of viruses revealed six unique amino acid residues in the membrane, envelope, and in non-structural genes in the virus isolated from the DSS patient.

  18. Pathogenesis of dengue: challenges to molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1988-01-29

    Dengue viruses occur as four antigenically related but distinct serotypes transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. These viruses generally cause a benign syndrome, dengue fever, in the American and African tropics, and a severe syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), in Southeast Asian children. This severe syndrome, which recently has also been identified in children infected with the virus in Puerto Rico, is characterized by increased vascular permeability and abnormal hemostasis. It occurs in infants less than 1 year of age born to dengue-immune mothers and in children 1 year and older who are immune to one serotype of dengue virus and are experiencing infection with a second serotype. Dengue viruses replicate in cells of mononuclear phagocyte lineage, and subneutralizing concentrations of dengue antibody enhance dengue virus infection in these cells. This antibody-dependent enhancement of infection regulates dengue disease in human beings, although disease severity may also be controlled genetically, possibly by permitting and restricting the growth of virus in monocytes. Monoclonal antibodies show heterogeneous distribution of antigenic epitopes on dengue viruses. These epitopes serve to regulate disease: when antibodies to shared antigens partially neutralize heterotypic virus, infection and disease are dampened; enhancing antibodies alone result in heightened disease response. Further knowledge of the structure of dengue genomes should permit rapid advances in understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of dengue.

  19. Advances in dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Defang, Gabriel; Burgess, Timothy; Porter, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    Dengue viruses are the most important arboviruses causing human disease. Expansion of the disease in recent decades to include more geographical areas of the world, an appreciation of the disease burden and market potentials have spurred a flurry of activity in the development of vaccines to combat dengue viruses. Recent progress in this area and some of the obstacles associated with this development are discussed. PMID:19535912

  20. Recent advances in understanding dengue

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Sophie; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an emerging threat to billions of people worldwide. In the last 20 years, the incidence has increased four-fold and this trend appears to be continuing. Caused by one of four viral serotypes, dengue can present as a wide range of clinical phenotypes with the severe end of the spectrum being defined by a syndrome of capillary leak, coagulopathy, and organ impairment. The pathogenesis of severe disease is thought to be in part immune mediated, but the exact mechanisms remain to be defined. The current treatment of dengue relies on supportive measures with no licensed therapeutics available to date. There have been recent advances in our understanding of a number of areas of dengue research, of which the following will be discussed in this review: the drivers behind the global dengue pandemic, viral structure and epitope binding, risk factors for severe disease and its pathogenesis, as well as the findings of recent clinical trials including therapeutics and vaccines. We conclude with current and future dengue control measures and key areas for future research. PMID:26918159

  1. Recent advances in understanding dengue.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Sophie; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an emerging threat to billions of people worldwide. In the last 20 years, the incidence has increased four-fold and this trend appears to be continuing. Caused by one of four viral serotypes, dengue can present as a wide range of clinical phenotypes with the severe end of the spectrum being defined by a syndrome of capillary leak, coagulopathy, and organ impairment. The pathogenesis of severe disease is thought to be in part immune mediated, but the exact mechanisms remain to be defined. The current treatment of dengue relies on supportive measures with no licensed therapeutics available to date. There have been recent advances in our understanding of a number of areas of dengue research, of which the following will be discussed in this review: the drivers behind the global dengue pandemic, viral structure and epitope binding, risk factors for severe disease and its pathogenesis, as well as the findings of recent clinical trials including therapeutics and vaccines. We conclude with current and future dengue control measures and key areas for future research. PMID:26918159

  2. Dengue in infants: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amita; Chaturvedi, Umesh C

    2010-07-01

    Dengue virus (DV) infection causes either a benign syndrome, dengue fever, or a severe syndrome, dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), that is characterized by systemic capillary leakage, thrombocytopaenia and hypovolaemic shock. DHF/DSS occur mainly due to secondary infection by a heterotype DV infection in children and adults but in infants even primary infection by DV causes DHF/DSS. Clinical manifestations of DHF/DSS are more significantly associated with death in infants compared with older children. Vertical transmission of DV and anti-DV IgG has been well reported and is responsible for the pathogenesis of DV disease and its manifestations in infants. The complex pathogenesis of DHF/DSS during primary dengue in infants, with multiple age-related confounding factors, offers unique challenges to investigators. Dengue in infants is not often studied in detail due to practical limitations, but looking at the magnitude of DHF/DSS in infants and the unique opportunities this model provides, there is a need to focus on this problem. This paper reviews existing knowledge on this aspect of DV infection and the challenges it provides.

  3. Dengue Fever in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ya; Lun, Zhao-Rong; James, Anthony A; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2010-09-01

    Dengue is an acute emerging infectious disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and has become a serious global public health problem. In mainland China, a number of large dengue outbreaks with serious consequences have been reported as early as 1978. In the three decades from 1978 to 2008, a total of 655,324 cases were reported, resulting in 610 deaths. Since the 1990s, dengue epidemics have spread gradually from Guangdong, Hainan, and Guangxi provinces in the southern coastal regions to the relatively northern and western regions including Fujian, Zhejiang, and Yunnan provinces. As the major transmission vectors of dengue viruses, the biological behavior and vectorial capacity of Aedes mosquitoes have undergone significant changes in the last two decades in mainland China, most likely the result of urbanization and global climate changes. In this review, we summarize the geographic and temporal distributions, the serotype and genotype distributions of dengue viruses in mainland China, and analyze the current status of surveillance and control of vectors for dengue transmission.

  4. Dengue Virus May Bolster Zika's Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... dengue fever virus may increase the severity of Zika virus, a new study says. Early stage laboratory findings ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Zika Virus Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Dengue ...

  5. [Dengue fever in the Primorye Territory].

    PubMed

    Popov, A F; Simakova, A I; Kiriakov, V Iu; Petukhova, S A; Dadalova, O B; Sokotun, S A; Shapovalenko, A M

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen cases of dengue fever were imported to the Primorye Territory in 2012-2013. The cases were related to visits to Thailand, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Of the 18 patients, 17 and 1 had classic and hemorrhagic dengue fever, respectively.

  6. Mosquitoes feeding on insect larvae.

    PubMed

    Harris, P; Riordan, D F; Cooke, D

    1969-04-11

    Caged Aedes aegypti and Culex tarsalis are attracted to insect larvae, engorge on their body fluids, and produce viable eggs. Attractiveness of the larvae is related to their size, shape, and color but not to their movement. The possibility that wild mosquitoes substitute insect hemolymph for vertebrate blood is discussed. PMID:5774191

  7. Field Worker Evaluation of Dengue Vector Surveillance Methods: Factors That Determine Perceived Ease, Difficulty, Value, and Time Effectiveness in Australia and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azil, Aishah H; Ritchie, Scott A; Williams, Craig R

    2015-10-01

    This qualitative study aimed to describe field worker perceptions, evaluations of worth, and time costs of routine dengue vector surveillance methods in Cairns (Australia), Kuala Lumpur and Petaling District (Malaysia). In Cairns, the BG-Sentinel trap is a favored method for field workers because of its user-friendliness, but is not as cost-efficient as the sticky ovitrap. In Kuala Lumpur, the Mosquito Larvae Trapping Device is perceived as a solution for the inaccessibility of premises to larval surveys. Nonetheless, the larval survey method is retained in Malaysia for prompt detection of dengue vectors. For dengue vector surveillance to be successful, there needs to be not only technical, quantitative evaluations of method performance but also an appreciation of how amenable field workers are to using particular methods. Here, we report novel field worker perceptions of dengue vector surveillance methods in addition to time analysis for each method.

  8. Field Worker Evaluation of Dengue Vector Surveillance Methods: Factors That Determine Perceived Ease, Difficulty, Value, and Time Effectiveness in Australia and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azil, Aishah H; Ritchie, Scott A; Williams, Craig R

    2015-10-01

    This qualitative study aimed to describe field worker perceptions, evaluations of worth, and time costs of routine dengue vector surveillance methods in Cairns (Australia), Kuala Lumpur and Petaling District (Malaysia). In Cairns, the BG-Sentinel trap is a favored method for field workers because of its user-friendliness, but is not as cost-efficient as the sticky ovitrap. In Kuala Lumpur, the Mosquito Larvae Trapping Device is perceived as a solution for the inaccessibility of premises to larval surveys. Nonetheless, the larval survey method is retained in Malaysia for prompt detection of dengue vectors. For dengue vector surveillance to be successful, there needs to be not only technical, quantitative evaluations of method performance but also an appreciation of how amenable field workers are to using particular methods. Here, we report novel field worker perceptions of dengue vector surveillance methods in addition to time analysis for each method. PMID:25186807

  9. Reviewing Dengue: Still a Neglected Tropical Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a “neglected tropical disease” (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003–2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  10. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  11. Dengue 3 virus transmission in Africa.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J; Sather, G E; Kuno, G; Cabral, J R

    1986-11-01

    The first known transmission of dengue 3 virus in Africa was documented by virus isolation during an epidemic of dengue-like illness in Pemba, Mozambique, in late 1984 and early 1985. Dengue 3 virus was the only serotype isolated. Most patients appeared to be experiencing secondary flavivirus infections, but whether this was the result of previous dengue, yellow fever, or other flavivirus infection is not known. Two cases of hemorrhagic disease with shock and death were associated with the epidemic.

  12. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD.

  13. Randomness of Dengue Outbreaks on the Equator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yirong; Cook, Alex R; Lim, Alisa X L

    2015-09-01

    A simple mathematical model without seasonality indicated that the apparently chaotic dengue epidemics in Singapore have characteristics similar to epidemics resulting from chance. Randomness as a sufficient condition for patterns of dengue epidemics in equatorial regions calls into question existing explanations for dengue outbreaks there.

  14. Dengue associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Pal, Priyankar; Giri, Prabhas Prasun; Ramanan, A V

    2014-06-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a rare complication of dengue. We present 8 cases of dengue associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis diagnosed in our hospital during the dengue outbreak of 2012. All the cases were treated with a short (4 weeks) course of steroids along with supportive measures, and showed an excellent response.

  15. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and the dengue shock syndrome in India.

    PubMed

    Lall, R; Dhanda, V

    1996-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe haemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. Increased capillary permeability is the diagnostic feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). The pathophysiology of DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is related to sequential infection with different serotypes of the virus, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental or host factors and a combination of various risk factors. Infection due to low virulence strains is assumed to be the reason for the infrequent incidence of serious dengue disease in India. Since all four serotypes of the dengue virus have been implicated in various outbreaks in this country and several outbreaks of DHF/DSS have been recorded since the first report in 1963, further epidemics of the disease are likely. The situation is aggravated by the recent emergence of DHF/DSS in Sri Lanka. In view of the potential of this disease to spread, effective preventive and control measures should be a priority.

  16. [Effects of fermented cattle dung on the growth and development of Tenebrio molitor larvae].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang-Wei; Wang, Xia; Guo, Li-Yue; Zhan, Li-Jie; Bo, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhan; Wu, Guang-Lei; Jiang, Gao-Ming

    2012-07-01

    In order to make use of and industrialize the animal dung from large cattle farms, this paper explored the feasibility of using Tenebrio molitor to digest and utilize cattle dung. Cattle dung was mixed with the conventional feed (65% wheat bran, 30% corn flour, and 5% bean pulp) of T. molitor in definite proportions, and fermented with effective microorganisms (EM). The fermented products containing 60% and 80% of cattle dung (FD1 and FD2, respectively) were selected to feed T. molitor larvae, and the effects of the fermented products on the growth curve, death rate, pupation rate, and antioxidant system of the larvae were compared. Compared with CK (conventional deed), the FD1 made the developmental duration of the larvae prolonged by 10 days and the larvae's death rate upraised somewhat, but made the single larva's total food intake, average body mass, crude fat content, and ratio of unsaturated to saturated fat acids increased by 49%, 28%, 26%, and 32%, respectively (P < 0.05), and the activity of larvae's antioxidant system improved significantly, showing a remarkable adaptability of the larvae to FD1. Unlike FD1, FD2 displayed definite disadvantages in most test growth indicators, as compared with CK, indicating that T. molitor larvae had weak adaptability to FD2. Our findings suggested that using FD1 to feed the 3rd instar of T. molitor larvae would have good practical prospects in industrializing cattle dung.

  17. Rare occurrence of natural transovarial transmission of dengue virus and elimination of infected foci as a possible intervention method.

    PubMed

    Angel, Annette; Angel, Bennet; Joshi, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Transovarial transmission of dengue virus has been studied in 33 districts of Rajasthan, India. Small proportion (1.09%) of breeding containers positive for the virus and their elimination has been demonstrated as a possible intervention method of disease control. Dengue virus was isolated from individual mosquitoes employing Indirect Fluorescence Antibody Test and Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction. Out of 1,30,525 containers examined only 1432(1.09%) showed transovarially transmitted virus activity. Elimination of larvae from all the 1432 virus positive containers resulted in substantial control over prospective transmission of dengue. The study highlights rarity of transovarial transmission under natural conditions and sensitizes whether elimination of vertically infected foci could be used as a new intervention method.

  18. Dengue: an arthropod-borne disease of global importance.

    PubMed

    Mairuhu, A T A; Wagenaar, J; Brandjes, D P M; van Gorp, E C M

    2004-06-01

    Dengue viruses cause a variable spectrum of disease that ranges from an undifferentiated fever to dengue fever to the potentially fatal dengue shock syndrome. Due to the increased incidence and geographical distribution of dengue in the last 50 years, dengue is becoming increasingly recognised as one of the world's major infectious diseases. This article will review clinical and diagnostic aspects of dengue virus infections. It also presents our current knowledge of the pathophysiology of severe dengue and addresses the importance of dengue virus infections in those travelling to parts of the world where dengue is endemic.

  19. A comparative analysis of the relative efficacy of vector-control strategies against dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Amaku, Marcos; Coutinho, Francisco Antonio Bezerra; Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Lopez, Luis Fernandez; Nascimento Burattini, Marcelo; Massad, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Dengue is considered one of the most important vector-borne infection, affecting almost half of the world population with 50 to 100 million cases every year. In this paper, we present one of the simplest models that can encapsulate all the important variables related to vector control of dengue fever. The model considers the human population, the adult mosquito population and the population of immature stages, which includes eggs, larvae and pupae. The model also considers the vertical transmission of dengue in the mosquitoes and the seasonal variation in the mosquito population. From this basic model describing the dynamics of dengue infection, we deduce thresholds for avoiding the introduction of the disease and for the elimination of the disease. In particular, we deduce a Basic Reproduction Number for dengue that includes parameters related to the immature stages of the mosquito. By neglecting seasonal variation, we calculate the equilibrium values of the model's variables. We also present a sensitivity analysis of the impact of four vector-control strategies on the Basic Reproduction Number, on the Force of Infection and on the human prevalence of dengue. Each of the strategies was studied separately from the others. The analysis presented allows us to conclude that of the available vector control strategies, adulticide application is the most effective, followed by the reduction of the exposure to mosquito bites, locating and destroying breeding places and, finally, larvicides. Current vector-control methods are concentrated on mechanical destruction of mosquitoes' breeding places. Our results suggest that reducing the contact between vector and hosts (biting rates) is as efficient as the logistically difficult but very efficient adult mosquito's control.

  20. High rates of inapparent dengue in older adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Yap, Grace; Li, Chenny; Mutalib, Adeliza; Lai, Yee-Ling; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2013-06-01

    Although the dengue iceberg phenomenon is well known, there is a paucity of data on inapparent dengue. Results from a seroepidemiological study conducted during a dengue epidemic in 2007 in Singapore showed a seroprevalence of 65.9% and an inapparent dengue rate of 78%. Older adults (> 45 years old) had significantly higher rates of inapparent dengue infections (P < 0.05).

  1. Application of revised dengue classification criteria as a severity marker of dengue viral infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Basuki, Parwati Setiono; Budiyanto; Puspitasari, Dwiyanti; Husada, Dominicus; Darmowandowo, Widodo; Ismoedijanto; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Yamanaka, Atsushi

    2010-09-01

    A prospective study of dengue infected patients at Dr.Soetomo Hospital pediatric ward was carried out from October 2008 to April 2009 to evaluate the revised dengue classification system proposed by the Dengue Control (DENCO), for early detection of severe dengue infected patients using the WHO classification system for comparison, with the addition of clinical interventions as a tool to grade for severity. One hundred forty-five patients were included in the study. Using the WHO classification system, 122 cases (84.1%) were classified as having non-severe dengue, of which 70 (48.3%) were classified as having dengue fever (DF), 39 (26.9%) as having dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) grade I, and 13 (9%) as having DHF grade II. Twenty-three (15.9%) were classified as having severe dengue, of which 16 (11%) were classified as having DHF grade III and 7 (4.8%) as having DHF grade IV. With clinical interventions included, 8 cases (6.6%) originally classified as having non-severe dengue infection were reclassified as having severe infection (sensitivity = 74%, specificity = 100%, likelihood ratio (-) = 0.26). Using the new dengue classification system, 117 cases (80.7%) were classified as having non-severe dengue infection, of which 79 (54.5%) were classified as having dengue without warning signs and 38 (26.2%) were classified as having dengue with warning signs, while 28 (19.3%) were classified as having severe dengue infection. Using clinical intervention, 4 cases (3.4%) which were originally classified as having non-severe dengue infection were reclassified as having severe dengue infection (sensitivity = 88%, specificity = 99%, likelihood ratio (+) = 98.88, likelihood ratio (-) = 0.13). Binary logistic regression showed the revised dengue classification system (p = 0.000, Wald:22.446) was better in detecting severe dengue infections than the WHO classification system (p = 0.175, Wald:6.339).

  2. Novel concept on antiviral strategies to dengue.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence has revealed that asymptomatic and/or persistent dengue virus (DENV) infections play a role in the cycling pattern of dengue outbreaks. These findings add a new dimension to the continually evolving search for effective prevention strategies in dengue. Disappointing outcomes of clinical trials in anti-dengue modalities have become commonplace. These failures may result from confounding variables and/or unresolved scientific issues that surround dengue, including the replication cycle of DENV in a natural setting, the target cells and reservoir for viral replication in vivo, and the effect of asymptomatic/persistent carriers in the dissemination of dengue. This article sets forth to address these issues using the most updated information available in the literature and to propose a novel antiviral strategy for the prevention and control of dengue. PMID:27284691

  3. Reemergence of Dengue in Southern Texas, 2013.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dana L; Santiago, Gilberto A; Abeyta, Roman; Hinojosa, Steven; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Adam, Jessica K; Evert, Nicole; Caraballo, Elba; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Smith, Brian; Banicki, Alison; Tomashek, Kay M; Gaul, Linda; Sharp, Tyler M

    2016-06-01

    During a dengue epidemic in northern Mexico, enhanced surveillance identified 53 laboratory-positive cases in southern Texas; 26 (49%) patients acquired the infection locally, and 29 (55%) were hospitalized. Of 83 patient specimens that were initially IgM negative according to ELISA performed at a commercial laboratory, 14 (17%) were dengue virus positive by real-time reverse transcription PCR performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue virus types 1 and 3 were identified, and molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated close identity with viruses that had recently circulated in Mexico and Central America. Of 51 household members of 22 dengue case-patients who participated in household investigations, 6 (12%) had been recently infected with a dengue virus and reported no recent travel, suggesting intrahousehold transmission. One household member reported having a recent illness consistent with dengue. This outbreak reinforces emergence of dengue in southern Texas, particularly when incidence is high in northern Mexico. PMID:27191223

  4. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    PubMed Central

    Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia; Orsini, Marco; Soares, Cristiane N.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world's population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM) dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial. PMID:23355928

  5. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  6. Reemergence of Dengue in Southern Texas, 2013.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dana L; Santiago, Gilberto A; Abeyta, Roman; Hinojosa, Steven; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Adam, Jessica K; Evert, Nicole; Caraballo, Elba; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Smith, Brian; Banicki, Alison; Tomashek, Kay M; Gaul, Linda; Sharp, Tyler M

    2016-06-01

    During a dengue epidemic in northern Mexico, enhanced surveillance identified 53 laboratory-positive cases in southern Texas; 26 (49%) patients acquired the infection locally, and 29 (55%) were hospitalized. Of 83 patient specimens that were initially IgM negative according to ELISA performed at a commercial laboratory, 14 (17%) were dengue virus positive by real-time reverse transcription PCR performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue virus types 1 and 3 were identified, and molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated close identity with viruses that had recently circulated in Mexico and Central America. Of 51 household members of 22 dengue case-patients who participated in household investigations, 6 (12%) had been recently infected with a dengue virus and reported no recent travel, suggesting intrahousehold transmission. One household member reported having a recent illness consistent with dengue. This outbreak reinforces emergence of dengue in southern Texas, particularly when incidence is high in northern Mexico.

  7. Reemergence of Dengue in Southern Texas, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dana L.; Santiago, Gilberto A.; Abeyta, Roman; Hinojosa, Steven; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Adam, Jessica K.; Evert, Nicole; Caraballo, Elba; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Smith, Brian; Banicki, Alison; Tomashek, Kay M.; Gaul, Linda

    2016-01-01

    During a dengue epidemic in northern Mexico, enhanced surveillance identified 53 laboratory-positive cases in southern Texas; 26 (49%) patients acquired the infection locally, and 29 (55%) were hospitalized. Of 83 patient specimens that were initially IgM negative according to ELISA performed at a commercial laboratory, 14 (17%) were dengue virus positive by real-time reverse transcription PCR performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue virus types 1 and 3 were identified, and molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated close identity with viruses that had recently circulated in Mexico and Central America. Of 51 household members of 22 dengue case-patients who participated in household investigations, 6 (12%) had been recently infected with a dengue virus and reported no recent travel, suggesting intrahousehold transmission. One household member reported having a recent illness consistent with dengue. This outbreak reinforces emergence of dengue in southern Texas, particularly when incidence is high in northern Mexico. PMID:27191223

  8. Dengue Virus Type 3, Brazil, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Schatzmayr, Hermann Gonçalves; Bispo de Filippis, Ana Maria; Barreto dos Santos, Flávia; Venâncio da Cunha, Rivaldo; Coelho, Janice Oliveira; José de Souza, Luiz; Guimarães, Flávia Ramos; Machado de Araújo, Eliane Saraiva; De Simone, Thatiane Santos; Baran, Meri; Teixeira, Gualberto; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, Rio de Janeiro had a large epidemic of dengue fever; 288,245 cases were reported. A subset of 1,831 dengue hemorrhagic fever cases occurred. In this study, performed in the first half of 2002, samples from 1,559 patients with suspected cases of dengue infection were analyzed. From this total, 1,497 were obtained from patients with nonfatal cases, and 62 were obtained from patients with fatal cases. By the use of different methods, 831 (53.3%) cases, including 40 fatal cases, were confirmed as dengue infection. When virus identification was successful, dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3) was obtained in 99% of cases. Neurologic involvement was shown in 1 patient with encephalitis, confirmed by the detection of DENV-3 RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. This explosive epidemic of DENV-3 was the most severe dengue epidemic reported in Brazil since dengue viruses were introduced in 1986. PMID:16229765

  9. Recent developments in understanding dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Patiño, Claudia; Torres, Silvia; Haenni, Anne-Lise; Díaz, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Dengue is the most important cause of mosquito-borne virus diseases in tropical and subtropical regions in the world. Severe clinical outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are potentially fatal. The epidemiology of dengue has undergone profound changes in recent years, due to several factors such as expansion of the geographical distribution of the insect vector, increase in traveling, and demographic pressure. As a consequence, the incidence of dengue has increased dramatically. Since mosquito control has not been successful and since no vaccine or antiviral treatment is available, new approaches to this problem are needed. Consequently, an in-depth understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the virus should be helpful to design efficient strategies for the control of dengue. Here, we review the recently acquired knowledge on the molecular and cell biology of the dengue virus life cycle based on newly developed molecular biology technologies.

  10. Dengue infection: a growing global health threat.

    PubMed

    Hemungkorn, Marisa; Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2007-10-01

    Dengue infection, one of the most devastating mosquito-borne viral diseases in humans, is now a significant problem in several tropical countries. The disease, caused by the four dengue virus serotypes, ranges from asymptomatic infection to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever (DF), and severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without shock. DHF is characterized by fever, bleeding diathesis and a tendency to develop a potentially fatal shock syndrome. Consistent hematological findings include vasculopathy, coagulopathy, and thrombocytopenia. There are increasing reports of dengue infection with unusual manifestations that mainly involve cerebral and hepatic symptoms. Laboratory diagnosis includes virus isolation, serology, and detection of dengue ribonucleic acid. Successful treatment, which is mainly supportive, depends on early recognition of the disease and careful monitoring for shock. Prevention depends primarily on control of the mosquito vector. Further study of the pathogenesis of DHF is required for the development of a safe and effective dengue vaccine.

  11. Spatial analysis of notified dengue fever infections.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Clements, A; Williams, G; Tong, S

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the spatial clustering and dynamic dispersion of dengue incidence in Queensland, Australia. We used Moran's I statistic to assess the spatial autocorrelation of reported dengue cases. Spatial empirical Bayes smoothing estimates were used to display the spatial distribution of dengue in postal areas throughout Queensland. Local indicators of spatial association (LISA) maps and logistic regression models were used to identify spatial clusters and examine the spatio-temporal patterns of the spread of dengue. The results indicate that the spatial distribution of dengue was clustered during each of the three periods of 1993-1996, 1997-2000 and 2001-2004. The high-incidence clusters of dengue were primarily concentrated in the north of Queensland and low-incidence clusters occurred in the south-east of Queensland. The study concludes that the geographical range of notified dengue cases has significantly expanded in Queensland over recent years.

  12. Dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Jason S; Mahon, Connie R

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus, an arthropod-borne viral agent, causes two distinct diseases: classic dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There are four dengue virus serotypes: DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4. Although infection with dengue stimulates immunologic response to a serotype, there is no cross-immunity conferred. Hence, a person can potentially be infected with each serotype during his or her lifetime. An infected female Aedes mosquito transmits the virus from person to person while feeding. The disease, now endemic in more than 100 countries in Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific, is spreading to new areas and causing explosive outbreaks. Because of the major impact on lives and local economies epidemics produce, rapid detection of dengue infection has become an important public health research issue. Recently developed serological procedures to detect dengue infections have shown great potential for field use.

  13. Dengue virus type 3, Brazil, 2002.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Schatzmayr, Hermann Gonçalves; de Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo; dos Santos, Flávia Barreto; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Coelho, Janice Oliveira; de Souza, Luiz José; Guimarães, Flávia Ramos; de Araújo, Eliane Saraiva Machado; De Simone, Thatiane Santos; Baran, Meri; Teixeira, Gualberto; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2005-09-01

    During the summer of 2002, Rio de Janeiro had a large epidemic of dengue fever; 288,245 cases were reported. A subset of 1,831 dengue hemorrhagic fever cases occurred. In this study, performed in the first half of 2002, samples from 1,559 patients with suspected cases of dengue infection were analyzed. From this total, 1,497 were obtained from patients with nonfatal cases, and 62 were obtained from patients with fatal cases. By the use of different methods, 831 (53.3%) cases, including 40 fatal cases, were confirmed as dengue infection. When virus identification was successful, dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3) was obtained in 99% of cases. Neurologic involvement was shown in 1 patient with encephalitis, confirmed by the detection of DENV-3 RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. This explosive epidemic of DENV-3 was the most severe dengue epidemic reported in Brazil since dengue viruses were introduced in 1986.

  14. Imported Dengue Fever: an important reemerging disease.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Malachi; Shetty, Avinash K

    2009-11-01

    Fever in a returned traveler from the tropics often poses a diagnostic challenge to the emergency department physician because of the potential for serious morbidity and mortality associated with certain infections such as falciparum malaria and dengue. We report a case of imported dengue fever in a 15-year-old adolescent boy acquired during a recent travel to Guatemala. Dengue fever is a mosquito-transmitted viral infection of global importance. The majority of US residents with dengue become infected during travel to tropical areas. In recent years, dengue has remerged in US tropical and subtropical areas. The disease is underreported in the United States along the Mexican border. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, control, and prevention of this important global reemerging infectious disease are reviewed. Clinicians should include dengue in the differential diagnosis of febrile illness in children who have recently returned from dengue endemic areas.

  15. Dengue virus identification by transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods in fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Limonta, D; Falcón, V; Torres, G; Capó, V; Menéndez, I; Rosario, D; Castellanos, Y; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Roche, R; de la Rosa, M C; Pavón, A; López, L; González, K; Guillén, G; Diaz, J; Guzmán, M G

    2012-12-01

    Dengue virus is the most significant virus transmitted by arthropods worldwide and may cause a potentially fatal systemic disease named dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this work, dengue virus serotype 4 was detected in the tissues of one fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever case using electron immunomicroscopy and molecular methods. This is the first report of dengue virus polypeptides findings by electron immunomicroscopy in human samples. In addition, not-previously-documented virus-like particles visualized in spleen, hepatic, brain, and pulmonary tissues from a dengue case are discussed.

  16. Points for Consideration for dengue vaccine introduction - recommendations by the Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jacqueline Kyungah; Lee, Yong-Seok; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Thiry, Georges; Mahoney, Richard; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a public health problem in the tropics and subtropics. There are several vaccine candidates in clinical development. However, there may be gaps in the new vaccine introduction after vaccine licensure before it becomes available in developing countries. In anticipation of the first dengue vaccine candidate to be licensed, Dengue Vaccine Initiative (DVI) and, its predecessor, Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI) have been working on points for consideration to accelerate evidence-based dengue vaccine introduction, once a vaccine becomes available. In this paper, we review the history of PDVI and its successor, the DVI, and elaborate on the points of consideration for dengue vaccine introduction.

  17. [Society, economy, inequities and dengue].

    PubMed

    Kouri, Gustavo; Pelegrino, José L; Munster, Blanca María; Guzmán, María G

    2007-01-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Americas have been on the rise throughout the 1990s, with the highest number -over one million cases- reported in 2002. This paper analyzed the situation of dengue in the region and discussed the determining factors that account for the rise of the disease, making emphasis on socioeconomic factors, such as poverty, inequality, migrations and the lack of access to basic services, which are the most influential in perpetuating this disease in most countries. Considering that a safe and accessible vaccine is now unavailable, basic principles of vector control combined with political willingness, inter-sectoral involvement, active community participation and the tightening of health legislation were also examined as the only viable solution at present.

  18. Models of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bente, Dennis A; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2006-01-01

    The need for models of dengue disease has reached a pinnacle as the transmission of this mosquito-borne virus has increased dramatically. Little is known about the mechanisms that lead to dengue fever and its more severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever; this is owing to the fact that only humans show signs of disease. In the past 5 years, research has better identified the initial target cells of infection, and this has led to the development of models of infection in primary human cell cultures. Mouse-human chimeras, containing these target cells, have also led to progress in developing animal models. These advances should soon end the stalemate in testing antivirals and vaccine preparations that had necessarily been done in incomplete or irrelevant models. PMID:18087566

  19. Dengue fever outbreak in Lahore.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Usman; Loya, Asif; Mehmood, Muhammad Tariq; Nazeer, Hammad; Sultan, Faisal

    2013-03-01

    Dengue fever has now affected all the major cities of country. About 41,354 patients underwent antibody screening for dengue fever from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore, during the epidemic period (October 1st 2010 to December 20th 2010). Out of them, 1294 (3.1%) patients were positive for IgM antibodies, and 124 (0.3%) for IgG antibodies. A total of 722 (1.7%) patients were borderline positive for IgM antibodies and 108 (0.26%) were borderline positive for IgG antibodies. Dengue fever has emerged as a global problem over the last 5 years. It has also hit Lahore badly especially after the floods in 2010. High index of suspicion should be there in case of related symptoms.

  20. Prevalence of Malaria, Dengue, and Chikungunya Significantly Associated with Mosquito Breeding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; ZulKifle, Mohammad; Sherwani, Arish Mohammad Khan; Ghosh, Susanta Kumar; Tiwari, Satyanarayan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the prevalence of malaria, dengue, and chikungunya and their association with mosquito breeding sites. Methods: The study was observational and analytical. A total of 162 houses and 670 subjects were observed during the study period. One hundred forty-two febrile patients were eligible for the study. After obtaining informed consent from all febrile patients, 140 blood samples were collected to diagnose malaria, dengue, and chikungunya. Larval samples were collected by the standard protocol that follows. Correlation of data was performed by Pearson correlation test. Results: Forty-seven blood samples were found positive: 33 for chikungunya, 3 for dengue, and 11 for malaria. Fifty-one out of 224 larval samples were found positive. Out of the 51 positive samples, 37 were positive for Aedes, 12 were positive for Anopheles, and two were positive for Culex larvae. Interpretation and Conclusion: Mosquito-borne fevers, especially malaria, dengue, and chikungunya, have shown a significant relationship with mosquito breeding sites. PMID:23610486

  1. Evidence based community mobilization for dengue prevention in Nicaragua and Mexico (Camino Verde, the Green Way): cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nava-Aguilera, Elizabeth; Arosteguí, Jorge; Morales-Perez, Arcadio; Suazo-Laguna, Harold; Legorreta-Soberanis, José; Hernandez-Alvarez, Carlos; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Paredes-Solís, Sergio; Balmaseda, Angel; Cortés-Guzmán, Antonio Juan; Serrano de los Santos, René; Coloma, Josefina; Ledogar, Robert J; Harris, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether community mobilization adds effectiveness to conventional dengue control. Design Pragmatic open label parallel group cluster randomized controlled trial. Those assessing the outcomes and analyzing the data were blinded to group assignment. Centralized computerized randomization after the baseline study allocated half the sites to intervention, stratified by country, evidence of recent dengue virus infection in children aged 3-9, and vector indices. Setting Random sample of communities in Managua, capital of Nicaragua, and three coastal regions in Guerrero State in the south of Mexico. Participants Residents in a random sample of census enumeration areas across both countries: 75 intervention and 75 control clusters (about 140 households each) were randomized and analyzed (60 clusters in Nicaragua and 90 in Mexico), including 85 182 residents in 18 838 households. Interventions A community mobilization protocol began with community discussion of baseline results. Each intervention cluster adapted the basic intervention—chemical-free prevention of mosquito reproduction—to its own circumstances. All clusters continued the government run dengue control program. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes per protocol were self reported cases of dengue, serological evidence of recent dengue virus infection, and conventional entomological indices (house index: households with larvae or pupae/households examined; container index: containers with larvae or pupae/containers examined; Breteau index: containers with larvae or pupae/households examined; and pupae per person: pupae found/number of residents). Per protocol secondary analysis examined the effect of Camino Verde in the context of temephos use. Results With cluster as the unit of analysis, serological evidence from intervention sites showed a lower risk of infection with dengue virus in children (relative risk reduction 29.5%, 95% confidence interval 3.8% to 55.3%), fewer reports of

  2. Culturing larvae of marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Strathmann, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of marine invertebrates cultured in the laboratory experience conditions that they do not encounter in nature, but development and survival to metamorphic competence can be obtained in such cultures. This protocol emphasizes simple methods suitable for a wide variety of larvae. Culturing larvae requires seawater of adequate quality and temperature within the tolerated range. Beyond that, feeding larvae require appropriate food, but a few kinds of algae and animals are sufficient as food for diverse larvae. Nontoxic materials include glass, many plastics, hot-melt glue, and some solvents, once evaporated. Cleaners that do not leave toxic residues after rinsing include dilute hydrochloric or acetic acid, sodium hypochlorite (commercial bleach), and ethanol. Materials that can leave toxic residues, such as formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, detergents, and hand lotions, should be avoided, especially with batch cultures that lack continuously renewed water. Reverse filtration can be used to change water gently at varying frequencies, depending on temperature and the kinds of food that are provided. Bacterial growth can be limited by antibiotics, but antibiotics are often unnecessary. Survival and growth are increased by low concentrations of larvae and stirring of large or dense cultures. One method of stirring large numbers of containers is a rack of motor-driven paddles. Most of the methods and materials are inexpensive and portable. If necessary, a room within a few hours of the sea could be temporarily equipped for larval culture. PMID:24567204

  3. Selective inhibitors of digestive enzymes from Aedes aegypti larvae identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane Sanches; Soares Torquato, Ricardo Jose; Alves Lemos, Francisco Jose; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a serious disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti during blood meal feeding. It is estimated that the dengue virus is transmitted to millions of individuals each year in tropical and subtropical areas. Dengue control strategies have been based on controlling the vector, Ae. aegypti, using insecticide, but the emergence of resistance poses new challenges. The aim of this study was the identification of specific protease inhibitors of the digestive enzymes from Ae. aegypti larvae, which may serve as a prospective alternative biocontrol method. High affinity protein inhibitors were selected by all of the digestive serine proteases of the 4th instar larval midgut, and the specificity of these inhibitors was characterized. These inhibitors were obtained from a phage library displaying variants of HiTI, a trypsin inhibitor from Haematobia irritans, that are mutated in the reactive loop (P1-P4'). Based on the selected amino acid sequence pattern, seven HiTI inhibitor variants were cloned, expressed and purified. The results indicate that the HiTI variants named T6 (RGGAV) and T128 (WNEGL) were selected by larval trypsin-like (IC(50) of 1.1 nM) and chymotrypsin-like enzymes (IC(50) of 11.6 nM), respectively. The variants T23 (LLGGL) and T149 (GGVWR) inhibited both larval chymotrypsin-like (IC(50) of 4.2 nM and 29.0 nM, respectively) and elastase-like enzymes (IC(50) of 1.2 nM for both). Specific inhibitors were successfully obtained for the digestive enzymes of Ae. aegypti larvae by phage display. Our data also strongly suggest the presence of elastase-like enzymes in Ae. aegypti larvae. The HiTI variants T6 and T23 are good candidates for the development as a larvicide to control the vector.

  4. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  5. Fulminant hepatitis in dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Lum, L C; Lam, S K; George, R; Devi, S

    1993-09-01

    Eight cases of liver failure and encephalopathy were observed among twenty cases of grade 3 and grade 4 dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur from January 1990 to December 1991. All patients with deterioriation in mental status showed a marked increase in liver enzymes (aspartate and alanine aminotransaminases) and severe coagulopathy. Six patients needed cerebral protection, including ventilation, intravenous sedation and muscle relaxants. There was one death during the period of study and one case of residual hemiparesis in a boy who had, in addition, intracerebral hemorrhage. All other survivors had complete recovery of liver and neurological function.

  6. The ethnoecology of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Whiteford, L M

    1997-06-01

    This article employs an ethnoecological analysis to link indigenous, ethnomedical, and Western biomedical ideas of infectious disease causation/prevention. The ethnoecological analysis is expanded to include the cultural and historical context of political will and community participation in dengue fever control activities in an urban neighborhood in the Dominican Republic. Findings indicate that a key source of dengue fever transmission has been overlooked because it falls between established gender-role boundaries, and that mala union, an explanatory concept central to the failure of previous community-based interventions, emerges from local views of national political history. Data were generated through a neighborhood household survey, key respondent interviews, and participant-observation.

  7. Fractional Derivatives in Dengue Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooseh, Shakoor; Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2011-09-01

    We introduce the use of fractional calculus, i.e., the use of integrals and derivatives of non-integer (arbitrary) order, in epidemiology. The proposed approach is illustrated with an outbreak of dengue disease, which is motivated by the first dengue epidemic ever recorded in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of west Africa, in 2009. Numerical simulations show that in some cases the fractional models fit better the reality when compared with the standard differential models. The classical results are obtained as particular cases by considering the order of the derivatives to take an integer value.

  8. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  9. Policymakers' views on dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever and the need for dengue vaccines in four southeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    DeRoeck, Denise; Deen, Jacqueline; Clemens, John D

    2003-12-01

    A survey of policymakers and other influential professionals in four southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam) was conducted to determine policymakers' views on the public health importance of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), the need for a vaccine and the determinants influencing its potential introduction. The survey, which involved face-to-face interviews with policymakers, health programme managers, researchers, opinion leaders and other key informants, revealed an almost uniformly high level of concern about dengue fever/DHF and a high perceived need for a dengue vaccine. Several characteristics of the disease contribute to this high sense of priority, including its geographic spread, occurrence in outbreaks, the recurrent risk of infection each dengue season, its severity and the difficulty in diagnosis and management, its urban predominance, its burden on hospitals, and its economic toll on governments and families. Research felt to be key to future decision-making regarding dengue vaccine introduction include: disease surveillance studies, in-country vaccine trials or pilot projects, and studies on the economic burden of dengue and the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccines. The results suggest favourable conditions for public and private sector markets for dengue vaccines and the need for creative financing strategies to ensure their accessibility to poor children in dengue-endemic countries.

  10. EVALUATION OF SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF Ipomoea cairica LINN. EXTRACT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF DENGUE VECTORS

    PubMed Central

    ZUHARAH, Wan Fatma; AHBIRAMI, Rattanam; DIENG, Hamady; THIAGALETCHUMI, Maniam; FADZLY, Nik

    2016-01-01

    Plant derived insecticides have considerable potential for mosquito control because these products are safer than conventional insecticides. This study aimed to investigate sublethal activities of Ipomoea carica or railway creeper crude acethonilic extract against life history trait of dengue vectors, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. The late third instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti were exposed to a sublethal dose at LC50 and larvae that survived were further cultured. Overall, Ipomea cairica crude extracts affected the whole life history of both Aedes species. The study demonstrated significantly lower egg production (fecundity) and eggs hatchability (fertility) in Ae. albopictus. The sublethal dose of crude extracts reduced significantly the width of larval head capsule and the wing length of both sexes in both Aedes species. The significance of sublethal effects of I. cairica against Aedes mosquitoes was an additional hallmark to demonstrate further activity of this plant despite its direct toxicity to the larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity as well as morphological and physiological anomalies are some of the effects that make I. cairica a potential candidate to be used as a new plant-based insecticide to control dengue vectors. PMID:27253746

  11. EVALUATION OF SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF Ipomoea cairica LINN. EXTRACT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF DENGUE VECTORS.

    PubMed

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Ahbirami, Rattanam; Dieng, Hamady; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    Plant derived insecticides have considerable potential for mosquito control because these products are safer than conventional insecticides. This study aimed to investigate sublethal activities of Ipomoea carica or railway creeper crude acethonilic extract against life history trait of dengue vectors, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. The late third instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti were exposed to a sublethal dose at LC50 and larvae that survived were further cultured. Overall, Ipomea cairica crude extracts affected the whole life history of both Aedes species. The study demonstrated significantly lower egg production (fecundity) and eggs hatchability (fertility) in Ae. albopictus. The sublethal dose of crude extracts reduced significantly the width of larval head capsule and the wing length of both sexes in both Aedes species. The significance of sublethal effects of I. cairica against Aedes mosquitoes was an additional hallmark to demonstrate further activity of this plant despite its direct toxicity to the larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity as well as morphological and physiological anomalies are some of the effects that make I. cairica a potential candidate to be used as a new plant-based insecticide to control dengue vectors.

  12. EVALUATION OF SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF Ipomoea cairica LINN. EXTRACT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF DENGUE VECTORS.

    PubMed

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Ahbirami, Rattanam; Dieng, Hamady; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    Plant derived insecticides have considerable potential for mosquito control because these products are safer than conventional insecticides. This study aimed to investigate sublethal activities of Ipomoea carica or railway creeper crude acethonilic extract against life history trait of dengue vectors, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. The late third instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti were exposed to a sublethal dose at LC50 and larvae that survived were further cultured. Overall, Ipomea cairica crude extracts affected the whole life history of both Aedes species. The study demonstrated significantly lower egg production (fecundity) and eggs hatchability (fertility) in Ae. albopictus. The sublethal dose of crude extracts reduced significantly the width of larval head capsule and the wing length of both sexes in both Aedes species. The significance of sublethal effects of I. cairica against Aedes mosquitoes was an additional hallmark to demonstrate further activity of this plant despite its direct toxicity to the larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity as well as morphological and physiological anomalies are some of the effects that make I. cairica a potential candidate to be used as a new plant-based insecticide to control dengue vectors. PMID:27253746

  13. Headache features in patients with dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Domingues, R B; Kuster, G W; Onuki de Castro, F L; Souza, V A; Levi, J E; Pannuti, C S

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and features of headache among patients with confirmed dengue virus infection and to compare the headache features in patients with dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever, primary and secondary dengue infection, and patients with and without neurological involvement. Patients with classic dengue fever had a more intense headache than those with the more severe form of the disease, dengue haemorrhagic fever.

  14. Dengue in French Guiana, 1965-1993.

    PubMed

    Fouque, F; Reynes, J M; Moreau, J P

    1995-06-01

    While it seems likely that dengue fever (DF) has existed in French Guiana for at least one century, data on outbreaks are sketchy before temporary eradication of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti and its reestablishment in the early 1960s. Dengue cases were serologically confirmed for the first time in 1965, and since then dengue epidemics have occurred at two to six year intervals, the most important occurring in 1968-1969, 1970, 1972, 1976, 1982, 1986, and 1992. Three of the four dengue virus serotypes (dengue-1, dengue-2, and dengue-4) have been implicated in these outbreaks. During the 1992 epidemic, which appears to have begun in 1991 and extended into 1993, cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) were confirmed for the first time. In all, at least 40 DHF cases and several deaths were associated with this epidemic. This development has raised considerable concern about the public health threat posed by DHF in French Guiana. Such concern is only heightened by the fact that while vector control is the sole means of preventing or combating dengue outbreaks, it has proved difficult to maintain vector populations at low levels with the control measures currently employed.

  15. [The 1991 dengue epidemic in Kaohsiung City].

    PubMed

    Harn, M R; Chiang, Y L; Tian, M J; Chang, Y H; Ko, Y C

    1993-03-01

    In Kaohsiung City, dengue fever subsided for two years after the 1987-1988 epidemic. The main reason that it recurred was due to late diagnoses of the dengue fever in patients because of mild or atypical clinical presentations. The first patient contracted dengue fever from Thailand in mid-May, 1991. The disease then spread among his co-workers. Dengue fever was not suspected until the 9th patient contracted it in early July 1991. Through chain transmission, the epidemic spread in the community and even to other parts of Taiwan. There were 113 confirmed dengue cases in Kaohsiung City, and a total of 175 cases on the whole island during the 1991 epidemic. The clinical manifestations were mainly fever, body pain, dizziness, general weakness, and a skin rash. No instances of severe bleeding, shock or dengue hemorrhagic fever were found. Seven dengue 1 and three dengue 3 viruses were isolated from the sera of patients. We found that the clinical severity of the 1991 dengue epidemic was milder, and the viral isolation rate was lower, compared with the 1987-1988 epidemic, although these two outbreaks of dengue fever were both mostly due to dengue type 1. Genetic variation in the dengue virus may be the explanation. Clinically, about 35% of the patients were missed or not reported, although they were finally demonstrated to be dengue fever patients during a patient survey in the epidemic area. For early detection, viral surveys should be performed in new epidemic regions in addition to fixed-spot surveillance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Surveillance for Dengue and Dengue-Associated Neurologic Syndromes in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Stephen H.; Margolis, Harold S.; Sejvar, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Autochthonous dengue virus transmission has occurred in the continental United States with increased frequency during the last decade; the principal vector, Aedes aegypti, has expanded its geographic distribution in the southern United States. Dengue, a potentially fatal arboviral disease, is underreported, and US clinicians encountering patients with acute febrile illness consistent with dengue are likely to not be fully familiar with dengue diagnosis and management. Recently, investigators suggested that an outbreak of dengue likely occurred in Houston during 2003 based on retrospective laboratory testing of hospitalized cases with encephalitis and aseptic meningitis. Although certain aspects of the Houston testing results and argument for local transmission are doubtful, the report highlights the importance of prospective surveillance for dengue in Aedes-infested areas of the United States, the need for clinical training on dengue and its severe manifestations, and the need for laboratory testing in domestic patients presenting with febrile neurologic illness in these regions to include dengue. PMID:25371183

  17. Is drought helping or killing dengue? Investigation of spatiotemporal relationship between dengue fever and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2015-04-01

    Dengue Fever is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted between human and mosquitos in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Previous studies have found significant relationship between the epidemic of dengue cases and climate variables, especially temperature and precipitation. Besides, the natural phenomena (e.g., drought) are considered that significantly drop the number of dengue cases by killing vector's breeding environment. However, in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, there are evidences that the temporal pattern of dengue is correlated to drought events. Kaohsiung City experienced two main dengue outbreaks in 2002 and 2014 that both years were confirmed with serious drought. Especially in 2014, Kaohsiung City was suffered from extremely dengue outbreak in 2014 that reported the highest number of dengue cases in the history. This study constructs the spatiotemporal model of dengue incidences and index of drought events (Standardized Precipitation Index, SPI) based on the distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM). Other meteorological measures are also included in the analysis.

  18. Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. An unwelcome arrival in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Teelucksingh, S; Mangray, A S; Barrow, S; Jankey, N; Prabhakar, P; Lewis, M

    1997-06-01

    This is the first report of dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome in Trinidad. Dengue infection was confirmed serologically or by viral isolation in five patients, aged 15 to 53 years, who presented with fever, thrombocytopenia and haemoconcentration. Three patients developed dengue shock syndrome, which was fatal; although there was no haemorrhagic tendency among these patients, bleeding occurred shortly before death in one of them. Two patients who had dengue haemorrhagic fever survived. The co-circulation of dengue virus serotypes 1, 2, and 4 in the Caribbean facilitates the development of dengue shock syndrome (DSS) or dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Clinicians should therefore be aware of their clinical features, laboratory diagnosis and clinical management. Appropriate public health interventions and improved surveillance should be implemented to reduce the risk of DHF/DSS associated mortality in Trinidad and Tobago.

  19. The dengue vaccine pipeline: Implications for the future of dengue control.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lauren M; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Durbin, Anna P; Longini, Ira M

    2015-06-26

    Dengue has become the most rapidly expanding mosquito-borne infectious disease on the planet, surpassing malaria and infecting at least 390 million people per year. There is no effective treatment for dengue illness other than supportive care, especially for severe cases. Symptoms can be mild or life-threatening as in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Vector control has been only partially successful in decreasing dengue transmission. The potential use of safe and effective tetravalent dengue vaccines is an attractive addition to prevent disease or minimize the possibility of epidemics. There are currently no licensed dengue vaccines. This review summarizes the current status of all dengue vaccine candidates in clinical evaluation. Currently five candidate vaccines are in human clinical trials. One has completed two Phase III trials, two are in Phase II trials, and three are in Phase I testing.

  20. [Dengue epidemic in Nicaragua, 1985].

    PubMed

    Kouri, G; Valdéz, M; Arguello, L; Guzmán, M G; Valdés, L; Soler, M; Bravo, J

    1991-01-01

    In the second half of the year 1985, during the rainy season, an epidemic of Dengue Fever was recognized in Nicaragua. A total of 17,483 cases were reported by the health services. The highest morbidity and attack rates were reported between August and November of the same year. Regions II (Leon and Chinandega), III (Managua) and IV (Masaya, Granada, Carazo y Rivas) reported 89% of the cases; these regions are precisely the more densely populated in the country, located in the Pacific Coast. Leon and Chinandega were the more affected cities reporting 41% of the cases of the epidemic. Sixty seven percent of the cases were adults, 57% were female. The national attack rate was 55.4/10,000 inhab. An intensive campaign for the control of the vector was launched immediately after the epidemic was recognized and by the month of October 1985 morbidity decreased and an endemic situation was established. Seven fatal cases were reported in adults. They were considered as DHF/DSS cases by a multidisciplinary group of pathologists and clinicians, considering the criteria of WHO and the experience obtained during the cuban DHF/DSS epidemic, in 1981. The outbreak was considered as a Classical Dengue Fever epidemic with 7 fatalities. Dengue-1 and -2 were isolated from acute sera and Dengue-1 from one of the dead.

  1. The 1986 dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemic in Puerto Rico: epidemiologic and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Gubler, D J; Ortiz, S; Kuno, G; Casta-Vélez, A; Sather, G E; Gómez, I; Vergne, E

    1996-09-01

    In 1986 Puerto Rico experienced its eleventh dengue outbreak of this century, but the first with simultaneous transmission of three dengue virus serotypes, and the first with significant numbers of severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Overall, 10,659 cases were reported; 1,257 cases were laboratory confirmed as having current or recent dengue infection. Dengue 4 (DEN-4) was the predominant serotype (160/363 isolates, 44%) followed by dengue 1 (DEN-1) with 134 isolates (37%) and dengue 2 (DEN-2), 69 isolates (19%). Transmission peaked during September, but large numbers of cases occurred through November. Seventy-one (91%) of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities had laboratory-confirmed cases. Fifty-one percent of all confirmed cases occurred in metropolitan San Juan. Most cases presented clinically as classical dengue fever, but 37% of all confirmed cases were reported to have developed some type of hemorrhagic manifestation, and 6% reported hematemesis. In addition, 29 laboratory confirmed cases met the WHO case definition for dengue hemorrhagic fever, 3 of which were fatal. Among the 29 laboratory-confirmed cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever/ dengue shook syndrome, virus was isolated from 12; one DEN-1, three DEN-2, and eight DEN-4. Among laboratory confirmed cases, infants less than one year of age were at greater risk of developing dengue hemorrhagic fever/ dengue shook syndrome, hematemesis and any reported hemorrhage than were the other age groups evaluated.

  2. Relationship between Breteau and House indices and cases of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Pawanchee, Z A; Arifin, Z; Wahab, A

    1996-09-01

    The relationship between the Breteau index, the House index, and the occurrence of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever in the 6 zones of Kuala Lumpur was studied throughout 1994. Cases of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever varied between zones and between months, ranging from 0 to 21 cases. In most of the zones in Kuala Lumpur, the occurrence of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever has no relationship with the Breteau and House indices. Cases of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever occurred in all zones despite the low Breteau and House indices.

  3. Epidemiological Scenario of Dengue in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Rafaelle C. G.; Souza, Katia P. R.; Añez, Germán; Rios, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most important reemerging mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. It is caused by any of four Dengue virus types or serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4) and is transmitted by mosquitoes from the genus Aedes. Ecological changes have favored the geographic expansion of the vector and, since the dengue pandemic in the Asian and Pacific regions, the infection became widely distributed worldwide, reaching Brazil in 1845. The incidence of dengue in Brazil has been frequently high, and the number of cases in the country has at some point in time represented up to 60% of the dengue reported cases worldwide. This review addresses vector distribution, dengue outbreaks, circulating serotypes and genotypes, and prevention approaches being utilized in Brazil. PMID:26413514

  4. Dengue: an emerging disease in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Pun, S B

    2011-01-01

    Dengue is an acute infectious disease caused by dengue viruses and transmitted by the Aedes species of mosquito. The rapid global spread of the dengue virus into new areas has begun to attract more research attention. A series of dengue fever outbreaks in several districts of Nepal has been recently observed. The evidence of all four serotypes (DEN - 1 - 4) could be a consequence of a sudden resurgence of a more severe dengue disease in Nepal. Health care providers need to become familiar with the disease to prevent or control the possibility of future outbreaks. The clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, epidemiological patterns and challenges of dengue virus infection in Nepal will be discussed here.

  5. [Dengue fever during pregnancy. Cases report].

    PubMed

    Rosado León, Rocio; Muñoz Rodríguez, Mario R; Soler Huerta, Elizabeth; Parissi Crivelli, Aurora; Méndez Machado, Gustavo F

    2007-11-01

    Dengue is known as an endemic disease of tropical and subtropical regions. It was considered a disease very frequent on kids, but recently an increase was reported on adult people. Some of these cases were related to pregnant women, for that reason, we decided to check eight cases, including just the mothers who presented dengue virus infection through ELISA IgM. IgG and ELISA IgM studies. Five products were determined between 3 and 9-born-babies. Eight cases of dengue were analyzed during pregnancy, three cases of fever dengue and five cases of hemorrhagic dengue; main complications detected were threat of abortion, and premature labour, postsurgical bleeding with desiccant haematoma of uterine artery, oligohydramnios, as well as pleural effusion, two of the neonates were classified as septic for presenting fever. In no case, IgG or IgM for fever dengue was detected in neonates.

  6. Dengue myocarditis in Singapore: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Marques, N; Gan, V C; Leo, Y-S

    2013-06-01

    The authors report two cases of complicated dengue viral infection with acute myocarditis involving young male adults, of which one was fatal. The first case presented with typical signs of myocardial disease: chest pain and diaphoresis with myocardial depression in the electrocardiograph. The second case deteriorated rapidly and demised within the first day of admission. Histology of the heart muscles showed multiple small foci of myocyte necrosis surrounded by lymphocytes, in keeping with viral myocarditis. Both cases fulfilled the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnosis of probable dengue: the first case had positive dengue serology, both IgM and IgG at day six of illness, and the second case was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for dengue and identified as serotype 2. Despite the severe outcome, both cases did not completely fulfil the criteria for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Although severe cardiac impairment is not commonly reported in dengue infection, it can be life threatening.

  7. The global distribution and burden of dengue.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Samir; Gething, Peter W; Brady, Oliver J; Messina, Jane P; Farlow, Andrew W; Moyes, Catherine L; Drake, John M; Brownstein, John S; Hoen, Anne G; Sankoh, Osman; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Jaenisch, Thomas; Wint, G R William; Simmons, Cameron P; Scott, Thomas W; Farrar, Jeremy J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-04-25

    Dengue is a systemic viral infection transmitted between humans by Aedes mosquitoes. For some patients, dengue is a life-threatening illness. There are currently no licensed vaccines or specific therapeutics, and substantial vector control efforts have not stopped its rapid emergence and global spread. The contemporary worldwide distribution of the risk of dengue virus infection and its public health burden are poorly known. Here we undertake an exhaustive assembly of known records of dengue occurrence worldwide, and use a formal modelling framework to map the global distribution of dengue risk. We then pair the resulting risk map with detailed longitudinal information from dengue cohort studies and population surfaces to infer the public health burden of dengue in 2010. We predict dengue to be ubiquitous throughout the tropics, with local spatial variations in risk influenced strongly by rainfall, temperature and the degree of urbanization. Using cartographic approaches, we estimate there to be 390 million (95% credible interval 284-528) dengue infections per year, of which 96 million (67-136) manifest apparently (any level of disease severity). This infection total is more than three times the dengue burden estimate of the World Health Organization. Stratification of our estimates by country allows comparison with national dengue reporting, after taking into account the probability of an apparent infection being formally reported. The most notable differences are discussed. These new risk maps and infection estimates provide novel insights into the global, regional and national public health burden imposed by dengue. We anticipate that they will provide a starting point for a wider discussion about the global impact of this disease and will help to guide improvements in disease control strategies using vaccine, drug and vector control methods, and in their economic evaluation.

  8. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI. PMID:26613023

  9. [Dengue hemorrhagic fever. Experiences from Thailand].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, E

    1992-06-30

    Increased incidence of dengue haemorrhagic fever has been observed in South East Asia. The etiology, clinical features and epidemiology of dengue virus infections are presented, with special emphasis on experience from Thailand. Reduction of sources, in terms of eliminating breeding sites for mosquitos, is the major approach in controlling dengue haemorrhagic fever, an approach which can succeed only through participation by the local community. The involvement of schools has proven to be successful in campaigns to reduce mosquito breeding sites in Thailand.

  10. PirAB toxin from Photorhabdus asymbiotica as a larvicide against dengue vectors.

    PubMed

    Ahantarig, Arunee; Chantawat, Nantarat; Waterfield, Nicholas R; ffrench-Constant, Richard; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn

    2009-07-01

    We have evaluated Photorhabdus insect-related protein (Pir) from Photorhabdus asymbiotica against dengue vectors. PirAB shows larvicidal activity against both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus larvae but did not affect the Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides predator. PirAB expressed the strongest toxicity compared to PirA, PirB, or the mixture of PirA plus PirB. Whether the presence of an enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence in PirAB, but not in PirA, PirB, or the mixture of PirA plus PirB, has any impact on biological control efficacy needs further investigation.

  11. Pushing the Envelope: Dengue Viral Membrane Coaxed into Shape by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Marzinek, Jan K; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Huber, Roland G; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Dengue virus is a flavivirus responsible for millions of infections per year. Its surface contains a phospholipid bilayer, within which are embedded the envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins, arranged with icosahedral geometry. Exposure to low pH triggers the E proteins to undergo conformational changes, which precede fusion with the host cell membrane and release of the viral genome. The flavivirus membrane exhibits significant local curvature and deformation, as revealed by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM), but its precise structure and interactions with envelope components remain unclear. We now report simulations of the dengue viral particle that refine its envelope structure in unprecedented detail. Our final models are morphologically consistent with cryo-EM data, and reveal the structural basis for membrane curvature. Electrostatic interactions increased envelope complex stability; this coupling has potential functional significance in the context of the viral fusion mechanism and infective states. PMID:27396828

  12. Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: A Review in the Prevention of Dengue Disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-09-01

    Tetravalent, live-attenuated, dengue vaccine (Dengvaxia(®); CYD-TDV) is the first vaccine approved for the prevention of dengue disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4 in individuals aged 9-45 or 9-60 years living in high dengue endemic areas. This narrative review discusses the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, reactogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV in the prevention of dengue disease. In Latin American and Asian phase 3 trials in children and adolescents (n > 30,000), the recommended three-dose CYD-TDV regimen was efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue (VCD) during the period from 28 days after the last dose (month 13) to month 25, meeting the primary endpoint criteria. Protective efficacy against VCD in the respective individual trials was 60.8 and 56.5 % (primary analysis). During the 25-month active surveillance phase, CYD-TDV also provided protective efficacy against VCD, severe dengue, any grade of dengue haemorrhagic fever and VCD-related hospitalization in children aged 9 years and older. CYD-TDV was generally well tolerated, with no safety concerns identified after up to 4 years' follow-up (i.e. from post dose 1) in ongoing long-term studies. Based on evidence from the dengue clinical trial program, the WHO SAGE recommended that countries with high dengue endemicity consider introducing CYD-TDV as part of an integrated disease prevention strategy to lower disease burden. Pharmacoeconomic considerations will be pivotal to implementing dengue vaccination prevention strategies in these countries. The availability of a dengue vaccine is considered essential if the 2012 WHO global strategy targets for reducing the burden of dengue disease by 2020 are to be attained. Hence, CYD-TDV represents a major advance for the prevention of dengue disease in high dengue endemic regions. PMID:27506852

  13. An Unusual Ocular Emergency in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Kalpana Badami; Jayadev, Chaitra; Yajmaan, Soumya; Prakash, Savitha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, one of the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus diseases affecting humans, is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Most people infected with dengue virus are asymptomatic or only have mild symptoms such as an uncomplicated fever; few have more severe features, while in a small proportion it is life-threatening. Severe dengue is defined as that associated with severe bleeding, severe organ dysfunction, or severe plasma leakage. Ophthalmic manifestations can involve both the anterior and posterior segment. We report an ocular emergency of proptosis and globe rupture in a patient with severe dengue. PMID:25371643

  14. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  15. Dengue blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, A.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rasheed, R.; Nawaz, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this work Raman spectra of normal and dengue infected serum and whole blood were analyzed. In normal whole blood and serum characteristic peaks were observed when excited at 442 and 532 nm. In dengue whole blood and serum all peaks found to be blue shifted with reduced Raman intensity. Dengue whole blood and serum shows two peaks at 1614 and 1750 cm-1 which are due to presence of Immunoglobulin antibodies IgG and IgM. Whole study provides a route of information for diagnosis of dengue viral infection.

  16. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Niyati; Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  17. Recent progress in dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianchun; Chen, Hui; An, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has four distinct serotypes. DENV infection can result in classic dengue fever and life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. In recent decades, DENV infection has become an important public health concern in epidemic-prone areas. Vaccination is the most effective measure to prevent and control viral infections. However, several challenges impede the development of effective DENV vaccines, such as the lack of suitable animal models and the antibody-dependent enhancement phenomenon. Although no licensed DENV vaccine is available, significant progress has been made. This review summarizes candidate DENV vaccines from recent investigations. PMID:25547681

  18. An epidemic of dengue fever in Wewak.

    PubMed

    Farrell, K T

    1978-06-01

    143 clinical cases of dengue fever were reported in Wewak between April and August 1976. 15 patients demonstrated a diagnostic rise in antibody titre for Group B arbovirus. Tests for complement-fixing antibody to dengue viruses did not indicate what type of dengue virus was responsible for the epidemic. Vector species Aedes aegypti and Aedes scutellaris were found before control measures were adopted but were not found four months later. The epidemiology of dengue fever is discussed and measures for prevention and control of epidemics are recommended.

  19. Dengue fever with encephalopathy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Row, D; Weinstein, P; Murray-Smith, S

    1996-03-01

    During an epidemic of dengue type 2 virus in the rural community of Charters Towers, North Queensland, Australia, in 1993, 210 cases presented to the local hospital with signs and symptoms of classic dengue fever. Two cases were noteworthy because of neurologic complications, which included drowsiness, short term memory loss, agitation, and seizure. The cases are presented in detail because they are the first cases of dengue-associated encephalopathy to be documented in Australia. An increasing number of cases of encephalopathy associated with classic dengue fever is being reported world wide, but the etiology of this clinical syndrome remains unknown.

  20. Anti-dengue efficacy of bioactive andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata (Lamiales: Acanthaceae) against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Edwin, Edward-Sam; Vasantha-Srinivasan, Prabhakaran; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Ponsankar, Athirstam; Pradeepa, Venkatraman; Selin-Rani, Selvaraj; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Hunter, Wayne B; Abdel-Megeed, Ahmed; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2016-11-01

    The current study investigated the toxic effect of the leaf extract compound andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f) against the dengue vector Ae. aegypti. GC-MS analysis revealed that andrographolide was recognized as the major chemical constituent with the prominent peak area compared with other compounds. All isolated toxic compounds were purified and confirmed through RP-HPLC against chemical standards. The larvicidal assays established at 25ppm of bioactive compound against the treated instars of Ae. Aegypti showed prominent mortality compared to other treated concentrations. The percent mortality of larvae was directly proportional to concentration. The lethal concentration (LC50) was observed at 12ppm treatment concentration. The bioactive andrographolide considerably reduced the detoxifying enzyme regulations of α- and β- carboxylesterases. In contrast, the levels of GST and CYP450 significantly increase in a dose dependent manner. The andrographolide also showed strong oviposition deterrence effects at the sub-lethal dose of 12ppm. Similarly, the mean number of eggs were also significantly reduced in a dose dependent manner. At the concentration of 12ppm the effective percentage of repellency was greater than 90% with a protection time of 15-210min, compared with control. The histopathology study displayed that larvae treated with bioactive andrographolide had cytopathic effects in the midgut epithelium compared with the control. The present study established that bioactive andrographolide served as a potential useful for dengue vector management. PMID:27443607

  1. Dengue fever among Israeli expatriates in Delhi, 2015: implications for dengue incidence in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Ami; Turgeman, Avigail; Lustig, Yaniv; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-03-01

    We present the data of 13 dengue cases diagnosed between 1 August and 15 September 2015 among 240 Israeli expatriates residing in Delhi. Attack rates were similar between adults (6/128, 4.7%) and children (7/112, 6.3%). dengue virus (DENV-2) was identified in two and DENV-1 in one dengue-seropositive sample. Another febrile patient was diagnosed with chikungunya virus infection. The reported incidence of dengue fever among people living in Delhi was lower than 0.1% as of September 2015. Based on our results, we hypothesize that the incidence of dengue fever in Delhi is grossly underestimated.

  2. Dengue 1 virus and dengue hemorrhagic fever, French Polynesia, 2001.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Bruno; Halstead, Scott B

    2009-08-01

    An epidemic of dengue 1 virus (DENV-1) occurred in French Polynesia in 2001, 4 years after a DENV-2 epidemic that ended in 1997. Surveillance data from hospitalized case-patients showed that case-patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) exhibited a bimodal age distribution with 1 peak among infants 6-10 months of age and a second peak at 4-11 years of age. The relative risk of DHF developing in children born before rather than after the DENV-2 epidemic was 186 (95% confidence interval 26-1,324). Among children born toward the end of the DENV-2 epidemic, a strong temporal association was found between the month of birth and the risk of being hospitalized for DHF. This study documents epidemic pathogenicity associated with the sequence of DENV-2 infection followed by DENV-1 infection.

  3. Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever: history and current status.

    PubMed

    Gubler, Duane J

    2006-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an old disease; the first record of a clinically compatible disease being recorded in a Chinese medical encyclopaedia in 992. As the global shipping industry expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries, port cities grew and became more urbanized, creating ideal conditions for the principal mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Both the mosquitoes and the viruses were thus spread to new geographic areas causing major epidemics. Because dispersal was by sailing ship, however, there were long intervals (10-40 years) between epidemics. In the aftermath of World War II, rapid urbanization in Southeast Asia led to increased transmission and hyperendemicity. The first major epidemics of the severe and fatal form of disease, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), occurred in Southeast Asia as a direct result of this changing ecology. In the last 25 years of the 20th century, a dramatic global geographic expansion of epidemic DF/DHF occurred, facilitated by unplanned urbanization in tropical developing countries, modern transportation, lack of effective mosquito control and globalization. As we go into the 21st century, epidemic DF/DHF is one of the most important infectious diseases affecting tropical urban areas. Each year there are an estimated 50-100 million dengue infections, 500000 cases of DHF that must be hospitalized and 20000-25 000 deaths, mainly in children. Epidemic DF/DHF has an economic impact on the community of the same order of magnitude as malaria and other important infectious diseases. There are currently no vaccines nor antiviral drugs available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic DF/DHF is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti.

  4. Larvicidal Activity of Cassia occidentalis (Linn.) against the Larvae of Bancroftian Filariasis Vector Mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Chawla, Rakesh; Dhamodaram, P.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives. The plan of this work was to study the larvicidal activity of Cassia occidentalis (Linn.) against the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus. These larvae are the most significant vectors. They transmit the parasites and pathogens which cause a deadly disease like filariasis, dengue, yellow fever, malaria, Japanese encephalitis, chikungunya, and so forth, which are considered harmful towards the population in tropic and subtropical regions. Methods. The preliminary laboratory trail was undertaken to determine the efficacy of petroleum ether and N-butanol extract of dried whole plant of Cassia occidentalis (Linn.) belonging to the family Caesalpiniaceae at various concentrations against the late third instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus by following the WHO guidelines. Results. The results suggest that 100% mortality effect of petroleum ether and N-butanol extract of Cassia occidentalis (Linn.) was observed at 200 and 300 ppm (parts per million). The results obviously showed use of plants in insect control as an alternative method for minimizing the noxious effect of some pesticide compounds on the environment. Thus the extract of Cassia occidentalis (Linn.) is claimed as more selective and biodegradable agent. Conclusion. This study justified that plant Cassia occidentalis (Linn.) has a realistic mortality result for larvae of filarial vector. This is safe to individual and communities against mosquitoes. It is a natural weapon for mosquito control. PMID:24688786

  5. DenguePredict: An Integrated Drug Repositioning Approach towards Drug Discovery for Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, QuanQiu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a viral disease of expanding global incidence without cures. Here we present a drug repositioning system (DenguePredict) leveraging upon a unique drug treatment database and vast amounts of disease- and drug-related data. We first constructed a large-scale genetic disease network with enriched dengue genetics data curated from biomedical literature. We applied a network-based ranking algorithm to find dengue-related diseases from the disease network. We then developed a novel algorithm to prioritize FDA-approved drugs from dengue-related diseases to treat dengue. When tested in a de-novo validation setting, DenguePredict found the only two drugs tested in clinical trials for treating dengue and ranked them highly: chloroquine ranked at top 0.96% and ivermectin at top 22.75%. We showed that drugs targeting immune systems and arachidonic acid metabolism-related apoptotic pathways might represent innovative drugs to treat dengue. In summary, DenguePredict, by combining comprehensive disease- and drug-related data and novel algorithms, may greatly facilitate drug discovery for dengue. PMID:26958268

  6. HPTLC analysis of Scoparia dulcis Linn (Scrophulariaceae) and its larvicidal potential against dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Wankhar, Wankupar; Srinivasan, Sakthivel; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the larvicidal activity of Scoparia dulcis aqueous extract against dengue vector and determines its major chemical components. The extract was tested at various concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2 mg/mL against Aedes aegypti larvae. The extracts displayed significant larvicidal efficacy against Ae. aegypt species after 24 h exposure revealing LC50 of 3.3835 (mg/mL) and LC90 of 5.7578 (mg/mL). Finger printing profile carried out by CAMAG automatic TLC sample applicator programmed through WIN CATS software revealed peaks with different Rf values for three different volumes injected: 16, 15 and 18 peaks were spotted for 3, 6 and 9 μL, respectively. Ascending order of Rf values was also ascertained for each peak recorded. This study clearly signifies that S. dulcis extract contains numerous compounds that are known to have larvicidal properties which clearly substantiates its efficacy on Ae. aegypti larvae.

  7. HPTLC analysis of Scoparia dulcis Linn (Scrophulariaceae) and its larvicidal potential against dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Wankhar, Wankupar; Srinivasan, Sakthivel; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the larvicidal activity of Scoparia dulcis aqueous extract against dengue vector and determines its major chemical components. The extract was tested at various concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2 mg/mL against Aedes aegypti larvae. The extracts displayed significant larvicidal efficacy against Ae. aegypt species after 24 h exposure revealing LC50 of 3.3835 (mg/mL) and LC90 of 5.7578 (mg/mL). Finger printing profile carried out by CAMAG automatic TLC sample applicator programmed through WIN CATS software revealed peaks with different Rf values for three different volumes injected: 16, 15 and 18 peaks were spotted for 3, 6 and 9 μL, respectively. Ascending order of Rf values was also ascertained for each peak recorded. This study clearly signifies that S. dulcis extract contains numerous compounds that are known to have larvicidal properties which clearly substantiates its efficacy on Ae. aegypti larvae. PMID:25573588

  8. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1987-08-01

    There has been a constant increase in the incidence of dengue in the Americas over the past 15 years. This has been caused by increased frequency of epidemic activity in most countries, as a result of increased numbers of virus serotypes circulating in the region. The change in disease ecology has resulted in the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) in the region, first with a major epidemic in Cuba, followed by increased occurrence of sporadic cases of DHF/DSS in many countries. The sequence of events in the Americas in the 1980's has been nearly identical to the pattern observed in Southeast Asia in the 1950's. Prospects for prevention of epidemic DHF/DSS in the American region, therefore, are not good. In the absence of Aedes aegypti eradication, the only hope for effective prevention and control is to develop more effective active surveillance for DHF/DSS and combine that with both emergency and community-based vector control programs.

  9. DENGUE PATIENTS AT PHOTHARAM HOSPITAL: A CLINICAL TRIAL SITE OF DENGUE VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Nunthanid, Somboon; Tiawilai, Anongrat

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2013, 1,868 dengue patients, 916 male and 952 female, were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Among these patients, there were 1,209 with dengue fever (DF), 598 with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 61 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with 1 death. The disease was seen all year round with a higher incidence in the rainy season. A trend of shift in age group towards older children and adults was seen during the study period. These data show that dengue patient admissions to Photharam Hospital are common, causing a heavy burden on the health system. Only one death was seen during the period of study, indicating that early recognition and effective management of dengue patients occurred. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients during the study period is a problem of concern and needs further clarification. PMID:26506727

  10. DENGUE PATIENTS AT PHOTHARAM HOSPITAL: A CLINICAL TRIAL SITE OF DENGUE VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Nunthanid, Somboon; Tiawilai, Anongrat

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2013, 1,868 dengue patients, 916 male and 952 female, were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Among these patients, there were 1,209 with dengue fever (DF), 598 with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 61 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with 1 death. The disease was seen all year round with a higher incidence in the rainy season. A trend of shift in age group towards older children and adults was seen during the study period. These data show that dengue patient admissions to Photharam Hospital are common, causing a heavy burden on the health system. Only one death was seen during the period of study, indicating that early recognition and effective management of dengue patients occurred. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients during the study period is a problem of concern and needs further clarification.

  11. Epidemiology of dengue in Sri Lanka before and after the emergence of epidemic dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Messer, William B; Vitarana, U Tissa; Sivananthan, Kamalanayani; Elvtigala, Jayanthi; Preethimala, L D; Ramesh, R; Withana, Nalini; Gubler, Duane J; De Silva, Aravinda M

    2002-06-01

    Before 1989, dengue epidemiology in Sri Lanka was characterized by frequent transmission of all four dengue serotypes but a low incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). After 1989, cases of DHF dramatically increased. Here we present the results of epidemiologic studies conducted in Colombo, Sri Lanka before and after epidemic emergence of DHF in 1989. We compared the proportion of dengue cases among people with fever attending clinics from 1980 to 1984 and in 1997 and 1998 to determine if an increase in dengue transmission was associated with more DHF cases being reported. We also compared the relative distribution of dengue virus serotypes circulating in Colombo before and after the emergence of DHF. We detected no significant differences in dengue as a proportion of fever cases or in serotype distribution between the pre and post-DHF periods. We conclude that an increase in virus transmission or a change in circulating serotypes does not explain the epidemic emergence of DHF in Sri Lanka.

  12. Spatial distribution of the risk of dengue and the entomological indicators in Sumaré, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Gerson Laurindo; Donalísio, Maria Rita; Stephan, Celso; Lourenço, Roberto Wagner; Andrade, Valmir Roberto; Arduino, Marylene de Brito; de Lima, Virgilia Luna Castor

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide, caused by any of four virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4; Flaviviridae: Flavivirus), transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquito. Reducing the levels of infestation by A. aegypti is one of the few current strategies to control dengue fever. Entomological indicators are used by dengue national control program to measure the infestation of A. aegypti, but little is known about predictive power of these indicators to measure dengue risk. In this spatial case-control study, we analyzed the spatial distribution of the risk of dengue and the influence of entomological indicators of A. aegypti in its egg, larva-pupa and adult stages occurring in a mid-size city in the state of São Paulo. The dengue cases were those confirmed by the city's epidemiological surveillance system and the controls were obtained through random selection of points within the perimeter of the inhabited area. The values of the entomological indicators were extrapolated for the entire study area through the geostatistical ordinary kriging technique. For each case and control, the respective indicator values were obtained, according with its geographical coordinates and analyzed by using a generalized additive model. Dengue incidence demonstrated a seasonal behavior, as well as the entomological indicators of all mosquito's evolutionary stages. The infestation did not present a significant variation in intensity and was not a limiting or determining factor of the occurrence of cases in the municipality. The risk maps of the disease from crude and adjusted generalized additive models did not present differences, suggesting that areas with the highest values of entomological indicators were not associated with the incidence of dengue. The inclusion of other variables in the generalized additive models may reveal the modulatory effect for the risk of the disease, which is not found in this study. PMID:24831806

  13. Spatial Distribution of the Risk of Dengue and the Entomological Indicators in Sumaré, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Gerson Laurindo; Donalísio, Maria Rita; Stephan, Celso; Lourenço, Roberto Wagner; Andrade, Valmir Roberto; Arduino, Marylene de Brito; de Lima, Virgilia Luna Castor

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide, caused by any of four virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4; Flaviviridae: Flavivirus), transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquito. Reducing the levels of infestation by A. aegypti is one of the few current strategies to control dengue fever. Entomological indicators are used by dengue national control program to measure the infestation of A. aegypti, but little is known about predictive power of these indicators to measure dengue risk. In this spatial case-control study, we analyzed the spatial distribution of the risk of dengue and the influence of entomological indicators of A. aegypti in its egg, larva-pupa and adult stages occurring in a mid-size city in the state of São Paulo. The dengue cases were those confirmed by the city's epidemiological surveillance system and the controls were obtained through random selection of points within the perimeter of the inhabited area. The values of the entomological indicators were extrapolated for the entire study area through the geostatistical ordinary kriging technique. For each case and control, the respective indicator values were obtained, according with its geographical coordinates and analyzed by using a generalized additive model. Dengue incidence demonstrated a seasonal behavior, as well as the entomological indicators of all mosquito's evolutionary stages. The infestation did not present a significant variation in intensity and was not a limiting or determining factor of the occurrence of cases in the municipality. The risk maps of the disease from crude and adjusted generalized additive models did not present differences, suggesting that areas with the highest values of entomological indicators were not associated with the incidence of dengue. The inclusion of other variables in the generalized additive models may reveal the modulatory effect for the risk of the disease, which is not found in this study. PMID:24831806

  14. Spatial distribution of the risk of dengue and the entomological indicators in Sumaré, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Gerson Laurindo; Donalísio, Maria Rita; Stephan, Celso; Lourenço, Roberto Wagner; Andrade, Valmir Roberto; Arduino, Marylene de Brito; de Lima, Virgilia Luna Castor

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide, caused by any of four virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4; Flaviviridae: Flavivirus), transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquito. Reducing the levels of infestation by A. aegypti is one of the few current strategies to control dengue fever. Entomological indicators are used by dengue national control program to measure the infestation of A. aegypti, but little is known about predictive power of these indicators to measure dengue risk. In this spatial case-control study, we analyzed the spatial distribution of the risk of dengue and the influence of entomological indicators of A. aegypti in its egg, larva-pupa and adult stages occurring in a mid-size city in the state of São Paulo. The dengue cases were those confirmed by the city's epidemiological surveillance system and the controls were obtained through random selection of points within the perimeter of the inhabited area. The values of the entomological indicators were extrapolated for the entire study area through the geostatistical ordinary kriging technique. For each case and control, the respective indicator values were obtained, according with its geographical coordinates and analyzed by using a generalized additive model. Dengue incidence demonstrated a seasonal behavior, as well as the entomological indicators of all mosquito's evolutionary stages. The infestation did not present a significant variation in intensity and was not a limiting or determining factor of the occurrence of cases in the municipality. The risk maps of the disease from crude and adjusted generalized additive models did not present differences, suggesting that areas with the highest values of entomological indicators were not associated with the incidence of dengue. The inclusion of other variables in the generalized additive models may reveal the modulatory effect for the risk of the disease, which is not found in this study.

  15. Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.M.; Morgan, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Tests with naturally-occurring sediments are rare and sediment testing methodology is not standardized. The authors present a simple methodology for undertaking sediment bioassays with oyster larvae, and present data from a recent study to prove the utility of this method.

  16. Dengue Fever (DF) in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dengue is a widespread mosquito-borne infection in human beings, which in recent years has become a major international public health concern. Symptomatic dengue virus infections can present with a wide range of clinical manifestations, from a mild febrile illness to a life-threatening shock syndrome. Both viral and host factors are thought to contribute to the manifestations of disease in each infected. It is important to understand its burden on health care, morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and suspicion of DF in primary care might reduce the complications if handled properly. We must understand the depth of the problem in terms of its transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention. PMID:21349169

  17. Laboratory Surveillance of Dengue in Argentina, 1995–2001

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Maria Valeria; Rangeon, Griselda; Ranaivoarisoa, Marie Y.; Verzeri, Nora; Roginski, Sandra; Baroni, Pablo; Enria, Delia

    2003-01-01

    Local transmission of dengue fever virus in Argentina is increased by the presence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and dengue outbreaks in neighboring countries. From 1995 to 2001, a laboratory-based active surveillance program detected 922 dengue cases. Indigenous transmission involving dengue-1 and -2 serotypes was confirmed only in subtropical areas in northern Argentina. PMID:12781019

  18. Clinical profile and outcome of Dengue fever cases.

    PubMed

    Ratageri, Vinod H; Shepur, T A; Wari, P K; Chavan, S C; Mujahid, I B; Yergolkar, P N

    2005-08-01

    Dengue fever is on rise globally. In India, Dengue epidemics are expanding geographically, even into the rural areas. Dengue can present with varied manifestations. The mortality rate has been brought down with high index of suspicion, strict monitoring and proper fluid resuscitation. Herewith, we are presenting clinical features and outcome of Dengue cases seen in and around Hubli (North Karnataka).

  19. Laboratory surveillance of dengue in Argentina, 1995-2001.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Gabriela; Paz, Maria Valeria; Rangeon, Griselda; Ranaivoarisoa, Marie Y; Verzeri, Nora; Roginski, Sandra; Baroni, Pablo; Enria, Delia

    2003-06-01

    Local transmission of dengue fever virus in Argentina is increased by the presence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and dengue outbreaks in neighboring countries. From 1995 to 2001, a laboratory-based active surveillance program detected 922 dengue cases. Indigenous transmission involving dengue-1 and -2 serotypes was confirmed only in subtropical areas in northern Argentina.

  20. New dengue virus type 1 genotype in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Tissera, Hasitha A; Ooi, Eng Eong; Gubler, Duane J; Tan, Ying; Logendra, Barathy; Wahala, Wahala M P B; de Silva, Aravinda M; Abeysinghe, M R Nihal; Palihawadana, Paba; Gunasena, Sunethra; Tam, Clarence C; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Letson, G William; Margolis, Harold S; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2011-11-01

    The number of cases and severity of disease associated with dengue infection in Sri Lanka has been increasing since 1989, when the first epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever was recorded. We identified a new dengue virus 1 strain circulating in Sri Lanka that coincided with the 2009 dengue epidemic.

  1. Urban epidemic of dengue virus serotype 3 infection, Senegal, 2009.

    PubMed

    Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Faye, Oumar; Talla, Cheikh; Diallo, Diawo; Chen, Rubing; Mondo, Mireille; Ba, Rouguiétou; Macondo, Edgard; Siby, Tidiane; Weaver, Scott C; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2014-03-01

    An urban epidemic of dengue in Senegal during 2009 affected 196 persons and included 5 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 1 fatal case of dengue shock syndrome. Dengue virus serotype 3 was identified from all patients, and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were identified as the primary vector of the virus.

  2. Serologic evidence of dengue infection before onset of epidemic, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Anowar; Khatun, Mahmuda; Arjumand, Farzana; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F

    2003-11-01

    Dengue fever emerged in Bangladesh in 2000. We tested 225 serum samples from febrile patients and 184 blood donors in 1996 and 1997 for dengue antibodies; 55 (24.4% ) febrile patients had dengue antibodies ( 65.5% with secondary infection pattern), compared with one (0.54%) donor (p <0.001), suggesting that dengue transmission was ongoing well before 1996.

  3. How the pilidium larva feeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The nemertean pilidium is a long-lived feeding larva unique to the life cycle of a single monophyletic group, the Pilidiophora, which is characterized by this innovation. That the pilidium feeds on small planktonic unicells seems clear; how it does so is unknown and not readily inferred, because it shares little morphological similarity with other planktotrophic larvae. Results Using high-speed video of trapped lab-reared pilidia of Micrura alaskensis, we documented a multi-stage feeding mechanism. First, the external ciliation of the pilidium creates a swimming and feeding current which carries suspended prey past the primary ciliated band spanning the posterior margins of the larval body. Next, the larva detects prey that pass within reach, then conducts rapid and coordinated deformations of the larval body to re-direct passing cells and surrounding water into a vestibular space between the lappets, isolated from external currents but not quite inside the larva. Once a prey cell is thus captured, internal ciliary bands arranged within this vestibule prevent prey escape. Finally, captured cells are transported by currents within a buccal funnel toward the stomach entrance. Remarkably, we observed that the prey of choice – various cultured cryptomonads – attempt to escape their fate. Conclusions The feeding mechanism deployed by the pilidium larva coordinates local control of cilia-driven water transport with sensorimotor behavior, in a manner clearly distinct from any other well-studied larval feeding mechanisms. We hypothesize that the pilidium’s feeding strategy may be adapted to counter escape responses such as those deployed by cryptomonads, and speculate that similar needs may underlie convergences among disparate planktotrophic larval forms. PMID:23927417

  4. Wolbachia versus dengue: Evolutionary forecasts.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Turelli, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A novel form of biological control is being applied to the dengue virus. The agent is the maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia, naturally absent from the main dengue vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Three Wolbachia-based control strategies have been proposed. One is suppression of mosquito populations by large-scale releases of males incompatible with native females; this intervention requires ongoing releases. The other interventions transform wild mosquito populations with Wolbachia that spread via the frequency-dependent fitness advantage of Wolbachia-infected females; those interventions potentially require just a single, local release for area-wide disease control. One of these latter strategies uses Wolbachia that shortens mosquito life, indirectly preventing viral maturation/transmission. The other strategy uses Wolbachia that block viral transmission. All interventions can be undermined by viral, bacterial or mosquito evolution; viral virulence in humans may also evolve. We examine existing theory, experiments and comparative evidence to motivate predictions about evolutionary outcomes. (i) The life-shortening strategy seems the most likely to be thwarted by evolution. (ii) Mosquito suppression has a reasonable chance of working locally, at least in the short term, but long-term success over large areas is challenging. (iii) Dengue blocking faces strong selection for viral resistance but may well persist indefinitely at some level. Virulence evolution is not mathematically predictable, but comparative data provide no precedent for Wolbachia increasing dengue virulence. On balance, our analysis suggests that the considerable possible benefits of these technologies outweigh the known negatives, but the actual risk is largely unknown. PMID:24481199

  5. The Risk of Dengue Virus Transmission in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during an Epidemic Period of 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mboera, Leonard E. G.; Mweya, Clement N.; Rumisha, Susan F.; Tungu, Patrick K.; Stanley, Grades; Makange, Mariam R.; Misinzo, Gerald; De Nardo, Pasquale; Vairo, Francesco; Oriyo, Ndekya M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014 dengue outbreaks have been reported in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. However, there is no comprehensive data on the risk of transmission of dengue in the country. The objective of this study was to assess the risk of transmission of dengue in Dar es Salaam during the 2014 epidemic. Methodology/Principal Findings This cross-sectional study was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during the dengue outbreak of 2014. The study involved Ilala, Kinondoni and Temeke districts. Adult mosquitoes were collected using carbon dioxide-propane powered Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus traps. In each household compound, water-holding containers were examined for mosquito larvae and pupae. Dengue virus infection of mosquitoes was determined using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Partial amplification and sequencing of dengue virus genome in infected mosquitoes was performed. A total of 1,000 adult mosquitoes were collected. Over half (59.9%) of the adult mosquitoes were collected in Kinondoni. Aedes aegypti accounted for 17.2% of the mosquitoes of which 90.6% were from Kinondoni. Of a total of 796 houses inspected, 38.3% had water-holding containers in their premises. Kinondoni had the largest proportion of water-holding containers (57.7%), followed by Temeke (31.4%) and Ilala (23.4%). The most common breeding containers for the Aedes mosquitoes were discarded plastic containers and tires. High Aedes infestation indices were observed for all districts and sites, with a house index of 18.1% in Ilala, 25.5% in Temeke and 35.3% in Kinondoni. The respective container indices were 77.4%, 65.2% and 80.2%. Of the reared larvae and pupae, 5,250 adult mosquitoes emerged, of which 61.9% were Ae. aegypti. Overall, 27 (8.18) of the 330 pools of Ae. aegypti were positive for dengue virus. On average, the overall maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) indicates pooled infection rate of 8.49 per 1,000 mosquitoes (95%CI = 5.72–12

  6. Workbook on the Identification of Mosquito Larvae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Harry D.; And Others

    This self-instructional booklet is designed to enable public health workers identify larvae of some important North American mosquito species. The morphological features of larvae of the various genera and species are illustrated in a programed booklet, which also contains illustrated taxonomic keys to the larvae of 11 North American genera and to…

  7. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year. PMID:25080833

  8. Computer literature searches on dengue.

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, G.

    1993-01-01

    Many research workers, to save time, rely entirely on either on-line or off-line databases offered by an increasing number of information services. The characteristics of eight databases, including five on-line services, were analysed in the present study concerning the retrieval of information on dengue, the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans. Differences in the rate of retrieval among data-bases were apparent, depending on the main subject of publication as well as on the geographical location of the publisher. While rates of retrieval of references in molecular biology were generally satisfactory (mostly > 70%), those in clinical medicine and epidemiology were not (< 50%). The latter, as published in many dengue-endemic tropical countries, were found to be inadequately covered. For the global surveillance of dengue, which has increased in intensity and spread to many countries because of increased international travel, the development of a new database emphasizing tropical geographic medicine is highly desirable. PMID:8490978

  9. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year.

  10. Dengue and other emerging flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Solomon, T; Mallewa, M

    2001-02-01

    Flaviviruses are among the most important emerging viruses known to man. Most are arboviruses (arthropod-borne) being transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. They derived from a common ancestor 10-20000 years ago and are evolving rapidly to fill new ecological niches. Many are spreading to new geographical areas and causing increased numbers of infections. Traditionally, three clinical syndromes are recognized: fever-arthralgia-rash, viral haemorrhagic fever, and neurological disease, though for some flaviviruses the disease pattern is changing. Dengue, the most important flavivirus, is transmitted between humans by Aedes mosquitoes. Recent work is elucidating the pathogenesis of its most severe form, dengue haemorrhagic fever. Yellow fever, which has epidemiological similarities to dengue, was under control in the mid-20th century, but is once again increasing. Japanese encephalitis virus is numerically the most important cause of epidemic encephalitis; its geographical area is expanding despite the availability of vaccines. Other mosquito-borne neurotropic flaviviruses with clinical and epidemiological similarities are found across the globe. These include St Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus, which recently reached the Americas for the first time. In cooler northern climates ticks are more important vectors. Tick-borne encephalitis virus occurs across large parts of Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent states. The tick-borne haemorrhagic flaviviruses, Omsk haemorrhagic fever and Kyasanur Forrest disease are localized in small areas.

  11. Recent Advances in Dengue: Relevance to Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Noyd, David H.; Sharp, Tyler M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents an increasingly important public health challenge in Puerto Rico, with recent epidemics in 2007, 2010, and 2012–2013. Although recent advances in dengue vaccine development offer hope for primary prevention, the role of health professionals in the diagnosis and management of dengue patients is paramount. Case definitions for dengue, dengue with warning signs, and severe dengue provide a framework to guide clinical decision-making. Furthermore, the differentiation between dengue and other acute febrile illnesses, such as leptospirosis and chikungunya, is necessary for the appropriate diagnosis and management of cases. An understanding of dengue epidemiology and surveillance in Puerto Rico provides context for clinicians in epidemic and non-epidemic periods. This review aims to improve health professionals’ ability to diagnose dengue, and as highlight the relevance of recent advances in dengue prevention and management in Puerto Rico. PMID:26061055

  12. Human dendritic cells as targets of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Marovich, M; Grouard-Vogel, G; Louder, M; Eller, M; Sun, W; Wu, S J; Putvatana, R; Murphy, G; Tassaneetrithep, B; Burgess, T; Birx, D; Hayes, C; Schlesinger-Frankel, S; Mascola, J

    2001-12-01

    Dengue virus infections are an emerging global threat. Severe dengue infection is manifested as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, both of which can be fatal complications. Factors predisposing to complicated disease and pathogenesis of severe infections are discussed. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and ELISA techniques, we studied the cellular targets of dengue virus infection, at both the clinical (in vivo) and the laboratory (in vitro) level. Resident skin dendritic cells are targets of dengue virus infection as demonstrated in a skin biopsy from a dengue vaccine recipient. We show that factors influencing infection of monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells are different. Immature dendritic cells were found to be the cells most permissive for dengue infection and maybe early targets for infection. Immature dendritic cells exposed to dengue virus produce TNF-alpha protein. Some of these immature dendritic cells undergo TNF-alpha mediated maturation as a consequence of exposure to the dengue virus. PMID:11924831

  13. Recent Advances in Dengue: Relevance to Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Noyd, David H; Sharp, Tyler M

    2015-06-01

    Dengue represents an increasingly important public health challenge in Puerto Rico, with recent epidemics in 2007, 2010, and 2012-2013. Although recent advances in dengue vaccine development offer hope for primary prevention, the role of health professionals in the diagnosis and management of dengue patients is paramount. Case definitions for dengue, dengue with warning signs, and severe dengue provide a framework to guide clinical decision-making. Furthermore, the differentiation between dengue and other acute febrile illnesses, such as leptospirosis and chikungunya, is necessary for the appropriate diagnosis and management of cases. An understanding of dengue epidemiology and surveillance in Puerto Rico provides context for clinicians in epidemic and non-epidemic periods. This review aims to improve health professionals' ability to diagnose dengue, and as highlight the relevance of recent advances in dengue prevention and management in Puerto Rico. PMID:26061055

  14. Characteristic of dengue disease in Taiwan: 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chou; Huang, Yh-Hsiung; Shu, Pei-Yun; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2010-04-01

    Taiwan's dengue outbreaks have a unique type of transmission: starting by import from abroad in early summer, spreading out locally, and ending in the winter. This pattern repeats every year. Most of the dengue patients are adults, with dengue fever peaking in the 50-54 year age range, and dengue hemorrhagic fever in the 60-64 year age range. Two patterns of dengue infection were found: DENV-2 in 2002 with 74% of secondary infection in contrast to non-DENV-2 (DENV-1 or DENV-3) in 2004-2007 with approximately 70% of primary infection. Secondary dengue virus infection increases disease morbidity, but not mortality in adults. The active serological surveillance shows two-thirds of the dengue-infected adults are symptomatic post infection. The Taiwanese experience of adult dengue should be valuable for countries or areas where, although dengue is not endemic, the Aedes aegypti vector exists and dengue virus can be introduced by travelers.

  15. Recent Advances in Dengue: Relevance to Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Noyd, David H; Sharp, Tyler M

    2015-06-01

    Dengue represents an increasingly important public health challenge in Puerto Rico, with recent epidemics in 2007, 2010, and 2012-2013. Although recent advances in dengue vaccine development offer hope for primary prevention, the role of health professionals in the diagnosis and management of dengue patients is paramount. Case definitions for dengue, dengue with warning signs, and severe dengue provide a framework to guide clinical decision-making. Furthermore, the differentiation between dengue and other acute febrile illnesses, such as leptospirosis and chikungunya, is necessary for the appropriate diagnosis and management of cases. An understanding of dengue epidemiology and surveillance in Puerto Rico provides context for clinicians in epidemic and non-epidemic periods. This review aims to improve health professionals' ability to diagnose dengue, and as highlight the relevance of recent advances in dengue prevention and management in Puerto Rico.

  16. Dengue fever with unusual thalamic involvement.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Asim Kumar; Purkait, Radheshyam; Sinhamahapatra, Tapan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is caused by four distinct viruses (type 1 to 4) that are closely related antigenically. Infection by dengue virus may be asymptomatic or may lead to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever or dengue haemorrhagic fever. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing and the neurological complications are being reported more frequently. The neurological features includeheadache, seizures, neck stiffness, depressed sensorium, behavioural disorders, delirium, paralysis and cranial nerve palsies. Such neurological symptoms in dengue fever wereattributed to cerebral oedema, haemorrhage, haemoconcentration due to increasing vascular permeability, coagulopathy and release of toxic substances. Cerebral oedema, encephalitis-like changes (oedema and scattered focal lesions), intracranial haemorrhages as well as selective involvement of bilateral hippocampus in dengue infection have been reported previously on selective neuro-imaging but thalamic involvement is rare. We here report a case of a typical presentation of encephalopathy with left sided complete hemiplegia due to thalamic involvement in dengue infection.

  17. Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Control Pocket Guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This technical guide consolidates information and procedures for surveillance and control of mosquitoes that transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses. The guide focuses on mosquitoes that transmit dengue but also makes reference to chikungunya and yellow fever because the pathogens that cause these ...

  18. Autochthonous dengue fever, Tokyo, Japan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Satoshi; Kato, Yasuyuki; Moi, Meng Ling; Kotaki, Akira; Ota, Masayuki; Shinohara, Koh; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Kei; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Sato, Tastuya; Kunimatsu, Junwa; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Ohmagari, Norio

    2015-03-01

    After 70 years with no confirmed autochthonous cases of dengue fever in Japan, 19 cases were reported during August-September 2014. Dengue virus serotype 1 was detected in 18 patients. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope protein genome sequence from 3 patients revealed 100% identity with the strain from the first patient (2014) in Japan.

  19. Social justice, climate change, and dengue.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aileen Y; Fuller, Douglas O; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Beier, John C

    2014-06-14

    Climate change should be viewed fundamentally as an issue of global justice. Understanding the complex interplay of climatic and socioeconomic trends is imperative to protect human health and lessen the burden of diseases such as dengue fever. Dengue fever is rapidly expanding globally. Temperature, rainfall, and frequency of natural disasters, as well as non-climatic trends involving population growth and migration, urbanization, and international trade and travel, are expected to increase the prevalence of mosquito breeding sites, mosquito survival, the speed of mosquito reproduction, the speed of viral incubation, the distribution of dengue virus and its vectors, human migration patterns towards urban areas, and displacement after natural disasters. The burden of dengue disproportionately affects the poor due to increased environmental risk and decreased health care. Mobilization of social institutions is needed to improve the structural inequalities of poverty that predispose the poor to increased dengue fever infection and worse outcomes. This paper reviews the link between dengue and climatic factors as a starting point to developing a comprehensive understanding of how climate change affects dengue risk and how institutions can address the issues of social justice and dengue outbreaks that increasingly affect vulnerable urban populations.

  20. Unusual clinical manifestations of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    George, R; Liam, C K; Chua, C T; Lam, S K; Pang, T; Geethan, R; Foo, L S

    1988-12-01

    Four recent cases of dengue fever with severe, unusual clinical manifestations are described. Two of these cases had features of fulminant hepatitis and encephalopathy; one of these cases was fatal. The two remaining cases showed hepatitis with renal impairment. The significance and importance of these unusual manifestations of dengue disease are discussed.

  1. Dengue vaccines approach the finish line.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Robert

    2007-07-15

    The spread of dengue virus (DV) via its Aedes mosquito vector throughout most of the tropics has led to a worldwide resurgence of epidemic dengue, including dengue hemorrhagic fever. For the first time in 60 years, the pipeline of dengue vaccines looks promising. Strains of each of the 4 DV serotypes, attenuated by passage in tissue culture or by recombinant DNA technology, have been formulated into tetravalent vaccines and have entered successful phase 1 and 2 clinical trials in the United States and Southeast Asia. Antibody-dependent enhancement of wild-type DV infections by the vaccine represents a unique safety issue, which is under investigation. The Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation), the World Health Organization, industry, the US military, and governments of tropical countries are collaborating to accelerate dengue vaccine development and phase 3 vaccine efficacy trials in countries where dengue is endemic. A protective tetravalent vaccine must be licensed soon if dengue is to be brought under control.

  2. Dengue hemorrhagic fever: clinical manifestations and management.

    PubMed

    Kabra, S K; Jain, Y; Singhal, T; Ratageri, V H

    1999-01-01

    Dengue virus infection may remain asymptomatic or manifest as nonspecific viral infection to life threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Patients with DHF/DSS have fever, hemorrhagic manifestations along with thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration. Thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration are distinguishing features between DHF/DSS and dengue fever (DF). Some patients with dengue fever may have significant bleed and mild thrombocytopenia but no hemoconcentration. These patients are labelled to have dengue fever with unusual bleeds. Laboratory findings in DHF/DSS include rising hematocrit, thrombocytopenia and transformed lymphocytes on peripheral smear. There may be increased transaminases, hyponatremia, transient increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. In severe disease there may be lab evidence of dissemination intravascular coagulation. X-ray film of the chest may show pleural-effusion. Ultrasonogram of abdomen may detect thickened gall bladder wall with hepatomegaly and ascitis. In some patients there may be abnormality in electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. The diagnosis of DHF/DSS is based on typical clinical findings. For confirmation of dengue virus infection viral culture can be done on blood obtained from patients during early phase of illness. In later part of illness antibodies against dengue virus can be demonstrated by various techniques. The treatment of DF is symptomatic. For control of fever nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided. DHF/DSS are managed by intravenous fluid infusion with repeated monitoring of vital parameters and packed cell volume (PCV).

  3. Dengue antibody prevalence in German travelers.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Ole; Lauschke, Annekathrin; Frank, Christina; Shu, Pei-Yun; Niedrig, Matthias; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Stark, Klaus; Jelinek, Tomas

    2005-05-01

    We studied 2,259 German citizens after they returned from dengue-endemic countries from 1996 to 2004. Serotype-specific dengue antibodies indicated acute infections in 51 (4.7%) travelers with recent fever and 13 (1.1%) travelers with no recent fever, depending largely on destination and epidemic activity in the countries visited.

  4. Development of dengue infection severity score.

    PubMed

    Pongpan, Surangrat; Wisitwong, Apichart; Tawichasri, Chamaiporn; Patumanond, Jayanton; Namwongprom, Sirianong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a simple scoring system to predict dengue infection severity based on patient characteristics and routine clinical profiles. Methods. Retrospective data of children with dengue infection from 3 general hospitals in Thailand were reviewed. Dengue infection was categorized into 3 severity levels: dengue infection (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Coefficients of significant predictors of disease severity under ordinal regression analysis were transformed into item scores. Total scores were used to classify patients into 3 severity levels. Results. Significant clinical predictors of dengue infection severity were age >6 years, hepatomegaly, hematocrit ≥40%, systolic pressure <90 mmHg, white cell count >5000 / μ L, and platelet ≤50000 / μ L. The derived total scores, which ranged from 0 to 18, classified patients into 3 severity levels: DF (scores <2.5, n = 451, 58.1%), DHF (scores 2.5-11.5, n = 276, 35.5%), and DSS (scores >11.5, n = 50, 6.4%). The derived score correctly classified patients into their original severity levels in 60.7%. An under-estimation of 25.7% and an over-estimation of 13.5% were clinically acceptable. Conclusions. The derived dengue infection severity score classified patients into DF, DHF, or DSS, correctly into their original severity levels. Validation of the score should be reconfirmed before application of routine practice.

  5. [Hepatic alterations in patients with dengue].

    PubMed

    Larreal, Yraima; Valero, Nereida; Estévez, Jesús; Reyes, Ivette; Maldonado, Mery; Espina, Luz Marina; Arias, Julia; Meleán, Eddy; Añez, German; Atencio, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Clinical features of Dengue are very variable due to multiple alterations induced by the virus in the organism. Increased levels of transaminases similar to those produced by the Hepatitis virus have been reported in patients with Dengue from hiperendemic zones in Asia. The objectives of this study were to determine alterations in the liver tests in patients with Dengue and to relate them to the disease, clinically and serologically. Clinical history, hemathological tests serum transaminases (ALT y AST) and bilirubin assays were performed in 62 patients with clinical and serological diagnosis of Dengue. According to clinical features 38.7% of the patients with classical (CD) and hemorrhagic (DHF) forms of Dengue reffered abdominal pain and 2 patients with DHF had ictericia and hepatomegaly. Laboratory test findings showed leucopenia in 72.5% in both forms of Dengue and of patients with DHF severe thrombocytopenia (< 50.000 platelets x mm3), long PT and PPT in 70.9%, 23.0% and 42.3%, respectively. Transaminase values five fold higher than the normal values (p < 0.005) were observed in 36.8% and 74.4% of patients with CD and DHF respectively; AST was predominant in both groups. Our results suggest liver damage during the course of Dengue. A differential diagnosis has to be done between the hepatic involvement of Dengue cases and others viral diseases with hepatic disfunctions.

  6. Real-time forecasts of dengue epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, T. K.; Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, with an estimated 2.5 billion people at risk of transmission. In many areas with endemic dengue, disease transmission is seasonal but prone to high inter-annual variability with occasional severe epidemics. Predicting and preparing for periods of higher than average transmission is a significant public health challenge. Here we present a model of dengue transmission and a framework for optimizing model simulations with real-time observational data of dengue cases and environmental variables in order to generate ensemble-based forecasts of the timing and severity of disease outbreaks. The model-inference system is validated using synthetic data and dengue outbreak records. Retrospective forecasts are generated for a number of locations and the accuracy of these forecasts is quantified.

  7. Dissecting Japan's Dengue Outbreak in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Mikkel B.; Sessions, October; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    Despite Japan's temperate climate, a dengue outbreak occurred in Tokyo for the first time in over 70 years in 2014. We dissected this dengue outbreak based on phylogenetic analysis, travel interconnectivity, and environmental drivers for dengue epidemics. Comparing the available dengue virus 1 (DENV1) E gene sequence from this outbreak with 3,282 unique DENV1 sequences in National Center for Biotechnology Information suggested that the DENV might have been imported from China, Indonesia, Singapore, or Vietnam. With travelers arriving into Japan, Guangzhou (China) may have been the source of DENV introduction, given that Guangzhou also reported a large-scale dengue outbreak in 2014. Coinciding with the 2014 outbreak, Tokyo's climate conditions permitted the amplification of Aedes vectors and the annual peak of vectorial capacity. Given suitable vectors and climate conditions in addition to increasing interconnectivity with endemic areas of Asia, Tokyo's 2014 outbreak did not come as a surprise and may foretell more to come. PMID:26711518

  8. Dengue fever: a risk to travelers.

    PubMed

    Karp, B E

    1997-07-01

    An outbreak of dengue fever occurred among a small group of Maryland and Pennsylvania residents following a trip to the British Virgin Islands in January 1996. Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral illness that occurs primarily in tropical urban areas. Most dengue infections are benign and self-limited, but some produce severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Although dengue is not endemic in the continental United States, travelers may acquire the infection during visits to the tropics. Physicians should consider dengue in the differential diagnosis of a patient with a febrile illness and a history of recent travel to a tropical area. Travelers to endemic areas should be advised to take precautions to prevent mosquito bites.

  9. Severe Dengue Fever Outbreak in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Ko; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a vector-borne disease caused by dengue viruses (DENVs). Epidemic dengue occurs intermittently in Taiwan. In 2014, Taiwan experienced its largest DF outbreak. There were 15,732 DF cases reported. There were a total of 136 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases, of which 20 resulted in death. Most DF cases were reported in southern Taiwan. A total of 15,043 (96%) cases were from Kaohsiung, a modern city in southern Taiwan. This report reviews DF epidemics in Taiwan during 2005-2014. The correlation between DF and DHF along with temperature and precipitation were conjointly examined. We conclude that most dengue epidemics in Taiwan resulted from imported DF cases. Results indicate three main factors that may have been associated with this DF outbreak in Kaohsiung: an underground pipeline explosion combined with subsequent rainfall and higher temperature. These factors may have enhanced mosquito breeding activity, facilitating DENV transmission.

  10. Dengue fever, Hawaii, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Effler, Paul V; Pang, Lorrin; Kitsutani, Paul; Vorndam, Vance; Nakata, Michele; Ayers, Tracy; Elm, Joe; Tom, Tammy; Reiter, Paul; Rigau-Perez, José G; Hayes, John M; Mills, Kristin; Napier, Mike; Clark, Gary G; Gubler, Duane J

    2005-05-01

    Autochthonous dengue infections were last reported in Hawaii in 1944. In September 2001, the Hawaii Department of Health was notified of an unusual febrile illness in a resident with no travel history; dengue fever was confirmed. During the investigation, 1,644 persons with locally acquired denguelike illness were evaluated, and 122 (7%) laboratory-positive dengue infections were identified; dengue virus serotype 1 was isolated from 15 patients. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome were reported. In 3 instances autochthonous infections were linked to a person who reported denguelike illness after travel to French Polynesia. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Hawaiian isolates were closely associated with contemporaneous isolates from Tahiti. Aedes albopictus was present in all communities surveyed on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Kauai; no Ae. aegypti were found. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining surveillance and control of potential disease vectors even in the absence of an imminent disease threat.

  11. Dissecting Japan's Dengue Outbreak in 2014.

    PubMed

    Quam, Mikkel B; Sessions, October; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2016-02-01

    Despite Japan's temperate climate, a dengue outbreak occurred in Tokyo for the first time in over 70 years in 2014. We dissected this dengue outbreak based on phylogenetic analysis, travel interconnectivity, and environmental drivers for dengue epidemics. Comparing the available dengue virus 1 (DENV1) E gene sequence from this outbreak with 3,282 unique DENV1 sequences in National Center for Biotechnology Information suggested that the DENV might have been imported from China, Indonesia, Singapore, or Vietnam. With travelers arriving into Japan, Guangzhou (China) may have been the source of DENV introduction, given that Guangzhou also reported a large-scale dengue outbreak in 2014. Coinciding with the 2014 outbreak, Tokyo's climate conditions permitted the amplification of Aedes vectors and the annual peak of vectorial capacity. Given suitable vectors and climate conditions in addition to increasing interconnectivity with endemic areas of Asia, Tokyo's 2014 outbreak did not come as a surprise and may foretell more to come.

  12. Ongoing dengue epidemic - Angola, June 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-06-21

    On April 1, 2013, the Public Health Directorate of Angola announced that six cases of dengue had been reported to the Ministry of Health of Angola (MHA). As of May 31, a total of 517 suspected dengue cases had been reported and tested for dengue with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT). A total of 313 (60.5%) specimens tested positive for dengue, including one from a patient who died. All suspected cases were reported from Luanda Province, except for two from Malanje Province. Confirmatory diagnostic testing of 49 specimens (43 RDT-positive and six RDT-negative) at the CDC Dengue Branch confirmed dengue virus (DENV) infection in 100% of the RDT-positive specimens and 50% of the RDT-negative specimens. Only DENV-1 was detected by molecular diagnostic testing. Phylogenetic analysis indicated this virus has been circulating in the region since at least 1968, strongly suggesting that dengue is endemic in Angola. Health-care professionals throughout Angola should be aware of the ongoing epidemic, the recommended practices for clinical management of dengue patients, and the need to report cases to MHA. Persons in Angola should seek medical care for acute febrile illness to reduce the risk for developing complications. Laboratory-confirmed dengue also has been reported from seven countries on four continents among persons who had recently traveled to Luanda, including 79 persons from Portugal. Angola is the third of four African countries to report a dengue outbreak in 2013. Persons returning from Africa with acute febrile illness should seek medical care, including testing for DENV infection, and suspected cases should be reported to public health authorities.

  13. Microevolution and virulence of dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of dengue viruses has had a major impact on their virulence for humans and on the epidemiology of dengue disease around the world. Although antigenic and genetic differences in virus strains had become evident, it is mainly due to the lack of animal models of disease that has made it difficult to detect differences in virulence of dengue viruses. However, phylogenetic studies of many different dengue virus samples have led to the association between specific genotypes (within serotypes) and the presentation of more or less severe disease. Currently, dengue viruses can be classified as being of epidemiologically low, medium, or high impact; i.e., some viruses may remain in sylvatic cycles of little or low transmissibility to humans, others produce dengue fever (DF) only, and some genotypes have been associated with the potential to cause the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in addition to DF. Although the factors that contribute to dengue virus epidemiology are complex, studies have suggested that specific viral structures may contribute to increased replication in human target cells and to increased transmission by the mosquito vector; however, the immune status and possibly the genetic background of the host are also determinants of virulence or disease presentation. As to the question of whether dengue viruses are evolving toward virulence as they continue to spread throughout the world, phylogenetic and epidemiological analyses suggest that the more virulent genotypes are now displacing those that have lower epidemiological impact; there is no evidence for the transmission of antigenically aberrant, new strains.

  14. How the pilidium larva grows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For animal cells, ciliation and mitosis appear to be mutually exclusive. While uniciliated cells can resorb their cilium to undergo mitosis, multiciliated cells apparently can never divide again. Nevertheless, many multiciliated epithelia in animals must grow or undergo renewal. The larval epidermis in a number of marine invertebrate larvae, such as those of annelids, mollusks and nemerteans, consists wholly or in part of multiciliated epithelial cells, generally organized into a swimming and feeding apparatus. Many of these larvae must grow substantially to reach metamorphosis. Do individual epithelial cells simply expand to accommodate an increase in body size, or are there dividing cells amongst them? If some cells divide, where are they located? Results We show that the nemertean pilidium larva, which is almost entirely composed of multiciliated cells, retains pockets of proliferative cells in certain regions of the body. Most of these are found near the larval ciliated band in the recesses between the larval lobes and lappets, which we refer to as axils. Cells in the axils contribute both to the growing larval body and to the imaginal discs that form the juvenile worm inside the pilidium. Conclusions Our findings not only explain how the almost-entirely multiciliated pilidium can grow, but also demonstrate direct coupling of larval and juvenile growth in a maximally-indirect life history. PMID:24690541

  15. Coexistence of Philodina roseola (Rotifera: Bdelloidea) with larvae of Aedes aegypti in India.

    PubMed

    Muniaraj, M; Sathish Babu, R

    2014-06-01

    The vector mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus of dengue and Chikungunya fever are closely associated with human habitations and adapted to feed on human blood. They undergo larval and pupal development in natural and artificial freshwater collections in the urban and peri-urban environment. Although reports are available about the feeding behaviour of the thriving mosquito larvae, much information is still required to understand the successful survival of Aedes mosquitoes in small and temporary water collections. This study was undertaken to determine the co-existence and prevalence of Philodina roseola and other Bdelloid rotifers in the container habitats of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. The investigation was conducted in 43 villages which belong to four districts in South India, affected by the epidemic of either dengue or Chikungunya fever. A total of 2093 houses and 12980 containers were examined for Aedes breeding and those containers with Aedes larvae were chosen for further investigation. The investigation showed that, the P. roseola was found associated in 502 (98.2%) containers, P. roseola along with other Philodina sp. in 126 containers (25%) and P. roseola along with other Philodina sp. and other Bdelloid rotifers found in 93 containers (19%). Since the members of the genus Philodina can survive desiccation, reproduce by parthenogenesis, can be transported by wind easily and more importantly, it can incorporate the genome of other organisms including viruses, understanding the co-existence and relationship of Philodina sp. with Aedes larvae would be helpful in the control of Aedes breeding and the control measures can be designed keeping the association of Bdelloids with Aedes in mind.

  16. Role of cognitive parameters in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is becoming recognized as one of the most important vector-borne human diseases. It is predominant in tropical and subtropical zones but its geographical distribution is progressively expanding, making it an escalating global health problem of today. Dengue presents with spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic, undifferentiated mild fever, dengue fever (DF), to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without shock (DSS), a life-threatening illness characterized by plasma leakage due to increased vascular permeability. Currently, there are no antiviral modalities or vaccines available to treat and prevent dengue. Supportive care with close monitoring is the standard clinical practice. The mechanisms leading to DHF/DSS remains poorly understood. Multiple factors have been attributed to the pathological mechanism, but only a couple of these hypotheses are popular in scientific circles. The current discussion focuses on underappreciated factors, temperature, natural IgM, and endotoxin, which may be critical components playing roles in dengue pathogenesis. PMID:24305068

  17. Human antibody response to dengue virus: implications for dengue vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, a global health threat, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical countries. Dengue can range from asymptomatic, relatively mild dengue fever to severe and life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. Disease severity and outcome is largely associated with the host immune response. Several candidate vaccines in clinical trials appear promising as effective measures for dengue disease control. Vaccine development has been hampered by safety and efficacy issues, driven by a lack of understanding of the host immune response. This review focuses on recent research findings on the dengue host immune response, particularly in humans, and the relevance of these findings to challenges in vaccine development. PMID:27398060

  18. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome: are they tumour necrosis factor-mediated disorders?

    PubMed

    Yadav, M; Kamath, K R; Iyngkaran, N; Sinniah, M

    1991-12-01

    A consecutive series of 24 patients with clinical features of primary dengue infection and 22 controls (14 patients with viral fever of unknown origin and 8 healthy subjects) were assayed for serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). The acute sera of the 24 patients with clinical dengue infection were positive for dengue virus-specific IgM antibody. Clinically, 8 had dengue fever (DF), 14 dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and 2 dengue shock syndrome (DSS). All 16 patients with DHF/DSS had significantly elevated serum TNF levels but the 8 DF patients had TNF levels equivalent to that in the 22 controls. A case is made for augmented TNF production having a role for the pathophysiological changes observed in DHF/DSS and mediator modulation as a possible therapeutic approach to treatment.

  19. Myanmar dengue outbreak associated with displacement of serotypes 2, 3, and 4 by dengue 1.

    PubMed

    Thu, Hlaing Myat; Lowry, Kym; Myint, Thein Thein; Shwe, Than Nu; Han, Aye Maung; Khin, Kyu Kyu; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Thein, Soe; Aaskov, John

    2004-04-01

    In 2001, Myanmar (Burma) had its largest outbreak of dengue-15,361 reported cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), including 192 deaths. That year, 95% of dengue viruses isolated from patients were serotype 1 viruses belonging to two lineages that had diverged from an earlier, now extinct, lineage sometime before 1998. The ratio of DHF to DSS cases in 2001 was not significantly different from that in 2000, when 1,816 cases of DHF/DSS were reported and dengue 1 also was the most frequently isolated serotype. However, the 2001 ratio was significantly higher than that in 1998 (also an outbreak year) and in 1999, when all four serotypes were detected and serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were recovered in similar numbers. The large number of clinical cases in 2001 may have been due, in part, to a preponderance of infections with dengue 1 viruses.

  20. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Istúriz, R E; Gubler, D J; Brea del Castillo, J

    2000-03-01

    Four serotypes of dengue viruses produce dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. They are the most important arbovirus infections of humans, in terms of both morbidity and mortality, constituting one of the most rapidly expanding and re-emerging infectious disease problems in Latin America. In less than 20 years, the region has transformed itself from hypoendemic to hyperendemic, while serotype circulation in most countries has gone from none or single to multiple. Changes in endemicity have coincided with the emergence and increasing incidence of the severer forms of dengue infection. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these diseases. Health care providers who see patients in or returning from areas of Latin America, the Caribbean, and other tropical areas must consider dengue in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with compatible symptoms, and must be knowledgeable in the current management of this important disease.

  1. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  2. [Outbreak of classical fever of dengue caused by serotype 2 in Araguaiana, Tocantins, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, P F; Travassos da Rosa, E S; Travassos da Rosa, J F; de Freitas, R B; Dégallier, N; Rodrigues, S G; Travassos da Rosa, A P

    1993-01-01

    We report the first outbreak of dengue fever caused by dengue 2 (DEN 2) in Araguaina, Tocantins State. Four hundred people of 74 families, living at S. João, Araguaina Sul and Neblina districts were questioned and then bled, in order to obtain sera to test for anti-dengue antibodies. If a person was sick, a small quantity of blood was collected for virus isolation. The main clinical picture of disease was characterized by fever, headache, myalgias, arthralgias and skin rash. Were obtained 1,105 (56 females and 45 males of Culex quinquefasciatus and 567 females and 437 males of Aedes aegypti) mosquitoes from larvae collected in Araguaina. The females of Aedes aegypti obtained from larvae were allowed to feed on 8 febrile patients. The diagnosis of infection was made by both virus isolation into Aedes albopictus (C6/36) cells, and serology, by Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and IgM capture ELISA (MAC ELISA). No virus was isolated from mosquitoes. Although five strains of DEN 2 were obtained from humans, and another 111 infections were diagnosed serologically (IgM positive). The positivity rate of the samples was 27.75% (111 of 400), while that of the families was 66.2% (45 of 72), where at least one member of the each family was infected. It was also detected 26.1% of asymptomatic infections. All age groups were affected. Therefore, the infection was more frequent in females (33.5%) than males (23.8%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. DengueTools: innovative tools and strategies for the surveillance and control of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Renhorn, Karl-Erik; Tissera, Hasitha; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Alphey, Luke; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Lindsay, Steve; Logan, James; Hatz, Christoph; Reiter, Paul; Rocklöv, Joacim; Byass, Peter; Louis, Valérie R.; Tozan, Yesim; Massad, Eduardo; Tenorio, Antonio; Lagneau, Christophe; L'Ambert, Grégory; Brooks, David; Wegerdt, Johannah; Gubler, Duane

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease estimated to cause about 230 million infections worldwide every year, of which 25,000 are fatal. Global incidence has risen rapidly in recent decades with some 3.6 billion people, over half of the world's population, now at risk, mainly in urban centres of the tropics and subtropics. Demographic and societal changes, in particular urbanization, globalization, and increased international travel, are major contributors to the rise in incidence and geographic expansion of dengue infections. Major research gaps continue to hamper the control of dengue. The European Commission launched a call under the 7th Framework Programme with the title of ‘Comprehensive control of Dengue fever under changing climatic conditions’. Fourteen partners from several countries in Europe, Asia, and South America formed a consortium named ‘DengueTools’ to respond to the call to achieve better diagnosis, surveillance, prevention, and predictive models and improve our understanding of the spread of dengue to previously uninfected regions (including Europe) in the context of globalization and climate change. The consortium comprises 12 work packages to address a set of research questions in three areas: Research area 1: Develop a comprehensive early warning and surveillance system that has predictive capability for epidemic dengue and benefits from novel tools for laboratory diagnosis and vector monitoring. Research area 2: Develop novel strategies to prevent dengue in children. Research area 3: Understand and predict the risk of global spread of dengue, in particular the risk of introduction and establishment in Europe, within the context of parameters of vectorial capacity, global mobility, and climate change. In this paper, we report on the rationale and specific study objectives of ‘DengueTools’. DengueTools is funded under the Health theme of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Community, Grant Agreement Number: 282589

  4. DengueTools: innovative tools and strategies for the surveillance and control of dengue.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Renhorn, Karl-Erik; Tissera, Hasitha; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Alphey, Luke; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Lindsay, Steve; Logan, James; Hatz, Christoph; Reiter, Paul; Rocklöv, Joacim; Byass, Peter; Louis, Valérie R; Tozan, Yesim; Massad, Eduardo; Tenorio, Antonio; Lagneau, Christophe; L'Ambert, Grégory; Brooks, David; Wegerdt, Johannah; Gubler, Duane

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease estimated to cause about 230 million infections worldwide every year, of which 25,000 are fatal. Global incidence has risen rapidly in recent decades with some 3.6 billion people, over half of the world's population, now at risk, mainly in urban centres of the tropics and subtropics. Demographic and societal changes, in particular urbanization, globalization, and increased international travel, are major contributors to the rise in incidence and geographic expansion of dengue infections. Major research gaps continue to hamper the control of dengue. The European Commission launched a call under the 7th Framework Programme with the title of 'Comprehensive control of Dengue fever under changing climatic conditions'. Fourteen partners from several countries in Europe, Asia, and South America formed a consortium named 'DengueTools' to respond to the call to achieve better diagnosis, surveillance, prevention, and predictive models and improve our understanding of the spread of dengue to previously uninfected regions (including Europe) in the context of globalization and climate change.The consortium comprises 12 work packages to address a set of research questions in three areas:Research area 1: Develop a comprehensive early warning and surveillance system that has predictive capability for epidemic dengue and benefits from novel tools for laboratory diagnosis and vector monitoring.Research area 2: Develop novel strategies to prevent dengue in children.Research area 3: Understand and predict the risk of global spread of dengue, in particular the risk of introduction and establishment in Europe, within the context of parameters of vectorial capacity, global mobility, and climate change.In this paper, we report on the rationale and specific study objectives of 'DengueTools'. DengueTools is funded under the Health theme of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Community, Grant Agreement Number: 282589 Dengue Tools.

  5. Molecular characterization of dengue virus 1 from autochthonous dengue fever cases in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Kurolt, I C; Betica-Radić, L; Daković-Rode, O; Franco, L; Zelená, H; Tenorio, A; Markotić, A

    2013-03-01

    In the summer of 2010, two autochthonous dengue fever cases were detected in Croatia. Here we report the retrospective detection of an additional case of dengue fever, representing the first sustained autochthonous transmission in Europe since 1928. In addition, we present the phylogenetic analyses based on two sequences from the Pelješac peninsula, southern Croatia. The sequences were identified as dengue virus genotype 1 and recovered from two out of the three Pelješac patients in whom infection occurred.

  6. Studies on dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in West Bengal State, India.

    PubMed

    Hati, A K

    2006-03-01

    A large outbreak of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred from August to November 2005 involving all districts of West Bengal. Altogether 6293 persons were serologically diagnosed to be suffering from dengue through detection of IgM antibodies, with 27 (0.42%) seropositive deaths. In Kolkata alone 3967 persons were affected with 14 deaths. A total of 874 sera samples from febrile patients were quantitatively analysed for IgG and IgM antibodies using the IVD microwell ELISA dengue fever test kit. In 21.6%, no antibody was detected and 52.6% had only IgG antibodies. In 8.9% only IgM antibodies and in 16.8% both IgG, IgM antibodies were present, suggesting primary and secondary dengue respectively. About 10% of secondary dengue would develop DHF. As in this outbreak secondary dengue was 65.3% of total dengue cases, so of the 6293 dengue victims presumably, 3998 had secondary dengue, thus having risk of DHF in about 400 persons. Case fatality rate amongst DHF patients was 8.5%. This study also indicated that DHF would be a nagging problem in coming days. Age-group analysis of primary and secondary dengue cases revealed that although secondary cases occurred in all ages, more of primary cases belonged to younger ages (1-10) years and more of secondary cases in middle to older ages. Prevailing type during this outbreak was DEN3. This epidemiological study of an outbreak categorized prevalence of primary and secondary dengue, calculated risk factors for precipitation of DHF, model of which could be utilized to compare and evaluate future epidemiological pattern, where-ever and whenever applicable.

  7. [Emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Americas. Reemergence of dengue].

    PubMed

    Guzmán Tirado, M G; Kourí Flores, G; Bravo González, J R

    1999-01-01

    Dengue is at present the most important human arbovirosis. It is the main cause of hospitalization and death among children from southeast Asia. Two fifth of the world population live in dengue risk areas. In 1997, over 100 countries reported epidemic and more than 50,000,000 cases and 25,000 deaths were estomated. Nowadays, the Americas is passing through the same situation Asia faced years ago. In 1997, 27 countries reported cases of dengue, and in 14 of them cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever were documented. In all, 387,459 cases of classic dengue and 11,645 of dengue hemorrhagic fever were registered. During the last 2 decades dengue has increased significantly in our region with ups and downs in the annual incidence since 1981. It should be remarked that every 3 or 4 years there is a cyclic decrease and a further increase of the incidence, though it trends to rise. As regards dengue hemorrhagic fever, the situation is not more favorable. The Cuban epidemic that appeared in 1981 was completely untimely in the region. In 1989, 8 years later, the second important dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemic emerged in Venezuela, and from that moment on there has been an increasing tendency of this clinical form of the disease. The factors of the emergence and reemergence are present and rise year after year. The neoliberal policies and the consequent privatization of the health services in most of the countries allow us to watch a gloomy future in relation to the development of dengue and its severe form, the dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome.

  8. Outbreak of dengue in Mumbai and predictive markers for dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ira; Deshpande, G C; Tardeja, P N

    2004-10-01

    An alarming rise of dengue has been seen in Mumbai during the post-monsoon season. We undertook this prospective study in the pediatric wards and pediatric intensive care unit of B. J. Wadia Hospital for Children between 27 August 2003 and 10 October 2003 to determine the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, and outcome of children affected with dengue and to determine the predictive markers for dengue shock syndrome. Fifty-one suspected dengue cases were tested for positivity of dengue by determination of dengue IgM antibodies by ELISA test. These positive cases were analysed for common clinical features, laboratory derangements, and outcome. Patients were subdivided into three subgroups: dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) as per WHO classification. Predictive markers for DSS were also determined. Thirty-nine patients had a positive dengue IgM titre, 20 patients had DHF, 18 patients had DSS, and one patient had DF The mean age of presentation was 4.9 years. Fever, hepatomegaly, vomiting, bleeding tendencies, erythematous rash, thrombocytopenia, elevated liver enzymes, and deranged PT and PTT were the predominant clinical and laboratory features. Predictive markers for DSS were younger age at onset, altered sensorium, paralytic ileus, and significantly deranged PT. Patients with DSS also had a longer recovery period and required more supportive management in the form of component therapy and ionotropic support. All three patients who died belonged to the DSS subgroup with case fatality rate for DSS being 16.6 per cent. None of the patients in the DHF or DF subgroup died. Endemicity of dengue fever is on the rise in Mumbai with increased incidence among children. Appropriate investigations, strict monitoring and prompt supportive management can reduce mortality in dengue. Predictive markers of DSS can reduce the mortality if promptly treated. Also prevention of transmission by mosquito control and maintaining

  9. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  10. Dengue situation in Brazil by year 2000.

    PubMed

    Schatzmayr, H G

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus types 1 and 2 have been isolated in Brazil by the Department of Virology, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, in 1986 and 1990 respectively, after many decades of absence. A successful continental Aedes aegypti control program in the Americas, has been able to eradicate the vector in most countries in the 60's, but the program could not be sustained along the years. Dengue viruses were reintroduced in the American region and the infection became endemic in Brazil, like in most Central and South American countries and in the Caribbean region, due to the weaning of the vector control programs in these countries. High demographic densities and poor housing conditions in large urban communities, made the ideal conditions for vector spreading. All four dengue types are circulating in the continent and there is a high risk of the introduction in the country of the other two dengue types in Brazil, with the development of large epidemics. After the Cuban episode in 1981, when by the first time a large epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome have been described in the Americas, both clinical presentations are observed, specially in the countries like Brazil, with circulation of more than one dengue virus type. A tetravalent potent vaccine seems to be the only possible way to control the disease in the future, besides rapid clinical and laboratory diagnosis, in order to offer supportive treatment to the more severe clinical infections.

  11. The 2006 dengue outbreak in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N; Gupta, N; Jhamb, R; Gulati, S; Kulkarni Ajit, V

    2008-12-01

    Dengue is a worldwide condition spread throughout the tropical and subtropical zones between 30 degrees north and 40 degrees south. It is endemic in South East Asia, the pacific, East and West Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas. Dengue outbreaks are occurring almost every three yearly in Delhi for the last 12 years. The latest outbreak was in the year 2006, which started late in August, peaked in the month of October and lasted till late November. We describe here the clinical, hematological and biochemical data of 70 patients of dengue fever diagnosed as per WHO criteria in Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi during this outbreak. Hematological parameters were estimated by automated counter and dengue serology was done by capture ELISA technique. The results displayed widespread effect of dengue fever on hematological and biochemical profile. Some of our patients also had atypical dengue manifestations. These results suggest that dengue fever is a major public health problem which can lead to significant morbidity and can even be fatal at times. All efforts should be made to prevent it.

  12. Influence of the dengue serotype, previous dengue infection, and plasma viral load on clinical presentation and outcome during a dengue-2 and dengue-4 co-epidemic.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Laurent; Verlaeten, Olivier; Cabié, André; Kaidomar, Stéphane; Moravie, Victor; Martial, Jenny; Najioullah, Fatiha; Plumelle, Yves; Fonteau, Christiane; Dussart, Philippe; Césaire, Raymond

    2008-06-01

    Martinique experienced a dengue outbreak with co-circulation of DENV-2 and DENV-4. In an emergency department-based study, we analyzed whether the clinical presentation and outcome of adult patients were related to serotype, immune status, or plasma viral load. Of the 146 adult patients who had confirmed dengue infection, 91 (62.3%) were classified as having classic dengue fever, 11 (7.5%) fulfilled World Health Organization criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome (DSS), 21 other patients (14.4%) presented with at least one typical feature of DHF/DSS [i.e., internal hemorrhage, plasma leakage, marked thrombocytopenia (platelet count < or = 50,000 platelets/mm(3)) and/or shock], and 23 further patients (15.8%) had unusual manifestations. Four patients died. Severe illness was more frequent in patients with secondary dengue infection (odds ratio, 7.18; 95% confidence interval, 3.1-16.7; P < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that gastrointestinal symptoms and other unusual manifestations were independently associated with DENV-2 infection, whereas cough and DHF/DSS features were independently associated with secondary immune response. A high plasma viral load was associated with DENV-2 infection, increased serum liver enzymes, and with DHF/DSS features in patients presenting after the third day of illness. The most severe cases of dengue resulted from the combined effects of DENV-2 and secondary infection.

  13. Encephalitis in the clinical spectrum of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Varatharaj, Aravinthan

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are common worldwide. Clinical manifestations form a broad spectrum, and include uncomplicated dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. Encephalopathy has been well reported and has classically been thought to result from the multisystem derangement that occurs in severe dengue infection; with liver failure, shock, and coagulopathy causing cerebral insult. However, there is increasing evidence for dengue viral neurotropism, suggesting that, in a proportion of cases, there may be an element of direct viral encephalitis. Understanding the pathophysiology of dengue encephalopathy is crucial toward developing a more effective management strategy. This review provides an overview of the clinical spectrum of dengue infection, and examines evidence supporting the existence of dengue encephalitis.

  14. Behavioral Response of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Larvae to Synthetic and Natural Attractants and Repellents.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Paula V; González Audino, Paola A; Masuh, Héctor M

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is the key vector of three important arboviral diseases: dengue, yellow fever, and chikungunya. Immature stages of this species inhabit human-made containers placed in residential landscapes. In this study, we evaluated a few compounds in a sensitive behavioral assay with Ae. aegypti larvae. The orientation of larvae to different compounds was surveyed using a performance index (PI). The PI represents the response to each odorant, where a value of +1 is indicative of full attraction and -1 represents complete repulsion. The widely used insect repellent N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide elicited a significantly negative PI, as did acetophenone and indole. A yeast extract, a known food source, elicited a significantly positive PI, as did 2-methylphenol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-methylphenol, and fish food. On the other hand, no response was observed for the essential oil of Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus camaldulensis at the concentration evaluated. Pretreatment of larvae with N-ethylmaleimide and ablation of the antennae resulted in a suppression of behavioral responses. The overall mobility of ablated larvae was indistinguishable from unablated controls, and absence of any visible locomotor dysfunction was observed. This work is a contribution to the study of the chemical ecology of disease vectors with the aim of developing more efficient tools for surveillance and control.Natural and synthetic compounds attractive to Ae. aegypti larvae should be incorporated into integrated pest management programs through the use of baited traps or by improving the efficacy of larvicides commonly used in control campaigns. PMID:26352935

  15. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro. Are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?

    PubMed Central

    Mocellin, Márcio Goulart; Simões, Taynãna César; do Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva; Teixeira, Maria Lucia França; Lounibos, Leon Philip; de Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço

    2012-01-01

    Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus (0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats. PMID:20140379

  16. [Development of immunizing agents against dengue].

    PubMed

    López Antuñano, F J; Mota, J

    2000-05-01

    The four serotypes of dengue flaviviruses are transmitted mainly by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, and some epidemics have been attributed to Ae. albopictus, Ae. polynesiensis, and various species of the Ae. scutellaris complex. The risk factors involved in dengue mortality and morbidity are related to the human host (genetic characteristics of infected persons; lifestyles, immune status, and health conditions of people; basic sanitation of dwellings; and water supply) and to the virus (genetic variability between and among serotypes, different pathogenicities, and geographic distribution). Notwithstanding the lack of knowledge of the immunopathobiology of dengue fever, important advances have been made in terms of a protective immune response, using attenuated dengue viruses or antigens produced by means of recombinant technologies. Efforts have been made since the 1940s to develop dengue vaccines. Immunity acquired from natural infection is specific for each serotype, and as many as three different serotype infections have been reported in one individual. For this reason, a tetravalent vaccine may likely be needed. Candidate vaccines against the four serotypes have been tested in volunteers and have proven to be immunogenic and safe. Although attenuated live virus vaccines are promising, more study is needed regarding their effectiveness and safety. Currently, several studies are ongoing to develop dengue vaccines using antigens from structural proteins (particularly E glycoprotein) and nonstructural proteins, with recombinant DNA technology and other biomolecular technologies. With the same goal, various expression vectors are being used, including Escherichia coli, baculovirus, vaccinia virus, and yellow fever virus. Unfortunately, no satisfactory results have been obtained in humans. The need for effective dengue vaccines is great, given the serious worldwide problem of the transmission of the four serotypes. Effective immunization against dengue would contribute

  17. [Dengue in French Guiana. History and present status].

    PubMed

    Reynes, J M

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of dengue in French Guiana has the same trend as in most tropical American countries, with emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and endemicity of the disease. During the 1940's, several dengue-like outbreaks were reported from French Guiana. Then, the only dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, was eradicated between 1950 and 1963, when it started to reinfest the country. By the end of the 1960's, new dengue epidemics with serological confirmation were described. After 1970, the first dengue strains were isolated, firstly dengue-2 strains, then dengue-1 and dengue-4 strains. Between 1970 and 1990, several dengue outbreaks struck French Guiana with 2 to 6 years intervals. In July 1991, started the first DHF outbreak in French Guiana which spread in all the most important towns until October 1992. About 3,000 cases were reported, that is almost 3% of the population, from which about 1/3 had serological confirmation; more than 300 people were hospitalized and some 80 with hemorrhages. Finally 6 deaths were reported, 5 of which had hemorrhages but could not be included into DHF cases according to WHO criteria. The dengue-2 strain responsible for this outbreak is close to the Jamaïcan topotype known to be particularly virulent. Since the beginning of 1993 and actually, dengue is still circulating in French Guiana, but at low level and dengue-1 and dengue-4 strains are occasionally isolated.

  18. Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: lessons from the Cuban epidemic, 1981.

    PubMed Central

    Kouri, G. P.; Guzmán, M. G.; Bravo, J. R.; Triana, C.

    1989-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is one of the principal causes of hospitalization and death among children in several south-east Asian countries. Also, in the Region of the Americas, there has been an increase in the frequency of dengue fever epidemics and in the number of cases of DHF/DSS. In 1981 an epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in Cuba and this suggests that there is a high risk that such epidemics could recur in the region. The article summarizes the main clinical, virological, and epidemiological data obtained during the outbreak, some of which are reported for the first time. PMID:2805215

  19. The global pandemic of dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever: current status and prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1998-03-01

    Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever has been one of the most important resurgent tropical diseases in the past 17 years, with expanding geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased frequency of epidemics, the development of hyperendemicity (co-circulation of multiple virus serotypes) and the emergence of dengue haemorrhagic fever in new areas. This paper briefly reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue, discusses some of the factors responsible for the recent resurgence, and reviews the current options for reversing the trend of emergent disease.

  20. Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: lessons from the Cuban epidemic, 1981.

    PubMed

    Kouri, G P; Guzmán, M G; Bravo, J R; Triana, C

    1989-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is one of the principal causes of hospitalization and death among children in several south-east Asian countries. Also, in the Region of the Americas, there has been an increase in the frequency of dengue fever epidemics and in the number of cases of DHF/DSS. In 1981 an epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in Cuba and this suggests that there is a high risk that such epidemics could recur in the region. The article summarizes the main clinical, virological, and epidemiological data obtained during the outbreak, some of which are reported for the first time.

  1. Serotype-specific dengue virus circulation and dengue disease in Bangkok, Thailand from 1973 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Nisalak, Ananda; Endy, Timothy P; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Thisayakorn, Usa; Scott, Robert M; Burke, Donald S; Hoke, Charles H; Innis, Bruce L; Vaughn, David W

    2003-02-01

    Dengue virus circulation and association with epidemics and severe dengue disease were studied in hospitalized children with suspected dengue at the Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health in Bangkok, Thailand, from 1973 to 1999. Dengue serology was performed on all patients and viral isolation attempted on laboratory-confirmed patients. Acute dengue was diagnosed in 15,569 children and virus isolated from 4,846. DEN-3 was the most frequent serotype in primary dengue (49% of all isolates), DEN-2 in secondary and in dengue hemorrhagic fever (37% and 35%, respectively). The predominant dengue serotype varied by year: DEN-1 from 1990-92, DEN-2 from 1973-86 and 1988-89; DEN-3 in 1987 and 1995-99; and DEN-4 from 1993-94. Only DEN-3 was associated with severe outbreak years. Our findings illustrate the uniqueness of each serotype in producing epidemics and severe disease and underscore the importance of long-term surveillance of dengue serotypes in understanding the epidemiology of these viruses.

  2. [Incidence of dengue in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Orozco Hechavarría, N; Díaz Portuondo, I M; Abad Cañete, U; Martínez Delgado, Y

    2001-01-01

    A descriptive study of children and adolescents that got sick with dengue in the health area served by "José Martí" polyclinics in Santiago de Cuba from May to August 1997 was conducted to determine the incidence of this affection in these age groups. It was observed that dengue was more frequent in males aged 5-11 years. Bronchial asthma, epilepsy and congenital cardiopathy were the most common previous affections found. The incidence of the disease in the casuistry was low, with well-nourished males without histories of chronic processes and good clinical recovery prevailing. Only one case was classified as hemorrhagic dengue.

  3. Childhood dengue shock syndrome in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Teelucksingh, S; Lutchman, G; Udit, A; Pooransingh, S

    1999-09-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is a major cause of hospitalisation and mortality among children in South East Asia. We now report, for the first time, the occurrence of DHF/DSS in Trinidadian children. The presence of vomiting, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly in the setting of a dengue epidemic should alert clinicians to the possibility of DHF/DSS. Timely diagnosis and aggressive supportive treatment are essential for a successful outcome. Source reduction, vector control and community participation are also necessary to avert the South East Asian scenario from emerging in the Caribbean.

  4. Imported dengue--United States, 1995.

    PubMed

    1996-11-15

    Dengue is an acute disease caused by any of four mosquito-transmitted virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3 and DEN-4) and characterized by the sudden onset of fever, headache, myalgias, rash, nausea, and vomiting. The disease is endemic in most tropical areas of the world and can occur in U.S. residents returning from travel to such areas. This report summarizes information about imported dengue among U.S. residents during 1995 and documents a substantially increased incidence of dengue in the Caribbean, Central America, and Mexico.

  5. Dengue viral infections; pathogenesis and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McBride, W J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H

    2000-07-01

    Dengue viral infections affect up to 100 million individuals per year. Dengue haemorrhagic fever is a clinical form of disease characterised by intravascular fluid loss. There has been a marked increase in the incidence of this form of the disease over the last few decades, associated with significant mortality, particularly in the paediatric population. A number of theories relating to the pathogenesis of dengue haemorrhagic fever exist that have evolved from the analysis of the epidemiology of this disease. Virological and immunopathological factors are both important but the exact mechanisms for the disease are unknown.

  6. Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever imported into Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Tenner-Racz, K; Poppert, D; Emmerich, P; Frank, C; Dinges, C; Penning, R; Nerlich, A; Racz, P; Günther, S

    2012-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne virus (family Flaviviridae) causing dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever. Here, we report the first fatal DENV infection imported into Germany. A female traveler was hospitalized with fever and abdominal pain after returning from Ecuador. Due to a suspected acute acalculous cholecystitis, cholecystectomy was performed. After cholecystectomy, severe spontaneous bleeding from the abdominal wound occurred and the patient died. Postmortem analysis of transudate and tissue demonstrated a DENV secondary infection of the patient and a gallbladder wall thickening (GBWT) due to an extensive edema.

  7. Current emerging situation of dengue in India.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Thiruppathi

    2013-07-01

    Outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) have been reported from various countries. Although DF has been endemic in India from the nineteenth century, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was first reported in 1987. The first major widespread epidemic of DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) was reported in 1996 with four serotypes reported to be in co-circulation. In 2012 an outbreak occurred in India during which a total of 47,029 DF cases and 242 deaths were reported - three times higher than the previous year. Twelve states reported a large number of cases, including Tamil Nadu which recorded 12,264 from various districts. We discuss methods of prevention and control.

  8. Imported dengue--United States, 1992.

    PubMed

    1994-02-18

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted acute disease caused by any of four virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4) and characterized by the sudden onset of fever, headache, myalgia, rash, nausea, and vomiting. The disease is endemic in most tropical areas of the world and can occur in U.S. residents returning from international travel. Serum samples from 68 persons with suspected imported dengue with onset in 1992 (1) were submitted to CDC from 23 states (Table 1). Of these, 17 (25%) cases (from 10 states) were serologically or virologically diagnosed as dengue. This report summarizes information about these 17 cases.

  9. Update on the global spread of dengue.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Alfonso; Istúriz, Raul E

    2010-11-01

    The global spread of dengue fever within and beyond the usual tropical boundaries threatens a large percentage of the world's population, as human and environmental conditions for persistence and even spread are present in all continents. The disease causes great human suffering, a sizable mortality from dengue haemorrhagic fever and its complications, and major costs. This situation has worsened in the recent past and may continue to do so in the future. Efforts to decrease transmission by vector control have failed, and no effective antiviral treatment is available or foreseeable on the immediate horizon. A safe and effective vaccine protective against all serotypes of dengue viruses is sorely needed.

  10. Prevalence and insecticide susceptibility of dengue vectors in the district of Batticaloa in eastern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Dharshini, Sangaralingam; Vinobaba, Muthuladchumy; Jude, Pavilupillai J; Karunaratne, S H P Parakrama; Surendran, Sinnathamby N

    2011-06-01

    Unprecedented incidences of dengue have been reported in Sri Lanka in recent years. The district of Batticaloa, which was devastated by the 2004 Asian tsunami, is one of the districts affected by dengue. One option to curtail this disease is to implement appropriate vector control measures. A nine-month study was carried out within the Batticaloa Municipal Council limit from April to December 2008. Larval collections were conducted fortnightly using conventional ovitraps for nine months covering the dry and wet seasons. Ovitraps (indoor and outdoor) were placed in 15 randomly selected houses. The collected larvae were brought to the laboratory and reared under laboratory conditions. The larval forms and emerged adults were identified on the basis of reported morphological descriptions. The identified adults of 2-3 d old were exposed to common insecticides following the WHO protocol. During the study period, a total of 10,685 Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were collected, with the former constituting 57% of the total sample. Both species were collected from indoor and outdoor ovitraps, and their prevalence was recorded throughout the study period. A seasonal shift was observed in the density, with Ae. aegypti predominating during the dry season and Ae. albopictus during the wet season. Both species were highly resistant to 4% DDT and susceptible to 0.25% permethrin. The continuous presence of potential dengue vectors may have contributed to the dengue prevalence in the district. Since both species can oviposit in indoor and outdoor ovitraps, public awareness and participation should be promoted in the vector control programme of the Ministry of Health along with continuous vector surveillance. PMID:22028610

  11. Temephos Resistance in Aedes aegypti in Colombia Compromises Dengue Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Grisales, Nelson; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Gomez, Santiago; Fonseca-Gonzalez, Idalyd; Ranson, Hilary; Lenhart, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Control and prevention of dengue relies heavily on the application of insecticides to control dengue vector mosquitoes. In Colombia, application of the larvicide temephos to the aquatic breeding sites of Aedes aegypti is a key part of the dengue control strategy. Resistance to temephos was recently detected in the dengue-endemic city of Cucuta, leading to questions about its efficacy as a control tool. Here, we characterize the underlying mechanisms and estimate the operational impact of this resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Larval bioassays of Ae. aegypti larvae from Cucuta determined the temephos LC50 to be 0.066 ppm (95% CI 0.06–0.074), approximately 15× higher than the value obtained from a susceptible laboratory colony. The efficacy of the field dose of temephos at killing this resistant Cucuta population was greatly reduced, with mortality rates <80% two weeks after application and <50% after 4 weeks. Neither biochemical assays nor partial sequencing of the ace-1 gene implicated target site resistance as the primary resistance mechanism. Synergism assays and microarray analysis suggested that metabolic mechanisms were most likely responsible for the temephos resistance. Interestingly, although the greatest synergism was observed with the carboxylesterase inhibitor, DEF, the primary candidate genes from the microarray analysis, and confirmed by quantitative PCR, were cytochrome P450 oxidases, notably CYP6N12, CYP6F3 and CYP6M11. Conclusions/Significance In Colombia, resistance to temephos in Ae. aegypti compromises the duration of its effect as a vector control tool. Several candidate genes potentially responsible for metabolic resistance to temephos were identified. Given the limited number of insecticides that are approved for vector control, future chemical-based control strategies should take into account the mechanisms underlying the resistance to discern which insecticides would likely lead to the greatest control efficacy while

  12. Larvicidal action of ethanolic extracts from fruit endocarps of Melia azedarach and Azadirachta indica against the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Wandscheer, Carolina B; Duque, Jonny E; da Silva, Mario A N; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Wohlke, Jonathan L; Adelmann, Juliana; Fontana, José D

    2004-12-15

    Ethanolic extracts from the kernels of ripe fruits from the Indian Lilac Melia azedarach and from the well-known Neem tree, Azadirachta indica were assayed against larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever. The lethality bioassays were carried out according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization. Extracts were tested at doses ranging from 0.0033 to 0.05 g% in an aqueous medium for 24 and 48 h, at 25 or 30 degrees C, with or without feeding of the larvae. LC50, LC95 and LC99 were determined. Both seed extracts proved lethal for third to fourth instar larvae. Non-fed A. aegypti larvae were more susceptible to Azadirachta extracts at both temperatures. Under a more realistic environmental situation, namely with fed larvae at 25 degrees C, the death rates caused by the Melia extract were higher, although at 30 degrees C the extract of Azadirachta had an even higher lethality. Inter allia, the LC50 values for the crude extracts of these two members of the Meliaceae ranged from 0.017 to 0.034 g% while the LC99 values ranged from 0.133 to 0.189 g%. Since no downstream processing was undertaken to purify the active agents in the extracts, our findings seem very promising, suggesting that it may be possible to increase the larvicidal activity further by improving the extraction and the fractionation of the crude limonoids, for instance removing the co-extracted natural fats.

  13. Cymbopogon citratus-synthesized gold nanoparticles boost the predation efficiency of copepod Mesocyclops aspericornis against malaria and dengue mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Jeyalalitha, Tirupathi; Dinesh, Devakumar; Nicoletti, Marcello; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Suresh, Udaiyan; Madhiyazhagan, Pari

    2015-06-01

    Plant-borne compounds can be employed to synthesize mosquitocidal nanoparticles that are effective at low doses. However, how they affect the activity of mosquito predators in the aquatic environment is unknown. In this study, we synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuN) using the leaf extract of Cymbopogon citratus, which acted as a reducing and capping agent. AuN were characterized by a variety of biophysical methods and sorted for size in order to confirm structural integrity. C. citratus extract and biosynthesized AuN were tested against larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. LC₅₀ of C. citratus extract ranged from 219.32 ppm to 471.36 ppm. LC₅₀ of AuN ranged from 18.80 ppm to 41.52 ppm. In laboratory, the predatory efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops aspericornis against A. stephensi larvae was 26.8% (larva I) and 17% (larva II), while against A. aegypti was 56% (I) and 35.1% (II). Predation against late-instar larvae was minimal. In AuN-contaminated environment,predation efficiency against A. stephensi was 45.6% (I) and 26.7% (II), while against A. aegypti was 77.3% (I) and 51.6% (II). Overall, low doses of AuN may help to boost the control of Anopheles and Aedes larval populations in copepod-based control programs. PMID:25819295

  14. Cymbopogon citratus-synthesized gold nanoparticles boost the predation efficiency of copepod Mesocyclops aspericornis against malaria and dengue mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Jeyalalitha, Tirupathi; Dinesh, Devakumar; Nicoletti, Marcello; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Suresh, Udaiyan; Madhiyazhagan, Pari

    2015-06-01

    Plant-borne compounds can be employed to synthesize mosquitocidal nanoparticles that are effective at low doses. However, how they affect the activity of mosquito predators in the aquatic environment is unknown. In this study, we synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuN) using the leaf extract of Cymbopogon citratus, which acted as a reducing and capping agent. AuN were characterized by a variety of biophysical methods and sorted for size in order to confirm structural integrity. C. citratus extract and biosynthesized AuN were tested against larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. LC₅₀ of C. citratus extract ranged from 219.32 ppm to 471.36 ppm. LC₅₀ of AuN ranged from 18.80 ppm to 41.52 ppm. In laboratory, the predatory efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops aspericornis against A. stephensi larvae was 26.8% (larva I) and 17% (larva II), while against A. aegypti was 56% (I) and 35.1% (II). Predation against late-instar larvae was minimal. In AuN-contaminated environment,predation efficiency against A. stephensi was 45.6% (I) and 26.7% (II), while against A. aegypti was 77.3% (I) and 51.6% (II). Overall, low doses of AuN may help to boost the control of Anopheles and Aedes larval populations in copepod-based control programs.

  15. The use of rapid dengue diagnostic tests in a routine clinical setting in a dengue-endemic area of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Lyda; Uribe, Marcela; Ardila, Gloria Ines; Orejuela, Yaneth; Velasco, Margarita; Bonelo, Anilza; Parra, Beatriz

    2015-06-01

    There is insufficient evidence of the usefulness of dengue diagnostic tests under routine conditions. We sought to analyse how physicians are using dengue diagnostics to inform research and development. Subjects attending 14 health institutions in an endemic area of Colombia with either a clinical diagnosis of dengue or for whom a dengue test was ordered were included in the study. Patterns of test-use are described herein. Factors associated with the ordering of dengue diagnostic tests were identified using contingency tables, nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A total of 778 subjects were diagnosed with dengue by the treating physician, of whom 386 (49.5%) were tested for dengue. Another 491 dengue tests were ordered in subjects whose primary diagnosis was not dengue. Severe dengue classification [odds ratio (OR) 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.5], emergency consultation (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.5) and month of the year (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.7-5.5) were independently associated with ordering of dengue tests. Dengue tests were used both to rule in and rule out diagnosis. The latter use is not justified by the sensitivity of current rapid dengue diagnostic tests. Ordering of dengue tests appear to depend on a combination of factors, including physician and institutional preferences, as well as other patient and epidemiological factors.

  16. Dengue Expansion in Africa—Not Recognized or Not Happening?

    PubMed Central

    Junghanss, Thomas; Wills, Bridget; Brady, Oliver J.; Eckerle, Isabella; Farlow, Andrew; Hay, Simon I.; McCall, Philip J.; Messina, Jane P.; Ofula, Victor; Sall, Amadou A.; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Velayudhan, Raman; Wint, G.R. William; Zeller, Herve; Margolis, Harold S.; Sankoh, Osman

    2014-01-01

    An expert conference on Dengue in Africa was held in Accra, Ghana, in February 2013 to consider key questions regarding the possible expansion of dengue in Africa. Four key action points were highlighted to advance our understanding of the epidemiology of dengue in Africa. First, dengue diagnostic tools must be made more widely available in the healthcare setting in Africa. Second, representative data need to be collected across Africa to uncover the true burden of dengue. Third, established networks should collaborate to produce these types of data. Fourth, policy needs to be informed so the necessary steps can be taken to provide dengue vector control and health services. PMID:25271370

  17. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K.; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P.; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50–100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy. PMID:26167314

  18. First documented outbreak of dengue in the Peruvian Amazon region.

    PubMed

    Phillips, I; Need, J; Escamilla, J; Colán, E; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez, M; Vásquez, L; Seminario, J; Betz, T; da Rosa, A T

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a classical dengue outbreak caused by dengue serotypes 1 and 4 that occurred from March to July 1990 in the city of Iquitos and surrounding areas of Loreto Department in the Peruvian Amazon. Epidemiologic data indicate that more than 150,000 persons may have been affected in Iquitos alone. Another dengue outbreak occurred in Tarapoto, a city in the neighboring department of San Martín. Laboratory data indicate that the same dengue serotypes were involved in both outbreaks. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever/shock syndrome appear to have occurred. Prior to this outbreak, no indigenous dengue cases had been documented in Peru.

  19. Distribution of Mosquito Larvae on Kosrae Island, Kosrae State, the Federated States of Micronesia

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Sota; Toma, Takako; Taulung, Livinson

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of mosquito larvae were carried out in six areas of Kosrae Island, Kosrae State, the Federated States of Micronesia in December 2009 and June 2012. A total of 962 larvae of six species were collected from 106 natural and artificial habitats. They were identified as Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. marshallensis, Culex quinquefasciatus, Cx. annulirostris, and Cx. kusaiensis. This is the first report from Kosrae Island for three of these species—Ae. marshallensis, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Cx. annulirostris. The most abundant species was Ae. albopictus, followed by Ae. marshallensis, and these two species were found in all areas. Relatively large numbers of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. kusaiensis were found in five areas. Fewer Cx. annulirostris were found, and only in three areas. Aedes aegypti larvae were collected from a single habitat at Tafunsak in 2009. To prevent the outbreak of dengue fever, environmental management should focus on the destruction, alteration, disposal and recycling of containers that produce larger numbers of adult Aedes mosquitoes. PMID:24478593

  20. Dengue virus in Mexican bats

    PubMed Central

    AGUILAR-SETIÉN, Á.; ROMERO-ALMARAZ, M. L.; SÁNCHEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, C.; FIGUEROA, R.; JUÁREZ-PALMA, L. P.; GARCÍA-FLORES, M. M.; VÁZQUEZ-SALINAS, C.; SALAS-ROJAS, M.; HIDALGO-MARTÍNEZ, A. C.; PIERLÉ, S. AGUILAR; GARCÍA-ESTRADA, C.; RAMOS, C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals belonging to five families, 12 genera, and 19 different species of bats from dengue endemic areas in the Gulf and Pacific coasts of Mexico were examined by ELISA, RT–PCR, and for the presence of dengue virus (DV) NS1 protein. Nine individuals from four species were seropositive by ELISA: three insectivorous, Myotis nigricans (four positives/12 examined), Pteronotus parnellii (3/19), and Natalus stramineus (1/4), and one frugivorous Artibeus jamaicensis (1/35) (12·86% seroprevalence in positive species). DV serotype 2 was detected by RT–PCR in four samples from three species (all from the Gulf coast – rainy season): two frugivorous, A. jamaicensis (2/9), and Carollia brevicauda (1/2), and one insectivorous, M. nigricans (1/11). The latter was simultaneously positive for NS1 protein. DV RT–PCR positive animals were all antibody seronegative. M. nigricans showed positive individuals for all three tests. This is the first evidence suggesting the presence of DV in bats from Mexico. PMID:18325131

  1. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Burma.

    PubMed

    Thaung, U; Ming, C K; Thein, M

    1975-12-01

    Although sporadic from 1965 to 1969, a major outbreak of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred for the first time in Rangoon in 1970. Since then the disease has occurred every year in Rangoon and is now observed to be expanding to other urban areas in the country. The clinical diagnosis of DHF was confused by concurrent outbreaks of influenza A in 1971 and influenza A and B in 1972. A laboratory study of 3,447 clinically diagnosed haemorrhagic fever cases showed that 1643 cases (47.8%) were due to dengue and chikungunya, 296 (8.6%) to influenza A, 85(2.5%) to influenza B, 12(0.3%) to measles and 1411(40.8%) were of unknown aetiology during the 5 year period 1970-1974. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes are widely distributed in the country up to and including 900 meters above sea level but breeding is not found above that altitude. The absolute larval population which is highest in July as well as landing rate correlated with the peak incidence of DHF cases.

  2. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in infants.

    PubMed

    Hongsiriwon, Suchat

    2002-03-01

    A report of 19 cases of serologically-proven dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in infants aged 3-12 months who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Chon Buri Regional Hospital, Thailand, during 1995 to 1998. Subjects were 8 males and 11 females, with the peak age of 8 months. Four cases (21%) had DHF and other common co-infections ie pneumonia (2 cases), Staphylococcus aureus sepsis (1 case) and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis (1 case). The clinical manifestations of the 15 DHF cases were high fever (100%), coryza (93.3%), hepatomegaly (80%), drowsiness (53.3 %), and vomiting (46.7%); rash was observed in only 27%; one-fifth developed febrile convulsions. Sites of bleeding were the skin (petechiae) 58%, gastrointestinal system (melena) 16%, and mucous membrane (epistaxis) 5%; thrombocytopenia and increased hematocrit (> or =20%) were noted in 95% and 84% respectively. The majority of the patients (18 cases, 95%) had primary infection; only one (5%) had secondary infection. The clinical severity of the DHF was Grade I, II, and III (dengue shock syndrome) in 21%, 47% and 32% of cases respectively. After appropriate and effective management, all the infants recovered fully.

  3. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Rist, Anna; Thum, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances. PMID:26528147

  4. Impact of Argemone mexicana extracts on the cidal, morphological, and behavioral response of dengue vector, Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Warikoo, Radhika; Kumar, Sarita

    2013-10-01

    The larvicidal, behavioral, and morphological response of dengue vector, Aedes aegypti treated with deleterious weed, Argemone mexicana, was explored. The 1,000 ppm extracts of A. mexicana leaf, stem, and roots prepared in five different solvents (petroleum ether, hexane, benzene, acetone, and ethanol) were screened for their larvicidal activity against dengue vector establishing the efficacy of petroleum ether and hexane extracts. Other extracts, unable to give 100% mortality, were considered ineffective and discarded from further study. Larvicidal bioassay conducted with selected extracts confirmed the higher efficacy of hexane extracts exhibiting 1.1- to 1.8-fold more potential than the petroleum ether extracts. The results further revealed 1.6- to 2.4-fold higher efficacy of root extracts than those prepared from the leaves and stem of A. mexicana. The hexane root extract of A. mexicana was found to be the most effective larvicide with LC50 value of 91.331 ppm after 24 h of exposure causing 1.8 and 2.4 fold more toxicity as compared to the hexane leaf and stem extracts, respectively. Prolonged exposure of the larvae to the extracts resulted in increased toxicity potential of the extracts. Observations of the treated larvae revealed excitation, violent vertical, and horizontal movements with aggressive anal biting behavior suggesting effect of extracts on their neuromuscular system. Morphological studies of the treated larvae revealed the demelanization of cuticle and shrinkage of internal cuticle of anal papillae indicating the anal papillae as the probable action sites of the A. mexicana extracts. The potential of A. mexicana as new larvicides against dengue vector are being explored.

  5. The reappearance of dengue-3 and a subsequent dengue-4 and dengue-1 epidemic in Puerto Rico in 1998.

    PubMed

    Rigau-Pérez, José G; Ayala-López, Aurimar; García-Rivera, Enid J; Hudson, Sharon M; Vorndam, Vance; Reiter, Paul; Cano, Marta P; Clark, Gary G

    2002-10-01

    In January 1998, dengue-3 (DEN)-3 (group III genotype) was detected in Puerto Rico after an absence of 20 years. Public health officials intensified education efforts to promote community participation in dengue control. Virologic surveillance revealed an unexpected paradox: DEN-4 and DEN-1 produced a large epidemic overlaying the DEN-3 epidemic. In 1998 there were 17,000 reported cases of dengue (4.8/1,000 persons), and among all virus isolations (n = 960), DEN-4 (419, 43.6%), DEN-1 (337, 35.1%), and DEN-2 (143, 14.9%) were detected much more frequently than DEN-3 (61, 6%). Age group-specific attack rates were highest for persons 10-19 years old, followed by infants less than a year of age. Nineteen fatal cases (median = 37 years old, range = 8 months to 90 years) had a positive laboratory diagnosis of dengue. Among DEN-3 cases no fatalities were documented, 50 were hospitalized, and 10 of 48 (21%) fulfilled the criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever (four had primary infections and six had secondary infections). During 1999, DEN-3 became the predominant serotype isolated (182 of 310 isolations, 59%). The reappearance of DEN-3 and its subsequent circulation from 1999 to 2001 produced no changes in dengue incidence that could have been detected in the absence of virologic surveillance.

  6. Biology of Paenibacillus larvae, a deadly pathogen of honey bee larvae.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Julia; Knispel, Henriette; Hertlein, Gillian; Fünfhaus, Anne; Genersch, Elke

    2016-09-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American Foulbrood of honey bees, a notifiable disease in many countries. Hence, P. larvae can be considered as an entomopathogen of considerable relevance in veterinary medicine. P. larvae is a highly specialized pathogen with only one established host, the honey bee larva. No other natural environment supporting germination and proliferation of P. larvae is known. Over the last decade, tremendous progress in the understanding of P. larvae and its interactions with honey bee larvae at a molecular level has been made. In this review, we will present the recent highlights and developments in P. larvae research and discuss the impact of some of the findings in a broader context to demonstrate what we can learn from studying "exotic" pathogens. PMID:27394713

  7. Dengue: an update on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Chan, Candice Y Y; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral pathogen globally, with approximately 100 million cases of acute dengue annually. Infection can result in severe, life-threatening disease. Currently, there is no effective vaccine or licensed antiviral. Management is primarily supportive with fluids. Direct antiviral therapies that reduce dengue severity could be useful although these would need to inhibit all four viral serotypes effectively. This review focuses on the interventions that currently considered the gold standard in case management as well as exploratory therapies that have been studied in clinical trials. Although antiviral drug and therapeutic antibodies for dengue remain a work in progress, these studies have produced some promising results and may have the potential to be future drugs. PMID:26594048

  8. DENGUE-TYPE VIRUSES ISOLATED IN SINGAPORE.

    PubMed

    LIM, K A; CHAN, Y C; PHOON, W O; HANAM, E

    1964-01-01

    A dengue-like illness with marked haemorrhagic manifestations appeared in Singapore in 1960. Its similarity in many respects to the haemorrhagic fevers of Thailand and the Philippines led to its being described as "Singapore haemorrhagic fever".This paper describes the isolation and identification of dengue-type viruses from patients in Singapore between 1960 and 1962. In addition to the conventional complement-fixation and neutralization tests, a new test, called the "sensitized erythrocyte agglutination test", was employed; this test method is described.Altogether 21 dengue-type viruses were isolated, including dengue types 1, 2 and 4. Chikungunya virus, prominent in the Thailand disease, was not detected.The author suggests that study of the epidemiology of haemorrhagic fevers in South-East Asia would cast further light on the transmission of arboviruses.

  9. Imported dengue--United States, 1996.

    PubMed

    1998-07-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted acute disease caused by any of four dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4) and characterized by the sudden onset of fever, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, rash, nausea, and vomiting. This disease is endemic in most tropical areas of the world and has occurred in U.S. residents returning from travel to such areas. CDC maintains a laboratory-based passive surveillance system for imported dengue among U.S. residents. This report summarizes information about cases of imported dengue among U.S. residents for 1996, which indicated that most persons for whom travel history was known probably acquired infection in the Caribbean islands or Asia.

  10. Protect Yourself and Your Baby from Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent dengue virus infection during pregnancy » Use mosquito repellents with up to 50% DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or ... For babies over 2 months of age, use repellents with up to 30% DEET, picaridin or IR3535. ...

  11. Dengue: an update on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Chan, Candice Y Y; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral pathogen globally, with approximately 100 million cases of acute dengue annually. Infection can result in severe, life-threatening disease. Currently, there is no effective vaccine or licensed antiviral. Management is primarily supportive with fluids. Direct antiviral therapies that reduce dengue severity could be useful although these would need to inhibit all four viral serotypes effectively. This review focuses on the interventions that currently considered the gold standard in case management as well as exploratory therapies that have been studied in clinical trials. Although antiviral drug and therapeutic antibodies for dengue remain a work in progress, these studies have produced some promising results and may have the potential to be future drugs.

  12. Dengue and its effects on liver

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as an important arboviral disease with significant impact on the disease burden in population residing in tropical countries. Dengue is spread by the bite of Aedes mosquito. The virus seems to have some hepatotoxic effects. Affliction of liver in form of derangements in the liver function tests is common and may include mild elevations in serum bilirubin, elevated transaminases and derangements in serum albumin. Although asymptomatic in most cases, clinical manifestations like jaundice, and acute liver failure (ALF) may occasionally complicate the clinical picture. Indeed, dengue has been implicated as an important cause of ALF in endemic countries. The present review focuses on the hepatic manifestations and the pathogenesis of the liver injury in dengue. PMID:25685758

  13. Seroprevalence of dengue virus antibodies in healthy Jamaicans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michelle G; Vickers, Ivan E; Salas, Rose Alba; Smikle, Monica F

    2009-01-01

    Dengue fever, a mosquito borne viral infection, is endemic to Jamaica. The seroprevalence of dengue IgG and IgM antibodies were determined in 277 healthy Jamaicans by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The seroprevalence of dengue IgG antibodies was 100% (277/277) while dengue IgM antibodies were found in 3.6% (10/277). A statistically significant association was found between the presence of dengue IgM antibodies and gender (males 10/105, 9.5% vs females 0/172, 0.0%); chi(2) = 17.0, p=0.000.The high seroprevalence rate of dengue IgG antibodies and the presence of dengue IgM in the healthy population are in keeping with the endemicity of the virus in Jamaica. Therefore tests for dengue IgG antibodies are of limited usefulness in Jamaica and can be safely excluded from diagnostic testing as a cost saving measure. Serological diagnosis of current dengue infection should be centred around the dengue IgM tests although the limitations in the predictive values of such tests should also be considered. The results also suggest that the risk of emergence of the more severe forms of dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in the Jamaican population, due to the presence of enhancing antibodies, is high. PMID:19996526

  14. Seroprevalence of dengue virus antibodies in healthy Jamaicans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michelle G; Vickers, Ivan E; Salas, Rose Alba; Smikle, Monica F

    2009-01-01

    Dengue fever, a mosquito borne viral infection, is endemic to Jamaica. The seroprevalence of dengue IgG and IgM antibodies were determined in 277 healthy Jamaicans by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The seroprevalence of dengue IgG antibodies was 100% (277/277) while dengue IgM antibodies were found in 3.6% (10/277). A statistically significant association was found between the presence of dengue IgM antibodies and gender (males 10/105, 9.5% vs females 0/172, 0.0%); chi(2) = 17.0, p=0.000.The high seroprevalence rate of dengue IgG antibodies and the presence of dengue IgM in the healthy population are in keeping with the endemicity of the virus in Jamaica. Therefore tests for dengue IgG antibodies are of limited usefulness in Jamaica and can be safely excluded from diagnostic testing as a cost saving measure. Serological diagnosis of current dengue infection should be centred around the dengue IgM tests although the limitations in the predictive values of such tests should also be considered. The results also suggest that the risk of emergence of the more severe forms of dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in the Jamaican population, due to the presence of enhancing antibodies, is high.

  15. Dengue epidemic in southern Vietnam, 1998.

    PubMed

    Ha, D Q; Tien, N T; Huong, V T; Loan, H T; Thang, C M

    2000-01-01

    A widespread epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred in southern Vietnam in 1998, with 438.98 cases/100,000 population and 342 deaths. The number of DHF cases and deaths per 100,000 population increased 152.4% and 151.8%, respectively, over a 1997 epidemic. Dengue viruses were isolated from 143 patient blood samples; DEN-3 virus was identified as the predominant serotype, although a resurgence of DEN-4 was noted.

  16. Epidemic dengue transmission in southern Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Corwin, A L; Larasati, R P; Bangs, M J; Wuryadi, S; Arjoso, S; Sukri, N; Listyaningsih, E; Hartati, S; Namursa, R; Anwar, Z; Chandra, S; Loho, B; Ahmad, H; Campbell, J R; Porter, K R

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of dengue fever (DF), dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in the city of Palembang, south Sumatra, Indonesia was investigated to (i) validate epidemic occurrence, (ii) confirm dengue virus aetiology and associated serotype(s), (iii) provide a demonstrable measure of community impact, and (iv) identify causative relationship (if any) with climatic El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences. Trend analysis based on a 6-year retrospective review of hospital records demonstrates a 3-fold increase in clinical cases for the outbreak period (January-April 1998), relative to historical records. In the 2 hospitals surveyed, the monthly mean number of outbreak-related dengue cases over 4 months was 833 (range 650-995 cases/month); the mean monthly value for the previous 72 months was 107 (range 14-779 cases/month). An apparent trend in epidemic transmission was observed, evolving from a 5-year cyclic phenomenon to an annual occurrence, often indistinguishable from one year to the next. The proportional distribution of clinical outbreak cases into DF, DHF and DSS diagnostic categories was 24%, 66%, and 10%, respectively. The population aged 10-19 years accounted for the largest (35%) proportion of hospitalized DHF cases, followed by children aged 5-9 years (25%) and children aged 4 years (16%). Serum samples obtained during acute illness from 221 hospitalized patients were examined using serology, RT-PCR, and virus isolation in cell culture: 59% of samples had laboratory evidence of a dengue infection. All 4 dengue virus serotypes (DEN 1-4) were identified in epidemic circulation, with DEN 3 predominating (43%). DEN 1 was the principal serotype associated with less severe dengue illness, suggesting that virulence may be, in part, a function of infecting serotype. The climatic influence of ENSO on rainfall and temperature in the months leading up to and during the outbreak was dramatic, and is likely to contribute to favourable

  17. Ganzfeld ERG in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Mathias W; Rilk, Albrecht; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2002-01-01

    In developmental biology, zebrafish are widely used to study the impact of mutations. The fast pace of development allows for a definitive morphological evaluation of the phenotype usually 5 days post fertilization (dpf). At that age, a functional analysis is already feasible using electroretinographic (ERG) methods. Corneal Ganzfeld ERGs were recorded with a glass microelectrode in anaesthetized, dark-adapted larvae aged 5 dpf, using a platinum wire beneath a moist paper towel as reference. ERG protocols included flash, flicker, and ON/OFF stimuli, both under scotopic and photopic conditions. Repetitive, isoluminant stimuli were used to assess the dynamic effect of pharmacological agents on the ERG. Single flash, flicker, and ON/OFF responses had adequately matured at this point to be informative. Typical signs of the cone dominance were the small scotopic a-wave and the large OFF responses. The analysis of consecutive single traces was possible because of the lack of EKG, breathing, and blink artefacts. After application of APB, which selectively blocks the ON channel via the mGluR6 receptor, the successive loss of the b-wave could be observed, which was quite different from the deterioration of the ERG after a circulatory arrest. The above techniques allowed to reliably obtain Ganzfeld ERGs in larvae aged 5 dpf. This underlines the important role of the zebrafish as a model for the functional analysis of mutations disrupting the visual system. PMID:11949809

  18. Molecular Characterization of Ancylostoma braziliense Larvae in a Patient with Hookworm-Related Cutaneous Larva Migrans

    PubMed Central

    Joncour, Alexandre Le; Lacour, Sandrine A.; Lecso, Gabriel; Regnier, Stéphanie; Guillot, Jacques; Caumes, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans diagnosed microscopically. Viable hookworm larvae were found by microscopic examination of a skin scraping from follicular lesions. Amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 2 allowed the specific identification of the larvae as Ancylostoma braziliense. PMID:22556085

  19. [Neonatal Dengue. Presentation of clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Romero-Santacruz, Edith; Lira-Canul, Janeth Jaqueline; Pacheco-Tugores, Fredy; Palma-Chan, Adolfo Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a flavivirus, with four serotypes, transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In Mexico it is a public health problem, especially in the region of central and southeast of the country. The disease can be asymptomatic or present serious forms and even death. It is confirmed by detection of the NS1 Antigen; IgM antibodies, polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation. The vertical transmission to de newborn has been little studied. 7 cases in neonates from November to December 2011 are reported. All patients were male, obtained by caesarean section between 34 and 40 weeks of gestation, whose mothers were enrolled with fever and symptoms associated with dengue disease and serology positive for dengue. Six with positive AgNS1 and one positive IgM; one mother died. All the newborns had positive serology for dengue, 4 with positive AgNS1 and 3 positive IgM. The clinical features of the newborn ranged from asymptomatic to one serious dengue fever, shock and hemorrhage. The symptomatic 6 attended with thrombocytopenia, changes in temperature and unspecific disturbance. The severity of mothers conditioned disrepair product at birth, but not with subsequent gravity of the new born. Vertical trasmission of dengue should be suspected in risk areas, to maintain vigilance and to give early treatment. Also is neccesary promote the realization of specific diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines to the neonatal period.

  20. [Neonatal Dengue. Presentation of clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Romero-Santacruz, Edith; Lira-Canul, Janeth Jaqueline; Pacheco-Tugores, Fredy; Palma-Chan, Adolfo Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a flavivirus, with four serotypes, transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In Mexico it is a public health problem, especially in the region of central and southeast of the country. The disease can be asymptomatic or present serious forms and even death. It is confirmed by detection of the NS1 Antigen; IgM antibodies, polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation. The vertical transmission to de newborn has been little studied. 7 cases in neonates from November to December 2011 are reported. All patients were male, obtained by caesarean section between 34 and 40 weeks of gestation, whose mothers were enrolled with fever and symptoms associated with dengue disease and serology positive for dengue. Six with positive AgNS1 and one positive IgM; one mother died. All the newborns had positive serology for dengue, 4 with positive AgNS1 and 3 positive IgM. The clinical features of the newborn ranged from asymptomatic to one serious dengue fever, shock and hemorrhage. The symptomatic 6 attended with thrombocytopenia, changes in temperature and unspecific disturbance. The severity of mothers conditioned disrepair product at birth, but not with subsequent gravity of the new born. Vertical trasmission of dengue should be suspected in risk areas, to maintain vigilance and to give early treatment. Also is neccesary promote the realization of specific diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines to the neonatal period. PMID:26233977

  1. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in children in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kabra, S K; Verma, I C; Arora, N K; Jain, Y; Kalra, V

    1992-01-01

    An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in Delhi during 1988. A total of 21 paediatric patients with dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome were evaluated from September to November 1988. All the patients had fever, restlessness, ecchymotic spots and ascites. Pleural effusion occurred in 19 patients (90%), and 18 (86%) exhibited each of the following: vomiting, thrombocytopenia, and haemoconcentration. Hepatomegaly was observed in 15 patients (71%) and splenomegaly in three (14%). Titres of haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies against dengue virus type 2 were raised in all the 15 cases from whom sera were collected during the acute stage. Convalescent sera from five patients had increased titres of HI antibodies to dengue virus type 2. The remaining 10 cases exhibited raised IgM antibody levels against dengue virus type 2. The fatality rate for serologically proven cases was 13% (2 of 15 patients), while for all patients (including those diagnosed clinically (6) and serologically (15)) it was 33.3% (7 of 21). Patients who survived had no sequelae, except one who had transient hypertension that lasted for two weeks.

  2. Dengue vaccine design: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cardosa, M J

    1998-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is now a global problem affecting tens of millions of people. The spread of the four dengue virus serotypes had led to increased incidence of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) reported and with 2.5 billion people at risk, efforts towards the development of safe and effective vaccines against dengue must be accelerated. This chapter reviews some of the important lessons of pathogenesis which may be learnt from classical studies in the field and place these in the context of current knowledge about the molecular biology of the virus. The issues which have to be addressed in designing a safe vaccine against dengue are raised and the problems of designing subunit as well as whole virus vaccines are pointed out, particularly with regard to the phenomenon of antibody dependent enhancement and, more generally, the problem of immune potentiation of disease. More efforts must be made to understand the basis of pathogenesis in DHF and in finding out what nature has to teach about protection against and recovery from dengue virus infection.

  3. Dengue viruses in Brazil, 1986-2006.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão; Schatzmayr, Hermann Gonçalves

    2007-11-01

    A total of 4,243,049 dengue cases have been reported in Brazil between 1981 and 2006, including 5,817 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) and a total of 338 fatal cases. Although all Brazilian regions have been affected, the Northeast and Southeast regions have registered the highest number of notifications. DENV-1 and DENV-4 were isolated for the first time in the Amazon region of Brazil in 1981 and 1982. The disease became a nationwide public health problem following outbreaks of DENV-1 and DENV-2 in the state of Rio de Janeiro in 1986 and 1990, respectively. The introduction of DENV-3 in 2000, also in the state of Rio de Janeiro, led to a severe epidemic with 288 245 reported dengue cases, including 91 deaths. Virus strains that were typed during the 2002 epidemic show that DENV-3 has displaced other dengue virus serotypes and entered new areas, a finding that warrants closer evaluation. Unusual clinical symptoms, including central nervous system involvement, have been observed in dengue patients in at least three regions of the country.

  4. Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2015-03-01

    Infection with dengue virus may result in dengue fever or a more severe outcome, such as dengue hemorrhagic syndrome/shock. Dengue virus infection poses a threat to endemic regions for four reasons: the presence of four serotypes, each with the ability to cause a similar disease outcome, including fatality; difficulties related to vector control; the lack of specific treatment; and the nonavailability of a suitable vaccine. Vaccine development is considered challenging due to the severity of the disease observed in individuals who have acquired dengue-specific immunity, either passively or actively. Therefore, the presence of vaccine-induced immunity against a particular serotype may prime an individual to severe disease on exposure to dengue virus. Vaccine development strategies include live attenuated vaccines, chimeric, DNA-based, subunit, and inactivated vaccines. Each of the candidates is in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. Issues pertaining to selection pressures, viral interaction, and safety still need to be evaluated in order to induce a complete protective immune response against all four serotypes. This review highlights the various strategies that have been employed in vaccine development, and identifies the obstacles to producing a safe and effective vaccine.

  5. Severe dengue outbreak in Yunnan, China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Chun; Zhao, Hui; Li, Li-Hua; Jiang, Tao; Hong, Wen-Xin; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Ling-Zhai; Yang, Hui-Qin; Ma, De-Hong; Bai, Chun-Hai; Shan, Xi-Yun; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-10-01

    In recent decades, the impact of dengue has increased both geographically and in intensity, and this disease is now a threat to approximately half of the world's population. An unexpected large outbreak of dengue fever was reported in Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province, China, in 2013. This was the first autochthonous outbreak with a significant proportion of severe dengue cases in mainland China in a decade. According to the 2009 World Health Organization guidelines, half of the 136 laboratory confirmed cases during the epidemic were severe dengue. The clinical presentation included severe haemorrhage (such as massive vaginal and gastrointestinal bleeding), severe plasma leakage (such as pleural effusion, ascites, or hypoproteinaemia), and organ involvement (such as myocarditis and lung impairment); 21 cases eventually deteriorated to shock. During this outbreak, all severe cases occurred in adults, among whom about 43% had co-morbid conditions. Nucleic acid detection and virus isolation confirmed dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV-3) to be the pathogenic agent of this outbreak. Phylogenetic analyses of envelope gene sequences showed that these DENV-3 isolates belonged to genotype II. This finding is of great importance to understand the circulation of DENV and predict the risk of severe disease in mainland China. Here, we provide a brief report of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and aetiology of this dengue fever outbreak, and characterize DENV strains isolated from clinical specimens.

  6. Estimating dengue vector abundance in the wet and dry season: implications for targeted vector control in urban and peri-urban Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Khin Thet; Arunachalam, Natarajan; Tana, Susilowati; Espino, Fe; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Abeyewickreme, W; Hapangama, Dilini; Tyagi, Brij Kishore; Htun, Pe Than; Koyadun, Surachart; Kroeger, Axel; Sommerfeld, Johannes; Petzold, Max

    2012-01-01

    Background Research has shown that the classical Stegomyia indices (or “larval indices”) of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti reflect the absence or presence of the vector but do not provide accurate measures of adult mosquito density. In contrast, pupal indices as collected in pupal productivity surveys are a much better proxy indicator for adult vector abundance. However, it is unknown when it is most optimal to conduct pupal productivity surveys, in the wet or in the dry season or in both, to inform control services about the most productive water container types and if this pattern varies among different ecological settings. Methods A multi-country study in randomly selected twelve to twenty urban and peri-urban neighborhoods (“clusters”) of six Asian countries, in which all water holding containers were examined for larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti during the dry season and the wet season and their productivity was characterized by water container types. In addition, meteorological data and information on reported dengue cases were collected. Findings The study reconfirmed the association between rainfall and dengue cases (“dengue season”) and underlined the importance of determining through pupal productivity surveys the “most productive containers types”, responsible for the majority (>70%) of adult dengue vectors. The variety of productive container types was greater during the wet than during the dry season, but included practically all container types productive in the dry season. Container types producing pupae were usually different from those infested by larvae indicating that containers with larval infestations do not necessarily foster pupal development and thus the production of adult Aedes mosquitoes. Conclusion Pupal productivity surveys conducted during the wet season will identify almost all of the most productive container types for both the dry and wet seasons and will therefore facilitate cost-effective targeted interventions

  7. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge.

  8. Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investigates the contribution of dengue virus-specific proteins to the evasion of innate immunity by this virus and the host factors that the virus interacts with in order to evade immune recognition and to establish infection in humans. Here, we review recent findings from our group as well as published data from other groups regarding immune modulation by dengue virus. PMID:22569913

  9. Frequency and Clinical Manifestations of Dengue in Urban Medellin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Beatty, Mark E.; Goez, Yenny; Ramirez, Ruth E.; Letson, G. William; Diaz, Francisco J.; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    A dengue fever surveillance study was conducted at three medical facilities located in the low-income district of San Javier in Medellin, Colombia. During March 2008 to 2009, 781 patients with fever regardless of chief complaint were recruited for acute dengue virus infection testing. Of the 781 tested, 73 (9.3%) were positive for dengue infection. Serotypes DENV-2 (77%) and -3 (23%) were detected by PCR. One patient met the diagnostic criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever. Only 3 out of 73 (4.1%) febrile subjects testing positive for dengue infection were diagnosed with dengue fever by the treating physician. This study confirms dengue virus as an important cause of acute febrile illness in Medellin, Colombia, but it is difficult to diagnose without dengue diagnostic testing. PMID:24987421

  10. Country- and age-specific optimal allocation of dengue vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L; Durham, David P; Medlock, Jan; Galvani, Alison P

    2014-02-01

    Several dengue vaccines are under development, and some are expected to become available imminently. Concomitant with the anticipated release of these vaccines, vaccine allocation strategies for dengue-endemic countries in Southeast Asia and Latin America are currently under development. We developed a model of dengue transmission that incorporates the age-specific distributions of dengue burden corresponding to those in Thailand and Brazil, respectively, to determine vaccine allocations that minimize the incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever, taking into account limited availability of vaccine doses in the initial phase of production. We showed that optimal vaccine allocation strategies vary significantly with the demographic burden of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Consequently, the strategy that is optimal for one country may be sub-optimal for another country. More specifically, we showed that, during the first years following introduction of a dengue vaccine, it is optimal to target children for dengue mass vaccination in Thailand, whereas young adults should be targeted in Brazil.

  11. Capillary leakage in travelers with dengue infection: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eyal; Heyman, Zahava; Bin, Hanna; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is characterized by the presence of a capillary leak syndrome. Its pathogenesis is presumed to differ from that of classical dengue fever (DF) and to be associated with secondary dengue infection. Returning travelers given a diagnosis of DF were evaluated for capillary leakage with abdominal sonography. Data were compared between travelers with primary/secondary infection defined by epidemiologic and serologic parameters. A total of 12 (34.3%) of 35 patients had sonographic signs of capillary leakage. Most (85%) patients with capillary leakage had classical DF. Capillary leak was diagnosed in 32% of primary dengue cases and in 40% of secondary dengue cases (P = 0.69). The two patients given a diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever had primary infections. The high prevalence of capillary leakage among travelers, most of them with primary exposure to dengue, calls into question the importance of secondary infection in causing capillary leakage in dengue infection.

  12. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge. PMID:26855170

  13. Transmission spectroscopy of dengue viral infection Transmission spectroscopy of dengue viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rehman, A.; Nawaz, M.; Anwar, S.; Murtaza, S.

    2012-04-01

    We presented the rapid diagnostic test for dengue infection based on light spectrum of human blood. The transmission spectra of dengue infected whole blood samples have been recorded in ultra violet to near infrared range (400 - 800 nm) of about 30 conformed infected patients and compared to normal blood samples. Transmission spectra of dengue infected blood illustrate a strong band from 400 - 600 nm with prominant peaks at 540 and 580 nm, where is in case of normal blood below 600 nm, total absorption has been observed. These prominent peaks from 400 - 600 nm are characteristics of cells damage and dangue virus antibodies immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) produced against dengue antigen. The presented diagnostic method is non invasive, cost effective, easy and fast screening technique for dengue infected patients.

  14. An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome in tropical India.

    PubMed

    Pushpa, V; Venkatadesikalu, M; Mohan, S; Cherian, T; John, T J; Ponnuraj, E M

    1998-12-01

    An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in Chennai, South India in 1989 during and following the rainy season. Sixty-nine infants and children admitted to the Institute of Child Health and Hospital for Children with a brief febrile illness associated with skin and mucous membrane bleeds and/or shock were studied. Forty-nine had antibodies to dengue viruses. The specific serotype of the virus responsible could not be identified owing to cross-reacting antibodies. Primary infection occurred in 11 cases, secondary infection in 17 cases, antibodily titres were indicative of 'probable' dengue infection in 16 and were uninterpretable in five. In 11 cases, serology could not be done. The pattern of disease in these 60 cases was similar, with a high mortality. Haemoconcentration was not a feature in the majority and the Hess test was negative in all those tested. Nine cases with a similar but milder illness tested negative for dengue.

  15. Dengue virus serotype 2 from a sylvatic lineage isolated from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Cardosa, Jane; Ooi, Mong How; Tio, Phaik Hooi; Perera, David; Holmes, Edward C; Bibi, Khatijar; Abdul Manap, Zahara

    2009-01-01

    Dengue viruses circulate in both human and sylvatic cycles. Although dengue viruses (DENV) infecting humans can cause major epidemics and severe disease, relatively little is known about the epidemiology and etiology of sylvatic dengue viruses. A 20-year-old male developed dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with thrombocytopenia (12,000/ul) and a raised hematocrit (29.5% above baseline) in January 2008 in Malaysia. Dengue virus serotype 2 was isolated from his blood on day 4 of fever. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequence revealed that this virus was a member of a sylvatic lineage of DENV-2 and most closely related to a virus isolated from a sentinel monkey in Malaysia in 1970. This is the first identification of a sylvatic DENV circulating in Asia since 1975.

  16. Analysis of repeat hospital admissions for dengue to estimate the frequency of third or fourth dengue infections resulting in admissions and dengue hemorrhagic fever, and serotype sequences.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Robert V; Kalanarooj, Siripen; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Vaughn, David W; Endy, Timothy P; Mammen, Mammen P; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon

    2007-11-01

    Immunity to a single dengue virus (DENV) infection does not provide heterologous immunity to subsequent infection. In fact, the greatest risk for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is with a second DENV serotype exposure. The risk for DHF with a third or fourth dengue infection relative to a first or second exposure is not known. An analysis of our database of children admitted to the Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health and Kamphaeng Phet Provincial Hospital with suspected dengue illness revealed that the number of dengue admissions caused by a third or fourth DENV infection was extremely low (0.08-0.8%). Once admitted, the risk for DHF relative to dengue fever was not different for those experiencing third or fourth DENV infections over those experiencing a second DENV infection. We document new dengue serotype infection sequences leading to DHF of 1-4, 2-3, 3-1, and 3-4.

  17. Alternate hypothesis on the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2008-04-01

    Dengue fever, caused by infection with dengue virus, is not a new disease, but recently because of its serious emerging health threats, coupled with possible dire consequences including death, it has aroused considerable medical and public health concerns worldwide. Today, dengue is considered one of the most important arthropod-borne viral diseases in humans in terms of morbidity and mortality. Globally, it is estimated that approximate 50 to 100 million new dengue virus infections occur annually. Among these, there are 200,000 to 500,000 cases of potential life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS), characterized by thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. The death rate associated with the more severe form DHF/DSS is approximately 5%, predominantly in children under the age of 15. Although intensive efforts have been made to study the early clinical pathophysiology of dengue infection with the objective to identify the potential cause of DHF, results or data that have accumulated from different regions of the world involving studies of different ethnicity groups are inconsistent at present in terms of identifying a unified hypothesis for the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS. Thus, the potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DHF and DSS remain elusive. The purpose of this review is to identify alternate factors, such as innate immune parameters, hyper-thermal factors, conditioning of neutralizing antibody, concept of vector transmission, and physical status of virus in viremic patients that may play a role in the induction of DHF and DSS, which might have directly or indirectly contributed to the discrepancies that are noted in the literature reported to date. It is the hope that identification of an alternative explanation for the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS will pave the way for the institution of new strategies for the prevention of this complicated disease.

  18. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T. Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L’Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2–14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14’s active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  19. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions.

  20. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  1. Dengue specific immunoglobulins M, A, and E in primary and secondary dengue 4 infected Salvadorian children.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Susana; Lozano, Celina; Perez, Ana Beatriz; Castellanos, Yinet; Ruiz, Didye; Calzada, Naifi; Guzmán, Maria Guadalupe

    2014-09-01

    El Salvador is a Central American country that has been affected by several dengue outbreaks. This study investigated the levels of IgM, IgA, and IgE anti-dengue antibodies in serum samples from children in El Salvador, with a clinical and serological diagnosis of dengue infection during the dengue 4 outbreak in 2002-2003. Seventy one serum samples were tested by ELISA and cases were classified in three groups: 13 primary dengue fever (PDF), 21 secondary dengue fever (SDF), and 37 secondary dengue hemorrhagic fever (SDHF). Also, the specificity of anti-dengue IgM for the different serotypes was tested. No significant differences in the IgM response were found between PDF and SDF, but these were detected between PDF and SDHF (P = 0.0053) and between SDF and SDHF (P = 0.0003). The IgA and IgE values showed a statistically significant difference between primary and secondary groups. The highest positivity percentage of IgA was between 95% (SDF) and 100% (SDHF) towards day 7 of onset of fever. All secondary cases were positive for IgE antibodies. The specificity of IgM was determined for DENV-4 virus in primary and secondary DF groups. This is the first study on dengue cases in Salvadorian children related to the immune response of different immunoglobulins to the type of infection and the clinical picture. Further prospective studies are needed to define if the pattern of immunoglobulins can determine early dengue infection and/or severity.

  2. Dengue in the Americas and Southeast Asia: do they differ?

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2006-12-01

    The populations of Southeast Asia (SE Asia) and tropical America are similar, and all four dengue viruses of Asian origin are endemic in both regions. Yet, during comparable 5-year periods, SE Asia experienced 1.16 million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), principally in children, whereas in the Americas there were 2.8 million dengue fever (DF) cases, principally in adults, and only 65,000 DHF cases. This review aims to explain these regional differences. In SE Asia, World War II amplified Aedes aegypti populations and the spread of dengue viruses. In the Americas, efforts to eradicate A. aegypti in the 1940s and 1950s contained dengue epidemics mainly to the Caribbean Basin. Cuba escaped infections with the American genotype dengue-2 and an Asian dengue-3 endemic in the 1960s and 1970s. Successive infections with dengue-1 and an Asian genotype dengue-2 resulted in the 1981 DHF epidemic. When this dengue-2 virus was introduced in other Caribbean countries, it encountered populations highly immune to the American genotype dengue-2. During the 1980s and 1990s, rapidly expanding populations of A. aegypti in Brazil permitted successive epidemics of dengue-1, -2, and -3. These exposures, however, resulted mainly in DF, with surprisingly few cases of DHF. The absence of high rates of severe dengue disease in Brazil, as elsewhere in the Americas, may be partly explained by the widespread prevalence of human dengue resistance genes. Understanding the nature and distribution of these genes holds promise for containing severe dengue. Future research on dengue infections should emphasize population-based designs.

  3. Breeding Sites of Aedes aegypti: Potential Dengue Vectors in Dire Dawa, East Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Dejene; Tekie, Habte; Gebre-Michael, Teshome; Balkew, Meshesha; Mesfin, Akalu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Entomological survey was carried out from May-June to September-October 2014 to investigate the presence of dengue vectors in discarded tires and artificial water containers in houses and peridomestic areas. Methods. A cross-sectional immature stage survey was done indoors and outdoors in 301 houses. Mosquito larval sampling was conducted using pipette or dipper depending on container types. Larvae were identified morphologically and larval indices were also calculated. Results. A total of 750 containers were inspected, and of these 405 were positive for mosquito larvae. A total of 1,873 larvae were collected and morphologically identified as Aedes aegypti (n = 1580: 84.4%) and Culex (n = 293: 15.6%). The larval indices, house index, container index, and breteau index, varied from 33.3 to 86.2, from 23.2 to 73.9, and from 56.5 to 188.9, respectively. Conclusion. Aedes aegypti is breeding in a wide range of artificial containers. To control these mosquitoes, the integration of different methods should be taken into consideration. PMID:26435712

  4. Workbook on Identification of Aedes Aegypti Larvae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Harry D.; And Others

    This self-instructional booklet is designed to enable yellow fever control workers to identify the larvae of "Aedes aegypti." The morphological features of mosquito larvae are illustrated in this partially programed text, and the distinguishing features of "A. aegypti" indicated. A glossary is included. (AL)

  5. Stochastic dynamics of dengue epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, David R.; Tomé, Tânia; Pinho, Suani T. R.; Barreto, Florisneide R.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2013-01-01

    We use a stochastic Markovian dynamics approach to describe the spreading of vector-transmitted diseases, such as dengue, and the threshold of the disease. The coexistence space is composed of two structures representing the human and mosquito populations. The human population follows a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) type dynamics and the mosquito population follows a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) type dynamics. The human infection is caused by infected mosquitoes and vice versa, so that the SIS and SIR dynamics are interconnected. We develop a truncation scheme to solve the evolution equations from which we get the threshold of the disease and the reproductive ratio. The threshold of the disease is also obtained by performing numerical simulations. We found that for certain values of the infection rates the spreading of the disease is impossible, for any death rate of infected mosquitoes.

  6. Dengue in Greece in 1927 and 1928 and the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever: new data and a different conclusion.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L

    1986-05-01

    A massive outbreak of dengue, with a high incidence of hemorrhagic manifestations and a high death rate, occurred in Athens and neighboring areas of Greece in 1927 and 1928. For many years it was believed that the episode had been caused by dengue type 1 virus. Recently, it was claimed that dengue type 2 virus also was present in Athens in 1928, and this report is cited in support of the hypotheses that dengue hemorrhagic fever is almost always the result of sequential infection with different dengue serotypes and that infection with dengue type 2 following dengue type 1 is particularly pathogenic. In the present study of 258 Greek residents born from 1914 to 1938, it was also found that dengue type 2 had occurred in Greece--but after 1928. No evidence was found that that virus had occurred in the country during, or within 13 years before, the 1927-1928 epidemic.

  7. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sumarmo

    1987-09-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was first recognized in Indonesia in the cities of Jakarta and Surabaya in 1968, 15 years after its recognition in the Philippines. During the 1968 outbreak, a total of 58 clinical cases with 24 deaths were reported. The number of reported cases since then has increased sharply, with the highest number of cases recorded in the years 1973 (10, 189 cases), 1983 (13,668 cases), and 1985 (13,588 cases). Outbreaks of the disease have spread to involve most of the major urban areas, as well as some of the rural areas. In 1985, the disease had spread to 26 of 27 Provinces and 160 of 300 regencies or municipalities. At present, the disease is endemic in many large cities and small towns. Interestingly, DHF has not been reported in some cities, even though dengue virus transmission rates in those cities are high. The epidemic pattern of DHF for the country as a whole has become irregular. Since 1982, the intensity and spread of DHF has created an increasing public health problem in Indonesia, particularly in Java where 60% of the total population of the country resides. Java contributed about 71% of all cases occurring in the country in 1982, 84% in 1983, and 91% in 1984. The peak monthly incidence of DHF was frequently reported during October through April, months which coincide with the rainy season. The morbidity rate for Indonesia, estimated from reported cases over five years (1981-1985), ranged between 3.39 to 8.65 per 100,000 population.

  8. Fight against dengue in India: progresses and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhavna; Reddy, B P Niranjan

    2013-04-01

    At the end of the last century, India has faced resurgence of many infectious diseases, of which dengue is one of the most important in terms of morbidity and mortality. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Program data show that dengue is established in India and is becoming endemic to many areas (dengue cases have increased steadily from ∼450 to ∼50,000 from 2000 to 2012). Despite extensive efforts being made in developing the effective dengue control measures, the number of dengue cases, their severity, and geographical boundaries are expanding alarmingly and posing dengue as one of the deadly disease. Recently, the increasing burden of dengue in the country has attracted the scientific as well as Indian Government's administrative attention; however, a lot remain to be achieved for managing the disease under threshold level. Like other vector-borne diseases, better management of the dengue needs balanced approach involving various aspects like disease prevention, cure/treatment, and the vector control, simultaneously. We have briefly discussed here the situation of dengue in India and have tried to highlight the worrying facets of dengue control and its implementation in Indian perspective. The review on various aspects of dengue control has revealed an urgent need for permanent surveillance programs, coupled with improvised disease diagnostics, effective anti-dengue treatment measures, and controlling the disease transmission by following an effective implementation of vector control programs.

  9. Concurrent dengue and malaria in Cayenne Hospital, French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Carme, Bernard; Matheus, Severine; Donutil, Gerd; Raulin, Olivia; Nacher, Mathieu; Morvan, Jacques

    2009-04-01

    Dengue-malaria co-infection reports are scarce. Of 1,723 consecutive febrile patients in Cayenne Hospital, 238 had dengue (174 early dengue fever cases) and 393 had malaria (371 acute malaria); 17 had both. Diagnosis of 1 of these 2 infections should not rule out testing for the other infection.

  10. Upward trend in dengue incidence among hospitalized patients, United States.

    PubMed

    Streit, Judy A; Yang, Ming; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2011-05-01

    International travel and a global expansion of dengue fever have the potential to increase the incidence of dengue in the United States. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of trends in dengue among hospitalized patients by using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2007); the number of cases more than tripled (p<0.0001).

  11. Describing dengue epidemics: Insights from simple mechanistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Stollenwerk, Nico; Kooi, Bob W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a set of nested models to be applied to dengue fever epidemiology. We perform a qualitative study in order to show how much complexity we really need to add into epidemiological models to be able to describe the fluctuations observed in empirical dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence data offering a promising perspective on inference of parameter values from dengue case notifications.

  12. Reemergence and Autochthonous Transmission of Dengue Virus, Eastern China, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Yu, Bin; Lin, Xian-Dan; Kong, De-Guang; Wang, Jian; Tian, Jun-Hua; Li, Ming-Hui; Holmes, Edward C; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-09-01

    In 2014, 20 dengue cases were reported in the cities of Wenzhou (5 cases) and Wuhan (15 cases), China, where dengue has rarely been reported. Dengue virus 1 was detected in 4 patients. Although most of these cases were likely imported, epidemiologic analysis provided evidence for autochthonous transmission.

  13. [Genetic relatedness of the dengue 3 virus isolated in the outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Nicaragua, 1994].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, M G; Rosario, D; Muné, M; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez, R; Kourí, G

    1996-01-01

    It is reported the isolation of 2 dengue strains, 3 in samples from Nicaraguan patients suffering from dengue with hemorrhagic manifestations, which showed the reintroduction of this serotype in the region after being 17 years out of circulation. It is also reported the genetic characterization of the isolated strain, which, according to its classification, belongs to the group of dengue 2 strains isolated in Southeast Asi and which have been associated to hemorrhagic dengue. These results suggest the origin of this strain.

  14. Dengue infection in Dhaka City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, R; Tabassum, S; Mamun, K Z; Nessa, A; Jahan, M

    2013-10-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are now endemic in Bangladesh with outbreaks being reported quite frequently. This cross sectional study was done clinically suspected dengue patients were selected from different hospitals of Dhaka city, Bangladesh, from January 2008 to December 2008. The clinical features, risk factors and laboratory findings associated with dengue infection were investigated among 201 clinically suspected patients. Antibodies were detected in 137(68.2%) cases. Of these, 80(58.4%) were primary and 57(41.6%) as secondary dengue cases according to presence of dengue-specific IgM and/or IgG antibodies. Among primary cases, 70(87.5%) were DF and 10(12.5%) were DHF cases, in contrast to secondary cases, where 10(18.1%) were DF and 47(81.9%) were DHF cases. Majority (57.9%) of patients presented with Grade I and 42.1% had Grade II disease. Patients between 16-30 years were the most vulnerable age group (81.3% DF and 71.9% DHF patients). Males out-numbered females with 72.5% male vs. 27.5% female patients having DF and 68.4% male vs. 31.6% female patients having DHF. The monsoon period was the peak season for dengue infection. Headache and arthralgia were the most frequent symptoms in both DF and DHF, but vomiting was more common in DHF. The Tourniquet test was significantly positive among DHF than DF cases (p = 0.001). Platelet count was the only laboratory parameter that showed significantly higher values among DHF than DF cases (p = 0.001).

  15. Egg and fourth instar larvae gut of Aedes aegypti as a source of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mario, Lara C; Borghesi, Jéssica; Crivellari-Damasceno, Wilson T; Favaron, Phelipe O; Carreira, Ana Claudia O; Will, Sonia E A L; Maria, Durvanei A; Miglino, Maria A

    2016-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 2015 registered more than 1.206.172 cases of Dengue in the Americas. Recently, the Aedes aegypti has been not only related to Dengue, but also with cases of Zika virus and Chikungunya. Due to its epidemiological importance, this study characterized the morphology of the embryonated eggs of A. aegypti and provided a protocol to culture stem cells from eggs and digestive tract of fourth instar larvae in order to examine cell biology and expression of markers in these vectors. Cells were isolated and cultured in DMEM-High at 28°C, and their morphology, cell cycle and immunophenotyping were examined. Morphologically, embryos were at the end of the embryonic period and showed: head, thorax, and abdomen with eight abdominal segments. The embryonic tissues expressed markers related to cell proliferation (PCNA), pluripotency (Sox2 and OCT3/4), neural cells (Nestin), mesenchymal cells (Vimentin and Stro-1), and endosomal cells (GM130 and RAB5). In culture, cells from both tissues (eggs and larvae gut) were composed by a heterogeneous population. The cells had a globoid shape and small size. Cell cycle analysis on passage 1 (P1) showed 27.5%±2.0% of cell debris, 68% of cells on G0-G1 phase, 30.2% on S phase, 1.9%±0.5% on G2-M phase. In addition, cells on passage 2 showed: 10% of cell debris, 92.4% of cells on G0-G1 phase, 6.8% on S phase, 0.6% on G2-M phase. Embryonated eggs expressed markers involved with pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct 3/4), mesenchymal cells (vimentin and Stro-1), neural cells (Nestin), and cellular death by apoptosis (Caspase 3). Specific endosomal markers for insect cells (GM130 and RAB5) were also highly expressed. In cell culture of A. aegypti larvae gut the same labeling pattern was observed, with a small decrease in the expression of mesenchymal (vimentin and Stro-1) and neural (Nestin) markers. In summary, we were able to establish a protocol to culture embryonated eggs and larvae gut of A. aegypti

  16. Egg and fourth instar larvae gut of Aedes aegypti as a source of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mario, Lara C; Borghesi, Jéssica; Crivellari-Damasceno, Wilson T; Favaron, Phelipe O; Carreira, Ana Claudia O; Will, Sonia E A L; Maria, Durvanei A; Miglino, Maria A

    2016-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 2015 registered more than 1.206.172 cases of Dengue in the Americas. Recently, the Aedes aegypti has been not only related to Dengue, but also with cases of Zika virus and Chikungunya. Due to its epidemiological importance, this study characterized the morphology of the embryonated eggs of A. aegypti and provided a protocol to culture stem cells from eggs and digestive tract of fourth instar larvae in order to examine cell biology and expression of markers in these vectors. Cells were isolated and cultured in DMEM-High at 28°C, and their morphology, cell cycle and immunophenotyping were examined. Morphologically, embryos were at the end of the embryonic period and showed: head, thorax, and abdomen with eight abdominal segments. The embryonic tissues expressed markers related to cell proliferation (PCNA), pluripotency (Sox2 and OCT3/4), neural cells (Nestin), mesenchymal cells (Vimentin and Stro-1), and endosomal cells (GM130 and RAB5). In culture, cells from both tissues (eggs and larvae gut) were composed by a heterogeneous population. The cells had a globoid shape and small size. Cell cycle analysis on passage 1 (P1) showed 27.5%±2.0% of cell debris, 68% of cells on G0-G1 phase, 30.2% on S phase, 1.9%±0.5% on G2-M phase. In addition, cells on passage 2 showed: 10% of cell debris, 92.4% of cells on G0-G1 phase, 6.8% on S phase, 0.6% on G2-M phase. Embryonated eggs expressed markers involved with pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct 3/4), mesenchymal cells (vimentin and Stro-1), neural cells (Nestin), and cellular death by apoptosis (Caspase 3). Specific endosomal markers for insect cells (GM130 and RAB5) were also highly expressed. In cell culture of A. aegypti larvae gut the same labeling pattern was observed, with a small decrease in the expression of mesenchymal (vimentin and Stro-1) and neural (Nestin) markers. In summary, we were able to establish a protocol to culture embryonated eggs and larvae gut of A. aegypti

  17. Awareness of dengue and practice of dengue control among the semi-urban community: a cross sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Ren, Wong Yih; Man, Chan Yuk; Fern, Koh Pei; Qiqi, Chua; Ning, Choo Ning; Ee, Clarice Wong Syun

    2011-12-01

    Primary prevention is the most effective measure in dengue prevention and control. The objectives were (i) to determine the level of knowledge and practice of dengue control amongst the study community, and (ii) to explore the factors affecting practice of dengue control in the study area. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a semi-urban Town of Malaysia, using a structured questionnaire covering sociodemography, knowledge related to dengue, knowledge related to Aedes mosquito and preventive measures against the disease. For comparison of survey responses, chi-square test was applied for categorical data. To explore the factors affecting the practice of dengue control, a linear regression model was introduced. Almost all of the respondents (95%) had heard about dengue. Overall, misconceptions of dengue transmission were identified and the practice of dengue control in the study population was insufficient. About half (50.5%) had misconceptions that Aedes can breed in dirty water and the preferred biting time is dusk or sunset (45.6%). Only 44.5% of the households surveyed had covered their water containers properly. Significant associations were found between knowledge scores of dengue and age (P = 0.001), education level (P = 0.001), marital status (P = 0.012), and occupation (P = 0.007). In regression analysis, only the knowledge of dengue was significantly and positively associated with practice on dengue control. A future study with larger samples and more variables to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of dengue control is recommended.

  18. Dengue-induced Acute Kidney Injury (DAKI): A Neglected and Fatal Complication of Dengue Viral Infection--A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Yusra Habib; Hamzah, Azhar Amir; Jummaat, Fauziah; Khan, Amer Hayat

    2015-11-01

    Dengue Viral Infection (DVI) imperils an estimated 2.5 billion people living in tropical and subtropical regions. World Health Organization (2011) guidelines also classified dengue as 'Expanded Dengue Syndrome' to incorporate wide spectrum of unusual manifestations of dengue infection affecting various organ systems - including liver, kidney, heart and brain. Renal involvements are least appreciated area of dengue infection, therefore, we systematically reviewed studies describing renal disorders in dengue infection, with emphasis on Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). The purpose of current review is to underscore clinicians’attention to this neglected intricacy of DVI. It suggests that dengue induced renal involvements vary from glomerulonephritis, nephrotic range proteinuria and AKI. We observed great disparity in incidence of AKI among dengue patients, based upon criteria used to define AKI. AKI among dengue patients was found to be associated with significant morbidity, mortality and longer hospitalization, adding financial burden to patients and healthcare system. Additionally, we identified several predictors of AKI in dengue patients including old age, obesity, severe dengue infection and concurrent bacterial or viral infection. Direct viral injury and deposition of antigen-antibody complex in glomerulus were found to be possible causes of renal disorders in dengue infection. Prior knowledge of clinico-laboratory characteristics and risk factors with early detection of AKI by using appropriate criteria would not only reduce morbidity and mortality but also decrease burden to patients and healthcare system. PMID:26577971

  19. Dengue surveillance in the French armed forces: a dengue sentinel surveillance system in countries without efficient local epidemiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    de Laval, Franck; Dia, Aissata; Plumet, Sébastien; Decam, Christophe; Leparc Goffart, Isabelle; Deparis, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of travel-acquired dengue could improve dengue risk estimation in countries without ability. Surveillance in the French army in 2010 to 2011 highlighted 330 dengue cases, mainly in French West Indies and Guiana: DENV-1 circulated in Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana, New Caledonia, Djibouti; DENV-3 in Mayotte and Djibouti; and DENV-4 in French Guiana.

  20. Dengue surveillance in the French armed forces: a dengue sentinel surveillance system in countries without efficient local epidemiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    de Laval, Franck; Dia, Aissata; Plumet, Sébastien; Decam, Christophe; Leparc Goffart, Isabelle; Deparis, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of travel-acquired dengue could improve dengue risk estimation in countries without ability. Surveillance in the French army in 2010 to 2011 highlighted 330 dengue cases, mainly in French West Indies and Guiana: DENV-1 circulated in Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana, New Caledonia, Djibouti; DENV-3 in Mayotte and Djibouti; and DENV-4 in French Guiana. PMID:23809078

  1. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Dengue Transmission along a Red Sea Coastline: A Longitudinal Entomological and Serological Survey in Port Sudan City

    PubMed Central

    Seidahmed, Osama M. E.; Hassan, Safa A.; Soghaier, Mohamed A.; Siam, Hanna A. M.; Ahmed, Fayez T. A.; Elkarsany, Mubarak M.; Sulaiman, Suad M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is an emerging health problem in several coastlines along the Red Sea. The objective of the present work is to elucidate spatial and temporal patterns of dengue transmission in Port Sudan. Methods/Findings A longitudinal study with three cross-sectional surveys was carried out in upper, middle and lower class neighborhoods, from November 2008 to October 2009. Monthly, entomological surveys were followed by serological surveys in dengue vector-positive houses. Meteorological records were obtained from two weather stations in the city during the same time. Overall, 2825 houses were inspected. Aedes aegypti represented 65% (35,714/54,944) and 68% (2526/3715) of the collected larvae and pupae, respectively. Out of 4640 drinking water containers, 2297 were positive for Ae. aegypti. Clay-pots “Zeirr” followed by plastic barrels were key productive containers for pupae of dengue vector, 63% (n = 3959) and 26% (n = 1651), respectively. A total of 791 blood samples were tested using PanBio Capture/Indirect IgM ELISA. Overall, the sero-prevalence rate of dengue ranged between 3%–8% (41/791), compared to an incidence of 29–40 new cases per 10,000 (193/54886) in the same examined population. Lower and middle class neighborhoods had higher entomological indices compared with upper class ones (p<0.001). Although, dengue incidence rate was significantly lower in the middle and lower class neighborhoods (F = 73.97, d.f. = 2, p<0.001), no difference in IgM prevalence was shown. The city is subject to two transmission peaks in the winter (i.e. November–January), and summer (i.e. June–August). The serological peaks of dengue are preceded by entomological peaks that occur before the onset of winter (November) and summer (March) respectively. Conclusion Dengue incidence is heterogeneously distributed across the neighborhoods of Port Sudan and exhibits a bi-cyclic intra-annual pattern. Hence, it should be feasible to carry out timely vector

  2. Epidemiology of dengue: past, present and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Natasha Evelyn Anne; Quam, Mikkel B; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is currently regarded globally as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease. A history of symptoms compatible with dengue can be traced back to the Chin Dynasty of 265–420 AD. The virus and its vectors have now become widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, particularly over the last half-century. Significant geographic expansion has been coupled with rapid increases in incident cases, epidemics, and hyperendemicity, leading to the more severe forms of dengue. Transmission of dengue is now present in every World Health Organization (WHO) region of the world and more than 125 countries are known to be dengue endemic. The true impact of dengue globally is difficult to ascertain due to factors such as inadequate disease surveillance, misdiagnosis, and low levels of reporting. Currently available data likely grossly underestimates the social, economic, and disease burden. Estimates of the global incidence of dengue infections per year have ranged between 50 million and 200 million; however, recent estimates using cartographic approaches suggest this number is closer to almost 400 million. The expansion of dengue is expected to increase due to factors such as the modern dynamics of climate change, globalization, travel, trade, socioeconomics, settlement and also viral evolution. No vaccine or specific antiviral therapy currently exists to address the growing threat of dengue. Prompt case detection and appropriate clinical management can reduce the mortality from severe dengue. Effective vector control is the mainstay of dengue prevention and control. Surveillance and improved reporting of dengue cases is also essential to gauge the true global situation as indicated in the objectives of the WHO Global Strategy for Dengue Prevention and Control, 2012–2020. More accurate data will inform the prioritization of research, health policy, and financial resources toward reducing this poorly controlled disease. The objective

  3. Dengue in an area of the Colombian Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Barreto, Heidi; Mattar-Velilla, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Colombia, dengue is an endemic disease and the four serotypes have been reported. Objective: To describe the frequency and severity of dengue in an area of the Colombian Caribbean (Department of Cordoba) Methods: A retrospective study was conducted. Two data sources were analysed: The database from the Direction of Health in Córdoba, and clinical registers of patients diagnosed with haemorrhagic fevers and fevers of unknown origin in reference hospitals. Results: The mean incidence of dengue between 2003-2010 was 36.5 cases/105 inhabitants (CI95%: 34.3-37.5) and adjusted for sub-reporting, could be between 178.5 and 521.6. The mean incidence of severe dengue was 4.7 cases/105 inhabitants (CI95%: 4.3-5.0). Mean mortality rate due to dengue was 0.3 cases/105 inhabitants. The fatality rate was below 1%. The mean total leukocyte count in patients with dengue was 6,181 mm3 (CI95%: 5,973-6,389) and with severe Dengue was 4,729 mm3 (CI95%: 4,220-5,238). The average platelet count in patients with Dengue was 118,793/mm3 (CI95%: 107,255-130,331) and in patients with Severe Dengue 77,655 (CI95%: 59,640-95,670). Both differences were statistically significant (p <0.05). The frequency of laboratories test per patient in patients with Dengue and severe Dengue were different. Conclusion: The department of Cordoba is a highly endemic zone of Dengue and severe Dengue in the Colombian Caribbean. Moreover, the results show significant differences between dengue and severe dengue so much in tests as in frequency of use of healthcare services. PMID:26019378

  4. Clinical profile of dengue during 2005 outbreak in Kolkata and predictive markers of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanat Kumar; De, Saumyen; Sarkar, Uttam; Ghosh, Mausumi; Chatterjee, Mrinal Kanti; Samanta, Sandip

    2011-11-01

    Epidemics of dengue outbreak are frequent in south-east Asian countries. Dengue is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this region. This prospective observational study was done at Dr BC Roy Memorial for Children during the outbreak in 2005 in Kolkata to know the clinical pattern of dengue cases and to find the possible markers of development of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Two hundred and eighty seropositive cases of dengue were included in the study. Among paediatric population, 5 to 10 years age group was most commonly affected. One-sixth of the cases were from villages indicating the extension of the epidemic in rural areas. Abrupt onset of high fever, non-purulent conjunctival injection, erythematous lips, flushed appearance, myalgia, arthralgia, headache and thrombocytopenia were the predominant features. Rhinitis and pharyngitis were rarely found. Prolonged fever more than 7 days, flushed appearance, pharyngeal congestion, shock evidence, serous effusion, bleeding manifestations, thrombocytopenia, elevated liver enzymes and elevated PCV were associated with development of dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

  5. Comparison of dengue virus antigens in sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dengue infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, L; Meethien, N; Sujirarat, D; Kittigul, C; Vasanavat, S

    1997-12-01

    The presence of dengue virus antigens in acute sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from dengue infected patients were determined by a biotin-streptavidin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BS-ELISA). The frequency of the antigens detected in PBMC was higher than that in sera (53.8% vs 18.9%). In comparison with sera, the detection rate in PBMC was greater than six times: 7 cases were positive only in sera whereas 44 cases were positive only in PBMC, p < 0.001. The presence of the antigens in the sera did not depend on the severity of the disease, i.e. dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (grades I and II) or dengue shock syndrome (grades III and IV). In contrast, the presence of the antigens in PBMC increased from 36.8% to 100% when the infection was more severe. The dengue virus antigens could be detected in the samples collected between day 2 and day 7 after onset of the disease with the highest rate of detection (68.8%) in PBMC collected on day 4. The data suggest the use of PBMC with access to the appropriate acute-phase specimen for detection of dengue virus antigens.

  6. Reintroduction of dengue fever into the continental United States. I. Dengue surveillance in Texas, 1980.

    PubMed

    Hafkin, B; Kaplan, J E; Reed, C; Elliott, L B; Fontaine, R; Sather, G E; Kappus, K

    1982-11-01

    Two surveillance systems were initiated in Texas in 1980 to detect cases of dengue fever. Physicians throughout the state were requested to report cases of dengue (passive surveillance), and 27 out-patient facilities serving geographically and ethnically high risk populations were asked to report cases of dengue-like illness weekly (active surveillance). Additionally, two clinics participating in active surveillance submitted acute-phase blood specimens weekly for dengue virus isolation. Sixty-three cases of illness due to dengue type 1 infection (dates of onset 2 August-10 November) were documented by virus isolation or serologic testing; 52 of them (83%) occurred n countries adjacent to the Texas-Mexico border. Fifty-six patients (89%) were Hispanic; 46 (73%) were females. Twenty-seven patients (43%) had not traveled outside the U.S. before becoming ill. Since no clinically apparent outbreak of dengue was ever recognized by public health officials in Texas in 1980, the active surveillance system in other Gulf Coast states should be considered when the risk of introduction of dengue is considered high.

  7. Reduction in dengue cases observed during mass control of Aedes (Stegomyia) in street catch basins in an endemic urban area in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Clara B.; Mina, Neila Julieth; Carabalí, Mabel; Alexander, Neal; Osorio, Lyda

    2015-01-01

    Dengue incidence continues to increase globally and, in the absence of an efficacious vaccine, prevention strategies are limited to vector control. It has been suggested that targeting the most productive breeding sites instead of all water-holding containers could be a cost-effective vector control strategy. We sought to identify and continuously control the most productive Aedes (Stegomyia) breeding site in an endemic urban area in Colombia and followed the subsequent incidence of dengue. In the urban area of Guadalajara de Buga, southwestern Colombia, potential breeding sites inside and outside houses were first characterized, and local personnel trained to assess their productivity based on the pupae/person index. Simultaneously, training and monitoring were implemented to improve the dengue case surveillance system. Entomological data and insecticide resistance studies were used to define the targeted intervention. Then, a quasi-experimental design was used to assess the efficacy of the intervention in terms of the positivity index of the targeted and non- targeted breeding sites, and the impact on dengue cases. Street catch basins (storm drains) were the potential breeding site most frequently found containing Aedes immature stages in the baseline (58.3% of 108). Due to the high resistance to temephos (0% mortality after 24 h), the intervention consisted of monthly application of pyriproxyfen in all the street catch basins (n = 4800). A significant decrease in catch basins positivity for Aedes larvae was observed after each monthly treatment (p < 0.001). Over the intervention period, a reduction in the dengue incidence in Buga was observed (rate ratio 0.19, 95% CI 0.12–0.30, p < 0.0001) after adjusting for autocorrelation and controlling with a neighboring town, Palmira, This study highlights the importance of street catch basins as Aedes breeding sites and suggests that their targeted control could help to decrease dengue transmission in such areas. PMID

  8. Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles as a novel control tool against dengue virus (DEN-2) and its primary vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Sujitha, Vasu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Paulpandi, Manickam; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Suresh, Udaiyan; Roni, Mathath; Nicoletti, Marcello; Higuchi, Akon; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Dinesh, Devakumar; Vadivalagan, Chithravel; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Barnard, Donald R; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Dengue is an arthropod-borne viral infection mainly vectored through the bite of Aedes mosquitoes. Recently, its transmission has strongly increased in urban and semi-urban areas of tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide, becoming a major international public health concern. There is no specific treatment for dengue. Its prevention and control solely depends on effective vector control measures. In this study, we proposed the green-synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) as a novel and effective tool against the dengue serotype DEN-2 and its major vector Aedes aegypti. AgNP were synthesized using the Moringa oleifera seed extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. AgNP were characterized using a variety of biophysical methods including UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and sorted for size categories. AgNP showed in vitro antiviral activity against DEN-2 infecting vero cells. Viral titer was 7 log10 TCID50/ml in control (AgNP-free), while it dropped to 3.2 log10 TCID50/ml after a single treatment with 20 μl/ml of AgNP. After 6 h, DEN-2 yield was 5.8 log10 PFU/ml in the control, while it was 1.4 log10 PFU/ml post-treatment with AgNP (20 μl/ml). AgNP were highly effective against the dengue vector A. aegypti, with LC50 values ranging from 10.24 ppm (I instar larvae) to 21.17 ppm (pupae). Overall, this research highlighted the concrete potential of green-synthesized AgNP in the fight against dengue and its primary vector A. aegypti. Further research on structure-activity relationships of AgNP against other dengue serotypes is urgently required.

  9. Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles as a novel control tool against dengue virus (DEN-2) and its primary vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Sujitha, Vasu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Paulpandi, Manickam; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Suresh, Udaiyan; Roni, Mathath; Nicoletti, Marcello; Higuchi, Akon; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Dinesh, Devakumar; Vadivalagan, Chithravel; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Barnard, Donald R; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Dengue is an arthropod-borne viral infection mainly vectored through the bite of Aedes mosquitoes. Recently, its transmission has strongly increased in urban and semi-urban areas of tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide, becoming a major international public health concern. There is no specific treatment for dengue. Its prevention and control solely depends on effective vector control measures. In this study, we proposed the green-synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) as a novel and effective tool against the dengue serotype DEN-2 and its major vector Aedes aegypti. AgNP were synthesized using the Moringa oleifera seed extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. AgNP were characterized using a variety of biophysical methods including UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and sorted for size categories. AgNP showed in vitro antiviral activity against DEN-2 infecting vero cells. Viral titer was 7 log10 TCID50/ml in control (AgNP-free), while it dropped to 3.2 log10 TCID50/ml after a single treatment with 20 μl/ml of AgNP. After 6 h, DEN-2 yield was 5.8 log10 PFU/ml in the control, while it was 1.4 log10 PFU/ml post-treatment with AgNP (20 μl/ml). AgNP were highly effective against the dengue vector A. aegypti, with LC50 values ranging from 10.24 ppm (I instar larvae) to 21.17 ppm (pupae). Overall, this research highlighted the concrete potential of green-synthesized AgNP in the fight against dengue and its primary vector A. aegypti. Further research on structure-activity relationships of AgNP against other dengue serotypes is urgently required. PMID:26063530

  10. Clinically Profiling Pediatric Patients with Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingham, Mahalaskhmy; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of dengue fever in children at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: All children (0-12 years of age) diagnosed and confirmed as dengue fever from August 2012 to January 2015 were reviewed retrospectively from hospital case records as per the revised World Health Organization guidelines for dengue fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen-based ELISA test or dengue serology for IgM and IgG antibodies, and the data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. After collecting the data, all the variables were summarized by descriptive statistics. Results: Among the 261 confirmed cases of dengue fever non-severe and severe dengue infection was seen in 60.9% and 39.1%, respectively. The mean age (standard deviation) of the presentation was 6.9 + 3.3 years and male: female ratio was 1.2:1. The most common clinical manifestations were fever (94.6%), conjunctival congestion (89.6%), myalgia (81.9%), coryza (79.7%), headache (75.1%), palmar erythema (62.8%), and retro-orbital pain (51.3%). The common early warning signs at the time of admission were persistent vomiting (75.1%), liver enlargement (59.8%), cold and clammy extremities (45.2%), pain abdomen (31.0%), hypotension (29.5%), restlessness (26.4%), giddiness (23.0%), bleeding (19.9%), and oliguria (18.4%). The common manifestation of severe dengue infection was shock (39.1%), bleeding (19.9%), and multi-organ dysfunction (2.3%). The most common complications were liver dysfunction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, encephalopathy, pleural effusion, ascites, myocarditis, myositis, acute kidney injury, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Platelet count did not always correlate well with the severity of bleeding. There were six deaths (2.3%) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6%). The common causes for poor outcome were multiorgan failure, encephalopathy, and fluid refractory shock

  11. Clinically Profiling Pediatric Patients with Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingham, Mahalaskhmy; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of dengue fever in children at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: All children (0-12 years of age) diagnosed and confirmed as dengue fever from August 2012 to January 2015 were reviewed retrospectively from hospital case records as per the revised World Health Organization guidelines for dengue fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen-based ELISA test or dengue serology for IgM and IgG antibodies, and the data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. After collecting the data, all the variables were summarized by descriptive statistics. Results: Among the 261 confirmed cases of dengue fever non-severe and severe dengue infection was seen in 60.9% and 39.1%, respectively. The mean age (standard deviation) of the presentation was 6.9 + 3.3 years and male: female ratio was 1.2:1. The most common clinical manifestations were fever (94.6%), conjunctival congestion (89.6%), myalgia (81.9%), coryza (79.7%), headache (75.1%), palmar erythema (62.8%), and retro-orbital pain (51.3%). The common early warning signs at the time of admission were persistent vomiting (75.1%), liver enlargement (59.8%), cold and clammy extremities (45.2%), pain abdomen (31.0%), hypotension (29.5%), restlessness (26.4%), giddiness (23.0%), bleeding (19.9%), and oliguria (18.4%). The common manifestation of severe dengue infection was shock (39.1%), bleeding (19.9%), and multi-organ dysfunction (2.3%). The most common complications were liver dysfunction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, encephalopathy, pleural effusion, ascites, myocarditis, myositis, acute kidney injury, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Platelet count did not always correlate well with the severity of bleeding. There were six deaths (2.3%) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6%). The common causes for poor outcome were multiorgan failure, encephalopathy, and fluid refractory shock

  12. The enzyme 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase as potential target for 1,2,4-oxadiazoles with larvicide activity against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vanessa S; Pimenteira, Cecília; da Silva-Alves, Diana C B; Leal, Laylla L L; Neves-Filho, Ricardo A W; Navarro, Daniela M A F; Santos, Geanne K N; Dutra, Kamilla A; dos Anjos, Janaína V; Soares, Thereza A

    2013-11-15

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the vector agent responsible for the transmission of yellow fever and dengue fever viruses to over 80 million people in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Exhaustive efforts have lead to a vaccine candidate with only 30% effectiveness against the dengue virus and failure to protect patients against the serotype 2. Hence, vector control remains the most viable route to dengue fever control programs. We have synthesized a class of 1,2,4-oxadiazole derivatives whose most biologically active compounds exhibit potent activity against Aedes aegypti larvae (ca. of 15 ppm) and low toxicity in mammals. Exposure to these larvicides results in larvae pigmentation in a manner correlated with the LC50 measurements. Structural comparisons of the 1,2,4-oxadiazole nucleus against known inhibitors of insect enzymes allowed the identification of 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase as a potential target for these synthetic larvicides. Molecular docking calculations indicate that 1,2,4-oxadiazole compounds can bind to 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase with similar conformation and binding energies as its crystallographic inhibitor 4-(2-aminophenyl)-4-oxobutanoic acid.

  13. Behavior of Settling Marine Larvae in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J.; Koehl, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many bottom-dwelling marine animals produce microscopic larvae that are dispersed by ambient water currents. These larvae can only recruit to habitats on which they have landed if they can resist being washed away by ambient water flow. We found that larvae on marine surfaces do not experience steady water flow, but rather are exposed to brief pulses of water movement as turbulent eddies sweep across them. We made video recordings of larvae of the tube worm, Hydroides elegans, (important members of the community of organisms growing on docks and ships) on surfaces subjected to measured realistic flow pulses to study factors that might affect their dislodgement from surfaces in nature. We found that the response of a larva of H. elegans to a realistic pulse of water flow depended on its behavior at the time of the pulse and on its recent history of exposure to flow pulses, and that stationary larvae were less likely than locomoting larvae to be blown away when hit by the first pulse of water flow.; ;

  14. Directional flow sensing by passively stable larvae.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Christman, Adam J; Gerbi, Gregory P; Hunter, Elias J; Diez, F Javier

    2015-09-01

    Mollusk larvae have a stable, velum-up orientation that may influence how they sense and react to hydrodynamic signals applied in different directions. Directional sensing abilities and responses could affect how a larva interacts with anisotropic fluid motions, including those in feeding currents and in boundary layers encountered during settlement. Oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) were exposed to simple shear in a Couette device and to solid-body rotation in a single rotating cylinder. Both devices were operated in two different orientations, one with the axis of rotation parallel to the gravity vector, and one with the axis perpendicular. Larvae and flow were observed simultaneously with near-infrared particle-image velocimetry, and behavior was quantified as a response to strain rate, vorticity and centripetal acceleration. Only flows rotating about a horizontal axis elicited the diving response observed previously for oyster larvae in turbulence. The results provide strong evidence that the turbulence-sensing mechanism relies on gravity-detecting organs (statocysts) rather than mechanosensors (cilia). Flow sensing with statocysts sets oyster larvae apart from zooplankters such as copepods and protists that use external mechanosensors in sensing spatial velocity gradients generated by prey or predators. Sensing flow-induced changes in orientation, rather than flow deformation, would enable more efficient control of vertical movements. Statocysts provide larvae with a mechanism of maintaining their upward swimming when rotated by vortices and initiating dives toward the seabed in response to the strong turbulence associated with adult habitats. PMID:26333930

  15. Directional flow sensing by passively stable larvae.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Christman, Adam J; Gerbi, Gregory P; Hunter, Elias J; Diez, F Javier

    2015-09-01

    Mollusk larvae have a stable, velum-up orientation that may influence how they sense and react to hydrodynamic signals applied in different directions. Directional sensing abilities and responses could affect how a larva interacts with anisotropic fluid motions, including those in feeding currents and in boundary layers encountered during settlement. Oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) were exposed to simple shear in a Couette device and to solid-body rotation in a single rotating cylinder. Both devices were operated in two different orientations, one with the axis of rotation parallel to the gravity vector, and one with the axis perpendicular. Larvae and flow were observed simultaneously with near-infrared particle-image velocimetry, and behavior was quantified as a response to strain rate, vorticity and centripetal acceleration. Only flows rotating about a horizontal axis elicited the diving response observed previously for oyster larvae in turbulence. The results provide strong evidence that the turbulence-sensing mechanism relies on gravity-detecting organs (statocysts) rather than mechanosensors (cilia). Flow sensing with statocysts sets oyster larvae apart from zooplankters such as copepods and protists that use external mechanosensors in sensing spatial velocity gradients generated by prey or predators. Sensing flow-induced changes in orientation, rather than flow deformation, would enable more efficient control of vertical movements. Statocysts provide larvae with a mechanism of maintaining their upward swimming when rotated by vortices and initiating dives toward the seabed in response to the strong turbulence associated with adult habitats.

  16. Current perspectives on dengue episode in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ee Leen; Loh, Hwei-San

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of dengue transmission has been alarmed by an estimate of 390 million infections per annum. Urban encroachment, ecological disruption and poor sanitation are all contributory factors of increased epidemiology. Complication however arises from the fact that dengue virus inherently exists as four different serotypes. Secondary infection is often manifested in the more severe form, such that antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) could aggravate ailment by allowing pre-existing antibodies to form complexes with infecting viruses as means of intrusion. Consequently, increased viraemic titter and suppression of antiviral response are observed. Deep concerns are thus expressed in regards to escalating trend of hospitalisation and mortality rates. In Malaysia, situation is exacerbated by improper clinical management and pending vector control operations. As a preparedness strategy against the potential deadly dengue pandemic, the call for development of a durable and cost-effective dengue vaccine against all infecting serotypes is intensified. Even though several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, uncertainties in regards to serotypes interference, incomplete protection and dose adequacy have been raised. Instead of sole reliance on outsourcing, production of local vaccine should be considered in coherent to government's efforts to combat against dengue. PMID:27086160

  17. Dengue vaccines: Are they safe for travelers?

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Aguiar, Maira

    2016-01-01

    The four dengue viruses (DENV) circulate among nearly one-half of the world's population in tropical and semitropical countries imposing a huge morbidity burden on travelers. Sanofipasteur has developed a tetravalent live-attenuated vaccine, Dengvaxia, recently approved by the World Health Organization and licensed in four dengue-endemic countries. An additional two dengue vaccines, developed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), USA and Takeda, are entering phase III testing. Dengvaxia is composed of four yellow fever 17D-DENV chimeras, the NIAID vaccine contains three mutagenized DENV and one DENV2/4 chimera while the Takeda vaccine contains an attenuated DENV 2 and three DENV 2-DENV chimeras. Which of these vaccines might be useful in protecting travelers against dengue infections and disease? Dengvaxia requires three doses administered over the course of one year but in addition has safety signals suggesting that susceptible individuals should not be vaccinated. The NIAID vaccine is promising as a travel vaccine as a single dose fully protected susceptible adults against live dengue 2 virus challenge. The protective efficacy and safety of the Takeda vaccine remain to be demonstrated. PMID:27343438

  18. Control of dengue vectors in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wang, N C

    1994-12-01

    Singapore has a well-established system for the surveillance, research and control of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Control of these vectors comes under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Public Health Division of the Ministry of the Environment. The strategy for Aedes control is an integrated approach incorporating case detection, source reduction, health education and law enforcement. This is done through the Quarantine & Epidemiology Department (dengue surveillance and research), Vector Control & Research Department (Aedes surveillance, control and research), Environmental Health Department (environmental sanitation and hygiene) and Public Education Department (health education on dengue prevention and control). Despite its success in reducing the Aedes population to a house index of around 1%, the incidence of dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever has increased sharply during the last 5 years. The Ministry realises that the dengue problem can only be tackled on a regional basis and it is with this objective in mind that the Institute of Environmental Epidemiology has been formed to collaborate with other international agencies in operational research and training projects.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C J; Kuo, C H; Chen, P C; Changcheng, C S

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six virologically and serologically confirmed Dengue patients with signs of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (13.1%) were studied during the 1987 outbreak in southern Taiwan. Within a 1-yr period from 1987 to 1988 in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, there were 198 patients with Dengue fever confirmed. Viral isolation and serological studies indicated that type I Dengue was the cause. There was no evidence of sequential secondary infection among them. The 26 patients were evaluated gastroduodenoscopically. Most of the Dengue patients who developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding had gastric ulcers or duodenal ulcers; superficial and hemorrhagic gastritis are the other relevant endoscopic findings. Thirteen patients (50%) had a past history of peptic ulcer symptoms, whereas the other 13 did not. Dengue infection is a precipitating factor in inducing peptic ulcer bleeding because of hemostatic derangements. Supportive therapy and blood transfusions alone were adequate treatment, except for one patient who required surgery due to massive bleeding of a duodenal ulcer. No mortality was observed in this study.

  20. [Clinical observations of dengue fever among children].

    PubMed

    Hwang, K P; Su, S C; Chiang, C H

    1989-01-01

    From November 1987 to October 1988, seventy-seven cases diagnosed as dengue fever and confirmed by viral culture or serological examination in the Pediatric Department of Kaohsiung Medical College Hospital were studied. In nearly two thirds (64.9%) of the total cases, the ages were between 10 and 14 years old. No significant sexual difference could be found in this study. Two peaks of cases distribution occurred at November 1987 and October 1988. The major clinical manifestations of Dengue Fever were fever, headache, skin rash and cough. Nearly half of the total cases had nausea, vomiting, myalgia and skin itching. 29 cases (37.7%) had hemorrhagic complications during the course of disease. The most common features of hemorrhage was petechiae followed by epistaxis. Two cases were confirmed as hemorrhagic dengue fever and one was also dengue shock syndrome. Most (92.5%) of the cases had body temperatures over 38.5 degrees C at the onset of the disease. The mean duration of fever was 5.9 days. No fatality was found. It is concluded that eradication of vectors in the school environment might be one of the major points of disease control according to the age distribution of this study. The appearance of hemorrhagic dengue fever is a major problem and should be closely followed by clinicians and workers of public health in Taiwan.

  1. Autoimmune pathogenesis in dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) caused by dengue virus (DV) infection remain unresolved. Patients with DHF/DSS are characterized by several manifestations, including severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hepatomegaly. In addition to the effect of virus load and virus variation, abnormal immune responses of the host after DV infection may also account for the progression of DHF/DSS. Actually, viral autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, human hepatitis C virus, human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and DV. In this review, we discuss the implications of autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. Antibodies directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) showed cross-reactivity with human platelets and endothelial cells, which lead to platelet and endothelial cell damage and inflammatory activation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that anti-DV NS1 is involved in the pathogenesis of DF and DHF/DSS, and this may provide important information in dengue vaccine development.

  2. Understanding the relative importance of global dengue risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted viral infection of major international public health concern. Global environmental and socio-economic change has created ideal conditions for the global expansion of dengue transmission. Innovative modelling tools help in understanding the global determinants of dengue risk and the relative impact of environmental and socio-economic factors on dengue transmission and spread. While climatic factors may act as a limiting factor on the global scale, other processes may play a dominant role at the local level. Understanding the spatial scales at which environmental and socio-economic factors dominate can help to target appropriate dengue control and prevention strategies. PMID:26311416

  3. [Dengue fever. Another infectious disease out of control?].

    PubMed

    Jensenius, M; Gundersen, S G

    1997-11-30

    In the 1950s dengue fever left its home in South-East Asia. The result, as we see it 40 years later, is terrifying. From being an almost unknown infection, dengue fever is today's most common arboviral disease with up to 100 million cases annually. In addition, the clinical picture has changed from a benign influenza-like disorder (classic dengue fever) to a serious disease with bleeding and hypovolemic shock (dengue hemorrhagic fever). In this article the authors give an overview of the present epidemiology, prognosis and possible preventive measures against dengue fever.

  4. Dengue in Spanish travelers returning from the tropics.

    PubMed

    López-Vélez, R; Pérez-Casas, C; Vorndam, A V; Rigau, J

    1996-10-01

    Dengue is seldom recognized as an imported disease in Europe. A prospective clinical study was carried out in 37 travelers suspected to have dengue infection on their return from dengue-endemic areas. Anti-dengue antibodies were found in 24 of 37 patients (14 recent infections and 10 undetermined). The most common features among the recent infections were fever (100%), thrombocytopenia (61.5%), abnormal liver function tests (61.5%), and rash (53.8%). In one case, denguehemorrhagic fever grade III was confirmed and later followed by depression and suicide of the patient. The possibility of local transmission of dengue in Spain is discussed.

  5. Gravitraps for management of dengue clusters in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caleb; Vythilingam, Indra; Chong, Chee-Seng; Abdul Razak, Muhammad Aliff; Tan, Cheong-Huat; Liew, Christina; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2013-05-01

    Although Singapore has an intensive dengue control program, dengue remains endemic with regular outbreaks. We report development and use of a novel adult oviposition trap, the Gravitrap, in managing dengue cluster areas. The Gravitrap is a simple, hay infusion-filled cylindrical trap with a sticky inner surface to serve as an oviposition site for gravid female Aedes mosquitoes. Wire gauze fitted above the water level minimizes the risk of it being an unwanted breeding habitat. The Gravitrap was deployed in 11 dengue cluster areas throughout Singapore. Aedes aegypti was the predominant mosquito caught in the trap and some (5.73%) were found to be positive for dengue virus.

  6. Understanding the relative importance of global dengue risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted viral infection of major international public health concern. Global environmental and socio-economic change has created ideal conditions for the global expansion of dengue transmission. Innovative modelling tools help in understanding the global determinants of dengue risk and the relative impact of environmental and socio-economic factors on dengue transmission and spread. While climatic factors may act as a limiting factor on the global scale, other processes may play a dominant role at the local level. Understanding the spatial scales at which environmental and socio-economic factors dominate can help to target appropriate dengue control and prevention strategies.

  7. 78 FR 43219 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Live Attenuated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... et al., ``Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating Dengue Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses... Antigenic Chimeric Dengue Viruses 1,2,3, And 4'', United States Patent Application Number 10/970,640 (now...., ``Mutations which enhance the replication of dengue virus type 4 and an antigenic chimeric dengue virus...

  8. 75 FR 6211 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses''-- European Patent Application Number 02739358.6, filed May 22, 2002... Deletion in the 3'-UTR of Dengue Types 1,2,3, and 4, or Antigenic Chimeric Dengue Viruses 1,2,3, and 4... which enhance the replication of dengue virus type 4 and an antigenic chimeric dengue virus type...

  9. Emergence of epidemic dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever as a public health problem in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J; Trent, D W

    1993-12-01

    The incidence of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever has increased dramatically in the past 15 years in most urban centers of the tropics. Coincident with this increase has been the emergence of epidemic dengue hemorrhagic fever in the American region. The current changing disease pattern in the Americas is very similar to that which occurred in southeast Asia 30 years ago. The similarities in the evolution of severe disease in the two regions and the possible reasons for the changing disease pattern are discussed.

  10. Best Practices in Dengue Surveillance: A Report from the Asia-Pacific and Americas Dengue Prevention Boards

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Mark E.; Stone, Amy; Fitzsimons, David W.; Hanna, Jeffrey N.; Lam, Sai Kit; Vong, Sirenda; Guzman, Maria G.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Halstead, Scott B.; Letson, G. William; Kuritsky, Joel; Mahoney, Richard; Margolis, Harold S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is a virus infection that is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito and can cause severe disease especially in children. Dengue fever is a major problem in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Methodology/Principal Findings We invited dengue experts from around the world to attend meetings to discuss dengue surveillance. We reviewed literature, heard detailed reports on surveillance programs, and shared expert opinions. Results Presentations by 22 countries were heard during the 2.5 day meetings. We describe the best methods of surveillance in general, the stakeholders in dengue surveillance, and the steps from mosquito bite to reporting of a dengue case to explore how best to carry out dengue surveillance. We also provide details and a comparison of the dengue surveillance programs by the presenting countries. Conclusions/Significance The experts provided recommendations for achieving the best possible data from dengue surveillance accepting the realities of the real world (e.g., limited funding and staff). Their recommendations included: (1) Every dengue endemic country should make reporting of dengue cases to the government mandatory; (2) electronic reporting systems should be developed and used; (3) at minimum dengue surveillance data should include incidence, hospitalization rates, deaths by age group; (4) additional studies should be completed to check the sensitivity of the system; (5) laboratories should share expertise and data; (6) tests that identify dengue virus should be used in patients with fever for four days or less and antibody tests should be used after day 4 to diagnose dengue; and (7) early detection and prediction of dengue outbreaks should be goals for national surveillance systems. PMID:21103381

  11. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  12. [Virology diagnosis of re-emergent infections: dengue virus].

    PubMed

    Vilibić-Cavlek, Tatjana; Ljubin-Sternak, Suncanica; Babić-Erceg, Andrea; Sviben, Mario; Mlinarić-Galinović, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is acute viral disease transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti, Ae. albopictus). Dengue virus belongs to the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus. There are four dengue virus serotypes (1-4) which are maintained endemically. The disease is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas between latitudes 35 degrees N and 35 degrees S. Infections may be asymptomatic or may produce a wide spectrum of diseases: non-specific febrile illness, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. For the first time in Croatia, Ae. albopictus was registered in Zagreb in October 2004. In autumn 2005, additional records of Ae. albopictus presence were made in many places along the Adriatic coast. During 2007, two cases of imported dengue fever were reported in Croatia, after which similar imported cases appeared continually. In August 2010, the first autochthonous case of dengue fever was recorded on the peninsula Peljesac. Though Croatia is not endemic for dengue, the existence of a corresponding vector and a latent threat by imported dengue cases demand state-of-the-art and timely diagnostics. The most commonly used methods in laboratory diagnosis of dengue infections involve detection of viral RNA, antigen detection and serologic methods (detection of antibodies).

  13. Current perspectives on the spread of dengue in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ekta; Ballani, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ~50 million dengue infections and ~500,000 individuals are hospitalized with DHF, mainly in Southeast Asia. Dengue in India has dramatically expanded over the last few decades, with rapidly changing epidemiology. The first major DHF outbreak in the entire nation occurred in 1996 by dengue virus serotype 2, and after a gap of almost a decade, the country faced yet another DF outbreak in the year 2003 by dengue virus serotype 3. A dramatic increase in the number and frequency of outbreaks followed, and, at present, in most of the states of India, dengue is almost endemic. At present, all the four serotypes are seen in circulation, but the predominant serotype keeps changing. Despite this trend, surveillance, reporting, and diagnosis of dengue remain largely passive in India. More active community-based epidemiological studies with intensive vector control and initiatives for dengue vaccine development should be geared up to control the spread of dengue in India. We review here the factors that may have contributed to the changing epidemiology of dengue in India.

  14. Metarhizium brunneum Blastospore Pathogenesis in Aedes aegypti Larvae: Attack on Several Fronts Accelerates Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alkhaibari, Abeer M.; Carolino, Aline T.; Yavasoglu, Sare I.; Maffeis, Thierry; Mattoso, Thalles C.; Bull, James C.; Samuels, Richard I.; Butt, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the vector of a wide range of diseases (e.g. yellow fever, dengue, Chikungunya and Zika) which impact on over half the world’s population. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana have been found to be highly efficacious in killing mosquito larvae but only now are the underlying mechanisms for pathogenesis being elucidated. Recently it was shown that conidia of M. anisopliae caused stress induced mortality in Ae. aegypti larvae, a different mode of pathogenicity to that normally seen in terrestrial hosts. Blastospores constitute a different form of inoculum produced by this fungus when cultured in liquid media and although blastospores are generally considered to be more virulent than conidia no evidence has been presented to explain why. In our study, using a range of biochemical, molecular and microscopy methods, the infection process of Metarhizium brunneum (formerly M. anisopliae) ARSEF 4556 blastospores was investigated. It appears that the blastospores, unlike conidia, readily adhere to and penetrate mosquito larval cuticle. The blastospores are readily ingested by the larvae but unlike the conidia are able infect the insect through the gut and rapidly invade the haemocoel. The fact that pathogenicity related genes were upregulated in blastospores exposed to larvae prior to invasion, suggests the fungus was detecting host derived cues. Similarly, immune and defence genes were upregulated in the host prior to infection suggesting mosquitoes were also able to detect pathogen-derived cues. The hydrophilic blastospores produce copious mucilage, which probably facilitates adhesion to the host but do not appear to depend on production of Pr1, a cuticle degrading subtilisin protease, for penetration since protease inhibitors did not significantly alter blastospore virulence. The fact the blastospores have multiple routes of entry (cuticle and gut) may explain why this form of the inoculum killed Ae. aegypti

  15. Metarhizium brunneum Blastospore Pathogenesis in Aedes aegypti Larvae: Attack on Several Fronts Accelerates Mortality.

    PubMed

    Alkhaibari, Abeer M; Carolino, Aline T; Yavasoglu, Sare I; Maffeis, Thierry; Mattoso, Thalles C; Bull, James C; Samuels, Richard I; Butt, Tariq M

    2016-07-01

    Aedes aegypti is the vector of a wide range of diseases (e.g. yellow fever, dengue, Chikungunya and Zika) which impact on over half the world's population. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana have been found to be highly efficacious in killing mosquito larvae but only now are the underlying mechanisms for pathogenesis being elucidated. Recently it was shown that conidia of M. anisopliae caused stress induced mortality in Ae. aegypti larvae, a different mode of pathogenicity to that normally seen in terrestrial hosts. Blastospores constitute a different form of inoculum produced by this fungus when cultured in liquid media and although blastospores are generally considered to be more virulent than conidia no evidence has been presented to explain why. In our study, using a range of biochemical, molecular and microscopy methods, the infection process of Metarhizium brunneum (formerly M. anisopliae) ARSEF 4556 blastospores was investigated. It appears that the blastospores, unlike conidia, readily adhere to and penetrate mosquito larval cuticle. The blastospores are readily ingested by the larvae but unlike the conidia are able infect the insect through the gut and rapidly invade the haemocoel. The fact that pathogenicity related genes were upregulated in blastospores exposed to larvae prior to invasion, suggests the fungus was detecting host derived cues. Similarly, immune and defence genes were upregulated in the host prior to infection suggesting mosquitoes were also able to detect pathogen-derived cues. The hydrophilic blastospores produce copious mucilage, which probably facilitates adhesion to the host but do not appear to depend on production of Pr1, a cuticle degrading subtilisin protease, for penetration since protease inhibitors did not significantly alter blastospore virulence. The fact the blastospores have multiple routes of entry (cuticle and gut) may explain why this form of the inoculum killed Ae. aegypti larvae

  16. Metarhizium brunneum Blastospore Pathogenesis in Aedes aegypti Larvae: Attack on Several Fronts Accelerates Mortality.

    PubMed

    Alkhaibari, Abeer M; Carolino, Aline T; Yavasoglu, Sare I; Maffeis, Thierry; Mattoso, Thalles C; Bull, James C; Samuels, Richard I; Butt, Tariq M

    2016-07-01

    Aedes aegypti is the vector of a wide range of diseases (e.g. yellow fever, dengue, Chikungunya and Zika) which impact on over half the world's population. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana have been found to be highly efficacious in killing mosquito larvae but only now are the underlying mechanisms for pathogenesis being elucidated. Recently it was shown that conidia of M. anisopliae caused stress induced mortality in Ae. aegypti larvae, a different mode of pathogenicity to that normally seen in terrestrial hosts. Blastospores constitute a different form of inoculum produced by this fungus when cultured in liquid media and although blastospores are generally considered to be more virulent than conidia no evidence has been presented to explain why. In our study, using a range of biochemical, molecular and microscopy methods, the infection process of Metarhizium brunneum (formerly M. anisopliae) ARSEF 4556 blastospores was investigated. It appears that the blastospores, unlike conidia, readily adhere to and penetrate mosquito larval cuticle. The blastospores are readily ingested by the larvae but unlike the conidia are able infect the insect through the gut and rapidly invade the haemocoel. The fact that pathogenicity related genes were upregulated in blastospores exposed to larvae prior to invasion, suggests the fungus was detecting host derived cues. Similarly, immune and defence genes were upregulated in the host prior to infection suggesting mosquitoes were also able to detect pathogen-derived cues. The hydrophilic blastospores produce copious mucilage, which probably facilitates adhesion to the host but do not appear to depend on production of Pr1, a cuticle degrading subtilisin protease, for penetration since protease inhibitors did not significantly alter blastospore virulence. The fact the blastospores have multiple routes of entry (cuticle and gut) may explain why this form of the inoculum killed Ae. aegypti larvae

  17. Clinical and Oral Implications of Dengue Fever: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Roopashri, G; Vaishali, M R; David, Maria Priscilla; Baig, Muqeet; Navneetham, Anuradha; Venkataraghavan, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a viral infection with fatal potential complications. It is also called as break-bone fever. Worldwide dengue infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease. It is caused by vector Aedesa egypti and represents a major public health issue in more than 100 tropical countries. The word dengue is obtained from Swahili phrase Ka-dinga pepo meaning “cramplikeseizure.” Dengue viral infections are characterized by abrupt febrile illness, but can also lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, it requires an early and correct diagnosis. Gingival bleeding is the most common oral manifestation of dengue infection. Although oral lesions are uncommon in dengue infections and if manifested, may be mistaken for bleeding disorders. This review emphasizes the significance of oral lesions as it may be the early indicators of dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25859113

  18. Diagnosis of Dengue Infection Using Conventional and Biosensor Based Techniques.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim

    2015-10-19

    Dengue is an arthropod-borne viral disease caused by four antigenically different serotypes of dengue virus. This disease is considered as a major public health concern around the world. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine or antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of dengue disease. Moreover, clinical features of dengue are indistinguishable from other infectious diseases such as malaria, chikungunya, rickettsia and leptospira. Therefore, prompt and accurate laboratory diagnostic test is urgently required for disease confirmation and patient triage. The traditional diagnostic techniques for the dengue virus are viral detection in cell culture, serological testing, and RNA amplification using reverse transcriptase PCR. This paper discusses the conventional laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of dengue during the acute and convalescent phase and highlights the advantages and limitations of these routine laboratory tests. Subsequently, the biosensor based assays developed using various transducers for the detection of dengue are also reviewed.

  19. Dendritic Cell Apoptosis and the Pathogenesis of Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Sharon de T.; Silveira, Guilherme F.; Alves, Lysangela R.; dos Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte; Bordignon, Juliano

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses and other members of the Flaviviridae family are emerging human pathogens. Dengue is transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti female mosquitoes. Following infection through the bite, cells of the hematopoietic lineage, like dendritic cells, are the first targets of dengue virus infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen presenting cells, sensing pathogens, processing and presenting the antigens to T lymphocytes, and triggering an adaptive immune response. Infection of DCs by dengue virus may induce apoptosis, impairing their ability to present antigens to T cells, and thereby contributing to dengue pathogenesis. This review focuses on general mechanisms by which dengue virus triggers apoptosis, and possible influence of DC-apoptosis on dengue disease severity. PMID:23202502

  20. Dengue: the risk to developed and developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T P

    1994-01-01

    Dengue viruses are members of the Flaviviridae, transmitted principally in a cycle involving humans and mosquito vectors. In the last 20 years the incidence of dengue fever epidemics has increased and hyperendemic transmission has been established over a geographically expanding area. A severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), is an immunopathologic disease occurring in persons who experience sequential dengue infections. The risk of sequential infections, and consequently the incidence of DHF, has risen dramatically, first in Asia and now in the Americas. At the root of the emergence of dengue as a major health problem are changes in human demography and behavior, leading to unchecked populations of and increased exposure to the principal domestic mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Virus-specified factors also influence the epidemiology of dengue. Speculations on future events in the epidemiology, evolution, and biological expression of dengue are presented. Images PMID:8146129

  1. Diagnosis of Dengue Infection Using Conventional and Biosensor Based Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Om; Hanim Shueb, Rafidah

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an arthropod-borne viral disease caused by four antigenically different serotypes of dengue virus. This disease is considered as a major public health concern around the world. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine or antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of dengue disease. Moreover, clinical features of dengue are indistinguishable from other infectious diseases such as malaria, chikungunya, rickettsia and leptospira. Therefore, prompt and accurate laboratory diagnostic test is urgently required for disease confirmation and patient triage. The traditional diagnostic techniques for the dengue virus are viral detection in cell culture, serological testing, and RNA amplification using reverse transcriptase PCR. This paper discusses the conventional laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of dengue during the acute and convalescent phase and highlights the advantages and limitations of these routine laboratory tests. Subsequently, the biosensor based assays developed using various transducers for the detection of dengue are also reviewed. PMID:26492265

  2. Dengue vaccine: a valuable asset for the future.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; S K, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way. PMID:25424928

  3. Dengue: the risk to developed and developing countries.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P

    1994-03-29

    Dengue viruses are members of the Flaviviridae, transmitted principally in a cycle involving humans and mosquito vectors. In the last 20 years the incidence of dengue fever epidemics has increased and hyperendemic transmission has been established over a geographically expanding area. A severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), is an immunopathologic disease occurring in persons who experience sequential dengue infections. The risk of sequential infections, and consequently the incidence of DHF, has risen dramatically, first in Asia and now in the Americas. At the root of the emergence of dengue as a major health problem are changes in human demography and behavior, leading to unchecked populations of and increased exposure to the principal domestic mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Virus-specified factors also influence the epidemiology of dengue. Speculations on future events in the epidemiology, evolution, and biological expression of dengue are presented.

  4. [Dengue in Mexico: an analysis of two decades].

    PubMed

    Torres-Galicia, Ivonne; Cortés-Poza, David; Becker, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is one of the main vector-borne diseases and has become a severe Public Health problem during the last decade, both in Mexico and worldwide. This report analyses two decades (1990-2011) of dengue in Mexico, based on reports published by the Ministry of Health. The data show that although the incidence rate of dengue in Mexico has remained constant throughout the last two decades, the incidence rate for dengue hemorrhagic fever has increased importantly since 2002 (20% of cases). Additionally, during the last decade, the increase in the incidence rate of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever has shifted towards a younger population and the disease outbreaks showed a longer duration throughout the year. We conclude that dengue is showing a changing pattern and the factors involved remain to be analyzed.

  5. Dengue/DHF: an emerging disease in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S N; Raina, V K; Kumar, A

    2000-09-01

    Dengue/DHF is an emergent disease in India and some parts of country are endemic and periodically contributing annual outbreaks of dengue/DHF. Dengue infection manifests as undifferentiated fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) which leads to hospitalization large number of people in a localized area. There is high mortality and morbidity associated with the onset of each dengue outbreak leading to great socio-economic impact. The prevention and control of dengue outbreak depends upon the proper monitoring of the disease case through disease surveillance so as to ensure timely management of cases. Vector surveillance helps in the proper and timely implementation of emergency control measures against dengue vector i.e. Aedes aegypti. There is an urgent need for an effective diagnostic strategy for early diagnosis to shorten the illness duration, hospitalization time and the associated complications.

  6. Dengue vaccine: a valuable asset for the future.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; S K, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way.

  7. Unusual neurologic manifestations occurring during dengue fever infection.

    PubMed

    Patey, O; Ollivaud, L; Breuil, J; Lafaix, C

    1993-06-01

    This is a report on dengue fever in two young patients in France that were infected in New Caledonia and Thailand. Both presented with unusual neurologic manifestations. The first patient developed a focal subarachnoid hemorrhage that was associated with transient thrombocytopenia. No neurologic vascular malformation was detected; a mild dengue hemorrhagic fever after a previous dengue infection was suspected. The second patient showed peripheral facial palsy one week after apyrexia without any other etiology except the dengue infection. This case was probably a postinfectious syndrome associated with dengue virus. Both patients recovered spontaneously. The circumstances of the neurologic manifestations in these patients may be attributed to the dengue fever virus. However, although neurologic complications reported for dengue fever are unusual, it is reasonable to consider these manifestations as being due to immunopathologic consequences.

  8. Implication of vaccination against dengue for Zika outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Xiao, Yanni; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus co-circulates with dengue in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Cases of co-infection by dengue and Zika have been reported, the implication of this co-infection for an integrated intervention program for controlling both dengue and Zika must be addressed urgently. Here, we formulate a mathematical model to describe the transmission dynamics of co-infection of dengue and Zika with particular focus on the effects of Zika outbreak by vaccination against dengue among human hosts. Our analysis determines specific conditions under which vaccination against dengue can significantly increase the Zika outbreak peak, and speed up the Zika outbreak peak timing. Our results call for further study about the co-infection to direct an integrated control to balance the benefits for dengue control and the damages of Zika outbreak. PMID:27774987

  9. Toxicological properties of several medicinal plants from the Himalayas (India) against vectors of malaria, filariasis and dengue.

    PubMed

    Alam, M F; Safhi, Mohammed M; Chopra, A K; Dua, V K

    2011-08-01

    The leaves of five plants namely Nyctanthes arbortistis (Oleaceae), Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae), Boenininghusenia albiflora (Rutaceae), Valeriana hardwickii (Valerianaceae) and Eupatorium odoratum (Asteraceae) were selected for the first time from the Garhwal region of north west Himalaya to investigation its toxicological properties against mosquito vectors of malaria, filariasis and dengue. In a laboratory study, using different polarity solvents (petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol) were tested against important larvae of malaria, filariasis and dengue vectors in India. It was observed that petroleum ether fraction of all selected plant possess good larvicidal properties than other solvent fraction. The LC(50) values of isolates from Nyctanthes arbortistis (HAR-1), C. roseus (CAT-1), B. albiflora (BOA-1), V. hardwickii (SUG-1) and E. odoratum (EUP-1) against Anopheles stephensi were 185 ppm, 150 ppm, 105 ppm, 225 ppm and 135 ppm, respectively. The results therefore suggest that the fraction code BOA-1 has excellent larvicidal properties and could be incorporated as botanical insecticides against mosquito vectors with high safety to nontarget organisms. The same fraction was tested against adult vectors of malaria, filariasis and dengue, but no mortality was observed.

  10. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity.

  11. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity. PMID:27142427

  12. Dengue surveillance in the Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Condon, R; Taleo, G; Stewart, T; Sweeney, T; Kiedrzynski, T

    2000-09-01

    Adequate monitoring of dengue activity can be achieved using a combination of mosquito vector surveillance, fever surveillance, sentinel clinicians and laboratory screening. An apparent increase in fever cases or clinically suspected DF should prompt a careful clinical and laboratory investigation. If an outbreak of dengue is confirmed, health authorities will need to implement emergency community-wide control strategies. Laboratories will quickly feel the burden of clinical monitoring of cases admitted with DHF/DSS. Surveillance can change to clinical case definitions as health workers become familiar with the presenting features of DF and DHF/DSS. Criteria for hospital referral and admission must be well understood. Routine laboratory and sentinel surveillance may resume as the epidemic wanes, and should then continue indefinitely to monitor any resurgence of dengue activity.

  13. Dengue virus evolution and virulence models.

    PubMed

    Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2007-06-01

    Dengue virus transmission has increased dramatically in the past 2 decades, making this virus one of the most important mosquito-borne human pathogens. The emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in most tropical countries has made its control a public health priority, but no vaccines or treatments exist. Little is understood about dengue virus pathogenesis, because no other animals develop symptoms of disease, and research, therefore, has been limited to studies involving patients. Although epidemiologic and evolutionary studies have pointed to host and viral factors in determining disease outcome, only recently developed models could prove the importance of viral genotypes in causing severe epidemics. The influence of host immune status and mosquito vectorial capacity are also being tested in mathematical models to determine virus population dynamics. Therefore, new technologies are allowing us to better understand how specific virus variants cause more disease than others, and these virus variants should be targeted for detection, control, and treatment.

  14. [Hemorrhagic fever and the dengue shock syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ramos, C; García, H; Villaseca, J M

    1993-01-01

    Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) are the severe and/or fatal clinical manifestations of dengue fever. Epidemics of DHF/DSS occur mainly in the southeast Asian countries where children are seriously affected and high case-fatality ratio is annually reported. Recently significant epidemics of DHF/DSS have been reported in Cuba, Venezuela and Brazil, which means that reinforcements of the epidemiological surveillance in the countries of the American region that show high virus transmission, are urgently needed. The main purpose of the present article is to review relevant information regarding the clinical manifestations, pathology, diagnostic procedures, treatment of cases, pathophysiologic mechanisms and some data related with specific DHF/DSS epidemics.

  15. Tackling dengue fever: Current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; El-Kafrawy, Sherif; Sohrab, Sayed S; Desprès, Philippe; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Azhar, Esam

    2015-01-01

    According to recent statistics, 96 million apparent dengue infections were estimated worldwide in 2010. This figure is by far greater than the WHO prediction which indicates the rapid spread of this disease posing a growing threat to the economy and a major challenge to clinicians and health care services across the globe particularly in the affected areas.This article aims at bringing to light the current epidemiological and clinical status of the dengue fever. The relationship between genetic mutations, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the pathophysiology of disease progression will be put into perspective. It will also highlight the recent advances in dengue vaccine development.Thus far, a significant progress has been made in unraveling the risk factors and understanding the molecular pathogenesis associated with the disease. However, further insights in molecular features of the disease and the development of animal models will enormously help improving the therapeutic interventions and potentially contribute to finding new preventive measures for population at risk.

  16. [Increase of entomological indices during the pre-epidemic period of dengue in Ben Tre, South Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T P Q; Luu, L L; Vu, T Q H; Buisson, Y

    2011-10-01

    Dengue has emerged in Vietnam 50 years ago and since has become endemo-epidemic throughout the whole country. Each year, major epidemics of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) hit South Vietnam during the rainy season, causing significant morbidity and mortality, especially among young children. The only preventive measure is vector control, but it is often implemented too late or indiscriminately. The aim of this study was to investigate, in the pre-epidemic stage, the existence of significant changes in vector indices, which will predict DF/DHF outbreaks. We conducted a descriptive transversal study, repeated once a month for four months (March to June) in the village of Locthuan (province Ben Tre) in the Mekong's delta. Adult mosquitoes were caught in 30 houses, and larvae were collected in water holding containers of 50 houses. The houses were randomly selected. Vector densities were calculated according to the indices recommended by WHO. Virological analysis was carried out on lots of female Aedes and larvae in order to determine viral infection rates. Catches of adult mosquitoes collected 496 specimens including 329 Aedes, 139 Culex and 28 Anopheles. Aedes aegypti was present in 63% of visited homes that is an average density of 1.8 mosquitoes per house. The increase in imaginal indices during the 4 months was not significant. The survey of breeding sites of Ae. aegypti identified 1292 water containers in which 71,569 larval specimens were collected. The values of house index, container index [CI] and Breteau index [BI] increased each month, the latter from 166 to 442. This increase was significant for CI and BI. Breeding sites were mostly intra-home, mainly consisting of large and small ceramic jars. Larval density of Ae. aegypti in the containers also increased significantly over the 4 months. It was correlated with the lack of cover and predators such as Mesocyclops spp., Micronecta spp. and larvivorous fishes. Cultivation of 15 pools of

  17. Dengue vaccines: challenges, development, current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Dar, L

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. The clinical spectrum of dengue, caused by any of the four serotypes of DENV, ranges from mild self-limiting dengue fever to severe dengue, in the form dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Increased rates of hospitalization due to severe dengue, during outbreaks, result in massive economic losses and strained health services. In the absence of specific antiviral therapy, control of transmission of DENV by vector management is the sole method available for decreasing dengue-associated morbidity. Since vector control strategies alone have not been able to satisfactorily achieve reduction in viral transmission, the implementation of a safe, efficacious and cost-effective dengue vaccine as a supplementary measure is a high public health priority. However, the unique and complex immunopathology of dengue has complicated vaccine development. Dengue vaccines have also been challenged by critical issues like lack of animal models for the disease and absence of suitable markers of protective immunity. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under phases of development, including live attenuated virus vaccines, live chimeric virus vaccines, inactivated virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, DNA vaccines and viral-vectored vaccines. Although some vaccine candidates have progressed from animal trials to phase II and III in humans, a number of issues regarding implementation of dengue vaccine in countries like India still need to be addressed. Despite the current limitations, collaborative effects of regulatory bodies like World Health Organization with vaccine manufacturers and policy makers, to facilitate vaccine development and standardize field trials can make a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine a reality in near future.

  18. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers.

  19. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers. PMID:20545737

  20. TIME management by medicinal larvae.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, David I; Čeřovský, Václav; Nigam, Yamni; Pickles, Samantha F; Cazander, Gwendolyn; Nibbering, Peter H; Bültemann, Anke; Jung, Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Wound bed preparation (WBP) is an integral part of the care programme for chronic wounds. The acronym TIME is used in the context of WBP and describes four barriers to healing in chronic wounds; namely, dead Tissue, Infection and inflammation, Moisture imbalance and a non-migrating Edge. Larval debridement therapy (LDT) stems from observations that larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata clean wounds of debris. Subsequent clinical studies have proven debriding efficacy, which is likely to occur as a result of enzymatically active alimentary products released by the insect. The antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and wound healing activities of LDT have also been investigated, predominantly in a pre-clinical context. This review summarises the findings of investigations into the molecular mechanisms of LDT and places these in context with the clinical concept of WBP and TIME. It is clear from these findings that biotherapy with L. sericata conforms with TIME, through the enzymatic removal of dead tissue and its associated biofilm, coupled with the secretion of defined antimicrobial peptides. This biotherapeutic impact on the wound serves to reduce inflammation, with an associated capacity for an indirect effect on moisture imbalance. Furthermore, larval serine proteinases have the capacity to alter fibroblast behaviour in a manner conducive to the formation of granulation tissue.

  1. Cost of dengue outbreaks: literature review and country case studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue disease surveillance and vector surveillance are presumed to detect dengue outbreaks at an early stage and to save – through early response activities – resources, and reduce the social and economic impact of outbreaks on individuals, health systems and economies. The aim of this study is to unveil evidence on the cost of dengue outbreaks. Methods Economic evidence on dengue outbreaks was gathered by conducting a literature review and collecting information on the costs of recent dengue outbreaks in 4 countries: Peru, Dominican Republic, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The literature review distinguished between costs of dengue illness including cost of dengue outbreaks, cost of interventions and cost-effectiveness of interventions. Results Seventeen publications on cost of dengue showed a large range of costs from 0.2 Million US$ in Venezuela to 135.2 Million US$ in Brazil. However, these figures were not standardized to make them comparable. Furthermore, dengue outbreak costs are calculated differently across the publications, and cost of dengue illness is used interchangeably with cost of dengue outbreaks. Only one paper from Australia analysed the resources saved through active dengue surveillance. Costs of vector control interventions have been reported in 4 studies, indicating that the costs of such interventions are lower than those of actual outbreaks. Nine papers focussed on the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccines or dengue vector control; they do not provide any direct information on cost of dengue outbreaks, but their modelling methodologies could guide future research on cost-effectiveness of national surveillance systems. The country case studies – conducted in very different geographic and health system settings - unveiled rough estimates for 2011 outbreak costs of: 12 million US$ in Vietnam, 6.75 million US$ in Indonesia, 4.5 million US$ in Peru and 2.8 million US$ in Dominican Republic (all in 2012 US$). The proportions of the

  2. An epidemiological study of dengue in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Kumar; Nagpal, B N; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Anvikar, Anup; Das, Aparup; Singh, Himmat; Anushrita; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Tuli, N R; Telle, Olivier; Yadav, N K; Valecha, Neena; Paul, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Delhi, the capital of India, is an important metropolitan hub for major financial and sociocultural exchanges, offering challenging threats to current public health infrastructure. In recent past, an upsurge of dengue cases in Delhi posed a significant menace to the existing dengue control policies. To reform the control strategies and take timely intervention to prevent future epidemics, an epidemiological study on the proportion of both asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in selected population was conducted. The aim of the study was to investigate and assess the epidemiology of dengue infection and to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in Delhi. In this study, around 50 confirmed dengue cases, a total of 2125 individuals as household and neighbourhood contacts, with or without dengue febrile illness, were finger pricked and serologically detected as dengue positive or negative using SD Duo Bioline Rapid Diagnostic Test (SD Inc, Korea) with NS1, IgM & IgG combo test, which detected dengue virus antigen and antibodies to dengue virus in human blood. Out of 2125 individuals, 768 (36.1%) individuals showed positive dengue test with past (25.5%), primary (1.88%) or secondary (8.8%) dengue infections. Higher percentage of IgG was found in age groups 15-24 years and 25-50 years (36% each). Infants (<1 year) presented higher incidence of new infections (22% of NS1+IgM positives) as compared to adults. Further analysis revealed that out of the 226 newly infected cases (including NS1 and IgM positives), 142 (63%) were asymptomatic and 84 (37%) were symptomatic, as per WHO guidelines. Our findings also suggest that out of the total population screened, 10.6% dengue infection was either primary or secondary. On the basis of these results, it may be hypothesized that there are large number of asymptomatic dengue infections in the community as compared to reported symptomatic cases in Delhi. For the effective control of dengue

  3. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  4. [Epidemiological dynamics of Dengue on Easter Island].

    PubMed

    Canals, Mauricio; González, Christian; Canals, Andrea; Figueroa, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    Dengue is considered an emerging disease with an increasing prevalence especially in South America. In 2002, an epidemic of classic Dengue (DENV-1) occurred unexpectedly on Easter Island, where it had never been detected before. It reappeared in 2006-2007 and 2008, 2009 and 2011. The aim of this study was to estimate the most relevant parameters of the epidemiological dynamics of transmission of Dengue on Easter Island and to model the dynamics since 2002, comparing the predictions with the actual situation observed. Of the total cases, 52.27% were females and 47.73% men. The average age of infection was 31.38 ± 18.37 years, similar in men and women. We estimated the reproductive number R0 = 3.005 with an IC0,95 = [1.92, 4.61]. The inter-epidemic period reached an estimated T = 5.20 to 6.8 years. The case simulation showed recurrent epidemics with decreasing magnitude (damped oscillations), which is a known phenomenon in models of dengue and malaria. There was good qualitative fit to the epidemiological dynamics from 2002 onwards. It accurately predicted the rise in cases between 2006 and 2011. The predicted number of cases during the 2002 epidemic is greater than the confirmed cases and the predicted epidemic was faster than notified cases. Interepidemic period in the simulation was 6.72 years between 2002 and 2008 and 4.68 years between 2008 and 2013. From the theoretical perspective, the first epidemic had affected 94% of the population (approximately 3500 cases), but 639 were reported suggesting underreporting and a lot of sub-clinical cases occurred. Future epidemic of decreasing size are expected, although the main danger are epidemics of hemorrhagic dengue fever resulting from the introduction of different dengue virus serotypes.

  5. Dengue in China: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Qiu, F X; Gubler, D J; Liu, J C; Chen, Q Q

    1993-01-01

    Three etiologically proven outbreaks of dengue fever and one etiologically confirmed epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever have occurred in south China since 1978. The first of these, an epidemic of dengue due to virus type 4 took place in Shiwan town, Foshan city, Guangdong Province, in 1978; the epidemic began in May and ended in November. The clinical manifestations of 583 hospitalized patients were observed from August to October. The majority (81.3%) of patients were aged 21-50 years (male:female = 1.2:1). The course of illness was about 1 week in most cases; three patients (0.5%) died. A local outbreak of dengue due to virus type 1 occurred in Shiqi town, Zhongshan County, Guangdong Province, from September to November 1979. The majority of patients were older children and adolescents. There was no marked difference between males and females in terms of the course of the illness, and there were no complications or deaths. A large epidemic of dengue due to virus type 3 occurred on Hainan Island in 1980. The clinical manifestations of 510 hospitalized patients (mostly adolescents and adults) were observed from April to September. Some patients developed rare complications, such as loss of hair, acute intravascular haemolysis, and multiple peripheral paralysis; there were four deaths (0.78%). The first known epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever in China occurred among 10-29-year-olds on Hainan Island in 1985 and 1986. There were no essential differences between males and females. Some cases had rare complications such as acute intravascular haemolysis, while others had diffuse intravascular coagulation and altered mental status; 10 patients (6.5%) died.

  6. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, John R

    2005-04-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease.

  7. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of a new dengue IgA capture assay (Platelia Dengue IgA Capture, Bio-Rad) for dengue infection detection.

    PubMed

    De Decker, Sophie; Vray, Muriel; Sistek, Viridiana; Labeau, Bhety; Enfissi, Antoine; Rousset, Dominique; Matheus, Séverine

    2015-03-01

    Considering the short lifetime of IgA antibodies in serum and the key advantages of antibody detection ELISAs in terms of sensitivity and specificity, Bio-Rad has just developed a new ELISA test based on the detection of specific anti-dengue IgA. This study has been carried out to assess the performance of this Platelia Dengue IgA Capture assay for dengue infection detection. A total of 184 well-characterized samples provided by the French Guiana NRC sera collection (Laboratory of Virology, Institut Pasteur in French Guiana) were selected among samples collected between 2002 and 2013 from patients exhibiting a dengue-like syndrome. A first group included 134 sera from confirmed dengue-infected patients, and a second included 50 sera from non-dengue infected patients, all collected between day 3 and day 15 after the onset of fever. Dengue infection diagnoses were all confirmed using reference assays by direct virological identification using RT-PCR or virus culture on acute sera samples or on paired acute-phase sera samples of selected convalescent sera. This study revealed: i) a good overall sensitivity and specificity of the IgA index test, i.e., 93% and 88% respectively, indicating its good correlation to acute dengue diagnosis; and ii) a good concordance with the Panbio IgM capture ELISA. Because of the shorter persistence of dengue virus-specific IgA than IgM, these results underlined the relevance of this new test, which could significantly improve dengue diagnosis accuracy, especially in countries where dengue virus is (hyper-) endemic. It would allow for additional refinement of dengue diagnostic strategy.

  8. First evidence of fish larvae producing sounds

    PubMed Central

    Staaterman, Erica; Paris, Claire B.; Kough, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic ecology of marine fishes has traditionally focused on adults, while overlooking the early life-history stages. Here, we document the first acoustic recordings of pre-settlement stage grey snapper larvae (Lutjanus griseus). Through a combination of in situ and unprovoked laboratory recordings, we found that L. griseus larvae are acoustically active during the night, producing ‘knock’ and ‘growl’ sounds that are spectrally and temporally similar to those of adults. While the exact function and physiological mechanisms of sound production in fish larvae are unknown, we suggest that these sounds may enable snapper larvae to maintain group cohesion at night when visual cues are reduced. PMID:25274018

  9. What's eating you? Cutaneous larva migrans.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Kyle A; Ferringer, Tammie C

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a focused update and clinical review on cutaneous larva migrans (CLM), including atypical clinical presentations and newer management recommendations. The results and recommendations are subject to modification based on future studies.

  10. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in Thai society.

    PubMed

    Kantachuvessiri, Aree

    2002-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is one of the most important infectious diseases in Thailand for many decades. Knowledge of DHF is vital to its control. Like other tropical countries, Thailand is facing this resurgent disease. The Thai National Dengue Prevention and Control Plan has been recently implemented to prevent and reduce the problems resulting from the spread of DHF. In this paper, a three-pronged strategy is offered that will create social mobilization at family, community, and national level and that will, therefore, reduce the socioeconomic and health impacts of DHF.

  11. Implications of previous subclinical dengue infection but not virus load in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wen-Ting; Chen, Rong-Fu; Wang, Lin; Liu, Jien-Wei; Shaio, Men-Fang; Yang, Kuender D

    2006-10-01

    In a study comparing the virus load and immune reaction between patients with primary and secondary dengue-2 (DEN-2) infections in a hospital-based analysis, we found that 40.7% (55/135) of the 135 patients had secondary DEN-2 infection following a DEN-2 outbreak in southern Taiwan. Most of the secondary infections had subclinical primary dengue infections (78.2%; 43/55). Patients with secondary DEN-2 infections had lower platelet counts, and blood interferon-alpha and virus load, but significantly higher interleukin-10 (P=0.030) and anti-DEN-1 neutralization titers (P=0.013) than those with primary infection. Patients with secondary DEN-2 infection also had a higher rate of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) (61.7% vs. 36.3%). A previous subclinical dengue infection is involved in the secondary DEN-2 infection associated with altered immune reaction and higher DHF rate, but lower blood virus load.

  12. Coagulation abnormalities in dengue hemorrhagic Fever: serial investigations in 167 Vietnamese children with Dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wills, Bridget A; Oragui, Emmanuelle E; Stephens, Alick C; Daramola, Olufunmilayo A; Dung, Nguyen Minh; Loan, Ha Thi; Chau, Nguyen Vinh; Chambers, Mary; Stepniewska, Kasia; Farrar, Jeremy J; Levin, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The pathophysiological basis of hemorrhage in dengue infections remains poorly understood, despite the increasing global importance of these infections. A large prospective study of 167 Vietnamese children with dengue shock syndrome documented only minor prolongations of prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times but moderate to severe depression of plasma fibrinogen concentrations. A detailed study of 48 children revealed low plasma concentrations of the anticoagulant proteins C, S, and antithrombin III, which decreased with increasing severity of shock, probably because of capillary leakage. Concurrent increases in the levels of thrombomodulin, tissue factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) indicated increased production of these proteins. Thrombomodulin levels suggestive of endothelial activation correlated with increasing shock severity, whereas PAI-1 levels correlated with bleeding severity. Dengue virus can directly activate plasminogen in vitro. Rather than causing true disseminated intravascular coagulation, dengue infection may activate fibrinolysis primarily, degrading fibrinogen directly and prompting secondary activation of procoagulant homeostatic mechanisms.

  13. Transstadial Effects of Bti on Traits of Aedes aegypti and Infection with Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Barry W.; Lord, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    Most mosquito control efforts are primarily focused on reducing the adult population size mediated by reductions in the larval population, which should lower risk of disease transmission. Although the aim of larviciding is to reduce larval abundance and thus recruitment of adults, nonlethal effects on adults are possible, including transstadial effects on phenotypes of adults such as survival and pathogen infection and transmission. In addition, the mortality induced by control efforts may act in conjunction with other sources of mosquito mortality in nature. The consequences of these effects and interactions may alter the potential of the population to transmit pathogens. We tested experimentally the combined effects of a larvicide (Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis, Bti) and competition during the larval stages on subsequent Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) traits, population performance, and susceptibility to dengue-1 virus infection. Ae. aegypti that survived exposure to Bti experienced accelerated development, were larger, and produced more eggs with increasing amounts of Bti, consistent with competitive release among surviving mosquitoes. Changing larval density had no significant interactive effect with Bti treatment on development and growth to adulthood. Larval density, but not Bti or treatment interaction, had a strong effect on survival of adult Ae. aegypti females. There were sharper declines in cumulative daily survival of adults from crowded than uncrowded larval conditions, suggesting that high competition conditions of larvae may be an impediment to transmission of dengue viruses. Rates of infection and dengue-1 virus disseminated infections were found to be 87±13% and 88±12%, respectively. There were no significant treatment effects on infection measurements. Our findings suggest that larvicide campaigns using Bti may reduce the number of emerged adults, but survivors will have a fitness advantage (growth, development, enhanced production of eggs

  14. Natural vertical transmission of dengue viruses in Aedes aegypti in selected sites in Cebu City, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Edillo, Frances E; Sarcos, Janet R; Sayson, Stephanie L

    2015-12-01

    We attempted to determine the vertical transmission of dengue virus (DENV) in Aedes aegypti in selected sites in Cebu City, Philippines. Mosquito sub-adults were collected monthly from households and the field during the wet-dry-wet season from November, 2011 to July, 2012 and were laboratory-reared to adults. Viral RNA extracts in mosquitoes were assayed by hemi-nested RT-PCR. Results showed that 62 (36.26%; n=679) out of 171 mosquito pools (n=2,871) were DENV+. The minimum infection rate (MIR) of DENV ranged from 0 in wet months to 48.22/1,000 mosquitoes in April, 2012 (mid-dry). DENVs were detected in larvae, pupae, and male and female adults, with DENV-4, DENV-3, and DENV-1, in that rank of prevalence. DENV-1 co-infected with either DENV-3 or -4 or with both in April, 2012; DENV-3 and -4 were present in both seasons. More DENV+ mosquitoes were collected from households than in field premises (p<0.001) and in the dry than in the wet season (p<0.05), with significant interaction (p<0.05) between sites and premises but no interaction between sites and seasons (p>0.05). By Generalized Linear Mixed models, the type of premises nested in sites and monthly total rainfall were significant predictors of monthly dengue cases (p<0.05) and not MIR, season, temperature, and relative humidity. Surveillance of DENV prevalence in Ae. aegypti and detecting their natural foci in the dry season provide an early warning signal of dengue outbreak.

  15. Activity of R(+) Limonene Against Anisakis Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Muscolino, Daniele; Panebianco, Felice; Patania, Andrea; Benianti, Chiara; Ziino, Graziella; Giuffrida, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the activity of R(+) limonene of against Anisakidae larvae. Its effectiveness was tested in vitro. The results obtained showed a significant activity of the compound against Anisakis larvae, suggesting further investigation on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. In this regard, the use of R(+) limonene in seafood products could be interesting, also due the sensory attributes resulting from its use and its relatively safe status. PMID:27800423

  16. Bioefficacy of Mentha piperita essential oil against dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarita; Wahab, Naim; Warikoo, Radhika

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the larvicidal and repellent potential of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of peppermint plant, Mentha piperita (M. piperita) against the larval and adult stages of Aedes aegypti (Ae. Aegypti). Methods The larvicidal potential of peppermint oil was evaluated against early fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti using WHO protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 and 48 h, and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. The efficacy of peppermint oil as mosquito repellent was assessed using the human-bait technique. The measured area of one arm of a human volunteer was applied with the oil and the other arm was applied with ethanol. The mosquito bites on both the arms were recorded for 3 min after every 15 min. The experiment continued for 3 h and the percent protection was calculated. Results The essential oil extracted from M. piperita possessed excellent larvicidal efficiency against dengue vector. The bioassays showed an LC50 and LC90 value of 111.9 and 295.18 ppm, respectively after 24 h of exposure. The toxicity of the oil increased 11.8% when the larvae were exposed to the oil for 48 h. The remarkable repellent properties of M. piperita essential oil were established against adults Ae. aegypti. The application of oil resulted in 100% protection till 150 min. After next 30 min, only 1-2 bites were recorded as compared with 8-9 bites on the control arm. Conclusions The peppermint essential oil is proved to be efficient larvicide and repellent against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of oil as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the oil could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control. PMID:23569733

  17. Epidemiology and vector efficiency during a dengue fever outbreak in Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianci; Lu, Liang; Fu, Guiming; Zhong, Shi; Ding, Gangqiang; Xu, Rong; Zhu, Guangfeng; Shi, Nanfeng; Fan, Feilong; Liu, Qiyong

    2009-06-01

    An emigrant worker returning from Southeast Asia triggered the outbreak of a DF epidemic in Zhejiang province, China, in October, 2004. Eighty-three cases, mainly young and middle-aged people between 20 and 50 (78.3%), were reported in the area of Cixi. There were no obvious occupational patterns. The majority of cases were female, with a sex ratio of 1:1.86 (m:f). The dengue virus (DENV) strains from the epidemic area were isolated and identified as DENV-1, which belongs to Asian strain 1. According to the epidemiological investigation, the incidence of DF had no relationship to temperature, humidity, or precipitation, and the Breteau index of larvae showed a clear relationship only with the House Index and Container Index. Recent dengue problems in the town have been associated with the complex social factors and hygienic conditions for endemic villagers and immigrant workers. Some hygienic measures should be taken by the local government to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne disease. These measures should aim to eliminate the breeding sites of the vector Aedes albopictus in indoor and outdoor containers filled with rainwater and thus reducing the risk of DF transmission.

  18. Indirect effects of cigarette butt waste on the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Dieng, Hamady; Rajasaygar, Sudha; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Ahmad, Hamdan; Satho, Tomomitsu; Miake, Fumio; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fukumitsu, Yuki; Saad, Ahmad Ramli; Abdul Hamid, Suhaila; Vargas, Ronald Enrique Morales; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz; Fadzly, Nik; Abu Kassim, Nur Faeza; Hashim, Nur Aida; Abd Ghani, Idris; Abang, Fatimah Bt; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2014-02-01

    Despite major insecticide-based vector control programs, dengue continues to be a major threat to public health in urban areas. The reasons for this failure include the emergence of insecticide resistance and the narrowing of the spectrum of efficient products. Cigarette butts (CBs), the most commonly discarded piece of waste, also represent a major health hazard to human and animal life. CBs are impregnated with thousands of chemical compounds, many of which are highly toxic and none of which has history of resistance in mosquitoes. This study was performed to examine whether exposure to CB alters various biological parameters of parents and their progeny. We examined whether the mosquito changes its ovipositional behaviors, egg hatching, reproductive capacity, longevity and fecundity in response to CB exposure at three different concentrations. Females tended to prefer microcosms containing CBs for egg deposition than those with water only. There were equivalent rates of eclosion success among larvae from eggs that matured in CB and water environments. We also observed decreased life span among adults that survived CB exposure. Extracts of CB waste have detrimental effects on the fecundity and longevity of its offspring, while being attractive to its gravid females. These results altogether indicate that CB waste indirectly affect key adult life traits of Aedes aegypti and could conceivably be developed as a novel dengue vector control strategy, referring to previously documented direct toxicity on the larval stage. But this will require further research on CB waste effects on non-target organisms including humans.

  19. Complete genome sequence of a Dengue virus serotype 4 strain isolated in Roraima, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Naveca, Felipe G; Souza, Victor C; Silva, George A V; Maito, Rodrigo M; Granja, Fabiana; Siqueira, Thalita; Acosta, Pablo O A

    2012-02-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide. We report the complete genome sequence of a dengue virus serotype 4, genotype II strain isolated in 2010 from a patient with classical dengue fever in Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil.

  20. Coral Larvae Move toward Reef Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Marhaver, Kristen L.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Simpson, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm) that influence settlement success are difficult to observe in situ and are therefore largely unknown. Here, we show that coral larvae respond to acoustic cues that may facilitate detection of habitat from large distances and from upcurrent of preferred settlement locations. Using in situ choice chambers, we found that settling coral larvae were attracted to reef sounds, produced mainly by fish and crustaceans, which we broadcast underwater using loudspeakers. Our discovery that coral larvae can detect and respond to sound is the first description of an auditory response in the invertebrate phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, and hydroids as well as corals. If, like settlement-stage reef fish and crustaceans, coral larvae use reef noise as a cue for orientation, the alleviation of noise pollution in the marine environment may gain further urgency. PMID:20498831

  1. Coral larvae move toward reef sounds.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Mark J A; Marhaver, Kristen L; Huijbers, Chantal M; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Simpson, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm) that influence settlement success are difficult to observe in situ and are therefore largely unknown. Here, we show that coral larvae respond to acoustic cues that may facilitate detection of habitat from large distances and from upcurrent of preferred settlement locations. Using in situ choice chambers, we found that settling coral larvae were attracted to reef sounds, produced mainly by fish and crustaceans, which we broadcast underwater using loudspeakers. Our discovery that coral larvae can detect and respond to sound is the first description of an auditory response in the invertebrate phylum Cnidaria, which includes jellyfish, anemones, and hydroids as well as corals. If, like settlement-stage reef fish and crustaceans, coral larvae use reef noise as a cue for orientation, the alleviation of noise pollution in the marine environment may gain further urgency. PMID:20498831

  2. Larvicidal Potential of the Halogenated Sesquiterpene (+)-Obtusol, Isolated from the Alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh (Ceramiales: Rhodomelaceae), against the Dengue Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Neto, Orlando; Gomes, Simone Azevedo; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Machado, Fernanda Lacerda da Silva; Samuels, Richard Ian; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Moraes, Jorge Luiz da Cunha; Campos, Eldo; Mury, Flávia Borges; Silva, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is considered a serious public health problem in many tropical regions of the world including Brazil. At the moment, there is no viable alternative to reduce dengue infections other than controlling the insect vector, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. In the continuing search for new sources of chemicals targeted at vector control, natural products are a promising alternative to synthetic pesticides. In our work, we investigated the toxicity of a bioactive compound extracted from the red alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh. The initial results demonstrated that crude extracts, at a concentration of 5 ppm, caused pronounced mortality of second instar A. aegypti larvae. Two molecules, identified as (−)-elatol and (+)-obtusol were subsequently isolated from crude extract and further evaluated. Assays with (−)-elatol showed moderate larvicidal activity, whereas (+)-obtusol presented higher toxic activity than (−)-elatol, with a LC50 value of 3.5 ppm. Histological analysis of the larvae exposed to (+)-obtusol revealed damage to the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, (+)-obtusol-treated larvae incubated with 2 µM CM-H2DCFDA showed the presence of reactive oxygen species, leading us to suggest that epithelial damage might be related to redox imbalance. These results demonstrate the potential of (+)-obtusol as a larvicide for use against A. aegypti and the possible mode of action of this compound. PMID:26821032

  3. Larvicidal Potential of the Halogenated Sesquiterpene (+)-Obtusol, Isolated from the Alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh (Ceramiales: Rhodomelaceae), against the Dengue Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Salvador-Neto, Orlando; Gomes, Simone Azevedo; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Machado, Fernanda Lacerda da Silva; Samuels, Richard Ian; Nunes da Fonseca, Rodrigo; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Moraes, Jorge Luiz da Cunha; Campos, Eldo; Mury, Flávia Borges; Silva, José Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is considered a serious public health problem in many tropical regions of the world including Brazil. At the moment, there is no viable alternative to reduce dengue infections other than controlling the insect vector, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus. In the continuing search for new sources of chemicals targeted at vector control, natural products are a promising alternative to synthetic pesticides. In our work, we investigated the toxicity of a bioactive compound extracted from the red alga Laurencia dendroidea J. Agardh. The initial results demonstrated that crude extracts, at a concentration of 5 ppm, caused pronounced mortality of second instar A. aegypti larvae. Two molecules, identified as (-)-elatol and (+)-obtusol were subsequently isolated from crude extract and further evaluated. Assays with (-)-elatol showed moderate larvicidal activity, whereas (+)-obtusol presented higher toxic activity than (-)-elatol, with a LC50 value of 3.5 ppm. Histological analysis of the larvae exposed to (+)-obtusol revealed damage to the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, (+)-obtusol-treated larvae incubated with 2 µM CM-H₂DCFDA showed the presence of reactive oxygen species, leading us to suggest that epithelial damage might be related to redox imbalance. These results demonstrate the potential of (+)-obtusol as a larvicide for use against A. aegypti and the possible mode of action of this compound.

  4. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro--are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Márcio Goulart; Simões, Taynãna César; Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva do; Teixeira, Maria Lucia França; Lounibos, Leon Philip; Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço de

    2009-12-01

    Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus(0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats.

  5. Prevalence of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Hospital Tengku Ampuan Rahimah, Klang, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jamaiah, I; Rohela, M; Nissapatorn, V; Maizatulhikma, M M; Norazlinda, R; Syaheerah, H; Tan, H P

    2005-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever have been known to be endemic and reportable diseases in Malaysia since 1971. Major outbreaks occurred in 1973, 1982 and in 1998. For the past few decades until now. many studies have been performed to investigate the importance of these two diseases in Malaysia. A retrospective study was carried out in Hospital Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Klang to find the prevalence of these diseases. The data was collected from the record department of this hospital starting from the year 1999 until 2003 (5 years). A total of 6,577 cases of dengue fever and 857 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever were reported. From the year 2000 onwards, cases of dengue fever had increased tremendously. However for the year 2001, there was a slight decrease in the reported cases. Most cases occurred in 2003, increasing from 674 in 1999 to 2,813 in 2003. Highest incidence was seen in Malay males more than 12 years of age. However, the cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever declined tremendously throughout the years. Most cases occurred in 1999 with 674 cases, then declining to only one in the year 2001 before it increased to 60 and 72 in the years 2002 and 2003, respectively. Most cases occurred in patients above 12 years old, the majority of which were Malay males.

  6. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Americas: lessons and challenges.

    PubMed

    Guzman, María G; Kouri, Gustavo

    2003-05-01

    The incidence of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) has increased significantly over the last decades. Yearly, an estimated 50-100 million cases of DF and about 250000-500000 cases of DHF occur worldwide. The epidemiological situation in Latin America now resembles that in Southeast Asia. Here, the main clinical, epidemiological and virological observations in the American region are presented and compared with those previously reported from Southeast Asia. During 2002, more than 30 Latin American countries reported over 1000000 DF cases. DHF occurred in 20 countries with more than 17000 DHF cases, including 225 fatalities. The co-circulation of multiple serotypes has been reported from many countries. In the Americas, DHF is observed both in children and adults; secondary infection by a different dengue virus serotype has been confirmed as an important risk factor for this severe form of the disease. However, some new risk factors such as the interval of dengue virus infections and the ethnicity and underlying chronic conditions of the patient have also been identified. The sequence of dengue virus infections and association with certain genotypes are further factors of importance. We also discuss the control and prevention strategies. In conclusion, without urgent action for the prevention and control of dengue/DHF and its vector, the current situation will worsen and, more dramatical, there is a risk of the urbanization of yellow fever.

  7. DengueME: A Tool for the Modeling and Simulation of Dengue Spatiotemporal Dynamics †

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Tiago França Melo; Lana, Raquel Martins; de Senna Carneiro, Tiago Garcia; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; Machado, Gabriel Souza; Ferreira, Lucas Saraiva; de Castro Medeiros, Líliam César; Davis Junior, Clodoveu Augusto

    2016-01-01

    The prevention and control of dengue are great public health challenges for many countries, particularly since 2015, as other arboviruses have been observed to interact significantly with dengue virus. Different approaches and methodologies have been proposed and discussed by the research community. An important tool widely used is modeling and simulation, which help us to understand epidemic dynamics and create scenarios to support planning and decision making processes. With this aim, we proposed and developed DengueME, a collaborative open source platform to simulate dengue disease and its vector’s dynamics. It supports compartmental and individual-based models, implemented over a GIS database, that represent Aedes aegypti population dynamics, human demography, human mobility, urban landscape and dengue transmission mediated by human and mosquito encounters. A user-friendly graphical interface was developed to facilitate model configuration and data input, and a library of models was developed to support teaching-learning activities. DengueME was applied in study cases and evaluated by specialists. Other improvements will be made in future work, to enhance its extensibility and usability. PMID:27649226

  8. DengueME: A Tool for the Modeling and Simulation of Dengue Spatiotemporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Tiago França Melo; Lana, Raquel Martins; de Senna Carneiro, Tiago Garcia; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; Machado, Gabriel Souza; Ferreira, Lucas Saraiva; de Castro Medeiros, Líliam César; Davis Junior, Clodoveu Augusto

    2016-01-01

    The prevention and control of dengue are great public health challenges for many countries, particularly since 2015, as other arboviruses have been observed to interact significantly with dengue virus. Different approaches and methodologies have been proposed and discussed by the research community. An important tool widely used is modeling and simulation, which help us to understand epidemic dynamics and create scenarios to support planning and decision making processes. With this aim, we proposed and developed DengueME, a collaborative open source platform to simulate dengue disease and its vector's dynamics. It supports compartmental and individual-based models, implemented over a GIS database, that represent Aedes aegypti population dynamics, human demography, human mobility, urban landscape and dengue transmission mediated by human and mosquito encounters. A user-friendly graphical interface was developed to facilitate model configuration and data input, and a library of models was developed to support teaching-learning activities. DengueME was applied in study cases and evaluated by specialists. Other improvements will be made in future work, to enhance its extensibility and usability. PMID:27649226

  9. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Clitoria fairchildiana Cotyledons is Active Against Digestive Enzymes of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lucilene O; Fernandes, Kátia V S; Pádua, Dayanni de Souza; Carvalho, André de O; Lemos, Francisco J A; Gomes, Valdirene M; Oliveira, Antônia E A; Ferreira, André T da Silva; Perales, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal mosquito vector of yellow fever, dengue fever and chikungunya fever virus-transmitted diseases, is an insect closely associated with humans and their housing habitats. As there is no commercially available vaccine, prevention is the most suggested form of avoiding disease spreading and a number of studies are being developed in order to give support to vector control operations. The present study reports on the identification of a trypsin inhibitor isolated from cotyledons of the Clitoria fairchildiana amazonic tree seeds, which was able to reduce by 87.93 % the activity of digestive enzymes of fourth instar A. aegypti larva. A partial amino acid sequence showed strong similarity with sequences from several trypsin inhibitors already reported in the literature. The 13,000 Da isolated inhibitor was seen to be active solely against trypsin-like enzymes, neither acting on papain, α-amylase nor on other serine proteases, such as elastase, chymotrypsin or subtilisin. At least six from seven active digestive proteases from A. aegypti larvae, visualized by zymography, were severely affected soon after exposed to the inhibitor. The strong and specific action of the isolated inhibitor against trypsin digestive enzymes of this insect vector led us to believe that this protein may be a good candidate for a prospective alternative biocontrol method. PMID:26156641

  10. Silencing of P-glycoprotein increases mortality in temephos-treated Aedes aegypti larvae.

    PubMed

    Figueira-Mansur, J; Ferreira-Pereira, A; Mansur, J F; Franco, T A; Alvarenga, E S L; Sorgine, M H F; Neves, B C; Melo, A C A; Leal, W S; Masuda, H; Moreira, M F

    2013-12-01

    Re-emergence of vector-borne diseases such as dengue and yellow fever, which are both transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, has been correlated with insecticide resistance. P-glycoproteins (P-gps) are ATP-dependent efflux pumps that are involved in the transport of substrates across membranes. Some of these proteins have been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we identified a putative P-glycoprotein in the Ae. aegypti database based on its significantly high identity with Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Drosophila melanogaster and human P-gps. The basal ATPase activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in larvae was significantly increased in the presence of MDR modulators (verapamil and quinidine). An eightfold increase in Ae. aegypti P-gp (AaegP-gp) gene expression was detected in temephos-treated larvae as determined by quantitative PCR. To analyse the potential role of AaegP-gp in insecticide efflux, a temephos larvicide assay was performed in the presence of verapamil. The results showed an increase of 24% in temephos toxicity, which is in agreement with the efflux reversing effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of the AaegP-gp gene caused a significant increase in temephos toxicity (57%). In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time in insects that insecticide-induced P-gp expression can be involved in the modulation of insecticide efflux. PMID:23980723

  11. Silencing of P-glycoprotein increases mortality in temephos-treated Aedes aegypti larvae.

    PubMed

    Figueira-Mansur, J; Ferreira-Pereira, A; Mansur, J F; Franco, T A; Alvarenga, E S L; Sorgine, M H F; Neves, B C; Melo, A C A; Leal, W S; Masuda, H; Moreira, M F

    2013-12-01

    Re-emergence of vector-borne diseases such as dengue and yellow fever, which are both transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, has been correlated with insecticide resistance. P-glycoproteins (P-gps) are ATP-dependent efflux pumps that are involved in the transport of substrates across membranes. Some of these proteins have been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we identified a putative P-glycoprotein in the Ae. aegypti database based on its significantly high identity with Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Drosophila melanogaster and human P-gps. The basal ATPase activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in larvae was significantly increased in the presence of MDR modulators (verapamil and quinidine). An eightfold increase in Ae. aegypti P-gp (AaegP-gp) gene expression was detected in temephos-treated larvae as determined by quantitative PCR. To analyse the potential role of AaegP-gp in insecticide efflux, a temephos larvicide assay was performed in the presence of verapamil. The results showed an increase of 24% in temephos toxicity, which is in agreement with the efflux reversing effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of the AaegP-gp gene caused a significant increase in temephos toxicity (57%). In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time in insects that insecticide-induced P-gp expression can be involved in the modulation of insecticide efflux.

  12. Effect of crude extract of Solanum xanthocarpum against snails and mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Changbunjong, Tanasak; Wongwit, Waranya; Leemingsawat, Somjai; Tongtokit, Yuwadee; Deesin, Vanida

    2010-03-01

    The ethanolic crude extract from Solanum xanthocarpum was investigated for its molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail vector of Schistosoma mansoni, and Indoplanorbis exustus, the snail vector of intestinal echinostomiasis and Schistosoma spindale, together with the larvicidal activity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti, mosquito vector of dengue hemorrhagic fever and Culex quinquefasciatus, the mosquito vector of urban bancroftian filariasis. The bioassays were carried out following the methods recommended by the World Health Organization. For molluscicidal activity, the LC50 against Bi. glabrata and I. exustus were reported at 163.85 and 198.00 mg/l while the LC90 were 219.33 and 236.80 mg/l, respectively. Regarding mosquito larvicidal activity, the LC50 against the larvae of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus were 788.10 and 573.20 mg/l, while the LC90 were 1288.91 and 1066.93 mg/l, respectively. These results suggest a preparation of ingredients from this plant may be used as a biological larvicide for these vectors in the field.

  13. Effects of essential oils on Aedes aegypti larvae: alternatives to environmentally safe insecticides.

    PubMed

    Silva, W J; Dória, G A A; Maia, R T; Nunes, R S; Carvalho, G A; Blank, A F; Alves, P B; Marçal, R M; Cavalcanti, S C H

    2008-05-01

    The essential oils from leaves of Hyptis fruticosa (Lamiaceae) Salzm., H. pectinata (Lamiaceae) Poit., and Lippia gracilis (Verbenaceae) HBK were investigated for their larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti and analyzed by GC/MS. Fifty-nine compounds, representing 91.28-98.39% of the essential oils, have been identified. A standard solution was used to make 20 mL solutions ranging from 30 to 2000 ppm. Twenty larvae between third and fourth stages were added to the essential oil solution. A mortality count was conducted 24 h after treatment. Essential oils LC50 and their confidence limits at 95% probability were calculated by the methods of Reed-Muench and Pizzi, respectively. The essential oil of Lippia gracilis showed potent insecticidal effect against Aedes aegypti larvae, the vector of dengue fever. Carvacrol and caryophyllene oxide were the main responsible for the activity of L. gracilis and H. pectinata. Minor compounds are probably acting synergistically to achieve H. fruticosa activity. PMID:17662602

  14. Chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticle mediated gene silencing in disease vector mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen; Michel, Kristin; Severson, David W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2015-03-25

    Vector mosquitoes inflict more human suffering than any other organism-and kill more than one million people each year. The mosquito genome projects facilitated research in new facets of mosquito biology, including functional genetic studies in the primary African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the dengue and yellow fever vector Aedes aegypti. RNA interference- (RNAi-) mediated gene silencing has been used to target genes of interest in both of these disease vector mosquito species. Here, we describe a procedure for preparation of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are combined with food and ingested by larvae. This technically straightforward, high-throughput, and relatively inexpensive methodology, which is compatible with long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, has been used for the successful knockdown of a number of different genes in A. gambiae and A. aegypti larvae. Following larval feedings, knockdown, which is verified through qRT-PCR or in situ hybridization, can persist at least through the late pupal stage. This methodology may be applicable to a wide variety of mosquito and other insect species, including agricultural pests, as well as other non-model organisms. In addition to its utility in the research laboratory, in the future, chitosan, an inexpensive, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, could potentially be utilized in the field.

  15. Internal travel and risk of dengue transmission in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, Pablo E; de la Hoz, Fernando; Lozano Becerra, Juan C; Repetto, Silvia A; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2014-09-01

    Human behavior plays a key role in the dynamics of dengue transmission. However, research on the relationship between human movement and dengue transmission within endemic countries is limited. From January 2008 to December 2011, the authors of this study conducted a retrospective analysis of imported dengue infections in Bogotá, Colombia. Bogotá is a vector-transmission-free city that is also the capital district and most populated municipality in Colombia. The study revealed that 1) Bogotá inhabitants acquired dengue infection in diverse localities throughout the country but the largest proportion of cases (35.6%) were contracted at popular tourist destinations in dengue-endemic areas near Bogotá (<200-km radius from city limits), and 2) the number of imported dengue cases increased after major holidays, a transmission pattern not seen in dengue-endemic areas, where disease incidence correlates with rainy periods. It is therefore recommended that physicians consider the effect of travel when diagnosing their patients' illnesses, especially outside dengue-endemic areas where diagnosis of the disease can be challenging due to its nonspecific symptoms. The study also showed that analysis of dengue cases imported to regions free of vector transmission can generate an evidence-based model for characterizing the impact of human movement on the spread of diseases like dengue in countries where they are endemic. PMID:25418771

  16. The prevention and control of dengue after Typhoon Haiyan

    PubMed Central

    Aumentado, Charito; Cerro, Boyd Roderick; Olobia, Leonido; Suy, Lyndon Lee; Reyes, Aldrin; Kusumawathie, Pahalagedera HD; Sagrado, Maria; Hall, Julie Lyn; Abeyasinghe, Rabindra; Foxwell, Alice Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many of the areas in the Philippines affected by Typhoon Haiyan are endemic for dengue; therefore, dengue prevention was a priority in the initial post-disaster risk assessment. We describe the dengue prevention and response strategies applied after Haiyan. Methods The dengue response was implemented by a wide range of national and international stakeholders. Priorities included the rapid re-establishment of an effective surveillance system to quickly identify new dengue cases, monitor trends and determine the geographical distribution of cases. Dengue rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) were distributed to sentinel health facilities, and comprehensive vector control activities and entomological surveys were implemented. Several training sessions for key stakeholders and awareness campaigns for communities were organized. Results There were RDT-positive dengue cases reported from urban and semi-urban areas where entomological surveys also confirmed a high density of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Although there was an increase in dengue cases in January 2014, the number of cases remained below the epidemic threshold throughout the remaining months of 2014. Discussion There was no large outbreak of dengue after Haiyan, possibly due to the targeted, multifaceted and rapid response for dengue after Haiyan. However, surveillance differed after Typhoon Haiyan, making comparisons with previous years difficult. Multiple players contributed to the response that was also facilitated by close communication and coordination within the Health Cluster. PMID:26767138

  17. Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Packierisamy, P. Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Inbaraj, Jonathan; Balan, Venugopalan K.; Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, an arbovirus disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has recently spread rapidly, especially in the tropical countries of the Americas and Asia-Pacific regions. It is endemic in Malaysia, with an annual average of 37,937 reported dengue cases from 2007 to 2012. This study measured the overall economic impact of dengue in Malaysia, and estimated the costs of dengue prevention. In 2010, Malaysia spent US$73.5 million or 0.03% of the country's GDP on its National Dengue Vector Control Program. This spending represented US$1,591 per reported dengue case and US$2.68 per capita population. Most (92.2%) of this spending occurred in districts, primarily for fogging. A previous paper estimated the annual cost of dengue illness in the country at US$102.2 million. Thus, the inclusion of preventive activities increases the substantial estimated cost of dengue to US$175.7 million, or 72% above illness costs alone. If innovative technologies for dengue vector control prove efficacious, and a dengue vaccine was introduced, substantial existing spending could be rechanneled to fund them. PMID:26416116

  18. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  19. An innovative forecasting and dashboard system for Malaysian dengue trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Shaharanee, Izwan Nizal Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Dengue fever has been recognized in over 100 countries and 2.5 billion people live in areas where dengue is endemic. It is currently a serious arthropod-borne disease, affecting around 50-100 million people worldwide every year. Dengue fever is also prevalent in Malaysia with numerous cases including mortality recorded over the past year. In 2012, a total of 21,900 cases of dengue fever were reported with 35 deaths. Dengue, a mosquito-transmitted virus, causes a high fever accompanied by significant pain in afflicted patient and the Aedes Aegypti mosquito is the primary disease carrier. Knowing the dangerous effect of dengue fever, thus one of the solutions is to implement an innovative forecasting and dashboard system of dengue spread in Malaysia, with emphasize on an early prediction of dengue outbreak. Specifically, the model developed will provide with a valuable insight into strategically managing and controlling the future dengue epidemic. Importantly, this research will deliver the message to health policy makers such as The Ministry of Health Malaysia (MOH), practitioners, and researchers of the importance to integrate their collaboration in exploring the potential strategies in order to reduce the future burden of the increase in dengue transmission cases in Malaysia.

  20. Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Inbaraj, Jonathan; Balan, Venugopalan K; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    Dengue fever, an arbovirus disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has recently spread rapidly, especially in the tropical countries of the Americas and Asia-Pacific regions. It is endemic in Malaysia, with an annual average of 37,937 reported dengue cases from 2007 to 2012. This study measured the overall economic impact of dengue in Malaysia, and estimated the costs of dengue prevention. In 2010, Malaysia spent US$73.5 million or 0.03% of the country's GDP on its National Dengue Vector Control Program. This spending represented US$1,591 per reported dengue case and US$2.68 per capita population. Most (92.2%) of this spending occurred in districts, primarily for fogging. A previous paper estimated the annual cost of dengue illness in the country at US$102.2 million. Thus, the inclusion of preventive activities increases the substantial estimated cost of dengue to US$175.7 million, or 72% above illness costs alone. If innovative technologies for dengue vector control prove efficacious, and a dengue vaccine was introduced, substantial existing spending could be rechanneled to fund them.