Science.gov

Sample records for dense graded aggregates

  1. Particle Aggregation Dynamics in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.

    2009-09-01

    We continue our study of the dynamics of rigid aggregates, in the context of a local N-body simulation of planetary rings. Our modified version of pkdgrav now includes the unique capability to simulate the creation and destruction of rigid bonds of arbitrary strength between colliding particles in a non-inertial rotating frame. We have applied this model to dense planetary rings, such as Saturn's A and B rings, as interparticle sticking is hypothesized to occur between its icy particles. Laboratory experiments, such as Hatzes (1991), suggest that such bonding is common if the particles are coated in a layer of frost. And Tremaine (2003) suggests that radial structures in Saturn's B ring can be explained by invoking the presence of large bonded aggregates. The strength of these icy bonds is highly uncertain, however, so the potential parameter space to investigate is large. We present results from simulations exploring some of these parameters, particularly sticking and fragmentation thresholds, and shear and tensile bond strength, with the goal to determine the equilibrium state of the particles (wake formation and structure, aggregate size and shape, etc.) as a function of these parameters. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Sciences Fellowship (NESSF).

  2. Predator Effects on Dense Zooplankton Aggregations in the Coastal Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    multibeam sonar . The seafloor is just visible at 30 m. A thin layer of zooplankton is evident between 10 and 20 meters. The layer is deeper to the right...Use a multibeam sonar to detect relatively large individual, mobile acoustic scatters both inside and outside thin aggregations of zooplankton. The...supplementary data, and concomitant sensing with other techniques. Specific methods: Continuously map the distribution of acoustically scattering thin

  3. Predator Effects on Dense Zooplankton Aggregations in the Coastal Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    Assess the impact of the interaction of predators with aggregations of prey animals on the performance of acoustical and optical sensors. APPROACH...Role of Planktonic Thin Layers” 2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR Feb 22-18, 2010. Benoit-Bird, K.J., Cowles, T.J. “Acoustical and optical ...3 Benoit-Bird, K.J., Moline, M.A., Waluk, C.M, Robbins, I.C. 2010 “Integrated measurements of acoustical and optical thin layers I: Vertical

  4. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks.

  5. Dense Cluster Formation during Aggregation and Gelation of Attractive Slippery Nanoemulsion Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, J.N.; Graves, S.M.; Chang, C.B.; Meleson, K.; Mason, T.G.; Lin, M.Y.

    2006-01-13

    Using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering, we have measured the wave-number-dependent structure factor S(q) of monodisperse nanoemulsions that aggregate and gel after we suddenly turn on a strong, short-range, slippery attraction between the droplets. At high q, peaks in S(q) appear as dense clusters of droplets form, and S(q) increases strongly toward low q, as these dense clusters become locked into a rigid gel network, despite the fluidity of the films between the droplets. The long-time high-q structure of nanoemulsion gels formed by slippery diffusion-limited cluster aggregation is universal in shape and remarkably independent of the droplet volume fraction, {phi}.

  6. Transport of gases and liquids through dense microbial cell aggregates cultured within hollow fiber membrane bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Libicki, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The transport properties of liquids and dissolved gases in microbial cell aggregates were examined. An annular hollow fiber membrane bioreactor designed for this purpose, allowed a cell aggregate of well-defined geometry to be cultured between two retaining fibers. The transport of an inert substance through a lamellar annular hollow fiber reactor has been modeled. Calculations showed that Starling flow, a weak toroidal flow in the reactor, may account for a large fraction of the solute transport. The theoretical predictions were verified experimentally. The effective diffusive permeability of a dissolved tracer (nitrous oxide) was measured in dense microbial cell aggregates (Escherichia coli) ranging from 15% to 95% cell volume fraction. The results showed that the diffusive permeability is a monotonically decreasing function of cell volume fraction and can be described by the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on transport in a two phase material. Using these bounds, the effective diffusive permeability of nitrous oxide in E. coli cells at 37/sup 0/C was estimated to be 8.6 x 10/sup -9/ mol/m s or 0.24 +/- 0.03 that of the diffusive permeability of the surrounding interstitial fluid. Similar measurements of the diffusive permeability of nitrous oxide in artificial aggregates (compacted cells) and disrupted microbial cells yielded virtually identical results, showing that cell structure and viability have only a small effect. The Darcy permeability of the same microbial aggregates, measured under very low flow conditions, was found to be only weakly dependent on cell volume fraction. Electron micrographs indicate that this was due to clustering of the cells which increased the effective particle size within the cell aggregate.

  7. Syntaxin 8 Regulates Platelet Dense Granule Secretion, Aggregation, and Thrombus Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Ewelina M.; Harper, Matthew T.; Williams, Christopher M.; Savage, Joshua S.; Goggs, Robert; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele; Poole, Alastair W.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet secretion not only drives thrombosis and hemostasis, but also mediates a variety of other physiological and pathological processes. The ubiquitous SNARE machinery and a number of accessory proteins have been implicated in regulating secretion in platelet. Although several platelet SNAREs have been identified, further members of the SNARE family may be needed to fine-tune platelet secretion. In this study we identified expression of the t-SNARE syntaxin 8 (STX8) (Qc SNARE) in mouse and human platelets. In mouse studies, whereas STX8 was not essential for α-granule or lysosome secretion, Stx8−/− platelets showed a significant defect in dense granule secretion in response to thrombin and CRP. This was most pronounced at intermediate concentrations of agonists. They also showed an aggregation defect that could be rescued with exogenous ADP and increased embolization in Stx8−/− mice in vivo consistent with an important autocrine and paracrine role for ADP in aggregation and thrombus stabilization. STX8 therefore specifically contributes to dense granule secretion and represents another member of a growing family of genes that play distinct roles in regulating granule release from platelets and thus platelet function in thrombosis and hemostasis. PMID:25404741

  8. An investigation of wide-angle dense-medium cycloning for the recovery of metal and aggregate from fine slag.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Eric R; Klima, Mark S

    2006-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of using wide-angle dense-medium cycloning to process a fine (-600 microm) stainless-steel slag. The slag was characterized by size and density using a combination of sieving and pycnometer measurements. Separation testing was carried out using a laboratory dense-medium cyclone to concentrate the stainless-steel fraction and produce a low-metal aggregate material. The effects of cyclone geometry (cone angle, underflow diameter, overflow diameter, cylinder length, and vortex finder length) and medium density on cyclone performance were evaluated. A Plackett-Burman statistical design was used to determine the significant variables as related to recovery and purity of the metal and aggregate products. Based on these results, full-factorial designs were performed at two different medium densities. Regression models relating the significant variables to product recovery and purity were developed for both the metal and aggregate fractions.

  9. Does Aggregate School-Wide Achievement Mediate Fifth Grade Outcomes for Former Early Childhood Education Participants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curenton, Stephanie M.; Dong, Nianbo; Shen, Xiangjin

    2015-01-01

    This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic…

  10. Dense and sparse aggregations in complex motion: Video coupled with simulation modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In censuses of aggregations composed of highly mobile animals, the link between image processing technology and simulation modeling remains relatively unexplored despite demonstrated ecological needs for abundance and density assessments. We introduce a framework that connects video censusing with ...

  11. Laplacian growth phenomena with the third boundary condition: Crossover from dense structure to diffusion-limited aggregation fractal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1989-12-01

    A Laplacian growth model with the third boundary condition, (1-P)∂Φ/∂n-PΦ=0, is considered in order to study the effect of the sticking probability of the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), where Φ is the harmonic function satisfying the Laplace equation and ∂Φ/∂n the derivative normal to the interface. The crossover from the dense structure to the DLA fractal is investigated by using a two-parameter position-space renormalization-group method. A global flow diagram in two-parameter space is obtained. It is found that there are two nontrivial fixed points, the Eden point and the DLA point. The DLA point corresponding to the DLA fractal is stable in all directions, while the Eden point is a saddle point. When the sticking probability P is not 1, the aggregate must eventually cross over to the DLA fractal. The crossover exponent φ and crossover radius r× are calculated.

  12. Does aggregate school-wide achievement mediate fifth grade outcomes for former early childhood education participants?

    PubMed

    Curenton, Stephanie M; Dong, Nianbo; Shen, Xiangjin

    2015-07-01

    This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic proficiency in reading or math. Research questions were: (a) Do ECE program participants have better achievement at 5th grade compared with their matched peers who did not participate in an ECE program?; and (b) Is the association between ECE attendance and 5th grade academic performance mediated by school-wide achievement? Results indicated that children who attended prekindergarten (pre-K) and child care outperformed their matched peers who had not attended ECE programs; conversely, those children who did not attend ECE actually outperformed their Head Start counterparts. Mediation analyses indicated that aggregate school-wide achievement at 5th grade partially mediated the association between former ECE attendance and 5th grade performance; however, these mediated effects were small. Overall, the size of the total effects of ECE and the 5th grade academic outcomes were consistent with prior studies. This research confirms the long-term effects of pre-K and child care until 5th grade. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Simultaneous interfacial rheology and microstructure measurement of densely aggregated particle laden interfaces using a modified double wall ring interfacial rheometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2014-08-19

    The study of particle laden interfaces has increased significantly due to the increasing industrial use of particle stabilized foams and Pickering emulsions, whose bulk rheology and stability are highly dependent on particle laden interface's interfacial rheology, which is a function of interfacial microstructure. To understand the physical mechanisms that dictate interfacial rheology of particle laden interfaces requires correlating rheology to microstructure. To achieve this goal, a double wall ring interfacial rheometer has been modified to allow real time, simultaneous interfacial visualization and shear rheology measurements. The development of this tool is outlined, and its ability to provide novel and unique measurements is demonstrated on a sample system. This tool has been used to examine the role of microstructure on the steady shear rheology of densely packed, aggregated particle laden interfaces at three surface concentrations. Through examination of the rheology and analysis of interfacial microstructure response to shear, a transition from shear thinning due to aggregated cluster breakup to yielding at a slip plane within the interface has been identified. Interestingly, it is found that aggregated interfaces transition to yielding well before they reached a jammed state. Furthermore, these systems undergo significant shear induced order when densely packed. These results indicate that the mechanics of these interfaces are not simply jammed or unjammed and that the interfacial rheology relationship with microstructure can give us significant insight into understanding how to engineer particle laden interfaces in the future. By examining both rheology and microstructure, the mechanisms that dictate observed rheology are now understood and can be used to predict and control the rheology of the interface.

  14. Graded alterations of RBC aggregation influence in vivo blood flow resistance.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Ozlem; Uyuklu, Murat; Armstrong, Jonathan K; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2004-12-01

    Although the effects of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on low-shear rate blood viscosity are well known, the effects on in vivo flow resistance are still not fully resolved. The present study was designed to explore the in vivo effects of RBC aggregation on flow resistance using a novel technique to enhance aggregation: cells are covalently coated with a block copolymer (Pluronic F-98) and then suspended in unaltered plasma. RBC aggregation was increased in graded steps by varying the Pluronic concentration during cell coating and was verified by microscopy and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), which increased by 200% at the highest Pluronic level. RBC suspensions were perfused through an isolated in situ guinea pig hindlimb preparation while the arterial perfusion pressure was held constant at 100 mmHg via a pressure servo-controlled pump. No significant effects of enhanced RBC aggregation were observed when studies were conducted in preparations with intact vascular control mechanisms. However, after inhibition of smooth muscle tone (using 10(-4) M papaverin), a significant change in flow resistance was observed in a RBC suspension with a 97% increase of ESR. Additional enhancements of RBC aggregation (i.e., 136 and 162% increases of ESR) decreased flow resistance almost to control values. This was followed by another significant increase in flow resistance during perfusion with RBC suspensions with a 200% increase of ESR. This triphasic effect of graded increases of RBC aggregation is most likely explained by an interplay of several hemodynamic mechanisms that are triggered by enhanced RBC aggregation.

  15. Atmospheric pressure creep experiments using highly dense fine-grained mineral aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraga, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Tasaka, M.; Sueyoshi, K.; Nakakoji, S.; Koizumi, S.; Yoshida, H.

    2012-12-01

    Historically in mineral and rock physics, atmospheric pressure creep tests have been used extensively to study the rheological properties of minerals through deformation of single crystals. This technique has several advantages including minimal friction effects on the loading column, which allows excellent stress resolution on the sample, and stable temperature control, which allows long duration experiments at relatively slow strain rates. The downside of atmospheric pressure experiments on polycrystalline samples is that cavities and cracks are easily introduced during the test, resulting in brittle failure of the specimen. It is generally found that the confining pressure should be larger than the applied differential stress to avoid failure due to microcracking. Consequently very few creep experiments under atmospheric pressure have been conducted on polycrystalline samples. We revisit this classic method of atmospheric pressure creep experiments by developing a technique to synthesize very fine grained aggregates with essentially zero porosity. So far, we are able to reach even 200 micron grain size for certain type of mineral assemblies. During grain size sensitive creep, we expect that the differential stress applied to the samples can be reduced 100 to 1000 times the stress to deform coarser grained samples at the same strain rate condition by reducing grain size of one order of magnitude. Taking into account of ~10 micron grain size as a common value in conventional experiments, we should be able to reduce the applied stress of > 2500 times. Such lowering the applied stress will help to prevent cracking and/or cavitation in the samples. Using this technique, we have been able to demonstrate (i) superplasticity, (ii) microstructural development comparable to that in observed natural mylonites, (iii) flow strength as a function of stress, grain size and temperature, (iv) the effect of the fraction of second phase on flow strength in poly-phase materials, (v

  16. Gel-Entrapped Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria as Models of Biofilm Infection Exhibit Growth in Dense Aggregates, Oxygen Limitation, Antibiotic Tolerance, and Heterogeneous Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Breana; Pitts, Betsey; Lauchnor, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    An experimental model that mimicked the structure and characteristics of in vivo biofilm infections, such as those occurring in the lung or in dermal wounds where no biomaterial surface is present, was developed. In these infections, microbial biofilm forms as cell aggregates interspersed in a layer of mucus or host matrix material. This structure was modeled by filling glass capillary tubes with an agarose gel that had been seeded with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and then incubating the gel biofilm in medium for up to 30 h. Confocal microscopy showed that the bacteria formed in discrete pockets distributed throughout the gel matrix. These aggregates enlarged over time and also developed a size gradient, with the clusters being larger near the nutrient- and oxygen-supplied interface and smaller at greater depths. Bacteria entrapped in gels for 24 h grew slowly (specific growth rate, 0.06 h−1) and were much less susceptible to oxacillin, minocycline, or ciprofloxacin than planktonic cells. Microelectrode measurements showed that the oxygen concentration decreased with depth into the gel biofilm, falling to values less than 3% of air saturation at depths of 500 μm. An anaerobiosis-responsive green fluorescent protein reporter gene for lactate dehydrogenase was induced in the region of the gel where the measured oxygen concentrations were low, confirming biologically relevant hypoxia. These results show that the gel biofilm model captures key features of biofilm infection in mucus or compromised tissue: formation of dense, distinct aggregates, reduced specific growth rates, local hypoxia, and antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27503656

  17. Combustion zone durability program-B. Task VIII. Sputter deposited ceramic and metallic coatings. Executive summary. [Graded metal; metal/ceramic layered; dense surface ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J. W.; Moss, R. W.; Hays, D. D.

    1980-11-01

    The graded metal coatings are of the CoCrAlY type modified by including high Cr surface compositions, gradients in Cr and Al composition, underlayers and graded Pt additions, and Hf substitutions for Y. The metal ceramic layered coatings consist of alternate metal (Ni, Ni-Cr, CoCrAlY or Pt) and ceramic (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or ZrO/sub 2/ + Y) layers. Investigations of dense surface ceramic coatings are directed towards methods for obtaining adherent impermeable ceramic protective coatings for gas turbine hot section components. Increased coating adherence is being sought through two coating designs intended to accomodate expansion and modulus mismatches at the coating-substrate interface.

  18. Dense Breasts

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatty tissue. On a mammogram, fatty tissue appears dark (radio-lucent) and the glandular and connective tissues ... white on mammography) and non-dense fatty tissue (dark on mammography) using a visual scale and assign ...

  19. Phylogenetic classification of human papillomavirus genotypes in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in women from a densely populated Brazilian urban region.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Denise Rocha; Sarian, Luis Otávio; Campos, Elisabete Aparecida; Rabelo-Santos, Sílvia Helena; Syrjänen, Kari; Derchain, Sophie Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) types may correlate with the biological potential and invasion risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2 and CIN 3). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between different combinations of HPV types and CIN severity. Cross-sectional study, at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp). Cervical samples from 106 women treated due to CIN 2 (18) or CIN 3 (88) were examined for specific HPV genotypes using Roche Linear Array (LA-HPV). The proportions of CIN 2 and CIN 3 in groups of women infected with the HPV phylogenetic groups A7 and A9 were compared. Three groups were formed: women with single infections; multiple infections; and the whole sample. Multiple infections were detected in 68 samples (64.7%). The most frequent high-risk genotypes detected (single/multiple) were HPV 16 (57.1%), HPV 58 (24.7%), HPV 33 (15.2%), HPV 52 (13.3%), HPV 31 (10.4%), HPV 51 (7.6%) and HPV 18 (6.6%). Women without infection with HPV species Alpha 9 were less likely to have CIN 3 than were their Alpha 9 HPV-infected counterparts. HPV 16 and/or HPV 18, with or without associations with other viral types, were more frequently found in women with CIN 3 than in those with CIN 2. The severity of high-grade CIN may be aggravated by the presence of HPV types included in the Alpha 9 phylogenetic classification and by infections including HPV 16 and 18, singly or in combination with other HPV genotypes.

  20. Dense topological spaces and dense continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwoah, Khaled A.

    2013-09-01

    There are several attempts to generalize (or "widen") the concept of topological space. This paper uses equivalence relations to generalize the concept of topological space via the concept of equivalence relations. By the generalization, we can introduce from particular topology on a nonempty set X many new topologies, we call anyone of these new topologies a dense topology. In addition, we formulate some simple properties of dense topologies and study suitable generalizations of the concepts of limit points, closeness and continuity, as well as Jackson, Nörlund and Hahn dense topologies.

  1. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  2. Management of pulpal floor perforation and grade II Furcation involvement using mineral trioxide aggregate and platelet rich fibrin: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bains, Rhythm; Bains, Vivek K; Loomba, Kapil; Verma, Kavita; Nasir, Afreena

    2012-09-01

    To report the management of an iatrogenic perforation of pulpal floor in the furcation of mandibular first molar, using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). Unpredictable endodontic root/pulp chamber floor perforations resulting in unacceptable high rate of clinical failure has now been a lesser threat with the advent of new technologies and biocompatible materials that utilize the applications of basic research along with tissue engineering concept in clinical practice. Present case report illustrates the use of MTA and platelet rich fibrin (PRF) for the repair of the perforation defect and regeneration of the lost periodontium in furcation area. Although, histologic events and reaction of MTA with PRF is not studied so far, however, the autologous and biocompatible nature of the components used for present treatment modalities seems to be beneficial for the long term clinical results obtained in our case.

  3. Management of pulpal floor perforation and grade II Furcation involvement using mineral trioxide aggregate and platelet rich fibrin: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rhythm; Bains, Vivek K.; Loomba, Kapil; Verma, Kavita; Nasir, Afreena

    2012-01-01

    To report the management of an iatrogenic perforation of pulpal floor in the furcation of mandibular first molar, using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). Unpredictable endodontic root/pulp chamber floor perforations resulting in unacceptable high rate of clinical failure has now been a lesser threat with the advent of new technologies and biocompatible materials that utilize the applications of basic research along with tissue engineering concept in clinical practice. Present case report illustrates the use of MTA and platelet rich fibrin (PRF) for the repair of the perforation defect and regeneration of the lost periodontium in furcation area. Although, histologic events and reaction of MTA with PRF is not studied so far, however, the autologous and biocompatible nature of the components used for present treatment modalities seems to be beneficial for the long term clinical results obtained in our case. PMID:23230369

  4. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  5. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  6. Cell aggregation: Packing soft grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Karttunen, M.

    2006-06-01

    Cellular aggregates may be considered as collections of membrane enclosed units with a pressure difference between the internal and external liquid phases. Cells are kept together by membrane adhesion and/or confined space compression. Pattern formation and, in particular, intercellular spacing have important roles in controlling solvent diffusion within such aggregates. A physical approach is used to study generic aspects of cellular packings in a confined space. Average material properties are derived from the free energy. The appearance of penetrating intercellular void channels is found to be critically governed by the cell wall adhesion mechanisms during the formation of dense aggregates. A fully relaxed aggregate efficiently hinders solvent diffusion at high hydrostatic pressures, while a small fraction (˜0.1) of adhesion related packing frustration is sufficient for breaking such a blockage even at high a pressure.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  8. Dense array expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joseph N.; Chen, LiangMing

    1999-10-01

    Various researchers have realized the value of implementing loop fusion to evaluate dense (pointwise) array expressions. Recently, the method of template metaprogramming in C++ has been used to significantly speed-up the evaluation of array expressions, allowing C++ programs to achieve performance comparable to or better than FORTRAN for numerical analysis applications. Unfortunately, the template metaprogramming technique suffers from several limitations in applicability, portability, and potential performance. We present a framework for evaluating dense array expressions in object-oriented programming languages. We demonstrate how this technique supports both common subexpression elimination and threaded implementation and compare its performance to object-library and hand-generated code.

  9. Predator Effects on Dense Zooplankton Aggregations in the Coastal Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    blue whale distribution at the Costa Rica Dome” 2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR Feb 22-18, 2010. Cowles, T.J., Benoit-Bird, K.J., Benfield...Seasonal timing of zooplankton and forage fish in the Columbia River plume and effects on marine juvenile salmon survival” 2010 Ocean Sciences...Society of America. Portland, OR. May 18-22, 2009. Kaltenberg, A.M.*, Benoit-Bird, K.J., Emmet, R. “Temporal patterns of fish and mesozooplankton near

  10. Oxygen limitation within a bacterial aggregate.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Aimee K; Arshad, Talha A; Fitzpatrick, Mignon; Connell, Jodi L; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Shear, Jason B; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-04-15

    ABSTRACT Cells within biofilms exhibit physiological heterogeneity, in part because of chemical gradients existing within these spatially structured communities. Previous work has examined how chemical gradients develop in large biofilms containing >10(8) cells. However, many bacterial communities in nature are composed of small, densely packed aggregates of cells (≤ 10(5) bacteria). Using a gelatin-based three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy, we confined the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa within picoliter-sized 3D "microtraps" that are permeable to nutrients, waste products, and other bioactive small molecules. We show that as a single bacterium grows into a maximally dense (10(12) cells ml(-1)) clonal population, a localized depletion of oxygen develops when it reaches a critical aggregate size of ~55 pl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chemical and phenotypic heterogeneity exists on the micrometer scale within small aggregate populations. IMPORTANCE Before developing into large, complex communities, microbes initially cluster into aggregates, and it is unclear if chemical heterogeneity exists in these ubiquitous micrometer-scale aggregates. We chose to examine oxygen availability within an aggregate since oxygen concentration impacts a number of important bacterial processes, including metabolism, social behaviors, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. By determining that oxygen availability can vary within aggregates containing ≤ 10(5) bacteria, we establish that physiological heterogeneity exists within P. aeruginosa aggregates, suggesting that such heterogeneity frequently exists in many naturally occurring small populations.

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  12. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  13. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  14. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  15. Stoichiometry and Physical Chemistry of Promiscuous Aggregate-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coan, Kristin E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Many false positives in early drug discovery owe to nonspecific inhibition by colloid-like aggregates of organic molecules. Despite their prevalence, little is known about aggregate concentration, structure, or dynamic equilibrium; the binding mechanism, stoichiometry with, and affinity for enzymes remain uncertain. To investigate the elementary question of concentration, we counted aggregate particles using flow cytometry. For seven aggregate-forming molecules, aggregates were not observed until the concentration of monomer crossed a threshold, indicating a “critical aggregation concentration” (CAC). Above the CAC, aggregate count increased linearly with added organic material, while the particles dispersed when diluted below the CAC. The concentration of monomeric organic molecule is constant above the CAC, as is the size of the aggregate particles. For two compounds that form large aggregates, nicardipine and miconazole, we measured particle numbers directly by flow cytometry, determining that the aggregate concentration just above the CAC ranged from 5 to 30 fM. By correlating inhibition of an enzyme with aggregate count for these two drugs, we determined that the stoichiometry of binding is about 10 000 enzyme molecules per aggregate particle. Using measured volumes for nicardipine and miconazole aggregate particles (2.1 × 1011 and 4.7 × 1010 Å3, respectively), computed monomer volumes, and the observation that past the CAC all additional monomer forms aggregate particles, we find that aggregates are densely packed particles. Finally, given their size and enzyme stoichiometry, all sequestered enzyme can be comfortably accommodated on the surface of the aggregate. PMID:18588298

  16. Aggregate breakup in a contracting nozzle.

    PubMed

    Soos, Miroslav; Ehrl, Lyonel; Bäbler, Matthäus U; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-01-05

    The breakup of dense aggregates in an extensional flow was investigated experimentally. The flow was realized by pumping the suspension containing the aggregates through a contracting nozzle. Variation of the cluster mass distribution during the breakage process was measured by small-angle light scattering. Because of the large size of primary particles and the dense aggregate structure image analysis was used to determine the shape and structure of the produced fragments. It was found, that neither aggregate structure, characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) = 2.7, nor shape, characterized by an average aspect ratio equal to 1.5, was affected by breakage. Several passes through the nozzle were required to reach the steady state. This is explained by the radial variation of the hydrodynamic stresses at the nozzle entrance, characterized through computational fluid dynamics, which implies that only the fraction of aggregates whose strength is smaller than the local hydrodynamic stress is broken during one pass through the nozzle. Scaling of the steady-state aggregate size as a function of the hydrodynamic stress was used to determine the aggregate strength.

  17. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Jungman, Gerard; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  18. Fragility in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Romain; Cates, Mike

    Dense suspensions can jam under shear when the volume fraction of solid material is large enough. In this work we investigate the mechanical properties of shear jammed suspensions with numerical simulations. In particular, we address the issue of the fragility of these systems, i.e., the type of mechanical response (elastic or plastic) they show when subject to a mechanical load differing from the one applied during their preparation history.

  19. Electron opaque structures in human platelets: which are or are not dense bodies?

    PubMed

    White, James G

    2008-09-01

    The dense bodies, also referred to as delta (delta) granules, present in human platelets are the storage sites for adenine nucleotides and serotonin. Stored products released following activation are important for platelet aggregation during hemostasis. Dense bodies are easily detected in thin sections of properly fixed platelets and in unfixed, unstained whole mount preparations. It is important to determine their presence and frequency with accuracy because they are absent or markedly reduced in platelet storage pool deficiency disorders. The present study has demonstrated that identification of dense bodies as not a simple matter. There are electron dense structures, including dense rings, glycosomes, "fuzzy" balls, chains, clusters and other dense elements, that may confuse the determination of true dense bodies. Even some alpha granules are sufficiently electron dense to be confused with delta granules when using densitometric techniques. The present work may prevent investigators from making diagnostic errors.

  20. Are energy dense diets also nutrient dense?

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Theresa A; O'Neil, Carol E; Mendoza, Jason; Liu, Yan; Zakeri, Issa F; Berenson, Gerald S

    2008-10-01

    Some beverages are nutrient dense, but they are often excluded from nutrient density calculations. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the energy-nutrient association changed when beverages were included in these calculations. Applying a cross-sectional design, a 24-hour dietary recall was collected on each participant. Subjects/ 440 young adults (ages 19-28 years) in Bogalusa, Louisiana participated in this study. Mean nutrient intakes and food group consumption were examined across the energy density (ED) tertiles using two calculation methods: one with food and all beverages (excluding water) (ED1) and one including food and only energy containing beverages (ED2). Regression models were used and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey-Kramer procedure. A p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. With increasing ED, there was a significant increase in the consumption of total meats (ED1 p < 0.05; ED2 p < 0.01). In contrast, there was a significant decrease in consumption of fruits/juices (ED1 p < 0.01; ED2 p < 0.0001), vegetables (ED1 p < 0.01; ED2 p < 0.05), beverages (both p < 0.0001) and total sweets with increasing ED (both p < 0.0001). There was a significantly higher mean intake of total protein (grams) (ED2 p < 0.0001), amino acids (ED1 histidine/leucine p < 0.05; ED2 p < 0.0001), and total fat (grams) (ED1 p < 0.0001; ED2 p < 0.0001) with higher ED compared to lower ED. The percent energy from protein (ED1 p < 0.05; ED2 p < 0.0001), total fat (both p < 0.001) and saturated fatty acids (both p < 0.0001) significantly increased and the percent energy from carbohydrate (both p < 0.0001) and sucrose (both p < 0.0001) significantly decreased with increasing ED. This study suggests that ED may influence the ND of the diet depending on whether energy containing beverages are included or excluded in the analysis.

  1. Are Energy Dense Diets Also Nutrient Dense?

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Theresa A.; O’Neil, Carol E.; Mendoza, Jason; Liu, Yan; Zakeri, Issa F.; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Some beverages are nutrient dense, but they are often excluded from nutrient density calculations. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the energy-nutrient association changed when beverages were included in these calculations. Design Applying a cross-sectional design, a 24-hour dietary recall was collected on each participant. Subjects/Setting 440 young adults (ages 19–28 years) in Bogalusa, Louisiana participated in this study. Statistical Analysis Mean nutrient intakes and food group consumption were examined across the energy density (ED) tertiles using two calculation methods: one with food and all beverages (excluding water) (ED1) and one including food and only energy containing beverages (ED2). Regression models were used and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey-Kramer procedure. A p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results With increasing ED, there was a significant increase in the consumption of total meats (ED1 p < 0.05; ED2 p < 0.01). In contrast, there was a significant decrease in consumption of fruits/juices (ED1 p < 0.01; ED2 p < 0.0001), vegetables (ED1 p < 0.01; ED2 p < 0.05), beverages (both p < 0.0001) and total sweets with increasing ED (both p < 0.0001). There was a significantly higher mean intake of total protein (grams) (ED2 p < 0.0001), amino acids (ED1 histidine/leucine p < 0.05; ED2 p < 0.0001), and total fat (grams) (ED1 p < 0.0001; ED2 p < 0.0001) with higher ED compared to lower ED. The percent energy from protein (ED1 p < 0.05; ED2 p < 0.0001), total fat (both p < 0.001) and saturated fatty acids (both p < 0.0001) significantly increased and the percent energy from carbohydrate (both p < 0.0001) and sucrose (both p < 0.0001) significantly decreased with increasing ED. Conclusion This study suggests that ED may influence the ND of the diet depending on whether energy containing beverages are included or excluded in the analysis. PMID:18845705

  2. Dense cold baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinskiy, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    A possibility of studying cold nuclear matter on the Nuclotron-NICA facility at baryonic densities characteristic of and higher than at the center of a neutron star is considered based on the data from cumulative processes. A special rare-event kinematic trigger for collisions of relativistic ions is proposed for effective selection of events accompanied by production of dense baryonic systems. Possible manifestations of new matter states under these unusual conditions and an experimental program for their study are discussed. Various experimental setups are proposed for these studies, and a possibility of using experimental setups at the Nuclotron-NICA facility for this purpose is considered.

  3. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  4. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  5. Dense Axion Stars.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  6. Dense suspension splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Schaarsberg, Martin H. Klein; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2014-11-01

    Impact of a dense suspension drop onto a solid surface at speeds of several meters-per-second splashes by ejecting individual liquid-coated particles. Suppression or reduction of this splash is important for thermal spray coating and additive manufacturing. Accomplishing this aim requires distinguishing whether the splash is generated by individual scattering events or by collective motion reminiscent of liquid flow. Since particle inertia dominates over surface tension and viscous drag in a strong splash, we model suspension splash using a discrete-particle simulation in which the densely packed macroscopic particles experience inelastic collisions but zero friction or cohesion. Numerical results based on this highly simplified model are qualitatively consistent with observations. They also show that approximately 70% of the splash is generated by collective motion. Here an initially downward-moving particle is ejected into the splash because it experiences a succession of low-momentum-change collisions whose effects do not cancel but instead accumulate. The remainder of the splash is generated by scattering events in which a small number of high-momentum-change collisions cause a particle to be ejected upwards. Current Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

  7. Dense Suspension Splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-03-01

    Upon impact onto a solid surface at several meters-per-second, a dense suspension plug splashes by ejecting liquid-coated particles. We study the mechanism for splash formation using experiments and a numerical model. In the model, the dense suspension is idealized as a collection of cohesionless, rigid grains with finite surface roughness. The grains also experience lubrication drag as they approach, collide inelastically and rebound away from each other. Simulations using this model reproduce the measured momentum distribution of ejected particles. They also provide direct evidence supporting the conclusion from earlier experiments that inelastic collisions, rather than viscous drag, dominate when the suspension contains macroscopic particles immersed in a low-viscosity solvent such as water. Finally, the simulations reveal two distinct routes for splash formation: a particle can be ejected by a single high momentum-change collision. More surprisingly, a succession of small momentum-change collisions can accumulate to eject a particle outwards. Supported by NSF through its MRSEC program (DMR-0820054) and fluid dynamics program (CBET-1336489).

  8. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  9. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  10. ITRI Informational Text Reading Inventory: Grade 3 Teacher Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Innovation in Assessment (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Grade 3 Informational Text Reading Inventory (ITRI) was developed to address the specific reading challenges that grade 3 students encounter as they move from reading largely narrative textbooks in grade 2 to being expected to read and comprehend more dense and content-driven text in grade 3. This booklet contains all of the information…

  11. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  12. Grade Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renchler, Ron

    2000-01-01

    This issue reviews grade span, or grade configuration. Catherine Paglin and Jennifer Fager's "Grade Configuration: Who Goes Where?" provides an overview of issues and concerns related to grade spans and supplies profiles of eight Northwest schools with varying grade spans. David F. Wihry, Theodore Coladarci, and Curtis Meadow's…

  13. Hemodynamic effects of red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2007-01-01

    The influence of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on blood flow in vivo has been under debate since early 1900's, yet a full understanding has still has not been reached. Enhanced RBC aggregation is well known to increase blood viscosity measured in rotational viscometers. However, it has been demonstrated that RBC aggregation may decrease flow resistance in cylindrical tubes, due to the formation of a cell-poor zone near the tube wall which results from the enhanced central accumulation of RBC. There is also extensive discussion regarding the effects of RBC aggregation on in vivo blood flow resistance. Several groups have reported increased microcirculatory flow resistance with enhanced RBC aggregation in experiments that utilized intravital microscopy. Alternatively, whole organ studies revealed that flow resistance may be significantly decreased if RBC aggregation is enhanced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to achieve well-controlled, graded alterations in RBC aggregation without influencing suspending phase properties. Studies using this technique revealed that the effects of RBC aggregation are determined by the degree of aggregation changes, and that this relationship can be explained by different hemodynamic mechanisms.

  14. Dense Deposit Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard J.H; Harris, Claire L.; Pickering, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD) is an orphan disease that primarily affects children and young adults without sexual predilection. Studies of its pathophysiology have shown conclusively that it is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative pathway of complement, however the role played by genetics and autoantibodies like C3 nephritic factors must be more thoroughly defined if we are to make an impact in the clinical management of this disease. There are currently no mechanism-directed therapies to offer affected patients, half of whom progress to end stage renal failure disease within 10 years of diagnosis. Transplant recipients face the dim prospect of disease recurrence in their allografts, half of which ultimately fail. More detailed genetic and complement studies of DDD patients may make it possible to identify protective factors prognostic for naïve kidney and transplant survival, or conversely risk factors associated with progression to renal failure and allograft loss. The pathophysiology of DDD suggests that a number of different treatments warrant consideration. As advances are made in these areas, there will be a need to increase healthcare provider awareness of DDD by making resources available to clinicians to optimize care for DDD patients. PMID:21601923

  15. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  16. Mercury's Densely Cratered Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10 took this picture (FDS 27465) of the densely cratered surface of Mercury when the spacecraft was 18,200 kilometers (8085 miles) from the planet on March 29. The dark line across top of picture is a 'dropout' of a few TV lines of data. At lower left, a portion of a 61 kilometer (38 mile) crater shows a flow front extending across the crater floor and filling more than half of the crater. The smaller, fresh crater at center is about 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter. Craters as small as one kilometer (about one-half mile) across are visible in the picture.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  17. Graded/Gradient Porous Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xigeng; Sun, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials include bioceramics, biometals, biopolymers and biocomposites and they play important roles in the replacement and regeneration of human tissues. However, dense bioceramics and dense biometals pose the problem of stress shielding due to their high Young’s moduli compared to those of bones. On the other hand, porous biomaterials exhibit the potential of bone ingrowth, which will depend on porous parameters such as pore size, pore interconnectivity, and porosity. Unfortunately, a highly porous biomaterial results in poor mechanical properties. To optimise the mechanical and the biological properties, porous biomaterials with graded/gradient porosity, pores size, and/or composition have been developed. Graded/gradient porous biomaterials have many advantages over graded/gradient dense biomaterials and uniform or homogenous porous biomaterials. The internal pore surfaces of graded/gradient porous biomaterials can be modified with organic, inorganic, or biological coatings and the internal pores themselves can also be filled with biocompatible and biodegradable materials or living cells. However, graded/gradient porous biomaterials are generally more difficult to fabricate than uniform or homogenous porous biomaterials. With the development of cost-effective processing techniques, graded/gradient porous biomaterials can find wide applications in bone defect filling, implant fixation, bone replacement, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  18. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Objective was to develop a lightweight, high alumina refractory aggregate for use in various high performance insulating (low thermal conductivity) refractory applications (e.g., in the aluminium, glass, cement, and iron and steel industries). A new aggregate process was developed through bench and pilot-scale experiments involving extrusion of a blend of calcined and activated alumina powders and organic extrusion aids and binders. The aggregate, with a bulk density approaching 2.5 g/cc, exhibited reduced thermal conductivity and adequate fired strength compared to dense tabular aggregate. Refractory manufacturers were moderately enthusiastic over the results. Alcoa prepared an economic analysis for producing lightweight aggregate, based on a retrofit of this process into existing Alcoa production facilities. However, a new, competing lightweight aggregate material was developed by another company; this material (Plasmal{trademark})had a significantly more favorable cost base than the Alcoa/DOE material, due to cheap raw materials and fewer processing steps. In late 1995, Alcoa became a distributor of Plasmal. Alcoa estimated that {ge}75% of the market originally envisioned for the Alcoa/DOE aggregate would be taken by Plasmal. Hence, it was decided to terminate the contract without the full- scale demonstration.

  19. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  20. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  1. Conductive dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M.; Troyan, I.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen at ambient pressures and low temperatures forms a molecular crystal which is expected to display metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature Tc of 200-400 K. The superconductor may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures, and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. Recent experiments performed at low temperatures T < 100 K showed that at record pressures of 300 GPa, hydrogen remains in the molecular state and is an insulator with a band gap of appr 2 eV. Given our current experimental and theoretical understanding, hydrogen is expected to become metallic at pressures of 400-500 GPa, beyond the current limits of static pressures achievable using diamond anvil cells. We found that at room temperature and pressure > 220 GPa, new Raman modes arose, providing evidence for the transformation to a new opaque and electrically conductive phase IV. Above 260 GPa, in the next phase V, hydrogen reflected light well. Its resistance was nearly temperature-independent over a wide temperature range, down to 30 K, indicating that the hydrogen was metallic. Releasing the pressure induced the metallic phase to transform directly into molecular hydrogen with significant hysteresis at 200 GPa and 295 K. These data were published in our paper: M. I. Eremets and I. A. Troyan "Conductive dense hydrogen." Nature Materials 10: 927-931. We will present also new results on hydrogen: phase diagram with phases IV and V determined in P,T domain up to 300 GPa and 350 K. We will also discuss possible structures of phase IV based on our Raman and infrared measurements up to 300 GPa.

  2. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  3. Compatibility of Medical-Grade Polymers with Dense CO2

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, A; Thompson, G L; Matthews, M A; Davis, T A; Crocker, K; Lyons, J S; Trapotsis, A

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the effect of exposure to liquid carbon dioxide on the mechanical properties of selected medical polymers. The tensile strengths and moduli of fourteen polymers are reported. Materials were exposed to liquid CO2, or CO2 + trace amounts of aqueous H2O2, at 6.5 MPa and ambient temperature. Carbon dioxide uptake, swelling, and distortion were observed for the more amorphous polymers while polymers with higher crystallinity showed little effect from CO2 exposure. Changes in tensile strength were not statistically significant for most plastics, and most indicated good tolerance to liquid CO2. These results are relevant to evaluating the potential of liquid CO2-based sterilization technology. PMID:19756235

  4. 7 CFR 810.604 - Grades and grade requirements for flaxseed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Requirements § 810.604 Grades and grade requirements for flaxseed. Grade Minimum test weight per bushel (pounds... aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass, 3 or more... pellets, bird dropping, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8 to 11/4 quarts of flaxseed...

  5. 7 CFR 810.1204 - Grades and grade requirements for rye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.1204 Grades and grade requirements for rye. Grade Minimum test weight per... which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass...), 2 or more rodent pellets, bird droppings, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8 to...

  6. 7 CFR 810.1204 - Grades and grade requirements for rye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.1204 Grades and grade requirements for rye. Grade Minimum test weight per... which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass...), 2 or more rodent pellets, bird droppings, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8 to...

  7. 7 CFR 810.2004 - Grades and grade requirements for triticale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.2004 Grades and grade requirements for triticale. Grade Minimum test weight per..., 3, or 4; or (b) Contains 8 or more stones or any number of stones which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass, 3 or more crotalaria seeds...

  8. 7 CFR 810.1004 - Grades and grade requirements for oats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.1004 Grades and grade requirements for oats. Grade Minimum limits— Test weight...) Contain 8 or more stones which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2... combination, 10 or more rodent pellets, bird droppings, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8...

  9. 7 CFR 810.2004 - Grades and grade requirements for triticale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.2004 Grades and grade requirements for triticale. Grade Minimum test weight per..., 3, or 4; or (b) Contains 8 or more stones or any number of stones which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass, 3 or more crotalaria seeds...

  10. 7 CFR 810.604 - Grades and grade requirements for flaxseed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Requirements § 810.604 Grades and grade requirements for flaxseed. Grade Minimum test weight per bushel (pounds... aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass, 3 or more... pellets, bird dropping, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8 to 11/4 quarts of flaxseed...

  11. 7 CFR 810.1004 - Grades and grade requirements for oats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.1004 Grades and grade requirements for oats. Grade Minimum limits— Test weight...) Contain 8 or more stones which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2... combination, 10 or more rodent pellets, bird droppings, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8...

  12. 7 CFR 810.1204 - Grades and grade requirements for rye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Application of Standards § 810.1204 Grades and grade requirements for rye. Grade Minimum test weight per... which have an aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass...), 2 or more rodent pellets, bird droppings, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8 to...

  13. 7 CFR 810.604 - Grades and grade requirements for flaxseed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements § 810.604 Grades and grade requirements for flaxseed. Grade Minimum test weight per bushel (pounds... aggregate weight in excess of 0.2 percent of the sample weight, 2 or more pieces of glass, 3 or more... pellets, bird dropping, or equivalent quantity of other animal filth per 11/8 to 11/4 quarts of flaxseed...

  14. Effects of Computer Use on Mathematics Achievement. Findings from a Nationwide Field Experiment in Grades Five to Eight. Classes: Rationale, Study Design, and Aggregate Effect Sizes. Report No. 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Henry J.

    Since the mid-1980's, computers in elementary and middle grade schools have functioned to a large extent as a medium for student practice in the skills and concepts of basic mathematics and logic. This report presents the results of a 2-year nationwide field experiment designed to provide credible evidence about the effects of using computers in…

  15. Growth hormone aggregates in the rat adenohypophysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, M.; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although it has been known for some time that GH aggregates are contained within the rat anterior pituitary gland, the role that they might play in pituitary function is unknown. The present study examines this issue using the technique of Western blotting, which permitted visualization of 11 GH variants with apparent mol wt ranging from 14-88K. Electroelution of the higher mol wt variants from gels followed by their chemical reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. With the blot procedure we found 1) that GH aggregates greater than 44K were associated with a 40,000 x g sedimentable fraction; 2) that GH aggregates were not present in glands from thyroidectomized rats, but were in glands from the thyroidectomized rats injected with T4; 3) that GH aggregates were uniquely associated with a heavily granulated somatotroph subpopulation isolated by density gradient centrifugation; and 4) that high mol wt GH forms were released from the dense somatotrophs in culture, since treatment of the culture medium with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. Taken together, the results show that high mol wt GH aggregates are contained in secretory granules of certain somatotrophs and are also released in aggregate form from these cells in vitro.

  16. Growth hormone aggregates in the rat adenohypophysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, M.; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although it has been known for some time that GH aggregates are contained within the rat anterior pituitary gland, the role that they might play in pituitary function is unknown. The present study examines this issue using the technique of Western blotting, which permitted visualization of 11 GH variants with apparent mol wt ranging from 14-88K. Electroelution of the higher mol wt variants from gels followed by their chemical reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. With the blot procedure we found 1) that GH aggregates greater than 44K were associated with a 40,000 x g sedimentable fraction; 2) that GH aggregates were not present in glands from thyroidectomized rats, but were in glands from the thyroidectomized rats injected with T4; 3) that GH aggregates were uniquely associated with a heavily granulated somatotroph subpopulation isolated by density gradient centrifugation; and 4) that high mol wt GH forms were released from the dense somatotrophs in culture, since treatment of the culture medium with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. Taken together, the results show that high mol wt GH aggregates are contained in secretory granules of certain somatotrophs and are also released in aggregate form from these cells in vitro.

  17. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.; Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  18. Antartic Krill Cohort Determines Dominant Aggregation Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, K. S.; Cimino, M. A.; Fraser, W.; Kohut, J. T.; Oliver, M. J.; Patterson-Fraser, D.; Paxton, D.; Raycroft, S.; Statscewich, H.; Steinberg, D. K.; Winsor, P.

    2016-02-01

    Antarctic krill is a key prey item to numerous top predators along the western Antarctic Peninsula. Krill form aggregations of varying size and packing density, found at a wide range of depths within the water column, either sparsely or densely spaced together. Differences in the structure of krill aggregations will impact the availability of krill as prey. The population of Antarctic krill fluctuates over a 5-year period, typically with two strong recruitment years followed by 3 poor recruitment years, resulting in significant variability in the biomass and dominant cohort from year to year. We hypothesized that a shift in the dominant cohort would be accompanied by a shift in the dominant aggregation type. We investigated the aggregation structure of nearshore Antarctic krill over four sequential summers (2011-12 through 2014-15). The summers of 2011-12 and 2012-13 showed strong krill recruitment (juveniles < 30 mm dominated), while 2013-14 and 2014-15 were marked by reduced recruitment (adults > 30 mm dominated). Krill were acoustically mapped (Biosonics DT-X echo sounder) from a Zodiac within a 2-mile radius of Palmer Station. Aggregation parameters (e.g. depth, thickness, length, krill biomass, etc.) were described for each individual aggregation. These were used to group aggregations into similar types using a Principle Components Analysis followed by a Partitioning Around Medoids cluster analysis. Four distinctly different aggregation types were identified and the frequency at which these were observed varied significantly between summers. In particular, in 2011-12, krill aggregations were dominated by those that were near-surface, long and narrow, with high biomass and closely spaced together. Conversely in 2013-14, large, sparsely distributed, near-bottom aggregations, with high biomass dominated. Our results suggest a shift in aggregation structure and, consequently, availability to foraging top predators, with dominant cohort. Understanding inter annual

  19. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  20. On mean type aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yager, R R

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of mean aggregation of a collection of n numbers. We point out that the lack of associativity of this operation compounds the problem of the extending mean of n numbers to n+1 numbers. The closely related concepts of self identity and the centering property are introduced as one imperative for extending mean aggregation operators. The problem of weighted mean aggregation is studied. A new concept of prioritized mean aggregation is then introduced. We next show that the technique of selecting an element based upon the performance of a random experiment can be considered as a mean aggregation operation.

  1. Parametric bleaching of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the nonlinear bleaching of a dense plasma slab. In this new mechanism, the electromagnetic wave incident on the plasma decays into plasma waves and then reappears as a result of the coalescence of the plasma waves at the second boundary of the slab.

  2. External quality assessment of platelet disorder investigations: results of international surveys on diagnostic tests for dense granule deficiency and platelet aggregometry interpretation.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Catherine P M; Moffat, Karen A; Plumhoff, Elizabeth; Timleck, Marnie; Hoffman, Suzanne; Spitzer, Ernie; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Meijer, Piet

    2012-09-01

    The quality of platelet aggregation and dense granule deficiency testing is important for diagnosing platelet function disorders. After a successful pilot exercise on diagnosing platelet dense granule deficiency by electron microscopy (EM), the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association (NASCOLA) has launched regular external quality assurance (EQA) for dense granule EM, as well as for the interpretation of platelet aggregation findings. EQA records were analyzed to assess performance. For EM EQA, between 2009 and 2011, there was excellent performance in distinguishing normal from dense granule-deficient samples and good (>70%) agreement on classifying most electron dense structures in platelets. For aggregation EQA, some normal variants were misclassified and overall case interpretations were more acceptable for rare disorders than for common findings. NASCOLA experiences with these EQAs indicate that there is a need to improve the quality of platelet disorder evaluations. For aggregometry interpretations, deficits in performance could be addressed by translating guideline recommendations into practice.

  3. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  4. Radiative properties of dense nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Fedorov, Andrei G; Luo, Zhongyang; Ni, Mingjiang

    2012-09-01

    The radiative properties of dense nanofluids are investigated. For nanofluids, scattering and absorbing of electromagnetic waves by nanoparticles, as well as light absorption by the matrix/fluid in which the nanoparticles are suspended, should be considered. We compare five models for predicting apparent radiative properties of nanoparticulate media and evaluate their applicability. Using spectral absorption and scattering coefficients predicted by different models, we compute the apparent transmittance of a nanofluid layer, including multiple reflecting interfaces bounding the layer, and compare the model predictions with experimental results from the literature. Finally, we propose a new method to calculate the spectral radiative properties of dense nanofluids that shows quantitatively good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Boundary Preserving Dense Local Regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaechul; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-05-01

    We propose a dense local region detector to extract features suitable for image matching and object recognition tasks. Whereas traditional local interest operators rely on repeatable structures that often cross object boundaries (e.g., corners, scale-space blobs), our sampling strategy is driven by segmentation, and thus preserves object boundaries and shape. At the same time, whereas existing region-based representations are sensitive to segmentation parameters and object deformations, our novel approach to robustly sample dense sites and determine their connectivity offers better repeatability. In extensive experiments, we find that the proposed region detector provides significantly better repeatability and localization accuracy for object matching compared to an array of existing feature detectors. In addition, we show our regions lead to excellent results on two benchmark tasks that require good feature matching: weakly supervised foreground discovery and nearest neighbor-based object recognition.

  6. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  7. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  8. Marine Synechococcus Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuer, S.; Deng, W.; Cruz, B. N.; Monks, L.

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to play an important role in the oceanic biological carbon pump, especially in oligotrophic regions. But as single cells are too small to sink, their carbon export has to be mediated by aggregate formation and possible consumption by zooplankton producing sinking fecal pellets. Here we report results on the aggregation of the ubiquitous marine pico-cyanobacterium Synechococcus as a model organism. We first investigated the mechanism behind such aggregation by studying the potential role of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) and the effects of nutrient (nitrogen or phosphorus) limitation on the TEP production and aggregate formation of these pico-cyanobacteria. We further studied the aggregation and subsequent settling in roller tanks and investigated the effects of the clays kaolinite and bentonite in a series of concentrations. Our results show that despite of the lowered growth rates, Synechococcus in nutrient limited cultures had larger cell-normalized TEP production, formed a greater volume of aggregates, and resulted in higher settling velocities compared to results from replete cultures. In addition, we found that despite their small size and lack of natural ballasting minerals, Synechococcus cells could still form aggregates and sink at measureable velocities in seawater. Clay minerals increased the number and reduced the size of aggregates, and their ballasting effects increased the sinking velocity and carbon export potential of aggregates. In comparison with the Synechococcus, we will also present results of the aggregation of the pico-cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus in roller tanks. These results contribute to our understanding in the physiology of marine Synechococcus as well as their role in the ecology and biogeochemistry in oligotrophic oceans.

  9. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  10. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  11. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  12. Tumor Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... much of the tumor tissue has normal breast (milk) duct structures Nuclear grade : an evaluation of the ...

  13. Grading Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Okuchi, Sachi; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tsutomu; Yamauchi, Moritaka; Kataoka, Masako; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Jun C.; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose was to compare capability of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and thallium-201 (Tl)-SPECT for grading meningioma. This retrospective study was conducted as a case-control study under approval by the institutional review board. In the hospital information system, 67 patients (22 men and 45 women) who had both FDG-PET and Tl-SPECT preoperative examinations were found with histopathologic diagnosis of meningioma. The maximum FDG uptake values of the tumors were measured, and they were standardized to the whole body (SUVmax) and normalized as gray matter ratio (SUVRmax). Mean and maximum Tl uptake ratios (TURmean and TURmax, respectively) of the tumors were measured and normalized as ratios to those of the contralateral normal brain. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses of the 4 indexes were conducted for differentiation between low- and high-grade meningiomas, and areas under the curves (AUCs) were compared. Correlation coefficients were calculated between these indexes and Ki-67. Fifty-six meningiomas were classified as grade I (low grade), and 11 were grade II or III (high grade). In all 4 indexes, a significant difference was observed between low- and high-grade meningiomas (P < 0.05). AUCs were 0.817 (SUVmax), 0.781 (SUVRmax), 0.810 (TURmean), and 0.831 (TURmax), and no significant difference was observed among the indexes. Their sensitivity and specificity were 72.7% to 90.9% and 71.4% to 87.5%, respectively. Correlation of the 4 indexes to Ki-67 was statistically significant, but coefficients were relatively low (0.273–0.355). Tl-SPECT, which can be used at hospitals without a cyclotron or an FDG distribution network, has high diagnostic capability of meningioma grades comparable to FDG-PET. PMID:25674763

  14. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, P.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; de Jager, C. W.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Zheng, X.-C.; Zhu, L.

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  15. Probing cold dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Subedi, R; Shneor, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; de Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X-C; Zhu, L

    2008-06-13

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  16. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  17. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  18. Propagation of Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-30

    Since 2009, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau aggregates form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of Tau aggregates is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighbouring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induced the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Short fibrils constituted the major species of seed-competent Tau. The existence of several human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  19. Marine aggregate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The direction and scope of the Office of Naval Research's Marine Aggregate Dynamics Accelerated Research Initiative will be the topic of an open-house style meeting February 14, 7:30-10:00 P.M. in Ballroom D of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans at the Louisiana Superdome. This meeting is scheduled during the AGU/American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Ocean Sciences Meeting February 12-16 in New Orleans.The critical focus of the ARI is the measurement and modeling of the dynamics of the biological, physical, chemical and molecular processes that drive aggregation and produce aggregates. This new ARI will provide funding in Fiscal Years 1991-1995 to identify and quantify mechanisms that determine the distribution, abundance and size spectrum of aggregated particulate matter in the ocean.

  20. Aggregation and Averaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.

    The arithmetic processes of aggregation and averaging are basic to quantitative investigations of employment, unemployment, and related concepts. In explaining these concepts, this report stresses need for accuracy and consistency in measurements, and describes tools for analyzing alternative measures. (BH)

  1. Aggregation of retail stores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Pablo; Boisson, Jean; Larralde, Hernán

    2005-06-01

    We propose a simple model to understand the economic factors that induce aggregation of some businesses over small geographical regions. The model incorporates price competition with neighboring stores, transportation costs and the satisfaction probability of finding the desired product. We show that aggregation is more likely for stores selling expensive products and/or stores carrying only a fraction of the business variety. We illustrate our model with empirical data collected in the city of Lyon.

  2. Optically transparent dense colloidal gels

    PubMed Central

    Zupkauskas, M.; Lan, Y.; Joshi, D.; Ruff, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally it has been difficult to study the porous structure of dense colloidal gels and (macro) molecular transport through them simply because of the difference in refractive index between the colloid material and the continuous fluid phase surrounding it, rendering the samples opaque even at low colloidal volume fractions. Here, we demonstrate a novel colloidal gel that can be refractive index-matched in aqueous solutions owing to the low refractive index of fluorinated latex (FL)-particles (n = 1.37). Synthesizing them from heptafluorobutyl methacrylate using emulsion polymerization, we demonstrate that they can be functionalized with short DNA sequences via a dense brush-layer of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) block-copolymers (PS-PEO). The block-copolymer, holding an azide group at the free PEO end, was grafted to the latex particle utilizing a swelling–deswelling method. Subsequently, DNA was covalently attached to the azide-end of the block copolymer via a strain-promoted alkyne–azide click reaction. For comparison, we present a structural study of single gels made of FL-particles only and composite gels made of a percolating FL-colloid gel coated with polystyrene (PS) colloids. Further we demonstrate that the diffusivity of tracer colloids dispersed deep inside a refractive index matched FL-colloidal gel can be measured as function of the local confinement using Dynamic Differential Microscopy (DDM). PMID:28970935

  3. Magnetism in Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    We review the mechanisms via which an external magnetic field can affect the ground state of cold and dense quark matter. In the absence of a magnetic field, at asymptotically high densities, cold quark matter is in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase of color superconductivity characterized by three scales: the superconducting gap, the gluon Meissner mass, and the baryonic chemical potential. When an applied magnetic field becomes comparable with each of these scales, new phases and/or condensates may emerge. They include the magnetic CFL (MCFL) phase that becomes relevant for fields of the order of the gap scale; the paramagnetic CFL, important when the field is of the order of the Meissner mass, and a spin-one condensate associated to the magnetic moment of the Cooper pairs, significant at fields of the order of the chemical potential. We discuss the equation of state (EoS) of MCFL matter for a large range of field values and consider possible applications of the magnetic effects on dense quark matter to the astrophysics of compact stars.

  4. Dense crystalline packings of ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Weiwei; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Lufeng; Yuan, Ye; Li, Shuixiang

    2017-03-01

    An ellipsoid, the simplest nonspherical shape, has been extensively used as a model for elongated building blocks for a wide spectrum of molecular, colloidal, and granular systems. Yet the densest packing of congruent hard ellipsoids, which is intimately related to the high-density phase of many condensed matter systems, is still an open problem. We discover an unusual family of dense crystalline packings of self-dual ellipsoids (ratios of the semiaxes α : √{α }:1 ), containing 24 particles with a quasi-square-triangular (SQ-TR) tiling arrangement in the fundamental cell. The associated packing density ϕ exceeds that of the densest known SM2 crystal [ A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255506 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.255506] for aspect ratios α in (1.365, 1.5625), attaining a maximal ϕ ≈0.758 06 ... at α = 93 /64 . We show that the SQ-TR phase derived from these dense packings is thermodynamically stable at high densities over the aforementioned α range and report a phase diagram for self-dual ellipsoids. The discovery of the SQ-TR crystal suggests organizing principles for nonspherical particles and self-assembly of colloidal systems.

  5. Protein aggregation and prionopathies.

    PubMed

    Renner, M; Melki, R

    2014-06-01

    Prion protein and prion-like proteins share a number of characteristics. From the molecular point of view, they are constitutive proteins that aggregate following conformational changes into insoluble particles. These particles escape the cellular clearance machinery and amplify by recruiting the soluble for of their constituting proteins. The resulting protein aggregates are responsible for a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jacob, Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington diseases. In addition, there are increasing evidences supporting the inter-cellular trafficking of these aggregates, meaning that they are "transmissible" between cells. There are also evidences that brain homogenates from individuals developing Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases propagate the disease in recipient model animals in a manner similar to brain extracts of patients developing Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease. Thus, the propagation of protein aggregates from cell to cell may be a generic phenomenon that contributes to the evolution of neurodegenerative diseases, which has important consequences on human health issues. Moreover, although the distribution of protein aggregates is characteristic for each disease, new evidences indicate the possibility of overlaps and crosstalk between the different disorders. Despite the increasing evidences that support prion or prion-like propagation of protein aggregates, there are many unanswered questions regarding the mechanisms of toxicity and this is a field of intensive research nowadays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing relationships among properties of demolished concrete, recycled aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete using regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Wang, K; Tam, C M

    2008-04-01

    Recycled demolished concrete (DC) as recycled aggregate (RA) and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is generally suitable for most construction applications. Low-grade applications, including sub-base and roadwork, have been implemented in many countries; however, higher-grade activities are rarely considered. This paper examines relationships among DC characteristics, properties of their RA and strength of their RAC using regression analysis. Ten samples collected from demolition sites are examined. The results show strong correlation among the DC samples, properties of RA and RAC. It should be highlighted that inferior quality of DC will lower the quality of RA and thus their RAC. Prediction of RAC strength is also formulated from the DC characteristics and the RA properties. From that, the RAC performance from DC and RA can be estimated. In addition, RAC design requirements can also be developed at the initial stage of concrete demolition. Recommendations are also given to improve the future concreting practice.

  7. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  8. Ontogeny of the serotonergic projection to rat neocortex: transient expression of a dense innervation to primary sensory areas

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amato, R.J.; Blue, M.E.; Largent, B.L.; Lynch, D.R.; Ledbetter, D.J.; Molliver, M.E.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    The development of serotonergic innervation to rat cerebral cortex was characterized by immunohistochemical localization of serotonin combined with autoradiographic imaging of serotonin-uptake sites. In neonatal rat, a transient, dense, serotonergic innervation appears in all primary sensory areas of cortex. In somatosensory cortex, dense patches of serotonergic innervation are aligned with specialized cellular aggregates called barrels. The dense patches are not apparent after 3 weeks of age, and the serotonergic innervation becomes more uniform in adult neocortex. This precocious neonatal serotonergic innervation may play a transient physiologic role in sensory areas of cortex or may exert a trophic influence on the development of cortical circuitry and thalamocortical connections.

  9. DPIS for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  10. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  11. Velocity coherence in dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alyssa A.; Barranco, Joseph A.; Wilner, David J.; Heyer, Mark H.

    1997-02-01

    At the meeting, we presented a summary of two papers which support the hypothesis that the molecular clouds which contain star-forming low-mass dense cores are self-similar in nature on size scales larger than an inner scale, Rcoh, and that within Rcoh, the cores are ``coherent,'' in that their filling factor is large and they are characterized by a very small, roughly constant, mildly supersonic velocity dispersion. We expect these two papers, by Barranco & Goodman [1] and Goodman, Barranco, Wilner, & Heyer, to appear in the Astrophysical Journal within the coming year. Here, we present a short summary of our results. The interested reader is urged to consult the on-line version of this work at cfa-www.harvard.edu/~agoodman/vel_coh.html [2].

  12. Neutrino Oscillations in Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. E.

    2017-03-01

    A modification of the electroweak theory, where the fermions with the same electroweak quantum numbers are combined in multiplets and are treated as different quantum states of a single particle, is proposed. In this model, mixing and oscillations of particles arise as a direct consequence of the general principles of quantum field theory. The developed approach enables one to calculate the probabilities of the processes taking place in the detector at long distances from the particle source. Calculations of higher-order processes, including computation of the contributions due to radiative corrections, can be performed in the framework of the perturbation theory using the regular diagram technique. As a result, the analog to the Dirac-Schwinger equation of quantum electrodynamics describing neutrino oscillations and its spin rotation in dense matter can be obtained.

  13. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  14. Extended thermodynamics of dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Ruggeri, T.; Sugiyama, M.

    2012-11-01

    We study extended thermodynamics of dense gases by adopting the system of field equations with a different hierarchy structure to that adopted in the previous works. It is the theory of 14 fields of mass density, velocity, temperature, viscous stress, dynamic pressure, and heat flux. As a result, most of the constitutive equations can be determined explicitly by the caloric and thermal equations of state. It is shown that the rarefied-gas limit of the theory is consistent with the kinetic theory of gases. We also analyze three physically important systems, that is, a gas with the virial equations of state, a hard-sphere system, and a van der Waals fluid, by using the general theory developed in the former part of the present work.

  15. Copepod Aggregations: Influences of Physics and Collective Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flierl, Glenn R.; Woods, Nicholas W.

    2015-02-01

    Dense copepod aggregations form in Massachusetts Bay and provide an important resource for right whales. We re-examine the processes which might account for the high concentrations, investigating both horizontally convergent flow, which can increase the density of depth-keeping organisms, and social behavior. We argue that the two act in concert: social behavior creates small dense patches (on the scale of a few sensing radii); physical stirring brings them together so that they merge into aggregations with larger scales; it also moves them into areas of physical convergence which retain the increasingly large patch. But the turbulence can also break this apart, suggesting that the overall high density in the convergence zone will not be uniform but will instead be composed of multiple transient patches (which are still much larger than the sensing scale).

  16. Structural lumber from dense stands of small-diameter Douglas-fir trees.

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Eini C. Lowell; Roland. Hernandez

    2005-01-01

    Small-diameter trees growing in overstocked dense stands are often targeted for thinning to reduce fire hazard and improve forest health and ecosystem diversity. In the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain regions, Douglas-fir can be a predominant species in such stands. In this study, mechanical properties and grade yield of structural products were estimated for 2 by...

  17. Observing Convective Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  18. Observing convective aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Christopher; Wing, Allison; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Turner, David; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-04-01

    Convective self-aggregation was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad a distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  19. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  20. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  1. Dense module enumeration in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Koji; Georgii, Elisabeth

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of large networks is a central topic in various research fields including biology, sociology, and web mining. Detection of dense modules (a.k.a. clusters) is an important step to analyze the networks. Though numerous methods have been proposed to this aim, they often lack mathematical rigorousness. Namely, there is no guarantee that all dense modules are detected. Here, we present a novel reverse-search-based method for enumerating all dense modules. Furthermore, constraints from additional data sources such as gene expression profiles or customer profiles can be integrated, so that we can systematically detect dense modules with interesting profiles. We report successful applications in human protein interaction network analyses.

  2. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  3. Optimal probabilistic dense coding schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögler, Roger A.; Neves, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    Dense coding with non-maximally entangled states has been investigated in many different scenarios. We revisit this problem for protocols adopting the standard encoding scheme. In this case, the set of possible classical messages cannot be perfectly distinguished due to the non-orthogonality of the quantum states carrying them. So far, the decoding process has been approached in two ways: (i) The message is always inferred, but with an associated (minimum) error; (ii) the message is inferred without error, but only sometimes; in case of failure, nothing else is done. Here, we generalize on these approaches and propose novel optimal probabilistic decoding schemes. The first uses quantum-state separation to increase the distinguishability of the messages with an optimal success probability. This scheme is shown to include (i) and (ii) as special cases and continuously interpolate between them, which enables the decoder to trade-off between the level of confidence desired to identify the received messages and the success probability for doing so. The second scheme, called multistage decoding, applies only for qudits ( d-level quantum systems with d>2) and consists of further attempts in the state identification process in case of failure in the first one. We show that this scheme is advantageous over (ii) as it increases the mutual information between the sender and receiver.

  4. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  5. Aggregation of SiC-X Grains in Supernova Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneault, Ethan A.-N.

    2009-11-01

    We present a model for the formation of silicon carbide aggregates within the expanding and cooling supernova remnant. SiC type-X (SiC-X) grains measured in the laboratory at a high spatial resolution have been found to be aggregates of smaller crystals which are isotopically homogenous. The initial condensation of SiC in the ejecta occurs within an interior dense shell of material which is created by a reverse shock which rebounds from the core-envelope interface. A subsequent reverse shock accelerates the grains forward, but the gas drag from the ejecta on the rapidly moving particles limits their travel distance. By observing the effects of gas drag on the travel distance of grains, we propose that supernova grain aggregates form from material that condensed in a highly localized region, which satisfies the observational evidence of isotopic homogeneity in SiC-X grains.

  6. Graded Response Modeling of the Quality of Life Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttaro, Thomas; Lehman, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Outlined a graded response model and applied it to an aggregated data set from four studies involving subjective items from the Quality of Life Interview (QOLI) (A. Lehman, 1988). Used the results to create customized QOLI scales. Discusses the use of this methodology for scales involving ordered, graded categories. (SLD)

  7. Defensive allomones function as aggregation pheromones in diapausing Ladybird Beetles, Hippodamia convergens.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Christopher A; Cardé, Ring T

    2013-06-01

    Identification of the stimuli responsible for the formation of an aggregation can be used to distinguish between social and non-social aggregations and help in the process of identifying the adaptive benefits of the gregarious behavior. The convergent ladybird beetle, Hippodamia convergens, forms dense aggregations during winter diapause. The mechanisms of conspecific attraction and hibernacula site selection of H. convergens are not well understood. In laboratory and field bioassays, we evaluated the role of three defensive compounds in the formation of H. convergens aggregations. Diapausing H. convergens aggregated within the section of an arena exposed to alkylmethoxypyrazines. 2-Isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) caused the strongest aggregative effect. Beetles also aggregated to some doses of 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine, but appeared to be repelled at higher doses. A third constituent, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, generally had little effect on the distribution of beetles, although the highest dose tested was repellent. Beetles also aggregated to a blend of these alkylmethoxypyrazines at their natural ratio. During fall migration to overwintering sites, more beetles aggregated in artificial hibernacula baited with IBMP, confirming its function as an aggregation pheromone. These three pyrazines also function as warning odors that, in conjunction with other aposematic displays (contrasting red and black coloration, gregarious behavior, reflex bleeding), contribute to the multi-modal, anti-predatory defense of coccinellid beetles and some other arthropods. Confirmation of the role of some alkylmethoxypyrazines in coccinellid aggregations suggests that these defensive allomones have been co-opted for intraspecific communication.

  8. Combined research effort on aggregate road materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Hoff, Inge; Willy Danielsen, Svein; Wigum, Børge Johannes; Fladvad, Marit; Rieksts, Karlis; Loranger, Benoit; Barbieri, Diego

    2017-04-01

    ) mechanical and c) thermal properties, and d) frost action and susceptibility. The main goal of the PhD topic N1 is to achieve better utilization of aggregate resources through adjusting the production process according to local geological conditions and construction needs. The objective of the PhD project N2 is to look at the design stage and find the way to use these aggregates anyway by changing the road's design (e.g. increasing the thickness of asphalt layer). Fine particles content will also be harder to control due to rock type variability from site to site. Thus, PhD project N3 is going to investigate the effect of the increasing of fines and their mineralogy on frost action related problems during freezing and thawing seasons. Finally, PhD project N4 is investigating how the grading and mineralogy of the crushed rock material affects the heat exchange in road's granular layers and consequently, the frost penetration depth. Combining these PhD studies we aim to create a holistic approach for a new understanding within this very complex area.

  9. Reversible Aggregation of Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Ralph H.; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Krause, Wendy E.; Jones, Ronald L.

    2004-03-01

    We explore the interactions in synovial fluid involving the polyelectrolyte sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) and plasma proteins in their native state (albumin and globulins). Rheological measurements on synovial fluid show it to be highly viscoelastic and also rheopectic (stress increases with time in steady shear). Equilibrium dialysis confirms the findings of Ogston and Dubin that there is no association between NaHA and albumin at physiological pH and salt. What we find instead is a reversible aggregation of albumin, with an association energy of order 3kT and commensurate association lifetime of order microseconds. Certain anti-inflammatory drugs are shown to prevent this reversible aggregation. The implications of these findings for synovial fluid and blood rheology are discussed.

  10. Tracking protein aggregate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Jason C; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils share a structural motif consisting of highly ordered β-sheets aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis.1, 2 At each fibril end, β-sheets provide a template for recruiting and converting monomers.3 Different amyloid fibrils often co-occur in the same individual, yet whether a protein aggregate aids or inhibits the assembly of a heterologous protein is unclear. In prion disease, diverse prion aggregate structures, known as strains, are thought to be the basis of disparate disease phenotypes in the same species expressing identical prion protein sequences.4–7 Here we explore the interactions reported to occur when two distinct prion strains occur together in the central nervous system. PMID:21597336

  11. Automatic grading of carbon blacks from transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo, L.; Treuillet, S.; Gomez, E.

    2015-04-01

    Carbon blacks are widely used as filler in industrial products to modify their mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For rubber products, they are the subject of a standard classification system relative to their surface area, particle size and structure. The electron microscope remains the most accurate means of measuring these characteristics on condition that boundaries of aggregates and particles are correctly detected. In this paper, we propose an image processing chain allowing subsequent characterization for automatic grading of the carbon black aggregates. Based on literature review, 31 features are extracted from TEM images to obtain reliable information on the particle size, the shape and microstructure of the carbon black aggregates. Then, they are used for training several classifiers to compare their results for automatic grading. To obtain better results, we suggest to use a cluster identification of aggregates in place of the individual characterization of aggregates.

  12. Kinetics and Percolation in Dense Particulate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Chris; Chakrabarti, Amit

    2002-11-01

    Our work involves both experimentation and simulation of aggregating particle systems that form fractal aggregates that eventually fill space to form gels. Our experimental system is soot in diffusion flames. Our simulations model these flames as 3d, off lattice, Brownian motion systems, also known as diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA). We observe in these systems the behavior of the kinetics, cluster size distribution, and cluster morphology as the system evolves from dilute to concentrated and finally to the gel. With simulations, we find that the dynamical evolution of the system obeys typical DLCA type kinetics at early times when the system is dilute with a constant kinetic exponent z=1 and size distribution exponent lambda=0. With increasing aggregation time crowding of clusters occurs and the kinetics can be described by continuously evolving exponents. Both exponents show universal behavior with aggregate volume fraction, independent of the initial volume fraction. Remarkably, the relationship between z and lambda maintains it's mean-field nature i.e., mean field kinetics continue to hold when the system is crowded. Small angle light scattering from heavily sooting flames shows submicron D approximately equal to 1.8 fractal aggregates early in the flame but later, as the soot growth continues, a new supermicron phase appears with a fractal dimension of ca. 2.7. Simulations show essentially the same behavior and allow us to determine that these superaggregates occur when the smaller, D approximately equal to 1.8 DLCA aggregates percolate. With this, we propose the following picture of the sol-to-gel transition: A dilute sol aggregates via DLCA or RLCA kinetics yielding aggregates with fractal dimensions of D approximately equal to 1.8 or 2.15, respectively. Because these aggregate fractal dimensions are less than the spatial dimension, the effective aggregate volume fraction (the occupied volume of the aggregates normalized by the system volume

  13. Zooplankton Aggregations Near Sills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    frequency echo-sounder system. This data were supplemented with multi-net (BIONESS) trawls, bongo nets, and otter trawls (operated by D. Mackas and group...side. The general composition of the zooplankton aggregations can be deduced from the relative levels of the three echo-sounder frequencies; krill ...Nov. 20th, 2002. Krill layer is evident at 66 – 90 m, coincident with BIONESS trawl through the region. 3 Figure 2 shows a comparison between

  14. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Investigation of Usability as Aggregate of Different Originated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başpinar Tuncay, Ebru; Kilinçarslan, Şemsettin; Yağmurlu, Fuzuli

    2016-10-01

    The general properties of aggregate can determine the performance and durability of the concrete. In this study, mineralogical, petrographic, mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the rock samples of different origin (limestone, recrystallized limestone, dolomite, sand and gravel, tephra-phonolite, trachybasalt) were determined. Samples were obtained from different origin rocks units and they have been classified in three different sizes of aggregate with crushing and screening method. Grading, classification of particle, loose bulk density, water absorption ratio, flakiness index, coefficient of Los Angeles, resistance to freeze-loosening and alkali-silica reaction of aggregates and organic matter determination has been determined. The rocks have been investigated in compliance with the relevant standards. Trachybasalt and dolomite have higher particle density than other rocks. In addition, strength and flexural strength of these rocks are higher than other rocks. Tephra-phonolite has the lowest water absorption rate. At the same time resistance to freeze loosening of Tephra- phonolite is lower than the other rocks. Resistance to fragmentation and the resistance to wear of all of rocks are quite high. Sand and gravel, tephra-phonolite and trachybasalt are evaluated in terms of alkali-silica reaction. Sand and gravel are more reactive than the other aggregates. Organic matter content of the aggregates is low for the quality of aggregate. Also high correlation between some properties of aggregates was observed. For example, high correlation between compressive strength and flexural strength, water absorption and porosity, resistance to fragmentation and the resistance to ware (Micro-Deval).

  16. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles’ performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications.

  17. Age-Dependent Protein Aggregation Initiates Amyloid-β Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Nicole; Bühler, Anika; Huang, Chaolie; Li, Ka Wan; van Nierop, Pim; Smit, August B.; Fändrich, Marcus; Baumann, Frank; David, Della C.

    2017-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases associated with pathological protein aggregation such as Alzheimer’s disease. Although aging is an important player, it remains unknown which molecular changes are relevant for disease initiation. Recently, it has become apparent that widespread protein aggregation is a common feature of aging. Indeed, several studies demonstrate that 100s of proteins become highly insoluble with age, in the absence of obvious disease processes. Yet it remains unclear how these misfolded proteins aggregating with age affect neurodegenerative diseases. Importantly, several of these aggregation-prone proteins are found as minor components in disease-associated hallmark aggregates such as amyloid-β plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. This co-localization raises the possibility that age-dependent protein aggregation directly contributes to pathological aggregation. Here, we show for the first time that highly insoluble proteins from aged Caenorhabditis elegans or aged mouse brains, but not from young individuals, can initiate amyloid-β aggregation in vitro. We tested the seeding potential at four different ages across the adult lifespan of C. elegans. Significantly, protein aggregates formed during the early stages of aging did not act as seeds for amyloid-β aggregation. Instead, we found that changes in protein aggregation occurring during middle-age initiated amyloid-β aggregation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed several late-aggregating proteins that were previously identified as minor components of amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles such as 14-3-3, Ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 1 and Lamin A/C, highlighting these as strong candidates for cross-seeding. Overall, we demonstrate that widespread protein misfolding and aggregation with age could be critical for the initiation of pathogenesis, and thus should be targeted by therapeutic strategies to alleviate neurodegenerative

  18. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  19. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  20. Protein Aggregates May Differ in Water Entrapment but Are Comparable in Water Confinement.

    PubMed

    Urbonaite, V; de Jongh, H H J; van der Linden, E; Pouvreau, L

    2015-10-14

    Aggregate size and density are related to gel morphology. In the context of the water distribution in complex food systems, in this study, it was aimed to investigate whether protein aggregates varying in size and density differ in entrapped and confined water. Heat-set soy protein aggregates (1%, v/v) prepared in the presence of 3.5 mM divalent salts increased in size and decreased in apparent density following the salt type order MgSO4, MgCl2, CaSO4, and CaCl2. In the absence of applied (centrifugal) forces, larger and less dense aggregates entrap more water. When force is applied from larger and more deformable aggregates, more water can be displaced. Entrapped water of ∼8-13 g of water/g of protein is associated with (pelleted) aggregates, of which approximately 4.5-8.5 g of water/g of protein is not constrained in exchangeability with the solvent. The amount of confined water within aggregates was found to be independent of the aggregate density and accounted for ∼3.5 g of water/g of protein. Confined water in aggregates is hindered in its diffusion because of physical structure constraints and, therefore, not directly exchangeable with the solvent. These insights in the protein aggregate size and deformability in relation to water entrapment and confinement could be used to tune water holding on larger length scales when force is applied.

  1. The effect of particle aggregate shape on ultrasonic anisotropy in concentrated magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.; Kołodziejczyk, B.; Timko, M.; Skumiel, A.; Rajnak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of aggregate shape on the ultrasonic anisotropy in magnetic fluid was studied. Experimental results were compared with the theory of Ahuja and Hendee. Analysis of experimental results in terms of the theoretical model show the formation of ellipsoidal aggregates composed of several particles. The chain-like aggregates (h = b/a >> 1 a and b being minor and major axis lengths, respectively) are most conspicuous in diluted ferrofluids while dense ferrofluids are characterized by a more homogeneous drop-like (h = b/a > 1) structure. This finding is supported by some theoretical simulations.

  2. Propagation Of Dense Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Peter J.; Davis, John F.

    1988-05-01

    A variety of schemes have been proposed over the last two decades for delivering lethal amounts of energy and/or momentum to targets such as missiles and high speed aircraft. Techniques have ranged from high energy lasers and high voltage charged-particle accelerators to less exotic but still challenging devices such as electromagnetic railguns. One class of technology involves the use of high speed plasmas. The primary attraction of such technology is the possibility of utilizing relatively compact accelerators and electrical power systems that could allow highly mobile and agile operation from rocket or aircraft platforms, or in special ordnance. Three years ago, R & D Associates examined the possibility of plasma propagation for military applications and concluded that the only viable approach consisted of long dense plasma jets, contained in radial equilibrium by the atmosphere, while propagating at speeds of about 10 km/s. Without atmospheric confinement the plasma density would diminish too rapidly for adequate range and lethality. Propagation of atmospherically-confined jets at speeds much greater than 10 km/s required significant increases in power levels and/or operating altitudes to achieve useful ranges. The present research effort has been developing the experimental conditions necessary to achieve reasonable comparison with theoretical predictions for plasma jet propagation in the atmosphere. Time-resolved measurements have been made of high speed argon plasma jets penetrating a helium background (simulating xenon jets propagating into air). Basic radial confinement of the jet has been observed by photography and spectroscopy and structures in the flow field resemble those predicted by numerical calculations. Results from our successful initial experiments have been used to design improved diagnostic procedures and arcjet source characteristics for further experiments. In experiments with a modified arcjet source, radial confinement of the jet is again

  3. Non-Arrhenius protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Roberts, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    Protein aggregation presents one of the key challenges in the development of protein biotherapeutics. It affects not only product quality but also potentially impacts safety, as protein aggregates have been shown to be linked with cytotoxicity and patient immunogenicity. Therefore, investigations of protein aggregation remain a major focus in pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions. Due to the complexity of the aggregation process and temperature-dependent conformational stability, temperature-induced protein aggregation is often non-Arrhenius over even relatively small temperature windows relevant for product development, and this makes low-temperature extrapolation difficult based simply on accelerated stability studies at high temperatures. This review discusses the non-Arrhenius nature of the temperature dependence of protein aggregation, explores possible causes, and considers inherent hurdles for accurately extrapolating aggregation rates from conventional industrial approaches for selecting accelerated conditions and from conventional or more advanced methods of analyzing the resulting rate data.

  4. Ultrastructure of acetylcholine receptor aggregates parallels mechanisms of aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Dennis D; Lee, Lara K; Stollberg, Jes

    2001-01-01

    Background Acetylcholine receptors become aggregated at the developing neuromuscular synapse shortly after contact by a motorneuron in one of the earliest manifestations of synaptic development. While a major physiological signal for receptor aggregation (agrin) is known, the mechanism(s) by which muscle cells respond to this and other stimuli have yet to be worked out in detail. The question of mechanism is addressed in the present study via a quantitative examination of ultrastructural receptor arrangement within aggregates. Results In receptor rich cell membranes resulting from stimulation by agrin or laminin, or in control membrane showing spontaneous receptor aggregation, receptors were found to be closer to neighboring receptors than would be expected at random. This indicates that aggregation proceeds heterogeneously: nanoaggregates, too small for detection in the light microscope, underlie developing microaggregates of receptors in all three cases. In contrast, the structural arrangement of receptors within nanoaggregates was found to depend on the aggregation stimulus. In laminin induced nanoaggregates receptors were found to be arranged in an unstructured manner, in contrast to the hexagonal array of about 10 nm spacing found for agrin induced nanoaggregates. Spontaneous aggregates displayed an intermediate amount of order, and this was found to be due to two distinct population of nanoaggregates. Conclusions The observations support earlier studies indicating that mechanisms by which agrin and laminin-1 induced receptor aggregates form are distinct and, for the first time, relate mechanisms underlying spontaneous aggregate formation to aggregate structure. PMID:11749670

  5. The influence of erythrocyte aggregation on induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ott, C; Lardi, E; Schulzki, T; Reinhart, W H

    2010-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) affect platelet aggregation in flowing blood (primary hemostasis). We tested the hypothesis that RBC aggregation could influence platelet aggregation. RBC aggregation was altered in vitro by: (i) changing plasma aggregatory properties with 3.7 g% dextran 40 (D40), 3.0 g% dextran 70 (D70) or 1.55 g% dextran 500 (D500); (ii) changing RBC aggregatory properties by incubating RBCs in 50 mU/ml neuraminidase for 60 min (reduction of the surface sialic acid content, thus reducing electrostatic repulsion) and subsequent RBC resuspension in platelet rich plasma (PRP) containing 1 g% dextran 70. RBC aggregation was assessed with the sedimentation rate (ESR). Platelet aggregation was measured: (i) in flowing whole blood with a platelet function analyzer PFA-100(R), which simulates in vivo conditions with RBCs flowing in the center and platelets along the wall, where they adhere to collagen and aggregate; and (ii) in a Chrono-log 700 Aggregometer, which measures changes of impedance by platelet aggregation in whole blood or changes in light transmission in PRP. We found that RBC aggregation increased with increasing molecular weight of dextran (ESR: 4 +/- 3 mm/h, 34 +/- 14 mm/h and 89 +/- 23 mm/hfor D40, D70 and D500, respectively, p < 0.0001) and with neuraminidase-treated RBCs (76 +/- 27 mm/h vs 27 +/- 8 mm/h, respectively, p < 0.0001). Platelet aggregation measured in whole blood under flow conditions (PFA-100) and without flow (Chronolog Aggregometer) was not affected by RBC aggregation. Our data suggest that RBC aggregation does not affect platelet aggregation in vitro and plays no role in primary hemostasis.

  6. Dense Plasma Heating and Radiation Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The investigations under this grant consist of three parts: CO2 laser heating of dense preformed plasmas, interaction of a dense hot plasma with a...small solid pellet, and pulsed power systems and technology. The laser plasma heating experiment has demonstrated both beam guiding by the plasma and...plasma heating by the beam. These results will be useful in heating plasmas for radiation generation. Experiments have shown that the pellet-plasma

  7. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  8. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  9. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  10. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  11. The Dense Gas in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Bolatto, A.; Herrera-Camus, R.

    2014-10-01

    Galactic winds are responsible of carrying energy and matter from the inner regions of galaxies to the outer regions, even reaching the intergalactic medium. This process removes gas from the inner regions, the available material to form stars. How and in which amount these winds remove gas from galaxies plays an important role in galaxy evolution. To study this effect we have obtained 3 mm maps of dense gas (n_{{crit}}>10^{4} cm^{-3}) in the central region of the starburst galaxy M82. We detect line emission from the dense molecular gas tracers HCN, HCO^{+}, HNC, CS, HC_{3}N and C_{6}H. Our maps reveal a considerable amount of HCO^{+} emission extending above and bellow the central star-forming disk, indicating that the dense gas is entangled in the outflow. The mass of molecular Hydrogen outside the central starburst is M_{{out}}≍ 3 ± 1× 10^{6} M_{odot}, while in the central starburst is M_{{disk}}≍ 8 ± 2× 10^{6} M_{odot}. These maps also show variations of the amount of dense gas over the starburst disk, revealing that the gas is more concentrated towards the center of the starburst and less towards the edges. It is the average amount of dense gas what drives the observed star formation law between dense gas and star formation rate on galactic scales.

  12. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  13. Making Graphene Resist Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayan

    Graphene-based sheets have stimulated great interest in many scientific disciplines and shown promise for wide potential applications. Among various ways of creating single atomic layer carbon sheets, a promising route for bulk production is to first chemically exfoliate graphite powders to graphene oxide (GO) sheets, followed by reduction to form chemically modified graphene (CMG). Due to the strong van der Waals attraction between graphene sheets, CMG tends to aggregate. The restacking of sheets is largely uncontrollable and irreversible, thus it reduces their processability and compromises properties such as accessible surface area. Strategies based on colloidal chemistry have been applied to keep CMG dispersed in solvents by introducing electrostatic repulsion to overcome the van der Waals attraction or adding spacers to increase the inter-sheet spacing. In this dissertation, two very different ideas that can prevent CMG aggregation without extensively modifying the material or introducing foreign spacer materials are introduced. The van der Waals potential decreases with reduced overlapping area between sheets. For CMG, reducing the lateral dimension from micrometer to nanometer scale should greatly enhance their colloidal stability with additional advantages of increased charge density and decreased probability to interact. The enhanced colloidal stability of GO and CMG nanocolloids makes them especially promising for spectroscopy based bio-sensing applications. For potential applications in a compact bulk solid form, the sheets were converted into paper-ball like structure using capillary compression in evaporating aerosol droplets. The crumpled graphene balls are stabilized by locally folded pi-pi stacked ridges, and do not unfold or collapse during common processing steps. They can tightly pack without greatly reducing the surface area. This form of graphene leads to scalable performance in energy storage. For example, planer sheets tend to aggregate and

  14. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  15. Dense aggregations of Pygospio elegans (Claparède): effect on macrofaunal community structure and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolam, Stefan G.; Fernandes, Teresa F.

    2003-05-01

    Epibenthic biogenic structures such as polychaete tubes are conspicuous features of many marine soft-bottom habitats. This paper compares the benthic macrofauna in patches with high and low densities of the tube-dweller Pygospio elegans on intertidal sandflats in eastern Scotland (UK). The main aim of this study was to determine potential differences in the macrofaunal community structure, the size distribution of individual species and sediment properties. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the macrofaunal community composition (excluding P. elegans) within patches was always significantly different from outside patches, mainly due to variability in the abundances of Cerastoderma edule and Corophium volutator. In addition to P. elegans, 5 taxa were sufficiently abundant for univariate analyses, 4 of these ( Capitella capitata, C. edule, Macoma balthica and C. volutator) being significantly more abundant within P. elegans patches than in surrounding, non-patch sediments. The size distribution of P. elegans was significantly different between patches (bimodal distribution) and non-patches (skewed distribution). Similarly, there was a greater proportion of larger C. capitata individuals within patches compared to non-patch sediments. Sediment organic content and silt/clay fraction were always significantly higher in patch sediments while redox profiles showed no differences except at the end of the study period when the top 2 cm within patches were more positive and more negative at 4 cm. These results imply that even relatively small (1-1.5 m 2) P. elegans patches can have large effects on the spatial variability of macrofaunal community structure on intertidal sandflats. Towards the end of the study there were marked visual changes in the P. elegans patches, such as wave-ripple marks on the surface, which signified their demise. This coincided with dramatic changes in the invertebrate community structure within patches. Along with the decline in P. elegans numbers, dramatic increases in the densities of the 2 bivalve species C. edule and M. balthica occurred, while remaining comparatively stable outside patches. This suggested that the conditions within P. elegans patches were particularly favourable to successful bivalve spat settlement. We postulate that P. elegans patches have limited longevity and propose that enhanced bivalve competition within them leads to rapid decreases in P. elegans numbers.

  16. Evolution of Dense Gas with Starburst Age: When Star Formation Versus Dense Gas Relations Break Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, David S.; Turner, J. L.; Schinnerer, E.

    2011-05-01

    Dense gas correlates well with star formation on kpc scales. On smaller scales, motions of individual clouds become comparable to the 100 Myr ages of starbursts. One then expects the star formation rate vs. dense gas relations to break down on giant molecular cloud scales. We exploit this to study the evolutionary history of nuclear starburst in the nearby spiral, IC 342. Maps of the J=5-4 and 16-15 transitions of dense gas tracer HC3N at 20 pc resolution made with the VLA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer are presented. The 5-4 line of HC3N traces very dense gas in the cold phase, while the 16-15 transition traces warm, dense gas. These reveal changes in dense cloud structure on scales of 30 pc among clouds with star formation histories differing by only a few Myrs. HC3N emission does not correlate well with young star formation at these high spatial resolutions, but gas excitation does. The cold, dense gas extends well beyond the starburst region implying large amounts of dense quiescent gas not yet actively forming stars. Close to the starburst the high excitation combined with faint emission indicates that the immediate (30 pc) vicinity of the starburst lacks large masses of very dense gas and has high dense gas star formation efficiencies. The dense gas appears to be in pressure equilibrium with the starburst. We propose a scenario where the starburst is being caught in the act of dispersing or destroying the dense gas in the presence of the expanding HII region. This work is supported by the NSF through NRAO and grant AST-1009620.

  17. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  18. Conspecific aggregations mitigate the effects of ocean acidification on calcification of the coral Pocillopora verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Nicolas R; Edmunds, Peter J

    2017-03-15

    In densely populated communities, such as coral reefs, organisms can modify the physical and chemical environment for neighbouring individuals. We tested the hypothesis that colony density (12 colonies each placed ∼0.5 cm apart versus ∼8 cm apart) can modulate the physiological response (measured through rates of calcification, photosynthesis and respiration in the light and dark) of the coral Pocillopora verrucosa to partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2 ) treatments (∼400 μatm and ∼1200 μatm) by altering the seawater flow regimes experienced by colonies placed in aggregations within a flume at a single flow speed. While light calcification decreased 20% under elevated versus ambient PCO2  for colonies in low-density aggregations, light calcification of high-density aggregations increased 23% at elevated versus ambient PCO2 As a result, densely aggregated corals maintained calcification rates over 24 h that were comparable to those maintained under ambient PCO2 , despite a 45% decrease in dark calcification at elevated versus ambient PCO2 Additionally, densely aggregated corals experienced reduced flow speeds and higher seawater retention times between colonies owing to the formation of eddies. These results support recent indications that neighbouring organisms, such as the conspecific coral colonies in the present example, can create small-scale refugia from the negative effects of ocean acidification. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Thermochromism of a Poly(phenylene vinylene): Untangling the Roles of Polymer Aggregate and Chain Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, M.; Wang, C.-C.; Gao, Y.; Shreve, A.P.; Zhong, C.; Wang, L.; Mudalige, K.; Wang, H.-L.

    2009-12-17

    We report reversible thermochromism of a conjugated polymer, poly{l_brace}2,5-bis[3-(N,N-diethylamino)-1-oxapropyl]-1,4-phenylenevinylene{r_brace} (DAO-PPV), in diluted solutions of toluene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. By means of temperature- and solvent-dependent steady-state spectroscopy, picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering, we provide new insights into the role of polymer aggregates in defining the thermochromic behavior of PPVs. We find DAO-PPV to exhibit a low temperature state with vibronically structured red visible absorption and emission spectra. Structurally, this low temperature state is a densely packed and disordered polymer aggregate, which contains a fraction of well-ordered, packed polymer chains. These ordered regions serve as low energy trap sites for the more disordered regions in the aggregate, thus regulating the final emission of the aggregate and imposing a vibronically resolved emission spectrum, which is usually associated with emission from one or a few chromophores. The high temperature state of DAO-PPV is a loose aggregate, with structureless absorption and emission spectra in the green visible range. Structurally, the loose aggregate is a well-solvated aggregate retaining the physical dimension of the dense aggregate but for which interchain interactions are diminished with the increase of temperature. As a result, the spectroscopic behavior of the loose aggregate is very similar if not identical to that of the single polymer chain. Increased solubility untangles polymer aggregates into single, dispersed, polymer chains, as we demonstrate here for DAO-PPV in 1,2-dichlorobenzene and at high temperature.

  20. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  1. Teachers' Grading Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isnawati, Ida; Saukah, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' grading decision making, focusing on their beliefs underlying their grading decision making, their grading practices and assessment types, and factors they considered in grading decision making. Two teachers from two junior high schools applying different curriculum policies in grade reporting in Indonesian…

  2. Solving Transportation Problems via Aggregation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    AD-A144 219 SOLVING TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS VIA AGGREGATION (U) i/l GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION RESEARCH CENTER R W...10 July 1984 SOLVING TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS VIA AGGREGATION by" 4 Richard W. Taylort C. M. Shettytt PDRC 84-10 DTIC E L - TE~ School of Business...c UoaOO48--17 Rpouto spritein whol or pr for ny prpos of he U S. overment Abstract Solving Transportation Problems Via Aggregation 0

  3. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  4. Fractal structure of asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Nazmul H G; Dabros, Tadeusz; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2005-05-15

    A photographic technique coupled with image analysis was used to measure the size and fractal dimension of asphaltene aggregates formed in toluene-heptane solvent mixtures. First, asphaltene aggregates were examined in a Couette device and the fractal-like aggregate structures were quantified using boundary fractal dimension. The evolution of the floc structure with time was monitored. The relative rates of shear-induced aggregation and fragmentation/restructuring determine the steady-state floc structure. The average floc structure became more compact or more organized as the floc size distribution attained steady state. Moreover, the higher the shear rate is, the more compact the floc structure is at steady state. Second, the fractal dimensions of asphaltene aggregates were also determined in a free-settling test. The experimentally determined terminal settling velocities and characteristic lengths of the aggregates were utilized to estimate the 2D and 3D fractal dimensions. The size-density fractal dimension (D(3)) of the asphaltene aggregates was estimated to be in the range from 1.06 to 1.41. This relatively low fractal dimension suggests that the asphaltene aggregates are highly porous and very tenuous. The aggregates have a structure with extremely low space-filling capacity.

  5. Peptide Aggregation in Finite Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurpreet; Brovchenko, Ivan; Oleinikova, Alla; Winter, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Universal features of the peptide aggregation process suggest a common mechanism, with a first-order phase transition in aqueous solutions of the peptides being the driving force. Small system sizes strongly affect the stability of the minor phase in the two-phase region. We show manifestations of this effect in aqueous solutions of fragments of the islet amyloid polypeptide, using computer simulation methods and invoking various approaches in characterizing clustering and aggregate formation. These systems with peptide concentrations deeply inside the immiscibility region show two distinct stable states, which interchange with time: one state contains a peptide aggregate; and the other state has an aggregate that is noticeably dissolved. The first state is relevant for macroscopic systems, whereas the second one is artificial. At a fixed concentration, the occurrence probability of the aggregate state vanishes upon decreasing the system size, thus indicating the necessity to apply a finite size-scaling for meaningful studies of peptide aggregation by simulations. The effect observed may be one of the factors responsible for the difference between intracellular and extracellular aggregation and fibrillization of polypeptides. The finite size of biological cells or their compartments may be playing a decisive role in hampering intracellular aggregation of highly insoluble amyloidogenic proteins, whereas aggregation is unavoidable in the extracellular space at the same peptide concentration. PMID:18621830

  6. Molecular Aggregates in Cryogenic Solutions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-07

    of aggregates from solutions of monomers. Rapid deposition into a precooled sample cell is required to generate an aggregate solution. Such a solution...U AU-A11b 490 COLORAO0 STATE UNIV FORT COLLINS DEPT OF CHEMISTRY F/G 20/8 MOLECULAR AGGREGATES IN CRYOGENIC SOLUTIONS.CU) JUL 81 M W SCHAUER- J LEE...MOLECULAR AGGREGATES IN CRYOGENIC SOLUTIONS by M.W. Schauer, J. Lee, and E.R. Bernstein Prepared for Publication in The Journal of Chemical Physics

  7. Pressure in electronically excited warm dense metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegailov, Vladimir; Zhilyaev, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Non-equilibrium two-temperature warm dense metals consist of the ion subsystem that is subjected to structural transitions and involved in the mass transfer, and the electron subsystem that in various pulsed experiments absorbs energy and then evolves together with ions to equilibrium. Definition of pressure in such non-equilibrium systems causes certain controversy. In this work we make an attempt to clarify this definition that is vital for proper description of the whole relaxation process. Using the density functional theory we analyze on examples of Al and Au electronic pressure components in warm dense metals. Appealing to the Fermi gas model we elucidate a way to find a number of free delocalized electrons in warm dense metals. First results has been published in. This work is supported by the Russian Science Foundation grant No. 14-19-01487.

  8. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  9. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; ...

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  10. Dynamic structure factor in warm dense beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagemann, K.-U.; Sperling, P.; Thiele, R.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Fortmann, C.; Döppner, T.; Lee, H. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2012-05-01

    We calculate the dynamic structure factor (DSF) in warm dense beryllium by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamic conductivity is derived from the Kubo-Greenwood formula, and a Drude-like behaviour is observed. The corresponding dielectric function is used to determine the DSF. Since the ab initio approach is so far only applicable for wavenumbers k = 0, the k-dependence of the dielectric function is modelled via the Mermin ansatz. We present the results for the dielectric function and DSF of warm dense beryllium and compare these with perturbative treatments such as the Born-Mermin approximation. We found considerable differences between the results of these approaches; this underlines the need for a first-principles determination of the DSF of warm dense matter.

  11. Eddy Viscosity in Dense Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T.; Rognon, P.; Metzger, B.; Einav, I.

    2013-08-01

    We present a seminal set of experiments on dense granular flows in the stadium shear geometry. The advantage of this geometry is that it produces steady shear flow over large deformations, in which the shear stress is constant. The striking result is that the velocity profiles exhibit an S shape, and are not linear as local constitutive laws would predict. We propose a model that suggests this is a result of wall perturbations which span through the system due to the nonlocal behavior of the material. The model is analogous to that of eddy viscosity in turbulent boundary layers, in which the distance to the wall is introduced to predict velocity profiles. Our findings appear pivotal in a number of experimental and practical situations involving dense granular flows next to a boundary. They could further be adapted to other similar materials such as dense suspensions, foams, or emulsions.

  12. IR Spectroscopy of PAHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Bernstein, Max; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2007-05-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be a component of the ice mantles that form on dust grains in dense molecular clouds. PAHs frozen in grain mantles will produce IR absorption bands, not IR emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects embedded in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. Additionally spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 ?m region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It has not been possible to properly evaluate the contribution of PAH bands to these IR observations because the laboratory absorption spectra of PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ice analogs is lacking. This experimental data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the interaction of PAHs with the surrounding molecules effects PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Furthermore, PAHs are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the PAH spectrum. This laboratory proposal aims to remedy the situation by studying the IR spectroscopy of PAHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that realistically reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. The purpose is to provide laboratory spectra which can be used to interpret IR observations. We will measure the spectra of these mixed molecular ices containing PAHs before and after ionization and determine the intrinsic band strengths of neutral and ionized PAHs in these ice analogs. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PAHs can play in determining the 5-8 ?m spectrum of dense clouds and will directly address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PAHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PAH ions components of interstellar ice?

  13. Localization of platelet prostaglandin production in the platelet dense tubular system.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; White, J. G.; Rao, G. H.; Townsend, D.

    1976-01-01

    Platelet production of 12L-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 8-(1-hydroxy-3-oxopropyl)-9, 12L-dihydroxy-5,10-heptadecadienoic acid (PHD), two metabolites of the prostaglandin cyclic endoperoxides PGG2 and PGH2, was found in this investigation to occur primarily in a platelet microsomal fraction consisting almost exclusively of membranes. To further localize the membrane site of platelet prostaglandin biosynthesis, the present study has used a cytochemical technique employing 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as an oxidizable substrate. The reaction product was found to localize in the platelet dense tubular system. Formation of the reaction product was inhibited by aminotriazole. In similar concentrations, aminotriazole inhibited collagen and arachidonic acid aggregation, the second wave of ADP and epinephrine aggregation, but failed to inhibit aggregation by PGG2 and A23187. A study of the mechanism of action of aminotriazole revealed inhibition of formation of HHT and PHD. The results localize platelet prostaglandin biosynthesis to the membranes of the dense tubular system. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figures 1-2 Figure 3 and 4 PMID:1266944

  14. Superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Alford, Mark; Windisch, Andreas; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-03-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored as compared to well-separated triplets of ``semi-superfluid'' color flux tubes. In this talk we will provide results which will identify regions in parameter space where the superfluid vortex spontaneously decays. We will also discuss the nature of the mode that is responsible for the decay of a superfluid vortex in dense quark matter. We will conclude by mentioning the implications of our results to neutron stars.

  15. Controlled Dense Coding with the W State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Bai, Ming-qiang; Mo, Zhi-wen

    2017-09-01

    The average amount of information is an important factor in implementing dense coding. Based on this, we propose two schemes for controlled dense coding by using the three-qubit entangled W state as the quantum channel in this paper. In these schemes, the controller (Charlie) can adjust the local measurement angle 𝜃 to modulate the entanglement, and consequently the average amount of information transmitted from the sender (Alice) to the receiver (Bob). Although the results for the average amounts of information are the same from the different two schemes, the second scheme has advantage over the first scheme.

  16. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  17. Dense gas flow in minimum length nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Aldo, A.C.; Argrow, B.M.

    1995-06-01

    Recently, dense gases have been investigated for many engineering applications such as for turbomachinery and wind tunnels. Supersonic nozzle design can be complicated by nonclassical dense-gas behavior in the transonic flow regime. In this paper, a method of characteristics (MOC) is developed for two-dimensional (planar) and axisymmetric flow of a van der Waals gas. A minimum length nozzle design code is developed that employs the MOC procedure to generate an inviscid wall contour. The van der Waals results are compared to perfect gas results to show the real-gas effects on the flow properties and inviscid wall contours.

  18. Demagnetization effects in dense nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normile, P. S.; Andersson, M. S.; Mathieu, R.; Lee, S. S.; Singh, G.; De Toro, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We highlight the relevance of demagnetizing-field corrections in the characterization of dense magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. By an analysis that employs in-plane and out-of-plane magnetometry on cylindrical assemblies, we demonstrate the suitability of a simple analytical formula-based correction method. This allows us to identify artifacts of the demagnetizing field in temperature-dependent susceptibility curves (e.g., shoulder peaks in curves from a disordered assembly of essentially bare magnetic nanoparticles). The same analysis approach is shown to be a straightforward procedure for determining the magnetic nanoparticle packing fraction in dense, disordered assemblies.

  19. Gelation in Aerosols; Non-Mean-Field Aggregation and Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, C. M.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nature has many examples of systems of particles suspended in a fluid phase; colloids when in a liquid, aerosols when in a gas. These systems are inherently unstable since if the particles can come together, van der Waals forces will keep them together. In this work we studied the aggregation kinetics of particulate systems, most often aerosols. The emphasis of our work was to study dense systems and systems that gel since previous work had not considered these. Our work obtained a number of significant discoveries and results which are reported here.

  20. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  1. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  2. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  3. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  4. Imbibition kinetics of spherical aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébraud, Pascal; Lootens, Didier; Debacker, Alban

    The imbibition kinetics of a millimeter-sized aggregate of 300 nm diameter colloidal particles by a wetting pure solvent is studied. Three successive regimes are observed : in the first one, the imbibition proceeds by compressing the air inside the aggregate. Then, the solvent stops when the pressure of the compressed air is equal to the Laplace pressure at the meniscus of the wetting solvent in the porous aggregate. The interface is pinned and the aggregate slowly degases, up to a point where the pressure of the entrapped air stops decreasing and is controlled by the Laplace pressure of small bubbles. Depending on the curvature of the bubble, the system may then be in an unstable state. The imbibition then starts again, but with an inner pressure in equilibrium with these bubbles. This last stage leads to the complete infiltration of the aggregate.

  5. Premature red blood cells have decreased aggregation and enhanced aggregability.

    PubMed

    Arbell, D; Orkin, B; Bar-Oz, B; Barshtein, G; Yedgar, S

    2008-06-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic damage. This damage is most obvious in the brain, retina, and gastrointestinal tract. Studies focusing on the rheological properties of premature red blood cells (pRBCs) have consistently shown minimal or no RBC aggregation. Previously, measurements of pRBC aggregation kinetics indicated that specific plasma properties are responsible for the decreased RBC aggregation observed in the neonates, but that their specific RBC properties do not affect it. However, the strength of interaction in the pRBC aggregates as a function of medium composition has not been tested. In our previous research, we described clinically relevant parameters, that is, the aggregate resistance to disaggregation by flow. With the help of a cell flow property analyzer (CFA), we can monitor RBC aggregation by direct visualization of its dynamics during flow. We used the CFA to examine pRBC (from 9 premature babies) in the natural plasma and in PBS buffer supplemented with dextran (500 kDa) to distinguish between RBC intrinsic-cellular and plasma factors. pRBCs suspended in the native plasma showed minimal or no aggregation in comparison to normal adult RBC. When we transferred pRBCs from the same sample to the dextran solution, enhanced resistance to disaggregation by flow was apparent.

  6. Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01-3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

  7. Purification of Toxoplasma dense granule proteins reveals that they are in complexes throughout the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Braun, Laurence; Travier, Laetitia; Kieffer, Sylvie; Musset, Karine; Garin, Jérôme; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2008-01-01

    Dense granules are Apicomplexa specific secretory organelles. In Toxoplasma gondii, the dense granules proteins, named GRA proteins, are massively secreted into the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) shortly after invasion. Despite the presence of hydrophobic membrane segments, they are stored as both soluble and aggregated forms within the dense granules and are secreted as soluble forms into the vacuolar space where they further stably associate with PV membranes. In this study, we explored the unusual biochemical behavior of GRA proteins during their trafficking. Conventional chromatography indicated that the GRA proteins form high globular weight complexes within the parasite. To confirm these results, DeltaGRA knocked-out parasites were stably complemented with their respective HA-FLAG tagged GRA2 or GRA5. Purification of the tagged proteins by affinity chromatography showed that within the parasite and the PV soluble fraction, both the soluble GRA2-HA-FLAG and GRA5-HA-FLAG associate with several GRA proteins, the major ones being GRA3, GRA6 and GRA7. Following their insertion into the PV membranes, GRA2-HA-FLAG associated with GRA5 and GRA7 while GRA5-HA-FLAG associated with GRA7 only. Taken together, these data suggest that the GRA proteins form oligomeric complexes that may explain their solubility within the dense granules and the vacuolar matrix by sequestering their hydrophobic domains within the interior of the complex. Insertion into the PV membranes correlates with the decrease of the GRA partners number.

  8. Orthogonal flexible Rydberg aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, K.; Wüster, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the link between atomic motion and exciton transport in flexible Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of highly excited light alkali-metal atoms, for which motion due to dipole-dipole interaction becomes relevant. In two one-dimensional atom chains crossing at a right angle adiabatic exciton transport is affected by a conical intersection of excitonic energy surfaces, which induces controllable nonadiabatic effects. A joint exciton-motion pulse that is initially governed by a single energy surface is coherently split into two modes after crossing the intersection. The modes induce strongly different atomic motion, leading to clear signatures of nonadiabatic effects in atomic density profiles. We have shown how this scenario can be exploited as an exciton switch, controlling direction and coherence properties of the joint pulse on the second of the chains [K. Leonhardt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 223001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.223001]. In this article we discuss the underlying complex dynamics in detail, characterize the switch, and derive our isotropic interaction model from a realistic anisotropic one with the addition of a magnetic bias field.

  9. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  10. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  11. Dense peripheral corneal clouding in Scheie syndrome.

    PubMed

    Summers, C G; Whitley, C B; Holland, E J; Purple, R L; Krivit, W

    1994-05-01

    A 28-year-old woman with Scheie syndrome (MPS I-S) presented with the unusual feature of extremely dense peripheral corneal clouding, allowing maintenance of good central visual acuity. Characteristic systemic features, an abnormal electroretinogram result, and absent alpha-L-iduronidase activity confirmed the diagnosis despite the unusual corneal pattern of clouding.

  12. Dense matter at RAON: Challenges and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yujeong; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Gaitanos, T.; Kim, Youngman

    2016-11-01

    Dense nuclear matter is ubiquitous in modern nuclear physics because it is related to many interesting microscopic and macroscopic phenomena such as heavy ion collisions, nuclear structure, and neutron stars. The on-going rare isotope science project in Korea will build up a rare isotope accelerator complex called RAON. One of the main goals of RAON is to investigate rare isotope physics including dense nuclear matter. Using the relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (RBUU) transport code, we estimate the properties of nuclear matter that can be created from low-energy heavyion collisions at RAON.We give predictions for the maximum baryon density, the isospin asymmetry and the temperature of nuclear matter that would be formed during 197Au+197Au and 132Sn+64Ni reactions. With a large isospin asymmetry, various theoretical studies indicate that the critical densities or temperatures of phase transitions to exotic states decrease. Because a large isospin asymmetry is expected in the dense matter created at RAON, we discuss possibilities of observing exotic states of dense nuclear matter at RAON for large isospin asymmetry.

  13. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  14. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  15. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  16. Improvements in accuracy of dense OPC models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallingal, Chidam; Oberschmidt, James; Viswanathan, Ramya; Abdo, Amr; Park, OSeo

    2008-10-01

    Performing model-based optical proximity correction (MBOPC) on layouts has become an integral part of patterning advanced integrated circuits. Earlier technologies used sparse OPC, the run times of which explode when the density of layouts increases. With the move to 45 nm technology node, this increase in run time has resulted in a shift to dense simulation OPC, which is pixel-based. The dense approach becomes more efficient at 45nm technology node and beyond. New OPC model forms can be used with the dense simulation OPC engine, providing the greater accuracy required by smaller technology nodes. Parameters in the optical model have to be optimized to achieve the required accuracy. Dense OPC uses a resist model with a different set of parameters than sparse OPC. The default search ranges used in the optimization of these resist parameters do not always result in the best accuracy. However, it is possible to improve the accuracy of the resist models by understanding the restrictions placed on the search ranges of the physical parameters during optimization. This paper will present results showing the correlation between accuracy of the models and some of these optical and resist parameters. The results will show that better optimization can improve the model fitness of features in both the calibration and verification set.

  17. DNS of turbulent flows of dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciacovelli, L.; Cinnella, P.; Gloerfelt, X.; Grasso, F.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dense gas effects on compressible turbulence is investigated by means of numerical simulations of the decay of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence (CHIT) and of supersonic turbulent flows through a plane channel (TCF). For both configurations, a parametric study on the Mach and Reynolds numbers is carried out. The dense gas considered in these parametric studies is PP11, a heavy fluorocarbon. The results are systematically compared to those obtained for a diatomic perfect gas (air). In our computations, the thermodynamic behaviour of the dense gases is modelled by means of the Martin-Hou equation of state. For CHIT cases, initial turbulent Mach numbers up to 1 are analyzed using mesh resolutions up to 5123. For TCF, bulk Mach numbers up to 3 and bulk Reynolds numbers up to 12000 are investigated. Average profiles of the thermodynamic quantities exhibit significant differences with respect to perfect-gas solutions for both of the configurations. For high-Mach CHIT, compressible structures are modified with respect to air, with weaker eddy shocklets and stronger expansions. In TCF, the velocity profiles of dense gas flows are much less sensitive to the Mach number and collapse reasonably well in the logarithmic region without any special need for compressible scalings, unlike the case of air, and the overall flow behaviour is midway between that of a variable-property liquid and that of a gas.

  18. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  19. Burning Of Dense Clusters Of Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of evaporation, ignition, and combustion of rich and relatively dense clusters of drops of liquid fuel. Focus on interactions between heterogenous liquid/gas mixture in cluster and flame surrounding it. Theoretical model of evaporation, ignition, and combustion presented.

  20. Flexure modelling at seamounts with dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Sep; Wessel, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The lithospheric response to seamounts and ocean islands has been successfully described by deformation of an elastic plate induced by a given volcanic load. If the shape and mass of a seamount are known, the lithospheric flexure due to the seamount is determined by the thickness of an elastic plate, Te, which depends on the load density and the age of the plate at the time of seamount construction. We can thus infer important thermomechanical properties of the lithosphere from Te estimates at seamounts and their correlation with other geophysical inferences, such as cooling of the plate. Whereas the bathymetry (i.e. shape) of a seamount is directly observable, the total mass often requires an assumption of the internal seamount structure. The conventional approach considers the seamount to have a uniform density (e.g. density of the crust). This choice, however, tends to bias the total mass acting on an elastic plate. In this study, we will explore a simple approximation to the seamount's internal structure that considers a dense core and a less dense outer edifice. Although the existence of a core is supported by various gravity and seismic studies, the role of such volcanic cores in flexure modelling has not been fully addressed. Here, we present new analytic solutions for plate flexure due to axisymmetric dense core loads, and use them to examine the effects of dense cores in flexure calculations for a variety of synthetic cases. Comparing analytic solutions with and without a core indicates that the flexure model with uniform density underestimates Te by at least 25 per cent. This bias increases when the uniform density is taken to be equal to the crustal density. We also propose a practical application of the dense core model by constructing a uniform density load of same mass as the dense core load. This approximation allows us to compute the flexural deflection and gravity anomaly of a seamount in the wavenumber domain and minimize the limitations

  1. Superfluidity and vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavarapu, Satyanarayana Kumar

    This dissertation will elucidate specific features of superfluid behavior in dense quark matter, It will start with issues regarding spontaneous decay of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter. This will be followed by topics that explain superfluid phenomena from field theoretical viewpoint. In particular the first part of the dissertation will talk about superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter which are known to be energetically disfavored as compared to well-separated triplets of "semi-superfluid" color flux tubes. In this talk we will provide results which will identify regions in parameter space where the superfluid vortex spontaneously decays. We will also discuss the nature of the mode that is responsible for the decay of a superfluid vortex in dense quark matter. We will conclude by mentioning the implications of our results to neutron stars. In the field theoretic formulation of a zero-temperature superfluid one connects the superfluid four-velocity which is a macroscopic observable with a microscopic field variable namely the gradient of the phase of a Bose-Condensed scalar field. On the other hand, a superfluid at nonzero temperatures is usually described in terms of a two-fluid model: the superfluid and the normal fluid. In the later part of the dissertation we offer a deeper understanding of the two-fluid model by deriving it from an underlying microscopic field theory. In particular, we shall obtain the macroscopic properties of a uniform, dissipationless superfluid at low temperatures and weak coupling within the framework of a ϕ 4 model. Though our study is very general, it may also be viewed as a step towards understanding the superfluid properties of various phases of dense nuclear and quark matter in the interior of compact star.

  2. Chemical Dense Gas Modeling in Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. J.; Williams, M. D.; Nelson, M. A.; Streit, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Many industrial facilities have on-site storage of chemicals and are within a few kilometers of residential population. Chemicals are transported around the country via trains and trucks and often go through populated areas on their journey. Many of the chemicals, like chlorine and phosgene, are toxic and when released into the air are heavier-than-air dense gases that hug the ground and result in high airborne concentrations at breathing level. There is considerable concern about the vulnerability of these stored and transported chemicals to terrorist attack and the impact a release could have on highly-populated urban areas. There is the possibility that the impacts of a dense gas release within a city would be exacerbated since the buildings might act to trap the toxic cloud at street level and channel it over a large area down side streets. However, no one is quite sure what will happen for a release in cities since there is a dearth of experimental data. There are a number of fast-running dense gas models used in the air pollution and emergency response community, but there are none that account for the complex flow fields and turbulence generated by buildings. As part of this presentation, we will discuss current knowledge regarding dense gas releases around buildings and other obstacles. We will present information from wind tunnel and field experiments, as well as computational fluid dynamics modeling. We will also discuss new fast response modeling efforts which are trying to account for dense gas transport and dispersion in cities.

  3. Experimental ultrasound characterization of red blood cell aggregation using the structure factor size estimator.

    PubMed

    Yu, François T H; Cloutier, Guy

    2007-07-01

    The frequency dependence of the ultrasonic backscattering coefficient (BSC) was studied to assess the level of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. Three monoelement focused wideband transducers were used to insonify porcine blood sheared in a Couette flow from 9 to 30 MHz. A high shear rate was first applied to promote disaggregation. Different residual shear rates were then used to promote formation of RBC aggregates. The structure factor size estimator (SFSE), a second-order data reduction model based on the structure factor, was applied to the frequency-dependent BSC. Two parameters were extracted from the model to describe the level of aggregation at 6% and 40% hematocrits: W, the packing factor, and D the aggregate diameter, expressed in number of RBCs. Both parameters closely matched theoretical values for nonaggregated RBCs. W and D increased during aggregation with stabilized values modulated by the applied residual shear rate. Furthermore, parameter D during the kinetics of aggregation at 6% hematocrit under static conditions correlated with an optical RBC aggregate size estimation from microscopic images (r(2)=0.76). To conclude, the SFSE presents an interesting framework for tissue characterization of partially correlated dense tissues such as aggregated RBCs.

  4. Asterisk Grade Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokorsky, Eileen A.

    A study was conducted at Passaic County Community College (PCCC) to investigate the operation of a grading system which utilized an asterisk (*) grade to indicate progress in a course until a letter grade was assigned. The study sought to determine the persistence of students receiving the "*" grade, the incidence of cases of students receiving…

  5. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tails of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.

  6. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tailsmore » of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.« less

  7. Effect of arm exchange on the liquid-solid transition of dense suspensions of star polymers.

    PubMed

    Puaud, Fanny; Nicolai, Taco; Benyahia, Lazhar; Nicol, Erwan

    2013-10-10

    Star polymers with dynamic arm exchange are formed in water by self-assembly of amphiphilic diblock copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide) end capped with a small hydrophobic block. The arm exchange was arrested in situ by photo-cross-linking of the core. The effect of dynamic arm exchange on the osmotic compressibility and viscosity was investigated systematically as a function of the concentration and temperature. The discontinuous liquid-solid transition reported for dense polymeric micelle suspensions was found to be preserved after dynamic arm exchange was arrested in situ. The effect of cross-linking and aggregation number on the liquid-solid transition was investigated.

  8. Edge compression techniques for visualization of dense directed graphs.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tim; Henry Riche, Nathalie; Marriott, Kim; Mears, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    We explore the effectiveness of visualizing dense directed graphs by replacing individual edges with edges connected to 'modules'-or groups of nodes-such that the new edges imply aggregate connectivity. We only consider techniques that offer a lossless compression: that is, where the entire graph can still be read from the compressed version. The techniques considered are: a simple grouping of nodes with identical neighbor sets; Modular Decomposition which permits internal structure in modules and allows them to be nested; and Power Graph Analysis which further allows edges to cross module boundaries. These techniques all have the same goal--to compress the set of edges that need to be rendered to fully convey connectivity--but each successive relaxation of the module definition permits fewer edges to be drawn in the rendered graph. Each successive technique also, we hypothesize, requires a higher degree of mental effort to interpret. We test this hypothetical trade-off with two studies involving human participants. For Power Graph Analysis we propose a novel optimal technique based on constraint programming. This enables us to explore the parameter space for the technique more precisely than could be achieved with a heuristic. Although applicable to many domains, we are motivated by--and discuss in particular--the application to software dependency analysis.

  9. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  10. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data from over 1,000 public sources on over 500,000 chemicals and is searchable by chemical name, other identifiers and by chemical structure. It can be used to query a specific chemical and find all publicly available hazard, exposure and risk assessment data. It also provides access to EPA's ToxCast, ToxRefDB, DSSTox, Dashboard and DSSTox data.

  11. Polarization-resolved near-backscattering of airborne aggregates composed of different primary particles.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Pan, Yong-Le; Wang, Chuji; Cao, Hui

    2014-07-15

    We measured the polarization-resolved angular elastic scattering intensity distribution of aggregates composed of primary particles with different shapes and packing densities in the near-backward directions (155°-180°). Specifically, we compare aggregates composed of spherical polystyrene latex spheres, cylinder-like Bacillus subtilis particles, and Arizona road dust, as well as tryptophan particles. We observe clearly differentiable polarization aspect ratios and find that the negative polarization dip is more pronounced in more densely packed aggregates or particles. This work indicates that the polarization aspect ratio in the near-backward direction may be used as a fingerprint to discriminate between aggregates with the same size and overall shape by differences in their constituent particles.

  12. IR Spectroscopy of PANHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be frozen into ice mantles on dust grains in dense clouds. These PAHs will produce IR absorption bands, not emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. It is now thought that aromatic molecules in which N atoms are substituted for a few of the C atoms in a PAH's hexagonal skeletal network (PANHs) may well be as abundant and ubiquitous throughout the interstellar medium as PAHs. Spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 um region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It is not possible to analyze these observations because lab spectra of PANHs and PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar ice analogs are lacking. This lab data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the surrounding molecules affect PANH and PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Further, PAHs (and PANHs?) are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the spectrum. This proposal starts to address this situation by studying the IR spectra of PANHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. Thanks to Spitzer Cycle-4 support, we are now measuring the spectra of PAHs in interstellar ice analogs to provide laboratory spectra that can be used to interpret IR observations. Here we propose to extend this work to PANHs. We will measure the spectra of these interstellar ice analogs containing PANHs before and after ionization and determine the band strengths of neutral and ionized PANHs in these ices. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PANHs can play in the 5-8 um spectrum of dense clouds and address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PANHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PANH ions

  13. WARM EXTENDED DENSE GAS AT THE HEART OF A COLD COLLAPSING DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi E-mail: tgp@submm.caltech.ed E-mail: kitamura@isas.jaxa.j

    2009-12-01

    In order to investigate when and how the birth of a protostellar core occurs, we made survey observations of four well-studied dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud using CO transitions in submillimeter bands. We report here the detection of unexpectedly warm (approx30-70 K), extended (radius of approx2400 AU), dense (a few times 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}) gas at the heart of one of the dense cores, L1521F (MC27), within the cold dynamically collapsing components. We argue that the detected warm, extended, dense gas may originate from shock regions caused by collisions between the dynamically collapsing components and outflowing/rotating components within the dense core. We propose a new stage of star formation, 'warm-in-cold core stage (WICCS)', i.e., the cold collapsing envelope encases the warm extended dense gas at the center due to the formation of a protostellar core. WICCS would constitute a missing link in evolution between a cold quiescent starless core and a young protostar in class 0 stage that has a large-scale bipolar outflow.

  14. Aggregative response in bats: prey abundance versus habitat.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jörg; Mehr, Milenka; Bässler, Claus; Fenton, M Brock; Hothorn, Torsten; Pretzsch, Hans; Klemmt, Hans-Joachim; Brandl, Roland

    2012-07-01

    In habitats where prey is either rare or difficult to predict spatiotemporally, such as open habitats, predators must be adapted to react effectively to variations in prey abundance. Open-habitat foraging bats have a wing morphology adapted for covering long distances, possibly use information transfer to locate patches of high prey abundance, and would therefore be expected to show an aggregative response at these patches. Here, we examined the effects of prey abundance on foraging activities of open-habitat foragers in comparison to that of edge-habitat foragers and closed-habitat foragers. Bat activity was estimated by counting foraging calls recorded with bat call recorders (38,371 calls). Prey abundance was estimated concurrently at each site using light and pitfall traps. The habitat was characterized by terrestrial laser scanning. Prey abundance increased with vegetation density. As expected, recordings of open-habitat foragers clearly decreased with increasing vegetation density. The foraging activity of edge- and closed-habitat foragers was not significantly affected by the vegetation density, i.e., these guilds were able to forage from open habitats to habitats with dense vegetation. Only open-habitat foragers displayed a significant and proportional aggregative response to increasing prey abundance. Our results suggest that adaptations for effective and low-cost foraging constrains habitat use and excludes the guild of open-habitat foragers from foraging in habitats with high prey abundance, such as dense forest stands.

  15. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  16. ULTRASONICALLY-ENHANCED DENSE-MEDIUM CYCLONING FOR FINE COAL AND COAL REFUSE IMPOUNDMENT MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mark S. Klima; Dr. Barbara J. Arnold

    2001-08-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, its project team (Typlex, Inc., DAGER, Inc., and PrepTech, Inc.), and advisory committee members have demonstrated the application of ultrasonic energy during dense-medium cyclining and subsequent recovery of fine coal and coal refuse impoundment materials. The results will help to extend the range of conventional dense-medium cyclining to sizes now typically cleaned in relatively inefficient water-only cyclone and spiral concentrators circuits. This technology also provides a potential approach to produce ultra-clean material as would be used for feedstocks for premium carbon products. This report describes Phase I of the project, which involved laboratory testing of dense-medium cyclining and subsequent medium recovery, with and without ultrasonic treatment, along with fundamental dispersion testing. Dense-medium cycloning was conducted with a 76.2-mm (3-in.) diameter cyclone under various conditions including magnetite grade, medium relative density, inlet pressure, cyclone geometry, and feed coal. Dense-medium recovery testing was carried out with a 305-mm (12-in.) diameter x 152-mm (6-in.) wide wet-drum magnetic separator using the cyclone clean coal and refuse products as the feed material. Fundamental testing of dispersion/reagglomeration phenomena was conducted with coal/clay mixtures. In almost all cases, the dense-medium cyclone was capable of achieving separations down to approximately 0.037 mm. Ultrasonic treatment had a slight effect on reducing the ash content of the clean coal. It was also found that ultrasonic treatment improved the purity of the magnetic fraction during wet-drum magnetic separation. The treatment was particularly beneficial for the cyclone overflow material. The fundamental testing indicated that agitation after ultrasonic treatment is necessary to disperse fine particles and to prevent agglomeration.

  17. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  18. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  19. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2016-11-01

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (˜300 GPa ) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  20. Dense Deposit Disease and C3 Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Thomas D.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Terence Cook, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary C3 glomerulopathy refers to those renal lesions characterized histologically by predominant C3 accumulation within the glomerulus, and pathogenetically by aberrant regulation of the alternative pathway of complement. Dense deposit disease is distinguished from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy by its characteristic appearance on electron microscopy. The extent to which dense deposit disease also differs from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy in terms of clinical features, natural history, and outcomes of treatment including renal transplantation is less clear. We discuss the pathophysiology of C3 glomerulopathy, with evidence for alternative pathway dysregulation obtained from affected individuals and complement factor H (Cfh)-deficient animal models. Recent linkage studies in familial C3 glomerulopathy have shown genomic rearrangements in the Cfh-related genes, for which the novel pathophysiologic concept of Cfh deregulation has been proposed. PMID:24161036

  1. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells.

  2. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  3. Static dielectric properties of dense ionic fluids.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Grigory; Bier, Markus

    2015-05-14

    The static dielectric properties of dense ionic fluids, e.g., room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and inorganic fused salts, are investigated on different length scales by means of grandcanonical Monte Carlo simulations. A generally applicable scheme is developed which allows one to approximately decompose the electric susceptibility of dense ionic fluids into the orientation and the distortion polarization contribution. It is shown that at long range, the well-known plasma-like perfect screening behavior occurs, which corresponds to a diverging distortion susceptibility, whereas at short range, orientation polarization dominates, which coincides with that of a dipolar fluid of attached cation-anion pairs. This observation suggests that the recently debated interpretation of RTILs as dilute electrolyte solutions might not be simply a yes-no-question but it might depend on the considered length scale.

  4. Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Jeremey; Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2012-03-01

    We propose to search for nuclear density or greater compact ultra dense objects (CUDOs), which could constitute a significant fraction of the dark matter [1]. Considering their high density, the gravitational tidal forces are significant and atomic-density matter cannot stop an impacting CUDO, which punctures the surface of the target body, pulverizing, heating and entraining material near its trajectory through the target [2]. Because impact features endure over geologic timescales, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Mercury and large asteroids are well-suited to act as time-integrating CUDO detectors. There are several potential candidates for CUDO structure such as strangelet fragments or more generally dark matter if mechanisms exist for it to form compact objects. [4pt] [1] B. J. Carr, K. Kohri, Y. Sendouda, & J.'i. Yokoyama, Phys. Rev. D81, 104019 (2010). [0pt] [2] L. Labun, J. Birrell, J. Rafelski, Solar System Signatures of Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects, arXiv:1104.4572.

  5. Quantum kinetic equation for nonequilibrium dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, V. G.; Röpke, G.

    1995-02-01

    Using the density matrix method in the form developed by Zubarev, equations of motion for nonequilibrium quantum systems with continuous short range interactions are derived which describe kinetic and hydrodynamic processes in a consistent way. The T-matrix as well as the two-particle density matrix determining the nonequilibrium collision integral are obtained in the ladder approximation including the Hartree-Fock corrections and the Pauli blocking for intermediate states. It is shown that in this approximation the total energy is conserved. The developed approach to the kinetic theory of dense quantum systems is able to reproduce the virial corrections consistent with the generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck approximation in equilibrium. The contribution of many-particle correlations to the drift term in the quantum kinetic equation for dense systems is discussed.

  6. PHOTOCHEMICAL HEATING OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Glassgold, A. E.; Najita, J. R.

    2015-09-10

    Photochemical heating is analyzed with an emphasis on the heating generated by chemical reactions initiated by the products of photodissociation and photoionization. The immediate products are slowed down by collisions with the ambient gas and then heat the gas. In addition to this direct process, heating is also produced by the subsequent chemical reactions initiated by these products. Some of this chemical heating comes from the kinetic energy of the reaction products and the rest from collisional de-excitation of the product atoms and molecules. In considering dense gas dominated by molecular hydrogen, we find that the chemical heating is sometimes as large, if not much larger than, the direct heating. In very dense gas, the total photochemical heating approaches 10 eV per photodissociation (or photoionization), competitive with other ways of heating molecular gas.

  7. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  8. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  9. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.

    1995-12-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  10. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P [Lafayette, CA; Visco, Steven J [Berkeley, CA; De Jonghe, Lutgard C [Lafayette, CA

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  11. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1998-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

  12. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  13. Real-time monitoring of quorum sensing in 3D-printed bacterial aggregates using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Connell, Jodi L; Kim, Jiyeon; Shear, Jason B; Bard, Allen J; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-12-23

    Microbes frequently live in nature as small, densely packed aggregates containing ∼10(1)-10(5) cells. These aggregates not only display distinct phenotypes, including resistance to antibiotics, but also, serve as building blocks for larger biofilm communities. Aggregates within these larger communities display nonrandom spatial organization, and recent evidence indicates that this spatial organization is critical for fitness. Studying single aggregates as well as spatially organized aggregates remains challenging because of the technical difficulties associated with manipulating small populations. Micro-3D printing is a lithographic technique capable of creating aggregates in situ by printing protein-based walls around individual cells or small populations. This 3D-printing strategy can organize bacteria in complex arrangements to investigate how spatial and environmental parameters influence social behaviors. Here, we combined micro-3D printing and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to probe quorum sensing (QS)-mediated communication in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results reveal that QS-dependent behaviors are observed within aggregates as small as 500 cells; however, aggregates larger than 2,000 bacteria are required to stimulate QS in neighboring aggregates positioned 8 μm away. These studies provide a powerful system to analyze the impact of spatial organization and aggregate size on microbial behaviors.

  14. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  15. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  16. Confined magnetic monopoles in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorsky, A.; Shifman, M.; Yung, A.

    2011-04-01

    Non-Abelian strings exist in the color-flavor locked phase of dense QCD. We show that kinks appearing in the world-sheet theory on these strings, in the form of the kink-antikink bound pairs, are the magnetic monopoles—descendants of the ’t Hooft-Polyakov monopoles surviving in such a special form in dense QCD. Our consideration is heavily based on analogies and inspiration coming from certain supersymmetric non-Abelian theories. This is the first ever analytic demonstration that objects unambiguously identifiable as the magnetic monopoles are native to non-Abelian Yang-Mills theories (albeit our analysis extends only to the phase of the monopole confinement and has nothing to say about their condensation). Technically, our demonstration becomes possible due to the fact that low-energy dynamics of the non-Abelian strings in dense QCD is that of the orientational zero modes. It is described by an effective two-dimensional CP(2) model on the string world sheet. The kinks in this model representing confined magnetic monopoles are in a highly quantum regime.

  17. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  18. Dense Visual SLAM with Probabilistic Surfel Map.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhixin; Ye, Mao; Ren, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Visual SLAM is one of the key technologies to align the virtual and real world together in Augmented Reality applications. RGBD dense Visual SLAM approaches have shown their advantages in robustness and accuracy in recent years. However, there are still several challenges such as the inconsistencies in RGBD measurements across multiple frames that could jeopardize the accuracy of both camera trajectory and scene reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a novel map representation called Probabilistic Surfel Map (PSM) for dense visual SLAM. The main idea is to maintain a globally consistent map with both photometric and geometric uncertainties encoded in order to address the inconsistency issue. The key of our PSM is proper modeling and updating of sensor measurement uncertainties, as well as the strategies to apply them for improving both the front-end pose estimation and the back-end optimization. Experimental results on publicly available datasets demonstrate major improvements with our approach over the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, comparing with σ-DVO, we achieve a 40% reduction in absolute trajectory error and an 18% reduction in relative pose error in visual odometry, as well as an 8.5% reduction in absolute trajectory error in complete SLAM. Moreover, our PSM enables generation of a high quality dense point cloud with comparable accuracy as the state-of-the-art approach.

  19. Dense Correspondences across Scenes and Scales.

    PubMed

    Tau, Moria; Hassner, Tal

    2016-05-01

    We seek a practical method for establishing dense correspondences between two images with similar content, but possibly different 3D scenes. One of the challenges in designing such a system is the local scale differences of objects appearing in the two images. Previous methods often considered only few image pixels; matching only pixels for which stable scales may be reliably estimated. Recently, others have considered dense correspondences, but with substantial costs associated with generating, storing and matching scale invariant descriptors. Our work is motivated by the observation that pixels in the image have contexts-the pixels around them-which may be exploited in order to reliably estimate local scales. We make the following contributions. (i) We show that scales estimated in sparse interest points may be propagated to neighboring pixels where this information cannot be reliably determined. Doing so allows scale invariant descriptors to be extracted anywhere in the image. (ii) We explore three means for propagating this information: using the scales at detected interest points, using the underlying image information to guide scale propagation in each image separately, and using both images together. Finally, (iii), we provide extensive qualitative and quantitative results, demonstrating that scale propagation allows for accurate dense correspondences to be obtained even between very different images, with little computational costs beyond those required by existing methods.

  20. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  1. Effects of soil aggregates on debris-flow mobilization: Results from ring-shear experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Neal R.; Mann, Janet E.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Rates and styles of landslide motion are sensitive to pore-water pressure changes caused by changes in soil porosity accompanying shear deformation. Soil may either contract or dilate upon shearing, depending upon whether its initial porosity is greater or less, respectively, than a critical-state porosity attained after sufficiently high strain. We observed complications in this behavior, however, during rate-controlled (0.02 m s−1) ring-shear experiments conducted on naturally aggregated dense loamy sand at low confining stresses (10.6 and 40 kPa). The aggregated soil first dilated and then contracted to porosities less than initial values, whereas the same soil with its aggregates destroyed monotonically dilated. We infer that aggregates persisted initially during shear and caused dilation before their eventual breakdown enabled net contraction. An implication of this contraction, demonstrated in experiments in which initial soil porosity was varied, is that the value of porosity distinguishing initially contractive from dilative behavior can be significantly larger than the critical-state porosity, which develops only after disaggregation ceases at high strains. In addition, post-dilative contraction may produce excess pore pressures, thereby reducing frictional strength and facilitating debris-flow mobilization. We infer that results of triaxial tests, which generally produce strains at least a factor of ∼ 4 smaller than those we observed at the inception of post-dilative contraction, do not allow soil contraction to be ruled out as a mechanism for debris-flow mobilization in dense soils containing aggregates.

  2. The importance of 2D aggregates on the antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus sessile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miñán, A; Schilardi, P L; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms formed on implanted devices are difficult to eradicate. Adhesion mechanism, high bacterial density, aggregation, induction of persisters and stressed bacteria are some of the factors considered when the antimicrobial resistance of these biofilms is analyzed. The aim of this work was to provide an alternative approach to the understanding of this issue by using a specially designed experimental set up that includes the use of microstructured (MS) surfaces (potential inhibitors of bacterial aggregation) in combination with antimicrobial agents (streptomycin and levofloxacin) against Staphylococcusaureus attached cells. Biofilms formed on smooth surfaces were used as plain controls (biofilmed-PC) characterized by the formation of dense 2D bacterial aggregates. Results showed bacterial persistence when streptomycin or levofloxacin were applied to PC-biofilms. The antimicrobial activity of both antibiotics was enhanced when bacteria were attached on MS, where single cells or small aggregates were observed. Thus, dense 2D aggregates of bacteria seem to be crucial as a required previous stage to develop the antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Secreted protease mediates interspecies interaction and promotes cell aggregation of the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aggregans.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Sho; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Interspecies interactions were studied in hot spring microbial mats where diverse species of bacterial cells are densely packed. The anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium, Chloroflexus aggregans, has been widely found in the microbial mats as a major component in terrestrial hot springs in Japan at the temperature from 50 to 70°C. C. aggregans shows cellular motility to form a microbial mat-like dense cell aggregate. The aggregating ability of C. aggregans was affected by another bacterial species, strain BL55a (related to Bacillus licheniformis) isolated from the microbial mats containing C. aggregans. Cell aggregation rate of C. aggregans was promoted by the addition of culture supernatants of strain BL55a. Similar effects were also detected from other bacterial isolates, specifically Geobacillus sp. and Aeribacillus sp. Protease activity was detected from the culture supernatants from all of these isolates. The promoting effect of strain BL55a was suppressed by a serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. A purified serine protease, subtilisin obtained from B. licheniformis, showed a promoting effect on the cell aggregation. These results suggest that an extracellular protease, secreted from co-existing bacterial species promoted the aggregating motility of C. aggregans. This is the first report that exogenous protease affects bacterial cellular motility.

  4. Grading for Understanding--Standards-Based Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Standards-based grading (SBG), sometimes called learning objectives-based assessment (LOBA), is an assessment model that relies on students demonstrating mastery of learning objectives (sometimes referred to as standards). The goal of this grading system is to focus students on mastering learning objectives rather than on accumulating points. I…

  5. Grading for Understanding--Standards-Based Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Standards-based grading (SBG), sometimes called learning objectives-based assessment (LOBA), is an assessment model that relies on students demonstrating mastery of learning objectives (sometimes referred to as standards). The goal of this grading system is to focus students on mastering learning objectives rather than on accumulating points. I…

  6. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  7. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2017-02-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  8. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete.

  9. The Self-energy Of Growing Aggregates: "Strength Regime"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, Ana H. F.; Spahn, F.; Seiss, M.; Brilliantov, N. V.

    2009-09-01

    The vivid appearance of the outer regions of Saturn's rings points to a balance of ongoing fragmentation and coagulation processes. This idea finds support especially in the F-ring, where collisional processes occur on an almost daily basis stirred by perturbations of the satellites Prometheus and Pandora, and in addition due the presence of putative moonlets. In order to quantify this balance in a kinetic theory we propose to calculate the resistivity of small agglomerates ("dynamic ephemeral bodies") against rupture due collisional processes and tidal pull. Earlies studies have shown that the resistivity of an aggregate is divided into two phases: "strength regime" and "gravitational regime". Early in their formation, small agglomerates are supported basically by their "glue" between the particles (adhesion) - "strength regime". For larger agglomerates the "gravitational regime" takes over provided their sizes to be bigger than a threshold in which the self-gravitational energy exceeds the adhesive binding energy, in this case the cluster's constituents are held together gravitationally. We calculated the self-energy caused by adhesion and gravity of ring's aggregates which has been considered as the threshold of impact energy or of tidal work to disrupt the agglomerate. Using a Ballistic Particle Cluster Aggregate Model (BPCA) we varied the densities of the aggregates and the size distribution of their constituents (1-10cm), calculated their self-energy and identified the transition between the "strength" to "gravitational regime". The transition between the regimes occurs at house-size aggregates (diameter of approximately 20m), a fact, that fits to the cut-off on the dense rings' main population (cm - 5m in size). Acknowledgments: A.H.F.G. thanks Dr. E. Vieira-Neto for the discussions, and also the DAAD and Uni-Potsdam for the financial support of this project.

  10. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops.

  11. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  12. Not just fractal surfaces, but surface fractal aggregates: Derivation of the expression for the structure factor and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besselink, R.; Stawski, T. M.; Van Driessche, A. E. S.; Benning, L. G.

    2016-12-01

    Densely packed surface fractal aggregates form in systems with high local volume fractions of particles with very short diffusion lengths, which effectively means that particles have little space to move. However, there are no prior mathematical models, which would describe scattering from such surface fractal aggregates and which would allow the subdivision between inter- and intraparticle interferences of such aggregates. Here, we show that by including a form factor function of the primary particles building the aggregate, a finite size of the surface fractal interfacial sub-surfaces can be derived from a structure factor term. This formalism allows us to define both a finite specific surface area for fractal aggregates and the fraction of particle interfacial sub-surfaces at the perimeter of an aggregate. The derived surface fractal model is validated by comparing it with an ab initio approach that involves the generation of a "brick-in-a-wall" von Koch type contour fractals. Moreover, we show that this approach explains observed scattering intensities from in situ experiments that followed gypsum (CaSO4 ṡ 2H2O) precipitation from highly supersaturated solutions. Our model of densely packed "brick-in-a-wall" surface fractal aggregates may well be the key precursor step in the formation of several types of mosaic- and meso-crystals.

  13. An Unprecedented Aggregation of Whale Sharks, Rhincodon typus, in Mexican Coastal Waters of the Caribbean Sea

    PubMed Central

    de la Parra Venegas, Rafael; Hueter, Robert; González Cano, Jaime; Tyminski, John; Gregorio Remolina, José; Maslanka, Mike; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee; Carlson, Bruce; Dove, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are often perceived as solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. To the contrary, evidence is accumulating that they are gregarious and form seasonal aggregations in some coastal waters. One such aggregation occurs annually north of Cabo Catoche, off Isla Holbox on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Here we report a second, much denser aggregation of whale sharks (dubbed “the Afuera”) that occurs east of the tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Caribbean Sea. The 2009 Afuera event comprised the largest aggregation of whale sharks ever reported, with up to 420 whale sharks observed in a single aerial survey, all gathered in an elliptical patch of ocean approximately 18 km2. Plankton studies indicated that the sharks were feeding on dense homogenous patches of fish eggs, which DNA barcoding analysis identified as belonging to little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus. This contrasts with the annual Cabo Catoche aggregation nearby, where prey consists mostly of copepods and sergestid shrimp. Increased sightings at the Afuera coincide with decreased sightings at Cabo Catoche, and both groups have the same sex ratio, implying that the same animals are likely involved in both aggregations; tagging data support this idea. With two whale shark aggregation areas, high coastal productivity and a previously-unknown scombrid spawning ground, the northeastern Yucatán marine region is a critical habitat that deserves more concerted conservation efforts. PMID:21559508

  14. An unprecedented aggregation of whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, in Mexican coastal waters of the Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    de la Parra Venegas, Rafael; Hueter, Robert; González Cano, Jaime; Tyminski, John; Gregorio Remolina, José; Maslanka, Mike; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee; Carlson, Bruce; Dove, Alistair

    2011-04-29

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are often perceived as solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. To the contrary, evidence is accumulating that they are gregarious and form seasonal aggregations in some coastal waters. One such aggregation occurs annually north of Cabo Catoche, off Isla Holbox on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Here we report a second, much denser aggregation of whale sharks (dubbed "the Afuera") that occurs east of the tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Caribbean Sea. The 2009 Afuera event comprised the largest aggregation of whale sharks ever reported, with up to 420 whale sharks observed in a single aerial survey, all gathered in an elliptical patch of ocean approximately 18 km(2). Plankton studies indicated that the sharks were feeding on dense homogenous patches of fish eggs, which DNA barcoding analysis identified as belonging to little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus. This contrasts with the annual Cabo Catoche aggregation nearby, where prey consists mostly of copepods and sergestid shrimp. Increased sightings at the Afuera coincide with decreased sightings at Cabo Catoche, and both groups have the same sex ratio, implying that the same animals are likely involved in both aggregations; tagging data support this idea. With two whale shark aggregation areas, high coastal productivity and a previously-unknown scombrid spawning ground, the northeastern Yucatán marine region is a critical habitat that deserves more concerted conservation efforts.

  15. Electrostatic interactions lead to the formation of asymmetric collagen-phosphophoryn aggregates.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Thomas; Veis, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    In bone and dentin the formation and mineralization of the extra cellular matrix structure is a complex process highly dependent on intermolecular interactions. In dentin, the phosphophoryns (PP) and type I collagen (COL1) are the major constituents implicated in mineralization. Thus, as a first step in understanding the tissue organization, we have initiated a study of their interaction as a function of pH, ionic strength, and relative concentrations or mixing ratios. Complex formation has been analyzed by dynamic light scattering to detect aggregate formation and by rotary shadowing electron microscopy (EM) to determine aggregate shape. The EM data showed that at the pH values studied, the PP-COL1 interaction leads to the formation of large fibrillar aggregates in which the PP are present along the fibril surfaces. The quantitative phase distribution data showed a 1/1 molar equivalence at the maximum aggregation point, not at electrostatic PP-COL1 equivalence. As the ionic strength was raised, the PP-COL1 aggregates became smaller but the binding and asymmetric fibrillar aggregation persisted. In EM, the PP appear as dense spheres. Along the surfaces of the collagen aggregates, the PP are larger and more open or extended, suggesting that COL1-bound PP may undergo a conformational change, opening up so that a single PP molecule might interact with and electrostatically link several COL1 molecules. This might have important implications for dentin structure, stability, and mineralization.

  16. Optimal dense coding with arbitrary pure entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yuan; Duan, Runyao; Ji, Zhengfeng

    2006-07-15

    We examine dense coding with an arbitrary pure entangled state sharing between the sender and the receiver. Upper bounds on the average success probability in approximate dense coding and on the probability of conclusive results in unambiguous dense coding are derived. We also construct the optimal protocol which saturates the upper bound in each case.

  17. Composition, Buoyancy Regulation and Fate of Ice Algal Aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8–35 and 9–40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m−2, maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4–40 mg C m−2 d−1, and accounted for 3–80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  18. Composition, buoyancy regulation and fate of ice algal aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L; Glud, Ronnie N; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8-35 and 9-40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m(-2), maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4-40 mg C m(-2) d(-1), and accounted for 3-80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities.

  19. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  20. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  1. Spatial aggregation: Language and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey-Kellogg, C.; Zhao, F.; Yip, K.

    1996-12-31

    Spatial aggregation is a framework for organizing computations around image-like, analogue representations of physical processes in data interpretation and control tasks. It conceptualizes common computational structures in a class of implemented problem solvers for difficult scientific and engineering problems. It comprises a mechanism, a language, and a programming style. The spatial aggregation mechanism transforms a numerical input field to successively higher-level descriptions by applying a small, identical set of operators to each layer given a metric, neighborhood relation and equivalence relation. This paper describes the spatial aggregation language and its applications. The spatial aggregation language provides two abstract data types - neighborhood graph and field - and a set of interface operators for constructing the transformations of the field, together with a library of component implementations from which a user can mix-and-match and specialize for a particular application. The language allows users to isolate and express important computational ideas in different problem domains while hiding low-level details. We illustrate the use of the language with examples ranging from trajectory grouping in dynamics interpretation to region growing in image analysis. Programs for these different task domains can be written in a modular, concise fashion in the spatial aggregation language.

  2. Thermodynamic modeling of asphaltene aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rogel, E

    2004-02-03

    A new molecular thermodynamic model for the description of the aggregation behavior of asphaltenes in different solvents is presented. This new model is relatively simple and strictly predictive and does not use any experimental information from asphaltene solutions. In this model, asphaltene aggregates are described as composed of an aromatic core formed by stacked aromatic sheets surrounded by aliphatic chains. The proposed model qualitatively predicts the asphaltene aggregation behavior in a series of different solvents. In particular, the experimental trends observed for the variation of aggregate size with (1) asphaltene molecular characteristics (condensation index, aromaticity, and chain length), (2) asphaltene concentration, (3) solvent characteristics, and (4) temperature have been successfully reproduced by the proposed model. The model also provides a plausible explanation for the existence or absence of a critical micelle concentration (cmc) for asphaltene solutions. Specifically, the model predicted that the asphaltenes with low aromaticities and low aromatic condensations do not exhibit cmc behavior. Finally, the obtained results clearly support the classical model for asphaltene aggregates.

  3. Leaching behaviour of synthetic aggregates.

    PubMed

    van der Sloot, H A; Hoede, D; Cresswell, D J; Barton, J R

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of EU project "Utilising innovative kiln technology to recycle waste into synthetic aggregate" (BRST-CT98-5234), the leaching behaviour of synthetic aggregates has been studied to assess its environmental compatibility in the various stages of its use. Since the conditions are very different for the different uses, the assessment calls for a variety of different leaching conditions. The pH dependence test is used to cover important differences in pH environment to which the materials are exposed to as well as for an assessment of the buffering capacity of the material. Synthetic aggregate features a low buffer capacity, which makes it sensitive to externally imposed pH conditions. Utilisation and storage exposed to acidic conditions needs to be avoided. The results of the pH dependence test and column leaching test are mutually consistent. The CEN TC 154 method appears to provide systematically low values due to the arbitrary selection of test conditions. Synthetic aggregate studied to date will not adversely affect the concrete in its service life. The main issue for aggregate use is the recycling and the "end of life" condition, when the material becomes construction debris. Not metals, but oxyanions, such as Cr VI and Mo are most relevant under these conditions. A concise test has been applied to assess crucial aspects of leaching for different production mixes.

  4. Aggregated Recommendation through Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  5. The Meaning of Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Serna E.

    1996-01-01

    Asserts that students see grades as an indicator of effort unconnected to the content of the course while teachers regard grades as a measure of achievement within a discipline. Discusses some of the current controversies and approaches concerning grades and how they relate to school reform. (MJP)

  6. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  7. General Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    This paper describes the graded response model. The graded response model represents a family of mathematical models that deal with ordered polytomous categories, such as: (1) letter grading; (2) an attitude survey with "strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree" choices; (3) partial credit given in accord with an…

  8. Conversations about Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullen, Kristine; Gullen, James; Erickson-Guy, Nickolas

    2012-01-01

    Grades often are determined by the unspoken values and beliefs of an autonomous teacher, but technology is making grading practices more transparent to parents, students, and educators. The ability to view the grade books of teachers who are teaching the same course in the same district is increasingly raising questions and challenges to what were…

  9. Channel Aggregation Schemes for Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongheon; So, Jaewoo

    This paper proposed three channel aggregation schemes for cognitive radio networks, a constant channel aggregation scheme, a probability distribution-based variable channel aggregation scheme, and a residual channel-based variable channel aggregation scheme. A cognitive radio network can have a wide bandwidth if unused channels in the primary networks are aggregated. Channel aggregation schemes involve either constant channel aggregation or variable channel aggregation. In this paper, a Markov chain is used to develop an analytical model of channel aggregation schemes; and the performance of the model is evaluated in terms of the average sojourn time, the average throughput, the forced termination probability, and the blocking probability. Simulation results show that channel aggregation schemes can reduce the average sojourn time of cognitive users by increasing the channel occupation rate of unused channels in a primary network.

  10. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  11. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  12. Dense gas in low-metallicity galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braine, J.; Shimajiri, Y.; André, P.; Bontemps, S.; Gao, Yu; Chen, Hao; Kramer, C.

    2017-01-01

    Stars form out of the densest parts of molecular clouds. Far-IR emission can be used to estimate the star formation rate (SFR) and high dipole moment molecules, typically HCN, trace the dense gas. A strong correlation exists between HCN and far-IR emission, with the ratio being nearly constant, over a large range of physical scales. A few recent observations have found HCN to be weak with respect to the far-IR and CO in subsolar metallicity (low-Z) objects. We present observations of the Local Group galaxies M 33, IC 10, and NGC 6822 with the IRAM 30 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, greatly improving the sample of low-Z galaxies observed. HCN, HCO+, CS, C2H, and HNC have been detected. Compared to solar metallicity galaxies, the nitrogen-bearing species are weak (HCN, HNC) or not detected (CN, HNCO, N2H+) relative to far-IR or CO emission. HCO+ and C2H emission is normal with respect to CO and far-IR. While 13CO is the usual factor 10 weaker than 12CO, C18O emission was not detected down to very low levels. Including earlier data, we find that the HCN/HCO+ ratio varies with metallicity (O/H) and attribute this to the sharply decreasing nitrogen abundance. The dense gas fraction, traced by the HCN/CO and HCO+/CO ratios, follows the SFR but in the low-Z objects the HCO+ is much easier to measure. Combined with larger and smaller scale measurements, the HCO+ line appears to be an excellent tracer of dense gas and varies linearly with the SFR for both low and high metallicities.

  13. N-body Simulations with Cohesion in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall Patrick

    This dissertation is primarily focused on exploring whether weak cohesion among icy particles in Saturn's dense rings is consistent with observations---and if so, what limits can be placed on the strength of such cohesive bonds, and what dynamical or observable consequences might arise out of cohesive bonding. Here I present my numerical method that allows for N-body particle sticking within a local rotating frame ("patch")---an approach capable of modeling hundreds of thousands or more colliding bodies. Impacting particles can stick to form non-deformable but breakable aggregates that obey equations of rigid body motion. I then apply the method to Saturn's icy rings, for which laboratory experiments suggest that interpenetration of thin, frost-coated surface layers may lead to weak bonding if the bodies impact at low speeds---speeds that happen to be characteristic of the rings. This investigation is further motivated by observations of structure in the rings that could be formed through bottom-up aggregations of particles (i.e., "propellers" in the A ring, and large-scale radial structure in the B ring). This work presents the implementation of the model, as well as results from a suite of 100 simulations that investigate the effects of five parameters on the equilibrium characteristics of the rings: speed-based merge and fragmentation limits, bond strength, ring surface density, and patch orbital distance (specifically the center of either the A or B ring), some with both monodisperse and polydisperse particle comparison cases. I conclude that the presence of weak cohesion is consistent with observations of the A and B rings, and present a range of parameters that reproduce the observed size distribution and maximum particle size. The parameters that match observations differ between the A and B rings, and I discuss the potential implications of this result. I also comment on other observable consequences of cohesion for the rings, such as optical depth and

  14. Flavour Oscillations in Dense Baryonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We suggest that fast neutral meson oscillations may occur in a dense baryonic matter, which can influence the balance of s/¯s quarks in the nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus interactions, if primordial multiplicities of neutral K 0, mesons are sufficiently asymmetrical. The phenomenon can occur even if CP symmetry is fully conserved, and it may be responsible for the enhanced sub-threshold production of multi-strange hyperons observed in the low-energy A+A and p+A interactions.

  15. Dense hydrogen plasma: Comparison between models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clérouin, J. G.; Bernard, S.

    1997-09-01

    Static and dynamical properties of the dense hydrogen plasma (ρ>=2.6 g cm-3, 0.1

  16. The dose-dense principle in chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Iarosz, Kelly C; Batista, Antonio M; Seoane, Jesús M; Viana, Ricardo L; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2017-10-07

    Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment modality that uses drugs to kill tumor cells. A typical chemotherapeutic protocol consists of several drugs delivered in cycles of three weeks. We present mathematical analyses demonstrating the existence of a maximum time between cycles of chemotherapy for a protocol to be effective. A mathematical equation is derived, which relates such a maximum time with the variables that govern the kinetics of the tumor and those characterizing the chemotherapeutic treatment. Our results suggest that there are compelling arguments supporting the use of dose-dense protocols. Finally, we discuss the limitations of these protocols and suggest an alternative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dense, collisional, shearing flows of compliant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, James; Berzi, Diego

    2017-06-01

    We outline the development of theory to describe, dense, collisional shearing flows of identical compliant spheres. We begin with two simple theories: one for rigid, nearly elastic spheres that interact through instantaneous, binary collisions; the other for compliant spheres that interact through multiple, enduring contacts. We then join the two extremes by adding compliance to the collisions and collisions to the spheres in enduring contact. Finally, we compare the predictions of the resulting theory with the results of discrete numerical simulations of steady, homogeneous shearing of compliant frictional spheres.

  18. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  19. Dense optical-electrical interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chang

    2000-12-21

    The DOIM (Dense Optical-electrical Interface Modules) is a custom-designed optical data transmission module employed in the upgrade of Silicon Vertex Detector of CDF experiment at Fermilab. Each DOIM module consists of a transmitter (TX) converting electrical differential input signals to optical outputs, a middle segment of jacketed fiber ribbon cable, and a receiver (RX) which senses the light inputs and converts them back to electrical signals. The targeted operational frequency is 53 MHz, and higher rate is achievable. This article outlines the design goals, implementation methods, production test results, and radiation hardness tests of these modules.

  20. Resolving Ultrafast Heating of Dense Cryogenic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Harmand, M.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300 fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ˜0.9 ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  1. Phase boundary of hot dense fluid hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kenji; Ichimaru, Kota; Einaga, Mari; Kawaguchi, Sho; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the phase transformation of hot dense fluid hydrogen using static high-pressure laser-heating experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The results show anomalies in the heating efficiency that are likely to be attributed to the phase transition from a diatomic to monoatomic fluid hydrogen (plasma phase transition) in the pressure range between 82 and 106 GPa. This study imposes tighter constraints on the location of the hydrogen plasma phase transition boundary and suggests higher critical point than that predicted by the theoretical calculations. PMID:26548442

  2. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  3. Rheology of dense granular mixtures: boundary pressures.

    PubMed

    Hill, K M; Yohannes, B

    2011-02-04

    Models for dense sheared granular materials indicate that their rheological properties depend on particle size, but the representative size for mixtures is not obvious. Here, we computationally study pressure on a boundary due to sheared granular mixtures to determine its dependence on particle size distribution. We find that the pressure does not depend monotonically on average particle size. Instead it has an additional dependence on a measure of the effective free volume per particle we adapt from an expression for packing of monosized particles near the jammed state.

  4. Association/Dissociation Processes in Dense Gases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-16

    M. R. Flannery Prepared for AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH BOLLING AIR FORCE BASE WASHINGTON, D. C. 20332 - -Under Grant No. AFOSR-84-0233...Meetings 5 1.4 Abstracts of Papers Presented 5 1.5 List of Publications (in press and in preparation ) 8 1.6 Ph.D. Thesis Supervised 9 a 2. Appendices... preparation ) 1. "General Microscopic Theory of Association/Dissociation Non-Equilibrium Processes in Dense Gases," M. R. Flannery (Phys. Rev. A). 2

  5. Laser Sheet Dropsizing of dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal, P.; Farrugia, N.; Greenhalgh, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    A new technique has been developed that produces instantaneous or time-averaged two-dimensional images of Sauter Mean Diameter from a spray. Laser Sheet Dropsizing (LSD) combines elastic and inelastic light scattered from a laser sheet. Compared with Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA), the new technique offers advantages in increased spatial and temporal resolution and more rapid spray characterisation. Moreover, the technique can also be applied to dense sprays. Successful implementation requires careful calibration, particularly of the effect of dye concentration on the dropsize dependence of the inelastic scattered light.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  7. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  8. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  9. Molecular Aggregation in Disodium Cromoglycate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gautam; Agra-Kooijman, D.; Collings, P. J.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2012-02-01

    Details of molecular aggregation in the mesophases of the anti-asthmatic drug disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) have been studied using x-ray synchrotron scattering. The results show two reflections, one at wide angles corresponding to π-π stacking (3.32 å) of molecules, and the other at small angles which is perpendicular to the direction of molecular stacking and corresponds to the distance between the molecular aggregates. The latter varies from 35 - 41 å in the nematic (N) phase and 27 -- 32 å in the columnar (M) phase. The temperature evolution of the stack height, positional order correlations in the lateral direction, and orientation order parameter were determined in the N, M, and biphasic regions. The structure of the N and M phases and the nature of the molecular aggregation, together with their dependence on temperature and concentration, will be presented.

  10. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  11. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  12. Condition for the formation of micron-sized dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the condition for the formation of micron-sized grains in dense cores of molecular clouds. This is motivated by the detection of mid-infrared emission from deep inside a number of dense cores, the so-called `coreshine,' which is thought to come from scattering by micron (μm)-sized grains. Based on numerical calculations of coagulation starting from the typical grain-size distribution in the diffuse interstellar medium, we obtain a conservative lower limit to the time t to form μm-sized grains: t/tff > 3(5/S)(nH/105 cm-3)-1/4 (where tff is the free-fall time at hydrogen number density nH in the core and S the enhancement factor of the grain-grain collision cross-section to account for non-compact aggregates). At the typical core density nH = 105 cm-3, it takes at least a few free-fall times to form the μm-sized grains responsible for coreshine. The implication is that those dense cores observed in coreshine are relatively long-lived entities in molecular clouds, rather than dynamically transient objects that last for one free-fall time or less.

  13. Image-Guided Non-Local Dense Matching with Three-Steps Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Zhang, Yongjun; Yue, Zhaoxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new image-guided non-local dense matching algorithm that focuses on how to solve the following problems: 1) mitigating the influence of vertical parallax to the cost computation in stereo pairs; 2) guaranteeing the performance of dense matching in homogeneous intensity regions with significant disparity changes; 3) limiting the inaccurate cost propagated from depth discontinuity regions; 4) guaranteeing that the path between two pixels in the same region is connected; and 5) defining the cost propagation function between the reliable pixel and the unreliable pixel during disparity interpolation. This paper combines the Census histogram and an improved histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) feature together as the cost metrics, which are then aggregated based on a new iterative non-local matching method and the semi-global matching method. Finally, new rules of cost propagation between the valid pixels and the invalid pixels are defined to improve the disparity interpolation results. The results of our experiments using the benchmarks and the Toronto aerial images from the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) show that the proposed new method can outperform most of the current state-of-the-art stereo dense matching methods.

  14. Assessment: How Do I "Grade" without Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Susan Mandel

    1993-01-01

    Examines the A through F system of letter grades used in most schools, suggesting reasons why this framework is inadequate. Proposes a new assessment model which has children demonstrate that they can accomplish a given task on their own. (MDM)

  15. Duality for Graded Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Janusz; Jóźwikowski, Michał; Rotkiewicz, Mikołaj

    2017-08-01

    We study the notion of duality in the context of graded manifolds. For graded bundles, somehow like in the case of Gelfand representation and the duality: points vs. functions, we obtain natural dual objects which belong to a different category than the initial ones, namely graded polynomial (co)algebra bundles and free graded Weil (co)algebra bundles. Our results are then applied to obtain elegant characterizations of double vector bundles and graded bundles of degree 2. All these results have their supergeometric counterparts. For instance, we give a simple proof of a nice characterisation of N-manifolds of degree 2, announced in the literature.

  16. Global kinetic analysis of seeded BSA aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ziya; Demir, Yusuf Kemal; Kayser, Veysel

    2016-04-30

    Accelerated aggregation studies were conducted around the melting temperature (Tm) to elucidate the kinetics of seeded BSA aggregation. Aggregation was tracked by SEC-HPLC and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. Time evolution of monomer, dimer and soluble aggregate concentrations were globally analysed to reliably deduce mechanistic details pertinent to the process. Results showed that BSA aggregated irreversibly through both sequential monomer addition and aggregate-aggregate interactions. Sequential monomer addition proceeded only via non-native monomers, starting to occur only by 1-2°C below the Tm. Aggregate-aggregate interactions were the dominant mechanism below the Tm due to an initial presence of small aggregates that acted as seeds. Aggregate-aggregate interactions were significant also above the Tm, particularly at later stages of aggregation when sequential monomer addition seemed to cease, leading in some cases to insoluble aggregate formation. The adherence (or non-thereof) of the mechanisms to Arrhenius kinetics were discussed alongside possible implications of seeding for biopharmaceutical shelf-life and spectroscopic data interpretation, the latter of which was found to often be overlooked in BSA aggregation studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A specialist's audit of aggregated occurrence records: An 'aggregator's' perspective.

    PubMed

    Belbin, Lee; Daly, Joanne; Hirsch, Tim; Hobern, Donald; Salle, John La

    2013-01-01

    A recent ZooKeys' paper (Mesibov, 2013: http://www.pensoft.net/journal_home_page.php?journal_id=1&page=article&SESID=df7bcb35b02603283dcb83ee0e0af0c9&type=show&article_id=5111) has highlighted data quality issues in aggregated data sets, but did not provide a realistic way to address these issues. This paper provides an aggregator's perspective including ways that the whole community can help to address data quality issues. The establishment of GBIF and national nodes (national aggregators) such as the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) have integrated and exposed a huge diversity of biological observations along with many associated issues. Much of the admirable work by Mesibov (2013) was enabled by having the data exposed. Data quality, one of the highest priorities for GBIF, the national nodes and other aggregators, depends on both automatic methods and community experts to detect and correct data issues. Not all issues can however be automatically detected or corrected, so community assistance is needed to help improve the quality of exposed biological data. We do need to improve the infrastructure and associated processes to more easily identify data issues and document all changes to ensure a full record is permanently and publicly available.

  18. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  19. Molecular aggregates in cryogenic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, M. W.; Lee, J.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1981-07-01

    In this report, experimental procedures and results concerning the study of aggregates are presented. Absorption spectra of solutions of the following solutes and solvents have been studied: pyrazine/C3H8; benzene/NF3, C3H8, N2, CO, CF4; and osmium tetroxide/NF3, CH4, C3H8. In order to obtain some qualitative estimation of aggregate size light scattering experiments were also performed on solutions of pyrazine/C3H8, benzene/CF4 benzene/NF3, and benzene/C3H8. The nature of these non-equilibrium molecular clusters in solution will be addressed.

  20. Hydrodynamic behavior of fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltzius, Pierre

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of the radius of gyration RG and the hydrodynamic radius RH of colloidal silica aggregates are reported. These aggregates have fractal geometry and RH is proportional to RG for 500 Å<=RH<=7000 Å, with a ratio RH/RG=0.72+/-0.02. The results are compared with predictions for macromolecules of various shapes. The proportionality of the two radii can be understood with use of the pair correlation function of fractal objects and hydrodynamic interactions on the Oseen level. The value of the ratio remains to be explained.

  1. Storage pool diseases illuminate platelet dense granule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2016-11-16

    Platelet dense granules (DGs) are membrane bound compartments that store polyphosphate and small molecules such as ADP, ATP, Ca(2+), and serotonin. The release of DG contents plays a central role in platelet aggregation to form a hemostatic plug. Accordingly, congenital deficiencies in the biogenesis of platelet DGs underlie human genetic disorders that cause storage pool disease and manifest with prolonged bleeding. DGs belong to a family of lysosome-related organelles, which also includes melanosomes, the compartments where the melanin pigments are synthesized. These organelles share several characteristics including an acidic lumen and, at least in part, the molecular machinery involved in their biogenesis. As a result, many genes affect both DG and melanosome biogenesis and the corresponding patients present not only with bleeding but also with oculocutaneous albinism. The identification and characterization of such genes has been instrumental in dissecting the pathways responsible for organelle biogenesis. Because the study of melanosome biogenesis has advanced more rapidly, this knowledge has been extrapolated to explain how DGs are produced. However, some progress has recently been made in studying platelet DG biogenesis directly in megakaryocytes and megakaryocytoid cells. DGs originate from an endosomal intermediate compartment, the multivesicular body. Maturation and differentiation into a DG begins when newly synthesized DG-specific proteins are delivered from early/recycling endosomal compartments. The machinery that orchestrates this vesicular trafficking is composed of a combination of both ubiquitous and cell type-specific proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on DG biogenesis. In particular, we focus on the individual human and murine genes encoding the molecular machinery involved in this process and how their deficiencies result in disease.

  2. Adhesion and collisional release of particles in dense planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, Anna; Schmidt, Jürgen; Spahn, Frank; Brilliantov, Nikolay

    2012-03-01

    We propose a simple theoretical model for aggregative and fragmentative collisions in Saturn’s dense rings. In this model the ring matter consists of a bimodal size distribution: large (meter sized) boulders and a population of smaller particles (tens of centimeters down to dust). The small particles can adhesively stick to the boulders and can be released as debris in binary collisions of their carriers. To quantify the adhesion force we use the JKR theory (Johnson, K., Kendall, K., Roberts, A. [1971]. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 324, 301-313). The rates of release and adsorption of particles are calculated, depending on material parameters, sizes, and plausible velocity dispersions of carriers and debris particles. In steady state we obtain an expression for the amount of free debris relative to the fraction still attached to the carriers. In terms of this conceptually simple model a paucity of subcentimeter particles in Saturn’s rings (French, R.G., Nicholson, P.D. [2000]. Icarus 145, 502-523; Marouf, E. et al. [2008]. Abstracts for “Saturn after Cassini-Huygens” Symposium, Imperial College London, UK, July 28 to August 1, p. 113) can be understood as a consequence of the increasing strength of adhesion (relative to inertial forces) for decreasing particle size. In this case particles smaller than a certain critical radius remain tightly attached to the surfaces of larger boulders, even when the boulders collide at their typical speed. Furthermore, we find that already a mildly increased velocity dispersion of the carrier-particles may significantly enhance the fraction of free debris particles, in this way increasing the optical depth of the system.

  3. Wireless Fractal Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yixue; Chen, Min; Hu, Long; Song, Jeungeun; Volk, Mojca; Humar, Iztok

    2017-04-12

    With the ever-growing number of mobile devices, there is an explosive expansion in mobile data services. This represents a challenge for the traditional cellular network architecture to cope with the massive wireless traffic generated by mobile media applications. To meet this challenge, research is currently focused on the introduction of a small cell base station (BS) due to its low transmit power consumption and flexibility of deployment. However, due to a complex deployment environment and low transmit power of small cell BSs, the coverage boundary of small cell BSs will not have a traditional regular shape. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the coverage boundary of an ultra-dense small cell network and give its main features: aeolotropy of path loss fading and fractal coverage boundary. Simple performance analysis is given, including coverage probability and transmission rate, etc., based on stochastic geometry theory and fractal theory. Finally, we present an application scene and discuss challenges in the ultra-dense small cell network.

  4. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  5. Understanding Force Chains in Dense Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Guohua

    When a load is applied to a dense granular material, the stress is largely transmitted by relatively rigid, heavily stressed chains of particles forming a sparse network of larger contact forces. Force chains act as the key determinant of mechanical properties such as stability, elasticity and flowability. To understand the structure and evolution of force chains, related physical processes and three corresponding characteristic time scales are analyzed in this study. We also propose three dimensionless numbers for the measurement of the relative importance of force chains. To solely study the effect of particle surface friction on force chains, uniaxial compression tests of 11,000 equal-sized particles in 2D were numerically simulated using the discrete element method. By proposing three conditions to define a force chain, the chain length distribution is found in the form of a power law. The exponent of 1.744 is independent of the surface friction. Although these results were obtained from partially crystallized jammed packings, they provide new insight into the physical processes and the structure of force chains, and thus will be helpful in the interpretation of force chains in other dense granular systems.

  6. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Glenzer, S. H.; Neumayer, P.; Doppner, T.; ...

    2008-06-12

    Here, Compton scattering techniques have been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, whilemore » in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.« less

  7. Super-resolution without dense flow.

    PubMed

    Su, Heng; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Super-resolution is a widely applied technique that improves the resolution of input images by software methods. Most conventional reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms assume accurate dense optical flow fields between the input frames, and their performance degrades rapidly when the motion estimation result is not accurate enough. However, optical flow estimation is usually difficult, particularly when complicated motion is presented in real-world videos. In this paper, we explore a new way to solve this problem by using sparse feature point correspondences between the input images. The feature point correspondences, which are obtained by matching a set of feature points, are usually precise and much more robust than dense optical flow fields. This is because the feature points represent well-selected significant locations in the image, and performing matching on the feature point set is usually very accurate. In order to utilize the sparse correspondences in conventional super-resolution, we extract an adaptive support region with a reliable local flow field from each corresponding feature point pair. The normalized prior is also proposed to increase the visual consistency of the reconstructed result. Extensive experiments on real data were carried out, and results show that the proposed algorithm produces high-resolution images with better quality, particularly in the presence of large-scale or complicated motion fields.

  8. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  9. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kie Sang; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  10. Ion Acoustic Modes in Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Nicholas; Monaco, Guilio; White, Thomas; Gregori, Gianluca; Graham, Peter; Fletcher, Luke; Appel, Karen; Tschentscher, Thomas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Zastrau, Ulf; Doeppner, Tilo; Gericke, Dirk; Lepape, Sebastien; Ma, Tammy; Pak, Art; Schropp, Andreas; Glenzer, Siegfried; Hastings, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    We present results that, for the first time, show scattering from ion acoustic modes in warm dense matter, representing an unprecedented level of energy resolution in the study of dense plasmas. The experiment was carried out at the LCLS facility in California on an aluminum sample at 7 g/cc and 5 eV. Using an X-ray probe at 8 keV, shifted peaks at +/-150 meV were observed. Although the energy shifts from interactions with the acoustic waves agree with predicted values from DFT-MD models, a central (elastic) peak was also observed, which did not appear in modelled spectra and may be due to the finite timescale of the simulation. Data fitting with a hydrodynamic form has proved able to match the observed spectrum, and provide measurements of some thermodynamic properties of the system, which mostly agree with predicted values. Suggest for further experiments to determine the cause of the disparity are also given.

  11. Ion Beam Driven Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.

    2008-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a 1-mm beam spot size, and 2-ns pulse length. As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense ion beams can deliver precise and uniform beam energy deposition, in a relatively large sample size, and can heat any solid-phase target material. The range of the beams in solid targets is less than 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using reduced density porous targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial experiments will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  12. Neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.; Prakash, M.; Lattimer, J.M.

    1998-07-01

    We study the charged and neutral current weak interaction rates relevant for the determination of neutrino opacities in dense matter found in supernovae and neutron stars. We establish an efficient formalism for calculating differential cross sections and mean free paths for interacting, asymmetric nuclear matter at arbitrary degeneracy. The formalism is valid for both charged and neutral current reactions. Strong interaction corrections are incorporated through the in-medium single particle energies at the relevant density and temperature. The effects of strong interactions on the weak interaction rates are investigated using both potential and effective field-theoretical models of matter. We investigate the relative importance of charged and neutral currents for different astrophysical situations, and also examine the influence of strangeness-bearing hyperons. Our findings show that the mean free paths are significantly altered by the effects of strong interactions and the multi-component nature of dense matter. The opacities are then discussed in the context of the evolution of the core of a protoneutron star. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  14. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific {sup 83}Kr nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  15. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  16. Studies on recycled aggregates-based concrete.

    PubMed

    Rakshvir, Major; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2006-06-01

    Reduced extraction of raw materials, reduced transportation cost, improved profits, reduced environmental impact and fast-depleting reserves of conventional natural aggregates has necessitated the use of recycling, in order to be able to conserve conventional natural aggregate. In this study various physical and mechanical properties of recycled concrete aggregates were examined. Recycled concrete aggregates are different from natural aggregates and concrete made from them has specific properties. The percentages of recycled concrete aggregates were varied and it was observed that properties such as compressive strength showed a decrease of up to 10% as the percentage of recycled concrete aggregates increased. Water absorption of recycled aggregates was found to be greater than natural aggregates, and this needs to be compensated during mix design.

  17. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  18. Mesoscale Simulation of Asphaltene Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-08-18

    Asphaltenes constitute a heavy aromatic crude oil fraction with a propensity to aggregate and precipitate out of solution during petroleum processing. Aggregation is thought to proceed according to the Yen-Mullins hierarchy, but the molecular mechanisms underlying mesoscopic assembly remain poorly understood. By combining coarse-grained molecular models parametrized using all-atom data with high-performance GPU hardware, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the aggregation of hundreds of asphaltenes over microsecond time scales. Our simulations reveal a hierarchical self-assembly mechanism consistent with the Yen-Mullins model, but the details are sensitive and depend on asphaltene chemistry and environment. At low concentrations asphaltenes exist predominantly as dispersed monomers. Upon increasing concentration, we first observe parallel stacking into 1D rod-like nanoaggregates, followed by the formation of clusters of nanoaggregates associated by offset, T-shaped, and edge-edge stacking. Asphaltenes possessing long aliphatic side chains cannot form nanoaggregate clusters due to steric repulsions between their aliphatic coronae. At very high concentrations, we observe a porous percolating network of rod-like nanoaggregates suspended in a sea of interpenetrating aliphatic side chains with a fractal dimension of ∼2. The lifetime of the rod-like aggregates is described by an exponential distribution reflecting a dynamic equilibrium between coagulation and fragmentation.

  19. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  20. Influence of aggregate sizes and microstructures on bioremediation assessment of field-contaminated soils in pilot-scale biopiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Akbari, A.; Frigon, D.; Ghoshal, S.

    2011-12-01

    concentrations in macro-aggregates over time in the nutrient-amended biopile suggested increased microbial abundance in macro-aggregates, attributable to higher C16-C34 hydrocarbon biodegradation. In meso-aggregates, the change in protein concentrations was insignificant. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) found similar shifts in the microbial community irrespective of the aggregate size or the nutrient amendment suggesting that the enhanced biodegradation in macro-aggregates is due to metabolic stimulation and not microbial selection. The pore structures of macro- and meso-aggregates were characterized by N2 adsorption and non-invasive micro X-ray CT images. The macro-aggregates had significantly larger surface areas (3.7-5.3 vs. 0.76-1.1 m2 g-1) and pore volumes (12000 vs. 3200 mm3 g-1) compared to those of densely clustered meso-aggregates. Macro-aggregates in the biopiles thus had more porous structures and provided more favourable conditions for hydrocarbon biodegradation. Based on these results, we propose a conceptual model for aggregate formation which identifies diffusion through loose macro-aggregates or dense meso-aggregates as the controlling factor for bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial habitats.

  1. Sequence-dependent internalization of aggregating peptides.

    PubMed

    Couceiro, José R; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-02

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease.

  2. Love thy neighbour: group properties of gaping behaviour in mussel aggregations.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Katy R; Zardi, Gerardo I; McQuaid, Christopher D; Pearson, Gareth A; Serrão, Ester A

    2012-01-01

    By associating closely with others to form a group, an animal can benefit from a number of advantages including reduced risk of predation, amelioration of environmental conditions, and increased reproductive success, but at the price of reduced resources. Although made up of individual members, an aggregation often displays novel effects that do not manifest at the level of the individual organism. Here we show that very simple behaviour in intertidal mussels shows new effects in dense aggregations but not in isolated individuals. Perna perna and Mytilus galloprovincialis are gaping (periodic valve movement during emersion) and non-gaping mussels respectively. P. perna gaping behaviour had no effect on body temperatures of isolated individuals, while it led to increased humidity and decreased temperatures in dense groups (beds). Gaping resulted in cooler body temperatures for P. perna than M. galloprovincialis when in aggregations, while solitary individuals exhibited the highest temperatures. Gradients of increasing body temperature were detected from the center to edges of beds, but M. galloprovincialis at the edge had the same temperature as isolated individuals. Furthermore, a field study showed that during periods of severe heat stress, mortality rates of mussels within beds of the gaping P. perna were lower than those of isolated individuals or within beds of M. galloprovincialis, highlighting the determinant role of gaping on fitness and group functioning. We demonstrate that new effects of very simple individual behaviour lead to amelioration of abiotic conditions at the aggregation level and that these effects increase mussel resistance to thermal stress.

  3. A Simple Alternative to Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Glenda

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates whether an alternative grading system (contract grading) would yield the same final grades as traditional grading (letter grading), and whether or not it would be accepted by students. The author states that this study demonstrated that contract grading was widely, and for the most part, enthusiastically…

  4. Highly magnetizable superparamagnetic colloidal aggregates with narrowed size distribution from ferrofluid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Lobaz, Volodymyr; Klupp Taylor, Robin N; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-15

    The formation of spherical superparamagnetic colloidal aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles by emulsification of a ferrofluid and subsequent solvent evaporation has been systematically studied. The colloidal aggregates occur as a dense sphere with magnetite nanoparticles randomly packed and preserved particle-particle separation due to chemisorbed oleic acid. The voids between nanoparticles are filled with solvent and free oleic acid. The latter was found to influence the formation of colloidal aggregates and their surface properties. The choice of surfactant, whether low molecular weight or polymeric, was shown to lead to the colloidal aggregates having tailored interfacial behavior. Magnetization measurements at ambient temperature revealed that the magnetite colloidal aggregates preserve the superparamagnetic properties of the starting nanoparticle units and show high saturation magnetization values up to 57 emu/g. The size distribution of magnetite nanoparticle colloidal aggregates produced by such an approach was found to be a function of emulsion droplet breakup-coalescence and stabilization kinetics and therefore is influenced by the emulsification process conditions and concentrations of the emulsion compounds.

  5. Dense QCD: Overhauser or BCS pairing?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byung-Yoon; Rho, Mannque; Wirzba, Andreas; Zahed, Ismail

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the Overhauser effect (particle-hole pairing) versus the BCS effect (particle-particle or hole-hole pairing) in QCD at large quark density. In weak coupling and to leading logarithm accuracy, the pairing energies can be estimated exactly. For a small number of colors, the BCS effect overtakes the Overhauser effect, while for a large number of colors the opposite takes place, in agreement with a recent renormalization group argument. In strong coupling with large pairing energies, the Overhauser effect may be dominant for any number of colors, suggesting that QCD may crystallize into an insulator at a few times nuclear matter density, a situation reminiscent of dense Skyrmions. The Overhauser effect is dominant in QCD in 1+1 dimensions, although susceptible to quantum effects. It is sensitive to temperature in all dimensions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Transport Properties in Cold Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braby, Matt; Schaefer, Thomas; Chao, Jingyi; Alford, Mark; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2010-02-01

    We have calculated several transport properties of the low energy degrees of freedom of the color-flavor locked phase in dense quark matter. The low energy degrees of freedom are the superfluid phonon and the meson octet of which the lightest excitation is the kaon. In some choices of the parameters, the kaon can condense. The basis of the calculation is a matching of kinetic theory and hydrodynamics to extract the transport properties and calculating the appropriate scattering rates for each process. From this, we have calculated the bulk viscosity of condensed and massive kaons, the shear viscosity of condensed kaons, and the thermal conductivity of the superfluid phonons and massive kaons. We present the results and analyze how these transport properties could affect observables in compact stars. )

  7. Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.

    2013-10-15

    Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  8. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  9. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non

  10. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  11. Laser plasma diagnostics of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Amendt, P.; Budil, K.S.; Hammel, B.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Landen, O.L.; Remington, B.A.; Desenne, D.E.

    1995-07-12

    The authors describe several experiments on Nova that use laser-produced plasmas to generate x-rays capable of backlighting dense, cold plasmas (p {approximately} 1--3 gm/cm{sup 3}, kT {approximately} 5--10 eV, and areal density {rho}{ell}{approximately} 0.01--0.05 g/cm{sup 2}). The x-rays used vary over a wide range of h{nu}, from 80 eV (X-ray laser) to 9 keV. This allows probing of plasmas relevant to many hydrodynamic experiments. Typical diagnostics are 100 ps pinhole framing cameras for a long pulse backlighter and a time-integrated CCD camera for a short pulse backlighter.

  12. Possible test of ancient dense Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, W. K.; Engel, S.

    1993-01-01

    We have completed preliminary calculations of the minimum sizes of bolides that would penetrate various hypothetical Martian atmospheres with surface pressures ranging from 6 to 1000 mbar for projectiles of various strengths. The calculations are based on a computer program. These numbers are used to estimate the diameter corresponding to the turndown in the crater diameter distribution due to the loss of these bodies, analogous to the dramatic turndown at larger sized already discovered on Venus due to this effect. We conclude that for an atmosphere greater than a few hundred millibars, a unique downward displacement in the diameter distribution would develop in the crater diameter distribution at D approximately = 0.5-4 km, due to loss of all but Fe bolides. Careful search for this displacement globally, as outlined here, would allow us to place upper limits on the pressure of the atmosphere contemporaneous with the oldest surfaces, and possibly to get direct confirmation of dense ancient atmospheres.

  13. Dynamic structure of dense krypton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Salacuse, J. J.; Schommers, W.; Ram, J.

    1984-07-01

    We have made molecular-dynamics computer simulations of dense krypton gas (10.6×1027 atoms/m3 and 296 K) using reasonably realistic pair potentials. Comparisons are made with the recent experimental data

    [P. A. Egelstaff et al., Phys. Rev. A 27, 1106 (1983)]
    for the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) over the range 0.4
  14. Yielding behavior of dense microgel glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. G.; Tata, B. V. R.; Karthickeyan, D.

    2013-02-01

    We report here the yielding behavior of dense suspensions of stimuli-responsive poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAM) microgel particles studied by performing oscillatory shear measurements. At a volume fraction of φ = 0.6 (labeled as sample S1) the suspension is characterized to be repulsive glass by dynamic light scattering technique and showed one step yielding. Quite interestingly higher volume fraction sample (S2) prepared by osmotically compressing sample S1, showed yielding occurring in two steps. Such one step yielding behavior turning into two step yielding was reported by Pham et al [Europhys. Lett., 75, 624 (2006)] in hard-sphere repulsive colloidal glass when transformed into an attractive glass by inducing depletion attraction. We confirm the repulsive interparticle interaction between PNIPAM microgel particles turning into attractive upon osmotic compression by static light scattering measurements.

  15. The Theory of Dense Core Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2014-07-01

    I will review the theory of dense core collapse, with an emphasis on disk formation. Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in ideal MHD at the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe,” and review possible resolutions to the problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and turbulence. Other aspects of core collapse, such as fragmentation and outflow generation, will also be discussed.

  16. Performance Evaluation of Dense Gas Dispersion Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, Jawad S.; Cox, William M.; Thistle, Harold; Zapert, James G.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study to evaluate the performance of seven dense gas dispersion models using data from three field experiments. Two models (DEGADIS and SLAB) are in the public domain and the other five (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE) are proprietary. The field data used are the Desert Tortoise pressurized ammonia releases, Burro liquefied natural gas spill tests, and the Goldfish anhydrous hydrofluoric acid spill experiments. Desert Tortoise and Goldfish releases were simulated as horizontal jet releases, and Burro as a liquid pool. Performance statistics were used to compare maximum observed concentrations and plume half-width to those predicted by each model. Model performance varied and no model exhibited consistently good performance across all three databases. However, when combined across the three databases, all models performed within a factor of 2. Problems encountered are discussed in order to help future investigators.

  17. Toward cold and dense antikaonic nuclear clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    Experimental search for cold and dense anti-kaonic nuclear cluster systems has been tried since 1998. Recently, an important indication for the most basic cluster K - pp has been obtained from old data of DISTO on p + p →K + + p + Λ through Λ(1405) production as a doorway. This success now triggers an extended search for a double kaonic cluster K - K - pp. Ultimately we have possibility to investigate multi-kaonic objects and kaonic strangelets in heavy-ion reactions. In this paper I trace my personal reminiscences of collaborative work with Paul Kienle during which I enjoyed the same feeling and excitement as Paul for more than a decade.

  18. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1997-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  19. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1996-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  20. Small Satellites Embedded in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    A small satellite that inhabits a narrow gap in an dense planetary ring, such as Pan, will excite wakes at the gap edges, as well as spiral waves deeper in the ring. As the satellite disturbs the ring, it also draws angular momentum from the ring matter that orbits just interior to the satellite, while depositing that angular momentum among the ring particles that orbit just exterior. This outward transport of angular momentum causes the orbits of the nearby ring particles to slowly shrink, dragging along with them the satellite in its gap. This inward motion is of course type II migration that is familiar from planet formation theory. The significance of type II migration, if any, will also be assessed for the small satellites that orbit within Saturn's rings.

  1. Medical device disinfection by dense carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bertoloni, G; Bertucco, A; Rassu, M; Vezzù, K

    2011-01-01

    The employment of disinfection-sterilisation processes for the re-use of medical devices without negative effects such as the presence of toxic residues, material degradation or other modifications is an important consideration for reducing the costs of surgical and medical procedures. Ethylene oxide is the most commonly used low temperature sterilisation technique in healthcare facilities, but its associated toxicity has reduced interest in this technology for the reprocessing of medical equipment. The aim of this study was to examine the disinfection efficiency of a novel low temperature approach, based on dense carbon dioxide on artificially contaminated catheters. The results obtained demonstrated that this method provided a complete inactivation of all bacteria and yeast strains tested, and that no obvious modifications to the surfaces tested were observed with multiple treatments. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coherent neutrino interactions in a dense medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kiers, K.; Weiss, N. ||

    1997-11-01

    Motivated by the effect of matter on neutrino oscillations (the MSW effect) we study in more detail the propagation of neutrinos in a dense medium. The dispersion relation for massive neutrinos in a medium is known to have a minimum at nonzero momentum p{approximately}G{sub F}{rho}/{radical}(2). We study in detail the origin and consequences of this dispersion relation for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos both in a toy model with only neutral currents and a single neutrino flavor and in a realistic {open_quotes}standard model{close_quotes} with two neutrino flavors. We find that for a range of neutrino momenta near the minimum of the dispersion relation, Dirac neutrinos are trapped by their coherent interactions with the medium. This effect does not lead to the trapping of Majorana neutrinos. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Binary Black Holes from Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The recent detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of compact object astrophysics. But to fully utilize this new window into the universe, we must compare these observations to detailed models of binary black hole formation throughout cosmic time. In this talk, I will review our current understanding of cluster dynamics, describing how binary black holes can be formed through gravitational interactions in dense stellar environments, such as globular clusters and galactic nuclei. I will review the properties and merger rates of binary black holes from the dynamical formation channel. Finally, I will describe how the spins of a binary black hole are determined by its formation history, and how we can use this to discriminate between dynamically-formed binaries and those formed from isolated evolution in galactic fields.

  4. Anisotropic hydrodynamic function of dense confined colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2017-06-01

    Dense colloidal dispersions exhibit complex wave-vector-dependent diffusion, which is controlled by both direct particle interactions and indirect nonadditive hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the solvent. In bulk the hydrodynamic interactions are probed routinely, but in confined geometries their studies have been hitherto hindered by additional complications due to confining walls. Here we solve this issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid-filled microfluidic channels to yield the confined fluid's hydrodynamic function in the short-time limit. Most importantly, we find the confined fluid to exhibit a strongly anisotropic hydrodynamic function, similar to its anisotropic structure factor. This observation is important in order to guide future theoretical research.

  5. Dense annular flows of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ryck, Alain; Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Dense granular flows constitute an important topic for geophysics and process engineering. To describe them, a rheology based on the coaxiality between the stress and strain tensors with a Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion has been proposed. We propose here an analytic study of flows in an annular cell, with this rheology. This geometry is relevant for a series of powder rheometers or mixing devices, but the discussion is focused on the split-bottom geometry, for which the internal flow has been investigated by NMR technique. In this case, the full resolution of the velocity and stress fields allow to localize the shear deformations. The theoretical results obtained for the latter are compared with the torque measurements by Dijksman et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 82 (2010) 060301].

  6. Carbon nitride frameworks and dense crystalline polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Salamat, Ashkan; Bojdys, Michael J.; Needs, Richard J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-09-01

    We used ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to investigate polymorphism in C3N4 carbon nitride as a function of pressure. Our calculations reveal new framework structures, including a particularly stable chiral polymorph of space group P 43212 containing mixed s p2 and s p3 bonding, that we have produced experimentally and recovered to ambient conditions. As pressure is increased a sequence of structures with fully s p3 -bonded C atoms and three-fold-coordinated N atoms is predicted, culminating in a dense P n m a phase above 250 GPa. Beyond 650 GPa we find that C3N4 becomes unstable to decomposition into diamond and pyrite-structured CN2.

  7. Towards a theoretical description of dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, Owe

    2017-03-01

    The properties of matter at finite baryon densities play an important role for the astrophysics of compact stars as well as for heavy ion collisions or the description of nuclear matter. Because of the sign problem of the quark determinant, lattice QCD cannot be simulated by standard Monte Carlo at finite baryon densities. I review alternative attempts to treat dense QCD with an effective lattice theory derived by analytic strong coupling and hopping expansions, which close to the continuum is valid for heavy quarks only, but shows all qualitative features of nuclear physics emerging from QCD. In particular, the nuclear liquid gas transition and an equation of state for baryons can be calculated directly from QCD. A second effective theory based on strong coupling methods permits studies of the phase diagram in the chiral limit on coarse lattices.

  8. Plasmon resonance in warm dense matter.

    PubMed

    Thiele, R; Bornath, T; Fortmann, C; Höll, A; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Röpke, G; Wierling, A; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G

    2008-08-01

    Collective Thomson scattering with extreme ultraviolet light or x rays is shown to allow for a robust measurement of the free electron density in dense plasmas. Collective excitations like plasmons appear as maxima in the scattering signal. Their frequency position can directly be related to the free electron density. The range of applicability of the standard Gross-Bohm dispersion relation and of an improved dispersion relation in comparison to calculations based on the dielectric function in random phase approximation is investigated. More important, this well-established treatment of Thomson scattering on free electrons is generalized in the Born-Mermin approximation by including collisions. We show that, in the transition region from collective to noncollective scattering, the consideration of collisions is important.

  9. Neutrino trapping in nonstrange dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chiapparini, M.; Duarte, S.B.

    1996-08-01

    Neutrino trapping effects on the properties of dense stellar matter in nonstrange supranuclear regime are studied with the purpose of applying to supernovae dynamical evolution. The hadronic and leptonic compositions of stellar matter are obtained in the framework of the relativistic mean-field theory coupled with the {beta}-equilibrium condition, and maintaining the charge neutrality of the stellar medium. It is shown that the matter composition depends dramatically upon the confined electronic-leptonic fraction. The softness of the equation of state and the lowering of the nuclear incompressibility values, when compared with the situation in which neutrino confinement is not considered, are the remarkable results. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Megajoule Dense Plasma Focus Solid Target Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podpaly, Y. A.; Falabella, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Shaw, B. H.; Cooper, C. M.; Chapman, S.; Bennett, N.; Sipe, N.; Olson, R.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) devices are plasma sources that can produce significant neutron yields from beam into gas interactions. Yield increases, up to approximately a factor of five, have been observed previously on DPFs using solid targets, such as CD2 and D2O ice. In this work, we report on deuterium solid-target experiments at the Gemini DPF. A rotatable target holder and baffle arrangement were installed in the Gemini device which allowed four targets to be deployed sequentially without breaking vacuum. Solid targets of titanium deuteride were installed and systematically studied at a variety of fill pressures, bias voltages, and target positions. Target holder design, experimental results, and comparison to simulations will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Improved models of dense anharmonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenau, P.; Zilburg, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present two improved quasi-continuous models of dense, strictly anharmonic chains. The direct expansion which includes the leading effect due to lattice dispersion, results in a Boussinesq-type PDE with a compacton as its basic solitary mode. Without increasing its complexity we improve the model by including additional terms in the expanded interparticle potential with the resulting compacton having a milder singularity at its edges. A particular care is applied to the Hertz potential due to its non-analyticity. Since, however, the PDEs of both the basic and the improved model are ill posed, they are unsuitable for a study of chains dynamics. Using the bond length as a state variable we manipulate its dispersion and derive a well posed fourth order PDE.

  12. Nonplanar electrostatic shock waves in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.

    2010-02-15

    Two-dimensional quantum ion acoustic shock waves (QIASWs) are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of electrons and ions. In this regard, a nonplanar quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (QKPB) equation is derived using the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. Using the tangent hyperbolic method, an analytical solution of the planar QKPB equation is obtained and subsequently used as the initial profile to numerically solve the nonplanar QKPB equation. It is observed that the increasing number density (and correspondingly the quantum Bohm potential) and kinematic viscosity affect the propagation characteristics of the QIASW. The temporal evolution of the nonplanar QIASW is investigated both in Cartesian and polar planes and the results are discussed from the numerical stand point. The results of the present study may be applicable in the study of propagation of small amplitude localized electrostatic shock structures in dense astrophysical environments.

  13. Ion beam driven warm dense matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Ni, P. A.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P. K.; More, R.; Barnard, J. J.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A. W.; Yoneda, H.

    2007-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments at LBNL are at 0.3-1 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak), increasing toward the Bragg peak in future versions of the accelerator. The WDM conditions are envisioned to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. Initial experiments include an experiment to study transient darkening at LBNL; and a porous target experiment at GSI heated by intense heavy-ion beams from the SIS 18 storage ring. Further experiments will explore target temperature and other properties such as electrical conductivity to investigate phase transitions and the critical point.

  14. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Miller, Phil; Venkataraman, Ramprasad; Arya, Anshu; Jones, Terry R; Kale, Laxmikant V

    2012-01-01

    Dense LU factorization is a prominent benchmark used to rank the performance of supercomputers. Many implementations, including the reference code HPL, use block-cyclic distributions of matrix blocks onto a two-dimensional process grid. The process grid dimensions drive a trade-off between communication and computation and are architecture- and implementation-sensitive. We show how the critical panel factorization steps can be made less communication-bound by overlapping asynchronous collectives for pivot identification and exchange with the computation of rank-k updates. By shifting this trade-off, a modified block-cyclic distribution can beneficially exploit more available parallelism on the critical path, and reduce panel factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. The missed parallelism in traditional block-cyclic distributions arises because active panel factorization, triangular solves, and subsequent broadcasts are spread over single process columns or rows (respectively) of the process grid. Increasing one dimension of the process grid decreases the number of distinct processes in the other dimension. To increase parallelism in both dimensions, periodic 'rotation' is applied to the process grid to recover the row-parallelism lost by a tall process grid. During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal reuse. In a column-major process grid, the performance of this access pattern degrades as too many streaming processors contend for access to memory. A block-cyclic mapping in the more popular row-major order does not encounter this problem, but consequently sacrifices node and network locality in the critical pivoting steps. We introduce 'striding' to vary between the two extremes of row- and column-major process grids. As a test-bed for further mapping experiments, we describe a dense LU implementation that allows a block distribution to be defined as a general function of block

  15. Compiler blockability of dense matrix factorizations.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S.; Lehoucq, R. B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Michigan Technological Univ.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the LAPACK project is to provide efficient and portable software for dense numerical linear algebra computations. By recasting many of the fundamental dense matrix computations in terms of calls to an efficient implementation of the BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms), the LAPACK project has, in large part, achieved its goal. Unfortunately, the efficient implementation of the BLAS results often in machine-specific code that is not portable across multiple architectures without a significant loss in performance or a significant effort to reoptimize them. This article examines whether most of the hand optimizations performed on matrix factorization codes are unnecessary because they can (and should) be performed by the compiler. We believe that it is better for the programmer to express algorithms in a machine-independent form and allow the compiler to handle the machine-dependent details. This gives the algorithms portability across architectures and removes the error-prone, expensive and tedious process of hand optimization. Although there currently exist no production compilers that can perform all the loop transformations discussed in this article, a description of current research in compiler technology is provided that will prove beneficial to the numerical linear algebra community. We show that the Cholesky and optimized automatically by a compiler to be as efficient as the same hand-optimized version found in LAPACK. We also show that the QR factorization may be optimized by the compiler to perform comparably with the hand-optimized LAPACK version on modest matrix sizes. Our approach allows us to conclude that with the advent of the compiler optimizations discussed in this article, matrix factorizations may be efficiently implemented in a BLAS-less form.

  16. Embedded binaries and their dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Stahler, Steven W.

    2017-08-01

    We explore the relationship between young, embedded binaries and their parent cores, using observations within the Perseus Molecular Cloud. We combine recently published Very Large Array observations of young stars with core properties obtained from Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 observations at 850 μm. Most embedded binary systems are found towards the centres of their parent cores, although several systems have components closer to the core edge. Wide binaries, defined as those systems with physical separations greater than 500 au, show a tendency to be aligned with the long axes of their parent cores, whereas tight binaries show no preferred orientation. We test a number of simple, evolutionary models to account for the observed populations of Class 0 and I sources, both single and binary. In the model that best explains the observations, all stars form initially as wide binaries. These binaries either break up into separate stars or else shrink into tighter orbits. Under the assumption that both stars remain embedded following binary break-up, we find a total star formation rate of 168 Myr-1. Alternatively, one star may be ejected from the dense core due to binary break-up. This latter assumption results in a star formation rate of 247 Myr-1. Both production rates are in satisfactory agreement with current estimates from other studies of Perseus. Future observations should be able to distinguish between these two possibilities. If our model continues to provide a good fit to other star-forming regions, then the mass fraction of dense cores that becomes stars is double what is currently believed.

  17. A constitutive law for dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Jop, Pierre; Forterre, Yoël; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2006-06-08

    A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

  18. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.

  19. Self-folding and aggregation of amyloid nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-04-01

    Amyloids are highly organized protein filaments, rich in β-sheet secondary structures that self-assemble to form dense plaques in brain tissues affected by severe neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's Disease). Identified as natural functional materials in bacteria, in addition to their remarkable mechanical properties, amyloids have also been proposed as a platform for novel biomaterials in nanotechnology applications including nanowires, liquid crystals, scaffolds and thin films. Despite recent progress in understanding amyloid structure and behavior, the latent self-assembly mechanism and the underlying adhesion forces that drive the aggregation process remain poorly understood. On the basis of previous full atomistic simulations, here we report a simple coarse-grain model to analyze the competition between adhesive forces and elastic deformation of amyloid fibrils. We use simple model system to investigate self-assembly mechanisms of fibrils, focused on the formation of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings, and thereby address a critical issue in linking the biochemical (Angstrom) to micrometre scales relevant for larger-scale states of functional amyloid materials. We investigate the effect of varying the interfibril adhesion energy on the structure and stability of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings and demonstrate that these aggregated amyloid fibrils are stable in such states even when the fibril-fibril interaction is relatively weak, given that the constituting amyloid fibril length exceeds a critical fibril length-scale of several hundred nanometres. We further present a simple approach to directly determine the interfibril adhesion strength from geometric measures. In addition to providing insight into the physics of aggregation of amyloid fibrils our model enables the analysis of large-scale amyloid plaques and presents a new method for the estimation and engineering of the adhesive forces responsible of the self-assembly process of amyloid

  20. Self-folding and aggregation of amyloid nanofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven W.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-04-01

    Amyloids are highly organized protein filaments, rich in β-sheet secondary structures that self-assemble to form dense plaques in brain tissues affected by severe neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's Disease). Identified as natural functional materials in bacteria, in addition to their remarkable mechanical properties, amyloids have also been proposed as a platform for novel biomaterials in nanotechnology applications including nanowires, liquid crystals, scaffolds and thin films. Despite recent progress in understanding amyloid structure and behavior, the latent self-assembly mechanism and the underlying adhesion forces that drive the aggregation process remain poorly understood. On the basis of previous full atomistic simulations, here we report a simple coarse-grain model to analyze the competition between adhesive forces and elastic deformation of amyloid fibrils. We use simple model system to investigate self-assembly mechanisms of fibrils, focused on the formation of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings, and thereby address a critical issue in linking the biochemical (Angstrom) to micrometre scales relevant for larger-scale states of functional amyloid materials. We investigate the effect of varying the interfibril adhesion energy on the structure and stability of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings and demonstrate that these aggregated amyloid fibrils are stable in such states even when the fibril-fibril interaction is relatively weak, given that the constituting amyloid fibril length exceeds a critical fibril length-scale of several hundred nanometres. We further present a simple approach to directly determine the interfibril adhesion strength from geometric measures. In addition to providing insight into the physics of aggregation of amyloid fibrils our model enables the analysis of large-scale amyloid plaques and presents a new method for the estimation and engineering of the adhesive forces responsible of the self-assembly process of

  1. Role of streams in myxobacteria aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiskowski, Maria A.; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2004-10-01

    Cell contact, movement and directionality are important factors in biological development (morphogenesis), and myxobacteria are a model system for studying cell-cell interaction and cell organization preceding differentiation. When starved, thousands of myxobacteria cells align, stream and form aggregates which later develop into round, non-motile spores. Canonically, cell aggregation has been attributed to attractive chemotaxis, a long range interaction, but there is growing evidence that myxobacteria organization depends on contact-mediated cell-cell communication. We present a discrete stochastic model based on contact-mediated signaling that suggests an explanation for the initialization of early aggregates, aggregation dynamics and final aggregate distribution. Our model qualitatively reproduces the unique structures of myxobacteria aggregates and detailed stages which occur during myxobacteria aggregation: first, aggregates initialize in random positions and cells join aggregates by random walk; second, cells redistribute by moving within transient streams connecting aggregates. Streams play a critical role in final aggregate size distribution by redistributing cells among fewer, larger aggregates. The mechanism by which streams redistribute cells depends on aggregate sizes and is enhanced by noise. Our model predicts that with increased internal noise, more streams would form and streams would last longer. Simulation results suggest a series of new experiments.

  2. A PFC2D model of the interactions between the tire and the aggregate filled arrester bed on escape ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Pin-pin; Chen, Chui-ce; Pei, Shi-kang; Li, Xin

    2017-06-01

    The stopping distance of a runaway vehicle is determined by the entry speed, the design of aggregate-filled arrester bed and the longitudinal grade of escape ramp. Although numerous previous studies have been carried out on the influence of speed and grade on stopping distance, taking into account aggregate properties is rare. Firstly, this paper analyzes the interactions between the tire and the aggregate. The tire and the aggregate are abstracted into a big particle unit and a particle combination unit consisting of lots of aggregates, respectively. Secondly this paper proposes an assumption that this interaction is a kind of particle flow. Later, this paper uses some particle properties to describe the tire-particle unit and aggregate-particle unit respectively, then puts forward several simplified steps of modeling by particle flow code in 2 dimensions (PFC2D). Therefore, a PFC2D micro-simulation model of the interactions between the tire and the aggregate is proposed. The parameters of particle properties are then calibrated by three groups of numerical tests. The calibrated model is verified by eight full-scale arrester bed testing data to demonstrate its feasibility and accuracy. This model provides escape ramp designers a feasible simulation method not only for predicting the stopping distance but also considering the aggregate properties.

  3. Factors that affect the nearshore aggregations of Antarctic krill in a biological hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Kim S.; Cimino, Megan; Fraser, William; Kohut, Josh; Oliver, Matthew J.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna; Schofield, Oscar M. E.; Statscewich, Hank; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Winsor, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, is a highly abundant and ecologically important zooplankton species in the Southern Ocean. Regions of elevated Antarctic krill biomass exist around Antarctica, often as a result of the concentrating effect of bathymetry and ocean currents. Such areas are considered biological hotspots and are key foraging grounds for numerous top predators in the region. A hotspot of Antarctic krill biomass exists off the southern extent of Anvers Island, Western Antarctic Peninsula, and supports a population of Adélie penguins that feed almost exclusively on it, as well as numerous other top predators. We investigated the spatio-temporal variability in Antarctic krill biomass and aggregation structure over four consecutive summer seasons, identifying environmental factors that were responsible. We identified three distinct krill aggregation types (Large-dense, Small-close and Small-sparse), and found that the relative proportion of each type to total aggregation numbers varied significantly between survey days. Large-dense aggregations occurred more frequently when westerly winds predominated and when the local mixed tide was in the diurnal regime. Small-close aggregations were also more frequent during diurnal tides and were negatively correlated with phytoplankton biomass. Small-sparse aggregations, on the other hand, were more prevalent when the mixed tide was in the semi-diurnal phase. We suggest that, under certain conditions (i.e. diurnal tides and westerly winds), the biological hotspot in the nearshore waters off Palmer Station, Anvers Island, functions as a zone of accumulation, concentrating krill biomass. Our findings provide important information on the dynamics of Antarctic krill at the local scale.

  4. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lavleen; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0–3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature. PMID:26361799

  5. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lavleen; Singh, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0-3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature.

  6. Oligomeric baroeffect and gas aggregation states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The baroeffect is analyzed to include a gas that aggregates into higher-order polymers or oligomers. The resulting pressure change is found to vary independently of the molecular weight of the gas components and to depend only on the aggregation or oligomeric order of the gas. With increasing aggregation, diffusive slip velocities are found to increase. The calculations are extended to include general counterdiffusion of two distinct aggregation states (k-, j-mer) for the gas, and the pressure change is derived as a function that is independent of both molecular weight and the absolute aggregation. The only parameter that determines the baroeffect is the ratio of aggregated states, beta = k/j. For gases that reversibly aggregate, possible oscillatory behavior and complex dynamics for pressure are discussed. Gas aggregation may play a role for low-temperature crystal-growth conditions in which vapor concentrations of one (or more) species are high.

  7. Virus-induced aggregates in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Moshe, Adi; Gorovits, Rena

    2012-10-17

    During infection, many viruses induce cellular remodeling, resulting in the formation of insoluble aggregates/inclusions, usually containing viral structural proteins. Identification of aggregates has become a useful diagnostic tool for certain viral infections. There is wide variety of viral aggregates, which differ by their location, size, content and putative function. The role of aggregation in the context of a specific virus is often poorly understood, especially in the case of plant viruses. The aggregates are utilized by viruses to house a large complex of proteins of both viral and host origin to promote virus replication, translation, intra- and intercellular transportation. Aggregated structures may protect viral functional complexes from the cellular degradation machinery. Alternatively, the activation of host defense mechanisms may involve sequestration of virus components in aggregates, followed by their neutralization as toxic for the host cell. The diversity of virus-induced aggregates in mammalian and plant cells is the subject of this review.

  8. Dense-Gas Dispersion in Complex Terrain (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    public release; distribution unlimited. A dense-gas version of the ADPIC Lagrangian particle, advection-diffusion model has been developed to...of momentum principles along with the ideal gas law equation of state for a mixture of gases. ADPIC , which is generally run in conjunction with a...versatility of coupling the new dense-gas ADPIC with alternative wind flow models. The new dense-gas ADPIC has been used to simulate the atmospheric

  9. Vertebrae localization in pathological spine CT via dense classification from sparse annotations.

    PubMed

    Glocker, Ben; Zikic, Darko; Konukoglu, Ender; Haynor, David R; Criminisi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Accurate localization and identification of vertebrae in spinal imaging is crucial for the clinical tasks of diagnosis, surgical planning, and post-operative assessment. The main difficulties for automatic methods arise from the frequent presence of abnormal spine curvature, small field of view, and image artifacts caused by surgical implants. Many previous methods rely on parametric models of appearance and shape whose performance can substantially degrade for pathological cases. We propose a robust localization and identification algorithm which builds upon supervised classification forests and avoids an explicit parametric model of appearance. We overcome the tedious requirement for dense annotations by a semi-automatic labeling strategy. Sparse centroid annotations are transformed into dense probabilistic labels which capture the inherent identification uncertainty. Using the dense labels, we learn a discriminative centroid classifier based on local and contextual intensity features which is robust to typical characteristics of spinal pathologies and image artifacts. Extensive evaluation is performed on a challenging dataset of 224 spine CT scans of patients with varying pathologies including high-grade scoliosis, kyphosis, and presence of surgical implants. Additionally, we test our method on a heterogeneous dataset of another 200, mostly abdominal, CTs. Quantitative evaluation is carried out with respect to localization errors and identification rates, and compared to a recently proposed method. Our approach is efficient and outperforms state-of-the-art on pathological cases.

  10. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  11. Aggregation resistant zwitterated superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhana, Layal L.; Schlenoff, Joseph B.

    2012-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are promising for biomedical applications since they can be directed toward the organ of interest using an external magnetic field. They are also good contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and have potential for the treatment of malignant tumors (i.e., hyperthermia). Therefore, there is a need to produce stable, non-aggregating superparamagnetic nanomaterials that can withstand the in vivo environment. In this work, the colloidal stability of a dispersion of iron oxide NPs was enhanced by functionalizing them with a short zwitterionic siloxane shell in aqueous media. The stabilization procedure yields superparamagnetic nanomaterials, ca. 10 nm in diameter, with saturation magnetization of about 54 emu/g that resist aggregation at physiological salt concentration, temperature, and pH. The loading of the zwitterionic shell was established with diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. X-ray and electron diffraction verified the starting magnetite phase, and that no change in phase occurred on surface functionalization.

  12. Mapping Alpine Vegetation Location Properties by Dense Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederheiser, Robert; Rutzinger, Martin; Lamprecht, Andrea; Steinbauer, Klaus; Winkler, Manuela; Pauli, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Highly accurate 3D micro topographic mapping in mountain research demands for light equipment and low cost solutions. Recent developments in structure from motion and dense matching techniques provide promising tools for such applications. In the following, the feasibility of terrestrial photogrammetry for mapping topographic location properties of sparsely vegetated areas in selected European mountain regions is investigated. Changes in species composition at alpine vegetation locations are indicators of climate change consequences, such as the pronounced rise of average temperatures in mountains compared to the global average. Better understanding of climate change effects on plants demand for investigations on a micro-topographic scale. We use professional and consumer grade digital single-lens reflex cameras mapping 288 plots each 3 x 3 m on 18 summits in the Alps and Mediterranean Mountains within the GLORIA (GLobal Observation Research Initiative in Alpine environments) network. Image matching tests result in accuracies that are in the order of millimetres in the XY-plane and below 0.5 mm in Z-direction at the second image pyramid level. Reconstructing vegetation proves to be a challenge due to its fine and small structured architecture and its permanent movement by wind during image acquisition, which is omnipresent on mountain summits. The produced 3D point clouds are gridded to 6 mm resolution from which topographic parameters such as slope, aspect and roughness are derived. At a later project stage these parameters will be statistically linked to botanical reference data in order to conclude on relations between specific location properties and species compositions.

  13. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  14. Mineral resource of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willett, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Crushed stone and construction sand and gravel, the two major types of natural aggregates, are among the most abundant and accessible natural resources on the planet. The earliest civilizations used aggregates for various purposes, mainly construction. Today aggregates provide the basic raw materials for the foundation of modern society.

  15. Locally available aggregate and sediment production

    Treesearch

    Randy B. Foltz; Mark Truebe

    2003-01-01

    Selection of suitable locally available materials to build strong and durable roads with aggregate surfaces is desired to minimize road construction and maintenance costs and to minimize the detrimental effects of sedimentation. Eighteen aggregates were selected from local sources in Idaho, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington State. Aggregate was placed in shallow...

  16. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project all...

  17. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project all...

  18. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project all...

  19. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project all...

  20. Ultrafast visualization of the structural evolution of dense hydrogen towards warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Hot dense hydrogen far from equilibrium is ubiquitous in nature occurring during some of the most violent and least understood events in our universe such as during star formation, supernova explosions, and the creation of cosmic rays. It is also a state of matter important for applications in inertial confinement fusion research and in laser particle acceleration. Rapid progress occurred in recent years characterizing the high-pressure structural properties of dense hydrogen under static or dynamic compression. Here, we show that spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measure the thermodynamic properties of dense hydrogen and resolve the ultrafast evolution and relaxation towards thermodynamic equilibrium. These studies apply ultra-bright x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light (LCLS) source. The interaction of rapidly heated cryogenic hydrogen with a high-peak power optical laser is visualized with intense LCLS x-ray pulses in a high-repetition rate pump-probe setting. We demonstrate that electron-ion coupling is affected by the small number of particles in the Debye screening cloud resulting in much slower ion temperature equilibration than predicted by standard theory. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  1. Skill Schemes: Sixth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempf, Jerry

    The sixth grade instructional unit, part of a field-tested grade school level career education series, is designed to assist learners in understanding how present experiences relate to past and future ones. Before the main body of the lessons is described, field testing results are reported and key items are presented: the concepts, the estimated…

  2. Earth Science, Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalo Public Schools, NY.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 7. SUBJECT MATTER: Earth science. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The introductory material suggests a time schedule for the major units and gives details of the reference materials referred to in the text. The main text is presented in four columns: topical outline, basic understandings, suggested activities and…

  3. Beef grading by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reflections in ultrasonic A-scan signatures of beef carcasses indicate USDA grade. Since reflections from within muscle are determined primarily by fat/muscle interface, richness of signals is direct indication of degree of marbling and quality. Method replaces subjective sight and feel tests by individual graders and is applicable to grade analysis of live cattle.

  4. Middle Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a collection of computer-oriented teaching activities for the middle grades. They focus on Logo activities to sharpen visualization skills, use of spreadsheets, various uses of Apple microcomputer paddles, and writing a program from program output. All activities may be adapted for lower or higher grade levels. (JN)

  5. Science. Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    GRADES OR AGES: Kindergarten--grade 6. SUBJECT MATTER: Science. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The introductory section deals with objectives, scope, sequences, and units. The main body of the guide deals with activities and lists materials, with illustrations. The guide is offset printed and bound with a soft cover. OBJECTIVES AND…

  6. Controlling Grade Inflation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanoyevitch, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In this article concerning grade inflation, the author restricts his attention to the college and university level, although many of the tools and ideas developed here should be useful for high schools as well. The author considers the relationships between grades instructors assign and scores they receive on end-of-the semester student…

  7. Third Grade Reading Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, 14 states passed legislation geared toward improving 3rd-grade literacy through identification, intervention, and/or retention initiatives. Today, a total of 32 states and the District of Columbia have policies in statute aimed at improving 3rd-grade reading proficiency. The majority of these states require early assessment and…

  8. Middle Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a collection of computer-oriented teaching activities for the middle grades. They focus on Logo activities to sharpen visualization skills, use of spreadsheets, various uses of Apple microcomputer paddles, and writing a program from program output. All activities may be adapted for lower or higher grade levels. (JN)

  9. Beef grading by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reflections in ultrasonic A-scan signatures of beef carcasses indicate USDA grade. Since reflections from within muscle are determined primarily by fat/muscle interface, richness of signals is direct indication of degree of marbling and quality. Method replaces subjective sight and feel tests by individual graders and is applicable to grade analysis of live cattle.

  10. Grades out, Badges in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Grades are broken. Students grub for them, pick classes where good ones come easily, and otherwise hustle to win the highest scores for the least learning. As a result, college grades are inflated to the point of meaninglessness--especially to employers who want to know which diploma-holder is best qualified for their jobs. An alternative is to…

  11. Making Grades More Meaningful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochbein, Craig; Pollio, Marty

    2016-01-01

    To expand and improve evidence of grading practices, we seized an opportunity presented by the implementation of standards-based grading practices at 11 high schools in Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville, Ky. These high-needs schools faced substantial sanctions outlined by recently revised federal and state policies unless they made…

  12. The Grades Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleenor, Andy; Lamb, Sarah; Anton, Jennifer; Stinson, Todd; Donen, Tony

    2011-01-01

    It can be quite alarming (and eye-opening) to see exactly how many of the grades students receive are based on their behaviors rather than their learning. Students should be assessed on what they know and can use rather than on their behavior. The reality, unfortunately, is that the opposite is often the case. Grades for students who work hard are…

  13. Classroom: Efficient Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David D.; Pease, Leonard F., III.

    2014-01-01

    Grading can be accelerated to make time for more effective instruction. This article presents specific time management strategies selected to decrease administrative time required of faculty and teaching assistants, including a multiple answer multiple choice interface for exams, a three-tier grading system for open ended problem solving, and a…

  14. Grain Grading and Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  15. Growing beyond Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perchemlides, Natalia; Coutant, Carolyn

    2004-01-01

    Once students are asked to assess their own writing progress, they will begin to do their best for writing great prose instead of just great grades. Teachers will have to create a grade-free zone, allow students to set their own writing goals, provide a common language such as the Six Traits Model, and provide evaluation and instructional models…

  16. Controlling Grade Inflation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanoyevitch, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In this article concerning grade inflation, the author restricts his attention to the college and university level, although many of the tools and ideas developed here should be useful for high schools as well. The author considers the relationships between grades instructors assign and scores they receive on end-of-the semester student…

  17. What Is Fifth Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Thomas C.; Wallach, Christine

    2006-01-01

    One of the most consistent regularities observers would see in schools is the grouping of children by grade. The authors' work with schoolchildren causes them to ask, what is a grade beyond a group of children at a particular age? In this article, the authors share a glimpse of an activity involving inference and logical necessity that they…

  18. Are Grades Undermining Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David; Casanova, Ursula

    1988-01-01

    A study of fifth and sixth grade public school students in Israel suggests that grades and other norm-referenced methods are less effective than task-involving evaluation methods in enhancing student performance, interest, and motivation. This article consists of two commentaries on the findings, with suggestions for implementing task-involving…

  19. Pallet part grading trainer

    Treesearch

    Deborah F. Cook; Philip A. Araman; Matthew F. Winn

    2000-01-01

    A computerized pallet grading training system was developed to facilitate the production of higher quality pallets. Higher quality pallets would be more durable and could be re-used many times, resulting in long-term savings. Schmoldt et al. (1993) evaluated the economic impact of grading and sorting pallet parts. They determined that higher quality pallets produced by...

  20. Classroom: Efficient Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David D.; Pease, Leonard F., III.

    2014-01-01

    Grading can be accelerated to make time for more effective instruction. This article presents specific time management strategies selected to decrease administrative time required of faculty and teaching assistants, including a multiple answer multiple choice interface for exams, a three-tier grading system for open ended problem solving, and a…

  1. Making Grades More Meaningful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochbein, Craig; Pollio, Marty

    2016-01-01

    To expand and improve evidence of grading practices, we seized an opportunity presented by the implementation of standards-based grading practices at 11 high schools in Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville, Ky. These high-needs schools faced substantial sanctions outlined by recently revised federal and state policies unless they made…

  2. Third Grade Reading Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, 14 states passed legislation geared toward improving 3rd-grade literacy through identification, intervention, and/or retention initiatives. Today, a total of 32 states and the District of Columbia have policies in statute aimed at improving 3rd-grade reading proficiency. The majority of these states require early assessment and…

  3. Upper Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes computer-oriented teaching activities for the upper grades. They focus on the use of databases in history classes, checking taxes, examining aspects of the joystick button on Atari microcomputers, printing control using Logo, and a Logo program that draws whirling squares. All activities can be adapted for lower grades. (JN)

  4. Teaching Middle Grades Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    Background information and exemplary units for teaching science in Georgia's middle school grades are provided. Discussed in the first section are: (1) the rationale for including science in middle school grades, focusing on science/society/technology, science/social issues, scientific reasoning, and scientific literacy; (2) role of science…

  5. Catastrophic Collapse of Particulate Clouds: Implications From Aggregation Experiments in the USML-1 and USML-2 Glovebox. Experiment 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John; Freund, Friedemann; Sauke, Todd; Freund, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with electrostatic aggregation of well-dispersed (nominally, mono-dispersed), freely suspended particles in the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) Glovebox have determined that filamentary aggregates are a universal product of grain interactions in relatively dense particulate clouds. Aggregate growth from the experimental particle clouds primarily involves dipole-dipole interactions for nonconducting materials; dipole interactions account for both attraction between grains as well as the cohesive force that maintains the integrity of the filamentary structures. When a cloud undergoes a turbulent-to-quiescent transition after damping of fluid and ballistic grain motions, aggregation occurs almost instantaneously and the cloud is transformed into a population of "heavier" clusters of material with organized electrical structures. This abrupt transformation could initiate catastrophic gravitational collapse of certain regions of particulate clouds, thus controlling the longevity and fate of cloud systems as diverse as protoplanetary dust disks and volcanic eruption plumes.

  6. Catastrophic Collapse of Particulate Clouds: Implications From Aggregation Experiments in the USML-1 and USML-2 Glovebox. Experiment 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John; Freund, Friedemann; Sauke, Todd; Freund, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with electrostatic aggregation of well-dispersed (nominally, mono-dispersed), freely suspended particles in the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) Glovebox have determined that filamentary aggregates are a universal product of grain interactions in relatively dense particulate clouds. Aggregate growth from the experimental particle clouds primarily involves dipole-dipole interactions for nonconducting materials; dipole interactions account for both attraction between grains as well as the cohesive force that maintains the integrity of the filamentary structures. When a cloud undergoes a turbulent-to-quiescent transition after damping of fluid and ballistic grain motions, aggregation occurs almost instantaneously and the cloud is transformed into a population of "heavier" clusters of material with organized electrical structures. This abrupt transformation could initiate catastrophic gravitational collapse of certain regions of particulate clouds, thus controlling the longevity and fate of cloud systems as diverse as protoplanetary dust disks and volcanic eruption plumes.

  7. A quest for super dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Narayana, C.; Bellin, C.; Shukla, A.; Esteve, I.; Mezouar, N.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme pressure phase diagram of materials is important not only for understanding the interiors of planets or stars, but also for the fundamental understanding of the relation between crystal structure and electronic structure. Structural transitions induced by extreme pressure are governed by the deformation of valence electron charge density which bears the brunt of increasing compression while the relative volume occupied by the nearly incompressible ionic core electrons increases. At extreme pressures common materials are expected to transform into new dense phases with extremely compact atomic arrangements that may also have unusual physical properties. In this report, we present new experiments carried out on aluminium. A simple system like Al is not only important as a benchmark for theory, but can also be used as a standard for pressures in the TPa range and beyond which are targeted at new dynamic compression facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US or Laser Mégajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux in France. For aluminium, first principle calculations have consistently predicted a phase transition sequence from fcc to hcp and hcp to bcc in a pressure range below 0.5 TPa [Tambe et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 172102, 2008]. The hcp phase was identified at 217 GPa in a recent experiment [Akahama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 45505, 2006] but the detection of the predicted bcc phase has been hampered by the difficulty of routine static high pressure experiments beyond 350 GPa. Here, we report on the overcoming of this obstacle and the detection of all the structural phase transitions predicted in Al by achieving a pressure in excess of 500 GPa in the static regime in a diamond-anvil cell. In particular, using X-ray diffraction at the high-pressure beamline ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we find a bcc super-dense phase of aluminium at a pressure of 380 GPa. In this report

  8. Massive black holes in dense star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkan, Mehmet Atakan

    2005-11-01

    In this thesis, we study the formation of massive black holes in dense star clusters and their effects on the clusters' further evolution. We determine the necessary conditions for early core collapse, leading to the formation of a very massive star via runaway collisions. This process provides a natural mechanism for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young dense star clusters, which have been inferred from recent X-ray and optical observations. We performed about a hundred N -body simulations using our Monte Carlo technique, with a wide variety of initial conditions, containing up to 10 7 stars from a broad initial mass distribution. We find that for realistic initial mass functions, mass segregation and dynamical instabilities reduce the core collapse time, t cc , by two orders of magnitude compared to single- component cluster models. The ratio of the core collapse time to central relaxation time is generally ~0.15, which translates into ~0.07 for ratio of core collapse time to half-mass relaxation time for moderately concentrated clusters. This ratio can be smaller if there is initial mass segregation. We also find that typically the mass of the stars in the collapsing core is ~0.2% of the cluster's total mass. We then study the inspiral towards the Galactic center of young clusters which undergo early core collapse. We find that such clusters can bring many young stars to the central parsec, and hence explain the presence of many young stars in this region. However, this mechanism requires a large initial mass, and deposits more stars, both in the central parsec and outside it, than observed. We provide possible explanations for this discrepancy, and suggest future directions for research. Finally, we study the effects of primordial binaries on early core collapse runaway collisions. Even though such binaries generally delay and prevent core collapse (e.g., in globular clusters) they are expected to facilitate collisions and hence accelerate

  9. Secondary Principals' Perceptions of Grading and Grade Reporting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akins, Jeremie

    2016-01-01

    Effective grading practices in the classroom as well as reporting practices such as standards-based grading (SBG) is one way to report learning (Marzano, 2010). The focus of this particular study was to address alternative ways to tackle the issue of grading and grade reporting in comparison to the traditional grading methods. Specifically, this…

  10. The Role of Lipid Raft Aggregation in the Infection of Type II Pneumocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fine-Coulson, Kari; Reaves, Barbara J.; Karls, Russell K.; Quinn, Frederick D.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, cholesterol-dense regions of the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts (LR), have been observed to develop during and may be directly involved in infection of host cells by various pathogens. This study focuses on LR aggregation induced in alveolar epithelial cells during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli. We report dose- and time-dependent increases in LR aggregation after infection with three different strains at multiplicities of infection of 1, 10 and 100 from 2–24 hr post infection (hpi). Specific strain-dependent variations were noted among H37Rv, HN878 and CDC1551 with H37Rv producing the most significant increase from 15 aggregates per cell (APC) to 27 APC at MOI 100 during the 24 hour infection period. Treatment of epithelial cells with Culture Filtrate Protein, Total Lipids and gamma-irradiated whole cells from each strain failed to induce the level of LR aggregation observed during infection with any of the live strains. However, filtered supernatants from infected epithelial cells did produce comparable LR aggregation, suggesting a secreted mycobacterial product produced during infection of host cells is responsible for LR aggregation. Disruption of lipid raft formation prior to infection indicates that Mtb bacilli utilize LR aggregates for internalization and survival in epithelial cells. Treatment of host cells with the LR-disruption agent Filipin III produced a nearly 22% reduction in viable bacteria for strains H37Rv and HN878, and a 7% reduction for strain CDC1551 after 6 hpi. This study provides evidence for significant mycobacterial-induced changes in the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells and that Mtb strains vary in their ability to facilitate aggregation and utilization of LR. PMID:23024786

  11. Next-Generation Polymer Shells for Inorganic Nanoparticles are Highly Compact, Ultra-Dense, and Long-Lasting Cyclic Brushes.

    PubMed

    Morgese, Giulia; Shirmardi Shaghasemi, Behzad; Causin, Valerio; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Reimhult, Erik; Benetti, Edmondo M

    2017-04-10

    Cyclic poly-2-ethyl-2-oxazoline (PEOXA) ligands for superparamagnetic Fe3 O4 nanoparticles (NPs) generate ultra-dense and highly compact shells, providing enhanced colloidal stability and bio-inertness in physiological media. When linear brush shells fail in providing colloidal stabilization to NPs, the cyclic ones assure long lasting dispersions. While the thermally induced dehydration of linear PEOXA shells cause irreversible aggregation of the NPs, the collapse and subsequent rehydration of similarly grafted cyclic brushes allow the full recovery of individually dispersed NPs. Although linear ligands are densely grafted onto Fe3 O4 cores, a small plasma protein such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) still physisorbs within their shells. In contrast, the impenetrable entropic shield provided by cyclic brushes efficiently prevents nonspecific interaction with proteins. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Variation in dust properties in a dense filament of the Taurus molecular complex (L1506)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysard, N.; Abergel, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Pagani, L.; Könyves, V.; Spencer, L.; White, G.; Zavagno, A.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We observed the L1506 filament, which is located in the Taurus molecular complex, with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. Our aim is to prove the variation in grain properties along the entire length of the filament. In particular, we want to determine above which gas density this variation arises and what changes in the grain optical properties/size distribution are required. Methods: We use the 3D radiative transfer code CRT, coupled to the dust emission and extinction code DustEM, to model the emission and extinction of the dense filament. We test a range of optical properties and size distributions for the grains: dust of the diffuse interstellar medium (interstellar PAHs and amorphous carbons and silicates) and both compact and fluffy aggregates. Results: We find that the grain opacity has to increase across the filament to fit simultaneously the near-IR extinction and Herschel emission profiles of L1506. We interpret this change to be a consequence of the coagulation of dust grains to form fluffy aggregates. Grains similar to those in the diffuse medium have to be present in the outer layers of the cloud, whereas aggregates must prevail above gas densities of a few 103 H/cm3. This corresponds to line-of-sights with visual extinction in the V band of the order of 2 to 3. The dust opacity at 250 μm is raised by a factor of 1.8 to 2.2, while the grain average size is increased by a factor of 5. These exact numbers depend naturally on the dust model chosen to fit the data. Our findings agree with the constraints given by the study of the gas molecular lines. Using a simple approach, we show that the aggregates may have time to form inside the filament within the cloud lifetime. Our model also characterises the density structure of the filament, showing that the filament width is not constant along L1506 but instead varies by a factor of the order of 4. Conclusions: We confirm the need for an increase in the far-IR dust opacity to explain the emission

  13. Usefulness of Flow Cytometric Mepacrine Uptake/Release Combined with CD63 Assay in Diagnosis of Patients with Suspected Platelet Dense Granule Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huili; Mullier, François; Frotscher, Birgit; Briquel, Marie-Elisabeth; Toussaint, Marie; Massin, Frédéric; Lecompte, Thomas; Latger-Cannard, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Dense granule disorder is one of the most common platelet abnormalities, resulting from dense granule deficiency or secretion defect. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the flow cytometric combination of mepacrine uptake/release assay and CD63 expression detection in the management of patients with suspected dense granule disorder. Over a period of 5 years, patients with abnormal platelet aggregation and/or reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion suggestive of dense granule disorder were consecutively enrolled. The flow cytometric assays were systematically performed to further investigate dense granule functionality. Among the 26 included patients, 18 cases showed impaired mepacrine uptake/release and reduced CD63 expression on activated platelets, consistent with δ-storage pool deficiency (SPD). Another seven patients showed decrease in mepacrine release and CD63 expression but mepacrine uptake was normal, indicating secretion defect rather than δ-SPD. Unfortunately, ATP secretion could not be measured in 7 out of the 26 patients due to insufficient sample and/or severe thrombocytopenia. This test combination provides a rapid and effective method to detect the heterogeneous abnormalities of platelet dense granule by distinguishing between storage and release defects. This combination is particularly advantageous for severely thrombocytopenic patients and pediatric patients in which only minimal sample is required.

  14. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    PubMed Central

    Daranlot, Julien; Hincelin, Ugo; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimeter-wavelength transitions. Therefore, its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms, each involving two radical-radical reactions, are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction, down to 56 K. The measured rate constants for this reaction, and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation, are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase formation and the depletion of atomic nitrogen onto grains. As the reactions controlling N2 formation are inefficient, we argue that N2 does not represent the main reservoir species for interstellar nitrogen. Instead, elevated abundances of more labile forms of nitrogen such as NH3 should be present on interstellar ices, promoting the eventual formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. PMID:22689957

  15. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  16. Pycnonuclear reactions in dense stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Levenfish, K. P.; Gnedin, O. Y.

    2005-09-01

    We discuss pycnonuclear burning of highly exotic atomic nuclei in deep crusts of neutron stars, at densities up to 1013 g cm-3. As an application, we consider pycnonuclear burning of matter accreted on a neutron star in a soft X-ray transient (SXT, a compact binary containing a neutron star and a low-mass companion). The energy released in this burning, while the matter sinks into the stellar crust under the weight of newly accreted material, is sufficient to warm up the star and initiate neutrino emission in its core. The surface thermal radiation of the star in quiescent states becomes dependent on the poorly known equation of state (EOS) of supranuclear matter in the stellar core, which gives a method to explore this EOS. Four qualitatively different model EOSs are tested against observations of SXTs. They imply different levels of the enhancement of neutrino emission in massive neutron stars by 1) the direct Urca process in nucleon/hyperon matter; 2) pion condensates; 3) kaon condensates; 4) Cooper pairing of neutrons in nucleon matter with the forbidden direct Urca process. A low level of the thermal quiescent emission of two SXTs, SAX J1808.4-3658 and Cen X-4, contradicts model 4). Observations of SXTs test the same physics of dense matter as observations of thermal radiation from cooling isolated neutron stars, but the data on SXTs are currently more conclusive.

  17. Oblique impact of dense granular sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellowitz, Jake; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2013-11-01

    Motivated by experiments showing impacts of granular jets with non-circular cross sections produce thin ejecta sheets with anisotropic shapes, we study what happens when two sheets containing densely packed, rigid grains traveling at the same speed collide asymmetrically. Discrete particle simulations and a continuum frictional fluid model yield the same steady-state solution of two exit streams emerging from incident streams. When the incident angle Δθ is less than Δθc =120° +/-10° , the exit streams' angles differ from that measured in water sheet experiments. Below Δθc , the exit angles from granular and water sheet impacts agree. This correspondence is surprising because 2D Euler jet impact, the idealization relevant for both situations, is ill posed: a generic Δθ value permits a continuous family of solutions. Our finding that granular and water sheet impacts evolve into the same member of the solution family suggests previous proposals that perturbations such as viscous drag, surface tension or air entrapment select the actual outcome are not correct. Currently at Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  18. Superconductivity in dense carbon-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Siyu; Liu, Hanyu; Naumov, Ivan I.; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yinwei; Tse, John S.; Yang, Bai; Hemley, Russell J.

    2016-03-08

    Guided by a simple strategy in searching of new superconducting materials we predict that high temperature superconductivity can be realized in classes of high-density materials having strong sp3 chemical bonding and high lattice symmetry. Here, we examine in detail sodalite carbon frameworks doped with simple metals such as Li, Na, and Al. Though such materials share some common features with doped diamond, their doping level is not limited and the density of states at the Fermi level in them can be as high as that in the renowned MgB2. Altogether, with other factors, this boosts the superconducting temperature (Tc) in the materials investigated to higher levels compared to doped diamond. For example, the superconducting Tc of sodalite-like NaC6 is predicted to be above 100 K. This phase and a series of other sodalite-based superconductors are predicted to be metastable phases but are dynamically stable. In owing to the rigid carbon framework of these and related dense carbon-materials, these doped sodalite-based structures could be recoverable as potentially useful superconductors.

  19. Astrochemistry of Dense Protostellar and Protoplanetary Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    Dense molecular clouds contain a remarkably rich chemistry, as revealed by combined submillimeter and infrared observations. Simple and complex (organic) gases, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ices and silicates have been unambiguously detected in both low- and high-mass star forming regions. During star- and planet formation, these molecules undergo large abundance changes, with most of the heavy species frozen out as icy mantles on grains in the cold pre-stellar phase. As the protostars heat up their immediate surroundings, the warming and evaporation of the ices triggers the formation of more complex molecules, perhaps even of pre-biotic origin. Water, a key ingredient in the chemistry of life, is boosted in abundance in hot gas. Some of these molecules enter the protoplanetary disk where they are exposed to UV radiation or X-rays and modified further. The enhanced resolution and sensitivity of ALMA, Herschel, SOFIA, JWST and ELTs across the full range of wavelengths from cm to μm will be essential to trace this lifecycle of gas and dust from clouds to planets. The continued need for basic molecular data on gaseous and solid-state material coupled with powerful radiative transfer tools is emphasized to reap the full scientific benefits from these new facilities.

  20. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N. Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-01-01

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy (kBT) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:25344532

  1. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing

    DOE PAGES

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N. Khalid; ...

    2014-10-24

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. In this paper, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We definemore » DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy (kBT) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. Finally, we show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa.« less

  2. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Mieville, R.L.; Ma, B.; Udovich, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report focuses on a mechanism for oxygen transport through mixed- oxide conductors as used in dense ceramic membrane reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CO and H{sub 2}). The in-situ separation of O{sub 2} from air by the membrane reactor saves the costly cryogenic separation step that is required in conventional syngas production. The mixed oxide of choice is SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x}, which exhibits high oxygen permeability and has been shown in previous studies to possess high stability in both oxidizing and reducing conditions; in addition, it can be readily formed into reactor configurations such as tubes. An understanding of the electrical properties and the defect dynamics in this material is essential and will help us to find the optimal operating conditions for the conversion reactor. In this paper, we discuss the conductivities of the SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} system that are dependent on temperature and partial pressure of oxygen. Based on the experimental results, a defect model is proposed to explain the electrical properties of this system. The oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} is estimated by using conductivity data and is compared with that obtained from methane conversion reaction.

  3. Dense shearing flows of inelastic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, James T.

    2006-10-01

    We introduce a simple phenomenological modification to the hydrodynamic equations for dense flows of identical, frictionless, inelastic disks and show that the resulting theory describes the area fraction dependence of quantities that are measured in numerical simulations of steady, homogeneous shearing flows and steady, fully developed flows down inclines. The modification involves the incorporation of a length scale other than the particle diameter in the expression for the rate of collisional dissipation. The idea is that enduring contacts between grains forced by the shearing reduce the collisional rate of dissipation while continuing to transmit momentum and force. The length and orientation of the chains of particles in contact are determined by a simple algebraic equation. When the resulting expression for the rate of dissipation is incorporated into the theory, numerical solutions of the boundary-value problem for steady, fully developed flow of circular disks down a bumpy incline exhibit a core with a uniform area fraction that decreases with increasing angles of inclination. When the height at which an inclined flow stops is assumed to be proportional to this chain length, a scaling between the average velocity, flow height, and stopping height similar to that seen in experiments and numerical simulations is obtained from the balance of fluctuation energy.

  4. Dense fluids—New aspects and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, E. U.

    1986-05-01

    Dense fluids at elevated and supercritical temperatures find increased interest in science and technology. In this presentation special attention is given to binary mixtures with polar components. Methods and results of experiments with such high pressure-high temperature fluids are described. Far infrared spectra of CHCIF 2 and CHF 3 give indications of the types of molecular motion in the supercritical phases. “Enhancement factors” for the solubility of a solid solute like caffeine in high pressure CO 2 have been determined spectroscopically. The phase diagrams in the pressure-temperature-composition space and critical curves for water combined with nitrogen, oxygen, methane and helium have been measured recently to 2500 bar and 450°C. A “rational” equation of state permits calculation of critical curves and binodal surfaces for such systems. An extended investigation was made with the ternary system water-methane-sodium chloride. Small additions of salt shift critical curves by 100°C and more to higher temperatures. In water-methane mixtures between 400 and 500°C and at 1000 bar “supercritical flames” and “hydrothermal combustion” could be produced with injected oxygen. Binary liquid mixtures of cesium and cesium hydride to elevated hydrogen pressure and to 800°C show the phenomena of continuous transition from metal to ionic fluids. Electric conductance measurements in the whole range of concentrations are presented and discussed.

  5. Synthesis of dense energetic materials. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, C.

    1982-07-01

    The objective of the research described in the report is to synthesize new, dense, stable, highly energetic materials which will ultimately be a candidates for improved explosive and propellant formulations. Following strict guidelines pertaining to energy, density, stability, etc. Specific target molecules were chosen that appear to possess the improved properties desired for new energetic materials. This report summarizes research on the synthesis of these target materials from February 1981 to January 1982. The following compounds were synthesized: 5,5'-diamino-3,3'-bioxadiazole(1,2,4); 5,5'-bis(trichloromethyl)-3,3'-di(1,2,4-oxadiazole); 3,3'-bi(1,2,4-oxadiazole); ethylene tetranitramine (ETNA); N,N-bis(methoxymethyl)acetamide; N,N-bis(chloromethyl)acetamide; 7,8-dimethylglycoluril; Synthesis of 3,9-Di(t-butyl)-13,14-dimethyl-tetracyclo-(5,5,2,0/sup 5/ /sup 13/ 0/sup 11/ /sup 14/)-1,3,5,7,9,11-hexaaza-6,12-dioxotetradecane.

  6. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  8. Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments

    PubMed Central

    Liber, Shir R.; Borohovich, Shai; Butenko, Alexander V.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Sloutskin, Eli

    2013-01-01

    We relate, by simple analytical centrifugation experiments, the density of colloidal fluids with the nature of their randomly packed solid sediments. We demonstrate that the most dilute fluids of colloidal hard spheres form loosely packed sediments, where the volume fraction of the particles approaches in frictional systems the random loose packing limit, φRLP = 0.55. The dense fluids of the same spheres form denser sediments, approaching the so-called random close packing limit, φRCP = 0.64. Our experiments, where particle sedimentation in a centrifuge is sufficiently rapid to avoid crystallization, demonstrate that the density of the sediments varies monotonically with the volume fraction of the initial suspension. We reproduce our experimental data by simple computer simulations, where structural reorganizations are prohibited, such that the rate of sedimentation is irrelevant. This suggests that in colloidal systems, where viscous forces dominate, the structure of randomly close-packed and randomly loose-packed sediments is determined by the well-known structure of the initial fluids of simple hard spheres, provided that the crystallization is fully suppressed. PMID:23530198

  9. Neutrino ground state in a dense star

    SciTech Connect

    Kiers, K.; Tytgat, M.H. |

    1998-05-01

    It has recently been argued that long range forces due to the exchange of massless neutrinos give rise to a very large self-energy in a dense, finite-ranged, weakly charged medium. Such an effect, if real, would destabilize a neutron star. To address this issue we have studied the related problem of a massless neutrino field in the presence of an external, static electroweak potential of finite range. To be precise, we have computed to one loop the exact vacuum energy for the case of a spherical square well potential of depth {alpha} and radius R. For small wells, the vacuum energy is reliably determined by a perturbative expansion in the external potential. For large wells, however, the perturbative expansion breaks down. A manifestation of this breakdown is that the vacuum carries a non-zero neutrino charge. The energy and neutrino charge of the ground state are, to a good approximation for large wells, those of a neutrino condensate with chemical potential {mu}={alpha}. Our results demonstrate explicitly that long-range forces due to the exchange of massless neutrinos do not threaten the stability of neutron stars. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Superconductivity in dense carbon-based materials

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Siyu; Liu, Hanyu; Naumov, Ivan I.; ...

    2016-03-08

    Guided by a simple strategy in searching of new superconducting materials we predict that high temperature superconductivity can be realized in classes of high-density materials having strong sp3 chemical bonding and high lattice symmetry. Here, we examine in detail sodalite carbon frameworks doped with simple metals such as Li, Na, and Al. Though such materials share some common features with doped diamond, their doping level is not limited and the density of states at the Fermi level in them can be as high as that in the renowned MgB2. Altogether, with other factors, this boosts the superconducting temperature (Tc) inmore » the materials investigated to higher levels compared to doped diamond. For example, the superconducting Tc of sodalite-like NaC6 is predicted to be above 100 K. This phase and a series of other sodalite-based superconductors are predicted to be metastable phases but are dynamically stable. In owing to the rigid carbon framework of these and related dense carbon-materials, these doped sodalite-based structures could be recoverable as potentially useful superconductors.« less

  11. Dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    Shear a dense suspension of cornstarch and water hard enough, and the system seems to solidify as a result. Indeed, previous studies have shown that a jamming front propagates through these systems until, after interaction with boundaries, a jammed solid spans across the system. Because these fully jammed states are only observed if the deformation is fast enough, a natural question to ask is how this phenomenon is related to the discontinuous shear thickening (DST) behavior of these suspensions. We present a single experimental setup in which we on the one hand can measure the rheological flow curves, but on the other hand also determine if the suspension is in a jammed state. This we do by using a large-gap cylindrical Couette cell, where we control the applied shear stress using a rheometer. Because our setup only applies shear, the jammed states we observe are shear-jammed, and cannot be a result of an overall increase in packing fraction. We probe for jammed states by dropping small steel spheres on the surface of the suspension, and identify elastic responses. Our experiments reveal a clear distinction between the onset of DST and Shear-Jammed states, which have qualitatively different trends with packing fraction close to the isotropic jamming point.

  12. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  13. Transcriptional proofreading in dense RNA polymerase traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Mamata; Klumpp, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    The correction of errors during transcription involves the diffusive backward translocation (backtracking) of RNA polymerases (RNAPs) on the DNA. A trailing RNAP on the same template can interfere with backtracking as it progressively restricts the space that is available for backward translocation and thereby ratchets the backtracked RNAP forward. We analyze the resulting negative impact on proofreading theoretically using a driven lattice gas model of transcription under conditions of dense RNAP traffic. The fraction of errors that are corrected is calculated exactly for the case of a single RNAP; for multi-RNAP transcription, we use simulations and an analytical approximation and find a decrease with increasing traffic density. Moreover, we ask how the parameters of the system have to be set to keep down the impact of the interference of a trailing RNAP. Our analysis uncovers a surprisingly simple picture of the design of the error correction system: its efficiency is essentially determined by the rate for the initial backtracking step, while the value of the cleavage rate ensures that the correction mechanism remains efficient at high transcription rates. Finally, we argue that our analysis can also be applied to cases with transcription-translation coupling where the leading ribosome on the transcript assumes the role of the trailing RNAP.

  14. Superconductivity in dense carbon-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siyu; Liu, Hanyu; Naumov, Ivan I.; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yinwei; Tse, John S.; Yang, Bai; Hemley, Russell J.

    2016-03-01

    Guided by a simple strategy in search of new superconducting materials, we predict that high-temperature superconductivity can be realized in classes of high-density materials having strong sp3 chemical bonding and high lattice symmetry. We examine in detail sodalite carbon frameworks doped with simple metals such as Li, Na, and Al. Though such materials share some common features with doped diamond, their doping level is not limited, and the density of states at the Fermi level in them can be as high as that in the renowned Mg B2 . Together with other factors, this boosts the superconducting temperature (Tc) in the materials investigated to higher levels compared to doped diamond. For example, the Tc of sodalitelike Na C6 is predicted to be above 100 K. This phase and a series of other sodalite-based superconductors are predicted to be metastable phases but are dynamically stable. Owing to the rigid carbon framework of these and related dense carbon materials, these doped sodalite-based structures could be recoverable as potentially useful superconductors.

  15. Order in dense hydrogen at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, B.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2004-01-01

    By increase in density, impelled by pressure, the electronic energy bands in dense hydrogen attain significant widths. Nevertheless, arguments can be advanced suggesting that a physically consistent description of the general consequences of this electronic structure can still be constructed from interacting but state-dependent multipoles. These reflect, in fact self-consistently, a disorder-induced localization of electron states partially manifesting the effects of proton dynamics; they retain very considerable spatial inhomogeneity (as they certainly do in the molecular limit). This description, which is valid provided that an overall energy gap has not closed, leads at a mean-field level to the expected quadrupolar coupling, but also for certain structures to the eventual emergence of dipolar terms and their coupling when a state of broken charge symmetry is developed. A simple Hamiltonian incorporating these basic features then leads to a high-density, low-temperature phase diagram that appears to be in substantial agreement with experiment. In particular, it accounts for the fact that whereas the phase I–II phase boundary has a significant isotope dependence, the phase II–III boundary has very little. PMID:15028839

  16. Mach reflection in a warm dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Wilde, B. H.; Hartigan, P.; Perry, T. S.

    2010-11-01

    The phenomenon of irregular shock-wave reflection is of importance in high-temperature gas dynamics, astrophysics, inertial-confinement fusion, and related fields of high-energy-density science. However, most experimental studies of irregular reflection have used supersonic wind tunnels or shock tubes, and few or no data are available for Mach reflection phenomena in the plasma regime. Similarly, analytic studies have often been confined to calorically perfect gases. We report the first direct observation, and numerical modeling, of Mach stem formation for a warm, dense plasma. Two ablatively driven aluminum disks launch oppositely directed, near-spherical shock waves into a cylindrical plastic block. The interaction of these shocks results in the formation of a Mach-ring shock that is diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. The data are modeled using radiation hydrocodes developed by AWE and LANL. The experiments were carried out at the University of Rochester's Omega laser [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] and were inspired by modeling [A. M. Khokhlov, P. A. Höflich, E. S. Oran et al., Astrophys J. 524, L107 (1999)] of core-collapse supernovae that suggest that in asymmetric supernova explosion significant mass may be ejected in a Mach-ring formation launched by bipolar jets.

  17. Inference by replication in densely connected systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neirotti, Juan P.; Saad, David

    2007-10-15

    An efficient Bayesian inference method for problems that can be mapped onto dense graphs is presented. The approach is based on message passing where messages are averaged over a large number of replicated variable systems exposed to the same evidential nodes. An assumption about the symmetry of the solutions is required for carrying out the averages; here we extend the previous derivation based on a replica-symmetric- (RS)-like structure to include a more complex one-step replica-symmetry-breaking-like (1RSB-like) ansatz. To demonstrate the potential of the approach it is employed for studying critical properties of the Ising linear perceptron and for multiuser detection in code division multiple access (CDMA) under different noise models. Results obtained under the RS assumption in the noncritical regime give rise to a highly efficient signal detection algorithm in the context of CDMA; while in the critical regime one observes a first-order transition line that ends in a continuous phase transition point. Finite size effects are also observed. While the 1RSB ansatz is not required for the original problems, it was applied to the CDMA signal detection problem with a more complex noise model that exhibits RSB behavior, resulting in an improvement in performance.

  18. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing

    SciTech Connect

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N. Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-10-24

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. In this paper, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy (kBT) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. Finally, we show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa.

  19. Droplet formation and scaling in dense suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2012-01-01

    When a dense suspension is squeezed from a nozzle, droplet detachment can occur similar to that of pure liquids. While in pure liquids the process of droplet detachment is well characterized through self-similar profiles and known scaling laws, we show here the simple presence of particles causes suspensions to break up in a new fashion. Using high-speed imaging, we find that detachment of a suspension drop is described by a power law; specifically we find the neck minimum radius, rm, scales like near breakup at time τ = 0. We demonstrate data collapse in a variety of particle/liquid combinations, packing fractions, solvent viscosities, and initial conditions. We argue that this scaling is a consequence of particles deforming the neck surface, thereby creating a pressure that is balanced by inertia, and show how it emerges from topological constraints that relate particle configurations with macroscopic Gaussian curvature. This new type of scaling, uniquely enforced by geometry and regulated by the particles, displays memory of its initial conditions, fails to be self-similar, and has implications for the pressure given at generic suspension interfaces. PMID:22392979

  20. Activated Dynamics in Dense Model Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijie; Schweizer, Kenneth

    The nonlinear Langevin equation approach is applied to investigate the ensemble-averaged activated dynamics of small molecule liquids (or disconnected segments in a polymer melt) in dense nanocomposites under model isobaric conditions where the spherical nanoparticles are dynamically fixed. Fully thermalized and quenched-replica integral equation theory methods are employed to investigate the influence on matrix dynamics of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium nanocomposite structure, respectively. In equilibrium, the miscibility window can be narrow due to depletion and bridging attraction induced phase separation which limits the study of activated dynamics to regimes where the barriers are relatively low. In contrast, by using replica integral equation theory, macroscopic demixing is suppressed, and the addition of nanoparticles can induce much slower activated matrix dynamics which can be studied over a wide range of pure liquid alpha relaxation times, interfacial attraction strengths and ranges, particle sizes and loadings, and mixture microstructures. Numerical results for the mean activated relaxation time, transient localization length, matrix elasticity and kinetic vitrification in the nanocomposite will be presented.

  1. Beneficiation of natural aggregates by polymer impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Fontana, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    The use of polymer impregnation as a means of upgrading natural aggregates has been investigated. The effect of polymer impregnation on the physical and mechanical properties was evaluated in a series of tests performed using four aggregates of varying quality. The strength of concrete cast with polymer impregnated coarse aggregate was also tested. Two monomer systems were used in the investigation; a methyl methacrylate-based system and a styrene-based system. In general, significant improvements in the physical and mechanical properties of each of the four aggregates resulted from polymer impregnation. The strength of concrete cast with impregnated aggregates varied, being increased in some cases and decreased in others.

  2. [Lysophosphatidic acid and human erythrocyte aggregation].

    PubMed

    Sheremet'ev, Iu A; Popovicheva, A N; Levin, G Ia

    2014-01-01

    The effects of lysophosphatidic acid on the morphology and aggregation of human erythrocytes has been studied. Morphology of erythrocytes and their aggregates were studied by light microscopy. It has been shown that lysophosphatidic acid changes the shape of red blood cells: diskocyte become echinocytes. Aggregation of red blood cells (rouleaux) was significantly reduced in autoplasma. At the same time there is a strong aggregation of echinocytes. This was accompanied by the formation of microvesicles. Adding normal plasma to echinocytes restores shape and aggregation of red blood cells consisting of "rouleaux". A possible mechanism of action of lysophosphatidic acid on erythrocytes is discussed.

  3. [AGGREGATION OF METABOLICALLY DEPLETED HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES].

    PubMed

    Sheremet'ev, Yu A; Popovicheva, A N; Rogozin, M M; Levin, G Ya

    2016-01-01

    An aggregation of erythrocytes in autologous plasma after blood storage for 14 days at 4 °C was studied using photometry and light microscopy. The decrease of ATP content, the formation of echinocytes and spheroechinocytes, the decrease of rouleaux form of erythrocyte aggregation were observed during the storage. On the other hand the aggregates of echinocytes were formed in the stored blood. The addition of plasma from the fresh blood didn't restore the normal discocytic shape and aggregation of erythrocytes in the stored blood. The possible mechanisms of erythrocytes and echinocytes aggregation are discussed.

  4. Five Obstacles to Grading Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Educators seeking to reform grading must combat five long-held traditions that stand as formidable obstacles to change: (1) Grades should provide the basis for differentiating students; (2) grade distributions should resemble a bell-shaped curve; (3) grades should be based on students' standing among classmates; (4) poor grades prompt students to…

  5. Paperless Grades and Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, James C.; Jones, Dennis; Turner, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Provides overview of process of switching from paper-based grade reporting to computer-based grading. Authors found that paperless grading decreased number of errors, made student access more immediate, and reduced costs incurred by purchasing and storing grade-scanning sheets. Authors also argue that direct entry grading encourages faculty to…

  6. Five Obstacles to Grading Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Educators seeking to reform grading must combat five long-held traditions that stand as formidable obstacles to change: (1) Grades should provide the basis for differentiating students; (2) grade distributions should resemble a bell-shaped curve; (3) grades should be based on students' standing among classmates; (4) poor grades prompt students to…

  7. View of Highway 120 at Priest Grade. Old Priest Grade ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Highway 120 at Priest Grade. Old Priest Grade seen at left distance. New Priest Grade at center and right distance. Looking west - Big Oak Flat Road, Between Big Oak Flat Entrance & Merced River, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  8. Erythrocyte aggregation: basic aspects and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregate to form two- and three-dimensional structures when suspended in aqueous solutions containing large plasma proteins or polymers; this aggregation is reversible and shear dependent (i.e., dispersed at high shear and reformed at low or stasis). The extent of aggregation is the main determinant of low shear blood viscosity, thus predicting an inverse relationship between aggregation and in vivo blood flow. However, the effects of aggregation on hemodynamic mechanisms (e.g., plasma skimming, Fåhraeus Effect, microvascular hematocrit) may promote rather than impede vascular blood flow. The impact of enhanced RBC aggregation on endothelial function and hemostatic mechanisms adds further complexity, thereby requiring specific attention to the nature, extent and time course of aggregation when considering its overall influence on tissue perfusion. A detailed understanding of aggregation effects is important from a clinical point of view since it may be enhanced during a variety of pathophysiological processes, including infections, circulatory and metabolic disorders, hematological pathologies and several other disease states. Altered RBC aggregation may be an indicator of disease as well as a factor affecting the course of the clinical condition; the prognostic value of RBC aggregation indices has been demonstrated in various diseases. Currently, RBC aggregation is an easily and accurately measurable parameter, and therefore may be expected to have broader clinical usage in the future.

  9. Impaired dense core vesicle maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans mutants lacking Rab2.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stacey L; Charlie, Nicole K; Richmond, Janet E; Hegermann, Jan; Eimer, Stefan; Miller, Kenneth G

    2009-09-21

    Despite a key role for dense core vesicles (DCVs) in neuronal function, there are major gaps in our understanding of DCV biogenesis. A genetic screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants with behavioral defects consistent with impaired DCV function yielded five mutations in UNC-108 (Rab2). A genetic analysis showed that unc-108 mutations impair a DCV function unrelated to neuropeptide release that, together with neuropeptide release, fully accounts for the role of DCVs in locomotion. An electron microscopy analysis of DCVs in unc-108 mutants, coupled with quantitative imaging of DCV cargo proteins, revealed that Rab2 acts in cell somas during DCV maturation to prevent the loss of soluble and membrane cargo. In Rab2 null mutants, two thirds of these cargoes move to early endosomes via a PI(3)P-dependent trafficking pathway, whereas aggregated neuropeptides are unaffected. These results reveal how neurons solve a challenging trafficking problem using the most highly conserved animal Rab.

  10. Complex patterns arise through spontaneous symmetry breaking in dense homogeneous networks of neural oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajeev; Menon, Shakti N.; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2016-02-01

    There has been much interest in understanding collective dynamics in networks of brain regions due to their role in behavior and cognitive function. Here we show that a simple, homogeneous system of densely connected oscillators, representing the aggregate activity of local brain regions, can exhibit a rich variety of dynamical patterns emerging via spontaneous breaking of permutation or translational symmetries. Upon removing just a few connections, we observe a striking departure from the mean-field limit in terms of the collective dynamics, which implies that the sparsity of these networks may have very important consequences. Our results suggest that the origins of some of the complicated activity patterns seen in the brain may be understood even with simple connection topologies.

  11. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  12. Heating of Porous Icy Dust Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2017-06-01

    At the beginning of planetary formation, highly porous dust aggregates are formed through coagulation of dust grains. Outside the snowline, the main component of an aggregate is H2O ice. Because H2O ice is formed in amorphous form, its thermal conductivity is extremely small. Therefore, the thermal conductivity of an icy dust aggregate is low. There is a possibility of heating inside an aggregate owing to the decay of radionuclides. It is shown that the temperature increases substantially inside an aggregate, leading to crystallization of amorphous ice. During the crystallization, the temperature further increases sufficiently to continue sintering. The mechanical properties of icy dust aggregates change, and the collisional evolution of dust aggregates is affected by the sintering.

  13. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  14. Protein aggregation: From background to inhibition strategies.

    PubMed

    Alam, Parvez; Siddiqi, Khursheed; Chturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-10-01

    The aggregation of specific proteins is hypothesized to cause several pathological conditions, which are collectively known as amyloid disorders. The aggregation of peptides and proteins is mainly associated with the perturbation of cellular function, ageing and various human disorders. Mounting evidence suggests that protein aggregation is often caused by mutation, environmental stress or the cellular response to an imbalanced protein homeostasis. This review summarizes the background information on the protein folding, misfolding, cellular strategies against protein aggregation, factors affecting protein aggregation and mechanism of protein aggregation. We then focus on various inhibitors for protein aggregation both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude with a perspective that better therapeutics could be developed by using cocktail of small molecule inhibitors for the treatment of amyloid diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of dense direct-seeded stands of southern pines

    Treesearch

    J.C.G. Goelz

    2006-01-01

    Direct seeding of southern pines is an effective method of artificial regeneration, producing extremely dense stands when survival exceeds expectations. Long-term studies of dense direct-seeded stands provide ideal data for exploring development of stands as they approach the limit of maximum stand density. I present data from seven studies with ages of stands ranging...

  16. The chemistry of phosphorus in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that the ion-molecule chemistry of phosphorus is significantly different from that of nitrogen in dense interstellar clouds. The PH3 molecule is not readily formed by gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions in these regions. Laboratory results used in a simple kinetic model indicate that the most abundant molecule containing phosphorus in dense clouds is PO.

  17. Mining connected global and local dense subgraphs for bigdata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Shen, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The problem of discovering connected dense subgraphs of natural graphs is important in data analysis. Discovering dense subgraphs that do not contain denser subgraphs or are not contained in denser subgraphs (called significant dense subgraphs) is also critical for wide-ranging applications. In spite of many works on discovering dense subgraphs, there are no algorithms that can guarantee the connectivity of the returned subgraphs or discover significant dense subgraphs. Hence, in this paper, we define two subgraph discovery problems to discover connected and significant dense subgraphs, propose polynomial-time algorithms and theoretically prove their validity. We also propose an algorithm to further improve the time and space efficiency of our basic algorithm for discovering significant dense subgraphs in big data by taking advantage of the unique features of large natural graphs. In the experiments, we use massive natural graphs to evaluate our algorithms in comparison with previous algorithms. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our algorithms for the two problems and their efficiency. This work is also the first that reveals the physical significance of significant dense subgraphs in natural graphs from different domains.

  18. The chemistry of phosphorus in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that the ion-molecule chemistry of phosphorus is significantly different from that of nitrogen in dense interstellar clouds. The PH3 molecule is not readily formed by gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions in these regions. Laboratory results used in a simple kinetic model indicate that the most abundant molecule containing phosphorus in dense clouds is PO.

  19. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  20. Grading for Understanding - Standards-Based Grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Standards-based grading (SBG), sometimes called learning objectives-based assessment (LOBA), is an assessment model that relies on students demonstrating mastery of learning objectives (sometimes referred to as standards). The goal of this grading system is to focus students on mastering learning objectives rather than on accumulating points. I have used SBG in an introductory physics course for the past five years and worked with several physics faculty members to implement SBG in the first and second semester of algebra-based and calculus-based introductory physics courses at a primarily undergraduate comprehensive public university with class sizes of 48 students. In this article I will discuss methods for implementing SBG in a physics class.

  1. Aggregation Kinetics of Interrupted Polyglutamine Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert H.; Murphy, Regina M.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormally expanded polyglutamine domains are associated with at least nine neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. Expansion of the glutamine region facilitates aggregation of the impacted protein, and aggregation has been linked to neurotoxicity. Studies of synthetic peptides have contributed substantially to our understanding of the mechanism of aggregation, because the underlying biophysics of polyglutamine-mediated association can be probed independent of their context within a larger protein. In this report, interrupting residues were inserted into polyglutamine peptides (Q20), and the impact on conformational and aggregation properties was examined. A peptide with 2 alanine residues formed laterally-aligned fibrillar aggregates which were similar to the uninterrupted Q20 peptide. Insertion of 2 proline residues resulted in soluble, nonfibrillar aggregates, which did not mature into insoluble aggregates. In contrast, insertion of a β-turn template DPG rapidly accelerated aggregation and resulted in a fibrillar aggregate morphology with little lateral alignment between fibrils. These results are interpreted to indicate that (a) long-range nonspecific interactions lead to the formation of soluble oligomers, while maturation of oligomers into fibrils requires conformational conversion, and (b) that soluble oligomers dynamically interact with each other, while insoluble aggregates are relatively inert. Kinetic analysis revealed that the increase in aggregation caused by the DPG insert is inconsistent with the nucleation-elongation mechanism of aggregation featuring a monomeric β-sheet nucleus. Rather, the data support a mechanism of polyglutamine aggregation by which monomers associate into soluble oligomers, which then undergo slow structural rearrangement to form sedimentable aggregates. PMID:21821045

  2. Band 3 and glycophorin are progressively aggregated in density-fractionated sickle and normal red blood cells. Evidence from rotational and lateral mobility studies.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, J D; Golan, D E

    1993-01-01

    Band 3 aggregation in the plane of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane is postulated to be important in the pathophysiology of hemolysis of dense sickle and normal RBCs. We used the fluorescence photobleaching recovery and polarized fluorescence depletion techniques to measure the lateral and rotational mobility of band 3, glycophorins, and phospholipid analogues in membranes of density-separated intact RBCs from seven patients with sickle cell disease and eight normal controls. The fractions of laterally mobile band 3 and glycophorin decreased progressively as sickle RBC density increased. Normal RBCs also showed a progressive decrease in band 3 fractional mobility with increasing buoyant density. Rapidly rotating, slowly rotating, and rotationally immobile forms of band 3 were observed in both sickle and normal RBC membranes. The fraction of rapidly rotating band 3 progressively decreased and the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 progressively increased with increasing sickle RBC density. Changes in the fraction of rotationally immobile band 3 were not reversible upon hypotonic swelling of dense sickle RBCs, and normal RBCs osmotically shrunken in sucrose buffers failed to manifest band 3 immobilization at median cell hemoglobin concentration values characteristic of dense sickle RBCs. We conclude that dense sickle and normal RBCs acquire irreversible membrane abnormalities that cause transmembrane protein immobilization and band 3 aggregation. Band 3 aggregates could serve as cell surface sites of autologous antibody binding and thereby lead to removal of dense sickle and normal (senescent) RBCs from the circulation. PMID:8423219

  3. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2003-03-01

    This project addresses the need for reliable fabrication methods of supported thin/thick dense ceramic membranes for oxygen separation. Some ceramic materials that possess mixed conductivity (electronic and ionic) at high temperature have the potential to permeate oxygen with perfect selectivity, making them very attractive for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. In order to maximize permeation rates at the lowest possible temperatures, it is desirable to minimize diffusional limitations within the ceramic by reducing the thickness of the ceramic membrane, preferably to thicknesses of 10 {micro}m or thinner. It has proven to be very challenging to reliably fabricate dense, defect-free ceramic membrane layers of such thickness. In this project we are investigating the use of ultrafine SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) powders produced by aerosol pyrolysis to fabricate such supported membranes. SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} is a ceramic composition that has been shown to have desirable oxygen permeability, as well as good chemical stability in the reducing environments that are encountered in some important applications. Our approach is to use a doctor blade procedure to deposit pastes prepared from the aerosol-derived SCFO powders onto porous SCFO supports. We have previously shown that membrane layers deposited from the aerosol powders can be sintered to high density without densification of the underlying support. However, these membrane layers contained large-scale cracks and open areas, making them unacceptable for membrane purposes. In the past year, we have refined the paste formulations based on guidance from the ceramic tape casting literature. We have identified a multicomponent organic formulation utilizing castor oil as dispersant in a solvent of mineral spirits and isopropanol. Other additives were polyvinylbutyral as binder and dibutylphthalate as plasticizer. The nonaqueous formulation has superior wetting properties with the powder, and

  4. Variational theory of hot dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair correlation operators. The present approach uses microcanonical ensembles and the variational principle obeyed by the free energy. We show that the correlated states of the microcanonical ensemble at a given temperature T and density r can be orthonormalized preserving their diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. This allows for the minimization of the free energy without corrections from the nonorthogonality of the correlated basis states, similar to that of the ground state energy. Samples of the microcanonical ensemble can be used to study the response, and the neutrino luminosities and opacities of hot matter. We present methods to orthonormalize the correlated states that contribute to the response of hot matter. We apply this variational theory to symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter. This extension generalizes to finite temperatures, the many body technique used in the construction of the zero temperature Akmal-Pandharipande-Ravenhall equation of state. We discuss how the formalism can be used for practical calculations of hot dense matter. Our calculations are a significant improvement over the previous calculation due to Friedman and Pandharipande. The Hamiltonian contains modern realistic two nucleon and three nucleon interactions along with relativistic boost corrections. Expectation values of various operators, including the Hamiltonian, are calculated using cluster expansion and chain summation techniques. The pair correlation operator is now calculated at every density and temperature. Neutral pion condensation along with the associated isovector spin longitudinal sum rule is analyzed. The equation

  5. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  6. Dense surface reconstruction with shadows in MIS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bingxiong; Sun, Yu; Qian, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of internal organ surfaces provides useful information for better control and guidance of the operations of surgical tools for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The current reconstruction techniques using stereo cameras are still challenging due to the difficulties in correspondence matching in MIS, since there is very limited texture but significant specular reflection on organ surfaces. This paper proposes a new approach to overcome the problem by introducing weakly structured light actively casting surgical tool shadows on organ surfaces. The contribution of this paper is twofold: first, we propose a robust approach to extract shadow edges from a sequence of shadowed images; second, we develop a novel field surface interpolation (FSI) approach to obtain an accurate and dense disparity map. Our approach does not rely on texture information and is able to reconstruct accurate 3-D information by exploiting shadows from surgical tools. One advantage is that the point correspondences are directly calculated and no explicit stereo matching is required, which ensures the efficiency of the method. Another advantage is the minimum hardware requirement because only stereo cameras and a separated single-point light source are required. We evaluated the proposed approach using both phantom models and ex vivo images. Based on the experimental results, we achieved the precision of the recovered 3-D surfaces within 0.7 mm for phantom models and 1.2 mm for ex vivo images. The comparison of disparity maps indicates that with the addition of shadows, the proposed method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art stereo algorithms for MIS.

  7. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  8. The chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar and circumstellar clouds incorporating the biogenic elements. Recent results include the identification of a new astronomical carbon-chain molecule, C4Si. This species was detected in the envelope expelled from the evolved star IRC+10216 in observations at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan. C4Si is the carrier of six unidentified lines which had previously been observed. This detection reveals the existence of a new series of carbon-chain molecules, C sub n Si (n equals 1, 2, 4). Such molecules may well be formed from the reaction of Si(+) with acetylene and acetylene derivatives. Other recent research has concentrated on the chemical composition of the cold, dark interstellar clouds, the nearest dense molecular clouds to the solar system. Such regions have very low kinetic temperatures, on the order of 10 K, and are known to be formation sites for solar-type stars. We have recently identified for the first time in such regions the species of H2S, NO, HCOOH (formic acid). The H2S abundance appears to exceed that predicted by gas-phase models of ion-molecule chemistry, perhaps suggesting the importance of synthesis on grain surfaces. Additional observations in dark clouds have studied the ratio of ortho- to para-thioformaldehyde. Since this ratio is expected to be unaffected by both radiative and ordinary collisional processes in the cloud, it may well reflect the formation conditions for this molecule. The ratio is observed to depart from that expected under conditions of chemical equilibrium at formation, perhaps reflecting efficient interchange between cold dust grains in the gas phase.

  9. Graphle: Interactive exploration of large, dense graphs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A wide variety of biological data can be modeled as network structures, including experimental results (e.g. protein-protein interactions), computational predictions (e.g. functional interaction networks), or curated structures (e.g. the Gene Ontology). While several tools exist for visualizing large graphs at a global level or small graphs in detail, previous systems have generally not allowed interactive analysis of dense networks containing thousands of vertices at a level of detail useful for biologists. Investigators often wish to explore specific portions of such networks from a detailed, gene-specific perspective, and balancing this requirement with the networks' large size, complex structure, and rich metadata is a substantial computational challenge. Results Graphle is an online interface to large collections of arbitrary undirected, weighted graphs, each possibly containing tens of thousands of vertices (e.g. genes) and hundreds of millions of edges (e.g. interactions). These are stored on a centralized server and accessed efficiently through an interactive Java applet. The Graphle applet allows a user to examine specific portions of a graph, retrieving the relevant neighborhood around a set of query vertices (genes). This neighborhood can then be refined and modified interactively, and the results can be saved either as publication-quality images or as raw data for further analysis. The Graphle web site currently includes several hundred biological networks representing predicted functional relationships from three heterogeneous data integration systems: S. cerevisiae data from bioPIXIE, E. coli data using MEFIT, and H. sapiens data from HEFalMp. Conclusions Graphle serves as a search and visualization engine for biological networks, which can be managed locally (simplifying collaborative data sharing) and investigated remotely. The Graphle framework is freely downloadable and easily installed on new servers, allowing any lab to quickly set up

  10. A note on the use of Quin2 in studying shear-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, T D; Hellums, J D

    1986-02-01

    Quin2, a calcium ion chelator which can penetrate plasma membranes, was used to study the role of intracellular calcium ion concentration in mediating shear-induced platelet activation. Washed platelet suspensions were subjected to various levels of uniform, known shear stress in a cone and plate viscometer in the absence of added agonists. Additional samples were aggregated in response to chemical platelet agonists in a conventional aggregometer. The aggregometer response of Quin2-containing platelets to collagen, thrombin and ADP exhibited increased lag time and reduced maximum rate of aggregation in comparison to controls. However, the extent of aggregation of the Quin2-containing platelets eventually reached the same level as that of the controls. Very different results were obtained for aggregation by shear stress in the viscometer. Shear-induced aggregation was significantly suppressed by Quin2 treatment at both short (30 seconds) and long (300 seconds) times of exposure to the shear field. Shear-induced dense granular release and cellular lysis were unaltered by Quin2 treatment at 30 second exposure times, but both were significantly increased by Quin2 treatment at 300 second exposure times. These results suggest that intracellular calcium ion mobilization is an important early step in shear-induced platelet activation. Additionally, Quin2 appears to have effects resulting in increased platelet fragility. Thus, the findings raise questions on the suitability of Quin2 as an intracellular calcium ion probe in studies in shear fields.

  11. Molecular morphology and toxicity of cytoplasmic prion protein aggregates in neuronal and non-neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Catherine; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Volkov, Leonid; Roucou, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that accumulation of prion protein (PrP) in the cytoplasm results in the production of aggregates that are insoluble in non-ionic detergents and partially resistant to proteinase K. Transgenic mice expressing PrP in the cytoplasm develop severe ataxia with cerebellar degeneration and gliosis, suggesting that cytoplasmic PrP may play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The mechanism of cytoplasmic PrP neurotoxicity is not known. In this report, we determined the molecular morphology of cytoplasmic PrP aggregates by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Transient expression of cytoplasmic PrP produced juxtanuclear aggregates reminiscent of aggresomes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human neuroblastoma BE(2)-M17 cells and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Time course studies revealed that discrete aggregates form first throughout the cytoplasm, and then coalesce to form an aggresome. Aggresomes containing cytoplasmic PrP were 1–5-μm inclusion bodies and were filled with electron-dense particles. Cytoplasmic PrP aggregates induced mitochondrial clustering, reorganization of intermediate filaments, prevented the secretion of wild-type PrP molecules and diverted these molecules to the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic PrP decreased the viability of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. We conclude that any event leading to accumulation of PrP in the cytoplasm is likely to result in cell death. PMID:16696854

  12. Self-assembly of high molecular weight polypeptide copolymers studied via diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Weil, Tanja

    2014-01-13

    The assembly of high molecular weight polypeptides into complex architectures exhibiting structural complexity ranging from the nano- to the mesoscale is of fundamental importance for various protein-related diseases but also hold great promise for various nano- and biotechnological applications. Here, the aggregation of partially unfolded high molecular weight polypeptides into multiscale fractal structures is investigated by means of diffusion limited aggregation and atomic force microscopy. The zeta potential, the hydrodynamic radius, and the obtained fractal morphologies were correlated with the conformation of the polypeptide backbones as obtained from circular dichroism measurements. The polypeptides are modified with polyethylene oxide side chains to stabilize the polypeptides and to normalize intermolecular interactions. The modification with the hydrophobic thioctic acid alters the folding of the polypeptide backbone, resulting in a change in solution aggregation and fractal morphology. We found that a more compact folding results in dense and highly branched structures, whereas a less compact folded polypeptide chain yields a more directional assembly. Our results provide first evidence for the role of compactness of polypeptide folding on aggregation. Furthermore, the mesoscale-structured biofilms were used to achieve a hierarchical protein assembly, which is demonstrated by deposition of Rhodamine-labeled HSA with the preassembled fractal structures. These results contribute important insights to the fundamental understanding of the aggregation of high molecular weight polypeptides in general and provide opportunities to study nanostructure-related effects on biological systems such as adhesion, proliferation, and the development of, for example, neuronal cells.

  13. Molecular morphology and toxicity of cytoplasmic prion protein aggregates in neuronal and non-neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Catherine; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Volkov, Leonid; Roucou, Xavier

    2006-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that accumulation of prion protein (PrP) in the cytoplasm results in the production of aggregates that are insoluble in non-ionic detergents and partially resistant to proteinase K. Transgenic mice expressing PrP in the cytoplasm develop severe ataxia with cerebellar degeneration and gliosis, suggesting that cytoplasmic PrP may play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The mechanism of cytoplasmic PrP neurotoxicity is not known. In this report, we determined the molecular morphology of cytoplasmic PrP aggregates by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Transient expression of cytoplasmic PrP produced juxtanuclear aggregates reminiscent of aggresomes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human neuroblastoma BE2-M17 cells and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Time course studies revealed that discrete aggregates form first throughout the cytoplasm, and then coalesce to form an aggresome. Aggresomes containing cytoplasmic PrP were 1-5-microm inclusion bodies and were filled with electron-dense particles. Cytoplasmic PrP aggregates induced mitochondrial clustering, reorganization of intermediate filaments, prevented the secretion of wild-type PrP molecules and diverted these molecules to the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic PrP decreased the viability of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. We conclude that any event leading to accumulation of PrP in the cytoplasm is likely to result in cell death.

  14. Soft electrostatic repulsion in particle monolayers at liquid interfaces: surface pressure and effect of aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Danov, Krassimir D.; Petkov, Plamen V.

    2016-01-01

    Non-densely packed interfacial monolayers from charged micrometre-sized colloid particles find applications for producing micropatterned surfaces. The soft electrostatic repulsion between the particles in a monolayer on an air/water (or oil/water) interface is mediated by the non-polar fluid, where Debye screening is absent and the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters. Surface pressure versus area isotherms were measured at the air/water interface. The experiments show that asymptotically the surface pressure is inversely proportional to the third power of the interparticle distance. A theoretical model is developed that predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole surface pressure versus area dependence. An increase in the surface pressure upon aggregation of charged particles in the interfacial monolayers is experimentally established. This effect is explained by the developed theoretical model, which predicts that the surface pressure should linearly increase with the square root of the particle mean aggregation number. The effect of added electrolyte on the aggregation is also investigated. The data lead to the conclusion that ‘limited aggregation’ exists in the monolayers of charged particles. In brief, the stronger electrostatic repulsion between the bigger aggregates leads to a higher barrier to their coalescence that, in turn, prevents any further aggregation, i.e. negative feedback is present. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298437

  15. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  16. Characterization of a liver organoid tissue composed of hepatocytes and fibroblasts in dense collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Miho; Adachi, Eijiro; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2013-11-01

    The adult liver is wrapped in a connective tissue sheet called the liver capsule, which consists of collagen fibrils and fibroblasts. In this study, we set out to construct a liver organoid tissue that would be comparable to the endogenous liver, using a bioreactor. In vitro liver organoid tissue was generated by combining collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and primary murine hepatocytes or Hep G2 on a mesh of poly-lactic acid fabric using a bioreactor. Then, the suitability of this liver organoid tissue for transplantation was tested by implanting the constructs into partially hepatectomized BALB/cA-nu/nu mice. As determined by using scanning and transmission electron microscopes, the liver organoid tissues were composed of densely packed collagen fibrils with fibroblasts and aggregates of oval or spherical hepatocytes. Angiogenesis was induced after the transplantation, and blood vessels connected the liver organoid tissue with the surrounding tissue. Thus, a novel approach was applied to generate transplantable liver organoid tissue within a condensed collagen fibril matrix. These results suggested that a dense collagen network populated with fibroblasts can hold a layer of concentrated hepatocytes, providing a three-dimensional microenvrionment suitable for the reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, and resulting in the maintenance of their liver-specific functions. This liver organoid tissue may be useful for the study of intrahepatic functions of various cells, cytokines, and ECMs, and may fulfill the fundamental requirements of a donor tissue.

  17. Interaction Between the Supercontinent Cycle and the Evolution of Intrinsically Dense Provinces in the Deep Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, J. P.; Trim, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Shear-wave travel times in the Earth's deep mantle reveal broad steep-sided seismologically distinct provinces lying on the Core-Mantle Boundary (CMB). The longevity and permanence of the two large principal provinces, located below the sites of present-day Africa and the Pacific Ocean, have become a matter of great interest. Examination of the flood basalt record and kimberlite eruption dating suggests the presence of these provinces may disclose a deep mantle component with a compositionally distinct origin playing a role in the generation of mantle plumes at preferred locations. By extension, the presence of these provinces may affect the supercontinent cycle. Implementing a mantle convection model featuring distinct continental lithosphere and a Compositionally Anomalous and Intrinsically Dense (CAID) component, we study the distribution and mobility of naturally forming compositionally distinct provinces and their impact on model supercontinent assembly. In calculations featuring Earth-like convective vigor and global scale we find that an intrinsically dense mantle component generally aggregates into one or two broad provinces. The positions of the provinces are time-dependent but in many of our calculations the province locations are characterized by periods of fixity that reach several hundred million years. Eras of province and associated plume fixity are punctuated by periods of relatively rapid migration. A correlation between supercontinent position and the locations of CAID provinces is not supported by our findings. However, we find the frequency of supercontinent assemblies increases when CAID provinces are present.

  18. Whale sharks target dense prey patches of sergestid shrimp off Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Rohner, Christoph A; Armstrong, Amelia J; Pierce, Simon J; Prebble, Clare E M; Cagua, E Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E M; Berumen, Michael L; Richardson, Anthony J

    2015-03-01

    Large planktivores require high-density prey patches to make feeding energetically viable. This is a major challenge for species living in tropical and subtropical seas, such as whale sharks Rhincodon typus. Here, we characterize zooplankton biomass, size structure and taxonomic composition from whale shark feeding events and background samples at Mafia Island, Tanzania. The majority of whale sharks were feeding (73%, 380 of 524 observations), with the most common behaviour being active surface feeding (87%). We used 20 samples collected from immediately adjacent to feeding sharks and an additional 202 background samples for comparison to show that plankton biomass was ∼10 times higher in patches where whale sharks were feeding (25 vs. 2.6 mg m(-3)). Taxonomic analyses of samples showed that the large sergestid Lucifer hanseni (∼10 mm) dominated while sharks were feeding, accounting for ∼50% of identified items, while copepods (<2 mm) dominated background samples. The size structure was skewed towards larger animals representative of L.hanseni in feeding samples. Thus, whale sharks at Mafia Island target patches of dense, large, zooplankton dominated by sergestids. Large planktivores, such as whale sharks, which generally inhabit warm oligotrophic waters, aggregate in areas where they can feed on dense prey to obtain sufficient energy.

  19. Whale sharks target dense prey patches of sergestid shrimp off Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Rohner, Christoph A.; Armstrong, Amelia J.; Pierce, Simon J.; Prebble, Clare E. M.; Cagua, E. Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E. M.; Berumen, Michael L.; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Large planktivores require high-density prey patches to make feeding energetically viable. This is a major challenge for species living in tropical and subtropical seas, such as whale sharks Rhincodon typus. Here, we characterize zooplankton biomass, size structure and taxonomic composition from whale shark feeding events and background samples at Mafia Island, Tanzania. The majority of whale sharks were feeding (73%, 380 of 524 observations), with the most common behaviour being active surface feeding (87%). We used 20 samples collected from immediately adjacent to feeding sharks and an additional 202 background samples for comparison to show that plankton biomass was ∼10 times higher in patches where whale sharks were feeding (25 vs. 2.6 mg m−3). Taxonomic analyses of samples showed that the large sergestid Lucifer hanseni (∼10 mm) dominated while sharks were feeding, accounting for ∼50% of identified items, while copepods (<2 mm) dominated background samples. The size structure was skewed towards larger animals representative of L.hanseni in feeding samples. Thus, whale sharks at Mafia Island target patches of dense, large, zooplankton dominated by sergestids. Large planktivores, such as whale sharks, which generally inhabit warm oligotrophic waters, aggregate in areas where they can feed on dense prey to obtain sufficient energy. PMID:25814777

  20. Pro-hormone secretogranin II regulates dense core secretory granule biogenesis in catecholaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Courel, Maïté; Soler-Jover, Alex; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Mahata, Sushil K; Elias, Salah; Montero-Hadjadje, Maïté; Anouar, Youssef; Giuly, Richard J; O'Connor, Daniel T; Taupenot, Laurent

    2010-03-26

    Processes underlying the formation of dense core secretory granules (DCGs) of neuroendocrine cells are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that DCG biogenesis is dependent on the secretory protein secretogranin (Sg) II, a member of the granin family of pro-hormone cargo of DCGs in neuroendocrine cells. Depletion of SgII expression in PC12 cells leads to a decrease in both the number and size of DCGs and impairs DCG trafficking of other regulated hormones. Expression of SgII fusion proteins in a secretory-deficient PC12 variant rescues a regulated secretory pathway. SgII-containing dense core vesicles share morphological and physical properties with bona fide DCGs, are competent for regulated exocytosis, and maintain an acidic luminal pH through the V-type H(+)-translocating ATPase. The granulogenic activity of SgII requires a pH gradient along this secretory pathway. We conclude that SgII is a critical factor for the regulation of DCG biogenesis in neuroendocrine cells, mediating the formation of functional DCGs via its pH-dependent aggregation at the trans-Golgi network.

  1. Pro-hormone Secretogranin II Regulates Dense Core Secretory Granule Biogenesis in Catecholaminergic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Courel, Maïté; Soler-Jover, Alex; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Elias, Salah; Montero-Hadjadje, Maïté; Anouar, Youssef; Giuly, Richard J.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Taupenot, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Processes underlying the formation of dense core secretory granules (DCGs) of neuroendocrine cells are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that DCG biogenesis is dependent on the secretory protein secretogranin (Sg) II, a member of the granin family of pro-hormone cargo of DCGs in neuroendocrine cells. Depletion of SgII expression in PC12 cells leads to a decrease in both the number and size of DCGs and impairs DCG trafficking of other regulated hormones. Expression of SgII fusion proteins in a secretory-deficient PC12 variant rescues a regulated secretory pathway. SgII-containing dense core vesicles share morphological and physical properties with bona fide DCGs, are competent for regulated exocytosis, and maintain an acidic luminal pH through the V-type H+-translocating ATPase. The granulogenic activity of SgII requires a pH gradient along this secretory pathway. We conclude that SgII is a critical factor for the regulation of DCG biogenesis in neuroendocrine cells, mediating the formation of functional DCGs via its pH-dependent aggregation at the trans-Golgi network. PMID:20061385

  2. New Class of Cargo Protein in Tetrahymena thermophila Dense Core Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Alex; Bowman, Grant R.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.

    2002-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis of dense core secretory granules releases biologically active proteins in a stimulus-dependent fashion. The packaging of the cargo within newly forming granules involves a transition: soluble polypeptides condense to form water-insoluble aggregates that constitute the granule cores. Following exocytosis, the cores generally disassemble to diffuse in the cell environment. The ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia have been advanced as genetically manipulatable systems for studying exocytosis via dense core granules. However, all of the known granule proteins in these organisms condense to form the architectural units of lattices that are insoluble both before and after exocytosis. Using an approach designed to detect new granule proteins, we have now identified Igr1p (induced during granule regeneration). By structural criteria, it is unrelated to the previously characterized lattice-forming proteins. It is distinct in that it is capable of dissociating from the insoluble lattice following secretion and therefore represents the first diffusible protein identified in ciliate granules. PMID:12456006

  3. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new unsteady, cavitation model is presented wherein the phase change process (bubble growth/collapse) is coupled to the acoustic field in a cryogenic fluid. It predicts the number density and radius of bubbles in vapor clouds by tracking both the aggregate surface area and volume fraction of the cloud. Hence, formulations for the dynamics of individual bubbles (e.g. Rayleigh-Plesset equation) may be integrated within the macroscopic context of a dense vapor cloud i.e. a cloud that occupies a significant fraction of available volume and contains numerous bubbles. This formulation has been implemented within the CRUNCH CFD, which has a compressible real fluid formulation, a multi-element, unstructured grid framework, and has been validated extensively for liquid rocket turbopump inducers. Detailed unsteady simulations of a cavitating ogive in liquid nitrogen are presented where time-averaged mean cavity pressure and temperature depressions due to cavitation are compared with experimental data. The model also provides the spatial and temporal history of the bubble size distribution in the vapor clouds that are shed, an important physical parameter that is difficult to measure experimentally and is a significant advancement in the modeling of dense cloud cavitation.

  4. Assigning Grades More Fairly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheshier, Stephen R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a simplified method for converting raw scores to standard scores and transforming them to "T-scores" for easy comparison of performance. Obtaining letter grades from T-scores is discussed. A reading list is included. (GH)

  5. Gleason grading system

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Prostatic Neoplasia. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 11th ... nih.gov/pubmed/26956509 . Pierorazio PM, Walsh PC, Partin AW, Epstein JI. Prognostic Gleason grade grouping: data ...

  6. Investigating the mechanisms leading to protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Ruth; McManus, Jennifer J.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of protein aggregates is a feature of several diseases and is a problem during the manufacture of biopharmaceutical and protein based food products. During processing, stability may become compromised leading to the condensation of proteins to form non-native aggregates. The aim of this work is to induce aggregation on model proteins by the imposition of a particular stress to evaluate the extent of aggregation and to assess the degree of structural change to the protein. Aggregation of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin has been induced by several mechanisms. Using various techniques (electrophoresis, HPLC, spectroscopic analysis, and microscopic techniques) both the level of aggregation extent of protein unfolding has been investigated for a range of solution conditions. Our results show that the amount of aggregation depends strongly on the mechanism by which non-native aggregation proceeds, and within each mechanism, solution conditions are an important factor. With the exception of aggregation by self-association (which is concentration dependent), the appearance of aggregation is driven by structural changes induced by the applied stress (heat, chemical denaturant, oxidation or contact with a surface). Author would like to acknowledge support from Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), National University of Maynooth John and Pat Hume Scholarship.

  7. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study ofmore » aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.« less

  8. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study of aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.

  9. Pyridine Aggregation in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Pablo; Poerschke, Torsten; Habig, Daniel; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina

    2012-06-01

    Pyridine crystals show the unusual property of isotopic polymorphism. Experimentally it has been observed that deuterated pyridine crystals exist in two phases while non-deuterated pyridine does not show a phase transition. Therefore, although isotopic substitution is the smallest possible modification of a molecule it greatly affects the stability of pyridine crystals. A possible experimental approach in order to understand this striking effect might be the study of pyridine aggregation for small clusters. By embedding the clusters in helium nanodroplets the aggregates can be stabilized and studied by means of Infrared Depletion Spectroscopy. Pyridine oligomers were investigated in the C-H asymmetric vibration region (2980-3100 cm-1) using this experimental technique. The number of molecules for the clusters responsibles for each band were determined by means of pick-up curves as well as mass sensitive depletion spectra. Furthermore, the intensity dependence of the different bands on applying a dc electric field was studied. The assignment of the different structures for pyridine clusters on the basis of these measurements were also carried out. S. Crawford et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 48, 755 (2009).

  10. Asphaltene aggregation in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyeongseok; Ring, Terry A; Deo, Milind D

    2004-03-01

    Asphaltenic solids formed in the Rangely field in the course of a carbon dioxide flood and heptane insolubles in the oil from the same field were used in this study. Four different solvents were used to dissolve the asphaltenes. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the onset of asphaltene precipitation by heptane titration. When the onset values were plotted versus asphaltene concentrations, distinct break points (called critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) in this paper) were observed. CACs for the field asphaltenes dissolved in toluene, trichloroethylene, tetrahydrofuran, and pyridine occurred at concentrations of 3.0, 3.7, 5.0, and 8.2 g/l, respectively. CACs are observed at similar concentrations as critical micelle concentrations (CMC) for the asphaltenes in the solvents employed and can be interpreted to be the points at which rates of asphaltene aggregations change. CMC values of asphaltenes determined from surface tension measurements (in pyridine and TCE) were slightly higher than the CAC values measured by NIR onset measurements. The CAC for heptane-insoluble asphaltenes in toluene was 3.1 g/l. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental compositions of the two asphaltenes showed that the H/C ratio of the heptane-insoluble asphaltenes was higher and molecular weight (measured by vapor pressure osmometry) was lower.

  11. Sectoral shifts and aggregate unemployment

    SciTech Connect

    Loungani, P.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent research has taken the view that sectoral or industry-specific shocks significantly affect aggregate unemployment by increasing the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required. The empirical evidence for this view rests on the finding that during the 1950s - and again during the 1970s - there was a positive correlation between aggregate unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth rates. This thesis demonstrates that this correlation arises largely because oil price shocks affect both unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth. Once the dispersion due to oil shocks is accounted for, the residual dispersion in employment has very low explanatory power for unemployment. Since the dispersion index does not measure pure sectoral shifts, an alternate measure of dispersion is developed that serves as a better proxy for the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required each period. Estimates using this measure suggest that, during the 1950s, temporary increases in the relative price of oil were responsible for generating the observed correlation. On the other hand, sectoral shifts were important during the 1970s; in particular, the 1973 oil price increase has had significant reallocative effects on the economy. This contention is subjected to further tests by looking at the time-series behavior of employment in durable-goods industries and also by following the inter-industry movements of workers over time through the use of panel data.

  12. Does thermophoresis reduce aggregate stability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Eyal; Sarah, Pariente

    2017-04-01

    Thermophoresis is mass flow driven by a thermal gradient. As a result of Seebeck effect and Soret effect, colloids can move from the hot to the cold region or vice versa, depending on the electrolyte composition and on the particle size. This migration of colloids can weaken aggregates. The effect of raindrop temperatures on runoff generation and erosion on clayey soil was investigated in sprinkling experiments with a laboratory rotating disk rain simulator. The experiments were applied to Rhodoxeralt (Terra Rossa) soil with two pre-prepared moisture contents: hygroscopic and field capacity. For each moisture content three rainfall temperatures were applied: 2, 20, and 35°C. Erosion was generally lower in the pre-wetted soil than in the dry soil (12.5 and 24.4 g m-2 per 40 mm of rain,respectively). Whereas there was no significant effect of raindrop temperature on the dry soil the soil that was pre-moistened to field capacity was affected by rainwater temperature: runoff and erosion were high when the temperature difference between rainfall and soil surface was high, sediment yields were 13.9, 5.2, and 18.3 g m-2 per 40 mm of rain, for rain temperature of 2, 20, and 35 °C, respectively. It is reasonable to conclude that thermophoresis caused by thermal gradients within the soil solution reduces the stability of aggregates and then increase the soil losses.

  13. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  14. Stabilized fiber-reinforced pavement base course with recycled aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhan, Khaled

    's assumptions for rigid pavements), which has been found to explain reasonably well the field behavior of unreinforced and fiber-reinforced concrete slabs on grade. Finally, a preliminary cost analysis demonstrated that the use of stabilized recycled aggregate instead of a standard crushed stone base course can result in a meaningful economic savings.

  15. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Marielle; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc; Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Bontems, Sébastien; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  16. Strategies for identifying statistically significant dense regions in microarray data.

    PubMed

    Yip, Andy M; Ng, Michael K; Wu, Edmond H; Chan, Tony F

    2007-01-01

    We propose and study the notion of dense regions for the analysis of categorized gene expression data and present some searching algorithms for discovering them. The algorithms can be applied to any categorical data matrices derived from gene expression level matrices. We demonstrate that dense regions are simple but useful and statistically significant patterns that can be used to 1) identify genes and/or samples of interest and 2) eliminate genes and/or samples corresponding to outliers, noise, or abnormalities. Some theoretical studies on the properties of the dense regions are presented which allow us to characterize dense regions into several classes and to derive tailor-made algorithms for different classes of regions. Moreover, an empirical simulation study on the distribution of the size of dense regions is carried out which is then used to assess the significance of dense regions and to derive effective pruning methods to speed up the searching algorithms. Real microarray data sets are employed to test our methods. Comparisons with six other well-known clustering algorithms using synthetic and real data are also conducted which confirm the superiority of our methods in discovering dense regions. The DRIFT code and a tutorial are available as supplemental material, which can be found on the Computer Society Digital Library at http://computer.org/tcbb/archives.htm.

  17. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadhri, Comandur; Pinar, Ali; Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Catalyurek, Umit

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  18. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregates. These materials are commonly used construction materials and frequently can be interchanged with one another. They are widely used throughout the United States, with every State except two producing crushed stone. Together they amount to about half the mining volume in the United States. Approximately 96 percent of sand and gravel and 77 percent of the crushed stone produced in the United States are used in the construction industry. Natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States in a variety of geologic environments. Sand and gravel deposits commonly are the results of the weathering of bedrock and subsequent transportation and deposition of the material by water or ice (glaciers). As such, they commonly occur as river or stream deposits or in glaciated areas as glaciofluvial and other deposits. Crushed stone aggregates are derived from a wide variety of parent bedrock materials. Limestone and other carbonates account for approximately three quarters of the rocks used for crushed stone, with granite and other igneous rocks making up the bulk of the remainder. Limestone deposits are widespread throughout the Central and Eastern United States and are scattered in the West. Granites are widely distributed in the Eastern and Western United States, with few exposures in the Midwest. Igneous rocks (excluding granites) are largely concentrated in the Western United States and in a few isolated localities in the East. Even though natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States, they are not universally available for consumptive use. Some areas are devoid of sand and gravel, and potential sources of crushed stone may be covered with sufficient unconsolidated material to make surface mining impractical. In some areas many aggregates do not meet the physical property requirements for certain uses, or they may contain mineral constituents that react

  19. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2000-06-30

    . This successfully reduced cracking, however the films retained open porosity. The investigation of this concept will be continued in the final year of the project. Investigation of a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method for defect mending in dense membranes was also initiated. An appropriate metal organic precursor (iron tetramethylheptanedionate) was identified whose deposition can be controlled by access to oxygen at temperatures in the 280-300 C range. Initial experiments have deposited iron oxide, but only on the membrane surface; thus refinement of this method will continue.

  20. Measuring Wind Ventilation of Dense Surface Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. A.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Higgins, C. W.; Lehning, M.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Wind ventilation enhances exposure of suspended, canopy-captured and corniced snow to subsaturated air and can significantly increase sublimation rate. Although sublimation rate may be high for highly ventilated snow this snow regime represents a small fraction snow that resides in a basin potentially minimizing its influence on snow mass balance. In contrast, the vast majority of a seasonal snowpack typically resides as poorly ventilated surface snow. The sublimation rate of surface snow is often locally so small as to defy direct measurement but regionally pervasive enough that the integrated mass loss of frozen water across a basin may be significant on a seasonal basis. In a warming climate, sublimation rate increases even in subfreezing conditions because the equilibrium water vapor pressure over ice increases exponentially with temperature. To better understand the process of wintertime surface snow sublimation we need to quantify the depth to which turbulent and topographically driven pressure perturbations effect air exchange within the snowpack. Hypothetically, this active layer depth increases the effective ventilated snow surface area, enhancing sublimation above that given by a plane, impermeable snow surface. We designed and performed a novel set of field experiments at two sites in the Oregon Cascades during the 2014 winter season to examine the spectral attenuation of pressure perturbations with depth for dense snow as a function of turbulence intensity and snow permeability. We mounted a Campbell Scientific Irgason Integrated CO2 and H2O Open Path Gas Analyzer and 3-D Sonic Anemometer one meter above the snow to capture mean and turbulent wind forcing and placed outlets of four high precision ParoScientific 216B-102 pressure transducers at different depths to measure the depth-dependent pressure response to wind forcing. A GPS antenna captured data acquisition time with sufficient precision to synchronize a Campbell Scientific CR-3000 acquiring