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Sample records for dense star polymer

  1. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, David M.; Tomalia, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  2. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-28

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  3. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  4. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  5. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  6. GRAPE-6 Simulations of Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, Shawn D.; Maxwell, J. E.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    We report on recent results from a long-term program of N-body simulations of dense star cluster evolution which is being done with GRAPE-6 systems at Indiana University and Purdue University Calumet. We have been simulating cases of star cluster evolution with a particular focus on the dynamical evolution of hard binary populations of varying size. Initial models with a range of mass spectra, both with and without primordial binary populations, are being investigated to points well beyond core collapse. Our goal is to better understand the evoultion of compact binary populations in collapsed-core globular clusters. Observations of collapsed-core clusters with HST and Chandra have revealed populations of hard, X-ray binaries well outside the cluster core. Our work is focused on understanding the diffusion of these dynamically hardened binaries to regions in the cluster halo and the robustness of this process in models with mass spectra versus single-mass models.

  7. Star polymer unimicelles on graphene oxide flakes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ikjun; Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Xu, Weinan; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-08-01

    We report the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm star copolymers (PSnP2VPn and PSn(P2VP-b-PtBA)n (n = 28 arms)) on graphene oxide flakes at the air-water interface. Adsorption, spreading, and ordering of star polymer micelles on the surface of the basal plane and edge of monolayer graphene oxide sheets were investigated on a Langmuir trough. This interface-mediated assembly resulted in micelle-decorated graphene oxide sheets with uniform spacing and organized morphology. We found that the surface activity of solvated graphene oxide sheets enables star polymer surfactants to subsequently adsorb on the presuspended graphene oxide sheets, thereby producing a bilayer complex. The positively charged heterocyclic pyridine-containing star polymers exhibited strong affinity onto the basal plane and edge of graphene oxide, leading to a well-organized and long-range ordered discrete micelle assembly. The preferred binding can be related to the increased conformational entropy due to the reduction of interarm repulsion. The extent of coverage was tuned by controlling assembly parameters such as concentration and solvent polarity. The polymer micelles on the basal plane remained incompressible under lateral compression in contrast to ones on the water surface due to strongly repulsive confined arms on the polar surface of graphene oxide and a preventive barrier in the form of the sheet edges. The densely packed biphasic tile-like morphology was evident, suggesting the high interfacial stability and mechanically stiff nature of graphene oxide sheets decorated with star polymer micelles. This noncovalent assembly represents a facile route for the control and fabrication of graphene oxide-inclusive ultrathin hybrid films applicable for layered nanocomposites. PMID:23883114

  8. Star polymer unimicelles on graphene oxide flakes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ikjun; Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Xu, Weinan; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-08-01

    We report the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm star copolymers (PSnP2VPn and PSn(P2VP-b-PtBA)n (n = 28 arms)) on graphene oxide flakes at the air-water interface. Adsorption, spreading, and ordering of star polymer micelles on the surface of the basal plane and edge of monolayer graphene oxide sheets were investigated on a Langmuir trough. This interface-mediated assembly resulted in micelle-decorated graphene oxide sheets with uniform spacing and organized morphology. We found that the surface activity of solvated graphene oxide sheets enables star polymer surfactants to subsequently adsorb on the presuspended graphene oxide sheets, thereby producing a bilayer complex. The positively charged heterocyclic pyridine-containing star polymers exhibited strong affinity onto the basal plane and edge of graphene oxide, leading to a well-organized and long-range ordered discrete micelle assembly. The preferred binding can be related to the increased conformational entropy due to the reduction of interarm repulsion. The extent of coverage was tuned by controlling assembly parameters such as concentration and solvent polarity. The polymer micelles on the basal plane remained incompressible under lateral compression in contrast to ones on the water surface due to strongly repulsive confined arms on the polar surface of graphene oxide and a preventive barrier in the form of the sheet edges. The densely packed biphasic tile-like morphology was evident, suggesting the high interfacial stability and mechanically stiff nature of graphene oxide sheets decorated with star polymer micelles. This noncovalent assembly represents a facile route for the control and fabrication of graphene oxide-inclusive ultrathin hybrid films applicable for layered nanocomposites.

  9. Multiarm Star Polymers as Model Soft Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    Over the last decade, star polymers emerged as a useful model colloids that interpolate between polymers and hard sphere colloids. Together with microgels, they represent two benchmark soft colloidal systems, their internal structure being the key difference. Indeed, in the case of stars with open structure, the arms can interpenetrate in dense suspensions. The latter feature, that can be probed experimentally, is responsible for a number of interesting structural and dynamic properties of star polymers that set them apart from microgels. In this talk we present the basic properties of star polymers and focus on their extraordinary behavior in the highly concentrated regime, which is typically glassy. Our rheological and scattering experiments demonstrate unique features of the star glasses. Here we discuss two major ones: (i) Aging after pre-shear (the so-called rejuvenation) proceeds via a two-step process, associated with a fast arm engagement and a slow cooperative (cage) rearrangement. Remarkably, at extremely long times a steady state is observed and the terminal time in these systems can be experimentally accessible (and hence tailored at molecular level), as a consequence of the arms fluctuations. (ii) Multiple glassy states can be obtained when mixing stars with polymers or with other stars. Simultaneous theoretical and simulations work suggests that the softness is at the core of this unexpected behavior where depletion gives rise to glass melting and eventually re-entrant glasses are formed. Construction of a state diagram suggests kinetic pathways for tailoring the flow of soft colloids. These examples outline the importance of particle architecture on colloidal properties. Stars are a representative of a large class of hairy particles. The parallel important developments in mode coupling theory and its verses provide much needed predictive tools and rationalization for a number of phenomena such as those discussed here, as well as the complex

  10. Pulsar-irradiated stars in dense globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the properties of stars irradiated by millisecond pulsars in 'hard' binaries of dense globular clusters. Irradiation by a relativistic pulsar wind as in the case of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar PSR 1957+20 alter both the magnitude and color of the companion star. Some of the blue stragglers (BSs) recently discovered in dense globular clusters can be irradiated stars in binaries containing powerful millisecond pulsars. The discovery of pulsar-driven orbital modulations of BS brightness and color with periods of a few hours together with evidence for radio and/or gamma-ray emission from BS binaries would valuably contribute to the understanding of the evolution of collapsed stars in globular clusters. Pulsar-driven optical modulation of cluster stars might be the only observable effect of a new class of binary pulsars, i.e., hidden millisecond pulsars enshrouded in the evaporated material lifted off from the irradiated companion star.

  11. Hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian chain statistics revisited.

    PubMed

    Polińska, P; Gillig, C; Wittmer, J P; Baschnagel, J

    2014-02-01

    Conformational properties of regular dendrimers and more general hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian statistics for the spacer chains between branching points are revisited numerically. We investigate the scaling for asymptotically long chains especially for fractal dimensions df = 3 (marginally compact) and df = 2.5 (diffusion limited aggregation). Power-law stars obtained by imposing the number of additional arms per generation are compared to truly self-similar stars. We discuss effects of weak excluded-volume interactions and sketch the regime where the Gaussian approximation should hold in dense solutions and melts for sufficiently large spacer chains. PMID:24574057

  12. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  13. Massive Star Formation: Characterising Infall and Outflow in dense cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shaila; Cunningham, Maria; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jones, Paul Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew John

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars are some of the most important objects in the Universe, shaping the evolution of galaxies, creating chemical elements, and hence shaping the evolution of the Universe. However, the processes by which they form, and how they shape their environment during their birth processes, are not well understood. We are using NH3 data from the "The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey" (HOPS) to define the positions of dense cores/clumps of gas in the southern Galactic plane that are likely to form stars. Due to its effective critical density, NH3 can detect massive star forming regions effectively compared to other tracers. We did a comparative study with different methods for finding clumps and found Fellwalker as the best. We found ~ 10% of the star forming clumps with multiple components and ~ 90% clumps with single component along the line of sight. Then, using data from the "The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz" (MALT90) survey, we search for the presence of infall and outflow associated with these cores. We will subsequently use the "3D Molecular Line Radiative Transfer Code" (MOLLIE) to constrain properties of the infall and outflow, such as velocity and mass flow. The aim of the project is to determine how common infall and outflow are in star forming cores, hence providing valuable constraints on the timescales and physical process involved in massive star formation.

  14. Lattice cluster theory for dense, thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-04-07

    While the application of the lattice cluster theory (LCT) to study the miscibility of polymer blends has greatly expanded our understanding of the monomer scale molecular details influencing miscibility, the corresponding theory for inhomogeneous systems has not yet emerged because of considerable technical difficulties and much greater complexity. Here, we present a general formulation enabling the extension of the LCT to describe the thermodynamic properties of dense, thin polymer films using a high dimension, high temperature expansion. Whereas the leading order of the LCT for bulk polymer systems is essentially simple Flory-Huggins theory, the highly non-trivial leading order inhomogeneous LCT (ILCT) for a film with L layers already involves the numerical solution of 3(L − 1) coupled, highly nonlinear equations for the various density profiles in the film. The new theory incorporates the essential “transport” constraints of Helfand and focuses on the strict imposition of excluded volume constraints, appropriate to dense polymer systems, rather than the maintenance of chain connectivity as appropriate for lower densities and as implemented in self-consistent theories of polymer adsorption at interfaces. The ILCT is illustrated by presenting examples of the computed profiles of the density, the parallel and perpendicular bonds, and the chain ends for free standing and supported films as a function of average film density, chain length, temperature, interaction with support, and chain stiffness. The results generally agree with expected general trends.

  15. Dense brushes of stiff polymers or filaments in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, F.; Fedosov, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dense filamentous brush-like structures are present in many biological interfacial systems (e.g., glycocalyx layer in blood vessels) to control their surface properties. Such structures can regulate the softness of a surface and modify fluid flow. In this letter, we propose a theoretical model which predicts quantitatively flow-induced deformation of a dense brush of stiff polymers or filaments, whose persistence length is larger or comparable to their contour length. The model is validated by detailed mesoscopic simulations and characterizes different contributions to brush deformation including hydrodynamic friction due to flow and steric excluded-volume interactions between grafted filaments. This theoretical model can be used to describe the effect of a stiff-polymer brush on fluid flow and to aid in the quantification of experiments.

  16. Cooling compact stars and phase transitions in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    We report new simulations of cooling of compact stars containing quark cores and updated fits to the Cas A fast cooling data. Our model is built on the assumption that the transient behaviour of the star in Cas A is due to a phase transition within the dense QCD matter in the core of the star. Specifically, the fast cooling is attributed to an enhancement in the neutrino emission triggered by a transition from a fully gapped, two-flavor, red-green color-superconducting quark condensate to a superconducting crystalline or an alternative gapless, color-superconducting phase. The blue-colored condensate is modeled as a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type color superconductor with spin-one pairing order parameter. We study the sensitivity of the fits to the phase transition temperature, the pairing gap of blue quarks and the timescale characterizing the phase transition (the latter modelled in terms of a width parameter). Relative variations in these parameter around their best-fit values larger than 10-3 spoil the fit to the data. We confirm the previous finding that the cooling curves show significant variations as a function of compact star mass, which allows one to account for dispersion in the data on the surface temperatures of thermally emitting neutron stars.

  17. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes

    PubMed Central

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-01-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor’s swimmer). PMID:26975329

  18. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-01-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor's swimmer). PMID:26975329

  19. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-03-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor’s swimmer).

  20. Method for forming a uniformly dense polymer foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 to about 0.5 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microballoon material wherein some of the microballoons are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  1. Hydrophilic polymer composites synthesized by electrospinning under dense carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyudiono, Okamoto, Koichi; Machmudah, Siti; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2015-12-01

    Electrospinning technique is feasible in some applications, it has attracted more attention in recent years. Various polymers have been successfully electrospun into ultrafine fibers in solvent solution and some in melt form. In this work, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a hydrophilic polymer would be synthesized by electrospinning under dense carbon dioxide (CO2). The experiments were performed at 40 °C and ˜ 5 MPa. During the electrospinning process, the applied voltage was 10-17 kV and the distance of nozzle and collector was 8 cm. The concentration of PVP solution as a major component was 4 wt%. The results showed that the fibers surface morphology from PVP which blended with poly L-lactide acid (PLLA) were smooth with hollow core fibers at 5 MPa. At the same conditions, PVP-carbon nanotube was also successfully generated into electrospun fiber products with diameter ˜ 2 μm.

  2. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  3. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces.

    PubMed

    García, N A; Febbo, M; Vega, D A; Milchev, A

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks. PMID:25362341

  4. STAR FORMATION IN THE TAURUS FILAMENT L 1495: FROM DENSE CORES TO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzl, Markus; Kainulainen, Jouni; Henning, Thomas; Launhardt, Ralf; Quanz, Sascha P.; Alves, Joao; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.

    2010-12-10

    We present a study of dense structures in the L 1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud and examine its star-forming properties. In particular, we construct a dust extinction map of the filament using deep near-infrared observations, exposing its small-scale structure in unprecedented detail. The filament shows highly fragmented substructures and a high mass-per-length value of M{sub line} = 17 M{sub sun} pc{sup -1}, reflecting star-forming potential in all parts of it. However, a part of the filament, namely B 211, is remarkably devoid of young stellar objects. We argue that in this region the initial filament collapse and fragmentation is still taking place and star formation is yet to occur. In the star-forming part of the filament, we identify 39 cores with masses from 0.4 to 10 M{sub sun} and preferred separations in agreement with the local Jeans length. Most of these cores exceed the Bonnor-Ebert critical mass, and are therefore likely to collapse and form stars. The dense core mass function follows a power law with exponent {Gamma} = 1.2 {+-} 0.2, a form commonly observed in star-forming regions.

  5. Barrier crossing by a star polymer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ananya; Sebastian, K L

    2007-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a star polymer of F arms trapped in a double well potential. Initially the molecule is confined to one of the minima and can cross over the barrier to the other side. We use the continuum version of the Rouse-Ham model and calculate the rate of crossing using the multidimensional approach due to Langer [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 54, 258 (1969)]. Finding the transition state for the process is shown to be equivalent to the solution of Newton's equations for F independent particles, moving in an inverted potential. For each star polymer, there is a critical barrier top curvature, below which the star crosses over in coiled conformation. The value of the critical curvature is determined by the first Rouse mode of the star. If the curvature is greater than this critical value, the saddle point for the crossing is a stretched conformation of the star. For the coiled transition state, the activation energy is proportional to the total arm length of the star. For the stretched transition state, as one increases the length of an arm of the star, the activation energy at first increases and then decreases. This results from the fact that in the stretched state, only one arm of the polymer is stretched across the top of the barrier, while others need not be. We calculate the rate by expanding the energy around the saddle up to second order in the fluctuations. As we use the continuum model, there are infinite modes for the polymer and, consequently, the prefactor has infinite products. We show that these infinite products can be reduced to a simple expression, and evaluated easily. However, the rate diverges near NTc due to the multifurcation, which results in more than one unstable mode. The cure for this divergence is to keep terms up to fourth order in the expansion of energy for these modes. Performing this, we have calculated the rate as a function of the length of the star. It is found that the rate has a nonmonotonic dependence on the length

  6. Barrier crossing by a star polymer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ananya; Sebastian, K L

    2007-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a star polymer of F arms trapped in a double well potential. Initially the molecule is confined to one of the minima and can cross over the barrier to the other side. We use the continuum version of the Rouse-Ham model and calculate the rate of crossing using the multidimensional approach due to Langer [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 54, 258 (1969)]. Finding the transition state for the process is shown to be equivalent to the solution of Newton's equations for F independent particles, moving in an inverted potential. For each star polymer, there is a critical barrier top curvature, below which the star crosses over in coiled conformation. The value of the critical curvature is determined by the first Rouse mode of the star. If the curvature is greater than this critical value, the saddle point for the crossing is a stretched conformation of the star. For the coiled transition state, the activation energy is proportional to the total arm length of the star. For the stretched transition state, as one increases the length of an arm of the star, the activation energy at first increases and then decreases. This results from the fact that in the stretched state, only one arm of the polymer is stretched across the top of the barrier, while others need not be. We calculate the rate by expanding the energy around the saddle up to second order in the fluctuations. As we use the continuum model, there are infinite modes for the polymer and, consequently, the prefactor has infinite products. We show that these infinite products can be reduced to a simple expression, and evaluated easily. However, the rate diverges near NTc due to the multifurcation, which results in more than one unstable mode. The cure for this divergence is to keep terms up to fourth order in the expansion of energy for these modes. Performing this, we have calculated the rate as a function of the length of the star. It is found that the rate has a nonmonotonic dependence on the length

  7. Polymer absorption in dense polymer brushes vs. polymer adsorption on the brush-solvent interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchev, Andrey; Binder, Kurt

    2014-06-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of a dense brush of flexible polymers (of type A) interacting with a long flexible macromolecule (of type B) are presented, considering the case of an attractive AB interaction, while effective interactions between AA and BB pairs of monomers are repulsive. Varying the strength \\varepsilon_{AB} of the attraction between unlike monomers, an adsorption transition at some critical value \\varepsilon^c_{AB} is found, where the B-chain is bound to the brush-solvent interface, similar to the adsorption on a planar solid substrate. However, when \\varepsilon_{AB} is much higher than \\varepsilon^c_{AB} , the long macromolecule is gradually “sucked in” the brush, developing many pieces that are locally stretched in the z-direction perpendicular to the substrate, in order to fit between the brush chains. The resulting hairpin-like structures of the absorbed chain shows up via oscillatory decay of the bond vector autocorrelation function. Chain relaxation is only possible via reptation.

  8. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant in the past year we have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas. In this area, our results include (1) in 67 starless dense cores, some 19 show clear evidence of spatially extended inward motions, with typical line-of-sight inward speed 0.05-0.09 km s(sup -1) and with typical plane-of-the-sky extent 0.1-0.3 pc, (2) In some 40 nearby regions with embedded groups and clusters, we see extended infall asymmetry in lines of CS and HCO(+) clearly in 4 regions and less clearly in 4 others, (3) Using finer resolution (15 arcsec or 0.01-0.02 pc) and lines tracing higher density, we see spatial concentration of infall asymmetry near the protostars in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and B, L483, and L1251B, and with still finer resolution (2 arcsec or 0.003 pc or 600 AU) we detect inverse P Cyg profiles, indicating absorption of continuum emission from the protostellar envelope by infalling gas in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and 4B. Further, at high resolution we identify regions of stellar mass and low turbulence ("kernels") which are good candidates to become the next generation of stars in embedded clusters. In addition we have completed a survey for the OH Zeeman effect in absorption against nearby H II regions, indicating that the large-scale magnetic field may be nearly critical if it typically threads a flattened structure. We have also developed a model of spatially extended infall motions based on dissipation of turbulence in a magnetized, selfgravitating layer. In the following we describe some of these results in more detail.

  9. Influence of Molecular Solvation on the Conformation of Star Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Porcar, L.; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Smith, Gregory Scott; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We have used neutron scattering to investigate the influence of concentration on the conformation of a star polymer. By varying the contrast between the solvent and isotopically labeled stars, we obtain the distributions of polymer and solvent within a star polymer from analysis of scattering data. A correlation between the local desolvation and the inward folding of star branches is discovered. From the perspective of thermodynamics, we find an analogy between the mechanism of polymer localization driven by solvent depletion and that of the hydrophobic collapse of polymers in solutions.

  10. Connecting the Dense Gas and Young Stars in the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee G.; Storm, Shaye; Looney, Leslie; Lee, Katherine I.; Fernandez Lopez, Manuel; Ostriker, Eve C.; Chen, Che-Yu; CLASSy Team

    2016-01-01

    The CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy) imaged the dense gas structure and kinematics in five, roughly 1 pc scale regions in the Serpens and Perseus clouds with 7" angular resolution. The spatial distribution and Class of the young stellar population (YSOs) is available for these regions from the Spitzer c2d and Gould Belt surveys, with added sources from the Herschel 70 micron images. Together, these datasets allow us to compare, for the first time at similar spatial resolutions, the distributions of the dense gas and YSOs over regions containing up to 90 identified YSOs. This enables a detailed look at the separation between YSOs and the nearest dense gas peak and a measure of overall relationship between the YSO and dense gas distributions. We find that most Class 0 YSOs are forming in the highest column density regions: leaves in the dendrogram analysis utilized by CLASSy. In Serpens and Perseus, we find that 29% and 38%, respectively, of the leaves have identified embedded YSOs. Class 1 sources are less confined to leaf locations; Class II sources are distributed throughout regions, mostly away from hierarchical peaks. This trend could be due to a modest (0.1 km/sec) velocity difference between YSOs and their natal cores, or due to the YSOs consuming or dispersing their natal cores.

  11. Long Range Bond-Bond Correlations in Dense Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Meyer, H.; Baschnagel, J.; Johner, A.; Obukhov, S.; Mattioni, L.; Müller, M.; Semenov, A. N.

    2004-09-01

    The scaling of the bond-bond correlation function P1(s) along linear polymer chains is investigated with respect to the curvilinear distance s along the flexible chain and the monomer density ρ via Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. Surprisingly, the correlations in dense three-dimensional solutions are found to decay with a power law P1(s)˜s-ω with ω=3/2 and the exponential behavior commonly assumed is clearly ruled out for long chains. In semidilute solutions, the density dependent scaling of P1(s)≈g-ω0(s/g)-ω with ω0=2-2ν=0.824 (ν=0.588 being Flory's exponent) is set by the number of monomers g(ρ) in an excluded volume blob. Our computational findings compare well with simple scaling arguments and perturbation calculation. The power-law behavior is due to self-interactions of chains caused by the chain connectivity and the incompressibility of the melt.

  12. Interfacial Micellar Structures from Novel Amphiphilic Star Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Genson, Kirsten L.; Hoffman, Joshua; Teng, Jing; Zubarev, Eugene R.; Vaknin, David; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2010-11-10

    An amphiphilic heteroarm star polymer containing 12 alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic arms of polystyrene (PS) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) connected to a well-defined rigid aromatic core was studied at the air-water and the air-solid interfaces. At the air-water interface, the molecules spontaneously form pancakelike micellar aggregates which measure up to several microns in diameter and 5 nm in thickness. Upon reduction of the surface area per molecule to 7 nm2, the two-dimensional micelles merged into a dense monolayer. We suggest that confined phase separation of dissimilar polymer arms occurred upon their segregation on the opposite sides of the rigid disklike aromatic core, forcing the rigid cores to adopt a face-on orientation with respect to the interface. Upon transfer onto solid supports the PS chains face the air-film interface making it completely hydrophobic, and the PAA chains were found to collapse and form a thin flattened underlayer. This study points toward new strategies to create large 2D microstructures with facial amphiphilicity and suggests a profound influence of star molecular architecture on the self-assembly of amphiphiles at the air-water interface.

  13. Star Formation and Dense Gas in Galaxy Mergers from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; VIXENS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present our λ= 3 mm IRAM and NRO single dish line survey for a sample of 15 interacting galaxies in the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) survey. Our sample of merging galaxies range from early to late interaction stages (close pairs to merger remnants, respectively). A variety of molecular lines are detected including dense gas tracers HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, CN (and others) as well as 12CO and 13CO. We compare the dense gas fractions with 12CO and 13CO as well as star formation efficiencies defined by infrared-to-dense gas tracer luminosity ratio and discuss trends with interaction stage. We also investigate relations between star formation and dense gas content in our merger sample and compare them to non-interacting star forming galaxies and Galactic star forming regions in the Milky Way.

  14. Dual functional star polymers for lubricants

    DOE PAGES

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) with a three arm architecturewere designed, prepared and their performance as a dual additive (viscosity index improver and friction modifier) for engine oils was evaluated. Furthermore, the structure property relationships between the macromolecular structure and lubricant performance were studied, such as molecular weight and polarity effects on the viscosity index. Several copolymers of dodecylmethacrylate with polar methacrylates in various amounts and various topologies, were synthesized as model compounds. Star polymers with a polar content of at least 10% in a block or tapered block topology effectively reduced the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubricationmore » regimes. Furthermore, a polar content of 20% was efficient in reducing friction in both random and block topologies.« less

  15. Flow-induced translocation of star polymers through a nanopore.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingming; Duan, Xiaozheng; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-03-21

    We study the flow-induced translocation of the star polymers through a nanopore using a hybrid simulation method that incorporates a lattice-Boltzmann approach for the fluid into a molecular dynamics model for the polymer. Our simulation demonstrates the existence of an optimal forward arm number of the star polymers captured by the nanopore, and illustrates its significance in determining the critical velocity flux of the star polymer translocation through the nanopore. Importantly, we find that the critical velocity flux of the star polymers is independent of the arm polymerization degree, but exhibits a linear dependence on the arm number. Based on previous scaling arguments and our simulation results, we conclude a linear dependence of the critical velocity flux on the arm number of the star polymers, which can successfully describe the dynamics of the star polymer translocation. Our simulation results rationalize the experimental results for the dependence of the critical velocity flux on the arm polymerization degree and the arm number of the star polymers, which provide new insights for the characterization and the purification of the star polymers.

  16. A scattering function of star polymers including excluded volume effects

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis; Smith, Gregory; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-11-04

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffnessmore » of its constituent branch.« less

  17. A scattering function of star polymers including excluded volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis; Smith, Gregory; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-11-04

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  18. Structure, Motion, and Evolution of Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2003-01-01

    We have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas.

  19. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1–0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in star formation, finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction (traced by the HCN-to-CO ratio) and the apparent star formation efficiency of dense gas (traced by the IR-to-HCN ratio). The latter may be unexpected, given the recent popularity of gas density threshold models to explain star formation scaling relations. Our survey used the IRAM 30 m telescope to observe HCN(1–0), CO(1–0), and several other emission lines across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2–1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. We detected HCN in 48 out of 62 observed positions. Because our observations achieve a typical resolution of ∼1.5 kpc and span a range of galaxies and galactocentric radii (56% lie at {r}{gal}\\gt 1 kpc), we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions in a galaxy disk. We focus on how the ratios IR-to-CO, HCN-to-CO, and IR-to-HCN (observational cognates of the star formation efficiency, dense gas fraction, and dense gas star formation efficiency) depend on the stellar surface density, {{{Σ }}}{star}, and the molecular-to-atomic gas ratio, {{{Σ }}}{mol}/{{{Σ }}}{atom}. The HCN-to-CO ratio is low, often ∼1/30, and correlates tightly with both the molecular-to-atomic ratio and the stellar mass surface density across a range of 2.1 dex (factor of ≈125) in both parameters. Thus for the assumption of fixed CO-to-H2 and HCN-to-dense gas conversion factors, the dense gas fraction depends strongly on location in the disk, being higher in the high surface density, highly molecular parts of galaxies. At the same time, the IR-to-HCN ratio (closely related to the star formation efficiency of dense molecular gas) decreases systematically

  20. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  1. Compatibilization of polymer blends with star polymers containing a gamma-cyclodextrin core and polystyrene arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balik, C. M.; Tonelli, A. E.; Libert, Ryan

    2012-02-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic starch molecules having a hollow central cavity which can be threaded by a polymer to form an inclusion compound. This characteristic is exploited in a new type of compatibilizer: a star polymer with a gamma-CD (g-CD) core and polystyrene (PS) arms (CD-star). The mechanism of compatibilization involves threading of the CD core by a second polymer and solubilization of the threading polymer into a PS matrix by the PS star arms. In principle, the same CD-star polymer can be used to compatibilize blends of several different polymers with PS, provided that the second polymer is able to thread the CD core. We have taken the first step toward demonstrating the generality of this approach by producing compatibilized blends of PS with poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using the same CD-star polymer. Thin spun-cast films of these blends exhibit a nanoscale level of mixing, while spun-cast films of the same blends without CD-star exhibit large-scale phase separation. The number of CD-star molecules that must be threaded onto the polymer chain to achieve compatibilization is larger for PMMA than for PDMS.

  2. Inhomogeneous chiral symmetry breaking in dense neutron-star matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buballa, Michael; Carignano, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of model results suggests that chiral symmetry is broken inhomogeneously in a certain window at intermediate densities in the QCD phase diagram. This could have significant effects on the properties of compact stars, possibly leading to new astrophysical signatures. In this contribution we discuss this idea by reviewing recent results on inhomogeneous chiral symmetry breaking under an astrophysics-oriented perspective. After introducing two commonly studied spatial modulations of the chiral condensate, the chiral density wave and the real kink crystal, we focus on their properties and their effect on the equation of state of quark matter. We also describe how these crystalline phases are affected by different elements which are required for a realistic description of a compact star, such as charge neutrality, the presence of magnetic fields, vector interactions and the interplay with color superconductivity. Finally, we discuss possible signatures of inhomogeneous chiral symmetry breaking in the core of compact stars, considering the cases of mass-radius relations and neutrino emissivity explicitly.

  3. Entropy-induced separation of star polymers in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Blavats'ka, V.; Ferber, C. von; Holovatch, Yu.

    2006-09-15

    We present a quantitative picture of the separation of star polymers in a solution where part of the volume is influenced by a porous medium. To this end, we study the impact of long-range-correlated quenched disorder on the entropy and scaling properties of f-arm star polymers in a good solvent. We assume that the disorder is correlated on the polymer length scale with a power-law decay of the pair correlation function g(r){approx}r{sup -a}. Applying the field-theoretical renormalization group approach we show in a double expansion in {epsilon}=4-d and {delta}=4-a that there is a range of correlation strengths {delta} for which the disorder changes the scaling behavior of star polymers. In a second approach we calculate for fixed space dimension d=3 and different values of the correlation parameter a the corresponding scaling exponents {gamma}{sub f} that govern entropic effects. We find that {gamma}{sub f}-1, the deviation of {gamma}{sub f} from its mean field value is amplified by the disorder once we increase {delta} beyond a threshold. The consequences for a solution of diluted chain and star polymers of equal molecular weight inside a porous medium are that star polymers exert a higher osmotic pressure than chain polymers and in general higher branched star polymers are expelled more strongly from the correlated porous medium. Surprisingly, polymer chains will prefer a stronger correlated medium to a less or uncorrelated medium of the same density while the opposite is the case for star polymers.

  4. STELLAR COLLISIONS AND BLUE STRAGGLER STARS IN DENSE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert

    2013-11-10

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are abundantly observed in all Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) where data exist. However, observations alone cannot reveal the relative importance of various formation channels or the typical formation times for this well-studied population of anomalous stars. Using a state-of-the-art Hénon-type Monte Carlo code that includes all relevant physical processes, we create 128 models with properties typical of the observed GGCs. These models include realistic numbers of single and binary stars, use observationally motivated initial conditions, and span large ranges in central density, concentration, binary fraction, and mass. Their properties can be directly compared with those of observed GGCs. We can easily identify the BSSs in our models and determine their formation channels and birth times. We find that for central densities above ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉} pc{sup –3}, the dominant formation channel is stellar collisions, while for lower density clusters, mass transfer in binaries provides a significant contribution (up to 60% in our models). The majority of these collisions are binary-mediated, occurring during three-body and four-body interactions. As a result, a strong correlation between the specific frequency of BSSs and the binary fraction in a cluster can be seen in our models. We find that the number of BSSs in the core shows only a weak correlation with the collision rate estimator Γ traditionally used by observers, in agreement with the latest Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data. Using an idealized 'full mixing' prescription for collision products, our models indicate that the BSSs observed today may have formed several Gyr ago. However, denser clusters tend to have younger (∼1 Gyr) BSSs.

  5. Hadron-quark phase transition in dense stars

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, F.

    1987-10-01

    An equation of state is computed for a plasma of one flavor quarks interacting through some phenomenological potential, at zero temperature. Assuming that the confining potential is scalar and color-independent, it is shown that the quarks undergo a first-order mass phase transition. In addition, due to the way screening is introduced, all the thermodynamic quantities computed are independent of the actual shape of the interquark potential. This equation of state is then generalized to a several quark flavor plasma and applied to the study of the hadron-quark phase transition inside a neutron star. 45 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Hydrodynamic screening of star polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, M; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2007-08-01

    The mutual effects of the conformations of a star polymer in simple shear flow and the deformation of the solvent flow field are investigated by a hybrid mesoscale simulation technique. We characterize the flow field near the star polymer as a function of its functionality (arm number) f . A strong screening of the imposed flow is found inside the star polymer, which increases with increasing f . To elucidate the importance of hydrodynamic screening, we compare results for hydrodynamic and random solvents. The dependence of the polymer orientation angle on the Weissenberg number shows a power law behavior with super-universal exponent --independent of hydrodynamic and excluded-volume interactions. In contrast, the polymer rotation frequency changes qualitatively when hydrodynamic interactions are switched on.

  7. Are Superluminous Supernovae and Long GRBs the Products of Dynamical Processes in Young Dense Star Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed "metal aversion" of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  8. Are superluminous supernovae and long GRBs the products of dynamical processes in young dense star clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-20

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed 'metal aversion' of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  9. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN FORMING STARS AND DENSE GAS IN THE SMALL LOW-MASS CLUSTER CEDERBLAD 110

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, E. F.; Wong, T.; Bourke, T. L.; Thompson, K. L.

    2011-12-20

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaeleon I dark cloud complex. The region contains nine forming low-mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density ({Sigma}{sub YSO} {approx} 150 pc{sup -2}). The analysis of our N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1{yields}0) maps indicates the presence of 13 {+-} 3 solar masses of dense (n {approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS-1, which is almost certainly actively accreting material from its dense core. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources, IRS 4, 11, and 6. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS-1. The molecular component of the outflow, measured in the (J = 1{yields}0) line of {sup 12}CO, appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it appears to plow through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface between the head of the outflow lobe and the dense core material can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. IRS 2, the Class III source that produces the optical reflection nebula that gives the Cederblad 110 region its name, may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the MMS-1 dense core is consistent with warming from IRS 2, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star

  10. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The main focus was the study of star-forming regions through high spectral- and spatial resolution observations of mm-wavelength lines, and through models of the observations. The main accomplishments were a) demonstration that more than 15 starless cores show substantial evidence of extended inward motion at about half the sound speed; b) observations of infall asymmetry in several cores, in lines of N2H(+) and DCO(+), low- depletion tracers of the "inner core"; c) observation of "infall asymmetry" of spectral lines over approx. 0.5 pc in the NGC1333 cluster-forming region; d) observations indicating that cores are nearly at rest with respect to their envelopes; and e) development of analytic, power-series solutions to the equations of motions for condensing 1-D systems (layers, cylinders and spheres).

  11. Constraining the State of Ultra-dense Matter with the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-04-01

    [This presentation is submitted on behalf of the entire NICER Science Team] The state of cold matter at densities exceeding those of atomic nuclei remains one of the principal outstanding problems in modern physics. Neutron stars provide the only known setting in the universe where these physical conditions can be explored. Thermal X-ray radiation from the physical surface of a neutron star can serve as a powerful tool for probing the poorly understood behavior of the matter in the dense stellar interior. For instance, realistic modeling of the thermal X-ray modulations observed from rotation-powered millisecond pulsars can produce stringent constraints on the neutron star mass-radius relation, and by extension the state of supra-nuclear matter. I will describe the prospects for precision neutron star equation of state constraints with millisecond pulsars using the forthcoming Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) X-ray timing mission.

  12. Effectively Delivering a Unique Hsp90 Inhibitor Using Star Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) inhibitor conjugated to a star polymer. Using reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization, we prepared star polymers comprising PEG attached to a predesigned functional core. The stars were cross-linked using disulfide linkers, and a tagged version of our hsp90 inhibitor was conjugated to the polymer core to generate nanoparticles (14 nm). Dynamic light scattering showed that the nanoparticles were stable in cell growth media for 5 days, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of compound-release at 3 different pH values showed that release was pH dependent. Cell cytotoxicity studies and confocal microscopy verify that our hsp90 inhibitor was delivered to cells using this nanoparticle delivery system. Further, delivery of our hsp90 inhibitor using star polymer induces apoptosis by a caspase 3-dependent pathway. These studies show that we can deliver our hsp90 inhibitor effectively using star polymers and induce apoptosis by the same pathway as the parent compound. PMID:24379910

  13. Wavelength selective polymer network formation of end-functional star polymers.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Michael; Hiltebrandt, Kai; Trouillet, Vanessa; Mueller, Patrick; Quick, Alexander S; Wegener, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-01-31

    A wavelength selective technique for light-induced network formation based on two photo-active moieties, namely ortho-methylbenzaldehyde and tetrazole is introduced. The network forming species are photo-reactive star polymers generated via reversible activation fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, allowing the network to be based on almost any vinylic monomer. Direct laser writing (DLW) allows to form any complex three-dimensional structure based on the photo-reactive star polymers.

  14. Deposition of zwitterionic polymer brushes in a dense gas medium.

    PubMed

    Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Yeo, Tin Wei; Guo, Shifeng; Quintana, Robert; Jańczewski, Dominik; Srinivasan, M P

    2015-06-15

    Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) films known for their resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption, cell/bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation were produced by surface initiated polymerization on a silicon surface via a batch reaction system in CO2 expanded liquid (CO2-EL) medium. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was carried out using 2,2'-bipyridyl as ligand and CuBr as a catalyst in water/methanol mixture with trichloro[4-(chloromethyl)phenyl]silane (CMPS) used as the initiating species. The films were grown in the CO2-EL environment at a range of conditions and thickness up to 10nm. In contrast to films produced by conventional solvent systems at atmospheric pressure, the polymer films grown by the CO2-EL process showed uniform thickness and pin-hole free topography. Most importantly, the CO2-EL processed PSBMA films showed no trace of copper (used as the catalyst), thus obviating the need for post-deposition processing and avoiding adverse effects of the metal leaching during service. Finally, PSBMA films from both the conventional and CO2-EL processes were exposed to Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and the results showed that, while in both the cases the cell proliferation rate was inhibited by the charged polymeric brush surface, the CO2-EL-processed brush exhibited inhibition to a larger extent due to the reduced occurrence of pinholes. The process can be easily exploited effectively when carrying out surface initiated polymerization on non-flat topographies, such as in trenches and nanostructured features with high aspect ratios. PMID:25728486

  15. A new numerical approach to dense polymer brushes and surface instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeis, D.; Merlitz, H.; Sommer, J.-U.

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical self-consistent field (SCF) method which describes freely jointed chains of spherical monomers applied to densely grafted polymer brushes. We discuss both the Flory-Huggins model and the Carnahan-Starling equation of state and show the latter being preferable within our model at polymer volume fractions above 10%. We compare the results of our numerical method with data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [G.-L. He, H. Merlitz, J.-U. Sommer, and C.-X. Wu, Macromolecules 40, 6721 (2007)] and analytical SCF calculations [P. M. Biesheuvel, W. M. de Vos, and V. M. Amoskov, Macromolecules 41, 6254 (2008)] and obtain close agreement between the density profiles up to high grafting densities. In contrast to prior numerical and analytical studies of densely grafted polymer brushes our method provides detailed information about chain configurations including fluctuation, depletion, and packing effects. Using our model we could study the recently discovered instability of densely grafted polymer brushes with respect to slight variations of individual chain lengths, driven by fluctuation effects [H. Merlitz, G.-L. He, C.-X. Wu, and J.-U. Sommer, Macromolecules 41, 5070 (2008)]. The obtained results are in very close agreement with corresponding MD simulations.

  16. Tacticity control in the synthesis of poly(lactic acid) polymer stars with dipentaerythritol cores.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Michael P; Cameron, Donald J A

    2010-12-13

    The synthesis of a family of polymer stars with arms of varied tacticities is discussed. The effect of polymer tacticity on the physical properties of these polymer stars is presented. Dipentaerythritol cores support six poly(lactic acid) (PLA) arms. Lewis acidic tin and aluminum catalysts control the polymerization to afford polymer stars of variable tacticity. The analysis of these polymers by NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry reveals the effects of tacticity control on the physical properties of the polymer stars. Preliminary decomposition studies suggest that the biodegradation profile of a polymer star may also be tuned by stereochemical control. This is the first systematic altering of tacticity in PLA polymer stars, showing that polymer tacticity can have a great impact on star properties. PMID:21033736

  17. Tacticity control in the synthesis of poly(lactic acid) polymer stars with dipentaerythritol cores.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Michael P; Cameron, Donald J A

    2010-12-13

    The synthesis of a family of polymer stars with arms of varied tacticities is discussed. The effect of polymer tacticity on the physical properties of these polymer stars is presented. Dipentaerythritol cores support six poly(lactic acid) (PLA) arms. Lewis acidic tin and aluminum catalysts control the polymerization to afford polymer stars of variable tacticity. The analysis of these polymers by NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry reveals the effects of tacticity control on the physical properties of the polymer stars. Preliminary decomposition studies suggest that the biodegradation profile of a polymer star may also be tuned by stereochemical control. This is the first systematic altering of tacticity in PLA polymer stars, showing that polymer tacticity can have a great impact on star properties.

  18. Amylose-Based Cationic Star Polymers for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Umezaki, Kaori; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    A new siRNA delivery system using a cationic glyco-star polymer is described. Spermine-modified 8-arm amylose star polymer (with a degree of polymerization of approximately 60 per arm) was synthesized by chemoenzymatic methods. The cationic star polymer effectively bound to siRNA and formed spherical complexes with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 230 nm. The cationic 8-arm star polymer complexes showed superior cellular uptake characteristics and higher gene silencing effects than a cationic 1-arm polymer. These results suggest that amylose-based star polymers are a promising nanoplatform for glycobiomaterials. PMID:26539548

  19. Phase separation in star-linear polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Manuel; Likos, Christos N

    2009-05-28

    We study mixtures of star polymers and linear chains in good solvent conditions. We consider the effect of the addition of small chains on the equilibrium structure as well as on the phase behavior of low- and intermediate-functionality star solutions. By using a recently introduced effective cross interaction between stars and chains [C. Mayer and C. N. Likos, Macromolecules 40, 1196 (2007)], we solve the two-component Ornstein-Zernike equation, finding evidence for cluster formation, which is accompanied by a spinodal instability at moderate chain concentrations. The binodal lines are numerically calculated and the dependence of the observed phenomena on functionality, size, and concentrations is rationalized by considering the attractive contribution, which is displayed by the effective, chain-modified star-star interaction potential.

  20. Biodegradable star polymers functionalized with beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Setijadi, Eki; Tao, Lei; Liu, Jingquan; Jia, Zhongfan; Boyer, Cyrille; Davis, Thomas P

    2009-09-14

    Three-armed biodegradable star polymers made from polystyrene (polySt) and poly (polyethylene glycol) acrylate (polyPEG-A) were synthesized via a "core first" methodology using a trifunctional RAFT agent, created by attaching RAFT agents to a core via their R-groups. The resultant three-armed polymeric structures were well-defined, with polydispersity indices less than 1.2. Upon aminolysis and further reaction with dithiodipyridine (DTDP), these three-armed polymers could be tailored with sulfhydryl and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) end functionalities, available for further reaction with any free-sulfhydryl group containing precursors to form disulfide linkages. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) confirmed that more than 98% of the polymer arms retained integral trithiocarbonate active sites after polymerization. Intradisulfide linkages between the core and the arms conferred biodegradability on the star architectures. Subsequently, the arm-termini were attached to cholesterol also via disulfide linkages. The cholesterol terminated arms were then used to form supramolecular structures via inclusion complex formation with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). The star architectures were found to degrade rapidly on treatment with DL-dithiothereitol (DTT). The star polymers and supramolecular structures were characterized using gel permation chromatography (GPC), static light scattering (SLS), 2D NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  1. Solution and Melt Rheology of Polypropylene Comb and Star Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnav; Colby, Ralph H.; Rose, Jeffrey M.; Cherian, Anna E.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2006-03-01

    Syndiotactic polypropylene macromonomer arms have been prepared by coordination-insertion polymerization. These arms have been made into polypropylene star polymers by the homopolymerization of the syndiotactic arms with a living alkene polymerization catalyst. The macromonomer arms have also been randomly copolymerized with propylene using rac-dimethylsilyl(2-methyl-4-phenylindenyl) zirconium dichloride catalysts to make polypropylene combs. Consequently we have star polymers and a series of comb polymers with different backbone lengths that are all made from the same macromonomer arms. We compare linear viscoelastic data on star and comb polypropylene melts and solutions in squalane to predictions of the tube dilation model and the tube model without tube dilation. The ratio of comb terminal relaxation time to star terminal relaxation time eliminates the friction coefficient and allows determination of the extent of tube dilation the backbone experiences when it relaxes. The concentration dependence of the comb/star terminal relaxation time ratio can be described by either model, owing to adjustable parameters that are not known apriori, so independent means to evaluate those parameters will be discussed.

  2. Measuring the neutron star radius to constrain the dense-matter equation of state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie; Rutledge, Robert E.

    2014-08-01

    A physical understanding of the behaviour of cold ultra-dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars, and the thermal emission from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries inside globular clusters have proven very useful for that purpose. The recent ~2M⊙ mass measurements suggest that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of states (EoS) are disfavoured, in favour of hadronic "normal matter" EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, "normal matter" EoSs produce lines of quasi-constant radii (within the measurement uncertainties, of about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to un-modelled spectrally hard components. Our results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, with a value RNS = 9.1±1.4 km, at 90% confidence, using conservative assumptions, which suggests that neutron star matter is best described by the softest "normal matter" equations of state.

  3. Transport studies of conducting, semiconducting and photoconducting star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, John Baker

    Star polymers are studied for their transport properties in the highly conducting state doped with NOPF6 and iodine, the undoped semiconducting state and the photoconducting state. Doped star polymers exhibit variable range hopping of charge carriers. Transport dimensionality and conductivity depend intricately on the processing conditions for doping and casting films. The highest conducting diffusion doped film (room temperature conductivity 50 S/cm) exhibits 2-dimensional variable range for all doping levels. Polymers doped in solution, then cast to form films have 1.4 dimensional variable range hopping for the highest conducting samples with 10 S/cm at room temperature. The hopping dimensionality varies as the conductivity decreases. The doped star polymers remain on the insulator side of the insulator metal transition with localized carriers as revealed with Kramer-Kronig analysis. Optical and near infrared absorbance and photoluminescence reveal the core of the star polymers exist in a solid state solution of the arms with similar absorbance and luminescence for both solution and films. The arms retain the optical properties of their linear analogs indicating the core and arms do not interact quantum mechanically to produce a new state. Excitons created by absorption in the wider band gap cores rapidly migrate to the arms. Photoconductive time of flight mobility measurements reveal an almost field independent mobility at room temperature. This is due to a unique cancellation of on diagonal and off diagonal disorder in the Bassler disorder formalism. The cores introduce heterogeneous regions with a net lower mobility predicted by correlated disorder models. Space charge limited current reveals trap densities several orders of magnitude higher than the carrier density. Photovoltaic performance of star polymer and fullerene blend devices with both 20 nm and 100 nm thick layers are investigated. The thin devices have low open circuit voltages due to space charge

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of dense polymer melts using event chain algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Tobias A; Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-07-28

    We propose an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm for the off-lattice simulation of dense hard sphere polymer melts using cluster moves, called event chains, which allow for a rejection-free treatment of the excluded volume. Event chains also allow for an efficient preparation of initial configurations in polymer melts. We parallelize the event chain Monte Carlo algorithm to further increase simulation speeds and suggest additional local topology-changing moves ("swap" moves) to accelerate equilibration. By comparison with other Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, we verify that the event chain algorithm reproduces the correct equilibrium behavior of polymer chains in the melt. By comparing intrapolymer diffusion time scales, we show that event chain Monte Carlo algorithms can achieve simulation speeds comparable to optimized molecular dynamics simulations. The event chain Monte Carlo algorithm exhibits Rouse dynamics on short time scales. In the absence of swap moves, we find reptation dynamics on intermediate time scales for long chains.

  5. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Globular clusters are gravitationally bound systems containing up to millions of stars, and are found ubiquitously in massive galaxies, including the Milky Way. With densities as high as a million stars per cubic parsec, they are one of the few places in the Universe where stars interact with one another. They therefore provide us with a unique laboratory for studying how gravitational interactions can facilitate the formation of exotic systems, such as X-ray binaries containing black holes, and merging double black hole binaries, which are produced much less efficiently in isolation. While telescopes can provide us with a snapshot of what these dense clusters look like at present, we must rely on detailed numerical simulations to learn about their evolution. These simulations are quite challenging, however, since dense star clusters are described by a complicated set of physical processes occurring on many different length and time scales, including stellar and binary evolution, weak gravitational scattering encounters, strong resonant binary interactions, and tidal stripping by the host galaxy. Until very recently, it was not possible to model the evolution of systems with millions of stars, the actual number contained in the largest clusters, including all the relevant physics required describe these systems accurately. The Northwestern Group's Henon Monte Carlo code, CMC, which has been in development for over a decade, is a powerful tool that can be used to construct detailed evolutionary models of large star clusters. With its recent parallelization, CMC is now capable of addressing a particularly interesting unsolved problem in astrophysics: the dynamical evolution of stellar black holes in dense star clusters. Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes, the remnants of stars with initial masses from 20 - 100

  6. On the relative motions of dense cores and envelopes in star-forming molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayliffe, Ben A.; Langdon, James C.; Cohl, Howard S.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2007-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of star formation indicate that the motions of protostars through their natal molecular clouds may be crucial in determining the properties of stars through competitive accretion and dynamical interactions. Walsh, Myers & Burton recently investigated whether such motions might be observable in the earliest stages of star formation by measuring the relative shifts of line-centre velocities of low- and high-density tracers of low-mass star-forming cores. They found very small (~0.1kms-1) relative motions. In this paper, we analyse the hydrodynamical simulation of Bate, Bonnell & Bromm and find that it also gives small relative velocities between high-density cores and low-density envelopes, despite the fact that competitive accretion and dynamical interactions occur between protostars in the simulation. Thus, the simulation is consistent with the observations in this respect. However, we also find some differences between the simulation and the observations. Overall, we find that the high-density gas has a higher velocity dispersion than that observed by Walsh et al. We explore this by examining the dependence of the gas velocity dispersion on density and its evolution with time during the simulation. We find that early in the simulation the gas velocity dispersion decreases monotonically with increasing density, while later in the simulation, when the dense cores have formed multiple objects, the velocity dispersion of the high-density gas increases. Thus, the simulation is in best agreement with the observations early on, before many objects have formed in each dense core.

  7. Carma Large Area Star Formation Survey: Dense Gas in the Young L1451 Region of Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Teuben, Peter; Arce, Héctor G.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Isella, Andrea; Kauffmann, Jens; Shirley, Yancy L.; Kwon, Woojin; Plunkett, Adele L.; Pound, Marc W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Tassis, Konstantinos; Tobin, John J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    We present a 3 mm spectral line and continuum survey of L1451 in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These observations are from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), which also imaged Barnard 1, NGC 1333, Serpens Main, and Serpens South. L1451 is the survey region with the lowest level of star formation activity—it contains no confirmed protostars. HCO+, HCN, and N2H+ (J=1\\to 0) are all detected throughout the region, with HCO+ being the most spatially widespread, and molecular emission seen toward 90% of the area above N(H2) column densities of 1.9 × 1021 cm‑2. HCO+ has the broadest velocity dispersion, near 0.3 km s‑1 on average, compared with ∼0.15 km s‑1 for the other molecules, thus representing a range of subsonic to supersonic gas motions. Our non-binary dendrogram analysis reveals that the dense gas traced by each molecule has a similar hierarchical structure, and that gas surrounding the candidate first hydrostatic core (FHSC), L1451-mm, and other previously detected single-dish continuum clumps has similar hierarchical structure; this suggests that different subregions of L1451 are fragmenting on the pathway to forming young stars. We determined that the three-dimensional morphology of the largest detectable dense-gas structures was relatively ellipsoidal compared with other CLASSy regions, which appeared more flattened at the largest scales. A virial analysis shows that the most centrally condensed dust structures are likely unstable against collapse. Additionally, we identify a new spherical, centrally condensed N2H+ feature that could be a new FHSC candidate. The overall results suggest that L1451 is a young region starting to form its generation of stars within turbulent, hierarchical structures.

  8. Ordering phenomena of star polymer solutions approaching the Θ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likos, C. N.; Löwen, H.; Poppe, A.; Willner, L.; Roovers, J.; Cubitt, B.; Richter, D.

    1998-11-01

    The liquid-state ordering phenomena of a semidilute polybutadiene 64-arm star polymer solution were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. For this purpose, we used deuterated 1,4-dioxane, which is a Θ solvent for the star at 31.5 °C. Its quality was modified by varying the temperature in the range between 40 °C and 80 °C. Besides a swelling of the star, with increasing temperature the development of a strong correlation peak was observed in the experiment. The experimental data were described theoretically by employing an effective pair potential between stars which was introduced earlier by Mewis et al. [J. Mewis, W. J. Frith, T. A. Strivens, and W. B. Russel, AIChE J. 35, 415 (1989)].

  9. Ordered structures of small numbers of nanorods induced by semiflexible star polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; He, Lilin; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-09-14

    The ordered structures of nanorods (NRs) in the semiflexible star polymer/NR mixtures are explored by employing molecular dynamics simulation. The structures of small numbers of NRs can be well controlled by varying the stiffness of semiflexible star polymers. At a moderate binding energy between star polymers and NRs, four completely different structures of small numbers of NRs are observed, including that the side-to-side hexagonal aggregation structures of NRs for flexible star polymers, the partly parallel aggregation structures of NRs and the end-to-end contact parallel aggregation structures of NRs for semiflexible star polymers, and the partial dispersion of NRs for rigid star polymers. Helical conformations of semiflexible star polymers binding with NRs are responsible for the formation of the end-to-end contact parallel aggregation structures for small numbers of NRs. This investigation may provide a possible pathway to develop ''smart'' medium to construct novel materials with high performance.

  10. The neutron star radius and the dense-matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Servillat, M.; Webb, N.; Rutledge, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    A physical understanding of the behaviour of cold ultra-dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars, and the thermal emission from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries inside globular clusters have proven very useful for that purpose. The recent 1.97±0.04 Msun measurement for the radio pulsar PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of states (EoS) are disfavoured, in favour of hadronic "normal matter" EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, "normal matter" EoSs produce lines of quasi-constant radii (within the measurement uncertainties, of about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to un-modelled spectrally hard components. Our results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, with a value Rns = 9.1±1.4 km, at 90% confidence, using conservative assumptions, which suggests that neutron start matter is best described by the softest "normal matter" equations of state.

  11. Peptidomimetic Star Polymers for Targeting Biological Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Lu, Derong; Xie, Zili; Feng, Jing; Jia, Zhongfan; Ho, Junming; Coote, Michelle L.; Wu, Yingliang; Monteiro, Michael J.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Four end-functionalized star polymers that could attenuate the flow of ionic currents across biological ion channels were first de novo designed computationally, then synthesized and tested experimentally on mammalian K+ channels. The 4-arm ethylene glycol conjugate star polymers with lysine or a tripeptide attached to the end of each arm were specifically designed to mimic the action of scorpion toxins on K+ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the lysine side chain of the polymers physically occludes the pore of Kv1.3, a target for immuno-suppression therapy. Two of the compounds tested were potent inhibitors of Kv1.3. The dissociation constants of these two compounds were computed to be 0.1 μM and 0.7 μM, respectively, within 3-fold to the values derived from subsequent experiments. These results demonstrate the power of computational methods in molecular design and the potential of star polymers as a new infinitely modifiable platform for ion channel drug discovery. PMID:27007701

  12. Peptidomimetic Star Polymers for Targeting Biological Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Lu, Derong; Xie, Zili; Feng, Jing; Jia, Zhongfan; Ho, Junming; Coote, Michelle L; Wu, Yingliang; Monteiro, Michael J; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Four end-functionalized star polymers that could attenuate the flow of ionic currents across biological ion channels were first de novo designed computationally, then synthesized and tested experimentally on mammalian K+ channels. The 4-arm ethylene glycol conjugate star polymers with lysine or a tripeptide attached to the end of each arm were specifically designed to mimic the action of scorpion toxins on K+ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the lysine side chain of the polymers physically occludes the pore of Kv1.3, a target for immuno-suppression therapy. Two of the compounds tested were potent inhibitors of Kv1.3. The dissociation constants of these two compounds were computed to be 0.1 μM and 0.7 μM, respectively, within 3-fold to the values derived from subsequent experiments. These results demonstrate the power of computational methods in molecular design and the potential of star polymers as a new infinitely modifiable platform for ion channel drug discovery.

  13. Confinement and partitioning of a single polymer chain in a dense array of nanoposts.

    PubMed

    Joo, Heesun; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-11-14

    We present a Brownian dynamics simulation study on the confinement and partitioning of a single, flexible polymer chain in a dense array of nanoposts with different sizes and separations, especially, when the volume of an interstitial space formed among four nanoposts is less than the volume of the polymer chain. As the interstitial volume decreases by either increasing the nanopost diameter or decreasing the separation between nanoposts, the chain conformation becomes elongated in the direction parallel to the nanoposts. Interestingly, however, the degree of chain elongation varies in a non-monotonic fashion as the interstitial volume decreases while keeping the passage width between two nanoposts constant at a small value. We calculate the free energy of chain partitioning over several interstitial spaces from the partitioning probability, and find that the non-monotonic dependence of the chain elongation results from an interplay between the confinement-driven chain elongation along the direction parallel to the nanoposts and the chain spreading perpendicular to the nanoposts by partitioning chain segments over several interstitial spaces. These results present the possibility of utilizing a dense array of nanoposts as a template to control polymer conformations.

  14. THE AGE, STELLAR CONTENT, AND STAR FORMATION TIMESCALE OF THE B59 DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, K. R.; Lada, C. J.; Muench, A. A.; Forbrich, J.; Ascenso, J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.

    2010-10-20

    We have investigated the stellar content of Barnard 59 (B59), the most active star-forming core in the Pipe Nebula. Using the SpeX spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we obtained moderate resolution, near-infrared (NIR) spectra for 20 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in B59 and a representative sample of NIR and mid-IR bright sources distributed throughout the Pipe. Measuring luminosity and temperature sensitive features in these spectra, we identified likely background giant stars and measured each star's spectral type, extinction, and NIR continuum excess. To measure B59's age, we place its candidate YSOs in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and compare their location to YSOs in several well-studied star-forming regions, as well as predictions of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models. We find that B59 is composed of late-type (K4-M6) low-mass (0.9-0.1 M{sub sun}) YSOs whose median stellar age is comparable to, if not slightly older than, that of YSOs within the {rho} Oph, Taurus, and Chameleon star-forming regions. Deriving absolute age estimates from PMS models computed by D'Antona et al., and accounting only for statistical uncertainties, we measure B59's median stellar age to be 2.6 {+-} 0.8 Myr. Including potential systematic effects increases the error budget for B59's median (DM98) stellar age to 2.6{sup +4.1}{sub -2.6} Myr. We also find that the relative age orderings implied by PMS evolutionary tracks depend on the range of stellar masses sampled, as model isochrones possess significantly different mass dependences. The maximum likelihood median stellar age we measure for B59, and the region's observed gas properties, suggests that the B59 dense core has been stable against global collapse for roughly six dynamical timescales and is actively forming stars with a star formation efficiency per dynamical time of {approx}6%. While the {approx}150% uncertainties associated with our age measurement propagate directly into these

  15. Pressure-induced amorphization of a dense coordination polymer and its impact on proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Umeyama, Daiki; Hagi, Keisuke; Ogiwara, Naoki; Horike, Satoshi E-mail: kitagawa@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tassel, Cedric; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Higo, Yuji; Kitagawa, Susumu E-mail: kitagawa@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    The proton conductivity of a dense coordination polymer (CP) was investigated under high-pressure conditions. Impedance measurements under high pressures revealed that the proton conductivity of the CP decreased more than 1000-fold at pressures of 3–7 GPa and that the activation energy for proton conduction almost doubled compared with that at ambient pressure. A synchrotron X-ray study under high pressure identified the amorphization process of the CP during compression, which rationally explains the decrease in conductivity and increase in activation energy. This phenomenon is categorized as reversible pressure-induced amorphization of a dense CP and is regarded as a demonstration of the coupling of the mechanical and electrical properties of a CP.

  16. A novel geometric embedding algorithm for efficiently generating dense polymer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Nievergelt, J.; Santos, S.; Suter, U. W.

    2001-06-01

    A new algorithm for generating starting polymer structures for molecular simulations (e.g., MD) in dense phase is presented. The algorithm yields structures that fulfill to a large extent rotational isomeric state (RIS) probabilities and avoid atomic overlap. The heuristic search bases on the new parallel-rotation (ParRot) technique. We tested the performance of the algorithm on two polymeric systems: Atomistic polyethylene and polystyrene. The algorithm permits to tackle the problem of packing chains into large boxes of size up to 50 Å in a couple of hours on common workstations. Moreover, our packing algorithm is applicable for general polymer systems. The algorithm requires CPU effort scaling with a power 2.8 in the chain length, and with a power 1.5 in the number of chains.

  17. Parallelized event chain algorithm for dense hard sphere and polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kampmann, Tobias A. Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-01-15

    We combine parallelization and cluster Monte Carlo for hard sphere systems and present a parallelized event chain algorithm for the hard disk system in two dimensions. For parallelization we use a spatial partitioning approach into simulation cells. We find that it is crucial for correctness to ensure detailed balance on the level of Monte Carlo sweeps by drawing the starting sphere of event chains within each simulation cell with replacement. We analyze the performance gains for the parallelized event chain and find a criterion for an optimal degree of parallelization. Because of the cluster nature of event chain moves massive parallelization will not be optimal. Finally, we discuss first applications of the event chain algorithm to dense polymer systems, i.e., bundle-forming solutions of attractive semiflexible polymers.

  18. DENSE GAS FRACTION AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY VARIATIONS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Blitz, L.; Bolatto, A. D.; Da Cunha, E.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sandstrom, K.; Usero, A.

    2015-12-20

    We use the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) millimeter interferometer to map the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/39), tracing the bulk of the molecular gas via the {sup 12}CO(1–0) line and denser molecular gas via the high density transitions HCN(1–0), HCO{sup +}(1–0), CS(2–1), and HNC(1–0). We detect bright emission from all tracers in both the two nuclei and three locales in the overlap region between the two nuclei. These three overlap region peaks correspond to previously identified “supergiant molecular clouds.” We combine the CARMA data with Herschel infrared (IR) data to compare observational indicators of the star formation efficiency (star formation rate/H{sub 2} ∝ IR/CO), dense gas fraction (HCN/CO), and dense gas star formation efficiency (IR/HCN). Regions within the Antennae show ratios consistent with those seen for entire galaxies, but these ratios vary by up to a factor of six within the galaxy. The five detected regions vary strongly in both their integrated intensities and these ratios. The northern nucleus is the brightest region in millimeter-wave line emission, while the overlap region is the brightest part of the system in the IR. We combine the CARMA and Herschel data with ALMA CO data to report line ratio patterns for each bright point. CO shows a declining spectral line energy distribution, consistent with previous studies. HCO{sup +} (1–0) emission is stronger than HCN (1–0) emission, perhaps indicating either more gas at moderate densities or higher optical depth than is commonly seen in more advanced mergers.

  19. Structure and rheology of star polymers in confined geometries: a mesoscopic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feiwo; Goujon, Florent; Mendonça, Ana C F; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2015-11-28

    Mesoscopic simulations of star polymer melts adsorbed onto solid surfaces are performed using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. A set of parameters is developed to study the low functionality star polymers under shear. The use of a new bond-angle potential between the arms of the star creates more rigid chains and discriminates between different functionalities at equilibrium, but still allows the polymers to deform appropriately under shear. The rheology of the polymer melts is studied by calculating the kinetic friction and viscosity and there is good agreement with experimental properties of these systems. The study is completed with predictive simulations of star polymer solutions in an athermal solvent. PMID:26435466

  20. Properties of hadron matter. II - Dense baryon matter and neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Y. C.; Wang, C. G.

    1971-01-01

    In this article we have provided certain details of a nuclear-matter computation, based on the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theory of nuclear reaction, which leads to an equation of state for matter in the density region of 10 to 500 trillion g/cu cm. We also explore the possibilities that at very high baryon densities or for very short baryon separations, the net baryon-baryon interaction may be negligible so that the results of dynamical models, like the statistical bootstrap model and the dual-resonance model, may be applicable to the study of dense baryon matter. Several plausible equations of state are constructed, and their effect on the limiting mass of the neutron star is examined.

  1. A novel parallel-rotation algorithm for atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of dense polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, S.; Suter, U. W.; Müller, M.; Nievergelt, J.

    2001-06-01

    We develop and test a new elementary Monte Carlo move for use in the off-lattice simulation of polymer systems. This novel Parallel-Rotation algorithm (ParRot) permits moving very efficiently torsion angles that are deeply inside long chains in melts. The parallel-rotation move is extremely simple and is also demonstrated to be computationally efficient and appropriate for Monte Carlo simulation. The ParRot move does not affect the orientation of those parts of the chain outside the moving unit. The move consists of a concerted rotation around four adjacent skeletal bonds. No assumption is made concerning the backbone geometry other than that bond lengths and bond angles are held constant during the elementary move. Properly weighted sampling techniques are needed for ensuring detailed balance because the new move involves a correlated change in four degrees of freedom along the chain backbone. The ParRot move is supplemented with the classical Metropolis Monte Carlo, the Continuum-Configurational-Bias, and Reptation techniques in an isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo simulation of melts of short and long chains. Comparisons are made with the capabilities of other Monte Carlo techniques to move the torsion angles in the middle of the chains. We demonstrate that ParRot constitutes a highly promising Monte Carlo move for the treatment of long polymer chains in the off-lattice simulation of realistic models of dense polymer systems.

  2. Improved adhesion of dense silica coatings on polymers by atmospheric plasma pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linying; Ranade, Alpana N; Matos, Marvi A; Dubois, Geraud; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-09-11

    Oxygen atmospheric plasma was used to pretreat polycarbonate (PC) and stretched poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces in order to enhance the adhesion of the dense silica coatings deposited by atmospheric plasma on the polymer substrates. The treatment time and chemical structure of the polymers were found to be important factors. For PC, a short treatment increased the adhesion energy, while longer treatment times decreased the adhesion. In contrast, plasma pretreatment monotonically decreased the adhesion of PMMA, and pristine PMMA exhibited much higher adhesion than the PC counterpart. We found that adhesion enhancement was achieved through improved chemical bonding, chain interdiffusion, and mechanical interlocking at the coating/substrate interface, after a short atmospheric plasma treatment. Decreased adhesion resulted from overoxidation and low-molecular-weight weak layer formation on the polymer surface by prolonged atmospheric plasma treatment. The dramatic differences in the behavior of PC and PMMA in relation to the plasma treatment time were due to their dissimilar resistance to atmospheric plasma exposure.

  3. FORMATION OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS AND STARS AT THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RING IN THE BARRED GALAXY NGC 7552

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hsi-An; Lim, Jeremy; Matsushita, Satoki; Wong, Tony; Ryder, Stuart

    2013-05-01

    We present millimeter molecular line complemented by optical observations, along with a reanalysis of archival centimeter H I and continuum data, to infer the global dynamics and determine where dense molecular gas and massive stars preferentially form in the circumnuclear starburst ring of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 7552. We find diffuse molecular gas in a pair of dust lanes each running along the large-scale galactic bar, as well as in the circumnuclear starburst ring. We do not detect dense molecular gas in the dust lanes, but find such gas concentrated in two knots where the dust lanes make contact with the circumnuclear starburst ring. When convolved to the same angular resolution as the images in dense gas, the radio continuum emission of the circumnuclear starburst ring also exhibits two knots, each lying downstream of an adjacent knot in dense gas. The results agree qualitatively with the idea that massive stars form from dense gas at the contact points, where diffuse gas is channeled into the ring along the dust lanes, and later explode as supernovae downstream of the contact points. Based on the inferred rotation curve, however, the propagation time between the respective pairs of dense gas and centimeter continuum knots is about an order of magnitude shorter than the lifetimes of OB stars. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy, and conclude that either the initial mass function is top-heavy or massive stars in the ring do not form exclusively at the contact points where dense molecular gas is concentrated.

  4. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE MAPS THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS IN THE NEARBY STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Frayer, David; Leroy, Adam K.; Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies show that dense molecular gas correlates with recent star formation, suggesting that the formation of this gas phase may help regulate star formation. A key test of this idea requires wide-area, high-resolution maps of dense molecular gas in galaxies to explore how local physical conditions drive dense gas formation, but these observations have been limited because of the faintness of dense gas tracers like HCN and HCO{sup +}. Here we demonstrate the power of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT)—the largest single-dish millimeter radio telescope—for mapping dense gas in galaxies by presenting the most sensitive maps yet of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the starburst galaxy M82. The HCN and HCO{sup +} in the disk of this galaxy correlates with both recent star formation and more diffuse molecular gas and shows kinematics consistent with a rotating torus. The HCO{sup +} emission extending to the north and south of the disk is coincident with the outflow previously identified in CO and traces the eastern edge of the hot outflowing gas. The central starburst region has a higher ratio of star formation to dense gas than the outer regions, pointing to the starburst as a key driver of this relationship. These results establish that the GBT can efficiently map the dense molecular gas at 90 GHz in nearby galaxies, a capability that will increase further with the 16 element feed array under construction.

  5. Stress relaxation of polymer networks containing low concentrations of dangling chains and star shaped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Daniel A.; Gómez, Leopoldo R.

    2005-03-01

    We analyze the influence of low concentrations of star and dangling polymer chains on the stress relaxation process of model polymer networks. Model PDMS networks with well defined structure were obtained by the hydrosylilation reaction, based on the addition of hydrogen silanes from a trifunctional cross- linker to end vinyl groups of α- φ polydimethylsiloxane chains. Rheological characterization was carried out in a rotational rheometer by dynamic and stress relaxation tests. Viscoelastic properties of the networks depend strongly on the molecular weight of the stars or pendant chains. It was found that a modified Pearson-Helfand model provides a very good fit to the behavior of these networks. This model incorporates the effect of higher Rouse modes on the arm retraction [Milner and McLeish, Macromolecules, 1997] and the potential for arm retraction originally proposed by Doi and Kuzuu.

  6. Molecular systems under shock compression into the dense plasma regime: carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Cochrane, Kyle R.; Root, Seth; Carpenter, John H.

    2013-10-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) has proven remarkably accurate in predicting properties of matter under shock compression into the dense plasma regime. Materials where chemistry plays a role are of interest for many applications, including planetary science and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). As examples of systems where chemical reactions are important, and demonstration of the high fidelity possible for these both structurally and chemically complex systems, we will discuss shock- and re-shock of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) in the range 100 to 800 GPa and shock compression of hydrocarbon polymers, including GDP (glow discharge polymer) which is used as an ablator in laser ICF experiments. Experimental results from Sandia's Z machine validate the DFT simulations at extreme conditions and the combination of experiment and DFT provide reliable data for evaluating existing and constructing future wide-range equations of state models for molecular compounds. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-09-20

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO{sup +} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H{sub 2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO{sup +} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  8. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Totani, Masayasu; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78–88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94–97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  9. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion.

    PubMed

    Totani, Masayasu; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Kuroda, Kenichi; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78-88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94-97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria.

  10. Hot and Dense Neutron-Rich Matter in Supernovae and Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    The equation of state, transport and linear response properties of hot and dense neutron-rich matter created in core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers directly affect the observable electromagnetic, neutrino, and gravitational wave signals as well as the possibility for r-process nucleosynthesis in the ejected matter. In this talk I will describe recent progress in constructing a thermodynamic equation of state of nuclear matter based on the low-energy realization of QCD, chiral effective field theory, which incorporates realistic microphysics such as multi-pion exchange processes and three-body forces. Bulk properties of zero-temperature symmetric nuclear matter around saturation density are shown to be well described without additional fine tuning, as are selected thermodynamic observables. Constraints from microscopic many-body theory on farther-reaching phenomenological mean field models are explored, and first efforts toward the description of consistent neutrino response in neutron-rich matter from chiral effective field theory is presented. Work supported under US DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41014.

  11. The EMPIRE Survey: Systematic Variations in the Dense Gas Fraction and Star Formation Efficiency from Full-disk Mapping of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, Frank; Leroy, Adam K.; Jiménez-Donaire, Maria J.; Pety, Jérôme; Usero, Antonio; Cormier, Diane; Bolatto, Alberto; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Colombo, Dario; González-García, Manuel; Hughes, Annie; Kepley, Amanda A.; Kramer, Carsten; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Schruba, Andreas; Schuster, Karl; Tomicic, Neven; Zschaechner, Laura

    2016-05-01

    We present the first results from the EMPIRE survey, an IRAM large program that is mapping tracers of high-density molecular gas across the disks of nine nearby star-forming galaxies. Here, we present new maps of the 3 mm transitions of HCN, HCO+, and HNC across the whole disk of our pilot target, M51. As expected, dense gas correlates with tracers of recent star formation, filling the “luminosity gap” between Galactic cores and whole galaxies. In detail, we show that both the fraction of gas that is dense, {f}{dense} traced by HCN/CO, and the rate at which dense gas forms stars, {{SFE}}{dense} traced by IR/HCN, depend on environment in the galaxy. The sense of the dependence is that high-surface-density, high molecular gas fraction regions of the galaxy show high dense gas fractions and low dense gas star formation efficiencies. This agrees with recent results for individual pointings by Usero et al. but using unbiased whole-galaxy maps. It also agrees qualitatively with the behavior observed contrasting our own Solar Neighborhood with the central regions of the Milky Way. The sense of the trends can be explained if the dense gas fraction tracks interstellar pressure but star formation occurs only in regions of high density contrast.

  12. MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC LINE SURVEYS OF GALAXIES. I. THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS PHASE AS A BEACON

    SciTech Connect

    Geach, James E.; Papadopoulos, Padelis P. E-mail: padelis@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2012-10-01

    We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the universe and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular, and [C II] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses (1) recently available HCN spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), (2) a value for {epsilon}{sub *} = SFR/M{sub dense}(H{sub 2}) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium, and (3) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal 'emergent' CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [C II] as the most important of the far-infrared cooling lines. Optimal blind surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) could potentially detect very distant (z {approx} 10-12) [C II] emitters in the {>=}ULIRG galaxy class at a rate of {approx}0.1-1 hr{sup -1} (although this prediction is strongly dependent on the star formation and enrichment history at this early epoch), whereas the (high-frequency) Square Kilometer Array will be capable of blindly detecting z > 3 low-J CO emitters at a rate of {approx}40-70 hr{sup -1}. The [C II] line holds special promise for detecting metal-poor systems with extensive reservoirs of CO-dark molecular gas where detection rates with ALMA can reach up to 2-7 hr{sup -1} in Bands 4-6.

  13. Conformation-dependent translocation of a star polymer through a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhu; Liu, Jiannan; Xiao, Mengying; Wang, Rong; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2014-01-01

    The translocation process of star polymers through a nanochannel is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The translocation process is strongly influenced by the star arm arrangement as the polymer enters the channel, and a scaling relation between the translocation time τ and the total number of beads Ntot is obtained. Qualitative agreements are found with predictions of the nucleation and growth model for linear block co-polymer translocation. In the intermediate stage where the center of the star polymer is at the channel entrance, the translocation time is found to have power law-dependence on the number of arms outside the channel and very weakly dependent on the number of arms in the channel. Increasing the total number of star arms also increases the star translocation time. PMID:25332744

  14. Star Forming Dense Cloud Cores in the TeV -ray SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, H.; Sato, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Torii, K.; Moribe, N.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Inoue, T.; Inutsuka, S.; Tanaka, T.; Mizuno, A.; Ogawa, H.; Stutzki, J.; Bertoldi, F.; Anderl, S.; Bronfman, L.; Koo, B.C.

    2010-10-27

    RX J1713.7-3946 is one of the TeV {gamma}-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting synchrotron X rays. The SNR is associated with molecular gas located at {approx}1 kpc. We made new molecular observations toward the dense cloud cores, peaks A, C and D, in the SNR in the {sup 12}CO(J=2-1) and {sup 13}CO(J=2-1) transitions at angular resolution of 90 degrees. The most intense core in {sup 13}CO, peak C, was also mapped in the {sup 12}CO(J=4-3) transition at angular resolution of 38 degrees. Peak C shows strong signs of active star formation including bipolar outflow and a far-infrared protostellar source and has a steep gradient with a r{sup -2.2 {+-} 0.4} variation in the average density within radius r. Peak C and the other dense cloud cores are rim-brightened in synchrotron X rays, suggesting that the dense cloud cores are embedded within or on the outer boundary of the SNR shell. This confirms the earlier suggestion that the X rays are physically associated with the molecular gas (Fukui et al. 2003). We present a scenario where the densest molecular core, peak C, survived against the blast wave and is now embedded within the SNR. Numerical simulations of the shock-cloud interaction indicate that a dense clump can indeed survive shock erosion, since shock propagation speed is stalled in the dense clump. Additionally, the shock-cloud interaction induces turbulence and magnetic field amplification around the dense clump that may facilitate particle acceleration in the lower-density inter-clump space leading to the enhanced synchrotron X rays around dense cores.

  15. THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G0.253+0.016: A MASSIVE DENSE CLOUD WITH LOW STAR FORMATION POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Zhang Qizhou

    2013-03-10

    We present the first interferometric molecular line and dust emission maps for the Galactic Center (GC) cloud G0.253+0.016, observed using CARMA and the SMA. This cloud is very dense, and concentrates a mass exceeding the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) into a radius of only 3 pc, but it is essentially starless. G0.253+0.016 therefore violates ''star formation laws'' presently used to explain trends in galactic and extragalactic star formation by a factor {approx}45. Our observations show a lack of dense cores of significant mass and density, thus explaining the low star formation activity. Instead, cores with low densities and line widths {approx}< 1 km s{sup -1}-probably the narrowest lines reported for the GC region to date-are found. Evolution over several 10{sup 5} yr is needed before more massive cores, and possibly an Arches-like stellar cluster, could form. Given the disruptive dynamics of the GC region, and the potentially unbound nature of G0.253+0.016, it is not clear that this evolution will happen.

  16. Determination of the interaction parameter and topological scaling features of symmetric star polymers in dilute solution.

    PubMed

    Rai, Durgesh K; Beaucage, Gregory; Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Beaucage, Peter; Ramachandran, Ramnath; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2015-07-01

    Star polymers provide model architectures to understand the dynamic and rheological effects of chain confinement for a range of complex topological structures like branched polymers, colloids, and micelles. It is important to describe the structure of such macromolecular topologies using small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering to facilitate understanding of their structure-property relationships. Modeling of scattering from linear, Gaussian polymers, such as in the melt, has applied the random phase approximation using the Debye polymer scattering function. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter can be obtained using neutron scattering by this method. Gaussian scaling no longer applies for more complicated chain topologies or when chains are in good solvents. For symmetric star polymers, chain scaling can differ from ν=0.5(d(f)=2) due to excluded volume, steric interaction between arms, and enhanced density due to branching. Further, correlation between arms in a symmetric star leads to an interference term in the scattering function first described by Benoit for Gaussian chains. In this work, a scattering function is derived which accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers as well as the polymer-solvent interaction parameter for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension using a hybrid Unified scattering function. The approach is demonstrated for linear, four-arm and eight-arm polyisoprene stars in deuterated p-xylene.

  17. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F

    2015-01-28

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties. PMID:25638003

  18. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  19. N-Body interactions in soft-sphere coarse-grained models of star polymers.

    PubMed

    Pelissetto, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    We consider the coarse-grained approach in which star polymers are mapped onto atoms located at the centers of the stars interacting by means of ultrasoft potentials. We generalize the Witten-Pincus formula to all n-body potentials: in the good-solvent regime all potentials show an ultrasoft logarithmic divergence when the relative distance of all n stars goes to zero, with coefficients that can be related to the partition-function exponents γ(f). PMID:22463232

  20. HUBBLE UNCOVERS MYSTERY OBJECTS IN THE DENSE CORE OF A NEARBY STAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Piercing the heart of a glittering swarm of stars, NASA's sharp-eyed Hubble Space Telescope unveils the central region of the globular cluster M22, a 12- to 14-billion-year-old grouping of stars in the constellation Sagittarius. The telescope's view of the cluster's core measures 3.3 light-years across. The stars near the cluster's core are 100,000 times more numerous than those in the Sun's neighborhood. Buried in the glow of starlight are about six 'mystery objects,' which astronomers estimate are no larger than one quarter the mass of the giant planet Jupiter, the solar system's heftiest planet. The mystery objects are too far and dim for Hubble to see directly. Instead, the orbiting observatory detected these unseen celestial bodies by looking for their gravitational effects on the light from far distant stars. In this case, the stars are far beyond the cluster in the galactic bulge, about 30,000 light-years from Earth at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. M22 is 8,500 light-years away. The invisible objects betrayed their presence by bending the starlight gravitationally and amplifying it, a phenomenon known as microlensing. From February 22 to June 15, 1999, Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 looked through this central region and monitored 83,000 stars. During that time the orbiting observatory recorded six unexpectedly brief microlensing events. In each case a background star jumped in brightness for less than 20 hours before dropping back to normal. These transitory spikes in brightness mean that the object passing in front of the star must have been much smaller than a normal star. Hubble also detected one clear microlensing event. In that observation a star appeared about 10 times brighter over an 18-day span before returning to normal. Astronomers traced the leap in brightness to a dwarf star in the cluster floating in front of the background star. The inset photo shows the entire globular cluster of about 10 million stars. M22 is about 60

  1. Targeted Gene Delivery to Macrophages by Biodegradable Star-Shaped Polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yafeng; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Jin; Pan, Dejing; Liu, Jianghuai; Feng, Fude

    2016-02-17

    In this report, two biodegradable star-shaped polyasparamide derivatives and four analogues modified with either mannose or folic acid moiety for preferential targeting of a difficult-to-transfect immune cell type, i.e., macrophage, have been synthesized. Each of the prepared star polymers complexes with plasmid DNA to form nanosized particles featuring a core-shell-like morphology. Mannose or folate functionalized star polymers can greatly improve the transfection performance on a macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. As a result, a combination of targeting ligand modification and topological structures of gene carriers is a promising strategy for immune cells-based gene therapy.

  2. Synthesis and properties of star-comb polymers and their doxorubicin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; van der Poll, Derek G; Jerger, Katherine; Floyd, William C; Fréchet, Jean M J; Szoka, Francis C

    2011-04-20

    We describe a six-step synthesis to water-soluble doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded biodegradable PEGylated star-comb polymers with favorable pharmaceutical properties by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) starting with a commercially available tripentaerythritol carrying eight reactive sites. The low polydispersity polymers degrade in a stepwise manner into lower molecular weight (MW) fragments by 15 days at 37 °C at either pH 5.0 or pH 7.4. The half-life of the star-comb polymers in blood is dependent upon the molecular weight; the 44 kDa star-comb has a t(1/2, β) of 30.5 ± 2.1 h, which is not significantly changed (28.6 ± 2.7 h) when 6.6 wt % of DOX is attached to it via a pH-sensitive hydrazone linker. The star-comb polymers have low accumulation in organs but a high accumulation in C26 flank tumors implanted in Balb/C mice. The hydrodynamic diameter of polymer-DOX conjugates measured by dynamic light scattering increases from 8 to 35 to 41 nm as the loading is increased from 6.6 to 8.4 to 10.2 wt %. Although there is no significant difference in the t(1/2, β) or in the accumulation of polymer-DOX in C-26 tumors, the uptake of polymer in the spleen is significantly higher for polymers with DOX loadings greater than 6.6 wt %. Polymer accumulation in other vital organs is independent of the DOX loading. The facile synthesis, biodegradability, long circulation time, and high tumor accumulation of the attached drug suggests that the water-soluble star-comb polymers have promise in therapeutic applications.

  3. RX J0720.4-3125: Implications for neutron star cooling and the dense matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, John C. L.; Link, Bennett; van Riper, Kenneth; Arnaud, Keith A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    1999-05-01

    The soft X-ray source RX J0720.4-3125 appears to be a clean example of a cooling neutron star. Its X-ray emission is well-fit by a 79+/-4 eV blackbody and displays a periodic modulation with period P=8.391 sec and semi-amplitude ~ 10%. The observational upper limit to the period derivative implies a minimum spindown age of t0=1.7x 10(5) yr if the star was born rapidly rotating. The absence of a visible supernova remnant independently suggests an age for this source of gtrsim 10(5) yr. With the interpretation of this source as a cooling-driven, magnetized, rotating neutron star, we explore the implications for the dense matter equation of state (EOS), the mode of energy loss (modified URCA vs. direct URCA), and the rate of internal heating due to superfluid friction. For the standard (modified URCA) cooling models, we study two types of stars: those born slowly rotating, with relatively small spin-down rates and conventional dipole magnetic fields ( ~ 10(12) G), and those born rapidly rotating with large spin-down rates and magnetar-scale dipole fields ( ~ 10(14) G). We find that standard cooling with a stiff or moderately stiff EOS is consistent with the observations of RX J0720.4-3125 provided the star's age is ≲ 3 t_0=5*E(5) yr. If the EOS is very stiff, the star must be born with a short rotation period and significant internal heating by superfluid friction is required. More moderate heating suffices only if the star is very massive ( ~ 2 M_sun) and has an age ~ t_0. Stars with M ~ 1.4 M_sun and a moderately stiff EOS give modulations about a factor of five below that observed. However, the inclusion of atmospheric effects or more complex field geometries could increase the modulation to a level consistent with the observations. Stars with a stiff EOS give modulations close to that observed. As an illustration of the effects of accelerated cooling processes, we consider direct quark URCA cooling. We find that these models cool too fast and are cleanly ruled

  4. Control of Chemical, Thermal, and Gas Transport Properties in Dense Phosphazene Polymer Membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart; Mark L. Stone; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2005-10-01

    Polyphosphazenes are hybrid polymers having organic pendant groups attached to an inorganic backbone. Phosphazene polymers can be tailored to specific applications through the attachment of a variety of different pendant groups to the phosphazene backbone. Applications for which these polymers have proven useful include solid polymer electrolytes for batteries and fuel cells, as well as, membranes for gas and liquid separations. In past work, phosphazene polymers have been synthesized using mixtures of pendant groups with differing chemical affinities. Specific ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pendant groups were placed on the phosphazene backbone with a goal of demonstrating control of solubility, and therefore chemical selectivity. In this work, a series of phosphazene homo-polymers were synthesized having varying amounts of hydrophobic and hydrophilic character on each individual pendant group. Polymers were synthesized having a hydrophilic portion next to the polymer backbone and the hydrophobic portion on the terminal end of the pendant group. The effects of these combined hydrophobic/hydrophilic pendant groups on polymer morphology and gas transport properties are presented. The following data will be addressed: thermal characterization, pure gas permeability on seven gases (Ar, H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4 ), and ideal selectivity for the gas pairs: O2/N2, H2/CO2, CO2/H2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2.

  5. Into the polymer brush regime through the "grafting-to" method: densely polymer-grafted rodlike viruses with an unusual nematic liquid crystal behavior.

    PubMed

    Zan, Tingting; Wu, Fengchi; Pei, Xiaodong; Jia, Shaoyi; Zhang, Ran; Wu, Songhai; Niu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Zhenkun

    2016-01-21

    The current work reports an intriguing discovery of how the force exerted on protein complexes like filamentous viruses by the strong interchain repulsion of polymer brushes can induce subtle changes of the constituent subunits at the molecular scale. Such changes transform into the macroscopic rearrangement of the chiral ordering of the rodlike virus in three dimensions. For this, a straightforward "grafting-to" PEGylation method has been developed to densely graft a filamentous virus with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The grafting density is so high that PEG is in the polymer brush regime, resulting in straight and thick rodlike particles with a thin viral backbone. Scission of the densely PEGylated viruses into fragments was observed due to the steric repulsion of the PEG brush, as facilitated by adsorption onto a mica surface. The high grafting density of PEG endows the virus with an isotropic-nematic (I-N) liquid crystal (LC) phase transition that is independent of the ionic strength and the densely PEGylated viruses enter into the nematic LC phase at much lower virus concentrations. Most importantly, while the intact virus and the one grafted with PEG of low grafting density can form a chiral nematic LC phase, the densely PEGylated viruses only form a pure nematic LC phase. This can be traced back to the secondary to tertiary structural change of the major coat protein of the virus, driven by the steric repulsion of the PEG brush. Quantitative parameters characterising the conformation of the grafted PEG derived from the grafting density or the I-N LC transition are elegantly consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  6. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  7. GRAVITATIONAL CONUNDRUM? DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION VERSUS DISRUPTION OF BINARY STARS IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Zheng, Yong; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Deng, Licai; Hu, Yi; Wicker, James E.

    2013-03-01

    Upon their formation, dynamically cool (collapsing) star clusters will, within only a few million years, achieve stellar mass segregation for stars down to a few solar masses, simply because of gravitational two-body encounters. Since binary systems are, on average, more massive than single stars, one would expect them to also rapidly mass segregate dynamically. Contrary to these expectations and based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations, we show that the compact, 15-30 Myr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 exhibits tantalizing hints at the {approx}> 2{sigma} level of significance (>3{sigma} if we assume a power-law secondary-to-primary mass-ratio distribution) of an increasing fraction of F-star binary systems (with combined masses of 1.3-1.6 M {sub Sun }) with increasing distance from the cluster center, specifically between the inner 10''-20'' (approximately equivalent to the cluster's core and half-mass radii) and the outer 60''-80''. If confirmed, then this will offer support for the theoretically predicted but thus far unobserved dynamical disruption processes of the significant population of 'soft' binary systems-with relatively low binding energies compared to the kinetic energy of their stellar members-in star clusters, which we have access to here by virtue of the cluster's unique combination of youth and high stellar density.

  8. A Unified Equation for the Reaction Rate in Dense Matter Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gasques, L. R.; Wiescher, M.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2007-10-26

    We analyze thermonuclear and pycnonuclear reaction rates in multi-component dense stellar plasma. First we describe calculations of the astrophysical S-factor at low energies using the Sao Paulo potential on the basis of the barrier penetration model. Then we present a simple phenomenological expression for a reaction rate. The expression contains several fit parameters which we adjust to reproduce the best microscopic calculations available in the literature.

  9. Flexible star polymer chain adsorption by a flat surface: a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenak, Siham; Guenachi, Aicha; Sabeur, Sid Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we have studied the adsorption of a single flexible star polymer chain by a flat surface. The molecular dynamics simulation has been validated for the case of a free star polymer chain using the diffusion experiment. The scaling laws found are in agreement with the Flory theory predictions and the Rouse model. For the adsorption, preliminary results were obtained for chains of different sizes N=31 to N=199 and different functionalities (f=3,4,6,8,10). For the case of semi-flexible star polymer chains, further investigation is needed to locate the critical point of adsorption when varying the potential interaction strength between the chain and the surface.

  10. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  11. Metal-Organic Polyhedral Core as a Versatile Scaffold for Divergent and Convergent Star Polymer Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Nobuhiko; Gochomori, Mika; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-05-25

    We herein report the divergent and convergent synthesis of coordination star polymers (CSP) by using metal-organic polyhedrons (MOPs) as a multifunctional core. For the divergent route, copper-based great rhombicuboctahedral MOPs decorated with dithiobenzoate or trithioester chain transfer groups at the periphery were designed. Subsequent reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of monomers mediated by the MOPs gave star polymers, in which 24 polymeric arms were grafted from the MOP core. On the other hand, the convergent route provided identical CSP architectures by simple mixing of a macroligand and copper ions. Isophthalic acid-terminated polymers (so-called macroligands) immediately formed the corresponding CSPs through a coordination reaction with copper(II) ions. This convergent route enabled us to obtain miktoarm CSPs with tunable chain compositions through ligand mixing alone. This powerful method allows instant access to a wide variety of multicomponent star polymers that conventionally have required highly skilled and multistep syntheses. MOP-core CSPs are a new class of star polymer that can offer a design strategy for highly processable porous soft materials by using coordination nanocages as a building component.

  12. Metal-Organic Polyhedral Core as a Versatile Scaffold for Divergent and Convergent Star Polymer Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Nobuhiko; Gochomori, Mika; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-05-25

    We herein report the divergent and convergent synthesis of coordination star polymers (CSP) by using metal-organic polyhedrons (MOPs) as a multifunctional core. For the divergent route, copper-based great rhombicuboctahedral MOPs decorated with dithiobenzoate or trithioester chain transfer groups at the periphery were designed. Subsequent reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of monomers mediated by the MOPs gave star polymers, in which 24 polymeric arms were grafted from the MOP core. On the other hand, the convergent route provided identical CSP architectures by simple mixing of a macroligand and copper ions. Isophthalic acid-terminated polymers (so-called macroligands) immediately formed the corresponding CSPs through a coordination reaction with copper(II) ions. This convergent route enabled us to obtain miktoarm CSPs with tunable chain compositions through ligand mixing alone. This powerful method allows instant access to a wide variety of multicomponent star polymers that conventionally have required highly skilled and multistep syntheses. MOP-core CSPs are a new class of star polymer that can offer a design strategy for highly processable porous soft materials by using coordination nanocages as a building component. PMID:27119553

  13. Equation of state constraints for the cold dense matter inside neutron stars using the cooling tail method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nättilä, J.; Steiner, A. W.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-06-01

    The cooling phase of thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts can be used to constrain neutron star (NS) compactness by comparing the observed cooling tracks of bursts to accurate theoretical atmosphere model calculations. By applying the so-called cooling tail method, where the information from the whole cooling track is used, we constrain the mass, radius, and distance for three different NSs in low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1702-429, 4U 1724-307, and SAX J1810.8-260. Care is taken to use only the hard state bursts where it is thought that the NS surface alone is emitting. We then use a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm within a Bayesian framework to obtain a parameterized equation of state (EoS) of cold dense matter from our initial mass and radius constraints. This allows us to set limits on various nuclear parameters and to constrain an empirical pressure-density relationship for the dense matter. Our predicted EoS results in NS a radius between 10.5-12.8 km (95% confidence limits) for a mass of 1.4 M⊙, depending slightly on the assumed composition. Because of systematic errors and uncertainty in the composition, these results should be interpreted as lower limits for the radius.

  14. Lymphatic trafficking kinetics and near-infrared imaging using star polymer architectures with controlled anionic character.

    PubMed

    Bagby, Taryn R; Duan, Shaofeng; Cai, Shuang; Yang, Qiuhong; Thati, Sharadvi; Berkland, Cory; Aires, Daniel J; Forrest, M Laird

    2012-08-30

    Targeted lymphatic delivery of nanoparticles for drug delivery and imaging is primarily dependent on size and charge. Prior studies have observed increased lymphatic uptake and retentions of over 48 h for negatively charged particles compared to neutral and positively charged particles. We have developed new polymeric materials that extend retention over a more pharmaceutically relevant 7-day period. We used whole body fluorescence imaging to observe in mice the lymphatic trafficking of a series of anionic star poly-(6-O-methacryloyl-D-galactose) polymer-NIR dye (IR820) conjugates. The anionic charge of polymers was increased by modifying galactose moieties in the star polymers with succinic anhydride. Increasing anionic nature was associated with enhanced lymphatic uptake up to a zeta potential of ca.-40 mV; further negative charge did not affect lymphatic uptake. Compared to the 20% acid-conjugate, the 40-90% acid-star-polymer conjugates exhibited a 2.5- to 3.5-fold increase in lymphatic uptake in both the popliteal and iliac nodes. The polymer conjugates exhibited node half-lives of 2-20 h in the popliteal nodes and 19-114 h in the deeper iliac nodes. These polymer conjugates can deliver drugs or imaging agents with rapid lymphatic uptake and prolonged deep-nodal retention; thus they may provide a useful vehicle for sustained intralymphatic drug delivery with low toxicity.

  15. Second-generation Stellar Disks in Dense Star Clusters and Cluster Ellipticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-05-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) and nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are typically composed of several stellar populations, characterized by different chemical compositions. Different populations show different ages in NSCs, but not necessarily in GCs. The youngest populations in NSCs appear to reside in disk-like structures as observed in our Galaxy and in M31. Gas infall followed by formation of second-generation (SG) stars in GCs may similarly form disk-like structures in the clusters nuclei. Here we explore this possibility and follow the long-term evolution of stellar disks embedded in GCs, and study their effects on the evolution of the clusters. We study disks with different masses by means of detailed N-body simulations and explore their morphological and kinematic signatures on the GC structures. We find that as a SG disk relaxes, the old, first-generation stellar population flattens and becomes more radially anisotropic, making the GC structure become more elliptical. The SG stellar population is characterized by a lower velocity dispersion and a higher rotational velocity compared with the primordial older population. The strength of these kinematic signatures depends both on the relaxation time of the system and on the fractional mass of the SG disk. We therefore conclude that SG populations formed in flattened configurations will give rise to two systematic trends: (1) a positive correlation between GC ellipticity and fraction of SG population and (2) a positive correlation between GC relaxation time and ellipticity. Therefore, GC ellipticities and rotation could be related to the formation of SG stars and their initial configuration.

  16. FORMATION OF MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN DENSE STAR CLUSTERS. II. INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND PRIMORDIAL MASS SEGREGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Umbreit, Stefan; Rasio, Frederic A.; Bierbaum, Matt

    2012-06-10

    A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes is the runaway merger in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). In this paper, we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code for N-body systems with N as high as 10{sup 6} stars. Our code now includes an explicit treatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation, we generally see a decrease in core-collapse time (t{sub cc}). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in t{sub cc} is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time decreasing t{sub cc}. The final mass of the VMS formed is always close to {approx}10{sup -3} of the total cluster mass, in agreement with previous studies and is reminiscent of the observed correlation between the central BH mass and the bulge mass of the galaxies. As the degree of primordial mass segregation is increased, the mass of the VMS increases at most by a factor of three. Flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases t{sub cc}. For the range of IMFs investigated in this paper, this increase in t{sub cc} is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus, there is no significant change in t{sub cc} for the somewhat flatter global IMFs observed in very young massive clusters.

  17. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    SciTech Connect

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Sato, B.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  18. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm.

  19. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm. PMID:24504709

  20. White polymer light-emitting diodes based on star-shaped polymers with an orange dendritic phosphorescent core.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minrong; Li, Yanhu; Cao, Xiaosong; Jiang, Bei; Wu, Hongbin; Qin, Jingui; Cao, Yong; Yang, Chuluo

    2014-12-01

    A series of new star-shaped polymers with a triphenylamine-based iridium(III) dendritic complex as the orange-emitting core and poly(9,9-dihexylfluorene) (PFH) chains as the blue-emitting arms is developed towards white polymer light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs). By fine-tuning the content of the orange phosphor, partial energy transfer and charge trapping from the blue backbone to the orange core is realized to achieve white light emission. Single-layer WPLEDs with the configuration of ITO (indium-tin oxide)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/polymer/CsF/Al exhibit a maximum current efficiency of 1.69 cd A(-1) and CIE coordinates of (0.35, 0.33), which is very close to the pure white-light point of (0.33, 0.33). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on star-shaped white-emitting single polymers that simultaneously consist of fluorescent and phosphorescent species.

  1. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Kwon, Woojin; Kauffmann, Jens; Tobin, John J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Tassis, Konstantinos; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), and HCN (J = 1 → 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ∼7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ∼0.2 pc and widths of ∼0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  2. Quantification of interaction and topological parameters of polyisoprene star polymers under good solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Beaucage, Peter; Ramachandran, Ramnath; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2016-05-01

    Mass fractal scaling, reflected in the mass fractal dimension df, is independently impacted by topology, reflected in the connectivity dimension c , and by tortuosity, reflected in the minimum dimension dmin. The mass fractal dimension is related to these other dimensions by df=c dmin . Branched fractal structures have a higher mass fractal dimension compared to linear structures due to a higher c , and extended structures have a lower dimension compared to convoluted self-avoiding and Gaussian walks due to a lower dmin. It is found, in this work, that macromolecules in thermodynamic equilibrium display a fixed mass fractal dimension df under good solvent conditions, regardless of chain topology. These equilibrium structures accommodate changes in chain topology such as branching c by a decrease in chain tortuosity dmin. Symmetric star polymers are used to understand the structure of complex macromolecular topologies. A recently published hybrid Unified scattering function accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers along with polymer-solvent interaction for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension. Dilute solutions of linear, three-arm and six-arm polyisoprene stars are studied under good solvent conditions in deuterated p -xylene. Reduced chain tortuosity can be viewed as steric straightening of the arms. Steric effects for star topologies are quantified, and it is found that steric straightening of arms is more significant for lower-molecular-weight arms. The observation of constant df is explained through a modification of Flory-Krigbaum theory for branched polymers.

  3. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-01

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γ p ˙ , which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γ p ˙ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates ( γ ˙ ≪ γ p ˙), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates ( γ ˙ ≫ γ p ˙), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers.

  4. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-28

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γṗ, which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γṗ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates (γ̇≪γṗ), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates (γ̇≫γṗ), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers. PMID:27369542

  5. SiO excitation from dense shocks in the earliest stages of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Codella, C.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Gusdorf, A.; Csengeri, T.; Anderl, S.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular outflows are a direct consequence of accretion, and therefore they represent one of the best tracers of accretion processes in the still poorly understood early phases of high-mass star formation. Previous studies suggested that the SiO abundance decreases with the evolution of a massive young stellar object probably because of a decay of jet activity, as witnessed in low-mass star-forming regions. We investigate the SiO excitation conditions and its abundance in outflows from a sample of massive young stellar objects through observations of the SiO(8-7) and CO(4-3) lines with the APEX telescope. Through a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis, we find that the excitation conditions of SiO increase with the velocity of the emitting gas. We also compute the SiO abundance through the SiO and CO integrated intensities at high velocities. For the sources in our sample we find no significant variation of the SiO abundance with evolution for a bolometric luminosity-to-mass ratio of between 4 and 50 L⊙/M⊙. We also find a weak increase of the SiO(8-7) luminosity with the bolometric luminosity-to-mass ratio. We speculate that this might be explained with an increase of density in the gas traced by SiO. We find that the densities constrained by the SiO observations require the use of shock models that include grain-grain processing. For the first time, such models are compared and found to be compatible with SiO observations. A pre-shock density of 105cm-3 is globally inferred from these comparisons. Shocks with a velocity higher than 25 km s-1 are invoked for the objects in our sample where the SiO is observed with a corresponding velocity dispersion. Our comparison of shock models with observations suggests that sputtering of silicon-bearing material (corresponding to less than 10% of the total silicon abundance) from the grain mantles is occurring. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID

  6. Molecular emission in dense massive clumps from the star-forming regions S231-S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeyschikov, D. A.; Kirsanova, M. S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the study of the star-forming regions S231-S235 in radio lines of molecules of the interstellar medium—carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), in maser lines—methanol (CH3OH) and water vapor (H2O). The regions S231-S235 belong to the giant molecular cloudG174+2.5. The goal of this paper is to search for new sources of emission toward molecular clumps and to estimate their physical parameters from CO and NH3 molecular lines. We obtained new detections ofNH3 andHC3Nlines in the sources WB89673 and WB89 668 which indicates the presence of high-density gas. From the CO line, we derived sizes, column densities, and masses of molecular clumps. From the NH3 line, we derived gas kinetic temperatures and number densities in molecular clumps. We determined that kinetic temperatures and number densities of molecular gas are within the limits 16-30 K and 2.8-7.2 × 103 cm-3 respectively. The shock-tracing line of CH3OH molecule at a frequency of 36.2 GHz was detected in WB89 673 for the first time.

  7. Electrochemical Interrogation of G3-Poly(propylene thiophenoimine) Dendritic Star Polymer in Phenanthrene Sensing.

    PubMed

    Makelane, Hlamulo R; Tovide, Oluwakemi; Sunday, Christopher E; Waryo, Tesfaye; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I

    2015-09-03

    A novel dendritic star-copolymer, generation 3 poly(propylene thiophenoimine) (G3PPT)-co-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) star co-polymer on gold electrode (i.e., Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT) was used as a sensor system for the determination of phenanthrene (PHE). The G3PPT-co-P3HT star co-polymer was synthesized via in situ electrochemical co-polymerization of generation 3 poly (propylene thiophenoimine) and poly (3-hexylthiophene) on gold electrode. 1HNMR spectroscopy was used to determine the regioregularity of the polymer composites, whereas Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study their structural and morphological properties. Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT in the absence of PHE, exhibited reversible electrochemistry attributable to the oligo (thiophene) 'pendants' of the dendrimer. PHE produced an increase in the voltammetric signals (anodic currents) due to its oxidation on the dendritic material to produce catalytic current, thereby suggesting the suitability of the Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT electrode as a PHE sensor. The electrocatalysis of PHE was made possible by the rigid and planar oligo-P3HT species (formed upon the oxidation of the oligo (thiophene) pendants of the star-copolymer), which allowed the efficient capture (binding) and detection (electrocatalytic oxidation) of PHE molecules.

  8. Fluorous microgel star polymers: selective recognition and separation of polyfluorinated surfactants and compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yuta; Terashima, Takaya; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    Immiscible with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic solvents, polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are generally "fluorous", some of which have widely been employed as surfactants and water/oil repellents. Given the prevailing concern about the environmental pollution and the biocontamination by PFCs, their efficient removal and recycle from industrial wastewater and products are critically required. This paper demonstrates that fluorous-core star polymers consisting of a polyfluorinated microgel core and hydrophilic PEG-functionalized arms efficiently and selectively capture PFCs in water into the cores by fluorous interaction. For example, with over 10 000 fluorine atoms in the core and approximately 100 hydrophilic arms, the fluorous stars remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and related PFCs in water from 10 ppm to as low as a parts per billion (ppb) level, or an over 98% removal. Dually functionalized microgel-core star polymers with perfluorinated alkanes and additional amino (or ammonium) groups cooperatively recognize PFOA or its ammonium salt and, in addition, release the guests upon external stimuli. The "smart" performance shows that the fluorous-core star polymers are promising PFC separation, recovery, and recycle materials for water purification toward sustainable society.

  9. Electrochemical Interrogation of G3-Poly(propylene thiophenoimine) Dendritic Star Polymer in Phenanthrene Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Makelane, Hlamulo R.; Tovide, Oluwakemi; Sunday, Christopher E.; Waryo, Tesfaye; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I.

    2015-01-01

    A novel dendritic star-copolymer, generation 3 poly(propylene thiophenoimine) (G3PPT)-co-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) star co-polymer on gold electrode (i.e., Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT) was used as a sensor system for the determination of phenanthrene (PHE). The G3PPT-co-P3HT star co-polymer was synthesized via in situ electrochemical co-polymerization of generation 3 poly (propylene thiophenoimine) and poly (3-hexylthiophene) on gold electrode. 1HNMR spectroscopy was used to determine the regioregularity of the polymer composites, whereas Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study their structural and morphological properties. Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT in the absence of PHE, exhibited reversible electrochemistry attributable to the oligo (thiophene) ‘pendants’ of the dendrimer. PHE produced an increase in the voltammetric signals (anodic currents) due to its oxidation on the dendritic material to produce catalytic current, thereby suggesting the suitability of the Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT electrode as a PHE sensor. The electrocatalysis of PHE was made possible by the rigid and planar oligo-P3HT species (formed upon the oxidation of the oligo (thiophene) pendants of the star-copolymer), which allowed the efficient capture (binding) and detection (electrocatalytic oxidation) of PHE molecules. PMID:26404296

  10. Compressible or incompressible blend of interacting monodisperse star and linear polymers near a surface.

    PubMed

    Batman, Richard; Gujrati, P D

    2008-03-28

    We consider a lattice model of a mixture of repulsive, attractive, or neutral monodisperse star (species A) and linear (species B) polymers with a third monomeric species C, which may represent free volume. The mixture is next to a hard, infinite plate whose interactions with A and C can be attractive, repulsive, or neutral. These two interactions are the only parameters necessary to specify the effect of the surface on all three components. We numerically study monomer density profiles using the method of Gujrati and Chhajer that has already been previously applied to study polydisperse and monodisperse linear-linear blends next to surfaces. The resulting density profiles always show an enrichment of linear polymers in the immediate vicinity of the surface due to entropic repulsion of the star core. However, the integrated surface excess of star monomers is sometimes positive, indicating an overall enrichment of stars. This excess increases with the number of star arms only up to a certain critical number and decreases thereafter. The critical arm number increases with compressibility (bulk concentration of C). The method of Gujrati and Chhajer is computationally ultrafast and can be carried out on a personal computer (PC), even in the incompressible case, when simulations are unfeasible. Calculations of density profiles usually take less than 20 min on PCs.

  11. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: project overview with analysis of dense gas structure and kinematics in Barnard 1

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Gong, Hao; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Tobin, John J.; Kwon, Woojin; Isella, Andrea; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN (J = 1 → 0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7'' and spectral resolution near 0.16 km s{sup –1}. We imaged ∼150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO{sup +} and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity dispersions ranging from ∼0.05 to 0.50 km s{sup –1} across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new, non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} position-position-velocity (PPV) cube. The projected sizes of dendrogram-identified structures range from about 0.01 to 0.34 pc. Size-linewidth relations using those structures show that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with projected size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity rises steeply with projected size. Comparing these relations, we propose that all dense gas structures in Barnard 1 have comparable depths into the sky, around 0.1-0.2 pc; this suggests that overdense, parsec-scale regions within molecular clouds are better described as flattened structures rather than spherical collections of gas. Science-ready PPV cubes for Barnard 1 molecular emission are available for download.

  12. Effective delivery of siRNA into cancer cells and tumors using well-defined biodegradable cationic star polymers.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Cyrille; Teo, Joann; Phillips, Phoebe; Erlich, Rafael B; Sagnella, Sharon; Sharbeen, George; Dwarte, Tanya; Duong, Hien T T; Goldstein, David; Davis, Thomas P; Kavallaris, Maria; McCarroll, Joshua

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of death worldwide. Two types of cancer that have high mortality rates are pancreatic and lung cancer. Despite improvements in treatment strategies, resistance to chemotherapy and the presence of metastases are common. Therefore, novel therapies which target and silence genes involved in regulating these processes are required. Short-interfering RNA (siRNA) holds great promise as a therapeutic to silence disease-causing genes. However, siRNA requires a delivery vehicle to enter the cell to allow it to silence its target gene. Herein, we report on the design and synthesis of cationic star polymers as novel delivery vehicles for siRNA to silence genes in pancreatic and lung cancer cells. Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was polymerized via reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization (RAFT) and then chain extended in the presence of both cross-linkers N,N-bis(acryloyl)cistamine and DMAEMA, yielding biodegradable well-defined star polymers. The star polymers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, ζ potential, and gel permeation chromatography. Importantly, the star polymers were able to self-assemble with siRNA and form small uniform nanoparticle complexes. Moreover, the ratios of star polymer required to complex siRNA were nontoxic in both pancreatic and lung cancer cells. Treatment with star polymer-siRNA complexes resulted in uptake of siRNA into both cell lines and a significant decrease in target gene mRNA and protein levels. In addition, delivery of clinically relevant amounts of siRNA complexed to the star polymer were able to silence target gene expression by 50% in an in vivo tumor setting. Collectively, these results provide the first evidence of well-defined small cationic star polymers to deliver active siRNA to both pancreatic and lung cancer cells and may be a valuable tool to inhibit key genes involved in promoting chemotherapy drug resistance and

  13. Quantification of interaction and topological parameters of polyisoprene star polymers under good solvent conditions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Durgesh K; Beaucage, Gregory; Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Beaucage, Peter; Ramachandran, Ramnath; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2016-05-01

    Mass fractal scaling, reflected in the mass fractal dimension d_{f}, is independently impacted by topology, reflected in the connectivity dimension c, and by tortuosity, reflected in the minimum dimension d_{min}. The mass fractal dimension is related to these other dimensions by d_{f}=cd_{min}. Branched fractal structures have a higher mass fractal dimension compared to linear structures due to a higher c, and extended structures have a lower dimension compared to convoluted self-avoiding and Gaussian walks due to a lower d_{min}. It is found, in this work, that macromolecules in thermodynamic equilibrium display a fixed mass fractal dimension d_{f} under good solvent conditions, regardless of chain topology.  These equilibrium structures accommodate changes in chain topology such as branching c by a decrease in chain tortuosity d_{min}. Symmetric star polymers are used to understand the structure of complex macromolecular topologies. A recently published hybrid Unified scattering function accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers along with polymer-solvent interaction for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension. Dilute solutions of linear, three-arm and six-arm polyisoprene stars are studied under good solvent conditions in deuterated p-xylene. Reduced chain tortuosity can be viewed as steric straightening of the arms. Steric effects for star topologies are quantified, and it is found that steric straightening of arms is more significant for lower-molecular-weight arms. The observation of constant d_{f} is explained through a modification of Flory-Krigbaum theory for branched polymers. PMID:27300939

  14. High-Resolution Imaging of Dense Gas Structure and Kinematics in Nearby Molecular Clouds with the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Shaye

    This thesis utilizes new observations of dense gas in molecular clouds to develop an empirical framework for how clouds form structures which evolve into young cores and stars. Previous observations show the general turbulent and hierarchical nature of clouds. However, current understanding of the star formation pathway is limited by existing data that do not combine angular resolution needed to resolve individual cores with area coverage required to capture entire star-forming regions and with tracers that can resolve gas motions. The original contributions of this thesis to astrophysical research are the creation and analysis of the largest-area high-angular-resolution maps of dense gas in molecular clouds to-date, and the development of a non-binary dendrogram algorithm to quantify the hierarchical nature and three-dimensional morphology of cloud structure. I first describe the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey, which provides spectrally imaged N2H+, HCO+, and HCN (J = 1→0) emission across diverse regions of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. I then present a detailed analysis of the Barnard 1 and L1451 regions in Perseus. A non-binary dendrogram analysis of Barnard 1 N2H emission and all L1451 emission shows that the most hierarchically complex gas corresponds with sub-regions actively forming young stars. I estimate the typical depth of molecular emission in each region using the spatial and kinematic properties of dendrogram-identified structures. Barnard 1 appears to be a sheet-like region at the largest scales with filamentary substructure, while the L1451 region is composed of more spatially distinct ellipsoidal structures. I then do a uniform comparison of the hierarchical structure and young stellar content of all five regions. The more evolved regions with the most young stellar objects (YSOs) and strongest emission have formed the most hierarchical levels. However, all regions show similar mean branching properties at each level

  15. Six Isomers of Dendrimer-like Star Polymers: Design and Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A.

    1999-03-01

    The control of polymer properties through the synthesis of complex macromolecular architectures is central to many areas of research and advanced technological applications. properties of novel materials are altered mainly through modification of their constitution. Examples of constitutional changes include the use of different monomers, variable molecular weights, block structures, grafted branching and so on. Living polymerization techniques has facilitated the preparation of these structures. The use of new multifunctional initiators has enhanced the availability of for example star polymers, which are believed to have smaller hydrodynamic volume and lower melt viscosity than their linear counterparts. Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers are other classes of macromolecules which have received a lot of attention due to their unique architectures.

  16. Dense neutron star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.

    2014-05-02

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been a subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high-density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfill basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics.

  17. Electrophoretic mobility of linear and star-branched DNA in semidilute polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav; Heuer, Daniel M; Archer, Lynden A

    2006-08-01

    Electrophoresis of large linear T2 (162 kbp) and 3-arm star-branched (N(Arm) = 48.5 kbp) DNA in linear polyacrylamide (LPA) solutions above the overlap concentration c* has been investigated using a fluorescence visualization technique that allows both the conformation and mobility mu of the DNA to be determined. LPA solutions of moderate polydispersity index (PI approximately 1.7-2.1) and variable polymer molecular weight Mw (0.59-2.05 MDa) are used as the sieving media. In unentangled semidilute solutions (c* < c < c(e)), we find that the conformational dynamics of linear and star-branched DNA in electric fields are strikingly different; the former migrating in predominantly U- or I-shaped conformations, depending on electric field strength E, and the latter migrating in a squid-like profile with the star-arms outstretched in the direction opposite to E and dragging the branch point through the sieving medium. Despite these visual differences, mu for linear and star-branched DNA of comparable size are found to be nearly identical in semidilute, unentangled LPA solutions. For LPA concentrations above the entanglement threshold (c > c(e)), the conformation of migrating linear and star-shaped DNA manifest only subtle changes from their unentangled solution features, but mu for the stars decreases strongly with increasing LPA concentration and molecular weight, while mu for linear DNA becomes nearly independent of c and Mw. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories for electrophoresis of large polyelectrolytes. PMID:16850503

  18. Electrophoretic mobility of linear and star-branched DNA in semidilute polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav; Heuer, Daniel M; Archer, Lynden A

    2006-08-01

    Electrophoresis of large linear T2 (162 kbp) and 3-arm star-branched (N(Arm) = 48.5 kbp) DNA in linear polyacrylamide (LPA) solutions above the overlap concentration c* has been investigated using a fluorescence visualization technique that allows both the conformation and mobility mu of the DNA to be determined. LPA solutions of moderate polydispersity index (PI approximately 1.7-2.1) and variable polymer molecular weight Mw (0.59-2.05 MDa) are used as the sieving media. In unentangled semidilute solutions (c* < c < c(e)), we find that the conformational dynamics of linear and star-branched DNA in electric fields are strikingly different; the former migrating in predominantly U- or I-shaped conformations, depending on electric field strength E, and the latter migrating in a squid-like profile with the star-arms outstretched in the direction opposite to E and dragging the branch point through the sieving medium. Despite these visual differences, mu for linear and star-branched DNA of comparable size are found to be nearly identical in semidilute, unentangled LPA solutions. For LPA concentrations above the entanglement threshold (c > c(e)), the conformation of migrating linear and star-shaped DNA manifest only subtle changes from their unentangled solution features, but mu for the stars decreases strongly with increasing LPA concentration and molecular weight, while mu for linear DNA becomes nearly independent of c and Mw. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories for electrophoresis of large polyelectrolytes.

  19. Telechelic star polymers as self-assembling units from the molecular to the macroscopic scale.

    PubMed

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; LoVerso, Federica; Likos, Christos N; Blaak, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    By means of multiscale molecular simulations, we show that telechelic-star polymers are a simple, robust, and tunable system, which hierarchically self-assembles into soft-patchy particles and mechanically stabilizes selected, open crystalline structures. The self-aggregating patchy behavior can be fully controlled by the number of arms per star and by the fraction of attractive monomeric units at the free ends of the arms. Such self-assembled soft-patchy particles while forming, upon augmenting density, gel-like percolating networks, preserve properties as particle size, number, and arrangement of patches per particle. In particular, we demonstrate that the flexibility inherent in the soft-patchy particles brings forward a novel mechanism that leads to the mechanical stability of diamond and simple cubic crystals over a wide range of densities, and for molecular sizes ranging from about 10 nm up to the micrometer scale.

  20. Modulating Antimicrobial Activity and Mammalian Cell Biocompatibility with Glucosamine-Functionalized Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edgar H H; Khin, Mya Mya; Ravikumar, Vikashini; Si, Zhangyong; Rice, Scott A; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-14

    The development of novel reagents and antibiotics for combating multidrug resistance bacteria has received significant attention in recent years. In this study, new antimicrobial star polymers (14-26 nm in diameter) that consist of mixtures of polylysine and glycopolymer arms were developed and were shown to possess antimicrobial efficacy toward Gram positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) (with MIC values as low as 16 μg mL(-1)) while being non-hemolytic (HC50 > 10,000 μg mL(-1)) and exhibit excellent mammalian cell biocompatibility. Structure function analysis indicated that the antimicrobial activity and mammalian cell biocompatibility of the star nanoparticles could be optimized by modifying the molar ratio of polylysine to glycopolymers arms. The technology described herein thus represents an innovative approach that could be used to fight deadly infectious diseases.

  1. Social stars: Modeling the interactive lives of stars in dense clusters and binary systems in the era of time domain astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan Elowe

    This thesis uses computational modeling to study of phases of dramatic interaction that intersperse stellar lifetimes. In galactic centers stars trace dangerously wandering orbits dictated by the combined gravitational force of a central, supermassive black hole and all of the surrounding stars. In binary systems, stars' evolution -- which causes their radii to increase substantially -- can bring initially non-interacting systems into contact. Moments of strong stellar interaction transform stars, their subsequent evolution, and the stellar environments they inhabit. In tidal disruption events, a star is partially or completely destroyed as tidal forces from a supermassive black hole overwhelm the star's self gravity. A portion of the stellar debris falls back to the black hole powering a luminous flare as it accretes. This thesis studies the relative event rates and properties of tidal disruption events for stars across the stellar evolutionary spectrum. Tidal disruptions of giant stars occur with high specific frequency; these objects' extended envelopes make them vulnerable to disruption. More-compact white dwarf stars are tidally disrupted relatively rarely. Their transients are also of very different duration and luminosity. Giant star disruptions power accretion flares with timescales of tens to hundreds of years; white dwarf disruption flares take hours to days. White dwarf tidal interactions can additionally trigger thermonuclear burning and lead to transients with signatures similar to type I supernovae. In binary star systems, a phase of hydrodynamic interaction called a common envelope episode occurs when one star evolves to swallow its companion. Dragged by the surrounding gas, the companion star spirals through the envelope to tighter orbits. This thesis studies accretion and flow morphologies during this phase. Density gradients across the gravitationally-focussed material lead to a strong angular momentum barrier to accretion during common envelope

  2. Star-like supramolecular polymers fabricated by a Keplerate cluster with cationic terminated polymers and their self-assembly into vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; He, Lipeng; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Weisheng; Bu, Weifeng

    2012-07-18

    The electrostatic combination of a Keplerate cluster, [Mo(132)O(372)(CH(3)COO)(30)(H(2)O)(72)](42-) with cationic terminated poly(styrene) yields polyoxometalate-based supramolecular star polymers, which can further self-assemble into vesicular aggregates in CHCl(3)-MeOH mixed solvent.

  3. Alcohol-soluble Star-shaped Oligofluorenes as Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yang; He, Zhicai; Zhao, Baofeng; Liu, Yuan; Yang, Chuluo; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Two star-shaped oligofluorenes with hexakis(fluoren-2-yl)benzene as core are designed and sythesized for interfacial materials in polymer solar cell. Diethanolamino groups are attached to the side chain of fluorene units for T0-OH and T1-OH to enable the alcohol solubility, and additional hydrophobic n-hexyl chains are also grafted on the increased fluorene arms for T1-OH. In conventional device with PCDTBT/PC71BM as active layer, a 50% enhanced PCE is obtained by incorporating T0-OH and T1-OH as the interlayer compared with device without interlayer. By optimizing the active material with PTB7 and with the inverted device structure, a maximum PCE of 9.30% is achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for PTB7 based polymer solar cells. The work function of modified electrode, the surface morphology and the suraface properties are systematically studied. By modifying the structures of the star-shaped molecules, a balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic property is finely tuned, and thus facilitate the interlayer for high performance of PSCs. PMID:26612688

  4. Biocompatible polyester macroligands: new subunits for the assembly of star-shaped polymers with luminescent and cleavable metal cores.

    PubMed

    Corbin, P S; Webb, M P; McAlvin, J E; Fraser, C L

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of star-shaped, biocompatible polyesters--polylactides (PLAs), polycaprolactones (PCLs), and various copolymer analogues--with either labile iron(II) tris-bipyridyl or luminescent ruthenium(II) tris-bipyridyl cores is described. These polymers were readily assembled by a convergent, metal-template-assisted approach that entailed the synthesis of bipyridine (bpy) ligands incorporating PLA- and PCL-containing arms and subsequent chelation of the "macroligands" to iron(II) or ruthenium(II). Specifically, the polyester macroligands bpyPLA(2) and bpyPCL(2) were prepared by a stannous octoate catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of DL- or L-lactide and epsilon-caprolactone, using bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine as the initiator. Copolymers bpy(PCL-PLA)(2) and bpy(PLA-PCL)(2) were generated in an analogous manner using bpyPLA(2) and bpyPCL(2) as macroinitiators. Polymers with narrow molecular weight distributions and with molecular weights close to values expected based upon monomer/initiator loading were produced. The macroligands were subsequently chelated to iron(II) to afford six-armed, iron-core star polymers, which were characterized by UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Estimated chelation efficiencies for formation of the star polymers (M(n) calcd: 20-240 kDa) were high, as determined by UV-vis spectral analysis. Within the molecular weight range investigated, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the small amounts of metal in the polyester stars and differences in polymer architecture had little effect on the thermal properties of the PLA/PCL materials. However, thin films of the red-violet colored iron-core stars exhibited reversible, thermochromic bleaching. Solutions and films of the polymers also responded (with color loss) to a variety of chemical stimuli (e.g., acid, base, peroxides, ammonia), thus revealing potential for use in diverse sensing applications. Likewise, the polyester

  5. Emerging synthetic strategies for core cross-linked star (CCS) polymers and applications as interfacial stabilizers: bridging linear polymers and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijing; Cao, Xueteng; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2013-10-01

    Core cross-linked star (CCS) polymers become increasingly important in polymer science and are evaluated in many value-added applications. However, limitations exist to varied degrees for different synthetic methods. It is clear that improvement in synthetic efficiency is fundamental in driving this field moving even further. Here, the most recent advances are highlighted in synthetic strategies, including cross-linking with cross-linkers of low solubility, polymerization-induced self-assembly in aqueous-based heterogeneous media, and cross-linking via dynamic covalent bonds. The understanding of CCS polymers is also further refined to advocate their role as an intermediate between linear polymers and polymeric nanoparticles, and their use as interfacial stabilizers is rationalized within this context.

  6. Simultaneous nano- and micro-scale control of nanofibrous microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Marson, Ryan L.; Ge, Zhishen; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the multi-scale self-assembly of star-shaped polymers into non-hollow, hollow, and spongy nanofibrous microspheres is reported. Star-shaped poly(L-lactic acid) polymers with varying arm-numbers and arm-lengths are synthesized, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, emulsified in glycerol, and thermally-induced to phase separate, resulting in microspheres that are either smooth or fibrous on the nano-scale, and either non-hollow, hollow, or spongy on the micro-scale. Molecular architecture and the hydroxyl density are shown to control assembly and morphology at both nano- and micro-scales. Nanofibers form only when the arm length is sufficiently long, while an increase in hydroxyl density causes the microspheres to change from non-hollow to hollow to spongy. We demonstrate via both experiments of capping or doubling the hydroxyl end groups and dissipative particle dynamics simulations that the affinity of hydroxyl to glycerol is critical to stabilizing the micro-scale structure. A “phase diagram” was constructed for the six types of microspheres in relation to the molecular structures of the star-shaped polymers. The proposed mechanism explains how star-shaped polymers self-assemble into various microspheres, and guides us to simultaneously control both nano- and micro-features of the microspheres. PMID:26009995

  7. Biorenewable tough blends of polylactide and acrylated epoxidized soybean oil compatibilized by a polylactide star polymer

    DOE PAGES

    Mauck, Sheli C.; Wang, Shu; Ding, Wenyue; Rohde, Brian J.; Fortune, C. Karen; Yang, Guozhen; Robertson, Megan L.; Ahn, Suk -Kyun

    2016-02-26

    Polylactide (PLA), a commercially available thermoplastic derived from plant sugars, finds applications in consumer products, disposable packaging, and textiles, among others. The widespread application of this material is limited by its brittleness, as evidenced by low tensile elongation at break, impact strength, and fracture toughness. Herein, a multifunctional vegetable oil, acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO), was investigated as a biodegradable, renewable additive to improve the toughness of PLA. AESO was found to be a highly reactive oil, providing a dispersed phase with tunable properties in which the acrylate groups underwent cross-linking at the elevated temperatures required for processing the blends.more » Additionally, the presence of hydroxyl groups on AESO provided two routes for compatibilization of PLA/AESO blends: (1) reactive compatibilization through the transesterification of AESO and PLA and (2) synthesis of a PLA star polymer with an AESO core. The morphological, thermal, and mechanical behaviors of PLA/oil blends were investigated, in which the dispersed oil phase consisted of AESO, soybean oil (SYBO), or a 50/50 mixture of AESO/SYBO. The oil additives were found to toughen the PLA matrix, with significant enhancements in the elongation at break and tensile toughness values, while maintaining the glass transition temperature of neat PLA. Specifically, the blend containing PLA, AESO, SYBO, and the PLA star polymer was found to exhibit a uniform oil droplet size distribution with small average droplet size and interparticle distance, resulting in the greatest enhancements of PLA tensile properties with no observable plasticization.« less

  8. Probing star formation in the dense environments of z ˜ 1 lensing haloes aligned with dusty star-forming galaxies detected with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welikala, N.; Béthermin, M.; Guery, D.; Strandet, M.; Aird, K. A.; Aravena, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bothwell, M.; Beelen, A.; Bleem, L. E.; de Breuck, C.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Everett, W.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Gonzalez, A. H.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greve, T. R.; Gullberg, B.; Hezaveh, Y. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Keisler, R.; Lagache, G.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Mocanu, L. M.; Montier, L.; Murphy, E. J.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Omont, A.; Pointecouteau, E.; Puget, J. L.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rotermund, K. M.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Spilker, J. S.; Stalder, B.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.

    2016-01-01

    We probe star formation in the environments of massive (˜1013 M⊙) dark matter haloes at redshifts of z ˜ 1. This star formation is linked to a submillimetre clustering signal which we detect in maps of the Planck High Frequency Instrument that are stacked at the positions of a sample of high redshift (z > 2) strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) 2500 deg2 survey. The clustering signal has submillimetre colours which are consistent with the mean redshift of the foreground lensing haloes (z ˜ 1). We report a mean excess of star formation rate (SFR) compared to the field, of (2700 ± 700) M⊙ yr-1 from all galaxies contributing to this clustering signal within a radius of 3.5 arcmin from the SPT DSFGs. The magnitude of the Planck excess is in broad agreement with predictions of a current model of the cosmic infrared background. The model predicts that 80 per cent of the excess emission measured by Planck originates from galaxies lying in the neighbouring haloes of the lensing halo. Using Herschel maps of the same fields, we find a clear excess, relative to the field, of individual sources which contribute to the Planck excess. The mean excess SFR compared to the field is measured to be (370 ± 40) M⊙ yr-1 per resolved, clustered source. Our findings suggest that the environments around these massive z ˜ 1 lensing haloes host intense star formation out to about 2 Mpc. The flux enhancement due to clustering should also be considered when measuring flux densities of galaxies in Planck data.

  9. Dense molecular cocoons in the massive protocluster W3 IRS5: a test case for models of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-S.; Bourke, T. L.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Benz, A. O.; Megeath, S. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Two competing models describe the formation of massive stars in objects like the Orion Trapezium. In the turbulent core accretion model, the resulting stellar masses are directly related to the mass distribution of the cloud condensations. In the competitive accretion model, the gravitational potential of the protocluster captures gas from the surrounding cloud for which the individual cluster members compete. Aims: With high resolution submillimeter observations of the structure, kinematics, and chemistry of the proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5, we aim to determine which mode of star formation dominates. Methods: We present 354 GHz Submillimeter Array observations at resolutions of 1″-3″ (1800-5400 AU) of W3 IRS5. The dust continuum traces the compact source structure and masses of the individual cores, while molecular lines of CS, SO, SO2, HCN, H2CS, HNCO, and CH3OH (and isotopologues) reveal the gas kinematics, density, and temperature. Results: The observations show five emission peaks (SMM1-5). SMM1 and SMM2 contain massive embedded stars (~20 M⊙); SMM3-5 are starless or contain low-mass stars (<8 M⊙). The inferred densities are high, ≥107 cm-3, but the core masses are small, 0.2-0.6 M⊙. The detected molecular emission reveals four different chemical zones. Abundant (X ~ few 10-7 to 10-6) SO and SO2 are associated with SMM1 and SMM2, indicating active sulfur chemistry. A low abundance (5 × 10-8) of CH3OH concentrated on SMM3/4 suggest the presence of a hot core that is only just turning on, possibly by external feedback from SMM1/2. The gas kinematics are complex with contributions from a near pole-on outflow traced by CS, SO, and HCN; rotation in SO2, and a jet in vibrationally excited HCN. Conclusions: The proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5 is an ideal test case to discriminate between models of massive star formation. Either the massive stars accrete locally from their local cores; in this case the small core masses imply that W3 IRS5 is

  10. ON THE DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF VERY YOUNG, X-RAY EMITTING BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN DENSE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Garofali, Kristen; Converse, Joseph M.; Chandar, Rupali; Rangelov, Blagoy

    2012-08-10

    We recently discovered a population of very young ({tau} {approx}< 6-8 Myr), X-ray emitting black hole binaries (BHBs) in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449. These BHBs are located within or near to very young star clusters, indicating that they form within the clusters, but that some fraction are dynamically ejected. Here we present results from a suite of N-body simulations of N = 16,384 ({approx}6000 M{sub Sun }) star clusters, similar to the masses of BHB hosts in NGC 4449, through the first 10 Myr of their lives. Our goal is to determine whether dynamical interactions are responsible for the observed population of BHBs in NGC 4449. Our simulations span a wide range of initial size and density profiles, both with and without primordial mass segregation, testing both realistic initial conditions and extreme ones. We find that clusters without primordial mass segregation only dynamically produce BHBs within 10 Myr when they are extremely compact and centrally concentrated. Preliminary results that include primordial binaries support this conclusion. The introduction of strong primordial mass segregation, however, greatly increases the rapidity with which the binaries form, although these are still not tight enough that they will emit X-rays. We conclude that X-ray emitting BHBs are unlikely to form dynamically in clusters of this mass under realistic conditions. Instead, they probably originate from binaries that contain two massive stars with small orbital separations, which are present from the cluster's birth.

  11. Dense Molecular Gas and the Role of Star Formation in the Host Galaxies of Quasi-stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A. S.; Solomon, P. M.; Tacconi, L. J.; Vavilkin, T.; Downes, D.

    2006-12-01

    New millimeter-wave CO and HCN observations of the host galaxies of infrared-excess Palomar-Green (PG) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) previously detected in CO are presented. These observations are designed to assess the validity of using the infrared luminosity to estimate star formation rates of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by determining the relative significance of dust heating by young, massive stars and AGNs in QSO hosts and IRAS galaxies with warm, AGN-like infrared colors. The analysis of these data is based, in part, on evidence that HCN traces high-density (>104 cm-3) molecular gas, and that the starburst-to-HCN luminosity ratio, LSB/L'HCN, of IRAS-detected galaxies is constant. The new CO data provide a confirmation of prior claims that PG QSO hosts have high infrared-to-CO luminosity ratios, LIR/L'CO, relative to IRAS galaxies of comparable LIR. Such high LIR/L'CO ratios may be due to significant heating of dust by the QSO or to an increased star formation efficiency in QSO hosts relative to the bulk of the luminous IRAS galaxy population. The HCN data show a similar trend, with the PG QSO host I Zw 1 and most of the warm IRAS galaxies having high LIR/L'HCN (>1600) relative to the cool IRAS galaxy population, for which the median cool~890+440-470. If the assumption is made that the infrared emission from cool IRAS galaxies is reprocessed light from embedded star-forming regions, then high values of LIR/L'HCN are likely the result of dust heating by the AGNs. Further, if the median ratio of L'HCN/L'CO~0.06 observed for Seyfert galaxies and I Zw 1 is applied to the PG QSOs not detected in HCN, then the derived LIR/L'HCN values correspond to a stellar contribution to the production of LIR of ~7%-39%, and star formation rates of ~2-37 Msolar yr-1 are derived for the QSO hosts. The corresponding values for the warm galaxies are ~10%-100% and ~3-220 Msolar yr-1. Alternatively, if the far-infrared is adopted as the star formation component

  12. Charged-current weak interaction processes in hot and dense matter and its impact on the spectra of neutrinos emitted from protoneutron star cooling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinedo, G; Fischer, T; Lohs, A; Huther, L

    2012-12-21

    We perform three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport radiation hydrodynamics simulations covering a period of 3 s after the formation of a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova explosion. Our results show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter as suggested by Reddy et al. [Phys. Rev. D 58, 013009 (1998)] has a strong impact on the luminosities and spectra of the emitted neutrinos. When compared with simulations that neglect mean-field effects on the neutrino opacities, we find that the luminosities of all neutrino flavors are reduced while the spectral differences between electron neutrinos and antineutrinos are increased. Their magnitude depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at subnuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r process. Contrary to previous findings, our results show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth.

  13. Charged-current weak interaction processes in hot and dense matter and its impact on the spectra of neutrinos emitted from protoneutron star cooling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinedo, G; Fischer, T; Lohs, A; Huther, L

    2012-12-21

    We perform three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport radiation hydrodynamics simulations covering a period of 3 s after the formation of a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova explosion. Our results show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter as suggested by Reddy et al. [Phys. Rev. D 58, 013009 (1998)] has a strong impact on the luminosities and spectra of the emitted neutrinos. When compared with simulations that neglect mean-field effects on the neutrino opacities, we find that the luminosities of all neutrino flavors are reduced while the spectral differences between electron neutrinos and antineutrinos are increased. Their magnitude depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at subnuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r process. Contrary to previous findings, our results show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth. PMID:23368446

  14. EARLY STAR-FORMING PROCESSES IN DENSE MOLECULAR CLOUD L328; IDENTIFICATION OF L328-IRS AS A PROTO-BROWN DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Mi-Ryang; Kim, Gwanjeong; Saito, Masao; Kurono, Yasutaka; Myers, Philip C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of millimeter to sub-millimeter observations of CO, HCN, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and HCO{sup +} lines in the dense molecular cloud L328, which harbors L328-IRS, a Very Low Luminosity Object (VeLLO). Our analysis of the line width finds that {sup 13}CO and N{sub 2}H{sup +} lines are broadened right over the smallest sub-core S2 where L328-IRS is located, while they are significantly narrower in other regions of L328. Thus, L328-IRS has a direct association with the sub-core. CO observations show a bipolar outflow from this VeLLO with an extent of ∼0.08 pc. The outflow momentum flux and efficiency are much less than those of low-mass protostars. The most likely mass accretion rate (∼3.6 × 10{sup –7} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) inferred from the analysis of the CO outflow is an order of magnitude smaller than the canonical value for a protostar. If the main accretion lasts during the typical Class 0 period of a protostar, L328-IRS will accrete the mass of a brown dwarf, but not that of a star. Given that its envelope mass is small (∼0.09 M{sub ☉}) and 100% star formation rate is unlikely, we suggest that L328-IRS is likely a proto-brown dwarf. Inward motions are found in global scale in the L328 cloud and its sub-cores with a typical infall speed found in starless cores. L328 is found to be fairly well isolated from other nearby clouds and seems to be forming three sub-cores simultaneously through a gravitational fragmentation process. Altogether, these all leave L328-IRS as the best example supporting the idea that a brown dwarf forms like a normal star.

  15. The Star Formation Rate-Dense Gas Relation in Galaxies as Measured by HCN(3-2) Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, R. S.; Narayanan, D.; Shirley, Y. L.; Juneau, S.; Wu, J.; Solomon, P. M.; Vanden Bout, P. A.; Moustakas, J.; Walker, C. K.

    2008-07-01

    We present observations made with the 10 m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope of HCN(3-2) emission from a sample of 30 nearby galaxies ranging in infrared luminosity from 1010 to 1012.5 L⊙ and HCN(3-2) luminosity from 106 to 109 K km s-1 pc2. We examine the correlation between the infrared luminosity and HCN(3-2) luminosity and find that the best-fit linear regression has a slope (in log-log space) of 0.74 +/- 0.12. Including recently published data from Graciá-Carpio et al. tightens the constraints on the best-fit slope to 0.79 +/- 0.09. This slope below unity suggests that the HCN(3-2) molecular line luminosity is not linearly tracing the amount of dense gas. Our results are consistent with predictions from recent theoretical models that find slopes below unity when the line luminosity depends on the average gas density with a power-law index greater than a Kennicutt-Schmidt index of 1.5.

  16. CO J = 2-1 Line Emission in Cluster Galaxies at z ~ 1: Fueling Star Formation in Dense Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Desai, Vandana; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z ~ 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>1014 M ⊙) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3σ upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'CO < 6.08 × 109 and <6.63 × 109 K km s-1 pc2. Assuming a CO-to-H2 conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M_H_2 < 4.86 \\times 10^{9} \\,M_{\\odot } and M_H_2 < 5.30 \\times 10^{9} \\,M_{\\odot }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L IR < 7.4 × 1011 L ⊙, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'CO = (1.94 ± 0.35) × 1010 K km s-1 pc2, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M_H_2 = (1.55 +/- 0.28)\\times 10^{10}\\,M_{\\odot }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z ~ 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  17. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  18. The Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of a 64 kDa PolyPEG Star Polymer After Subcutaneous and Pulmonary Administration to Rats.

    PubMed

    Khor, Song Yang; Hu, Jinming; McLeod, Victoria M; Quinn, John F; Porter, Christopher J H; Whittaker, Michael R; Kaminskas, Lisa M; Davis, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    PolyPEG star polymers have potential utility as cost-effective polymeric drug delivery vehicles, and as such, it is important to develop an understanding of their biopharmaceutical behavior. Moreover, although a number of studies have evaluated the utility of PolyPEG stars in vitro, investigation of these novel materials in vivo has been limited. Herein, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of a 64 kDa tritiated PEG-based star polymer after subcutaneous and pulmonary administration in rats. After subcutaneous administration, the star polymer showed near complete bioavailability (∼80%) and a similar organ biodistribution profile to the polymer after intravenous administration. After intratracheal instillation to the lungs, the star polymer showed limited bioavailability (∼3%), and most of the administered radiolabel was recovered in lung tissue and feces after 6 d. The data reported here suggest that star polymers display similar pharmaceutical behavior to PEGylated dendrimers after subcutaneous and inhaled delivery and may therefore be used as similar, but more cost-effective drug delivery vehicles.

  19. HST Imaging of Dust Structures and Stars in the Ram Pressure Stripped Virgo Spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522: Stripped from the Outside In with Dense Cloud Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, A.; Kenney, J.; Crowl, H.; Tal, T.

    2016-08-01

    We describe and constrain the origins of interstellar medium (ISM) structures likely created by ongoing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure stripping in two Virgo Cluster spirals, NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) BVI images of dust extinction and stars, as well as supplementary H i, Hα, and radio continuum images. With a spatial resolution of ˜10 pc in the HST images, this is the highest-resolution study to date of the physical processes that occur during an ICM–ISM ram pressure stripping interaction, ram pressure stripping's effects on the multi-phase, multi-density ISM, and the formation and evolution of ram-pressure-stripped tails. In dust extinction, we view the leading side of NGC 4402 and the trailing side of NGC 4522, and so we see distinct types of features in both. In both galaxies, we identify some regions where dense clouds are decoupling or have decoupled and others where it appears that kiloparsec-sized sections of the ISM are moving coherently. NGC 4522 has experienced stronger, more recent pressure and has the “jellyfish” morphology characteristic of some ram-pressure-stripped galaxies. Its stripped tail extends up from the disk plane in continuous upturns of dust and stars curving up to ˜2 kpc above the disk plane. On the other side of the galaxy, there is a kinematically and morphologically distinct extraplanar arm of young, blue stars and ISM above a mostly stripped portion of the disk, and between it and the disk plane are decoupled dust clouds that have not been completely stripped. The leading side of NGC 4402 contains two kiloparsec-scale linear dust filaments with complex substructure that have partially decoupled from the surrounding ISM. NGC 4402 also contains long dust ridges, suggesting that large parts of the ISM are being pushed out at once. Both galaxies contain long ridges of polarized radio continuum emission indicating the presence of large-scale, ordered magnetic fields. We propose that magnetic

  20. HST Imaging of Dust Structures and Stars in the Ram Pressure Stripped Virgo Spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522: Stripped from the Outside In with Dense Cloud Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, A.; Kenney, J.; Crowl, H.; Tal, T.

    2016-08-01

    We describe and constrain the origins of interstellar medium (ISM) structures likely created by ongoing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure stripping in two Virgo Cluster spirals, NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) BVI images of dust extinction and stars, as well as supplementary H i, Hα, and radio continuum images. With a spatial resolution of ˜10 pc in the HST images, this is the highest-resolution study to date of the physical processes that occur during an ICM-ISM ram pressure stripping interaction, ram pressure stripping's effects on the multi-phase, multi-density ISM, and the formation and evolution of ram-pressure-stripped tails. In dust extinction, we view the leading side of NGC 4402 and the trailing side of NGC 4522, and so we see distinct types of features in both. In both galaxies, we identify some regions where dense clouds are decoupling or have decoupled and others where it appears that kiloparsec-sized sections of the ISM are moving coherently. NGC 4522 has experienced stronger, more recent pressure and has the “jellyfish” morphology characteristic of some ram-pressure-stripped galaxies. Its stripped tail extends up from the disk plane in continuous upturns of dust and stars curving up to ˜2 kpc above the disk plane. On the other side of the galaxy, there is a kinematically and morphologically distinct extraplanar arm of young, blue stars and ISM above a mostly stripped portion of the disk, and between it and the disk plane are decoupled dust clouds that have not been completely stripped. The leading side of NGC 4402 contains two kiloparsec-scale linear dust filaments with complex substructure that have partially decoupled from the surrounding ISM. NGC 4402 also contains long dust ridges, suggesting that large parts of the ISM are being pushed out at once. Both galaxies contain long ridges of polarized radio continuum emission indicating the presence of large-scale, ordered magnetic fields. We propose that magnetic

  1. Anti-Lymphoma Efficacy Comparison of Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibody-Targeted and Non-Targeted Star-Shaped Polymer-Prodrug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lidický, Ondřej; Janoušková, Olga; Strohalm, Jiří; Alam, Mahmudul; Klener, Pavel; Etrych, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and biological properties of two types of star-shaped polymer-doxorubicin conjugates: non-targeted conjugate prepared as long-circulating high-molecular-weight (HMW) polymer prodrugs with a dendrimer core and a targeted conjugate with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab (RTX). The copolymers were linked to the dendrimer core or to the reduced mAb via one-point attachment forming a star-shaped structure with a central antibody or dendrimer surrounded by hydrophilic polymer chains. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was attached to the N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA)-based copolymer chain in star polymer systems via a pH-labile hydrazone linkage. Such polymer-DOX conjugates were fairly stable in aqueous solutions at pH 7.4, and the drug was readily released in mildly acidic environments at pH 5-5.5 by hydrolysis of the hydrazone bonds. The cytotoxicity of the polymer conjugates was tested on several CD20-positive or negative human cell lines. Similar levels of in vitro cytotoxicity were observed for all tested polymer conjugates regardless of type or structure. In vivo experiments using primary cell-based murine xenograft models of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma confirmed the superior anti-lymphoma efficacy of the polymer-bound DOX conjugate when compared with the original drug. Targeting with RTX did not further enhance the anti-lymphoma efficacy relative to the non-targeted star polymer conjugate. Two mechanisms could play roles in these findings: changes in the binding ability to the CD-20 receptor and a significant loss of the immunological properties of RTX in the polymer conjugates. PMID:26556320

  2. Facile Determination of Molecular Structure Trends in Amphiphilic Core Corona Star Polymer Synthesis via Dielectric Property Measurement.

    PubMed

    Hild, Frederic; Nguyen, Nam T; Deng, Eileen; Katrib, Juliano; Dimitrakis, Georgios; Lau, Phei-Li; Irvine, Derek J

    2016-08-01

    The use of dielectric property measurements to define specific trends in the molecular structures of poly(caprolactone) containing star polymers and/or the interbatch repeatability of the synthetic procedures used to generate them is demonstrated. The magnitude of the dielectric property value is shown to accurately reflect: (a) the number of functional groups within a series of materials with similar molecular size when no additional intermolecular order is present in the medium, (b) the polymer molecular size for a series of materials containing a fixed core material and so functional group number, and/or (c) the batch to batch repeatability of the synthesis method. The dielectric measurements are validated by comparison to spectroscopic/chromatographic data. PMID:27315130

  3. Facile Determination of Molecular Structure Trends in Amphiphilic Core Corona Star Polymer Synthesis via Dielectric Property Measurement.

    PubMed

    Hild, Frederic; Nguyen, Nam T; Deng, Eileen; Katrib, Juliano; Dimitrakis, Georgios; Lau, Phei-Li; Irvine, Derek J

    2016-08-01

    The use of dielectric property measurements to define specific trends in the molecular structures of poly(caprolactone) containing star polymers and/or the interbatch repeatability of the synthetic procedures used to generate them is demonstrated. The magnitude of the dielectric property value is shown to accurately reflect: (a) the number of functional groups within a series of materials with similar molecular size when no additional intermolecular order is present in the medium, (b) the polymer molecular size for a series of materials containing a fixed core material and so functional group number, and/or (c) the batch to batch repeatability of the synthesis method. The dielectric measurements are validated by comparison to spectroscopic/chromatographic data.

  4. Molecular Differentiated Initiator Reactivity in the Synthesis of Poly(caprolactone)-Based Hydrophobic Homopolymer and Amphiphilic Core Corona Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Eileen; Nguyen, Nam T; Hild, Frédéric; Hamilton, Ian E; Dimitrakis, Georgios; Kingman, Samuel W; Lau, Phei-Li; Irvine, Derek J

    2015-11-09

    Macromolecules that possess three-dimensional, branched molecular structures are of great interest because they exhibit significantly differentiated application performance compared to conventional linear (straight chain) polymers. This paper reports the synthesis of 3- and 4-arm star branched polymers via ring opening polymerisation (ROP) utilising multi-functional hydroxyl initiators and Sn(Oct)2 as precatalyst. The structures produced include mono-functional hydrophobic and multi-functional amphiphilic core corona stars. The characteristics of the synthetic process were shown to be principally dependent upon the physical/dielectric properties of the initiators used. ROP's using initiators that were more available to become directly involved with the Sn(Oct)₂ in the "in-situ" formation of the true catalytic species were observed to require shorter reaction times. Use of microwave heating (MWH) in homopolymer star synthesis reduced reaction times compared to conventional heating (CH) equivalents, this was attributed to an increased rate of "in-situ" catalyst formation. However, in amphiphilic core corona star formation, the MWH polymerisations exhibited slower propagation rates than CH equivalents. This was attributed to macro-structuring within the reaction medium, which reduced the potential for reaction. It was concluded that CH experiments were less affected by this macro-structuring because it was disrupted by the thermal currents/gradients caused by the conductive/convective heating mechanisms. These gradients are much reduced/absent with MWH because it selectively heats specific species simultaneously throughout the entire volume of the reaction medium. These partitioning problems were overcome by introducing additional quantities of the species that had been determined to selectively heat.

  5. Photo-crosslinked fabrication of novel biocompatible and elastomeric star-shaped inositol-based polymer with highly tunable mechanical behavior and degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Ge, Juan; Xue, Yumeng; Du, Yuzhang; Lei, Bo; Ma, Peter X

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable and star-shaped polymers with highly tunable structure and properties have attracted much attention in recent years for potential biomedical applications, due to their special structure. Here, inositol-based star-shaped poly-L-lactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (INO-PLLA-PEG) biomedical polymer implants were for the first time synthesized by a facile photo-crosslinking method. This biomaterials show controlled elastomeric mechanical properties (~18 MPa in tensile strength, ~200 MPa in modulus, ~200% in elongation), biodegradability and osteoblasts biocompatibility. These results make INO-PLLA-PEG implants highly promising for bone tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. PMID:26253207

  6. Nanoparticles based on star polymers as theranostic vectors: endosomal-triggered drug release combined with MRI sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Duong, Hien T T; Laurent, Sophie; MacMillan, Alexandre; Whan, Renee Megan; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N; Hu, Jinming; Lowe, Andrew; Boyer, Cyrille; Davis, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Dual-functional star polymers (diameters 15 nm) are synthesized producing nanoparticles with excellent colloidal stability in both water and serum. The nanoparticles are built with aldehyde groups in the core and activated esters in the arms. The different reactivity of the two functional groups to sequentially react with different amino compounds is exploited; doxorubicin (DOX) and 1-(5-amino-3-aza-2-oxypentyl)-4,7,10-tris(tert-butoxycarbonylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DO3A-tBu-NH2 )-a chelating agent effective for the complexation of Gadolinium ions (Gd). The activated ester group is employed to attach the DO3A chelating agent, while the aldehyde groups are exploited for DOX conjugation, providing a controlled release mechanism for DOX in acidic environments. DOX/Gd-loaded nanoparticles are rapidly taken up by MCF-7 breast cancer cells, subsequently releasing DOX as demonstrated using in vitro fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Endosomal, DOX release is observed, using a phasor plot representation of the fluorescence lifetime data, showing an increase of native DOX with time. The MRI properties of the stars are assessed and the relaxivity of Gd loaded in stars is three times higher than conventional organic Gd/DO3A complexes. The DOX/Gd-conjugated nanoparticles yield a similar IC50 to native DOX for breast cancer cell lines, confirming that DOX integrity is conserved during nanoparticle attachment and release.

  7. Strong electroactive biodegradable shape memory polymer networks based on star-shaped polylactide and aniline trimer for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Ge, Juan; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of functional shape memory polymer (SMP) for tissue engineering remains a challenge. Here the synthesis of strong electroactive shape memory polymer (ESMP) networks based on star-shaped polylactide (PLA) and aniline trimer (AT) is reported. Six-armed PLAs with various chain lengths were chemically cross-linked to synthesize SMP. After addition of an electroactive AT segment into the SMP, ESMP was obtained. The polymers were characterized by (1)H NMR, GPC, FT-IR, CV, DSC, DMA, tensile test, and degradation test. The SMP and ESMP exhibited strong mechanical properties (modulus higher than GPa) and excellent shape memory performance: short recovery time (several seconds), high recovery ratio (over 94%), and high fixity ratio (almost 100%). Moreover, cyclic voltammetry test confirmed the electroactivity of the ESMP. The ESMP significantly enhanced the proliferation of C2C12 cells compared to SMP and linear PLA (control). In addition, the ESMP greatly improved the osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells compared to PH10 and PLA in terms of ALP enzyme activity, immunofluorescence staining, and relative gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). These intelligent SMPs and electroactive SMP with strong mechanical properties, tunable degradability, good electroactivity, biocompatibility, and enhanced osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells show great potential for bone regeneration.

  8. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  9. Doxorubicin-loaded aromatic imine-contained amphiphilic branched star polymer micelles: synthesis, self-assembly, and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liang; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Redox-and pH-sensitive branched star polymers (BSPs), BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAIGP)ns, have been successively prepared by two steps of reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The first step is RAFT polymerization of 2-(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)methacrylate (DMAEMA) and p-(methacryloxyethoxy) benzaldehyde (MAEBA) in the presence of divinyl monomer, 2,2′-dithiodiethoxyl dimethacrylate (DTDMA). The resultant branched polymers were used as a macro-RAFT agent in the subsequent RAFT polymerization. After hydrolysis of the BSPs to form BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAGP)ns (BSP-H), the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was covalently linked to branched polymer chains by reaction of primary amine of DOX and aldehyde groups in the polymer chains. Their compositions, structures, molecular weights, and molecular weight distributions were respectively characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and gel permeation chromatography measurements. The DOX-loaded micelles were fabricated by self-assembly of DOX-containing BSPs in water, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Aromatic imine linkage is stable in neutral water, but is acid-labile; controlled release of DOX from the BSP-H-DOX micelles was realized at pH values of 5 and 6, and at higher acidic solution, fast release of DOX was observed. In vitro cytotoxicity experiment results revealed low cytotoxicity of the BSPs and release of DOX from micelles in HepG2 and HeLa cells. Confocal laser fluorescence microscopy observations showed that DOX-loaded micelles have specific interaction with HepG2 cells. Thus, this type of BSP micelle is an efficient drug delivery system. PMID:26056444

  10. Doxorubicin-loaded aromatic imine-contained amphiphilic branched star polymer micelles: synthesis, self-assembly, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liang; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Redox-and pH-sensitive branched star polymers (BSPs), BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAIGP)(n)s, have been successively prepared by two steps of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The first step is RAFT polymerization of 2-(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)methacrylate (DMAEMA) and p-(methacryloxyethoxy) benzaldehyde (MAEBA) in the presence of divinyl monomer, 2,2'-dithiodiethoxyl dimethacrylate (DTDMA). The resultant branched polymers were used as a macro-RAFT agent in the subsequent RAFT polymerization. After hydrolysis of the BSPs to form BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAGP)(n)s (BSP-H), the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was covalently linked to branched polymer chains by reaction of primary amine of DOX and aldehyde groups in the polymer chains. Their compositions, structures, molecular weights, and molecular weight distributions were respectively characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and gel permeation chromatography measurements. The DOX-loaded micelles were fabricated by self-assembly of DOX-containing BSPs in water, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Aromatic imine linkage is stable in neutral water, but is acid-labile; controlled release of DOX from the BSP-H-DOX micelles was realized at pH values of 5 and 6, and at higher acidic solution, fast release of DOX was observed. In vitro cytotoxicity experiment results revealed low cytotoxicity of the BSPs and release of DOX from micelles in HepG2 and HeLa cells. Confocal laser fluorescence microscopy observations showed that DOX-loaded micelles have specific interaction with HepG2 cells. Thus, this type of BSP micelle is an efficient drug delivery system. PMID:26056444

  11. Mechanisms of the self-organization of star-shaped polymers with a varied structure of branching center based on fullerene C{sub 60} in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. T.; Toeroek, Gy.; Vinogradova, L. V.

    2011-12-15

    The self-organization of star-shaped polymers in toluene has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. Polystyrene stars with a mono-C{sub 60} branching center are ordered into globular clusters ({approx}1700 nm in diameter), whereas stars with a double (C{sub 60}-C{sub 60}) center are ordered into anisotropic structures (superchains), which are linked (depending on the concentration) into triads (chain clusters {approx}2500 nm in diameter). On the contrary, heteroarm polystyrene and poly-2-vinylpyridine stars with a C{sub 60} center are weakly associated into dimers. Moderately polar stars with arms composed of polystyrene and diblock copolymer (poly-2-vinylpyridine-poly-tret-butyl methacrylate) form short chains composed of four macromolecules, while stars of higher polarity based on polystyrene and poly-tret-butyl methacrylate form clusters containing {approx}12 macromolecules {approx}50 nm in diameter. Thus, by varying the structure of the center and the arm polarity, one can control the modes of star structuring.

  12. Drug-loaded pseudo-block copolymer micelles with a multi-armed star polymer as the micellar exterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chen; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhengkui; Yang, Chenchen; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-07-01

    Supramolecular constructed pseudo block copolymer micelles based on β-cyclodextrin terminated 4 and 7 armed star poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and adamantane terminated linear poly(ε-caprolactone) were prepared. The size, morphology, stability and protein adsorption were experimentally examined. The micelles with 7 armed PVP chains as the micellar exterior showed the lowest amount of protein adsorption and the best stability in media. When cabazitaxel, a new taxane, was loaded into the micelles, 14.4% drug loading content and 85% encapsulation efficacy were achieved. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show significant cytotoxicity against drug-resistant A2780/T cell lines. Biodistribution studies showed that the micelles can almost double the content of cargo in tumor sites compared with the free cargo. In vivo antitumor activity examinations indicated that cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show superior antitumor activity over free paclitaxel and free cabazitaxel.Supramolecular constructed pseudo block copolymer micelles based on β-cyclodextrin terminated 4 and 7 armed star poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and adamantane terminated linear poly(ε-caprolactone) were prepared. The size, morphology, stability and protein adsorption were experimentally examined. The micelles with 7 armed PVP chains as the micellar exterior showed the lowest amount of protein adsorption and the best stability in media. When cabazitaxel, a new taxane, was loaded into the micelles, 14.4% drug loading content and 85% encapsulation efficacy were achieved. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show significant cytotoxicity against drug-resistant A2780/T cell lines. Biodistribution studies showed that the micelles can almost double the content of cargo in tumor sites compared with the free cargo. In vivo antitumor activity examinations indicated that cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show superior antitumor activity over free

  13. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and tumor-suppressing p53 gene using a POSS-based star-shaped polymer for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmao; Xu, Bing; Bai, Tao; Liu, Wenguang

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a star-shaped polymer consisting of a cationic poly[2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) shell and a zwitterionic poly[N-(3-(methacryloylamino) propyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide] (PMPD) corona was grafted from a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS)-based initiator via atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The reported star-shaped polymer could form stable micelles in aqueous solutions even in the presence of serum. In addition, anti-cancer drug doxorubicin and tumor-suppressing p53 gene were loaded in the process of micelle formation. The formed polyplex was biocompatible and highly efficient for both drug and gene delivery. Furthermore, the polyplex was able to cause a high apoptotic rate of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. This combination delivery strategy offers a promising method for cancer therapy and can be used for further clinical applications. PMID:25934448

  14. Nanofibrous hollow microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped polymers as injectable cell carriers for knee repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohua; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-05-01

    To repair complexly shaped tissue defects, an injectable cell carrier is desirable to achieve an accurate fit and to minimize surgical intervention. However, the injectable carriers available at present have limitations, and are not used clinically for cartilage regeneration. Here, we report nanofibrous hollow microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped biodegradable polymers as an injectable cell carrier. The nanofibrous hollow microspheres, integrating the extracellular-matrix-mimicking architecture with a highly porous injectable form, were shown to efficiently accommodate cells and enhance cartilage regeneration, compared with control microspheres. The nanofibrous hollow microspheres also supported a significantly larger amount of, and higher-quality, cartilage regeneration than the chondrocytes-alone group in an ectopic implantation model. In a critical-size rabbit osteochondral defect-repair model, the nanofibrous hollow microspheres/chondrocytes group achieved substantially better cartilage repair than the chondrocytes-alone group that simulates the clinically available autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure. These results indicate that the nanofibrous hollow microspheres are an excellent injectable cell carrier for cartilage regeneration.

  15. DENSE GAS TRACERS AND STAR FORMATION LAWS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES: APEX SURVEY OF HCN J = 4 → 3, HCO{sup +} J = 4 → 3, AND CS J = 7 → 6

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Yinghe; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-04-01

    We report HCN J = 4 → 3, HCO{sup +} J = 4 → 3, and CS J = 7 → 6 observations in 20 nearby star-forming galaxies with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment 12 m telescope. Combined with four HCN, three HCO{sup +}, and four CS detections from the literature, we probe the empirical link between the luminosity of molecular gas (L{sub gas}{sup ′}) and that of infrared emission (L {sub IR}), up to the highest gas densities (∼10{sup 6} cm{sup –3}) that have been probed so far. For nearby galaxies with large radii, we measure the IR luminosity within the submillimeter beam size (14''-18'') to match the molecular emission. We find linear slopes for L{sub CS} {sub J=7--6}{sup ′}-L {sub IR} and L{sub HCN} {sub J=4--3}{sup ′}-L {sub IR}, and a slightly super-linear slope for L{sub HCO{sup +}} {sub J=4--3}{sup ′}-L {sub IR}. The correlation of L{sub CS} {sub J=7--6}{sup ′}-L {sub IR} even extends over eight orders of luminosity magnitude down to Galactic dense cores, with a fit of log(L {sub IR}) =1.00(± 0.01) ×log(L{sub CS} {sub J=7--6}{sup ′}) + 4.03(± 0.04). Such linear correlations appear to hold for all densities >10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and indicate that star formation rate is not related to the free-fall timescale for dense molecular gas.

  16. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF DENSE CORES IN THE {rho} OPHIUCHI MAIN CLOUD AND A SIGNIFICANT ROLE OF EXTERNAL PRESSURES IN CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Maruta, Hajime; Nishi, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2010-05-01

    Using the archive data of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} (J = 1-0) line emission taken with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope with a spatial resolution of {approx} 0.01 pc, we have identified 68 dense cores in the central dense region of the {rho} Ophiuchi main cloud. The H{sup 13}CO{sup +} data also indicate that the fractional abundance of H{sup 13}CO{sup +} relative to H{sub 2} is roughly inversely proportional to the square root of the H{sub 2} column density with a mean of 1.72 x 10{sup -11}. The mean radius, FWHM line width, and LTE mass of the identified cores are estimated to be 0.045 {+-} 0.011 pc, 0.49 {+-} 0.14 km s{sup -1}, and 3.4 {+-} 3.6 M{sub sun}, respectively. The majority of the identified cores have subsonic internal motions. The virial ratio, the ratio of the virial mass to the LTE mass, tends to decrease with increasing LTE mass and about 60% of the cores have virial ratios smaller than 2, indicating that these cores are not transient structures but self-gravitating. The detailed virial analysis suggests that the surface pressure often dominates over the self-gravity and thus plays a crucial role in regulating core formation and evolution. By comparing the {rho} Oph cores with those in the Orion A molecular cloud observed with the same telescope, we found that the statistical properties of the core physical quantities are similar between the two clouds if the effect of the different spatial resolutions is corrected. The line widths of the {rho} Oph cores appear to be nearly independent of the core radii over the range of 0.01-0.1 pc and deviate upward from the Heyer and Brunt relation. This may be evidence that turbulent motions are driven by protostellar outflows in the cluster environment.

  17. Amino-functionalized alkaline clay with cationic star-shaped polymer as adsorbents for removal of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuanfeng; Cai, Pingxiong; Farmahini-Farahani, Madjid; Li, Yiduo; Hou, Xiaobang; Xiao, Huining

    2016-11-01

    Pentaerythritol (PER) was esterified with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to synthesize a four-arm initiator 4Br-PER for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Star-shaped copolymers (P(AM-co-DMAEMA)4, CSP) were prepared via ATRP using dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and acrylamide (AM) as comonomers, while Br-PER and CuBr/2,2‧-bipyridine (BPY) as the initiator and the catalyst, respectively. The resulting four-arm initiator and star-shaped polymer (CSP) were characterized with FT-IR, 1H NMR and Ubbelohde viscometry. Alkaline clay (AC) was immobilized with CSPs to yield amino groups, and the cationic star polymer-immobilized alkaline clay (CSP-AC) was applied to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution in batch experiments. Various influencing factors, including pH, contact time and immobilization amount of CSP on adsorption capacity of CSP-AC for Cr(VI) were also investigated. The results demonstrated that Cr(VI) adsorption was highly pH dependent. The optimized pH value was 4.0. The adsorption isotherms of the adsorbent fit the Langmuir model well, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 137.9 mg/g at 30 °C. The material should be a promising adsorbent for Cr(VI) removal, with the advantages of high adsorption capacity.

  18. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF WARM DENSE GAS IN NGC 1614—BREAKING OF THE STAR FORMATION LAW IN THE CENTRAL KILOPARSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C. K.; Cao, C.; Lu, N.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Murphy, E. J.; Gao, Y.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Privon, G.; Evans, A. S.; König, S.; Aalto, S.; Charmandaris, V.; Chu, J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435 μm dust continuum emission in the central kiloparsec of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1{sup ′′}=329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0.''26 × 0.''20) into a circumnuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f {sub CO(6-5)} = 898 (± 153) Jy km s{sup –1}, which is 63(± 12)% of the total CO (6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100 pcstar formation regions with Σ{sub SFR} ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2} and Σ{sub Gas}∼10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435 μm continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick active galactic nucleus in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation from an expected local correlation between Σ{sub Gas} and Σ{sub SFR}, indicating a breakdown of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law on the linear scale of ∼100 pc.

  19. ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614—Breaking of the Star Formation Law in the Central Kiloparsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. K.; Cao, C.; Lu, N.; Gao, Y.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Meijerink, R.; Privon, G.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Evans, A. S.; König, S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Aalto, S.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Chu, J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; Murphy, E. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Schulz, B.; van der Werf, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435 μm dust continuum emission in the central kiloparsec of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1{\\prime \\prime }= 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0.''26 × 0.''20) into a circumnuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f CO(6-5) = 898 (± 153) Jy km s-1, which is 63(± 12)% of the total CO (6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100 pc < r < 350 pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of ~40 km s-1. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with ΣSFR ~ 100 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 and Σ Gas˜ 104 {M}_⊙ pc-2. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435 μm continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick active galactic nucleus in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation from an expected local correlation between ΣGas and ΣSFR, indicating a breakdown of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law on the linear scale of ~100 pc. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  1. CoRoT 101186644: A transiting low-mass dense M-dwarf on an eccentric 20.7-day period orbit around a late F-star. Discovered in the CoRoT lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Mazeh, T.; Alonso, R.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Deeg, H. J.; Deleuil, M.; Faigler, S.; Fridlund, M.; Hébrard, G.; Moutou, C.; Santerne, A.; Tingley, B.

    2013-05-01

    We present the study of the CoRoT transiting planet candidate 101186644, also named LRc01_E1_4780. Analysis of the CoRoT lightcurve and the HARPS spectroscopic follow-up observations of this faint (mV = 16) candidate revealed an eclipsing binary composed of a late F-type primary (Teff = 6090 ± 200 K) and a low-mass, dense late M-dwarf secondary on an eccentric (e = 0.4) orbit with a period of ~20.7 days. The M-dwarf has a mass of 0.096 ± 0.011 M⊙, and a radius of 0.104-0.006+0.026 R⊙, which possibly makes it the smallest and densest late M-dwarf reported so far. Unlike the claim that theoretical models predict radii that are 5-15% smaller than measured for low-mass stars, this one seems to have a radius that is consistent and might even be below the radius predicted by theoretical models. Based on observations made with the 1-m telescope at the Wise Observatory, Israel, the Swiss 1.2-m Leonhard Euler telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile, the IAC-80 telescope at the Observatory del Teide, Canarias, Spain, and the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639).

  2. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  3. Infrared Stars: The interaction between stars and interstellar clouds produces "infrared stars" of two different kinds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, H L

    1967-08-11

    Our searches for very cool stars have revealed three kinds of objects: very cool Mira stars, perhaps cooler than any of this type previously known; extremely dense interstellar clouds, more dense than any known heretofore; and, probably, cool circumstellar clouds that may be planetary systems in an early stage of formation.

  4. Dynamics of microemulsions bridged with hydrophobically end-capped star polymers studied by neutron spin-echo

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, I.; Malo de Molina, Paula; Gradzielski, M.; Farago, B.; Falus, P.; Herfurth, Christoph; Laschewsky, André

    2014-01-21

    The mesoscopic dynamical properties of oil-in-water microemulsions (MEs) bridged with telechelic polymers of different number of arms and with different lengths of hydrophobic stickers were studied with neutron spin-echo (NSE) probing the dynamics in the size range of individual ME droplets. These results then were compared to those of dynamicic light scattering (DLS) which allow to investigate the dynamics on a much larger length scale. Studies were performed as a function of the polymer concentration, number of polymer arms, and length of the hydrophobic end-group. In general it is observed that the polymer bridging has a rather small influence on the local dynamics, despite the fact that the polymer addition leads to an increase of viscosity by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to results from rheology and DLS, where the dynamics on much larger length and time scales are observed, NSE shows that the linear polymer is more efficient in arresting the motion of individual ME droplets. This finding can be explained by a simple simulation, merely by the fact that the interconnection of droplets becomes more efficient with a decreasing number of arms. This means that the dynamics observed on the short and on the longer length scale depend in an opposite way on the number of arms and hydrophobic stickers.

  5. Dynamics of microemulsions bridged with hydrophobically end-capped star polymers studied by neutron spin-echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, I.; de Molina, Paula Malo; Farago, B.; Falus, P.; Herfurth, Christoph; Laschewsky, André; Gradzielski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mesoscopic dynamical properties of oil-in-water microemulsions (MEs) bridged with telechelic polymers of different number of arms and with different lengths of hydrophobic stickers were studied with neutron spin-echo (NSE) probing the dynamics in the size range of individual ME droplets. These results then were compared to those of dynamicic light scattering (DLS) which allow to investigate the dynamics on a much larger length scale. Studies were performed as a function of the polymer concentration, number of polymer arms, and length of the hydrophobic end-group. In general it is observed that the polymer bridging has a rather small influence on the local dynamics, despite the fact that the polymer addition leads to an increase of viscosity by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to results from rheology and DLS, where the dynamics on much larger length and time scales are observed, NSE shows that the linear polymer is more efficient in arresting the motion of individual ME droplets. This finding can be explained by a simple simulation, merely by the fact that the interconnection of droplets becomes more efficient with a decreasing number of arms. This means that the dynamics observed on the short and on the longer length scale depend in an opposite way on the number of arms and hydrophobic stickers.

  6. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, P.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; de Jager, C. W.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Zheng, X.-C.; Zhu, L.

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  7. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  8. Dense with Sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ingkanisorn, W. Patricia; Mancini, Christine; Arai, Andrew E.

    2005-09-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a low encoding strength phase-cycled meta-DENSE readout and a two fold SENSE acceleration ( R = 2) is described. This combination reduces total breath-hold times for increased patient comfort during cardiac regional myocardial contractility studies. Images from phantoms, normal volunteers, and a patient are provided to demonstrate the SENSE-DENSE combination of methods. The overall breath-hold time is halved while preserving strain map quality.

  9. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  10. Multicompartmental Microcapsules from Star Copolymer Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjun; Malak, Sidney T.; Xu, Weinan; Heller, William T.; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2013-02-26

    We present the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm pH-sensitive star-shaped polystyrene-poly(2-pyridine) (PSnP2VPn) block copolymers to fabricate porous and multicompartmental microcapsules. Pyridine-containing star molecules forming a hydrophobic core/hydrophilic corona unimolecular micelle in acidic solution (pH 3) were alternately deposited with oppositely charged linear sulfonated polystyrene (PSS), yielding microcapsules with LbL shells containing hydrophobic micelles. The surface morphology and internal nanopore structure of the hollow microcapsules were comparatively investigated for shells formed from star polymers with a different numbers of arms (9 versus 22) and varied shell thickness (5, 8, and 11 bilayers). The successful integration of star unimers into the LbL shells was demonstrated by probing their buildup, surface segregation behavior, and porosity. The larger arm star copolymer (22 arms) with stretched conformation showed a higher increment in shell thickness due to the effective ionic complexation whereas a compact, uniform grainy morphology was observed regardless of the number of deposition cycles and arm numbers. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) revealed that microcapsules with hydrophobic domains showed different fractal properties depending upon the number of bilayers with a surface fractal morphology observed for the thinnest shells and a mass fractal morphology for the completed shells formed with the larger number of bilayers. Moreover, SANS provides support for the presence of relatively large pores (about 25 nm across) for the thinnest shells as suggested from permeability experiments. The formation of robust microcapsules with nanoporous shells composed of a hydrophilic polyelectrolyte with a densely packed hydrophobic core based on star amphiphiles represents an intriguing and novel case of compartmentalized microcapsules with an ability to simultaneously store different hydrophilic, charged, and hydrophobic

  11. H3+ in dense and diffuse clouds.

    PubMed

    McCall, B J; Hinkle, K H; Geballe, T R; Oka, T

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar H3+ has been detected in dense as well as diffuse clouds using three 3.7 microns infrared spectral lines of the nu 2 fundamental band. Column densities of H3+ from (1.7-5.5) x 10(14) cm-2 have been measured in dense clouds in absorption against the infrared continua of the deeply embedded young stellar objects GL2136, W33A, MonR2 IRS 3, GL961E, and GL2591. Strong and broad H3+ absorptions have been detected in dense and diffuse clouds towards GC IRS 3 and GCS3-2 in the region of the galactic center. A large column density of H3+, comparable to that of a dense cloud, has been detected towards the visible star Cygnus OB2 No. 12, which has a line of sight that crosses mostly diffuse clouds. The H3+ chemistry of dense and diffuse clouds are discussed using a very simple model. Some future projects and problems are discussed.

  12. Polymersomes via Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic β-Cyclodextrin-Centered Triarm Star Polymers for Enhanced Oral Bioavailability of Water-Soluble Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mengying; Shen, Yurun; Zhang, Lu; Qiu, Liyan

    2016-03-14

    To date, improving oral bioavailability of water-soluble drugs with poor membrane permeability is still challenging. An example of this includes doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), a widely used chemotherapeutic. We therefore developed a novel DOX·HCl-loaded polymersome (Ps-DOX·HCl) self-assembled by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin-centered triarm star polymer (mPEG(2k)-PLA(3k))3-CD with the considerable drug loading capability. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells trans-well models, it was found that the cellular uptake and absorptive transport of DOX·HCl was significantly increased and the efflux was attenuated when delivered through polymersomes than free drugs. This phenomenon was further verified in mechanistic studies, which was attributed to the change in membrane transport pathway from paracellular route (free DOX·HCl) to active transcellular transport (drug-loaded polymersomes). Moreover, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice demonstrated a significant increase in the oral bioavailability of Ps-DOX·HCl compared with free DOX·HCl (7.32-fold), as well as extended half-life (8.22-fold). This resulted in a substantial anticancer efficacy against mouse sarcoma 180 (S180) tumor in vivo. The cardiotoxicity, which is intrinsically induced by DOX·HCl, and toxicity toward gastrointestinal tissues were avoided according to histological studies. These findings indicate that (mPEG(2k)-PLA(3k))3-CD copolymer displays great potential as a vehicle for the effective oral delivery of water-soluble drugs with low permeability. PMID:26840277

  13. Polymersomes via Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic β-Cyclodextrin-Centered Triarm Star Polymers for Enhanced Oral Bioavailability of Water-Soluble Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mengying; Shen, Yurun; Zhang, Lu; Qiu, Liyan

    2016-03-14

    To date, improving oral bioavailability of water-soluble drugs with poor membrane permeability is still challenging. An example of this includes doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), a widely used chemotherapeutic. We therefore developed a novel DOX·HCl-loaded polymersome (Ps-DOX·HCl) self-assembled by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin-centered triarm star polymer (mPEG(2k)-PLA(3k))3-CD with the considerable drug loading capability. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells trans-well models, it was found that the cellular uptake and absorptive transport of DOX·HCl was significantly increased and the efflux was attenuated when delivered through polymersomes than free drugs. This phenomenon was further verified in mechanistic studies, which was attributed to the change in membrane transport pathway from paracellular route (free DOX·HCl) to active transcellular transport (drug-loaded polymersomes). Moreover, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice demonstrated a significant increase in the oral bioavailability of Ps-DOX·HCl compared with free DOX·HCl (7.32-fold), as well as extended half-life (8.22-fold). This resulted in a substantial anticancer efficacy against mouse sarcoma 180 (S180) tumor in vivo. The cardiotoxicity, which is intrinsically induced by DOX·HCl, and toxicity toward gastrointestinal tissues were avoided according to histological studies. These findings indicate that (mPEG(2k)-PLA(3k))3-CD copolymer displays great potential as a vehicle for the effective oral delivery of water-soluble drugs with low permeability.

  14. Efficient gene transfection in the neurotypic cells by star-shaped polymer consisting of β-cyclodextrin core and poly(amidoamine) dendron arms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Deng, Jun Jie; Yuan, Fang; Yang, Ning; Li, Wei; Yin, Jian Rui; Pu, Shu Xiang; Xie, Long Chang; Gao, Cong; Zhang, Li Ming

    2013-04-15

    In order to develop the effective vectors that had high gene transfection capability and low cytotoxicity in the neuronal cells, we tested the star-shaped polymer consisting of β-cyclodextrin core and poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendron arms [β-CD-(D3)7] as the vector to transfect the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The physicochemical properties of the β-CD-(D3)7/plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexes were characterized by using gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and zeta-potential experiments. Among the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, β-CD-(D3)7/pDNA complex demonstrated a lower toxicity compared to those of PAMAM (G=4, with an ethylenediamine core)/pDNA complex. When the N/P ratio was over 20, it was observed that PAMAM had a faster increment in toxicity compared to β-CD-(D3)7. Fluorescent image, confocal microscopy image and flow cytometry showed that β-CD-(D3)7/pDNA complexes had significantly higher transgene activity than that of PAMAM/pDNA complexes. For example, the transfection efficiency was 20% and 7.5% for β-CD-(D3)7/pDNA and PAMAM/pDNA complexes, respectively. These results indicated that β-CD-(D3)7 might be a promising candidate for neurotypic cells gene delivery with the characteristics of good biocompatibility, relatively high gene transfection capability and potential in vivo gene delivery ability. PMID:23544527

  15. pH-induced inversion of water-in-oil emulsions to oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) using core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer as interfacial stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijing; Deng, Xiaoyong; An, Zesheng

    2014-06-01

    A pH-responsive core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) arms was used as an interfacial stabilizer for emulsions containing toluene (80 v%) and water (20 v%). In the pH range of 12.1-9.3, ordinary water-in-oil emulsions were formed. Intermediate multiple emulsions of oil-in-water-in-oil and water-in-oil-in-water were formed at pH 8.6 and 7.5, respectively. Further lowering the pH resulted in the formation of gelled high internal phase emulsions of oil-in-water type in the pH range of 6.4-0.6. The emulsion behavior was correlated with interfacial tension, conductivity and configuration of the CCS polymer at different pH.

  16. Sub-kiloparsec ALMA Imaging of Compact Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2.5: Revealing the Formation of Dense Galactic Cores in the Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro, G.; Kriek, M.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Faber, S. M.; Dekel, A.; Primack, J. R.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Rujoparkarn, W.; Seth, K.

    2016-08-01

    We present spatially resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2.5. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ({r}{{e,F160W}}˜ 1.6 kpc) and high stellar mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 2. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of {L}{{IR}}={10}12.3-12.8 {L}ȯ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR = 200–700 M ⊙ yr‑1, consistent with those of typical star-forming “main sequence” galaxies. The high spatial resolution (FWHM ˜ 0.″12–0.″18) ALMA and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR–SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to r ˜ 5 kpc, by a factor of over 100× from the unobscured UV–SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ({r}{{e,SFR}}˜ 1 kpc) is ˜30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of Δt = ±100 Myr, is a 4× increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6× decrease of the half-mass–radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.

  17. Sub-kiloparsec ALMA Imaging of Compact Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2.5: Revealing the Formation of Dense Galactic Cores in the Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro, G.; Kriek, M.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Faber, S. M.; Dekel, A.; Primack, J. R.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Rujopakarn, W.; Seth, K.

    2016-08-01

    We present spatially resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2.5. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ({r}{{e,F160W}}˜ 1.6 kpc) and high stellar mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 2. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of {L}{{IR}}={10}12.3-12.8 {L}⊙ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR = 200-700 M ⊙ yr-1, consistent with those of typical star-forming “main sequence” galaxies. The high spatial resolution (FWHM ˜ 0.″12-0.″18) ALMA and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR-SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to r ˜ 5 kpc, by a factor of over 100× from the unobscured UV-SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ({r}{{e,SFR}}˜ 1 kpc) is ˜30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of Δt = ±100 Myr, is a 4× increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6× decrease of the half-mass-radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.

  18. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  19. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  20. Formation of Massive Stars in Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2004-12-01

    There are two scenarios for the formation of massive stars: the ``accretion'' and the ``coalescence'' scenario. Here we discuss the conditions for coalescence (mergers) to occur in very dense young star clusters. We also ask whether the observed multiplicity of tight massive stars in young clusters is consistent with failed mergers and tidal capture. Finally, we propose some ideas for the origin of many massive stars in the heart of the 30 Doradus cluster and other extragalactic starburst clusters. We believe that all massive star formation is triggered and propose a 4-stage process of massive star birth in dense clusters.

  1. Dense cold matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stavinskiy, A. V.

    2015-07-15

    The possibility of studying matter at densities on the order of or higher than the neutron-star density in laboratory experiments is considered. For this, it is proposed to employ a rare kinematical trigger in collisions of relativistic ions. The expected properties of matter under such unusual conditions and a program for investigations into it are discussed, and a design of experimental setup for such investigations is proposed.

  2. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  3. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  4. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  5. Dense Molecular Gas in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Wolfgang; Eckart, Andreas

    1999-10-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is the closest radio galaxy, and its molecular interstellar medium has been studied extensively in recent years. However, these studies used mostly molecular lines tracing low to medium density gas (see e.g. Eckart et al. 1990. Wild et al. 1997). The amount and distribution of the dense component remained largely unknown. We present spectra of the HCN(1-0) emission - which traces dense (n(H2) > 104 cm-3) molecular gas - at the center and along the prominent dust lane at offset positions +/- 60" and +/- 100", as well as single CS(2-1) and CS(3-2) spectra, observed with the SEST on La Silla, Chile. At the central position, the integrated intensity ratio I(HCN)/I(CO) peaks at 0.064, and decreases to somewhat equal to 0.02 to 0.04 in the dust lane. Based on the line luminosity ratio L(HCN)/L(CO) we estimate that there is a significant amount of dense gas in Centaurus A. The fraction of dense molecular gas as well as the star formation efficiency LFIR/LCO towards the center of Cen A is comparable to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and falls in between the values for ULIRGs and normal galaxies for positions in the dust lane. Details will be published in Wild & Eckart (A&A, in prep.). Eckart et al. 1990, ApJ 363, 451 Rydbeck et al. 1993, Astr.Ap. (Letters) 270, L13. Wild, W., Eckart, A. & Wiklind, T. 1997, Astr.Ap. 322, 419.

  6. Weakly dissipative solitons in dense relativistic-degenerate plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Saeed; Ata-ur-Rahman; Khan, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the features of weakly nonlinear waves in a collisional dense plasma consisting of ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons and non-relativistic degenerate ions. In weak dissipation limit, the dynamics of low frequency nonlinear ion (solitary) wave is described by solving a damped Korteweg-deVries equation. The analytical and numerical analysis shows the existence of weakly dissipative solitons evolving with time. The characteristics of soliton evolution with plasma number density and slow ion-neutral collision rate are discussed with some detail. The relevance of the study with degenerate plasmas in ultra-dense astrophysical objects, particularly white dwarf stars is also pointed out.

  7. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  8. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  9. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  10. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  11. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  12. ROSAT survey of emission from Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol

    1993-01-01

    ROSAT pointed observations of bright, classical Be stars have demonstrated that detection of soft x-rays at a level expected for normal B stars of comparable T(sub eff) and luminosity is anti-correlated with the presence of episodes of enhanced mass ejection and formation of a dense, moderately ionized equatorial circumstellar disk. At epochs of lower than average disk column density, x-ray flaring has been detected in 2 Be stars, lambda Eri and pi Aqr.

  13. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  14. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  15. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  16. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  17. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo ); Benvenuto, O.G. La Plata ); Vucetich, H. La Plata )

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  18. Diffusion and Coulomb separation of ions in dense matter.

    PubMed

    Beznogov, M V; Yakovlev, D G

    2013-10-18

    We analyze diffusion equations in strongly coupled Coulomb mixtures of ions in dense stellar matter. Strong coupling of ions in the presence of gravitational forces and electric fields (induced by plasma polarization in the presence of gravity) produces a specific diffusion current which can separate ions with the same A/Z (mass to charge number) ratios but different Z. This Coulomb separation of ions can be important for the evolution of white dwarfs and neutron stars. PMID:24182248

  19. Star-shaped polymers of bio-inspired algae core and poly(acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid) as arms in dissolution of silica/silicate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kalpana; Patiyal, Priyanka; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S; Sharma, Praveen

    2014-06-01

    Silica, in natural waters (due to weathering of rocks) decreases system performance in water processing industry due to scaling. In view of that, the present work involves the synthesis of novel green star shaped additives of algae core (a bio-inspired material as diatom maintains silicic acid equilibrium in sea water) as silica polymerization inhibitors. Star shaped materials with bio-inspired core and poly(acrylamide) [poly(AAm)] and poly(acrylic acid) [poly(AAc)] arms were synthesized by economical green approach. The proficiency was evaluated in 'mini lab' scale for the synthesized APAAm (Algae-g-poly(AAm)) and APAAc (Algae-g-poly(AAc)) dendrimers (star shaped) in colloidal silica mitigation/inhibition at 35 °C and 55 °C. Synthesized dendrimers were equally proficient in silica inhibition at 12 h and maintains ≥450 ppm soluble silica. However, APAAm dendrimers of generation 0 confirmed better results (≈300 ppm) in contrast to APAAc dendrimers in silica inhibition at 55 °C. Additionally, dendrimers also worked as a nucleator for heterogeneous polymerization to inhibit silica homo-polymerization. APAAm dendrimer test set showed no silica deposit for more than 10 days of inhibition. EDX characterization results support nucleator mechanism with Si content of 6.97%-10.98% by weight in silica deposits (SiO2-APAAm dendrimer composites).

  20. Star-shaped polymers of bio-inspired algae core and poly(acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid) as arms in dissolution of silica/silicate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kalpana; Patiyal, Priyanka; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S; Sharma, Praveen

    2014-06-01

    Silica, in natural waters (due to weathering of rocks) decreases system performance in water processing industry due to scaling. In view of that, the present work involves the synthesis of novel green star shaped additives of algae core (a bio-inspired material as diatom maintains silicic acid equilibrium in sea water) as silica polymerization inhibitors. Star shaped materials with bio-inspired core and poly(acrylamide) [poly(AAm)] and poly(acrylic acid) [poly(AAc)] arms were synthesized by economical green approach. The proficiency was evaluated in 'mini lab' scale for the synthesized APAAm (Algae-g-poly(AAm)) and APAAc (Algae-g-poly(AAc)) dendrimers (star shaped) in colloidal silica mitigation/inhibition at 35 °C and 55 °C. Synthesized dendrimers were equally proficient in silica inhibition at 12 h and maintains ≥450 ppm soluble silica. However, APAAm dendrimers of generation 0 confirmed better results (≈300 ppm) in contrast to APAAc dendrimers in silica inhibition at 55 °C. Additionally, dendrimers also worked as a nucleator for heterogeneous polymerization to inhibit silica homo-polymerization. APAAm dendrimer test set showed no silica deposit for more than 10 days of inhibition. EDX characterization results support nucleator mechanism with Si content of 6.97%-10.98% by weight in silica deposits (SiO2-APAAm dendrimer composites). PMID:24681378

  1. Communication: When does a branched polymer become a particle?

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-09-21

    Polymer melts with topologically distinct molecular structures, namely, linear chain, ring, and star polymers, are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. In particular, we determine the mean polymer size and shape, and glass transition temperature for each molecular topology. Both in terms of structure and dynamics, unknotted ring polymers behave similarly to star polymers with f ≈ 5-6 star arms, close to a configurational transition point between anisotropic chains to spherically symmetric particle-like structures. These counter-intuitive findings raise fundamental questions regarding the importance of free chain-ends and chain topology in the packing and dynamics of polymeric materials.

  2. Communication: When does a branched polymer become a particle?

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-09-21

    Polymer melts with topologically distinct molecular structures, namely, linear chain, ring, and star polymers, are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. In particular, we determine the mean polymer size and shape, and glass transition temperature for each molecular topology. Both in terms of structure and dynamics, unknotted ring polymers behave similarly to star polymers with f ≈ 5-6 star arms, close to a configurational transition point between anisotropic chains to spherically symmetric particle-like structures. These counter-intuitive findings raise fundamental questions regarding the importance of free chain-ends and chain topology in the packing and dynamics of polymeric materials. PMID:26395679

  3. Microporous polymer films and methods of their production

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A process is described for producing thin microporous polymeric films for a variety of uses. The process utilizes a dense gas (liquefied gas or supercritical fluid) selected to combine with a solvent-containing polymeric film so that the solvent is dissolved in the dense gas, the polymer is substantially insoluble in the dense gas, and two phases are formed. A microporous film is obtained by removal of a dense gas-solvent phase. 9 figs.

  4. Shocks in Dense Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant: FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 8 LWRS FUSE spectra to study a recently identified interaction of the Vela supernova remnant with a dense cloud region along its western edge. The goal is to quantify the temperature, ionization, density, and abundance characteristics associated with this shock/dense cloud interface by means of UV absorption line studies. Our detection of high-velocity absorption line C I at +90 to +130 km/s with IUE toward a narrow region interior to the Vela SNR strongly suggests the Vela supernova remnant is interacting with a dense ISM or molecular cloud. The shock/dense cloud interface is suggested by (1) the rarity of detection of high-velocity C I seen in IUE spectra, (2) its very limited spatial distribution in the remnant, and (3) a marked decrease in X-ray emission in the region immediately west of the position of these stars where one also finds a 100 micron emission ridge in IRAS images. We have investigated the shock physics and general properties of this interaction region through a focussed UV absorption line study using FUSE spectra. We have FUSE data on OVI absorption lines observed toward 8 stars behind the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). We compare the OVI observations with IUE observations of CIV absorption toward the same stars. Most of the stars, which are all B stars, have complex continua making the extraction of absorption lines difficult. Three of the stars, HD 72088, HD 72089 and HD 72350, however, are rapid rotators (v sin i less than 100 km/s) making the derivation of absorption column densities much easier. We have measured OVI and CIV column densities for the "main component" (i.e. the low velocity component) for these stars. In addition, by removing the H2 line at 1032.35A (121.6 km/s relative to OVI), we find high velocity components of OVI at approximately 150 km/s that we attribute to the shock in the Vela SNR. The column density ratios and magnitudes are compared to both steady shock models and results of hydrodynamical SNR

  5. Interactions of complex polymers with nanoporous substrate.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Jesse D; Wang, Yongmei

    2016-06-28

    With the advance of polymer synthesis, polymers that possess unique architectures such as stars or cyclic chains, and unique chemical composition distributions such as block copolymers or statistical copolymers have become frequently encountered. Characterization of these complex polymer systems drives the development of interactive chromatography where the adsorption of polymers on the porous substrate in chromatography columns is finely tuned. Liquid Chromatography at the Critical Condition (LCCC) in particular makes use of the existence of the Critical Adsorption Point (CAP) of polymers on solid surfaces and has been successfully applied to characterization of complex polymer systems. Interpretation and understanding of chromatography behaviour of complex polymers in interactive chromatography motivates theoretical/computational studies on the CAP of polymers and partitioning of these complex polymers near the CAP. This review article covers the theoretical questions encountered in chromatographic studies of complex polymers. PMID:27263839

  6. Nuclear astrophysics of dense matter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautherin, D.

    1991-12-01

    Starting from the equation of state for a non-relativistic Fermi gas the author describes the equilibrium state of stars whereby the equation of state is generalized to the relativistic case for the description of white dwarfs. Then the evolution of massive stars is described in this framework regarding the thermonuclear burning phase, the gravitational collapse, the neutronization, and the neutrino diffusion. Then the equation of state of supernova matter and the cooling of neutron stars are considered. The author concludes that this approach is somewhat oversimplified in the case of neutron stars, while it is very useful in the case of white dwarfs, where residual interactions can be neglected.

  7. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  8. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  9. Local Instability Signatures in ALMA Observations of Dense Gas in NGC 7469

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Kambiz; Izumi, Takuma; Romeo, Alessandro B.; Martín, Sergio; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Aalto, Susanne; Espada, Daniel; Kohno, Kotaro; Krips, Melanie; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Terashima, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    We present an unprecedented measurement of the disk stability and local instability scales in the luminous infrared Seyfert 1 host, NGC 7469, based on ALMA observations of dense gas tracers and with a synthesized beam of 165 × 132 pc. While we confirm that non-circular motions are not significant in redistributing the dense interstellar gas in this galaxy, we find compelling evidence that the dense gas is a suitable tracer for studying the origin of its intensely high-mass star-forming ringlike structure. Our derived disk stability parameter Q accounts for a thick disk structure, and its value falls below unity at the radii in which intense star formation is found. Furthermore, we derive the characteristic instability scale {λ }c and find a striking agreement between our measured scale of ∼180 pc and the typical sizes of individual complexes of young and massive star clusters seen in high-resolution images.

  10. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  11. The dense gas mass fraction in the W51 cloud and its protoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Youngblood, Allison; Darling, Jeremy; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Héctor; Lebrón Santos, Mayra E.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The density structure of molecular clouds determines how they will evolve. Aims: We map the velocity-resolved density structure of the most vigorously star-forming molecular cloud in the Galactic disk, the W51 giant molecular cloud. Methods: We present new 2 cm and 6 cm maps of H2CO, radio recombination lines, and the radio continuum in the W51 star forming complex acquired with Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope at ~ 50″ resolution. We use H2CO absorption to determine the relative line-of-sight positions of molecular and ionized gas. We measure gas densities using the H2CO densitometer, including continuous measurements of the dense gas mass fraction (DGMF) over the range 104cm-3dense gas mass fraction has been measured over a range of densities with a single data set. Results: The DGMF in W51 A is high, f ≳ 70% above n> 104cm-3, while it is low, f< 20%, in W51 B. We did not detect any H2CO emission throughout the W51 GMC; all gas dense enough to emit under normal conditions is in front of bright continuum sources and therefore is seen in absorption instead. Conclusions: (1) The dense gas fraction in the W51 A and B clouds shows that W51 A will continue to form stars vigorously, while star formation has mostly ended in W51 B. The lack of dense, star-forming gas around W51 C indicates that collect-and-collapse is not acting or is inefficient in W51. (2) Ongoing high-mass star formation is correlated with n ≳ 1 × 105cm-3 gas. Gas with n> 104cm-3 is weakly correlated with low and moderate mass star formation, but does not strongly correlate with high-mass star formation. (3) The nondetection of H2CO emission implies that the emission detected in other galaxies, e.g. Arp 220, comes from high-density gas that is not directly affiliated with already-formed massive stars. Either the non-star-forming ISM of these galaxies is very dense, implying the star formation density threshold is higher, or H ii regions

  12. The origin of OB runaway stars.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Michiko S; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2011-12-01

    About 20% of all massive stars in the Milky Way have unusually high velocities, the origin of which has puzzled astronomers for half a century. We argue that these velocities originate from strong gravitational interactions between single stars and binaries in the centers of star clusters. The ejecting binary forms naturally during the collapse of a young (≤1 million years old) star cluster. This model replicates the key characteristics of OB runaways in our galaxy, and it explains the presence of runaway stars of ≥100 solar masses (M(⊙)) around young star clusters, such as R136 and Westerlund 2. The high proportion and the distributions in mass and velocity of runaways in the Milky Way are reproduced if the majority of massive stars are born in dense and relatively low-mass (5000 to 10,000 M(⊙)) clusters. PMID:22096104

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Novak, Giles; Vaillancourt, John E.; Machida, Masahiro N.; Kataoka, Akimasa; Tomisaka, Kohji; Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin; Dowell, C. Darren; Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  14. Accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Pines, D

    1980-02-01

    During the past 8 years, extended temporal and broadband spectroscopic studies carried out by x-ray astronomical satellites have led to the identification of specific compact x-ray sources as accreting neutron stars, black holes, and degenerate dwarf stars in close binary systems. Such sources provide a unique opportunity to study matter under extreme conditions not accessible in the terrestrial laboratory. Quantitative theoretical models have been developed which demonstrate that detailed studies of these sources will lead to a greatly increased understanding of dense and superdense hadron matter, hadron superfluidity, high-temperature plasma in superstrong magnetic fields, and physical processes in strong gravitational fields. Through a combination of theory and observation such studies will make possible the determination of the mass, radius, magnetic field, and structure of neutron stars and degenerate dwarf stars and the identification of further candidate black holes, and will contribute appreciably to our understanding of the physics of accretion by compact astronomical objects. PMID:17749313

  15. Arm retraction potential of branched polymers in the absence of dynamic dilution.

    PubMed

    Vega, Daniel A; Gómez, Leopoldo R; Royh, Leandro E; Ressia, Jorge A; Villar, Marcelo A; Vallés, Enrique M

    2005-10-14

    We study the stress relaxation of model polymer networks containing low contents of star shaped and linear dangling polymers. As compared with their melts, the behavior of star and dangling polymers leads to a dynamic response with unprecedented large relaxation times. By comparing data of star melts with those corresponding to stars and dangling chains residing in polymer networks, we were able to identify the effects of dynamic dilution clearly. Since in polymer networks the dynamic dilution effect is suppressed, we were able by the first time to experimentally test the validity of the potential for arm retraction proposed by Pearson and Helfand. PMID:16281326

  16. Stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula, that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region.

  17. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  18. Noncontractible loops in the dense O(n) loop model on the cylinder.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, F C; Brankov, J G; Priezzhev, V B; Rittenberg, V; Rogozhnikov, A M

    2014-11-01

    A lattice model of critical dense polymers O(n) is considered for finite cylinder geometry. Due to the presence of noncontractible loops with a fixed fugacity ξ, the model at n=0 is a generalization of the critical dense polymers solved by Pearce, Rasmussen, and Villani. We found the free energy for any height N and circumference L of the cylinder. The density ρ of noncontractible loops is obtained for N→∞ and large L. The results are compared with those found for the anisotropic quantum chain with twisted boundary conditions. Using the latter method, we derived ρ for any O(n) model and an arbitrary fugacity. PMID:25493770

  19. Hybrid Stars and Coronal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    This program addresses the evolution of stellar coronas by comparing a solar-like corona in the supergiant Dra (G2 Ib-IIa) to the corona in the allegedly more evolved state of a hybrid star, TrA (K2 11-111). Because the hybrid star has a massive wind, it appears likely that the corona will be cooler and less dense as the magnetic loop structures are no longer closed. By analogy with solar coronal holes, when the topology of the magnetic field is configured with open magnetic structures, both the coronal temperature and density are lower than in atmospheres dominated by closed loops. The hybrid stars assume a pivotal role in the definition of coronal evolution, atmospheric heating processes and mechanisms to drive winds of cool stars.

  20. Sleuthing the Isolated Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In the early 1990's, isolated thermally-emitting neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium were predicted to show up in their thousands in the ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey. The glut of sources would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter. Only seven objects have been firmly identified to date. The reasons for this discrepency are discussed and recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of these objects are described. Spectra of the brightest of the isolated neutron star candidates, RX J1856.5-3754, continue to present interpretational difficulties for current neutron star model atmospheres and alternative models are briefly discussed. RX J1856.5-3754 remains a valid quark star candidate.

  1. Quantum crystals in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Using the many-body techniques appropriate for quantum crystals it is shown that the deep interior of a neutron star is most likely an orderly arrangement of neutrons, protons and hyperons forming a solid. It is shown that a liquid or gas arrangement would produce higher energy. If so, a neutron star can be viewed as two solids (crust and core) permeated by a layer of ordinary or (perhaps) superfluid liquid. Astronomical evidence is in favor of such a structure: the sudden jumps in the periods of the Crab and Vela pulsars that differ by a factor of about 100 can be easily explained by the star-quake model. If the Crab is less massive than Vela (i.e., if it is not dense enough to have a solid core), the star-quakes take place in the crust whereas for Vela they occur in the core.

  2. The chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar and circumstellar clouds incorporating the biogenic elements. Recent results include the identification of a new astronomical carbon-chain molecule, C4Si. This species was detected in the envelope expelled from the evolved star IRC+10216 in observations at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan. C4Si is the carrier of six unidentified lines which had previously been observed. This detection reveals the existence of a new series of carbon-chain molecules, C sub n Si (n equals 1, 2, 4). Such molecules may well be formed from the reaction of Si(+) with acetylene and acetylene derivatives. Other recent research has concentrated on the chemical composition of the cold, dark interstellar clouds, the nearest dense molecular clouds to the solar system. Such regions have very low kinetic temperatures, on the order of 10 K, and are known to be formation sites for solar-type stars. We have recently identified for the first time in such regions the species of H2S, NO, HCOOH (formic acid). The H2S abundance appears to exceed that predicted by gas-phase models of ion-molecule chemistry, perhaps suggesting the importance of synthesis on grain surfaces. Additional observations in dark clouds have studied the ratio of ortho- to para-thioformaldehyde. Since this ratio is expected to be unaffected by both radiative and ordinary collisional processes in the cloud, it may well reflect the formation conditions for this molecule. The ratio is observed to depart from that expected under conditions of chemical equilibrium at formation, perhaps reflecting efficient interchange between cold dust grains in the gas phase.

  3. STAR System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doverspike, James E.

    The STAR System is a developmental guidance approach to be used with elementary school children in the 5th or 6th grades. Two basic purposes underlie STAR: to increase learning potential and to enhance personal growth and development. STAR refers to 4 basic skills: sensory, thinking, adapting, and revising. Major components of the 4 skills are:…

  4. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  5. Star Formation Relations in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J., II; Heyer, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The relations between star formation and properties of molecular clouds (MCs) are studied based on a sample of star-forming regions in the Galactic Plane. Sources were selected by having radio recombination lines to provide identification of associated MCs and dense clumps. Radio continuum emission and mid-infrared emission were used to determine star formation rates (SFRs), while 13CO and submillimeter dust continuum emission were used to obtain the masses of molecular and dense gas, respectively. We test whether total molecular gas or dense gas provides the best predictor of SFR. We also test two specific theoretical models, one relying on the molecular mass divided by the free-fall time, the other using the free-fall time divided by the crossing time. Neither is supported by the data. The data are also compared to those from nearby star-forming regions and extragalactic data. The star formation “efficiency,” defined as SFR divided by mass, spreads over a large range when the mass refers to molecular gas; the standard deviation of the log of the efficiency decreases by a factor of three when the mass of relatively dense molecular gas is used rather than the mass of all of the molecular gas.

  6. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  7. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  8. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  9. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  10. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  11. Magnetically regulated fragmentation of a massive, dense, and turbulent clump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Commerçon, B.; Giannetti, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Sánchez-Monge, A.; Testi, L.; Brand, J.; Caselli, P.; Cesaroni, R.; Dodson, R.; Longmore, S.; Rioja, M.; Tan, J. C.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    Massive stars, multiple stellar systems, and clusters are born of the gravitational collapse of massive, dense, gaseous clumps, and the way these systems form strongly depends on how the parent clump fragments into cores during collapse. Numerical simulations show that magnetic fields may be the key ingredient in regulating fragmentation. Here we present ALMA observations at ~ 0.25'' resolution of the thermal dust continuum emission at ~ 278 GHz towards a turbulent, dense, and massive clump, IRAS 16061-5048c1, in a very early evolutionary stage. The ALMA image shows that the clump has fragmented into many cores along a filamentary structure. We find that the number, the total mass, and the spatial distribution of the fragments are consistent with fragmentation dominated by a strong magnetic field. Our observations support the theoretical prediction that the magnetic field plays a dominant role in the fragmentation process of massive turbulent clumps.

  12. Ion-temperature-gradient driven modes in very dense magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-02-01

    By employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic-Poisson model, a general dispersion relation for low-frequency electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) modes in a very dense Fermi plasma is derived. The growth rate is found to be higher in the presence of ion-temperature gradients and electron corrections due to quantum fluctuations. Two new ITG driven modes in the Fermi plasma are found. These ITG modes are associated with an electron density response that differs from the Boltzmann law. It is expected that newly found ITG modes can play an important role in anomalous cross-field ion energy transport in the next-generation laser-solid density plasma experiments as well as in dense astrophysical bodies (e.g., neutron stars and the interior of white dwarfs).

  13. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Jeon, Sea Ho; Mack, Nathan H.

    2011-08-02

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  14. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Jeon, Sea Ho; Mack, Nathan H.

    2012-04-03

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  15. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  16. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  17. Interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jahangir, R.; Saleem, Khalid; Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Batool, Nazia

    2015-09-15

    One dimensional propagation of fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense plasmas with degenerate electrons is investigated in this paper in the small amplitude limit. In this regard, Korteweg deVries equation is derived and discussed using the plasma parameters that are typically found in white dwarf stars. The interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons is explored by using the Hirota bilinear formalism, which admits multi soliton solutions. It is observed that the values of the propagation vectors determine the interaction of solitary waves. It is further noted that the amplitude of the respective solitary waves remain unchanged after the interaction; however, they do experience a phase shift.

  18. Interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangir, R.; Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Batool, Nazia; Saleem, Khalid

    2015-09-01

    One dimensional propagation of fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense plasmas with degenerate electrons is investigated in this paper in the small amplitude limit. In this regard, Korteweg deVries equation is derived and discussed using the plasma parameters that are typically found in white dwarf stars. The interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons is explored by using the Hirota bilinear formalism, which admits multi soliton solutions. It is observed that the values of the propagation vectors determine the interaction of solitary waves. It is further noted that the amplitude of the respective solitary waves remain unchanged after the interaction; however, they do experience a phase shift.

  19. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  20. A nonlinear model for magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Jahangir, R.; Siddiq, M.; Eliasson, B.

    2014-10-15

    The properties of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons are studied theoretically in the framework of the Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) equation for small but finite amplitude excitations. Shock-like solutions of the ZK equation are obtained and are applied to parameters relevant to white dwarf stars.

  1. Cyclodextrin Inclusion Polymers Forming Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun

    This chapter reviews the advances in the developments of supramolecular hydrogels based on the polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes formed by inclusion complexes of cyclodextrins threading onto polymer chains. Both physical and chemical supramolecular hydrogels of many different types are discussed with respect to their preparation, structure, property, and gelation mechanism. A large number of physical supramolecular hydrogels were formed induced by self-assembly of densely packed cyclodextrin rings threaded on polymer or copolymer chains acting as physical crosslinking points. The thermo-reversible and thixotropic properties of these physical supramolecular hydrogels have inspired their applications as injectable drug delivery systems. Chemical supramolecular hydrogels synthesized from polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes were based on the chemical crosslinking of either the cyclodextrin molecules or the included polymer chains. The chemical supramolecular hydrogels were often made biodegradable through incorporation of hydrolyzable threading polymers, end caps, or crosslinkers, for their potential applications as biomaterials.

  2. Nonlinear electrostatic excitations in magnetized dense plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.

    2013-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves in magnetized dense electron-ion plasmas are studied with nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate and singly, doubly charged helium (He{sup +}, He{sup ++}) and hydrogen (H{sup +}) ions, respectively. The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in magnetized dense plasmas is obtained under both the energy limits of degenerate electrons. Using reductive perturbation method, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for nonlinear propagation of electrostatic solitons in magnetized dense plasmas is derived for both nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons. It is found that variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, different mass, and charge number of ions play significant role in the formation of electrostatic solitons in magnetized dense plasmas. The numerical plots are also presented for illustration using the parameters of dense astrophysical plasma situations such as white dwarfs and neutron stars exist in the literature. The present investigation is important for understanding the electrostatic waves propagation in the outer periphery of compact stars which mostly consists of hydrogen and helium ions with degenerate electrons in dense magnetized plasmas.

  3. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  4. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  5. Dilatons in Dense Baryonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Rho, Mannque

    We discuss the role of dilaton, which is supposed to be representing a special feature of scale symmetry of QCD, trace anomaly, in dense baryonic matter. The idea that the scale symmetry breaking of QCD is responsible for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is presented along the similar spirit of Freund-Nambu model. The incorporation of dilaton field in the hidden local symmetric parity doublet model is briefly sketched with the possible role of dilaton at high density baryonic matter, the emergence of linear sigma model in dilaton limit.

  6. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  7. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  8. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  9. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  10. Infrared and optical imaging of newborn stars

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, M.H.; Ladd, E.F.; Myers, P.C.; Campbell, B. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque )

    1990-05-01

    Deep optical and near-infrared imaging observations of five low- to intermediate-luminosity pre-main-sequence stars embedded within dense cores reveal an extended emission component. Four of the five stars were previously identified as outflow sources. Nebulosity is detected with the optical and J and H bandpasses for each source. The large measured polarization values (p = 10 to 70 percent) at H and K identify the nebulosity as scattered light. At K the intensity distribution is generally less extended than at J and H, and is characterized by an additional, unresolved component. The position of this point source likely identifies the location of the newborn star within the field. For all sources, the illuminating star is redder than its associated nebula. The observed correlation of cometary reflection nebulae with newborn stars undergoing mass outflow suggests that the low-opacity paths are cavities associated with energetic stellar winds. 35 refs.

  11. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    simulations in which long polymers creep through tiny pores. In Chapter 3 we study pore blockage times for a translocating polymer of length N, driven by a field E across te pore. In three dimensions we find that the typical time the pore remains blocked during a translocation event scales as N^{1.37}/E We show that the scaling behavior stems from the polymer dynamics at the immediate vicinity of the pore -- in particular, the memory effects in the polymer chain tension imbalance across the pore. Chapter 4 studies the unbiased translocation of a polymer with length N, surrounded by equally long polymers, through a narrow pore in a membrane. We show that in dense polymeric systems a relaxation time exists that scales as N^{2.65}, much longer than the Rouse time N^2. If the polymers are well entangled, we find that the mean dwell times scales as N^{3.3}, while for shorter, less entangled polymers, we measure dwell times scaling as N^{2.7}. In Chapter 5 we study the translocation of an RNA molecule, pulled through a nanopore by an optical tweezer, as a method to determine its secondary structure. The resolution with which the elements of the secondary structure can be determined is limited by thermal fluctuations, ruling out single-nucleotide resolution under normal experimental conditions.

  12. Photoaddressable Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieringer, T.

    Polymers are the perfect materials for a variety of applications in almost every field of technical as well as human life. Because of their macromolecular architecture there are a lot of degrees of freedom in the synthesis of polymers. Owing to the change of their functional composition, they can be tailored even for quite difficult demands. Since a whole industry deals with the processing of polymers, cheap production lines have been developed for almost every polymer. This is the reason why not only the molecular composition but even the price of polymers has been optimized. Therefore these materials can be considered as encouraging components even in highly sophisticated areas of applications.

  13. The use of azide-alkyne click chemistry in recent syntheses and applications of polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Cao, Xiaosong; Gao, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of efficient organic click coupling reactions has significantly facilitated the construction of synthetic polymers with sophisticated branched nanostructures. This Feature Article summarizes the recent progress in the application of efficient copper-catalyzed and copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and CuFAAC) reactions in the syntheses of dendrimers, hyperbranched polymers, star polymers, graft polymers, molecular brushes, and cyclic graft polymers. Literature reports on the interesting properties and functions of these polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers are also discussed to illustrate their potential applications as self-healing polymers, adhesives, polymer catalysts, opto-electronic polymer materials and polymer carriers for drug and imaging molecules.

  14. INFRARED TWO-COLOR DIAGRAMS FOR AGB STARS, POST-AGB STARS, AND PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2015-08-01

    We present various infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-AGB stars, and Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and investigate possible evolutionary tracks. We use catalogs from the available literature for the sample of 4903 AGB stars (3373 O-rich; 1168 C-rich; 362 S-type), 660 post-AGB stars (326 post-AGB; 334 pre-PN), and 1510 PNe in our Galaxy. For each object in the catalog, we cross-identify the IRAS, AKARI, Midcourse Space Experiment, and 2MASS counterparts. The IR 2CDs can provide useful information about the structure and evolution of the dust envelopes as well as the central stars. To find possible evolutionary tracks from AGB stars to PNe on the 2CDs, we investigate spectral evolution of post-AGB stars by making simple but reasonable assumptions on the evolution of the central star and dust shell. We perform radiative transfer model calculations for the detached dust shells around evolving central stars in the post-AGB phase. We find that the theoretical dust shell model tracks using dust opacity functions of amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon roughly coincide with the densely populated observed points of AGB stars, post-AGB stars, and PNe on various IR 2CDs. Even though some discrepancies are inevitable, the end points of the theoretical post-AGB model tracks generally converge in the region of the observed points of PNe on most 2CDs.

  15. Warm, Dense Molecular Gas in the ISM of Starbursts, LIRGs, and ULIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika; Groppi, Christopher E.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Walker, Christopher K.

    2005-09-01

    The role of star formation in luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, LIR>=1011 Lsolar ULIRGs, LIR>=1012 Lsolar) is a hotly debated issue: while it is clear that starbursts play a large role in powering the IR luminosity in these galaxies, the relative importance of possible enshrouded AGNs is unknown. It is therefore important to better understand the role of star-forming gas in contributing to the infrared luminosity in IR-bright galaxies. The J=3 level of 12CO lies 33 K above ground and has a critical density of ~1.5×104 cm-3. The 12CO J=3-2 line serves as an effective tracer for warm, dense molecular gas heated by active star formation. Here we report on 12CO J=3-2 observations of 17 starburst spiral galaxies, LIRGs, and ULIRGs, which we obtained with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, Arizona. Our main results are as follows. (1) We find a nearly linear relation between the infrared luminosity and warm, dense molecular gas such that the infrared luminosity increases as the warm, dense molecular gas to the power 0.92; we interpret this to be roughly consistent with the recent results of Gao & Solomon. (2) We find LIR/MH2warm,dense ratios ranging from ~38 to ~482 Lsolar/Msolar using a modified CO-H2 conversion factor of 8.3×1019 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1 derived in this paper.

  16. Crystallization of dense neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The equation of state for cold neutron matter at high density is studied in the t-matrix formulation, and it is shown that energetically it is convenient to have neutrons in a crystalline configuration rather than in a liquid state for values of the density exceeding 1600 Tg/cu cm. The study of the mechanical properties indicates that the system is stable against shearing stresses. A solid core in the deep interior of heavy neutron stars appears to offer the most plausible explanation of speed-ups observed in the Vela pulsar.

  17. Do Circumnuclear Dense Gas Disks Drive Mass Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    We present a positive correlation between the mass of dense molecular gas ({M}{{dense}}) of ˜100 pc scale circumnuclear disks (CNDs) and the black hole mass accretion rate ({\\dot{M}}{{BH}}) in a total of 10 Seyfert galaxies, based on data compiled from the literature and an archive (median aperture θ med = 220 pc). A typical {M}{{dense}} of CNDs is 107–8 {M}ȯ , estimated from the luminosity of the dense gas tracer, the HCN(1–0) emission line. Because dense molecular gas is the site of star formation, this correlation is virtually equivalent to the one between the nuclear star-formation rate and {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} revealed previously. Moreover, the {M}{{dense}}{--}{\\dot{M}}{{BH}} correlation was tighter for CND-scale gas than for the gas on kiloparsec or larger scales. This indicates that CNDs likely play an important role in fueling black holes, whereas greater than kiloparesec scale gas does not. To demonstrate a possible approach for studying the CND-scale accretion process with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we used a mass accretion model where angular momentum loss due to supernova explosions is vital. Based on the model prediction, we suggest that only the partial fraction of the mass accreted from the CND ({\\dot{M}}{{acc}}) is consumed as {\\dot{M}}{{BH}}. However, {\\dot{M}}{{acc}} agrees well with the total nuclear mass flow rate (i.e., {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} + outflow rate). Although these results are still tentative with large uncertainties, they support the view that star formation in CNDs can drive mass accretion onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies.

  18. Do Circumnuclear Dense Gas Disks Drive Mass Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    We present a positive correlation between the mass of dense molecular gas ({M}{{dense}}) of ˜100 pc scale circumnuclear disks (CNDs) and the black hole mass accretion rate ({\\dot{M}}{{BH}}) in a total of 10 Seyfert galaxies, based on data compiled from the literature and an archive (median aperture θ med = 220 pc). A typical {M}{{dense}} of CNDs is 107-8 {M}⊙ , estimated from the luminosity of the dense gas tracer, the HCN(1-0) emission line. Because dense molecular gas is the site of star formation, this correlation is virtually equivalent to the one between the nuclear star-formation rate and {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} revealed previously. Moreover, the {M}{{dense}}{--}{\\dot{M}}{{BH}} correlation was tighter for CND-scale gas than for the gas on kiloparsec or larger scales. This indicates that CNDs likely play an important role in fueling black holes, whereas greater than kiloparesec scale gas does not. To demonstrate a possible approach for studying the CND-scale accretion process with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we used a mass accretion model where angular momentum loss due to supernova explosions is vital. Based on the model prediction, we suggest that only the partial fraction of the mass accreted from the CND ({\\dot{M}}{{acc}}) is consumed as {\\dot{M}}{{BH}}. However, {\\dot{M}}{{acc}} agrees well with the total nuclear mass flow rate (i.e., {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} + outflow rate). Although these results are still tentative with large uncertainties, they support the view that star formation in CNDs can drive mass accretion onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies.

  19. ATLASGAL: A Galaxy-wide sample of dense filamentary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Urquhart, James S.; Leurini, Silvia; Csengeri, Timea; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl M.; Schuller, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    therefore with the direction of large-scale Galactic magnetic field. We find many examples where the dense filaments identified in ATLASGAL are associated with larger scale filamentary structures (~100 pc), and argue that this is likely to be common, and as such these may indicate a connection between large-scale Galactic dynamics and star formation. Conclusions: We have produced a large and Galaxy-wide catalogue of dense filamentary structures that are representative of a particular size and mass range not previously well studied in the literature. Analyses of the properties and distribution of these filaments reveals that they are correlated with the spiral arms and make a significant contribution to star formation in the Galaxy. Massive star formation is ongoing within ~20% of the filaments and is strongly correlated with the filaments with the largest mass-to-length ratios. The luminosity of the embedded sources has a similar distribution to the Galactic-wide samples of young massive stars and can therefore be considered to be representative. Full Tables 1 and 3 and the FITS files associated to Fig. 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A5

  20. Dense molecular clumps associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud supergiant shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Kosuke; Mizuno, Norikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Miura, Rie E.; Ezawa, Hajime; Dawson, Joanne; Tosaki, Tomoka; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H{sub 2})) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) and their kinetic temperatures (T {sub kin}) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H{sub 2}) and T {sub kin}, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  1. Dense Molecular Clumps Associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud Supergiant Shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kosuke; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Onishi, Toshikazu; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Dawson, Joanne; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tosaki, Tomoka; Miura, Rie E.; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. 12CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and 13CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H2)) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (103-105 cm-3) and their kinetic temperatures (T kin) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H2) and T kin, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  2. A Dynamical Gravitational Wave Source in a Dense Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.; Tout, Christopher A.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2016-08-01

    Making use of a new N-body model to describe the evolution of a moderate-size globular cluster, we investigate the characteristics of the population of black holes within such a cluster. This model reaches core-collapse and achieves a peak central density typical of the dense globular clusters of the Milky Way. Within this high-density environment, we see direct confirmation of the merging of two stellar remnant black holes in a dynamically formed binary, a gravitational wave source. We describe how the formation, evolution, and ultimate ejection/destruction of binary systems containing black holes impacts the evolution of the cluster core. Also, through comparison with previous models of lower density, we show that the period distribution of black hole binaries formed through dynamical interactions in this high-density model favours the production of gravitational wave sources. We confirm that the number of black holes remaining in a star cluster at late times and the characteristics of the binary black hole population depend on the nature of the star cluster, critically on the number density of stars and by extension the relaxation timescale.

  3. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  4. Coupled modes in magnetized dense plasma with relativistic-degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.

    2012-01-15

    Low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves are investigated in ultra-dense quantum magnetoplasma with relativistic-degenerate electron and non-degenerate ion fluids. The dispersion relation is derived for mobile as well as immobile ions by employing hydrodynamic equations for such plasma under the influence of electromagnetic forces and pressure gradient of relativistic-degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The result shows the coexistence of shear Alfven and ion modes with relativistically modified dispersive properties. The relevance of results to the dense degenerate plasmas of astrophysical origin (for instance, white dwarf stars) is pointed out with brief discussion on ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic limits.

  5. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  6. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  7. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  8. Gravothermal Star Clusters - Theory and Computer Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurzem, Rainer

    2010-11-01

    In the George Darwin lecture, delivered to the British Royal Astronomical Society in 1960 by Viktor A. Ambartsumian he wrote on the evolution of stellar systems that it can be described by the "dynamic evolution of a gravitating gas" complemented by "a statistical description of the changes in the physical states of stars". This talk will show how this physical concept has inspired theoretical modeling of star clusters in the following decades up to the present day. The application of principles of thermodynamics shows, as Ambartsumian argued in his 1960 lecture, that there is no stable state of equilibrium of a gravitating star cluster. The trend to local thermodynamic equilibrium is always disturbed by escaping stars (Ambartsumian), as well as by gravothermal and gravogyro instabilities, as it was detected later. Here the state-of-the-art of modeling the evolution of dense stellar systems based on principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (Fokker-Planck approximation) will be reviewed. Recent progress including rotation and internal correlations (primordial binaries) is presented. The models have also very successfully been used to study dense star clusters around massive black holes in galactic nuclei and even (in a few cases) relativistic supermassive dense objects in centres of galaxies (here again briefly touching one of the many research fields of V.A. Ambartsumian). For the modern present time of high-speed supercomputing, where we are tackling direct N-body simulations of star clusters, we will show that such direct modeling supports and proves the concept of the statistical models based on the Fokker-Planck theory, and that both theoretical concepts and direct computer simulations are necessary to support each other and make scientific progress in the study of star cluster evolution.

  9. Spin and Isospin Dependent Interactions in Classical Molecular Simulations of Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amason, Charlee; Caplan, Matt; Horowitz, Cj

    2015-10-01

    A neutron star is the hot, incredibly dense remnant of a massive star gone supernova. Extreme conditions on neutron stars allow for the formation of exotically shaped nuclear matter, known colloquially as ``nuclear pasta.'' Competition between the strong nuclear force and the repulsive Coulomb force results in frustration of the neutron star crust, ultimately resulting in these pasta shapes. Previous work at Indiana University has used classical molecular dynamic simulations to model the formation of this pasta. For this project, we introduce a similar model with a new spin dependent interaction. Using this model, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of both symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter with 400 particles. The energies found are similar to those in chiral effective field theory calculations. When we include Coulomb interactions, the model produces pasta shapes. Future work will incorporate this spin potential into larger pasta simulations. Supported by the National Science Foundation REU at Indiana University.

  10. Neutrino Processes in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of these lectures is to introduce basic processes responsible for cooling of neutron stars and to show how to calculate the neutrino production rate in dense strongly interacting nuclear medium. The formalism is presented that treats on equal footing one-nucleon and multiple-nucleon processes and reactions with virtual bosonic modes and condensates. We demonstrate that neutrino emission from dense hadronic component in neutron stars is subject of strong modifications due to collective effects in the nuclear matter. With the most important in-medium processes incorporated in the cooling code an overall agreement with available soft X ray data can be easily achieved. With these findings the so-called “standard” and “non-standard” cooling scenarios are replaced by one general “nuclear medium cooling scenario” which relates slow and rapid neutron star coolings to the star masses (interior densities). The lectures are split in four parts. Part I: After short introduction to the neutron star cooling problem we show how to calculate neutrino reaction rates of the most efficient one-nucleon and two-nucleon processes. No medium effects are taken into account in this instance. The effects of a possible nucleon pairing are discussed. We demonstrate that the data on neutron star cooling cannot be described without inclusion of medium effects. It motivates an assumption that masses of the neutron stars are different and that neutrino reaction rates should be strongly density dependent. Part II: We introduce the Green’s function diagram technique for systems in and out of equilibrium and the optical theorem formalism. The latter allows to perform calculations of production rates with full Green’s functions including all off-mass-shell effects. We demonstrate how this formalism works within the quasiparticle approximation. Part III: The basic concepts of the nuclear Fermi liquid approach are introduced. We show how strong interaction effects can be

  11. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  12. Thermal Spray Formation of Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coquill, Scott; Galbraith, Stephen L.; Tuss. Darren L.; Ivosevic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    This innovation forms a sprayable polymer film using powdered precursor materials and an in-process heating method. This device directly applies a powdered polymer onto a substrate to form an adherent, mechanically-sound, and thickness-regulated film. The process can be used to lay down both fully dense and porous, e.g., foam, coatings. This system is field-deployable and includes power distribution, heater controls, polymer constituent material bins, flow controls, material transportation functions, and a thermal spray apparatus. The only thing required for operation in the field is a power source. Because this method does not require solvents, it does not release the toxic, volatile organic compounds of previous methods. Also, the sprayed polymer material is not degraded because this method does not use hot combustion gas or hot plasma gas. This keeps the polymer from becoming rough, porous, or poorly bonded.

  13. Peering into a Star Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    dense stellar clusters, located at large distances from the Sun. The earliest evolutionary stages of both low- and high-mass stars cannot be observed at visible wavelengths. This is due to the very heavy obscuration in that wavelength region by the dust in the parental molecular clouds. However, infrared and millimeter emission from these objects is able to penetrate the dust and thus allow us to investigate the complex processes that occur at the earliest phases of stellar evolution. A search for massive stars in the formation stage The best possible comprehension of this crucial stage of the stellar life cycle constitutes a key to the understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. And in this context, it is especially the massive stars with their powerful radiation fields, strong stellar winds and dramatic final interaction with the interstellar medium through supernova explosions that dominate the energetics of normal galaxies. Massive stars live much shorter (about 1 million years) than lighter solar-type stars (10 - 12,000 million years) and only they undergo such violent explosions at the end. A most challenging question in current astrophysics is therefore concerned with the nature of the various physical processes that take place during the formation of massive stars. It is for instance still unclear whether massive stars form like lower-mass stars of the solar type do, i.e., by accretion of gas from the surrounding cloud during a progressive contraction process, or if they are rather the results of stellar collisions in dense clusters. The only way to know is by finding the youngest massive stars and then to study them in detail by means of spectroscopic observations. At the same time, their immediate surroundings, e.g., the stellar population in the star-forming cluster of which they are members, must also be investigated before the full picture will emerge. Massive stars in Messier 17 ESO Press Photo 24b/00 ESO Press Photo 24b/00 [Preview; JPEG

  14. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  15. Galaxy Evolution Explorer Spies Band of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's ultraviolet eyes have captured a globular star cluster, called NGC 362, in our own Milky Way galaxy. In this new image, the cluster appears next to stars from a more distant neighboring galaxy, known as the Small Magellanic Cloud.

    Globular clusters are densely packed bunches of old stars scattered in galaxies throughout the universe. NGC 362, located 30,000 light-years away, can be spotted as the dense collection of mostly yellow-tinted stars surrounding a large white-yellow spot toward the top-right of this image. The white spot is actually the core of the cluster, which is made up of stars so closely packed together that the Galaxy Evolution Explorer cannot see them individually.

    The light blue dots surrounding the cluster core are called extreme horizontal branch stars. These stars used to be very similar to our sun and are nearing the end of their lives. They are very hot, with temperatures reaching up to about four times that of the surface of our sun (25,000 Kelvin or 45,500 degrees Fahrenheit).

    A star like our sun spends most of its life fusing hydrogen atoms in its core into helium. When the star runs out of hydrogen in its core, its outer envelope will expand. The star then becomes a red giant, which burns hydrogen in a shell surrounding its inner core. Throughout its life as a red giant, the star loses a lot of mass, then begins to burn helium at its core. Some stars will have lost so much mass at the end of this process, up to 85 percent of their envelopes, that most of the envelope is gone. What is left is a very hot ultraviolet-bright core, or extreme horizontal branch star.

    Blue dots scattered throughout the image are hot, young stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located approximately 200,000 light-years away. The stars in this galaxy are much brighter intrinsically than extreme horizontal branch stars, but they appear just as bright because they are farther

  16. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    " object (a white dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole) and the other an "ordinary" star can produce an intense X-ray emission. This happens because the compact object is so dense and massive that it siphons off matter from its companion star - astronomers refer to this as an accretion process, sometimes also called "stellar cannibalism". When the "stolen" matter approaches the compact object, it gradually heats up and may reach temperatures of millions of degrees. It then emits X-rays. At the same time, ultraviolet radiation is also emitted, which may produce high excitation regions in the surrounding nebula. This scenario can also explain the association of HeII nebulae with ultraluminous X-ray sources in other galaxies. VLT observations of highly excited nebulae in the MCs Observations of a number of highly excited nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds were carried out by a team composed of Belgian and American astronomers [1] in January 2002, by means of the FORS1 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT MELIPAL telescope. Detailed images were obtained through various special optical filters - they bring into light the complex structure of these nebulae and reveal for the first time the exact morphology of the high excitation zones. Some of exposures have been combined to produce the colour photos shown in PR Photos 09a-d/03. Here, the blue colour traces the exceptional HeII emission, whilst the red and green correspond to the more common nebular emissions from atomic hydrogen and doubly-ionized oxygen, respectively. All four nebulae shown were found to be associated with very hot stars. They carry rather prosaic names: BAT99-2 and BAT99-49, AB7 and N44C Star #2 [2]. The first three of these objects contain some of the highly evolved massive stars, of the so-called Wolf-Rayet (WR) type, while the fourth is an mid-age massive star, of type O. Massive stars, with masses more than 20 times that of the Sun, are very bright (100,000 to 10 million times brighter than the Sun

  17. Heating and Cooling in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries accrete enough mass over their lifetimes to replace their entire crust. The accreted matter undergoes a series of nuclear reactions in the crust as it is compressed by continued accretion to higher density. These reactions, which include electron captures, neutron emissions, and pycnonuclear reactions, heat the crust and core of the neutron star. In this talk I will discuss what we can learn from observations of transiently accreting neutron stars in quiescence, when accretion has turned off and we can see emission from the neutron star directly. The quiescent luminosity of these neutron stars constrains the neutrino emissivity in the neutron star core. In systems with long accretion outbursts, observations of thermal relaxation of the crust in quiescence enable, for the first time, constraints on the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the crust. In this way, low mass X-ray binary neutron stars offer a remarkable chance to constrain the properties of dense neutron-rich matter, such as neutron superfluidity and pasta phases in the inner crust of neutron stars.

  18. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  19. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  20. Pervaporation properties of dense polyamide-6 membranes in separation of water-ethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W.; Waczynski, M.; Lasota, M.

    1996-04-01

    Several dense polyamide-6 membranes were prepared by casting 7 wt% and/or 10 wt% solutions of polymer in trifluoroethanol. The cast membranes were dried at different temperatures from 25 to 80{degrees}C. Sorption and pervaporation properties of PA-6 membranes in water-ethanol mixtures were obtained. The data obtained showed that water was preferentially sorbed into the membrane and transported through the membrane; however, the pervaporation selectivity factor {alpha}{sup PV} was close to unity at higher concentrations. The selectivity parameters in pervaporation were improved for membranes obtained from 10 wt% polymer and dried at higher temperatures.

  1. Educational Applications of Star Formation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William; Clemens, Cathy; Green, Paul

    2005-07-01

    Research into the formation of stars involves many exciting physical processes -- from vast magnetized clouds collapsing under their own weight, to thermonuclear reactions igniting inside dense stellar cores, to powerful jets being shot from proto-planetary disks. Star formation research also touches on many aspects of the educational enterprise that is ongoing in schools, museums, and other community venues. In this presentation, we will (1) show how the science of star formation relates to the various learning goals and standards that currently underlie formal K-14 science and technology education, (2) describe the various opportunities that exist for space scientists to get involved in educational outreach, and (3) provide some examples of available resources that support educational outreach involving star formation.

  2. ON THE FORMATION OF GLYCOLALDEHYDE IN DENSE MOLECULAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Paul M.; Kelly, George; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Burke, Daren J.; Raza, Zamaan

    2012-05-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a simple monosaccharide sugar linked to prebiotic chemistry. Recently, it was detected in a molecular core in the star-forming region G31.41+0.31 at a reasonably high abundance. We investigate the formation of glycolaldehyde at 10 K to determine whether it can form efficiently under typical dense core conditions. Using an astrochemical model, we test five different reaction mechanisms that have been proposed in the astrophysical literature, finding that a gas-phase formation route is unlikely. Of the grain-surface formation routes, only two are efficient enough at very low temperatures to produce sufficient glycolaldehyde to match the observational estimates, with the mechanism culminating in CH{sub 3}OH + HCO being favored. However, when we consider the feasibility of these mechanisms from a reaction chemistry perspective, the second grain-surface route looks more promising, H{sub 3}CO + HCO.

  3. Hadronic Stars versus Hybrid stars: how can we identify them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The properties of high-density hadronic matter have been investigated for some time to predict properties of neutron stars including mass/radius and the maximum mass of a neutron star. Recent results indicate the properties of dense hadronic matter up to several times saturation density may be strongly constrained by properties of three-nucleon interactions and hyperon-nucleon interactions. We review some of these results and their comparison to observations. At high pressure, nuclear matter will undergo a transition to quark matter, so sufficiently heavy neutron stars may really be ``hybrid stars'' with quark matter cores. We will discuss the ``Constant Sound Speed'' (CSS) parameterization of the quark matter EoS, and show how it provides a generic way of understanding the topology of the mass-radius relation, as well as more specific features like the maximum mass and typical radius. CSS provides a fairly general framework or language for comparing different quark matter models with each other and with data, and for expressing experimental constraints in model-independent terms.

  4. Embedded Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger I.; Smith, Bradford A.; Hester, J. Jeff

    2002-05-01

    M16 (=NGC 6611), the Eagle Nebula, is a well-studied region of star formation and the source of a widely recognized Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. High spatial resolution infrared observations with the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) on HST reveal the detailed morphology of two embedded star formation regions that are heavily obscured at optical wavelengths. It is striking that only limited portions of the visually obscured areas are opaque at 2.2 μm. Although the optical images imply substantial columns of material, the infrared images show only isolated clumps of dense gas and dust. Rather than being an active factory of star production, only a few regions are capable of sustaining current star formation. Most of the volume in the columns may be molecular gas and dust, protected by capstones of dense dust. Two active regions of star formation are located at the tips of the optical northern and central large ``elephant trunk'' features shown in the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images. They are embedded in two capstones of infrared opaque material that contains and trails behind the sources. Although the presence of these sources was evident in previous observations at the same and longer wavelengths, the NICMOS images provide a high-resolution picture of their morphology. Two bright stars appear at the tip of the southern column and may be the result of recent star formation at the top of that column. These observations suggest that the epoch of star formation in M16 may be near its endpoint.

  5. Dispersing nanoparticles in a polymer film via solvent evaporation

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-05-19

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dispersion of nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer film during solvent evaporation. As the solvent evaporates, a dense polymer-rich skin layer forms at the liquid/vapor interface, which is either NP rich or poor depending on the strength of the NP/polymer interaction. When the NPs are strongly wet by the polymer, the NPs accumulate at the interface and form layers. However, when the NPs are only partially wet by the polymer, most NPs are uniformly distributed in the bulk of the polymer film, with the dense skin layer serving as a barrier tomore » prevent the NPs from moving to the interface. Furthermore, our results point to a possible route to employ less favorable NP/polymer interactions and fast solvent evaporation to uniformly disperse NPs in a polymer film, contrary to the common belief that strong NP/polymer attractions are needed to make NPs well dispersed in polymer nanocomposites.« less

  6. Statistical mechanics of polymer systems. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kovac, J.

    1991-04-01

    In the past year, the authors have concentrated efforts in the computer simulation of polymer dynamics. First, work concerning chains in the theta region and the lifetime of nearest pair contacts is reported. Second, the dynamics of chains tethered to rigid interfaces have been studied. Third, the authors work concerning shape relaxation in star polymers has been extended.

  7. Overview of Warm Dense Matter Experiments at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Eric; Levy, Anna; Williams, Gareth; Fletcher, Luke; Dorchies, Fabien; Gaudin, Jérôme; Sperling, Philipp

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is found in numerous astrophysical systems, from giant planets to brown dwarves or cool dense stars. Being this intermediate regime where condensed matter or plasma theories do not apply, it can be produced in all laser-induced plasma experiments on Earth. As a consequence, understanding its properties is fundamental and the whole community is investigating this extreme state of matter. With the advent of the 4th generation of light sources, namely the Free Electron Lasers (FELs), a new way of producing and diagnosing WDM becomes available. In 2009, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC was the first FEL to produce X-ray photons to be used by the user community. Since then, various experiments took place at LCLS to produce and measure specific physical properties of WDM. In this talk, we will present an overview of key experiments performed at LCLS to study WDM. The LCLS has been used in a variety of configuration: as the main heating mechanism, as a probe or both at the same time. When used as a probe, high power lasers have been used to shock matter and excite it into the WDM regime. Finally, we will describe exciting perspectives on the WDM research, as the LCLS-II will become available in about 5 years.

  8. Organic molecules in the gas phase of dense interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M

    1995-03-01

    Since a previous COSPAR review on this subject, the number of molecular species identified by astronomers in dense interstellar clouds or in the envelopes expelled by evolved stars has grown from about eighty to approximately one hundred. Recent detections in stellar envelopes include the radical CP, the second phosphorus-containing astronomical molecule; SiN, the first astronomical molecule with a Si-N bond; and the HCCN radical. In the dense interstellar clouds recent detections or verifications of previous possible identifications include the H3O+ ion, which is a critical intermediary in the production of H2O and O2; the CCO radical, which is isoelectronic with HCCN; the SO+ ion, which appears to be diagnostic of shock chemistry; two new isomers of cyanoacetylene, HCCNC and CCCNH; and the two cumulenes H2C3 and H2C4. Some recent work is also described on the mapping of interstellar clouds in multiple molecular transitions in order to separate variations in chemical abundance from gradients in physical parameters.

  9. Externally fed star formation: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Motahareh; Stahler, Steven W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate, through a series of numerical calculations, the evolution of dense cores that are accreting external gas up to and beyond the point of star formation. Our model clouds are spherical, unmagnetized configurations with fixed outer boundaries, across which gas enters subsonically. When we start with any near-equilibrium state, we find that the cloud's internal velocity also remains subsonic for an extended period, in agreement with observations. However, the velocity becomes supersonic shortly before the star forms. Consequently, the accretion rate building up the protostar is much greater than the benchmark value c_s^3/G, where cs is the sound speed in the dense core. This accretion spike would generate a higher luminosity than those seen in even the most embedded young stars. Moreover, we find that the region of supersonic infall surrounding the protostar races out to engulf much of the cloud, again in violation of the observations, which show infall to be spatially confined. Similar problematic results have been obtained by all other hydrodynamic simulations to date, regardless of the specific infall geometry or boundary conditions adopted. Low-mass star formation is evidently a quasi-static process, in which cloud gas moves inward subsonically until the birth of the star itself. We speculate that magnetic tension in the cloud's deep interior helps restrain the infall prior to this event.

  10. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  11. ENHANCED DENSE GAS FRACTION IN ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Juneau, S.; Shirley, Y. L.; Bussmann, R. S.; Narayanan, D. T.; Moustakas, J.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Vanden Bout, P. A. E-mail: yshirley@as.arizona.ed E-mail: dnarayanan@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: robk@ast.cam.ac.u

    2009-12-20

    We present a detailed analysis of the relation between infrared luminosity and molecular line luminosity, for a variety of molecular transitions, using a sample of 34 nearby galaxies spanning a broad range of infrared luminosities (10{sup 10} L{sub sun} < L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12.5} L{sub sun}). We show that the power-law index of the relation is sensitive to the critical density of the molecular gas tracer used, and that the dominant driver in observed molecular line ratios in galaxies is the gas density. As most nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) exhibit strong signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in their center, we revisit previous claims questioning the reliability of HCN as a probe of the dense gas responsible for star formation in the presence of AGNs. We find that the enhanced HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) luminosity ratio observed in ULIRGs can be successfully reproduced using numerical models with fixed chemical abundances and without AGN-induced chemistry effects. We extend this analysis to a total of 10 molecular line ratios by combining the following transitions: CO(1-0), HCO{sup +}(1-0), HCO{sup +}(3-2), HCN(1-0), and HCN(3-2). Our results suggest that AGNs reside in systems with higher dense gas fraction, and that chemistry or other effects associated with their hard radiation field may not dominate (NGC 1068 is one exception). Galaxy merger could be the underlying cause of increased dense gas fraction, and the evolutionary stage of such mergers may be another determinant of the HCN/CO luminosity ratio.

  12. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at Dense Cores in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Mottram, J. C.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1-2 × 1023 cm-2, most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 1023 cm-2, this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars.

  13. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars.

  14. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars. PMID:27472110

  15. Why neutron stars have three hairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Leo; Yagi, Kent; Pappas, George; Yunes, Nicolas; Apostolatos, Theocharis

    2015-04-01

    Neutron stars have recently been found to enjoy a certain `baldness' in their multipolar structure which is independent of the equation of state (EoS) of dense nuclear matter. This is reminiscent of the black hole no-hair relations, and in stark contrast to regular stars. Why is this? Is it because realistic EoSs are sufficiently similar, or because GR effects are especially important, or because the nuclear matter is `cold'? We explore the physics behind these and more hypotheses, and give a convincing explanation for the true origin of the three-hair relations.

  16. Pair Potential of Charged Colloidal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Addas, K.; Ward, A.; Flynn, N. T.; Velasco, E.; Hagan, M. F.; Dogic, Z.; Fraden, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the construction of colloidal stars: 1μm polystyrene beads grafted with a dense brush of 1μm long and 10 nm wide charged semiflexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  17. Polymer nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Jennifer M.

    Nanolithography involves making patterns of materials with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Surprisingly, writable CDs can provide polymer nanostructures for pennies a piece. Building on work previously done in the Drain lab, with an inherited home-built oven press, this research will explore the relationships between polymer chemical reactivity, polymer printing, and material surface energies. In addition, a relatively inexpensive entry point into high school and undergraduate education in nanolithography is presented. The ability to pattern cheaply at the nanoscale and microscale is necessary and attractive for many technologies towards biosensors, organic light emitting diodes, identification tags, layered devices, and transistors.

  18. Star quality.

    PubMed

    Dent, Emma

    2007-09-20

    Around 150 wards are participating in the voluntary Star Wards scheme to provide mental health inpatients with more activities with therapeutic value. Suggested activities range from a library, to horse riding Internet access and comedy. Service users are particularly keen to have more exercise, which can be a challenge in inpatient settings. PMID:17970387

  19. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  20. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  1. Astrochemical diagnostics of star and planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Stars like our Sun and planets like our Earth form out of diffuse interstellar material, which first accumulates to form molecular clouds and then it fragments into cold (~10 K) and dense (~105 H2 molecules per cc) cloud cores, the cradle of future stellar systems. The physical structure and chemical composition of these dense cores set the stage for the next steps: gravitational contraction and the formation of protostars and protoplanetary disks. Molecules are unique tracers of the dynamical evolution of interstellar clouds and astrochemistry is needed to guide and interpret our observations. In this talk I will review work done on the early stages of star and planet formation, underlying how astrochemical diagnostics have helped us to shed light on chemical and physical processes important to constraints theories and to find connections with our Solar System. ALMA results will be highlighted.

  2. STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

  3. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have documented an unexpected and rapid, seven-fold brightening of an unusual double star at the centre of the impressive 47 Tucanae globular cluster in the southern sky. This is the first HST observation of such a rare phenomenon. The astronomers [1] who are involved in this observational program find that this event cannot be explained by any of the common processes known to occur in such stars. The cores of globular clusters Globular clusters are like huge swarms of stars, containing about one million suns, which move around in their common gravitational field. Most galaxies contain globular clusters; around 150 are known within the confines of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Globular clusters change with time. In particular, at some stage in the life of a globular cluster, its central region will contract whereby the stars there move closer to each other. This phenomenon is referred to as core collapse [2]. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have revealed enormous central densities of the order of 30,000 stars per cubic light-year in clusters with fully collapsed cores; this is to be compared with the stellar density in the solar neighborhood of only 0.003 stars per cubic light-year [3]. Binary stars in globular clusters Binary (i.e., double) stars play an important role in the evolution of globular clusters: they can delay, halt, or even reverse the process of core collapse. In this dense stellar environment, close encounters between passing stars and binaries are relatively frequent. Such events may leave the binary stars more tightly bound, and at the same time speed up the motion of the stars involved, thereby counteracting the contraction of the core. The same close stellar encounters may also produce a diverse progeny of exotic objects. The centers of globular clusters contain blue stragglers (stars that ``look'' younger than they really are), millisecond pulsars (rapidly rotating, very

  4. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  5. Suspensions of polymer-grafted nanoparticles with added polymers-Structure and effective pair-interactions.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sivasurender; Saw, Shibu; Kandar, A K; Dasgupta, C; Sprung, M; Basu, J K

    2015-08-28

    We present the results of combined experimental and theoretical (molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory) studies of the structure and effective interactions of suspensions of polymer grafted nanoparticles (PGNPs) in the presence of linear polymers. Due to the absence of systematic experimental and theoretical studies of PGNPs, it is widely believed that the structure and effective interactions in such binary mixtures would be very similar to those of an analogous soft colloidal material-star polymers. In our study, polystyrene-grafted gold nanoparticles with functionality f = 70 were mixed with linear polystyrene (PS) of two different molecular weights for obtaining two PGNP:PS size ratios, ξ = 0.14 and 2.76 (where, ξ = Mg/Mm, Mg and Mm being the molecular weights of grafting and matrix polymers, respectively). The experimental structure factor of PGNPs could be modeled with an effective potential (Model-X), which has been found to be widely applicable for star polymers. Similarly, the structure factor of the blends with ξ = 0.14 could be modeled reasonably well, while the structure of blends with ξ = 2.76 could not be captured, especially for high density of added polymers. A model (Model-Y) for effective interactions between PGNPs in a melt of matrix polymers also failed to provide good agreement with the experimental data for samples with ξ = 2.76 and high density of added polymers. We tentatively attribute this anomaly in modeling the structure factor of blends with ξ = 2.76 to the questionable assumption of Model-X in describing the added polymers as star polymers with functionality 2, which gets manifested in both polymer-polymer and polymer-PGNP interactions especially at higher fractions of added polymers. The failure of Model-Y may be due to the neglect of possible many-body interactions among PGNPs mediated by matrix polymers when the fraction of added polymers is high. These observations point to the need for a new framework to

  6. Phosphorus-bearing Molecules in Massive Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M.; Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A.; Palau, A.

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects; hence, its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here, we show new detections of phosphorus nitride (PN) in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact H ii regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ≃5 km s-1, and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 1011-12 cm-2, marginally lower than the values derived in the few high-mass star-forming regions detected so far. New constraints on the abundance of phosphorus monoxide, the fundamental unit of biologically relevant molecules, are also given. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM-30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  7. Effect of Molecular Architecture on Polymer Melt Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Mark

    The dynamics of the thermally stimulated surface height fluctuations in a polymer melt dictate wetting, adhesion, and tribology at that surface. These surface fluctuations can be profoundly altered by tethering of the chains. One type of tethering is the tethering of one part of a molecule to another part of the same molecule. This tethering is found in both long chain branched polymers and in macrocycles. We have studied the surface fluctuations with X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy for melts of well-defined, anionically polymerized polystyrenes of various architectures, including linear, 6 arm star, pom-pom, comb and cyclic architectures. For linear chains, the variation of surface relaxation time with in-plane scattering vector can be fit using a hydrodynamic continuum theory (HCT) of thermally stimulated capillary waves that knows nothing of the chain architecture. Assuming the theory is applicable, apparent viscosities of the films may then be inferred from the XPCS data. For unentangled linear chains, the viscosity inferred from XPCS data in this manner is the same as that measured by conventional bulk rheometry. The HCT does a reasonable job of describing the variation of relaxation time with scattering vector for long branched chains also, but only if a viscosity much larger than that of the bulk is assumed. The discrepancy between the viscosity inferred from surface relaxation times using the HCT and that derived from conventional rheometry grows larger as the bulk Tg is approached and is different for each long chain branched architecture. However, for densely branched combs and cyclic chains different behaviors are found. Acknowledgement: Thanks to NSF (CBET 0730692) and the Advanced Photon Source, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38.

  8. Wide Variation Seen in 'Dense' Breast Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... defined mammography patients' breasts as dense. Higher breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, experts ... could have implications for the so-called breast density notification laws that have been passed in about ...

  9. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers…

  10. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  11. The Transition from Diffuse to Dense Gas in Herschel Dust Emission Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul

    Dense cores in dark clouds are the sites where young stars form. These regions manifest as relatively small (<0.1pc) pockets of cold and dense gas. If we wish to understand the star formation process, we have to understand the physical conditions in dense cores. This has been a main aim of star formation research in the past decade. Today, we do indeed possess a good knowledge of the density and velocity structure of cores, as well as their chemical evolution and physical lifetime. However, we do not understand well how dense cores form out of the diffuse gas clouds surrounding them. It is crucial that we constrain the relationship between dense cores and their environment: if we only understand dense cores, we may be able to understand how individual stars form --- but we would not know how the star forming dense cores themselves come into existence. We therefore propose to obtain data sets that reveal both dense cores and the clouds containing them in the same map. Based on these maps, we will study how dense cores form out of their natal clouds. Since cores form stars, this knowledge is crucial for the development of a complete theoretical and observational understanding of the formation of stars and their planets, as envisioned in NASA's Strategic Science Plan. Fortunately, existing archival data allow to derive exactly the sort of maps we need for our analysis. Here, we describe a program that exclusively builds on PACS and SPIRE dust emission imaging data from the NASA-supported Herschel mission. The degree-sized wide-field Herschel maps of the nearby (<260pc) Polaris Flare and Aquila Rift clouds are ideal for our work. They permit to resolve dense cores (<0.1pc), while the maps also reveal large-scale cloud structure (5pc and larger). We will generate column density maps from these dust emission maps and then run a tree-based hierarchical multi-scale structure analysis on them. Only this procedure permits to exploit the full potential of the maps: we will

  12. Field theoretic simulations of polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Jason; Chao, Huikuan; Riggleman, Robert A.

    2013-12-28

    Polymer field theory has emerged as a powerful tool for describing the equilibrium phase behavior of complex polymer formulations, particularly when one is interested in the thermodynamics of dense polymer melts and solutions where the polymer chains can be accurately described using Gaussian models. However, there are many systems of interest where polymer field theory cannot be applied in such a straightforward manner, such as polymer nanocomposites. Current approaches for incorporating nanoparticles have been restricted to the mean-field level and often require approximations where it is unclear how to improve their accuracy. In this paper, we present a unified framework that enables the description of polymer nanocomposites using a field theoretic approach. This method enables straightforward simulations of the fully fluctuating field theory for polymer formulations containing spherical or anisotropic nanoparticles. We demonstrate our approach captures the correlations between particle positions, present results for spherical and cylindrical nanoparticles, and we explore the effect of the numerical parameters on the performance of our approach.

  13. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  14. Hot and dense matter beyond relativistic mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Prakash, Madappa

    2016-05-01

    Properties of hot and dense matter are calculated in the framework of quantum hadrodynamics by including contributions from two-loop (TL) diagrams arising from the exchange of isoscalar and isovector mesons between nucleons. Our extension of mean field theory (MFT) employs the same five density-independent coupling strengths which are calibrated using the empirical properties at the equilibrium density of isospin-symmetric matter. Results of calculations from the MFT and TL approximations are compared for conditions of density, temperature, and proton fraction encountered in the study of core-collapse supernovae, young and old neutron stars, and mergers of compact binary stars. The TL results for the equation of state (EOS) of cold pure neutron matter at sub- and near-nuclear densities agree well with those of modern quantum Monte Carlo and effective field-theoretical approaches. Although the high-density EOS in the TL approximation for cold and β -equilibrated neutron-star matter is substantially softer than its MFT counterpart, it is able to support a 2 M⊙ neutron star required by recent precise determinations. In addition, radii of 1.4 M⊙ stars are smaller by ˜1 km than those obtained in MFT and lie in the range indicated by analysis of astronomical data. In contrast to MFT, the TL results also give a better account of the single-particle or optical potentials extracted from analyses of medium-energy proton-nucleus and heavy-ion experiments. In degenerate conditions, the thermal variables are well reproduced by results of Landau's Fermi-liquid theory in which density-dependent effective masses feature prominently. The ratio of the thermal components of pressure and energy density expressed as Γth=1 +(Pth/ɛth) , often used in astrophysical simulations, exhibits a stronger dependence on density than on proton fraction and temperature in both MFT and TL calculations. The prominent peak of Γth at supranuclear density found in MFT is, however, suppressed in

  15. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  16. Single Molecule Dynamics of Branched DNA Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Sing, Charles; Schroeder, Charles

    This work focuses on extending the field of single polymer dynamics to topologically complex polymers. Here, we report the direct observation of DNA-based branched polymers. Recently, we recently demonstrated a two-step synthesis method to generate star, H-shaped, and comb polymers for single molecule visualization. Following synthesis, we use single-color or dual-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize branched polymer dynamics in flow, in particular tracking side branches and backbones independently. In this way, our imaging method allows for characterization of molecular properties, including quantification of polymer contour length and branch distributions. Moving beyond characterization, we use molecular rheology and single molecule techniques to study the dynamics of single branched polymers in flow. Here, we utilize precision microfluidics to directly observe branched DNA polymer conformations during transient stretching, steady-state extension, and relaxation from high stretch. We specifically measure backbone end-to-end distance as a function of time. Experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations show that branched polymer relaxation is a strong function of the number of branches and position of branch points along the main chain backbone.

  17. Characterising molecular gas in nearby star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, George; Viti, Serena; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Regions of very dense, star-forming gas in the interstellar medium are necessary to maintain star formation activity in hostile conditions. Star-forming regions in these environments are able to resist winds and radiative forces from newly formed stars longer than gas in the surrounding ISM. Subject to a proper interpretation, observations of molecules can be used for many purposes: tracing the reservoir or leftover of the star formation process; tracing the process of star formation itself; and determining the galaxy energetics through influence of newly-formed stars or an AGN on their environments. We map the distribution of several tracer molecules over three nearby galaxies. We begin by mapping two starburst galaxies with single dish observations of the dense gas tracer CS. The formation of CS is modelled under different conditions with results fed into a molecular line radiative transfer model. From this we can obtain the physical conditions of the regions of the ISM where there is a high rate of star-formation, as well as compare how the conditions vary away from the galactic centre. Moving on from here, we use ALMA to map NGC 1068. Observations of several molecules across the AGN and starburst regions are used to determine conditions and processes with a spatial resolution of less than 35 parsecs.

  18. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  19. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  20. M20: Star Formation in a Young HII Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Lefloch, B.; Reach, W. T.; Cernicharo, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Trifid Nebula (M20) has a remarkable optical appearance with a large, reddish nebula of gas ionized by an O7 star (HD 164492) and trisected by obscuring dust lanes, with a blue reflection nebula in the north. During the last two decades, M20 has generated considerable interest because of multi-wavelength identifications of sites of low- and high-mass star formation. M20 is a young HII region showing active, dynamic ``pre-Orion" star formation, containing massive, young stars undergoing collapse and violent mass ejection, as well as a dense population of protostars and more developed pre-main sequence stars. Different stages of star formation have been detected at various wavelengths, as well as optical jets, mid- and far-infrared protostars, near-infrared young stellar objects, Hα emission stars, X-ray sources, and OH masers. M20 is relatively close, at a distance of 1.67 kpc with a low line-of-sight extinction (A_v=1.3 mag), and it is compact, with a small diameter of only 3.5 pc. M20 is an isolated HII region with a single O star, which provides an ideal place to investigate the onset of star birth and triggered star formation. We review the highlights of studies of star forming activities in the Trifid Nebula.

  1. Numerical study of the properties of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanco

    2009-10-01

    Compact stars are formed in catastrophic astrophysical events such as supernova explosions and binary stellar collisions. These objects permanently harbor compressed ultra-dense nuclear matter in their interiors. This key feature, together with the ongoing progress in observational astrophysics, make compact stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a wide range of intriguing physicals studies. Several such studies are performed in this thesis. The first activity concerns the widely unknown nuclear equation of state and the core composition of compact stars. Particular attention is paid to the possible presence of hyperons in the cores of neutron stars as well as to stars made of unconfined up, down and strange quarks (strange quark stars). The effects of ultra-strong electric fields on the surfaces of the latter is explored. The second activity aims at investigating the structure and stability of rapidly rotating compact stars. Special attention is paid to the maximal stable rotational frequencies of rotating compact stars. The third activity focuses on the thermal evolution of compact stars, driven by neutrino emission from their cores and by photon emission from the surfaces. It is show that the thermal behavior depends very strongly on the stellar core composition. Moreover, it is found that the thermal evolution of neutron stars is significantly different to that of strange quark stars. The studies performed in this thesis are key for our understanding of the thermal evolution of isolated rotating neutron stars, anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters, and provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of isospin-asymmetric ultra-dense nuclear matter which can not be probed in high-energy collision experiments.

  2. Self-assembly of star micelle into vesicle in solvents of variable quality: the star micelle retains its core-shell nanostructure in the vesicle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nijuan; He, Qun; Bu, Weifeng

    2015-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular interactions of star polymers in dilute solutions are of fundamental importance for both theoretical interest and hierarchical self-assembly into functional nanostructures. Here, star micelles with a polystyrene corona and a small ionic core bearing platinum(II) complexes have been regarded as a model of star polymers to mimic their intra- and interstar interactions and self-assembled behaviors in solvents of weakening quality. In the chloroform/methanol mixture solvents, the star micelles can self-assemble to form vesicles, in which the star micelles shrink significantly and are homogeneously distributed on the vesicle surface. Unlike the morphological evolution of conventional amphiphiles from micellar to vesicular, during which the amphiphilic molecules are commonly reorganized, the star micelles still retain their core-shell nanostructures in the vesicles and the coronal chains of the star micelle between the ionic cores are fully interpenetrated.

  3. SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF DENSE CLUMPS IN THE INFRARED DARK CLOUD G049.40-00.01

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Choi, Minho; Bieging, John H.; Rho, Jeonghee; Tsai, Chao-Wei

    2011-12-20

    We obtained 350 and 850 {mu}m continuum maps of the infrared dark cloud G049.40-00.01. Twenty-one dense clumps were identified within G049.40-00.01 based on the 350 {mu}m continuum map with an angular resolution of about 9.''6. We present submillimeter continuum maps and report physical properties of the clumps. The masses of clumps range from 50 to 600 M{sub Sun }. About 70% of the clumps are associated with bright 24 {mu}m emission sources, and they may contain protostars. The two most massive clumps show extended, enhanced 4.5 {mu}m emission indicating vigorous star-forming activity. The clump-size-mass distribution suggests that many of them are forming high-mass stars. G049.40-00.01 contains numerous objects in various evolutionary stages of star formation, from pre-protostellar clumps to H II regions.

  4. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  5. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism.

  6. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism. PMID:27180903

  7. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism. PMID:27180903

  8. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  9. Relativistic simulations of eccentric binary neutron star mergers: One-arm spiral instability and effects of neutron star spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    We perform general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of dynamical capture binary neutron star mergers, emphasizing the role played by the neutron star spin. Dynamical capture mergers may take place in globular clusters, as well as other dense stellar systems, where most neutron stars have large spins. We find significant variability in the merger outcome as a function of initial neutron star spin. For cases where the spin is aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the additional centrifugal support in the remnant hypermassive neutron star can prevent the prompt collapse to a black hole, while for antialigned cases the decreased total angular momentum can facilitate the collapse to a black hole. We show that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of ejected material, including the amount unbound with velocities greater than half the speed of light, leading to brighter electromagnetic signatures associated with kilonovae and interaction of the ejecta with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, we find that the initial neutron star spin can strongly affect the already rich phenomenology in the postmerger gravitational wave signatures that arise from the oscillation modes of the hypermassive neutron star. In several of our simulations, the resulting hypermassive neutron star develops the one-arm (m =1 ) spiral instability, the most pronounced cases being those with small but non-negligible neutron star spins. For long-lived hypermassive neutron stars, the presence of this instability leads to improved prospects for detecting these events through gravitational waves, and thus may give information about the neutron star equation of state.

  10. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have documented an unexpected and rapid, seven-fold brightening of an unusual double star at the centre of the impressive 47 Tucanae globular cluster in the southern sky. This is the first HST observation of such a rare phenomenon. The astronomers [1] who are involved in this observational program find that this event cannot be explained by any of the common processes known to occur in such stars. The cores of globular clusters Globular clusters are like huge swarms of stars, containing about one million suns, which move around in their common gravitational field. Most galaxies contain globular clusters; around 150 are known within the confines of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Globular clusters change with time. In particular, at some stage in the life of a globular cluster, its central region will contract whereby the stars there move closer to each other. This phenomenon is referred to as core collapse [2]. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have revealed enormous central densities of the order of 30,000 stars per cubic light-year in clusters with fully collapsed cores; this is to be compared with the stellar density in the solar neighborhood of only 0.003 stars per cubic light-year [3]. Binary stars in globular clusters Binary (i.e., double) stars play an important role in the evolution of globular clusters: they can delay, halt, or even reverse the process of core collapse. In this dense stellar environment, close encounters between passing stars and binaries are relatively frequent. Such events may leave the binary stars more tightly bound, and at the same time speed up the motion of the stars involved, thereby counteracting the contraction of the core. The same close stellar encounters may also produce a diverse progeny of exotic objects. The centers of globular clusters contain blue stragglers (stars that ``look'' younger than they really are), millisecond pulsars (rapidly rotating, very

  11. Antimocrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Huang, Zhi-Heng; Wright, Stacy C.

    2005-09-06

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

  12. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Wright, Stacy C.; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  13. Star formation in the Eagle Nebula and NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Jeffries, R. D.; van Loon, J. Th

    regions of the nebula. We are using VLT/VISIR imaging to identify young stars embedded in dense cores and clumps, and map the emission from the dust and ionised gas across these structures. This will allow us to assess the eroding effect of the NGC6611 massive stars on the molecular cloud and on star formation occurring within. massive stars on the molecular cloud and on star formation occurring within. Star formation is still ongoing in the denser regions of the nebula. I will be using VLT/VISIR imaging to identify young stars still embedded in dense cores and clumps, and map the emission from the dust and ionised gas across these structures. This will allow us to assess the eroding effect of the NGC6611 massive stars on the molecular cloud and on star formation occurring within. imply that the O-stars have little influence in hastening disc dissipation. We are complementing our data on NGC 6611 with Spitzer/IRAC data for the outer regions where crowding is less severe. This also allows us to investigate disc properties (e.g., inner disc temperature and geometry). Star formation is still ongoing in the denser regions of the nebula. I will be using VLT/VISIR imaging to identify young stars still embedded in dense cores and clumps, and map the emission from the dust and ionised gas across these structures. This will allow us to assess the eroding effect of the NGC6611 massive stars on the molecular cloud and on star formation occurring within.

  14. The Evolution of Massive Stars: a Selection of Facts and Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    In the present paper we discuss a selection of facts and questions related to observations and evolutionary calculations of massive single stars and massive stars in interacting binaries. We focus on the surface chemical abundances, the role of stellar winds, the early Be-stars, the high mass X-ray binaries and the effects of rotation on stellar evolution. Finally, we present an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) of WR binaries in dense stellar environments.

  15. Mixed-ionic and electronic conductivity in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, M.A.; Shriver, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The aim in this portion of the research is to prepare new electroactive films with high ion mobility, and to characterize the transport properties of these materials. The classic conducting polymers, polyacetylene, polythiophene, and polypyrrole have dense structures that prevent rapid redox switching because of the low diffusivity of ions. The objective is to modify the last two polymers with pendant polyethers, which should greatly improve ion transport.

  16. Gluon Vortices and Induced Magnetic Field in Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Efrain J.

    2007-10-26

    The natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of compact stars, many of which have very large magnetic fields, especially the so called magnetars. In this paper we discuss how a color superconducting core can serve to generate and enhance the stellar magnetic field without appealing to a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo mechanism.

  17. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  18. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  19. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  20. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  1. Propagation of light in a Dense Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Saleem, Iram

    Propagation of light is studied in a very dense system. Renormalization scheme of QED is used to understand the propagation of light in a hot and dense medium. We consider a medium of a very large chemical potential with relatively small temperature. The generalized results of vacuum polarization of photon in a hot and dense medium is used to study the behavior of light in such a system. Our hypothetical system corresponds to a heat bath of electrons at an equilibrium temperature and the density of electrons is larger as compared to the temperature of the medium. Such type of systems have previously been identified as classical systems because the chemical potential is large enough to dominate temperature.

  2. Shaping the outflows of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Shazrene

    2015-08-01

    Both hot and cool evolved stars, e.g., red (super)giants and Wolf-Rayet stars, lose copious amounts of mass, momentum and mechanical energy through powerful, dense stellar winds. The interaction of these outflows with their surroundings results in highly structured and complex circumstellar environments, often featuring knots, arcs, shells and spirals. Recent improvements in computational power and techniques have led to the development of detailed, multi-dimensional simulations that have given new insight into the origin of these structures, and better understanding of the physical mechanisms driving their formation. In this talk, I will discuss three of the main mechanisms that shape the outflows of evolved stars:- interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM), i.e., wind-ISM interactions- interaction with a stellar wind, either from a previous phase of evolution or the wind from a companion star, i.e., wind-wind interactions- and interaction with a companion star that has a weak or insignicant outflow (e.g., a compact companion such as a neutron star or black hole), i.e., wind-companion interactions.I will also highlight the broader implications and impact of these stellar wind interactions for other phenomena, e.g, for symbiotic and X-ray binaries, supernovae and Gamma-ray bursts.

  3. The sun, our star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  4. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  5. Ab Initio Simulations of Dense Helium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; He Xiantu; Zhang Ping

    2011-04-08

    We study the thermophysical properties of dense helium plasmas by using quantum molecular dynamics and orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations, where densities are considered from 400 to 800 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures up to 800 eV. Results are presented for the equation of state. From the Kubo-Greenwood formula, we derive the electrical conductivity and electronic thermal conductivity. In particular, with the increase in temperature, we discuss the change in the Lorenz number, which indicates a transition from strong coupling and degenerate state to moderate coupling and partial degeneracy regime for dense helium.

  6. Polymer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Curtis W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a series of four graduate level courses in polymer science, offered or currently in preparation, at Stanford University. Course descriptions and a list of required and recommended texts are included. Detailed course outlines for two of the courses are presented. (BT)

  7. Functional polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, G.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the existing polymer materials and the designing of model polymers need fundamental insights into the structure and dynamics over a large range of length and time scales. Consequently, a host of quite different methods needs to be applied to gain insights into the molecular and supramolecular structures and interactions that determine the performance of these materials. Supramolecular structures derived from shape persistent (stiff) macromolecules are used as examples to demonstrate the correlation between chemical structure, order phenomena and performance in applications concerning advanced or developing technologies: organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and separator membranes in lithium based batteries and fuel cells. Polymers are also important as additives in the manufacture and the processing of other materials. The design of block copolymers to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic particles precipitating from aqueous solutions (mineralization) is discussed as well as the use of block copolymers to optimize the processing of ceramic pieces and objects. Finally, the modification of surfaces by polymers including aspects of biocompatibility is discussed. Some remarks concerning the importance of recent developments and advances in synthesis of macromolecular materials are also given.

  8. Polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  9. HUBBLE CAPTURES THE HEART OF STAR BIRTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    about 35,000 light-years across. The right-hand image, taken by WFPC2, provides a closer look at the flurry of star birth at the galaxy's core. The star clusters (blue) can be seen (and many more are likely obscured) amid thick lanes of gas and dust. This image shows that stars are often born in compact clusters within star bursts, and that dense gas and dust heavily obscures the star burst region. The brightest knot of star birth seen here is probably a giant cluster of stars, about 100 light-years in diameter, at the very center of the galaxy. The other star clusters are about 10 to 50 light-years in diameter. The entire star burst region shown here is about 3,000 light-years across. This galaxy is about 40 million light-years away in the southern constellation Columba. The observation was taken Aug. 14, 1997, and was the last of 13 Hubble Space Telescope amateur programs. Credits: Jim Flood, an amateur astronomer affiliated with Sperry Observatory at Union College in New Jersey, and Max Mutchler, a member of the Space Telescope Science Institute staff who volunteered to work with Jim.

  10. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  11. Method of Preparing Polymers with Low Melt Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention is an improvement in standard polymerizations procedures, i.e., addition-type and step-growth type polymerizations, wherein monomers are reacted to form a growing polymer chain. The improvement includes employing an effective amount of a trifunctional monomer (such as a trifunctional amine anhydride, or phenol) in the polymerization procedure to form a mixture of polymeric materials consisting of branced polymers, star-shaped polymers, and linear polymers. This mixture of polymeric materials has a lower melt temperature and a lower melt viscosity than corresponding linear polymeric materials of equivalent molecular weight.

  12. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    is only 16% larger than this giant planet! A Dense Star "Imagine that you add 95 times its own mass to Jupiter and nevertheless end up with a star that is only slightly larger", suggests Claudio Melo from ESO and member of the team of astronomers who made the study. "The object just shrinks to make room for the additional matter, becoming more and more dense." The density of such a star is more than 50 times the density of the Sun. "This result shows the existence of stars that look strikingly like planets, even from close by", emphasizes Frederic Pont of the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland). "Isn't it strange to imagine that even if we were to receive images from a future space probe approaching such an object at close range, it wouldn't be easy to discern whether it is a star or a planet?" As all stars, OGLE-TR-122b produces indeed energy in its interior by means of nuclear reactions. However, because of its low mass, this internal energy production is very small, especially compared to the energy produced by its solar-like companion star. Not less striking is the fact that exoplanets which are orbiting very close to their host star, the so-called "hot Jupiters", have radii which may be larger than the newly found star. The radius of exoplanet HD209458b, for example, is about 30% larger than that of Jupiter. It is thus substantially larger than OGLE-TR-122b! Masqueraders ESO PR Photo 06c/05 ESO PR Photo 06c/05 Comparison Between OGLE-TR-122b, Jupiter and the Sun [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 598 pix - 30k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1196 pix - 350k] [HiRes - JPEG: 5000 x 3344 pix - 2.2M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 06c/05 is a comparison between the newly found low-mass star OGLE-TR-122b and the Sun and Jupiter. OGLE-TR-122b, while still 96 times as massive as Jupiter, is only 16% larger than this giant planet. It weighs 1/11th the mass of the Sun and has 1/8th of its diameter. (credits: Sun image: SOHO/ESA; Jupiter: Cassini/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/ESA) This discovery also

  13. Effective Field Theories for Hot and Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.

    2010-10-01

    The lecture is divided in two parts. The first one deals with an introduction to the physics of hot, dense many-particle systems in quantum field theory [1, 2]. The basics of the path integral approach to the partition function are explained for the example of chiral quark models. The QCD phase diagram is discussed in the meanfield approximation while QCD bound states in the medium are treated in the rainbow-ladder approximation (Gaussian fluctuations). Special emphasis is devoted to the discussion of the Mott effect, i.e. the transition of bound states to unbound, but resonant scattering states in the continnum under the influence of compression and heating of the system. Three examples are given: (1) the QCD model phase diagram with chiral symmetry ¨ restoration and color superconductivity [3], (2) the Schrodinger equation for heavy-quarkonia [4], and (2) Pions [5] as well as Kaons and D-mesons in the finite-temperature Bethe-Salpeter equation [6]. We discuss recent applications of this quantum field theoretical approach to hot and dense quark matter for a description of anomalous J/ψ supression in heavy-ion collisions [7] and for the structure and cooling of compact stars with quark matter interiors [8]. The second part provides a detailed introduction to the Polyakov-loop Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model [9] for thermodynamics and mesonic correlations [10] in the phase diagram of quark matter. Important relationships of low-energy QCD like the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation are generalized to finite temperatures. The effect of including the coupling to the Polyakov-loop potential on the phase diagram and mesonic correlations is discussed. An outlook is given to effects of nonlocality of the interactions [11] and of mesonic correlations in the medium [12] which go beyond the meanfield description.

  14. Equation of state of neutron star matter, limiting, rotational periods of fast pulsars, and the properties of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F. |; Glendenning, N.K.

    1993-10-25

    In this paper the following items will be treated: The present status of dense nuclear matter calculations and constraints on the behavior of the associated equation of state at high densities from data on rapidly rotating pulsars. Recent finding of the likely existence of a mixed phase of baryons and quarks forming a coulomb lattice in the dense cores of neutron stars. Review of important findings of recently performed calculations of rapidly rotating compact stars. These are constructed in the framework of general relativity theory for a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state. Establish the minimum-possible rotational periods of gravitationally bound neutron stars and self-bound strange stars. Its knowledge is of fundamental importance for the decision between pulsars that can be understood as rotating neutron stars and those that cannot (signature of hypothetical self-bound matter of which strange stars are the likely stellar candidates. Investigate the properties of sequences of strange stars. Specifically, we answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  15. Data Characterization Using Artificial-Star Tests: Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Deng, Licai; de Grijs, Richard; Liu, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Traditional artificial-star tests are widely applied to photometry in crowded stellar fields. However, to obtain reliable binary fractions (and their uncertainties) of remote, dense, and rich star clusters, one needs to recover huge numbers of artificial stars. Hence, this will consume much computation time for data reduction of the images to which the artificial stars must be added. In this article, we present a new method applicable to data sets characterized by stable, well-defined, point-spread functions, in which we add artificial stars to the retrieved-data catalog instead of to the raw images. Taking the young Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 as an example, we compare results from both methods and show that they are equivalent, while our new method saves significant computational time.

  16. Polymer Energy Rechargeable System Battery Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2003-01-01

    Long description. Illustrations of discotic liquid crystals, rod-coil polymers, lithium-ion conducting channel dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc) from top and side, novel star polyethylene oxide structures, composite polyethylene oxide materials (showing polyethylene oxide + lithium salt, carbon atoms and oxygen atoms), homopolyrotaxanes, and diblock copolymers In fiscal year 2000, NASA established a program to develop the next generation, lithium-based, polymer electrolyte batteries for aerospace applications. The goal of this program, known as Polymer Energy Rechargeable Systems (PERS), is to develop a space-qualified, advanced battery system embodying polymer electrolyte and lithium-based electrode technologies and to establish world-class domestic manufacturing capabilities for advanced batteries with improved performance characteristics that address NASA s future aerospace battery requirements.

  17. The dense gas mass fraction of molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, Andrew J.; Heyer, Mark H. E-mail: heyer@astro.umass.edu

    2014-01-10

    The mass fraction of dense gas within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) of the Milky Way is investigated using {sup 13}CO data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Plane Surveys and the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) of 1.1 mm dust continuum emission. A sample of 860 compact dust sources are selected from the BGPS catalog and kinematically linked to 344 clouds of extended (>3') {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. Gas masses are tabulated for the full dust source and subregions within the dust sources with mass surface densities greater than 200 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, which are assumed to be regions of enhanced volume density. Masses of the parent GMCs are calculated assuming optically thin {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The mean fractional mass of dust sources to host GMC mass is 0.11{sub −0.06}{sup +0.12}. The high column density subregions comprise 0.07{sub −0.05}{sup +0.13} of the mass of the cloud. Owing to our assumptions, these values are upper limits to the true mass fractions. The fractional mass of dense gas is independent of GMC mass and gas surface density. The low dense gas mass fraction suggests that the formation of dense structures within GMCs is the primary bottleneck for star formation. The distribution of velocity differences between the dense gas and the low density material along the line of sight is also examined. We find a strong, centrally peaked distribution centered on zero velocity displacement. This distribution of velocity differences is modeled with radially converging flows toward the dense gas position that are randomly oriented with respect to the observed line of sight. These models constrain the infall velocities to be 2-4 km s{sup –1} for various flow configurations.

  18. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  19. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  20. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  1. The Southern California Dense GPS Geodetic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center is coordinating a effort by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, and various academic institutions to establish a dense 250 station, continuously recording GPS geodetic array in southern California for measuring crustal deformation associated with slip on the numerous faults that underlie the major metropolitan areas of southern california.

  2. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  3. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  4. Spitzer Digs Up Hidden Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 3-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible Light Figure 2 Infrared (IRAC) Figure 3 Combined Figure 4

    Two rambunctious young stars are destroying their natal dust cloud with powerful jets of radiation, in an infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The stars are located approximately 600 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called BHR 71. In visible light (left panel), BHR 71 is just a large black structure. The burst of yellow light toward the bottom of the cloud is the only indication that stars might be forming inside. In infrared light (center panel), the baby stars are shown as the bright yellow smudges toward the center. Both of these yellow spots have wisps of green shooting out of them. The green wisps reveal the beginning of a jet. Like a rainbow, the jet begins as green, then transitions to orange, and red toward the end. The combined visible-light and infrared composite (right panel) shows that a young star's powerful jet is responsible for the rupture at the bottom of the dense cloud in the visible-light image. Astronomers know this because burst of light in the visible-light image overlaps exactly with a jet spouting-out of the left star, in the infrared image.

    The jets' changing colors reveal a cooling effect, and may suggest that the young stars are spouting out radiation in regular bursts. The green tints at the beginning of the jet reveal really hot hydrogen gas, the orange shows warm gas, and the reddish wisps at the end represent the coolest gas. The fact that gas toward the beginning of the jet is hotter than gas near the middle suggests that the stars must give off regular bursts of energy -- and the material closest to the star is being heated by shockwaves from a recent stellar outburst. Meanwhile, the tints of orange reveal gas that is

  5. The role of low-mass star clusters in forming the massive stars in DR 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the young low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar population associated with the massive star-forming region DR 21 by using archival X-ray Chandra observations and by complementing them with existing optical and infrared (IR) surveys. The Chandra observations have revealed for the first time a new highly extincted population of PMS low-mass stars previously missed in observations at other wavelengths. The X-ray population exhibits three main stellar density peaks, coincident with the massive star-forming regions, being the DR 21 core the main peak. The cross-correlated X-ray/IR sample exhibits a radial `Spokes-like' stellar filamentary structure that extends from the DR 21 core towards the northeast. The near-IR data reveal a centrally peaked structure for the extinction, which exhibits its maximum in the DR 21 core and gradually decreases with the distance to the N-S cloud axis and to the cluster centre. We find evidence of a global mass segregation in the full low-mass stellar cluster, and of a stellar age segregation, with the youngest stars still embedded in the N-S cloud, and more evolved stars more spatially distributed. The results are consistent with the scenario where an elongated overall potential well created by the full low-mass stellar cluster funnels gas through filaments feeding stellar formation. Besides the full gravitational well, smaller scale local potential wells created by dense stellar sub-clusters of low-mass stars are privileged in the competition for the gas of the common reservoir, allowing the formation of massive stars. We also discuss the possibility that a stellar collision in the very dense stellar cluster revealed by Chandra in the DR 21 core is the origin of the large-scale and highly energetic outflow arising from this region.

  6. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  7. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  8. Extracellular Matrix-Based Biohybrid Materials for Engineering Compliant, Matrix-Dense Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Fisher, John P

    2015-11-18

    An ideal tissue engineering scaffold should not only promote, but take an active role in, constructive remodeling and formation of site appropriate tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived proteins provide unmatched cellular recognition, and therefore influence cellular response towards predicted remodeling behaviors. Materials built with only these proteins, however, can degrade rapidly or begin too weak to substitute for compliant, matrix-dense tissues. The focus of this Progress Report is on biohybrid materials that incorporate polymer components with ECM-derived proteins, to produce a substrate with desired mechanical and degradation properties, as well as actively guide tissue remodeling. Materials are described through four fabrication methods: 1) polymer and ECM-protein fibers woven together, 2) polymer and ECM proteins combined in a bilayer, 3) cell-built ECM on polymer scaffold, and 4) ECM proteins and polymers combined in a single hydrogel. Scaffolds from each fabrication method can achieve characteristics suitable for different types of tissue. In vivo testing has shown progressive remodeling in injury models, and suggests ECM-based biohybrid materials promote a prohealing immune response over single component alternatives. The prohealing immune response is associated with lasting success and long term host maintenance of the implant.

  9. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Z.

    2016-06-01

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  10. Phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of forming 4,4',4'',4''' -tetraamino phthalocyanines involves reducing 4,4',4'',4''' -tetranitro phthalocyanines, polymerizing the metal tetraamino phthalocyanines with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride (preferably aromatic) or copolymerizing with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (preferably also aromatic) to produce amic acids which are then dehydrocyclized to imides. Thermally and oxidatively stable polymers result which form tough, flexible films, varnishes, adhesives, and fibers.

  11. Aqueous phase deposition of dense tin oxide films with nano-structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yoshitake Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    Dense tin oxide films were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. The pH of the solutions was controlled to pH 1.3 by addition of HCl. Precise control of solution condition and crystal growth allowed us to obtain dense tin oxide films. Concave–convex surface of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates was entirely-covered with the continuous films. The films were about 65 nm in thickness and had nano-structured surfaces. Morphology of the films was strikingly different from our previous reported nano-sheet assembled structures. The films were not removed from the substrates by strong water flow or air blow to show strong adhesion strength. The aqueous solution process can be applied to surface coating of various materials such as nano/micro-structured surfaces, particles, fibers, polymers, metals or biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. They had nano-structured surfaces. Concave-convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films. - Highlights: • Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. • They had nano-structured surfaces. • Concave–convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films.

  12. Nanoparticles of well-defined 4-arm stars made using nanoreactors in water.

    PubMed

    Sebakhy, Khaled O; Gavrilov, Mikhail; Valade, David; Jia, Zhongfan; Monteiro, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the use of a nanoreactor is demonstrated to rapidly prepare monodisperse polymer nanoparticles in water-based dispersion consisting of 4-arm star polymer via the R-group RAFT approach. It is shown that by heating a nanoparticle assembler above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST), stabilized nanoparticles are formed that act as a template for the 4-arm star RAFT-mediated polymerization of styrene. Monodisperse nanoparticles of size (between 40 and 90 nm) containing monodisperse polymer of desired molecular weight (30-95 k) are obtained with little star-star coupling due to compartmentalization. The nanoreactor technique allows independent control over the size and molecular weight with a 4-arm star topology.

  13. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  14. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  15. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  16. Ion acoustic solitons in dense magnetized plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, Safeer; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2014-09-20

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is investigated. The linear dispersion relation is obtained for slow and fast electrostatic waves in the EPI plasma. The limiting cases for ion acoustic wave (slow) and ion cyclotron wave (fast) are also discussed. Using the reductive perturbation method, two-dimensional propagation of ion acoustic solitons is found for both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons. The effects of positron concentration, magnetic field, and mass of ions on ion acoustic solitons are shown in numerical plots. The proper form of Fermi temperature for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is employed, which has not been used in earlier published work. The present investigation is useful for the understanding of linear and nonlinear electrostatic wave propagation in the dense magnetized EPI plasma of compact stars. For illustration purposes, we have applied our results to a pulsar magnetosphere.

  17. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-15

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it “M-Z equation”). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers’ equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  18. Numerical study of ion acoustic shock waves in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ali, S.; Mukhtar, Q.

    2014-03-15

    Two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of ion acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized dense quantum plasma, whose constituents are the electrons and ions. For this purpose, we employ the standard finite difference Lax Wendroff and relaxation methods, to examine the quantum effects on the profiles of shock potential, the electron/ion number densities, and velocity even for quantum parameter at H = 2. The effects of the latter vanish in a weakly non-linear limit while obeying the KdV theory. It is shown that the evolution of the wave depends sensitively on the plasma density and the quantum parameter. Numerical results reveal that the kinks or oscillations are pronounced for large values of quantum parameter, especially at H = 2. Our results should be important to understand the shock wave excitations in dense quantum plasmas, white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  19. On the interstellar extinction law toward young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamzin, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    We have determined the atomic hydrogen column density N HI toward all of the young stars from the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus star-forming complex for which the corresponding spectra are available in the Hubble Space Telescope archive (nine stars) by analyzing the Lyα line profile. We show that the stars studied, except DR Tau, lie not far from the edge of the gaseous cloud of the star-forming region closest to us or, more precisely, inside the outer H I shell of the cloud. This shell with a column density of N HI ≃ 6 × 1020 cm-2 surrounds the molecular gas of the cloud composed of a diffuse component (the so-called diffuse screen) in which dense, compact TMC-1 cores are embedded. The properties of the dust grains toward the stars that lie at the front edge of the cloud most likely differ only slightly from those of the interstellar dust outside star-forming regions. This casts doubt on the validity of the hypothesis that the extinction curve toward young stars has an anomalously low amplitude of the 2175 Å bump—such an extinction curve is observed for the field stars HD 29647 and HD 283809 toward which the line of sight passes through the TMC-1 core.

  20. Liquid Crystalline Phases of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Kiana; Abukhdeir, Nasser; Matsen, Mark

    The phase behavior of liquid-crystal polymeric brushes in solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory. The polymers are modeled as freely-jointed chain consisting of N rigid segments. The isotropic interactions between the polymer and the solvent are treated using the standard Flory-Huggins theory, while the anisotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) interactions between rigid segments are taken into account using the Mayer-Saupe theory. For weak LC interactions, the brush exhibits the conventional parabolic-like profile, while for strong LC interactions, the polymers crystallize into a dense brush with a step-like profile. At intermediate interaction strengths, we find the microphase-segregated phase observed previously for lattice-model calculations. In this phase, the brush exhibits a crystalline layer next to the grafting surface with an external layer similar to the conventional brush. This work was supported by NSERC of Canada.

  1. Microporous polyvinylidene fluoride film with dense surface enables efficient piezoelectric conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dajing; Zhang, John X. J.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that asymmetric porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film, with pores mostly distributed in the bulk but not at the surfaces, can be used as a highly efficient piezoelectric energy generation device. For such microporous PVDF film with dense or pore-free surface, piezoelectric theory shows the efficiency of energy conversion by piezoelectric device depends upon the structure compressibility. Film mechanical properties can be controlled by dispersing micro-scale pores in a polymer matrix with a dense top layer. Piezoelectric output is enhanced by optimization of PVDF micro-structure and electromechanical coupling efficiency. The power output increased three folds with a designed three-dimensional asymmetric porous structure as compared to solid film.

  2. A runaway collision in a young star cluster as the origin of the brightest supernova.

    PubMed

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F; van den Heuvel, Edward P J

    2007-11-15

    Supernova SN 2006gy in the galaxy NGC 1260 is the most luminous recorded. Its progenitor might have been a very massive (>100 Mo, where is the mass of the Sun) star, but that interpretation is incompatible with hydrogen in the spectrum of the supernova; stars >40 Moare believed to have shed their hydrogen envelopes several hundred thousand years before the explosion. Alternatively, the progenitor might have arisen from the merger of two massive stars. Here we show that the collision frequency of massive stars in a dense and young cluster (of the kind to be expected near the centre of a galaxy) is sufficient to provide a reasonable chance that SN 2006gy resulted from such a bombardment. If this is the correct explanation, then we predict that when the supernova fades (in a year or so) a dense cluster of massive stars will become visible at the site of the explosion.

  3. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  4. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  5. The Warm And Dense Gas In Embedded Low-mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Kempen, Tim; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Joergensen, J. K.; Guesten, R.; Schilke, P.

    2008-03-01

    The central regions of embedded low-mass protostars is characterized by warm (T K) and dense (10^6 cm-3) gas. Although short (10^5 years), these stages are critical for the subsequent evolution of the system. The total mass of the system and the initial conditions for (massive) planet formation are determined. Outflows, disks and envelopes all exist on scales of a few hundred to thousand AU, but except for a few cases, the physical structure has mainly been constrained on scales of a few thousand AU through observations of the cold, quiescent gas and dust. We present recent observations of observations using newly commisioned array receivers HARP-B on the JCMT and CHAMP+ on APEX of rotational emission lines of CO, HCO+ and their isotopologues ranging in frequency from 230 to 900 GHz for to probe the warm and dense gas, both close to the star and within the immedeate surroundings of the protostellar system. Observations were supplemented with continuum data ranging from the near-IR to radio. Special emphasis was put on the results obtained by the c2d program carried out on Spitzer. A large number of sources was observed, ranging from luminous, deeply embedded sources to weak sources where most of the envelope has accreted onto the central star/disk system. Initial results show that the amount of warm and dense gas is not necessarily related. Warm gas seems to be more present at more evolved sources, even at low luminosities, while dense gas is more present in the massive envelopes surrounding the deeply embedded Class 0 protostars. It is also shown that the warm (T 100 K) gas is mostly quiescent and not related to outflow activity. It is likely that the gas is thermally heated.

  6. ICES IN THE QUIESCENT IC 5146 DENSE CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Ennico, K.; Greene, T. P.; Roellig, T. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Keane, J. V.; Lada, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Decin, L.; Eriksson, K.

    2011-04-10

    This paper presents spectra in the 2 to 20 {mu}m range of quiescent cloud material located in the IC 5146 cloud complex. The spectra were obtained with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX instrument and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrometer. We use these spectra to investigate dust and ice absorption features in pristine regions of the cloud that are unaltered by embedded stars. We find that the H{sub 2}O-ice threshold extinction is 4.03 {+-} 0.05 mag. Once foreground extinction is taken into account, however, the threshold drops to 3.2 mag, equivalent to that found for the Taurus dark cloud, generally assumed to be the touchstone quiescent cloud against which all other dense cloud and embedded young stellar object observations are compared. Substructure in the trough of the silicate band for two sources is attributed to CH{sub 3}OH and NH{sub 3} in the ices, present at the {approx}2% and {approx}5% levels, respectively, relative to H{sub 2}O-ice. The correlation of the silicate feature with the E(J - K) color excess is found to follow a much shallower slope relative to lines of sight that probe diffuse clouds, supporting the previous results by Chiar et al.

  7. Outflows of stars due to quasar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Nayakshin, Sergei; Sazonov, Sergey; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-05-01

    Quasar feedback outflows are commonly invoked to drive gas out of galaxies in the early gas-rich epoch to terminate growth of galaxies. Here we present simulations that show that AGN feedback may drive not only gas but also stars out of their host galaxies under certain conditions. The mechanics of this process is as follows: (1) AGN-driven outflows accelerate and compress gas filling the host galaxy; (2) the accelerated dense shells become gravitationally unstable and form stars on radial trajectories. For the spherically symmetric initial conditions explored here, the black hole needs to exceed the host's Mσ mass by a factor of a few to accelerate the shells and the new stars to escape velocities. We discuss potential implications of these effects for the host galaxies: (i) radial mixing of bulge stars with the rest of the host; (ii) contribution of quasar outflows to galactic fountains as sources of high-velocity clouds; (iii) wholesale ejection of hypervelocity stars out of their hosts, giving rise to Type II supernovae on galactic outskirts, and contributing to reionization and metal enrichment of the Universe; (iv) bulge erosion and even complete destruction in extreme cases resulting in overweight or bulgeless SMBHs.

  8. Synthesis and Properties of Star HPMA Copolymer Nanocarriers Synthesised by RAFT Polymerisation Designed for Selective Anticancer Drug Delivery and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chytil, Petr; Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Kostka, Libor; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš

    2015-06-01

    High-molecular-weight star polymer drug nanocarriers intended for the treatment and/or visualisation of solid tumours were synthesised, and their physico-chemical and preliminary in vitro biological properties were determined. The water-soluble star polymer carriers were prepared by the grafting of poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by hetero-telechelic N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers, synthesised by the controlled radical Reversible Addition Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerisation. The well-defined star copolymers with Mw values ranging from 2 · 10(5) to 6 · 10(5) showing a low dispersity (approximately 1.2) were prepared in a high yield. A model anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was bound to the star polymer through a hydrazone bond, enabling the pH-controlled drug release in the target tumour tissue. The activated polymer arm ends of the star copolymer carrier enable a one-point attachment for the targeting ligands and/or a labelling moiety. In this study, the model TAMRA fluorescent dye was used to prove the feasibility of the polymer carrier visualisation by optical imaging in vitro. The tailor-made structure of the star polymer carriers should facilitate the synthesis of targeted polymer-drug conjugates, even polymer theranostics, for simultaneous tumour drug delivery and imaging.

  9. Large Area, High Resolution N2H+ studies of dense gas in the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee

    2014-07-01

    Star formation in molecular clouds occurs over a wide range of spatial scales and physical densities. Understanding the origin of dense cores thus requires linking the structure and kinematics of gas and dust from cloud to core scales. The CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy) is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged five diverse regions of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds in N2H+ (J=1-0), totaling over 800 square arcminutes. The observations have 7’’ angular resolution (~0.01 pc spatial resolution) to probe dense gas down to core scales, and use combined interferometric and single-dish data to fully recover line emission up to parsec scales. CLASSy observations are complete, and this talk will focus on three science results. First, the dense gas in regions with existing star formation has complex hierarchical structure. We present a non-binary dendrogram analysis for all regions and show that dense gas hierarchy correlates with star formation activity. Second, well-resolved velocity information for each dendrogram-identified structure allows a new way of looking at linewidth-size relations in clouds. Specifically, we find that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with structure size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity increases strongly with structure size. We argue that the typical line-of-sight depth of a cloud can be estimated from these relations, and that our regions have depths that are several times less than their extent on the plane of the sky. This finding is consistent with numerical simulations of molecular cloud turbulence that show that high-density sheets are a generic result. Third, N2H+ is a good tracer of cold, dense gas in filaments; we resolve multiple beams across many filaments, some of which are narrower than 0.1 pc. The centroid velocity fields of several filaments show gradients perpendicular to their major axis, which is a common feature in filaments formed from numerical

  10. Polymer Electronics: Power from Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, D.; Russell, Thomas P.

    2012-06-19

    We review polymer-based electronics and photovoltaics to provide the reader with a sense of how the field has developed, where we stand at present, and what possibilities are looming in the future. Expertise in areas ranging from synthesis to morphology to device design was sought to achieve this end. While these reviews cannot be exhaustive, they do provide a snapshot of the field at present and give some sense of where the key impediments are.

  11. Assembly of optical-scale dumbbells into dense photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jason D; Park, Jin-Gyu; Mittal, Manish; Noh, Heeso; Schreck, Carl F; O'Hern, Corey S; Cao, Hui; Furst, Eric M; Dufresne, Eric R

    2011-08-23

    We describe the self-assembly of nonspherical particles into crystals with novel structure and optical properties combining a partial photonic band gap with birefringence that can be modulated by an external field or quenched by solvent evaporation. Specifically, we study symmetric optical-scale polymer dumbbells with an aspect ratio of 1.58. Hard particles with this geometry have been predicted to crystallize in equilibrium at high concentrations. However, unlike spherical particles, which readily crystallize in the bulk, previous experiments have shown that these dumbbells crystallize only under strong confinement. Here, we demonstrate the use of an external electric field to align and assemble the dumbbells to make a birefringent suspension with structural color. When the electric field is turned off, the dumbbells rapidly lose their orientational order and the color and birefringence quickly go away. In this way, dumbbells combine the structural color of photonic crystals with the field addressability of liquid crystals. In addition, we find that if the solvent is removed in the presence of an electric field, the particles self-assemble into a novel, dense crystalline packing hundreds of particles thick. Analysis of the crystal structure indicates that the dumbbells have a packing fraction of 0.7862, higher than the densest known packings of spheres and ellipsoids. We perform numerical experiments to more generally demonstrate the importance of controlling the orientation of anisotropic particles during a concentration quench to achieve long-range order.

  12. Action of Winds Inside and Outside of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, Jan; Dale, Jim; Wünsch, Richard; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Whitworth, Anthony

    2011-04-01

    The feedback form pre-main sequence and young stars influences their vicinity. The stars are formed in clusters, which implies that the winds of individual stars collide with each other. Inside of a star cluster, winds thermalize a fraction of their kinetic energy, forming a very hot medium able to escape from the cluster in the form of a large-scale wind. Outside of the cluster, the cluster wind forms a shock front as it interacts with the ambient medium which is accreted onto the expanding shell. A variety of instabilities may develop in such shells, and in some cases they fragment, triggering second generation of star formation. However, if the cluster surpasses a certain mass (depending on the radius and other parameters) the hot medium starts to be thermally unstable even inside of the cluster, forming dense warm clumps. The formation of next generations of stars may start if the clumps are big enough to self-shield against stellar radiation creating cold dense cores.

  13. Frontier of the physics of dense plasmas and planetary interiors: experiments, theory, applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saumon, Didier; Fortney, Jonathan J; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Koenig, Michel; Brambrink, E; Militzer, Burkhard; Valencia, Diana

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter are reviewed, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. Several applications of this work are examined. These include the structure of massive 'super-Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as the benchmark for giant planets.

  14. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  15. PHOTOCHEMICAL HEATING OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Glassgold, A. E.; Najita, J. R.

    2015-09-10

    Photochemical heating is analyzed with an emphasis on the heating generated by chemical reactions initiated by the products of photodissociation and photoionization. The immediate products are slowed down by collisions with the ambient gas and then heat the gas. In addition to this direct process, heating is also produced by the subsequent chemical reactions initiated by these products. Some of this chemical heating comes from the kinetic energy of the reaction products and the rest from collisional de-excitation of the product atoms and molecules. In considering dense gas dominated by molecular hydrogen, we find that the chemical heating is sometimes as large, if not much larger than, the direct heating. In very dense gas, the total photochemical heating approaches 10 eV per photodissociation (or photoionization), competitive with other ways of heating molecular gas.

  16. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  17. Dense Deposit Disease and C3 Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Thomas D.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Terence Cook, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary C3 glomerulopathy refers to those renal lesions characterized histologically by predominant C3 accumulation within the glomerulus, and pathogenetically by aberrant regulation of the alternative pathway of complement. Dense deposit disease is distinguished from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy by its characteristic appearance on electron microscopy. The extent to which dense deposit disease also differs from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy in terms of clinical features, natural history, and outcomes of treatment including renal transplantation is less clear. We discuss the pathophysiology of C3 glomerulopathy, with evidence for alternative pathway dysregulation obtained from affected individuals and complement factor H (Cfh)-deficient animal models. Recent linkage studies in familial C3 glomerulopathy have shown genomic rearrangements in the Cfh-related genes, for which the novel pathophysiologic concept of Cfh deregulation has been proposed. PMID:24161036

  18. Deterministic dense coding with partially entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Mozes, Shay; Reznik, Benni; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The utilization of a d-level partially entangled state, shared by two parties wishing to communicate classical information without errors over a noiseless quantum channel, is discussed. We analytically construct deterministic dense coding schemes for certain classes of nonmaximally entangled states, and numerically obtain schemes in the general case. We study the dependency of the maximal alphabet size of such schemes on the partially entangled state shared by the two parties. Surprisingly, for d>2 it is possible to have deterministic dense coding with less than one ebit. In this case the number of alphabet letters that can be communicated by a single particle is between d and 2d. In general, we numerically find that the maximal alphabet size is any integer in the range [d,d{sup 2}] with the possible exception of d{sup 2}-1. We also find that states with less entanglement can have a greater deterministic communication capacity than other more entangled states.

  19. Dense silica coatings on ceramic powder particles

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, J.F.A.; Mayr, W.

    1995-09-01

    Dense silica coatings on the surface of inorganic powders particles are prepared by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in alcoholic suspensions. In a first reaction step, the TEOS is pre-hydrolysed in acidic solution and afterwards, a suspension of powder particles in this reaction solution is treated with ammonia which results in a dense silica coating of typically 10 - 100 nm thickness. Different luminescent powders which are used in the manufacture of cathode-ray tubes or fluorescent lamps have been coated by this procedure. The silica coating forms a transparent layer and the suspension properties of the coated powders are determined by the silica layer. The silica coating also protects sulfidic luminescent powders from being attacked by oxidizing agents like dichromate ions which are used in the suspension formulations for TV tube fabrication.

  20. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  1. Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Jeremey; Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2012-03-01

    We propose to search for nuclear density or greater compact ultra dense objects (CUDOs), which could constitute a significant fraction of the dark matter [1]. Considering their high density, the gravitational tidal forces are significant and atomic-density matter cannot stop an impacting CUDO, which punctures the surface of the target body, pulverizing, heating and entraining material near its trajectory through the target [2]. Because impact features endure over geologic timescales, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Mercury and large asteroids are well-suited to act as time-integrating CUDO detectors. There are several potential candidates for CUDO structure such as strangelet fragments or more generally dark matter if mechanisms exist for it to form compact objects. [4pt] [1] B. J. Carr, K. Kohri, Y. Sendouda, & J.'i. Yokoyama, Phys. Rev. D81, 104019 (2010). [0pt] [2] L. Labun, J. Birrell, J. Rafelski, Solar System Signatures of Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects, arXiv:1104.4572.

  2. Observations of Plasmons in Warm Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P; Lee, R W; Widmann, K; Pollaine, S W; Wallace, R J; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Bornath, T; Thiele, R; Schwarz, V; Kraeft, W; Redmer, R

    2006-09-05

    We present the first collective x-ray scattering measurements of plasmons in solid-density plasmas. The forward scattering spectra of a laser-produced narrow-band x-ray line from isochorically heated beryllium show that the plasmon frequency is a sensitive measure of the electron density. Dynamic structure calculations that include collisions and detailed balance match the measured plasmon spectrum indicating that this technique will enable new applications to determine the equation of state and compressibility of dense matter.

  3. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1998-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

  4. Particle sorting in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fan, Y.; Yohannes, B.

    2008-12-01

    Mixtures of particles tend to unmix by particle property. One of the most dramatically destructive examples of this occurs in debris flow: boulders, rocks, and mud tumble down a hillside, and the largest rocks migrate toward the top and then the front of the flow where they do the most damage. Rotating drums and chute flows are two of the most common apparatuses used to systematically study segregation in dense, gravity driven granular flows. In these cases, smaller or, alternatively, denser particles segregate away from the free surface, phenomena that have been modeled using mechanisms such as kinetic sieving and buoyancy, respectively. Other segregation mechanisms have been identified in suspensions and in more energetic systems such as a gradient in granular temperature -- the kinetic energy of velocity fluctuations -- and curvature effects. However, with most experimental systems the dominant segregation mechanism is difficult to ascertain. In typical experimental systems designed to study segregation in dense granular flow (such as chutes and rotated drums), gravity, velocity gradients and porosity gradients coexist in the direction of segregation. We study the segregation of mixtures of particles numerically and experimentally in a split-bottom cell and in a rotating drum to isolate three possible driving mechanisms for segregation of densely-sheared granular mixtures: gravity, porosity, and velocity gradients and their associated dynamics. We find gravity alone does not drive segregation associated with particle size without a sufficiently large porosity or porosity gradient. A velocity gradient, however, appears capable of driving segregation associated both with particle size and material density in dense flows. We present our results and discuss the implications for some particle segregation behaviors observed in natural systems such as debris flows and sediment transport.

  5. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  6. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  7. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  8. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Andreas; Hartmann, Lee E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu

    2013-08-10

    Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density {Sigma} of {Sigma}{sub c} {approx} 120 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} (A{sub K} {approx} 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area {Sigma}{sub SFR} with increasing {Sigma}, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of {Sigma}{sub SFR}, approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of {Sigma}{sub SFR} versus {Sigma} in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -3} for low-mass regions and A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -1} for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse.

  9. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  10. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  11. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  12. Confined magnetic monopoles in dense QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Shifman, M.; Yung, A.

    2011-04-15

    Non-Abelian strings exist in the color-flavor locked phase of dense QCD. We show that kinks appearing in the world-sheet theory on these strings, in the form of the kink-antikink bound pairs, are the magnetic monopoles-descendants of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles surviving in such a special form in dense QCD. Our consideration is heavily based on analogies and inspiration coming from certain supersymmetric non-Abelian theories. This is the first ever analytic demonstration that objects unambiguously identifiable as the magnetic monopoles are native to non-Abelian Yang-Mills theories (albeit our analysis extends only to the phase of the monopole confinement and has nothing to say about their condensation). Technically, our demonstration becomes possible due to the fact that low-energy dynamics of the non-Abelian strings in dense QCD is that of the orientational zero modes. It is described by an effective two-dimensional CP(2) model on the string world sheet. The kinks in this model representing confined magnetic monopoles are in a highly quantum regime.

  13. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-10-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime.

  14. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  15. The Cambridge Double Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEvoy, Bruce; Tirion, Wil

    2015-12-01

    Preface; What are double stars?; The binary orbit; Double star dynamics; Stellar mass and the binary life cycle; The double star population; Detecting double stars; Double star catalogs; Telescope optics; Preparing to observe; Helpful accessories; Viewing challenges; Next steps; Appendices: target list; Useful formulas; Double star orbits; Double star catalogs; The Greek alphabet.

  16. Spectroscopic survey of emission-line stars - I. B[e] stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aret, A.; Kraus, M.; Šlechta, M.

    2016-02-01

    Emission-line stars are typically surrounded by dense circumstellar material, often in form of rings or disc-like structures. Line emission from forbidden transitions trace a diversity of density and temperature regimes. Of particular interest are the forbidden lines of [O I] λλ6300, 6364 and [Ca II] λλ7291, 7324. They arise in complementary, high-density environments, such as the inner-disc regions around B[e] supergiants. To study physical conditions traced by these lines and to investigate how common they are, we initiated a survey of emission-line stars. Here, we focus on a sample of nine B[e] stars in different evolutionary phases. Emission of the [O I] lines is one of the characteristics of B[e] stars. We find that four of the objects display [Ca II] line emission: for the B[e] supergiants V1478 Cyg and 3 Pup, the kinematics obtained from the [O I] and [Ca II] line profiles agrees with a Keplerian rotating disc scenario; the forbidden lines of the compact planetary nebula OY Gem display no kinematical broadening beyond spectral resolution; the luminous blue variable candidate V1429 Aql shows no [O I] lines, but the profile of its [Ca II] lines suggests that the emission originates in its hot, ionized circumbinary disc. As none of the B[e] stars of lower mass displays [Ca II] line emission, we conclude that these lines are more likely observable in massive stars with dense discs, supporting and strengthening the suggestion that their appearance requires high-density environments.

  17. Tracing the cold regions of a dense core with para-H2D+ against a bright continuum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastel, Charlotte

    2015-10-01

    Using Herschel/HIFI and IRAM-30m/Pdb observations, we detected a dense and cold core on the line of sight of a distant compact HII region (W51). While the fortuitous coincidence of the dense core along the line of sight with the continuum-bright W51e2 compact HII region has contributed to its non detection in the submillimeter continuum images, this same attribute makes it an appropriate source for absorption studies of star-forming gas. This core has been traced with deuterated species for the first time in absorption in the case of DCO+. We now propose to trace this core with the para-H2D+ ground-state transition, since H2D+ is a reliable tracer of the cold and dense phase of star-forming regions. For example, both species will be used to constrain the H2 fraction in its para form and consequently the age of the core. The source proposed here is unique because of its distance and its chance coincidence to lie against a bright continuum source. A detection is crucial to constrain the nature of the clump, in a chemical point of view, at a galactocentric distance (~ 5 kpc) different than the usual clouds (such as Orion and Taurus) that have been observed so far for detection of tracers of star-formation activity with H2D+.

  18. KEY ISSUES REVIEW: Insights from simulations of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Richard B.

    2007-03-01

    Although the basic physics of star formation is classical, numerical simulations have yielded essential insights into how stars form. They show that star formation is a highly nonuniform runaway process characterized by the emergence of nearly singular peaks in density, followed by the accretional growth of embryo stars that form at these density peaks. Circumstellar discs often form from the gas being accreted by the forming stars, and accretion from these discs may be episodic, driven by gravitational instabilities or by protostellar interactions. Star-forming clouds typically develop filamentary structures, which may, along with the thermal physics, play an important role in the origin of stellar masses because of the sensitivity of filament fragmentation to temperature variations. Simulations of the formation of star clusters show that the most massive stars form by continuing accretion in the dense cluster cores, and this again is a runaway process that couples star formation and cluster formation. Star-forming clouds also tend to develop hierarchical structures, and smaller groups of forming objects tend to merge into progressively larger ones, a generic feature of self-gravitating systems that is common to star formation and galaxy formation. Because of the large range of scales and the complex dynamics involved, analytic models cannot adequately describe many aspects of star formation, and detailed numerical simulations are needed to advance our understanding of the subject. 'The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.' Richard W Hamming, in Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (1962) 'There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.' William Shakespeare, in Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (1604)

  19. The initial mass function of stars: evidence for uniformity in variable systems.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of stellar masses that form in one star formation event in a given volume of space is called the initial mass function (IMF). The IMF has been estimated from low-mass brown dwarfs to very massive stars. Combining IMF estimates for different populations in which the stars can be observed individually unveils an extraordinary uniformity of the IMF. This general insight appears to hold for populations including present-day star formation in small molecular clouds, rich and dense massive star-clusters forming in giant clouds, through to ancient and metal-poor exotic stellar populations that may be dominated by dark matter. This apparent universality of the IMF is a challenge for star formation theory, because elementary considerations suggest that the IMF ought to systematically vary with star-forming conditions. PMID:11778039

  20. The initial mass function of stars: evidence for uniformity in variable systems.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of stellar masses that form in one star formation event in a given volume of space is called the initial mass function (IMF). The IMF has been estimated from low-mass brown dwarfs to very massive stars. Combining IMF estimates for different populations in which the stars can be observed individually unveils an extraordinary uniformity of the IMF. This general insight appears to hold for populations including present-day star formation in small molecular clouds, rich and dense massive star-clusters forming in giant clouds, through to ancient and metal-poor exotic stellar populations that may be dominated by dark matter. This apparent universality of the IMF is a challenge for star formation theory, because elementary considerations suggest that the IMF ought to systematically vary with star-forming conditions.

  1. Herschel Dust Temperatures of High-Mass Star Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, James

    We request NASA ADAP support to infer the evolutionary state, luminosities, and masses of 3,000 star-forming dense molecular cores using Herschel Hi-GAL data. The target cores are selected from the 870 μm ATLASGAL survey to host the early stages of high-mass star formation and to span the complete range of their early evolutionary stages. All 3,000 of these cores will be mapped in the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey (MALT90), a new project designed to simultaneously image 16 molecular lines near 90 GHz. The dust temperatures derived from the Hi-GAL data will provide the key diagnostic of the evolutionary phase, as the cores evolve due to heating by the embedded young stars from the earliest cold "starless cores," to intermediate temperature "protostellar cores," and finally on to "hot cores" and H II regions. We will correlate the evolutionary state indicated by the Hi-GAL dust temperatures with the chemical and kinematic information supplied by the MALT 90 molecular line survey. Moreover, since MALT 90 data provides kinematic distances, the Hi-GAL submm/FIR spectral energy distributions will also provide the luminosity and mass distributions of dense cores. This project will allow for the first time a complete and robust characterization of the physical evolution of dense cores. Since this project studies the formation of high-mass stars, it bears directly on NASA's Origins theme.

  2. Interpretations of Polymer-Polymer Miscibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olabisi, Olagoke

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of polymeric mixtures, mixtures of structurally different homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. Defines concepts of polymer-polymer miscibility from practical and theoretical viewpoints, and ways of predicting such miscibility. (JN)

  3. MULTIPLE GENERATIONS OF STARS IN THE TARANTULA NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula -- that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Note for your calendar; Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  4. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  5. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Figer, D. F.

    1998-06-01

    Results of an spectroscopic investigation of the Pistol star are presented. The near-infrared spectra and photometry data are fit with stellar wind models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, L = 106.7±0.5 L⊙, making it one of the most luminous stars known. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, Teff = 10^{4.17_{ - 0.06}^{ + 0.19} } K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The derived line of sight velocity of the star assures its membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center.

  6. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  7. Polymer-coated long-circulating microparticulate pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Torchilin, V P

    1998-01-01

    The field of long-circulating microparticulate drug carriers is reviewed. The protective effect of certain polymers including poly(ethylene glycol) on nanoparticulate carriers (liposomes, nanoparticles, micelles) is considered in terms of statistical behaviour of macromolecules in solution. Using liposomes as an example, the mechanism is discussed assuming that surface-grafted chains of flexible and hydrophilic polymers form dense 'conformational clouds' preventing other macromolecules from interaction with the surface even at low concentrations of the protecting polymer. The scale of the protective effect is interpreted as the balance between the energy of the hydrophobic anchor interaction with the liposome membrane core or with the particle surface and the energy of the polymer chain free motion in solution. The possibility of using protecting polymers other than poly(ethylene glycol) is analysed, and examples of such polymers are given, based on polymer-coated liposome biodistribution data. General requirements for protecting polymers are formulated. Sterically protected nanoparticles and micelles are considered, and differences in steric protection of liposomes and particles are discussed. The problem of the preparation of drug carriers combining longevity and targetability is analysed. The biological consequences of steric protection of drug carriers with surface-grafted polymers are discussed, and possible clinical applications for long-circulating pharmaceutical carriers are considered.

  8. Stormy Clouds of Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    This image shows a 24-micron image mosaic, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer aboard Spitzer (MIPS). This image maps the cooler infrared emission from interstellar dust found throughout the interstellar medium. The DR21 complex is clearly seen near the center of the strip, which covers about twice the area of the IRAC image.

    Perhaps the most fascinating feature in this image is a long and shadowy linear filament extending towards the 10 o'clock position of DR21. This jet of cold and dense gas, nearly 50 light-years in extent, appears in silhouette against a warmer background. This filament is too long and massive to be a stellar jet and may have formed from a pre-existing molecular cloud core sculpted by DR21's strong winds. Regardless of its true nature, this jet and the numerous other arcs and wisps of cool dust signify the interstellar turbulence normally unseen by the human eye.

  9. Circumstellar disks of the most vigorously accreting young stars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard I; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Fukagawa, Misato; Tamura, Motohide; Henning, Thomas; Dunham, Michael M; Karr, Jennifer L; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Tsuribe, Toru

    2016-02-01

    Stars may not accumulate their mass steadily, as was previously thought, but in a series of violent events manifesting themselves as sharp stellar brightening. These events can be caused by fragmentation due to gravitational instabilities in massive gaseous disks surrounding young stars, followed by migration of dense gaseous clumps onto the star. Our high-resolution near-infrared imaging has verified the presence of the key associated features, large-scale arms and arcs surrounding four young stellar objects undergoing luminous outbursts. Our hydrodynamics simulations and radiative transfer models show that these observed structures can indeed be explained by strong gravitational instabilities occurring at the beginning of the disk formation phase. The effect of those tempestuous episodes of disk evolution on star and planet formation remains to be understood. PMID:26989772

  10. Tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novikov, I. D.; Pethick, C. J.; Polnarev, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    The processes leading to tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole and the consequences of these processes in a dense stellar cluster are discussed in detail. When the amplitude of a tide and the subsequent oscillations are sufficiently large, the energy deposited in a star after periastron passage and formation of a bound orbit cannot be estimated directly using the linear theory of oscillations of a spherical star, but rather numerical estimates must be used. The evolution of a star after tidal capture is discussed. The maximum ratio R of the cross-section for tidal capture to that for tidal disruption is about 3 for real systems. For the case of a stellar system with an empty capture loss cone, even in the case when the impact parameter for tidal capture only slightly exceeds the impact parameter for direct tidal disruption, tidal capture would be much more important than tidal disruption.

  11. Circumstellar disks of the most vigorously accreting young stars

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Fukagawa, Misato; Tamura, Motohide; Henning, Thomas; Dunham, Michael M.; Karr, Jennifer L.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Tsuribe, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Stars may not accumulate their mass steadily, as was previously thought, but in a series of violent events manifesting themselves as sharp stellar brightening. These events can be caused by fragmentation due to gravitational instabilities in massive gaseous disks surrounding young stars, followed by migration of dense gaseous clumps onto the star. Our high-resolution near-infrared imaging has verified the presence of the key associated features, large-scale arms and arcs surrounding four young stellar objects undergoing luminous outbursts. Our hydrodynamics simulations and radiative transfer models show that these observed structures can indeed be explained by strong gravitational instabilities occurring at the beginning of the disk formation phase. The effect of those tempestuous episodes of disk evolution on star and planet formation remains to be understood. PMID:26989772

  12. Circumstellar disks of the most vigorously accreting young stars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard I; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Fukagawa, Misato; Tamura, Motohide; Henning, Thomas; Dunham, Michael M; Karr, Jennifer L; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Tsuribe, Toru

    2016-02-01

    Stars may not accumulate their mass steadily, as was previously thought, but in a series of violent events manifesting themselves as sharp stellar brightening. These events can be caused by fragmentation due to gravitational instabilities in massive gaseous disks surrounding young stars, followed by migration of dense gaseous clumps onto the star. Our high-resolution near-infrared imaging has verified the presence of the key associated features, large-scale arms and arcs surrounding four young stellar objects undergoing luminous outbursts. Our hydrodynamics simulations and radiative transfer models show that these observed structures can indeed be explained by strong gravitational instabilities occurring at the beginning of the disk formation phase. The effect of those tempestuous episodes of disk evolution on star and planet formation remains to be understood.

  13. Unraveling the Labyrinth of Star Formation with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Philippe; Könyves, Vera; Arzoumanian, Doris; Palmeirim, Pedro

    Recent studies of nearby interstellar clouds with the Herschel Space Observatory have provided us with unprecedented images of the initial conditions and early phases of the star formation process. The Herschel images point to the central role of filaments in star formation and to their likely connection to interstellar turbulence. Overall, the Herschel results suggest that it may be possible to understand both the IMF and the global rate of star formation in galaxies by studying the physics of how dense structures (e.g. filaments, cores) form and grow in the ISM of our own Galaxy. Despite an apparent complexity, global star formation may be governed by relatively simple universal laws from filament to galactic scales.

  14. Bipolar rings from jet-inflated bubbles around evolved binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Muhammad; Soker, Noam

    2016-10-01

    We show that a fast wind that expands into a bipolar nebula composed of two opposite jet-inflated bubbles can form a pair of bipolar rings around giant stars. Our model assumes three mass-loss episodes: a spherical slow and dense shell, two opposite jets, and a spherical fast wind. We use the FLASH hydrodynamical code in three-dimensions to simulate the flow, and obtain the structure of the nebula. We assume that the jets are launched from an accretion disc around a stellar companion to the giant star. The accretion disc is assumed to be formed when the primary giant star and the secondary star suffer a strong interaction accompanied by a rapid mass transfer process from the primary to the secondary star, mainly a main-sequence star. Later in the evolution the primary star is assumed to shrink and blow a fast tenuous wind that interacts with the dense gas on the surface of the bipolar structure. We assume that the dense mass-loss episode before the jets are launched is spherically symmetric. Our results might be applicable to some planetary nebulae, and further emphasize the large variety of morphological features that can be formed by jets. But we could not reproduce some of the properties of the outer rings of SN 1987A. It seems that some objects, like SN 1987A, require a pre-jets mass-loss episode with a mass concentration at mid-latitudes.

  15. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE YOUNG STARS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER: N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF THE S-STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Hagai B.; Kupi, Gabor; Alexander, Tal; Gualandris, Alessia; Merritt, David

    2009-09-10

    We use Newtonian N-body simulations to study the evolution of the orbital eccentricities of stars deposited near ({approx}<0.05 pc) the Milky Way massive black hole (MBH), starting from initial conditions motivated by two competing models for their origin: formation in a disk followed by inward migration and exchange interactions involving a binary star. The first model predicts modest eccentricities, lower than those observed in the S-star cluster, while the second model predicts higher eccentricities than observed. The Newtonian N-body simulations include a dense cluster of 10 M{sub sun} stellar-mass black holes (SBHs), expected to accumulate near the MBH by mass segregation. Perturbations from the SBHs tend to randomize the stellar orbits, partially erasing the dynamical signatures of their origin. The eccentricities of the initially highly eccentric stars evolve, in 20 Myr (the S-star lifespan), to a distribution that is consistent with the observed eccentricity distribution. In contrast, the eccentricities of the initially more circular orbits fail to evolve to the observed values in 20 Myr, arguing against the disk migration scenario. We find that 20%-30% of the S-stars are tidally disrupted by the MBH over their lifetimes, and that the S-stars are not likely to be ejected as hypervelocity stars outside the central 0.05 pc by close encounters with SBHs.

  16. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  17. Dense Subgraph Partition of Positive Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Latecki, Longin Jan; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel partition framework, called dense subgraph partition (DSP), to automatically, precisely and efficiently decompose a positive hypergraph into dense subgraphs. A positive hypergraph is a graph or hypergraph whose edges, except self-loops, have positive weights. We first define the concepts of core subgraph, conditional core subgraph, and disjoint partition of a conditional core subgraph, then define DSP based on them. The result of DSP is an ordered list of dense subgraphs with decreasing densities, which uncovers all underlying clusters, as well as outliers. A divide-and-conquer algorithm, called min-partition evolution, is proposed to efficiently compute the partition. DSP has many appealing properties. First, it is a nonparametric partition and it reveals all meaningful clusters in a bottom-up way. Second, it has an exact and efficient solution, called min-partition evolution algorithm. The min-partition evolution algorithm is a divide-and-conquer algorithm, thus time-efficient and memory-friendly, and suitable for parallel processing. Third, it is a unified partition framework for a broad range of graphs and hypergraphs. We also establish its relationship with the densest k-subgraph problem (DkS), an NP-hard but fundamental problem in graph theory, and prove that DSP gives precise solutions to DkS for all kin a graph-dependent set, called critical k-set. To our best knowledge, this is a strong result which has not been reported before. Moreover, as our experimental results show, for sparse graphs, especially web graphs, the size of critical k-set is close to the number of vertices in the graph. We test the proposed partition framework on various tasks, and the experimental results clearly illustrate its advantages.

  18. 'Tertiary' nuclear burning - Neutron star deflagration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an 'octet' particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such 'tertiary' nuclear burning (here 'primary' is H-He and 'secondary' is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or 'dark' matter.

  19. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  20. Resolving ultrafast heating of dense cryogenic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zastrau, U; Sperling, P; Harmand, M; Becker, A; Bornath, T; Bredow, R; Dziarzhytski, S; Fennel, T; Fletcher, L B; Förster, E; Göde, S; Gregori, G; Hilbert, V; Hochhaus, D; Holst, B; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Ma, T; Mithen, J P; Mitzner, R; Murphy, C D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Neumayer, P; Przystawik, A; Roling, S; Schulz, M; Siemer, B; Skruszewicz, S; Tiggesbäumker, J; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; White, T; Wöstmann, M; Zacharias, H; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S H; Redmer, R

    2014-03-14

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300  fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ∼0.9  ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  1. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  2. Phase boundary of hot dense fluid hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kenji; Ichimaru, Kota; Einaga, Mari; Kawaguchi, Sho; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the phase transformation of hot dense fluid hydrogen using static high-pressure laser-heating experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The results show anomalies in the heating efficiency that are likely to be attributed to the phase transition from a diatomic to monoatomic fluid hydrogen (plasma phase transition) in the pressure range between 82 and 106 GPa. This study imposes tighter constraints on the location of the hydrogen plasma phase transition boundary and suggests higher critical point than that predicted by the theoretical calculations. PMID:26548442

  3. Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Hot Dense Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, J. F.; Shanahan, W. R.; Murillo, M. S.

    1999-10-01

    Electrical transport properties of dense aluminum are measured in the disordered liquidlike phase using a well-tamped, thermally equilibrated, exploding wire z pinch. Direct measurements of the electrical conductivity have been made using voltage and current measurements. Our measurements span the minimum conductivity regime, at higher densities than have been produced previously. We find that some Ziman-like theoretical predictions are in fair agreement with the data and one Ziman-like theoretical approach is in good agreement, in contrast to other experiments performed in similar regimes which indicate poor agreement with such theories.

  4. Dense optical-electrical interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chang

    2000-12-21

    The DOIM (Dense Optical-electrical Interface Modules) is a custom-designed optical data transmission module employed in the upgrade of Silicon Vertex Detector of CDF experiment at Fermilab. Each DOIM module consists of a transmitter (TX) converting electrical differential input signals to optical outputs, a middle segment of jacketed fiber ribbon cable, and a receiver (RX) which senses the light inputs and converts them back to electrical signals. The targeted operational frequency is 53 MHz, and higher rate is achievable. This article outlines the design goals, implementation methods, production test results, and radiation hardness tests of these modules.

  5. IN-SYNC. II. VIRIAL STARS FROM SUBVIRIAL CORES—THE VELOCITY DISPERSION OF EMBEDDED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R.; Covey, Kevin R.; Arce, Héctor G.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Da Rio, Nicola; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael; Wilson, John C.; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Rebull, Luisa; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-02-01

    The initial velocity dispersion of newborn stars is a major unconstrained aspect of star formation theory. Using near-infrared spectra obtained with the APOGEE spectrograph, we show that the velocity dispersion of young (1-2 Myr) stars in NGC 1333 is 0.92 ± 0.12 km s{sup –1} after correcting for measurement uncertainties and the effect of binaries. This velocity dispersion is consistent with the virial velocity of the region and the diffuse gas velocity dispersion, but significantly larger than the velocity dispersion of the dense, star-forming cores, which have a subvirial velocity dispersion of 0.5 km s{sup –1}. Since the NGC 1333 cluster is dynamically young and deeply embedded, this measurement provides a strong constraint on the initial velocity dispersion of newly formed stars. We propose that the difference in velocity dispersion between stars and dense cores may be due to the influence of a 70 μG magnetic field acting on the dense cores or be the signature of a cluster with initial substructure undergoing global collapse.

  6. IN-SYNC. II. Virial Stars from Subvirial Cores—the Velocity Dispersion of Embedded Pre-main-sequence Stars in NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Cottaar, Michiel; Covey, Kevin R.; Arce, Héctor G.; Meyer, Michael R.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; da Rio, Nicola; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Rebull, Luisa; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-02-01

    The initial velocity dispersion of newborn stars is a major unconstrained aspect of star formation theory. Using near-infrared spectra obtained with the APOGEE spectrograph, we show that the velocity dispersion of young (1-2 Myr) stars in NGC 1333 is 0.92 ± 0.12 km s-1 after correcting for measurement uncertainties and the effect of binaries. This velocity dispersion is consistent with the virial velocity of the region and the diffuse gas velocity dispersion, but significantly larger than the velocity dispersion of the dense, star-forming cores, which have a subvirial velocity dispersion of 0.5 km s-1. Since the NGC 1333 cluster is dynamically young and deeply embedded, this measurement provides a strong constraint on the initial velocity dispersion of newly formed stars. We propose that the difference in velocity dispersion between stars and dense cores may be due to the influence of a 70 μG magnetic field acting on the dense cores or be the signature of a cluster with initial substructure undergoing global collapse.

  7. Self-Trapping of Light Particles in Dense Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Terrence Lee

    1992-01-01

    A light particle (electron, positron, or positronium atom) thermalized in a dense fluid can in a certain range of density and temperature become localized in a region of altered fluid density. Because it is the presence of the light particle, lp, that initiates the localization process it is referred to as self-trapping. Self-Trapping results in non-linear dependence upon the density in experimental measurements of lp properties such as electron mobility and positron and positronium decay rate in fluids. Because of its small mass the lp has a thermal wavelength which is much greater than the thermal wavelength of the fluid molecules. Thus it is possible to treat the translational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics and the lp's degrees of freedom by quantum mechanics. This hybrid model is referred to as the adiabatic model. Density Functional Theory, DFT, and the Path Integral Monte Carlo, PIMC, technique are two approximations used to make calculations with the adiabatic model. DFT uses the Jensen inequality to approximate the trace over the lp wavefunction and calculate important equilibrium properties of an lp in a fluid. The PIMC technique uses the classical isomorphism to relate the partition function of a quantum particle to the partition function of a classical polymer. This relation allows the computation of quantum equilibrium averages by standard classical Monte Carlo methods. In this research the simplest variant of DFT and the PIMC technique are used to simulate positronium in dense fluids. DFT is shown to be able to qualitatively recreate experimental measurements of the decay rate of positronium in ethane and Argon. However, because density fluctuations are not included in DFT's the results show an unnatural discontinuity in decay rate plots. Because the PIMC technique is a microscopic model it includes density fluctuations and more closely resembles experimental measurements than DFT. The results of both approximations indicate that the

  8. Simplified tube models for entangled supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudara, Victor; Read, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This presentation describes current efforts investigating non-linear rheology of entangled, supramolecular polymeric materials. We describe two recently developed models: 1) We have developed a simplified model for the rheology of entangled telechelic star polymers. This is based on a pre-averaged orientation tensor, a stretch equation, and stretch-dependant probability of detachment of the sticker. In both linear and non-linear regimes, we produce maps of the whole parameter space, indicating the parameter values for which qualitative changes in response to flow are predicted. Results in the linear rheology regime are consistent with previous more detailed models and are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. 2) Using the same modelling framework, we investigate entangled linear polymers with stickers along the backbone. We use a set of coupled equations to describe the stretch between each stickers, and use equations similar to our star model for attachment/detachment of the sticky groups. This model is applicable to industrial polymers such as entangled thermoplastic elasomers, or functionalised model linear polymers. The work leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 607937 (SUPOLEN).

  9. From Commodity Polymers to Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Tao; Wang, Ling-Ren; Ma, Lang; Han, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Rui; Cheng, Chong; Xia, Yi; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Functional polymers bear specified chemical groups, and have specified physical, chemical, biological, pharmacological, or other uses. To adjust the properties while keeping material usage low, a method for direct synthesis of functional polymers is indispensable. Here we show that various functional polymers can be synthesized by in situ cross-linked polymerization/copolymerization. We demonstrate that the polymers synthesized by the facile method using different functional monomers own outstanding pH-sensitivity and pH-reversibility, antifouling property, antibacterial, and anticoagulant property. Our study opens a route for the functionalization of commodity polymers, which lead to important advances in polymeric materials applications. PMID:24710333

  10. From Commodity Polymers to Functional Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Tao; Wang, Ling-Ren; Ma, Lang; Han, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Rui; Cheng, Chong; Xia, Yi; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Functional polymers bear specified chemical groups, and have specified physical, chemical, biological, pharmacological, or other uses. To adjust the properties while keeping material usage low, a method for direct synthesis of functional polymers is indispensable. Here we show that various functional polymers can be synthesized by in situ cross-linked polymerization/copolymerization. We demonstrate that the polymers synthesized by the facile method using different functional monomers own outstanding pH-sensitivity and pH-reversibility, antifouling property, antibacterial, and anticoagulant property. Our study opens a route for the functionalization of commodity polymers, which lead to important advances in polymeric materials applications.

  11. Dense cloud cores revealed by CO in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Monica; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre A; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R; Cigan, Phil

    2015-09-10

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations they are molecular, with H2 the dominant species and carbon monoxide (CO) the best available tracer. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared with that of hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies, CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it is difficult for it to accumulate inside dense clouds. Here we report interferometric observations of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM), which has a metallicity that is 13 per cent of the solar value and 50 per cent lower than the previous CO detection threshold. The clouds are tiny compared to the surrounding atomic and H2 envelopes, but they have typical densities and column densities for CO clouds in the Milky Way. The normal CO density explains why star clusters forming in dwarf irregulars have similar densities to star clusters in giant spiral galaxies. The low cloud masses suggest that these clusters will also be low mass, unless some galaxy-scale compression occurs, such as an impact from a cosmic cloud or other galaxy. If the massive metal-poor globular clusters in the halo of the Milky Way formed in dwarf galaxies, as is commonly believed, then they were probably triggered by such an impact.

  12. Dense cloud cores revealed by CO in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Monica; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre A; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R; Cigan, Phil

    2015-09-10

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations they are molecular, with H2 the dominant species and carbon monoxide (CO) the best available tracer. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared with that of hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies, CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it is difficult for it to accumulate inside dense clouds. Here we report interferometric observations of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM), which has a metallicity that is 13 per cent of the solar value and 50 per cent lower than the previous CO detection threshold. The clouds are tiny compared to the surrounding atomic and H2 envelopes, but they have typical densities and column densities for CO clouds in the Milky Way. The normal CO density explains why star clusters forming in dwarf irregulars have similar densities to star clusters in giant spiral galaxies. The low cloud masses suggest that these clusters will also be low mass, unless some galaxy-scale compression occurs, such as an impact from a cosmic cloud or other galaxy. If the massive metal-poor globular clusters in the halo of the Milky Way formed in dwarf galaxies, as is commonly believed, then they were probably triggered by such an impact. PMID:26354481

  13. Making Stars … With a Little Help

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    Extremely high star formation rates have been observed in galaxies at high redshifts, posing somewhat of a mystery: how are these enormous rates achieved? A team of scientists has proposed that these high rates of star formation could be explained by feedback from active nuclei at the centers of the galaxies.Pressurized BubbleWe believe that star formation occurs in galaxies as a result of gas clumps that collapse under their own gravity, eventually becoming dense enough to launch nuclear fusion. Recently, theres been mounting evidence that the star formation rate is significantly higher in high-redshift galaxies, particularly those with active galactic nuclei (AGN). Could this simply be caused by a higher gas fraction at higher redshifts? Or is it possible that a different mechanism is at work in these galaxies, producing more efficient star formation?A team of authors led by Rebekka Bieri (Paris Institute of Astrophysics) has proposed that this enhanced star formation may be caused by positive feedback from the active nucleus of the galaxy. The team suggests that an outflow from the AGN could create an over-pressurized bubble around the galactic disk that pushes back on the disk, leading to a higher rate of star formation.Simulating a BoostThe authors test this toy model by simulating the scenario. They model a disk galaxy with roughly a tenth of the mass of the Milky Way, which starts in a relaxed state. The galaxy is then evolved either with or without an applied external pressure, representing the isotropic pressure from the bubble created by the AGN outflow. These models are tested in two different scenarios: one where the initial gas fraction is 10%, and one where the initial gas fraction is 50%.Star formation rates for the low-gas-fraction (left) and high-gas-fraction (right) simulated galaxies. The blue lines show the rates without external pressure; the red lines show the rates with external pressure applied. [Bieri et al. 2015]The simulations show that

  14. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  15. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  16. Astrophysics: Stars fight back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies contain fewer stars than predicted. The discovery of a massive galactic outflow of molecular gas in a compact galaxy, which forms stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way, may help to explain why. See Letter p.68

  17. 'Polaris, Mark Kummerfeldt's Star, and My Star.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, John W.

    1984-01-01

    In most astronomy courses, descriptions of stars and constellations reveal the western European origins of the astronomers who named them. However, it is suggested that a study of non-western views be incorporated into astronomy curricula. Descriptions of various stars and constellations from different cultures and instructional strategies are…

  18. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  19. Neutron Emission in Deuterium Dense Plasma Foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a computational study of the deuterium dense plasma focus (DPF) carried out to improve understanding of the neutron production mechanism in the DPF. The device currents studied range from 70 kA to several MA. The complete evolution of the DPF is simulated in 3D from rundown through to neutron emission using a hybrid computational method. The rundown, pinching, stagnation and post-stagnation (pinch break-up) phases are simulated using the 3D MHD code Gorgon. Kinetic computational tools are used to model the formation and transport of non-thermal ion populations and neutron production during the stagnation and post-stagnation phases, resulting in the production of synthetic neutron spectra. It is observed that the break-up phase plays an important role in the formation of non-thermal ions. Large electric fields generated during pinch break-up cause ions to be accelerated from the edges of dense plasma regions. The dependence on current of the neutron yield, neutron spectra shape and isotropy is studied. The effect of magnetization of the non-thermal ions is evident as the anisotropy of the neutron spectra decreases at higher current.

  20. Ion Acoustic Modes in Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Nicholas; Monaco, Guilio; White, Thomas; Gregori, Gianluca; Graham, Peter; Fletcher, Luke; Appel, Karen; Tschentscher, Thomas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Zastrau, Ulf; Doeppner, Tilo; Gericke, Dirk; Lepape, Sebastien; Ma, Tammy; Pak, Art; Schropp, Andreas; Glenzer, Siegfried; Hastings, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    We present results that, for the first time, show scattering from ion acoustic modes in warm dense matter, representing an unprecedented level of energy resolution in the study of dense plasmas. The experiment was carried out at the LCLS facility in California on an aluminum sample at 7 g/cc and 5 eV. Using an X-ray probe at 8 keV, shifted peaks at +/-150 meV were observed. Although the energy shifts from interactions with the acoustic waves agree with predicted values from DFT-MD models, a central (elastic) peak was also observed, which did not appear in modelled spectra and may be due to the finite timescale of the simulation. Data fitting with a hydrodynamic form has proved able to match the observed spectrum, and provide measurements of some thermodynamic properties of the system, which mostly agree with predicted values. Suggest for further experiments to determine the cause of the disparity are also given.

  1. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  2. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific {sup 83}Kr nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  3. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  4. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  5. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  6. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra-dense matter -- at and above nuclear density -- can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97+/-0.04 Msun measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodelled spectrally hard components.

  7. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, R. E.; Servillat, M.; Webb, N.

    2013-01-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97 ± 0.04 M⊙ measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodeled spectrally hard components.

  8. Toward ab initio extremely metal poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Extremely metal poor stars have been the focus of much recent attention owing to the expectation that their chemical abundances can shed light on the metal and dust yields of the earliest supernovae. We present our most realistic simulation to date of the astrophysical pathway to the first metal enriched stars. We simulate the radiative and supernova hydrodynamic feedback of a 60 M⊙ Population III star starting from cosmological initial conditions realizing Gaussian density fluctuations. We follow the gravitational hydrodynamics of the supernova remnant at high spatial resolution through its freely-expanding, adiabatic, and radiative phases, until gas, now metal-enriched, has resumed runaway gravitational collapse. Our findings are surprising: while the Population III progenitor exploded with a low energy of 1051 erg and injected an ample metal mass of 6 M⊙, the first cloud to collapse after the supernova explosion is a dense surviving primordial cloud on which the supernova blast wave deposited metals only superficially, in a thin, unresolved layer. The first metal-enriched stars can form at a very low metallicity, of only 2 - 5 × 10-4 Z⊙, and can inherit the parent cloud's highly elliptical, radially extended orbit in the dark matter gravitational potential.

  9. Physical Theories of Winds From Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cool stars in the late stages of their evolution generally lose mass at a prodigious rate. This includes low mass stars on the red giant branch, on the asymptotic giant branch, and those transiting from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula phase, as well as massive supergiants. All of these objects are surrounded by dense circumstellar gas and often dust envelopes. This mass loss is an important source of gas and dust for the interstellar medium. For some of these objects, the mass loss rate exceeds the nuclear burning rate and, hence, mass loss determines the subsequent evolution of the star. A variety processes have been invoked to explain the mass loss of these objects. A consensus has developed over the last decade: photospheric processes create an extended atmosphere which extends to several stellar radii. At this height above the photosphere, dust grains can form and radiation pressure drives the dust out. The gas is dragged along by friction. While the detailed processes involved, in particular those lifting the atmosphere, may differ from object to object, this paradigm seems applicable to all of these objects. The process of mass loss breaks up into three parts: 1) The formation of the extended atmosphere; 2) the nucleation and condensation of dust; and 3) The radiation pressure driven wind. Each of these processes will be discussed with an emphasis on those processes that play a role in the mass loss from asymptotic giant branch stars for which the most detailed theories have been developed.

  10. The 100 brigthest Blue Straggler Stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Durán, C.; Llorente de Andrés, F.; Ahumada, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Blue straggler stars (BSS) are characterized by their appearance in the CMD of globular and open clusters, in the Main Sequence extension, above the turn-off and blueward of this. In accordance with the Standard Theory of stellar evolution, BSS should be out of the Main Sequence and over the Giant Branch if they really belong to the cluster and are formed at the same time than the rest of cluster stars. There are several theories that try to explain the existence of BSS but at present prevails the idea that they can be the product of mass transfer in binaries (McCrea, 1964), and the luminosity of the receiver star is incremented in such a way that now it is over the Main Sequence turn-off point of its cluster. Also it is believed that they are the result of stellar fussion of two or several stars, specially in dense systems as the globular cluster nucleus. This work is focalised in all the BSS brihgter the V = 10 mag. that we have been able to identify in open clusters. It is a sample unprecedented by its number and as well it is a sample with plentiful observational information, it is why we hope to be able to assure their membership to the parent cluster and obtain reliable information about their possible origin.

  11. Viscoelasticity and primitive path analysis of entangled polymer liquids: From F-actin to polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Nariya; Grest, Gary S.; Everaers, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    We combine computer simulations and scaling arguments to develop a unified view of polymer entanglement based on the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state. Our results agree with experimentally measured plateau moduli for three different polymer classes over a wide range of reduced polymer densities: (i) semidilute theta solutions of synthetic polymers, (ii) the corresponding dense melts above the glass transition or crystallization temperature, and (iii) solutions of semiflexible (bio)polymers such as F-actin or suspensions of rodlike viruses. Together, these systems cover the entire range from loosely to tightly entangled polymers. In particular, we argue that the primitive path analysis renormalizes a loosely to a tightly entangled system and provide a new explanation of the successful Lin-Noolandi packing conjecture for polymer melts.

  12. Stability and Evolution of Supermassive Stars (SMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Amaro-Seoane, P.

    Highly condensed gaseous objects with masses larger than 5× 10^4 Modot are called Supermassive stars. They are thought to be possible precursors of Supermassive Black Holes in the centres of galaxies. In the quasi-stationary contraction phase the hydrostatic equilibrium is determined by radiation pressure and gravitation. The global structure is an n=3 polytrope which is at the stability limit. Small relativistic corrections for example can initiate a free fall collapse due to the “post Newtonian" instability. Since the outcome of the final collapse Supermassive Black Hole or Hypernova depends sensitively on the structure and the size of the object, when the instability sets in, it is important to investigate in more detail the contraction phase of the SMS. If the gaseous object is embedded in a dense stellar system, the central star cluster, the interaction and coupling of both components due to dynamical friction change the energy balance and evolution of the SMS dramatically. Dynamical friction between stars and gas, which can be estimated semi-analytically (see Just et al. 1986), has 3 different effects on the 2-component system. 1) The gas is heated by decelerating the stars. This may stall the contraction process for a while until the stars in the “loss cone", these which cross the SMS, lost their kinetic energy (for the total heating rate see Amaro-Seoane & Spurzem 2001). 2) This cooling of the loss cone stars lead to a mass segregation in the stellar component resulting in a much more condensed central stellar core. 3) The inhomogeneities due to the gravitational wakes in the gas changes the effective absorption coefficient of the gas. This affects the condition for hydrostatic equilibrium and may give essential deviations from the n=3 polytrope. We discuss, in which evolutionary stages and parameter range these interaction processes are relevant and how they can influence the stability and evolution of the SMS.

  13. MAGNETIC FLUX EXPULSION IN STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Bo; Li Zhiyun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2011-11-20

    Stars form in dense cores of magnetized molecular clouds. If the magnetic flux threading the cores is dragged into the stars, the stellar field would be orders of magnitude stronger than observed. This well-known 'magnetic flux problem' demands that most of the core magnetic flux be decoupled from the matter that enters the star. We carry out the first exploration of what happens to the decoupled magnetic flux in three dimensions, using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) version of the ENZO adaptive mesh refinement code. The field-matter decoupling is achieved through a sink particle treatment, which is needed to follow the protostellar accretion phase of star formation. We find that the accumulation of the decoupled flux near the accreting protostar leads to a magnetic pressure buildup. The high pressure is released anisotropically along the path of least resistance. It drives a low-density expanding region in which the decoupled magnetic flux is expelled. This decoupling-enabled magnetic structure has never been seen before in three-dimensional MHD simulations of star formation. It generates a strong asymmetry in the protostellar accretion flow, potentially giving a kick to the star. In the presence of an initial core rotation, the structure presents an obstacle to the formation of a rotationally supported disk, in addition to magnetic braking, by acting as a rigid magnetic wall that prevents the rotating gas from completing a full orbit around the central object. We conclude that the decoupled magnetic flux from the stellar matter can strongly affect the protostellar collapse dynamics.

  14. The Monte Carlo Milky Way: reverse engineering the dense gas structure of the Galaxy with ATLASGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figura, Charles C.; Urquhart, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) is the most senstive sub-millimetre survey of the inner Galaxy, covering 420 square degrees of the Galactic plane at a wavelength of 870 um. As with nearly any survey, however, ATLASGAL presents an incomplete view of the Milky Way, as it is biased by observational limitations which can distort our view of both the structure and distribution of the dense molecular gas.In order to better understand the structure of matter in the Galaxy, we have used Monte Carlo methods to simulate the distribution of dense gas from a grid of input models. By taking account of the observational limitations of the survey, we are able to compare the output from these models with the results obtained from the observations and determine the most likely distribution of dense gas. We investigate a number of spiral arm models, and discuss the results in the context of their role in massive star formation in the Galaxy.

  15. A Complete Census of Dense Cores in Chamaeleon I: Results from an ALMA Cycle 1 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Michael; Schnee, Scott; Pineda, Jaime E.; Offner, Stella; Price, Daniel; Arce, Hector G.; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug I.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Tobin, John J.; Chen, Xuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Stars form from the gravitational collapse of dense molecular cloud cores, yet many details relating to the onset of collapse and fragmentation into multiple systems remain unknown. I will present the results of an ALMA cycle 1 survey of all known dense cores (starless and protostellar) in the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud complex (d~170pc). The goals of this survey are to provide a complete census of protostars, including those too young, too low in luminosity, and/or too deeply embedded to detect in previous infrared and (sub)millimeter surveys, and to characterize when and how dense cores fragment into multiple systems. With these results we will report new detections of protostellar multiplicity and provide updated constraints on the fraction of starless cores that are truly starless, the lifetime of the first hydrostatic core phase, and the relative durations of the starless and protostellar core populations. We will also report a lack of detections among the starless cores and discuss implications of these results.

  16. The nature, origin and evolution of embedded star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of imaging infrared array cameras has enabled the first systematic studies of embedded protoclusters in the galaxy. Initial investigations suggest that rich embedded clusters are quite numerous and that a significant fraction of all stars formed in the galaxy may begin their lives in such stellar systems. These clusters contain extremely young stellar objects and are important laboratories for star formation research. However, observational and theoretical considerations suggest that most embedded clusters do not survive emergence from molecular clouds as bound clusters. Understanding the origin, nature, and evolution of embedded clusters requires understanding the intimate physical relation between embedded clusters and the dense molecular cloud cores from which they form.

  17. Massive star-formation in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Perez-Martinez, S.; Cesarsky, D.

    1999-03-01

    The Trifid nebula is a young galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected using ISO and ground-based telescopes. The sources are massive (17 to 60 0.20em Modot) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense apparently still inactive cores to somewhat more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source which powers an optical jet. these observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation.

  18. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  19. Managing the star performer.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas. PMID:23767124

  20. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars. II. Realistic modelling for intermediate-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, R.-M.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Very high precision seismic space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler provide the means for testing the modelling of transport processes in stellar interiors. For some stars, such as δ Scuti, γ Doradus, and Be stars, the observed pulsation spectra are modified by rotation to such an extent that it prevents any fruitful interpretation. Aims: Our aim is to characterise acoustic pulsation spectra of realistic stellar models in order to be able to interpret asteroseismic data from such stars. Methods: The 2D oscillation code ACOR, which treats rotation in a non-perturbative manner, is used to study pulsation spectra of highly distorted evolved models of stars. Two-dimensional models of stars are obtained by a self-consistent method that distorts spherically averaged stellar models a posteriori, at any stage of evolution, and for any type of rotation law. Results: Four types of modes are calculated in a very dense frequency spectrum, among which are island modes. The regularity of the island modes spectrum is confirmed and yields a new set of quantum numbers, with which an échelle diagram can be built. Mixed gravito-acoustic modes are calculated in rapidly rotating models for the first time.