Science.gov

Sample records for densification

  1. Tile densification with TEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C.

    1981-01-01

    Densification process uses brushed or sprayed coating of tetraethyl orthosilicate. Liquid is applied and cured in three steps; tile weight increase averages 0.15 g per square centimeter. TEOS liquid is prepared by mixing TEOS with hydrochloric acid and adding marking dye. TEOS application provides variable stiffness, strength, and penetration. Surface of tile shows no buidup and is more durable for additional coatings.

  2. Recent Advancements in Propellant Densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Nancy B.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    Next-generation launch vehicles demand several technological improvements to achieve lower cost and more reliable access to space. One technology area whose performance gains may far exceed others is densified propellants. The ideal rocket engine propellant is characterized by high specific impulse, high density, and low vapor pressure. A propellant combination of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen (LH2/LOX) is one of the highest performance propellants, but LH2 stored at standard conditions has a relatively low density and high vapor pressure. Propellant densification can significantly improve this propellant's properties relative to vehicle design and engine performance. Vehicle performance calculations based on an average of existing launch vehicles indicate that densified propellants may allow an increase in payload mass of up to 5 percent. Since the NASA Lewis Research Center became involved with the National Aerospace Plane program in the 1980's, it has been leading the way in making densified propellants a viable fuel for next-generation launch vehicles. Lewis researchers have been working to provide a method and critical data for continuous production of densified hydrogen and oxygen.

  3. Task 4 supporting technology. Densification requirements definition and test objectives. Propellant densification requirements definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor; Weeks, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    The primary challenge of the X-33 CAN is to build and test a prototype LO2 and LH2 densification ground support equipment (GSE) unit, and perform tank thermodynamic testing within the 15 month phase 1 period. The LO2 and LH2 propellant densification system will be scaled for the IPTD LO2 and LH2 tank configurations. The IPTD tanks were selected for the propellant technology demonstration because of the potential benefits to the phase 1 plan: tanks will be built in time to support thermodynamic testing; minimum cost; minimum schedule risk; future testing at MSFC will build on phase 1 data base; and densification system will be available to support X-33 and RLV engine test at IPTD. The objective of the task 1 effort is to define the preliminary requirements of the propellant densification GSE and tank recirculation system. The key densification system design parameters to be established in Task 1 are: recirculation flow rate; heat exchanger inlet temperature; heat exchanger outlet temperature; maximum heat rejection rate; vent flow rate (GN2 and GH2); densification time; and tank pressure level.

  4. Painful connections: densification versus fibrosis of fascia.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Stecco, Antonio; Stern, Robert; Stecco, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Deep fascia has long been considered a source of pain, secondary to nerve pain receptors becoming enmeshed within the pathological changes to which fascia are subject. Densification and fibrosis are among such changes. They can modify the mechanical properties of deep fasciae and damage the function of underlying muscles or organs. Distinguishing between these two different changes in fascia, and understanding the connective tissue matrix within fascia, together with the mechanical forces involved, will make it possible to assign more specific treatment modalities to relieve chronic pain syndromes. This review provides an overall description of deep fasciae and the mechanical properties in order to identify the various alterations that can lead to pain. Diet, exercise, and overuse syndromes are able to modify the viscosity of loose connective tissue within fascia, causing densification, an alteration that is easily reversible. Trauma, surgery, diabetes, and aging alter the fibrous layers of fasciae, leading to fascial fibrosis.

  5. Densification, microstructure and strength evolution in sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoping

    2000-10-01

    Powder metallurgy has the ability to fabricate high quality, complex components to close tolerances in an economical manner. In many applications, a high sintered density is desirable for an improved performance. However, sintering to a high density demands a large shrinkage, often resulting in difficulties with dimensional control. Recent studies indicate the occurrence of a sufficient densification requires a low in situ strength at high sintering temperatures. On the other hand, the low in situ strength often leads to component's distortion in response to the external forces, such as gravity. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge on strength evolution in sintering has been a major challenge to achieve an optimized combination of densification and shape retention. Therefore, the present study investigates strength evolution in sintering and the effects of processing factors. Experiments are performed on prealloyed bronze and elemental mixture of Fe-2Ni powders. For the bronze, a loose casting method is used to fabricate transverse rupture bars, while bars are injection molded for the Fe-2Ni. The in situ transverse rupture strength is measured using the Penn State Flaming Tensile Tester. Experimental results indicate a dependence of densification and strength on sintering temperature. High temperatures enhance densification and interparticle bonding, resulting in strong sintered structures. However, a low in situ strength at high test temperatures indicates the dominance of thermal softening. A strength model combining sintering theories and microstructural parameters is developed to predict both the in situ strength and the post-sintering strength. The model demonstrates the strength of the sintered materials depends on the inherent material strength, the square of neck size ratio, sintered density, and thermal softening. The model is verified by comparison of model predictions with experimental data of the bronze and Fe-2Ni. Compared to prior strength models, this

  6. The densification of layered polar firn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HöRhold, M. W.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Wilhelms, F.; Freitag, J.; Frenzel, A.

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution density profiles of 16 firn cores from Greenland and Antarctica are investigated in order to improve our understanding of the densification of layered polar firn. A vertical resolution of 1-5 mm enables us to study the detailed densification processes and the evolution of the layering and the resulting variability in density with increasing depth. The densification of layered firn is important for the process of air enclosure in ice and is connected with the observed formation of a nondiffusive zone. Our findings show the following. (1) Mean density profiles, obtained from high-resolution measurements, only partly show clear transitions in densification rate at densities of 550, 730, or 820-840 kg/m3, as they are commonly used in literature. (2) The density variability, induced by the layering, shows a similar pattern at all sites: high variabilities at the surface, a rapid drop to a relative minimum in variability at mean density of 600-650 kg/m3, followed by a second relative maximum. (3) This leads to increased variability at densities of the firn-ice transition for most of the sites. (4) The variability at the surface decreases with increasing mean annual temperature and accumulation rate, whereas the variability at the firn-ice transition increases. We can exclude a change in local climate conditions as an explanation for the density variability since the firn cores in this study cover a broad range in mean annual temperature, accumulation rate, and age. Overall, high-resolution density profiles deliver a more complex picture of compaction of polar firn as a layered granular medium than has been obtained from mean density profiles in the past.

  7. Densification effects on structural relaxation of polyolefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jason; Maranas, Janna K.

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the effect of densification on intramolecular and intermolecular chain packing and structural relaxation of four saturated hydrocarbon polymers: poly(ethylene propylene) (PEP), poly(ethylene butene), atactic polypropylene, and head-to-head polypropylene. Within this series, the local chain architecture, specifically the frequency and size of pendant groups, varies. Density changes of ρ0±5%, where ρ0 is the ambient density, are considered at a temperature of 400 K, which is well above the glass transition temperatures of all four polymers. Intramolecular chain packing remains nearly unchanged over this density range, and intermolecular packing shows a tendency towards closer and more efficient packing at higher densities. The effect of density on dynamics depends on the spatial scale considered. Self-intermediate scattering functions, as measured in incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering experiments, are calculated for spatial scales between 2.5 and 20 Å. At length scales less than the closest intermolecular spacing, densification has little effect on mobility. The largest effects are observed in the vicinity of the nearest chain spacing distance, where mobility is decreased and dynamic heterogeneity, as evidenced by the stretching parameter in stretched exponential fits, is increased with densification. At length scales approaching Rg, both effects level off and are slightly less than at spatial scales of interchain packing. The most flexible of the four materials, PEP, is least affected by density changes.

  8. Enhanced densification of metal powders by transformation-mismatch plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuh, C.; Noel, P.; Dunand, D.C.

    2000-05-11

    The densification of titanium powders is investigated in uniaxial die pressing experiments carried out isothermally at 980 C (in the {beta}-field of titanium) and during thermal cycling between 860 and 980 C (about the {alpha}/{beta} phase transformation of titanium). Thermal cycling is found to enhance densification kinetics through the emergence of transformation-mismatch plasticity (the mechanism responsible for transformation superplasticity) as a densification mechanism. The isothermal hot-pressing data compare favorably with existing models of powder densification, and these models are successfully adapted to the case of transformation-mismatch plasticity during thermal cycling. Similar conclusions are reached for the densification of titanium powders containing 1, 5, or 10 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} particles. However, the addition of ZrO{sub 2} hinders densification by dissolving in the titanium matrix during the hot-pressing procedure.

  9. Isothermal densification and metamorphism of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The interplay between overburden stress and surface energy induced growth and coarsening is relevant for the densification of snow and porous ice at all densities. The densification of new snow is amenable to high precision experiments on short time scales. To this end we investigate the coupling of densification and metamorphism of new snow via time-lapse tomography experiments in the laboratory. We compare the evolution of density, strain, and specific surface area to previous long-time metamorphism experiments of snow and creep of polycrystalline ice. Experimental conditions are tailored to the requirements of time-lapse tomography and the measurements are conducted under nearly isothermal conditions at -20°C with a duration of two days. Images were taken with temporal resolution of a few hours which reveal precise details of the microstructure evolution due to sintering and compaction. We used different crystal shapes of natural new snow and snow samples obtained by sieving crystals grown in a snowmaker in the laboratory. To simulate the effect of overburden stress due to an overlying snowpack additional weights were applied to the sample. As expected we find an influence of the densification rate on initial density and overburden stress. We calculated strain rates and identified a transient creep behavior with a similar power law for all crystal types which substantially differs from the Andrade creep of polycrystalline ice. As a main result we found that the evolution of the specific surface area is independent of the density and follows a unique decay form for all measurements of each crystal type. The accuracy of the measurements allows to obtain a decay exponent for the SSA which is the same as previously obtained from the long-time regime during isothermal metamorphism after several months. Our preliminary results for all available types of new snow suggest a correlation between the initial density and SSA. We also find snow samples which coincide in

  10. Sol-gel synthesis and densification of aluminoborosilicate powders. Part 2: Densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Selvaduray, Guna; Leiser, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Aluminoborosilicate (ABS) powders, high in alumina content, were synthesized by the sol-gel process utilizing four different methods of synthesis. The effect of these methods on the densification behavior of ABS powder compacts was studied. Five regions of shrinkage in the temperature range 25-1184 C were identified. In these regions, the greatest shrinkage occurred between the gel-to-glass transition temperature (T sub g approximately equal to 835 C) and the crystallization transformation temperature (T sub t approximately equal 900 C). The dominant mechanism of densification in this range was found to be viscous sintering. ABS powders were amorphous to x-rays up to T sub t at which a multiphasic structure crystallized. No 2Al2O3.B2O3 was found in these powders as predicted in the phase diagram. Above T sub t, densification was the result of competing mechanisms including grain growth and boria fluxed viscous sintering. Apparent activation energies for densification in each region varied according to the method of synthesis.

  11. Characterization of CVI densification of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Lee, S.

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic matrix composites promise higher operating temperature and better thermodynamic efficiency in many enregy conversion systems. In particular, composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process have excellent mechanical properties and, using the forced flow-thermal gradient variation, good processing economics in small scale demonstrations. Scale-up to larger, more complex shapes requires understanding of gas flow through the fiber preform and of the relationship between fiber architecture and densification behavior. This understanding is needed for design of preforms for optimum infiltration. The objective of this research is to observe the deposition of matrix material in the pores of a ceramic fiber preform at various stages of the CVI process. These observations allow us to relate local deposition rates in various regions of the composite to the connectivity of the surrounding network of porosity and to better model the relationship between gas transport and fiber architecture in CVI preforms. Our observation of the CVI process utilizes high resolution X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) in collaboration with Dr. John Kinney at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with repeated imaging of a small preform specimens after various processing times. We use these images to determine geometry and dimensions of channels between and through layers in cloth lay-up preform during CVI densification and relate these to a transport model.

  12. Controlled densification of mullite for composite applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T. A.

    1999-05-19

    As part of an effort to fabricate oxide-based fibrous monolithic ceramics, sintering of mullite has been examined. The effects of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on sinterability of sol-gel-derived mullite and on the resulting microstructure were evaluated over a range of compositions, sintering times, and temperatures. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and density measurements indicated that the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions promoted densification through formation of a Y-Si-Al-O liquid phase. This phase tended to solidify as a glass during normal processing, but could be crystallized by a two-step annealing process at 1300 and 1200 C. The four-point flexural strengths of mullite and mullite-5 Wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also examined.

  13. LIBRA: An inexpensive geodetic network densification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Gantsweg, M.; Callahan, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the Libra (Locations Interposed by Ranging Aircraft) system, by which geodesy and earth strain measurements can be performed rapidly and inexpensively to several hundred auxiliary points with respect to a few fundamental control points established by any other technique, such as radio interferometry or satellite ranging. This low-cost means of extending the accuracy of space age geodesy to local surveys provides speed and spatial resolution useful, for example, for earthquake hazards estimation. Libra may be combined with an existing system, Aries (Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) to provide a balanced system adequate to meet the geophysical needs, and applicable to conventional surveying. The basic hardware design was outlined and specifications were defined. Then need for network densification was described. The following activities required to implement the proposed Libra system are also described: hardware development, data reduction, tropospheric calibrations, schedule of development and estimated costs.

  14. Densification and shape distortion in liquid-phase sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; German, R.M.

    1999-12-01

    Densification and dimensional control are important aspects of liquid-phase sintering. The capillary force and the solid bonding affect both densification and shape preservation. Capillarity, which is orientated isotropically, causes uniform shrinkage and holds grains together to preserve the component shape in the early stage of sintering. On the other hand, solid bonding resists viscous flow and inhibits densification and shape distortion. The capillary force decreases with densification and approaches zero as pores are eliminated. Thus, shape retention eventually requires solid-grain bonding. The solid-grain bonding provides compact rigidity, which is represented by compact strength. Shape distortion occurs when the compact loses its strength. For every situation, there is a critical compact strength above which no shape distortion occurs. Distortion in liquid-phase sintering indicates that the compact strength passed below a critical level.

  15. Consolidation and densification methods for fibrous monolith processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sutaria, Manish P.; Rigali, Mark J.; Cipriani, Ronald A.; Artz, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Anthony C.

    2006-06-20

    Methods for consolidation and densification of fibrous monolith composite structures are provided. Consolidation and densification of two- and three-dimensional fibrous monolith components having complex geometries can be achieved by pressureless sintering. The fibrous monolith composites are formed from filaments having at least a first material composition generally surrounded by a second material composition. The composites are sintered at a pressure of no more than about 30 psi to provide consolidated and densified fibrous monolith composites.

  16. STS propellant densification feasibility study data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazah, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of using densification or subcooling with respect to standard temperature propellants on the Space Transportation System (STS) in order to achieve a payload gain is discussed in this report. The objective is to determine the magnitude of the payload gain and to identify any system impacts to the space shuttle on either flight systems or ground systems. Results show that a payload benefit can be obtained by subcooling the liquid hydrogen (LH2) from a nominal temperature of 36.4 R to 28.5 R and by subcooling the liquid oxygen (LO2) from a nominal temperature of 164 R to either 132.1 R or 141.4 R. When the propellants are subcooled to 28.5 R and 132.1 R for the LH2 and LO2, respectively, a maximum payload gain of 7,324 lb can be achieved, and when the propellants are subcooled to 28.5 R and 141.5 R for the LH2 and LO2, respectively, a maximum payload gain of 6,841 lb can be achieved. If the LH2 is subcooled to 28.5 R while the LH2 and LO2 remains at the nominal conditions, a maximum payload gain of 1,303 lb can be achieved.

  17. Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-09-12

    This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

  18. Permeability during densification of viscous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Ed; Dobson, Katherine; Schauroth, Jenny; Heap, Michael; Farquharson, Jamie; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; von Aulock, Felix; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation of magma can yield a transiently granular material, which can subsequently weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts its fluid permeability. We collate published data for the porosity and permeability of volcanic and synthetic materials which have undergone this process to different amounts. By discriminating data for which good microstructural information are provided, we use simple scaling arguments to collapse the data in both the still-granular, high porosity region, and the fluid-continuum low porosity region, such that a universal description can be provided. This allows us to describe the microstructural meaning of permeability scaling, and to infer the controls on the position of this transition between dominantly granular (dispersion) and dominantly fluid-continuum materials. Fractures in coherent magmas are thought to be a primary degassing pathway in high viscosity systems. As a specific application, we consider transiently granular magma being transported through and deposited in these fractures. We finally present a physical model for the kinetics of porosity changes in arrays of viscous droplets and compare this with our experimental data. The combination of the physical model for the evolution of porosity with the scaling between porosity and permeability permits us to describe the evolution of permeability during densification. We anticipate that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular filled cracks, both in conduits and shallow lava domes, as well as during the sedimentation of exceptionally hot ignimbrites undergoing compaction and welding.

  19. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  20. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270°C, densification, and torrefaction at 270°C followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700°C) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270°C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700°C as compared to 500°C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  1. Consolidation and densification methods for fibrous monolith processing

    DOEpatents

    Sutaria, Manish P.; Rigali, Mark J.; Cipriani, Ronald A.; Artz, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Anthony C.

    2004-05-25

    Methods for consolidation and densification of fibrous monolith composite structures are provided. Consolidation and densification of two- and three-dimensional fibrous monolith components having complex geometries can be achieved by pressureless sintering. The fibrous monolith composites are formed from filaments having at least a first material composition generally surrounded by a second material composition. The composites are sintered in an inert gas or nitrogen gas at a pressure of no more than about 30 psi to provide consolidated and densified fibrous monolith composites.

  2. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamic phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.

  3. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamicmore » phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.« less

  4. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis productsmore » increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.« less

  5. Frost Growth and Densification in Laminar Flow Over Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    One-dimensional frost growth and densification in laminar flow over flat surfaces has been theoretically investigated. Improved representations of frost density and effective thermal conductivity applicable to a wide range of frost circumstances have been incorporated. The validity of the proposed model considering heat and mass diffusion in the frost layer is tested by a comparison of the predictions with data from various investigators for frost parameters including frost thickness, frost surface temperature, frost density and heat flux. The test conditions cover a range of wall temperature, air humidity ratio, air velocity, and air temperature, and the effect of these variables on the frost parameters has been exemplified. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the model predictions and the various test data considered. The prevailing uncertainties concerning the role air velocity and air temperature on frost development have been elucidated. It is concluded that that for flat surfaces increases in air velocity have no appreciable effect on frost thickness but contribute to significant frost densification, while increase in air temperatures results in a slight increase the frost thickness and appreciable frost densification.

  6. Dynamic elastic moduli during isotropic densification of initially granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The elastic properties of homogeneous, isotropic materials are well constrained. However, in heterogeneous and evolving materials, these essential properties are less well-explored. During sintering of volcanic ash particles by viscous processes as well as during compaction and cementation of sediments, microstructure and porosity undergo changes that affect bulk dynamic elastic properties. Here using a model system of glass particles as an analogue for initially granular rock-forming materials, we have determined porosity and P-wave velocity during densification. Using these results, we test models for the kinetics of densification and the resultant evolution of the elastic properties to derive a quantitative description of the coupling between the kinetics of isotropic densification and the evolving dynamic elastic moduli. We demonstrate the power of the resultant model on a wide range of data for non-coherent sediments as well as sedimentary and volcanic rocks. We propose that such constraints be viewed as an essential ingredient of time-dependent models for the deformation of evolving materials in volcanoes and sedimentary basins.

  7. Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

  8. Densification of nanocrystalline ITO powders in fast firing: effect of specimen mass and sintering atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bong-Chull; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Joo . E-mail: jjkim@knu.ac.kr; Lee, Hee Young; Lee, Jai-Sung

    2005-02-15

    Nano-sized indium tin oxide (ITO) powders were prepared by a coprecipitation method, and the sintering characteristics in fast firing were examined. The mass of the specimen, sintering atmosphere and sintering temperature varied. Oxygen atmosphere promoted the densification in normal rate sintering, while oxygen inhibited the densification in fast firing. Fast firing severely retarded densification as the mass of the specimen and the sintering temperature increased. This was explained by differential densification, which could easily occur in conditions with a high densification rate and a high thermal gradient in the specimen, where the outer region of the specimen densifies much faster than the center. Once the highly densified outer skeleton is formed, the inside of the specimen is difficult to densify because the outer skeleton geometrically constrains densification.

  9. Permanent densification of compressed silica glass: a Raman-density calibration curve.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, T; Kassir-Bodon, A; Sonneville, C; Margueritat, J; Martinet, C; de Ligny, D; Mermet, A; Champagnon, B

    2013-01-16

    Raman scattering experiments have been carried out to study persistent densification in SiO(2) glass following hydrostatic compression at room temperature. A new relationship linking selective Raman parameters to the degree of densification in the glass has been developed here. This approach will allow quantification of the residual densification in silica following microindentation experiments, with the goal being the development of a constitutive law for amorphous silica.

  10. Evaluation of Liquefaction Susceptibility of Clean Sands after Blast Densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Posada, Carlos Alberto

    The effect of earthquakes on infrastructure facilities is an important topic of interest in geotechnical research. A key design issue for such facilities is whether or not liquefaction will occur during an earthquake. The consequences of this type of ground failure are usually severe, resulting in severe damage to a facility and in some cases the loss of human life. One approach to minimize the effect of liquefaction is to improve the ground condition by controlled blasting. The main limitations of the blast densification technique are that the design is mostly empirical and verification studies of densification have resulted in contradictory results in some case studies. In such cases, even though the ground surface settles almost immediately after blasting, common verification tests such as the cone penetration test (CPT), standard penetration test (SPT), and shear wave velocity test (Vs) suggest that the soil mass has not been improved at all. This raises concerns regarding the future performance of the soil and casts doubts on whether or not the improved deposit is still susceptible to liquefaction. In this work, a blast densification program was implemented at the Oakridge Landfill located in Dorchester County, SC, to gain information regarding the condition of a loose sand deposit during and after each blast event. In addition, an extensive laboratory testing program was conducted on reconstituted sand specimens to evaluate the mechanical behavior of saturated and gassy, medium dense sands during monotonic and cyclic loading. The results from the field and laboratory program indicate that gas released during blasting can remain trapped in the soil mass for several years, and this gas greatly affects the mechanical behavior of the sand. Gas greatly increases the liquefaction resistance of the soil. If the gas remains in the sand over the life of a project, then it will maintain this increased resistance to liquefaction, whether or not the penetration

  11. Poisson's Ratio and the Densification of Glass under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Ji, H.; Hammouda, T.; Moreac, A.

    2008-06-06

    Because of a relatively low atomic packing density, (C{sub g}) glasses experience significant densification under high hydrostatic pressure. Poisson's ratio ({nu}) is correlated to C{sub g} and typically varies from 0.15 for glasses with low C{sub g} such as amorphous silica to 0.38 for close-packed atomic networks such as in bulk metallic glasses. Pressure experiments were conducted up to 25 GPa at 293 K on silica, soda-lime-silica, chalcogenide, and bulk metallic glasses. We show from these high-pressure data that there is a direct correlation between {nu} and the maximum post-decompression density change.

  12. The prospects for urban densification: a place-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Thomé, Kaisa; Haybatollahi, Mohammad; Kyttä, Marketta; Korpi, Jari

    2013-06-01

    Study of the environmental outcomes of urban densification is a highly context-dependent task. Our study shows that collecting and processing place-based survey data by means of the softGIS method is clearly helpful here. With the map-based internet questionnaire each response remains connected to both the physical environment and the everyday life of the respondent. In our study of the Kuninkaankolmio area (located in the Helsinki metropolitan region) the survey data were combined with urban density variables calculated from register-based data on the existing built environment. The regression analysis indicated that the participants in the survey preferred the same density factors for their future residence as they enjoyed in their current neighbourhood. In the second analysis we related the densities of planned infill developments with the interest respondents had shown in these projects. The results show that new and even quite dense infill developments have been found to be rather attractive, with them often being viewed as interesting supplements to the current urban texture. These findings contribute to the ongoing scientific discussion on the feasibility of densification measures and encourage the Kuninkaankolmio planners to proceed, albeit carefully, with the planned infill developments.

  13. Volcanic sintering: Timescales of viscous densification and strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    [1] Sintering and densification are ubiquitous processes influencing the emplacement of both effusive and explosive products of volcanic eruptions. Here we sinter ash-size fragments of a synthetic National Institute of Standards and Technology viscosity standard glass at temperatures at which the resultant melt has a viscosity of ∼108–109 Pa.s at 1bar to assess sintering dynamics under near-surface volcanic conditions. We track the strength recovery via uniaxial compressive tests. We observe that volcanic ash sintering is dominantly time dependent, temperature dependent, and grain size dependent and may thus be interpreted to be controlled by melt viscosity and surface tension. Sintering evolves from particle agglutination to viscous pore collapse and is accompanied by a reduction in connected porosity and an increase in isolated pores. Sintering and densification result in a nonlinear increase in strength. Micromechanical modeling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains the strength of porous lava as a function of pore fraction and size. PMID:25821262

  14. Recent Advances and Applications in Cryogenic Propellant Densification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to review several historical cryogenic test programs that were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio over the past fifty years. More recently these technology programs were intended to study new and improved denser forms of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) cryogenic rocket fuels. Of particular interest are subcooled cryogenic propellants. This is due to the fact that they have a significantly higher density (eg. triple-point hydrogen, slush etc.), a lower vapor pressure and improved cooling capacity over the normal boiling point cryogen. This paper, which is intended to be a historical technology overview, will trace the past and recent development and testing of small and large-scale propellant densification production systems. Densifier units in the current GRC fuels program, were designed and are capable of processing subcooled LH2 and L02 propellant at the X33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) scale. One final objective of this technical briefing is to discuss some of the potential benefits and application which propellant densification technology may offer the industrial cryogenics production and end-user community. Density enhancements to cryogenic propellants (LH2, LO2, CH4) in rocket propulsion and aerospace application have provided the opportunity to either increase performance of existing launch vehicles or to reduce the overall size, mass and cost of a new vehicle system.

  15. Densification of nano-size powders. 1994 report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Malghan, S.G.; Dapkunas, J.S.; Piermarini, G.; Pechenik, A.; Danforth, S.C.

    1994-06-01

    Green compacts from a nano-size silicon nitride powder were fabricated having density up to 67% of theoretical at 2.8 GPa pressure using liquid nitrogen and pentane as compaction lubricant media. Pressureless sintering of these transparent samples did not promote further densification beyond that obtained for the green state. To further increase the density of these samples, a hot-pressing device was designed. In a series of experiments, hot-pressing of these samples at.0.5 to 1.0 GPa and 800 C, followed by pressureless sintering at 1400 C was studied. The resulting silicon nitride ceramic had a Vickers hardness of 9.0 GPa while transparency under visible light was maintained. Without the use of hot pressing, the hardness obtained was 5.8 GPa. In addition, the effect of compaction pressure on densification was studied for nano-size Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to further understand factors contributing to achieving high green densities. The dense Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} green samples were pressureless sintered to near full density at temperatures several hundred degrees lower than those needed for sintering low density green material.

  16. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  17. Selective laser densification of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocca, Andrea; Colombo, Paolo; Günster, Jens; Mühler, Thomas; Heinrich, Jürgen G.

    2013-01-01

    Tapes, cast by blade deposition of a lithium aluminosilicate glass slurry, were sintered using a YAG-fiber laser, with the aim of finding suitable parameters for an additive manufacturing process based on layer-wise slurry deposition and selective laser densification. The influence of the laser parameters (output power and scan velocity) on the sintering was evaluated, by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction, on the basis of the quality of the processed layer. Well densified samples could be obtained only in a small window of values for the output power and the scan velocity. The measurement of the width of a set of single scanned lines allowed also to estimate the minimum resolution of the system along the layer plane.

  18. Experimental Studies of Liquefaction and Densification of Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Jonathan Koert

    2010-01-01

    The propellant combination that offers optimum performance is very reactive with a low average molecular weight of the resulting combustion products. Propellant combinations such as oxygen and hydrogen meet the above criteria, however, the propellants in gaseous form require large propellant tanks due to the low density of gas. Thus, rocketry employs cryogenic refrigeration to provide a more dense propellant stored as a liquid. In addition to propellant liquefaction, cryogenic refrigeration can also conserve propellant and provide propellant subcooling and propellant densification. Previous studies analyzed vapor conditioning of a cryogenic propellant, with the vapor conditioning by either a heat exchanger position in the vapor or by using the vapor in a refrigeration cycle as the working fluid. This study analyzes the effects of refrigeration heat exchanger located in the liquid of the common propellant oxidizer, liquid oxygen. This study predicted and determined the mass condensation rate and heat transfer coefficient for liquid oxygen.

  19. The affect of densification and dehydroxylation on the mechanical properties of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Laasri, S.; Taha, M.; Laghzizil, A.; Hlil, E.K.; Chevalier, J.

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports the effects of processing densification on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite bioceramics. Densification of synthetic hydroxyapatite is conducted in the range 1000-1300 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction and SEM microscopy are used to check the microstructure transformations. Vickers hardness, toughness and Young's modulus are analyzed versus the density and grain size. The sintering temperature and the particle size influence strongly the densification and the resulting mechanical properties. In addition, the critical sintering temperature appears around 1200 {sup o}C and the declined strength at the temperature up to 1200 {sup o}C is found sensitive to the dehydroxylation process of hydroxyapatite.

  20. SIRGAS: ITRF densification in Latin America and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, C.; Costa, S.; Mackern, V.; Martínez, W.; Sánchez, L.; Seemüller, W.; da Silva, A.

    2009-04-01

    The continental reference frame of SIRGAS (Sistema de Referencia Geocéntrico para las Américas) is at present realized by the SIRGAS Continuously Operating Network (SIRGAS-CON) composed by about 200 stations distributed over all Latin America and the Caribbean. SIRGAS member countries are qualifying their national reference frames by installing continuously operating GNSS stations, which have to be consistently integrated into the continental network. As the number of these stations is rapidly increasing, the processing strategy of the SIRGAS-CON network was redefined during the SIRGAS 2008 General Meeting in May 2008. The new strategy relies upon the definition of two hierarchy levels: a) A core network (SIRGAS-CON-C) with homogeneous continental coverage and stabile site locations ensures the long-term stability of the reference frame and provides the primary link to the ITRS. Stations belonging to this network have been selected so that each country contributes with a number of stations defined according to its surface and guarantying that the selected stations are the best in operability, continuity, reliability, and geographical coverage. b) Several densification sub-networks (SIRGAS-CON-D) improve the accessibility to the reference frame. The SIRGAS-CON-D sub-networks shall correspond to the national reference frames, i.e., as an optimum there shall be as many sub-networks as countries in the region. The goal is that each country processes its own continuously stations following the SIRGAS processing guidelines, which are defined in accordance with the IERS and IGS standards and conventions. Since at present not all of the countries are operating a processing centre, the existing stations are classified in three densification networks (a Northern, a middle, and a Southern one), which are processed by three local processing centres until new ones are installed. As SIRGAS is defined as a densification of the ITRS, stations included in the core network, as

  1. Densification effects on the Boson peak in vitreous silica: A molecular-dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jund, P.; Jullien, R.

    2000-08-01

    We perform classical molecular-dynamics simulation to study the effect of densification on the vibrational spectrum of a model silica glass. We concentrate this study on the so-called Boson peak and compare our results, obtained from a direct diagonalization of the dynamical matrix, with experimental Raman data. We show that, upon densification, the position of the Boson peak shifts towards higher frequencies while its magnitude decreases which is in agreement with a recent experimental study.

  2. Densification of functional plasma polymers by momentum transfer during film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hegemann, Dirk; Koerner, Enrico; Blanchard, Noemi; Drabik, Martin; Guimond, Sebastien

    2012-11-19

    Functional plasma polymers were deposited from pure ethylene discharges and with the addition of carbon dioxide or ammonia. The incorporation of oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups depends on the fragmentation in the gas phase as well as on the densification during film growth. While a minimum energy per deposited carbon atom is required for cross-linking, the densification and accompanying reduction of functional group incorporation was found to scale linearly with momentum transfer through ion bombardment during film growth.

  3. Full Densification of Molybdenum Powders Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Soueidan, M.; Fabrègue, D.; Buttay, C.; Bley, V.; Allard, B.; Morel, H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure molybdenum powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) under various temperatures and holding times, under a pressure of 77 MPa and a heating rate at 700 K/min (700 °C/min). After sintering, a carbide layer was observed at the surface. The carbide layer thickness, the relative density of the sample as well as the microhardness, and the grain size of Mo were measured. The carbide thickness depends on time and temperature, and it was found that the carbide layer grows in a parabolic manner, with the activation energy of carbon diffusion in Mo being equal to 34 Kcal/mol. The densification of Mo is controlled mainly by the sintering temperature and the holding time. The molybdenum powder was successfully consolidated by SPS in short times. A relative density of 100 pct is achieved at a sintering temperature of 2123.15 K (1850 °C) and a holding time of 30 minutes. It was shown that the hardness decreases slightly with temperature and time. It should be related to the increase in grain size with the sintering temperature and time.

  4. Full Densification of Molybdenum Powders Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Soueidan, M.; Fabrègue, D.; Buttay, C.; Bley, V.; Allard, B.; Morel, H.

    2012-05-01

    Pure molybdenum powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) under various temperatures and holding times, under a pressure of 77 MPa and a heating rate at 700 K/min (700 °C/min). After sintering, a carbide layer was observed at the surface. The carbide layer thickness, the relative density of the sample as well as the microhardness, and the grain size of Mo were measured. The carbide thickness depends on time and temperature, and it was found that the carbide layer grows in a parabolic manner, with the activation energy of carbon diffusion in Mo being equal to 34 Kcal/mol. The densification of Mo is controlled mainly by the sintering temperature and the holding time. The molybdenum powder was successfully consolidated by SPS in short times. A relative density of 100 pct is achieved at a sintering temperature of 2123.15 K (1850 °C) and a holding time of 30 minutes. It was shown that the hardness decreases slightly with temperature and time. It should be related to the increase in grain size with the sintering temperature and time.

  5. On the self-damping nature of densification in photonic sintering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeill, William; Choi, Chang-Ho; Chang, Chih-Hung; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2015-10-01

    Sintering of nanoparticle inks over large area-substrates is a key enabler for scalable fabrication of patterned and continuous films, with multiple emerging applications. The high speed and ambient condition operation of photonic sintering has elicited significant interest for this purpose. In this work, we experimentally characterize the temperature evolution and densification in photonic sintering of silver nanoparticle inks, as a function of nanoparticle size. It is shown that smaller nanoparticles result in faster densification, with lower temperatures during sintering, as compared to larger nanoparticles. Further, high densification can be achieved even without nanoparticle melting. Electromagnetic Finite Element Analysis of photonic heating is coupled to an analytical sintering model, to examine the role of interparticle neck growth in photonic sintering. It is shown that photonic sintering is an inherently self-damping process, i.e., the progress of densification reduces the magnitude of subsequent photonic heating even before full density is reached. By accounting for this phenomenon, the developed coupled model better captures the experimentally observed sintering temperature and densification as compared to conventional photonic sintering models. Further, this model is used to uncover the reason behind the experimentally observed increase in densification with increasing weight ratio of smaller to larger nanoparticles.

  6. On the self-damping nature of densification in photonic sintering of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, William; Choi, Chang-Ho; Chang, Chih-Hung; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Sintering of nanoparticle inks over large area-substrates is a key enabler for scalable fabrication of patterned and continuous films, with multiple emerging applications. The high speed and ambient condition operation of photonic sintering has elicited significant interest for this purpose. In this work, we experimentally characterize the temperature evolution and densification in photonic sintering of silver nanoparticle inks, as a function of nanoparticle size. It is shown that smaller nanoparticles result in faster densification, with lower temperatures during sintering, as compared to larger nanoparticles. Further, high densification can be achieved even without nanoparticle melting. Electromagnetic Finite Element Analysis of photonic heating is coupled to an analytical sintering model, to examine the role of interparticle neck growth in photonic sintering. It is shown that photonic sintering is an inherently self-damping process, i.e., the progress of densification reduces the magnitude of subsequent photonic heating even before full density is reached. By accounting for this phenomenon, the developed coupled model better captures the experimentally observed sintering temperature and densification as compared to conventional photonic sintering models. Further, this model is used to uncover the reason behind the experimentally observed increase in densification with increasing weight ratio of smaller to larger nanoparticles. PMID:26443492

  7. Effect of aspect ratio and liquid-phase content on densification of alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Dillard, D.M. . Metals and Ceramics Div.)

    1990-05-01

    This paper reports that densification of alumina-SiC whisker composites by pressureless sintering is inhibited as a result of whisker interference with particle rearrangement and composite shrinkage. Reduction of the aspect ratio improves densification by improving particle/whisker packing for increased green densities and enhances the ability of the whiskers to rearrange themselves during sintering. Increasing the amount of liquid phases present during sintering also improves densification by aiding whisker rearrangement.

  8. Effect of initial particle size and densification on AFEX-pretreated biomass for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Binod; Biersbach, Gwen; Gibbons, William R; Pryor, Scott W

    2014-09-01

    Switchgrass (SG), corn stover (CS), and prairie cordgrass (PCG) pretreated with ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were densified using a novel low-temperature, low-pressure densification method. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) and separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) were performed with loose and densified AFEX-treated biomass to determine the effect of post-AFEX densification. Biomass particle size reduction before pretreatment increased 144-h SSF ethanol yields from densified material by 8-9 % although no significant differences were seen in the first 72 h. Grinding material after densification had no impact on final ethanol yields but increased production rates in the first 24-48 h. Low-pressure, post-AFEX densification had no adverse effects on SSF ethanol yields from SG or CS but reduced yields from densified PCG by 16 %. Glucose concentrations after hydrolysis (SHF) showed similar trends. Ethanol yields after SHF, however, showed that densification had no significant impact on CS or PCG but reduced final ethanol yields from SG.

  9. A Technical Review on Biomass Processing: Densification, Preprocessing, Modeling and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright

    2010-06-01

    It is now a well-acclaimed fact that burning fossil fuels and deforestation are major contributors to climate change. Biomass from plants can serve as an alternative renewable and carbon-neutral raw material for the production of bioenergy. Low densities of 40–60 kg/m3 for lignocellulosic and 200–400 kg/m3 for woody biomass limits their application for energy purposes. Prior to use in energy applications these materials need to be densified. The densified biomass can have bulk densities over 10 times the raw material helping to significantly reduce technical limitations associated with storage, loading and transportation. Pelleting, briquetting, or extrusion processing are commonly used methods for densification. The aim of the present research is to develop a comprehensive review of biomass processing that includes densification, preprocessing, modeling and optimization. The specific objective include carrying out a technical review on (a) mechanisms of particle bonding during densification; (b) methods of densification including extrusion, briquetting, pelleting, and agglomeration; (c) effects of process and feedstock variables and biomass biochemical composition on the densification (d) effects of preprocessing such as grinding, preheating, steam explosion, and torrefaction on biomass quality and binding characteristics; (e) models for understanding the compression characteristics; and (f) procedures for response surface modeling and optimization.

  10. Effects of enzyme loading, densification, and storage on AFEX-pretreated biomass for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Biersbach, Gwen; Rijal, Binod; Pryor, Scott W; Gibbons, William R

    2015-12-01

    Corn stover, switchgrass, and prairie cordgrass were treated with an ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) process and a novel densification method (ComPAKco). Separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were used to evaluate impacts of densification. ComPAKco densification is characterized by low-temperature and low-energy requirements, resulting in compacted biomass briquettes (CBB) 1-2 cm square, with a bulk density of 380-460 kg/m(3). Feedstocks were evaluated before and following AFEX pretreatment, after densification, and after storage. Two enzyme doses were tested. The low rate used 5 filter paper units (FPU) of Spezyme CP (cellulase) and 21.3 cellobiase units (CBU) of Novozyme 188 (aka NS50010 [β-glucosidase]) per gram of glucan. The high dosage rate was three times higher and resulted in 40-56 % and 33-82 % higher ethanol yields with SHF and SSF, respectively. Trials revealed no adverse effect on ethanol yield following densification or 6-month storage of densified, AFEX-pretreated feedstocks.

  11. Densification and crystallization of zirconia thin films prepared by sol-gel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Voigt, J.A.; Buchheit, C.D.; Boyle, T.J.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the effects of precursor nature and heat treatment schedule on the densification and crystallization behavior of sol-gel derived zirconia thin films. Precursor solutions were prepared from n-propanol, zirconium (IV) n-propoxide, and either acetic acid, or 2,4-pentanedione (acac) and water additions. By controlling the ligand type and ligand-to-metal ratio, we were able to prepare films which displayed significant differences in densification behavior. We attribute the dissimilarity in densification to variations in the nature of the as-deposited films, as influenced by ligand type and concentration. While the acac- derived film was a physical gel, (i.e., a physical aggregation of the oligomeric species), the acetic acid-derived film, which exhibited less consolidation, was a chemical gel that could not be redissolved in the parent solvent. Films prepared with large acac/metal ratios and small water additions exhibited minimal crosslinking at 25{degree}C, displayed the greatest consolidation ({approximately}86% shrinkage) and the highest refractive index (n = 2.071) when heat treated. These results indicate the importance that M-O-M bonds (crosslinks) formed at low temperature can have on densification behavior. We also report on the effects of heat-treatment schedules and ramp rates on densification behavior. All of the films of the present study crystallized into the cubic phase, at temperatures ranging from {approximately}400{degree}C to greater than 700{degree}C, depending on the heating rate.

  12. Application of powder densification models to the consolidation processing of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadley, H. N. G.; Elzey, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Unidirectional fiber reinforced metal matrix composite tapes (containing a single layer of parallel fibers) can now be produced by plasma deposition. These tapes can be stacked and subjected to a thermomechanical treatment that results in a fully dense near net shape component. The mechanisms by which this consolidation step occurs are explored, and models to predict the effect of different thermomechanical conditions (during consolidation) upon the kinetics of densification are developed. The approach is based upon a methodology developed by Ashby and others for the simpler problem of HIP of spherical powders. The complex problem is devided into six, much simpler, subproblems, and then their predicted contributions are added to densification. The initial problem decomposition is to treat the two extreme geometries encountered (contact deformation occurring between foils and shrinkage of isolated, internal pores). Deformation of these two geometries is modelled for plastic, power law creep and diffusional flow. The results are reported in the form of a densification map.

  13. Effects of thermo-hygro-mechanical densification on the surface characteristics of trembling aspen and hybrid poplar wood veneers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Papa Niokhor; Stevanovic, Tatjana; Cloutier, Alain; Fang, Chang-Hua; Blanchet, Pierre; Koubaa, Ahmed; Mariotti, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    The effect of thermo-hygro-mechanical (THM) densification temperature on the surface color, roughness, wettability, and chemical composition of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) and hybrid poplar (Populus maximowiczii × P. balsamifera) veneers was investigated. Veneers were subjected to four THM densification temperatures (160 °C, 180 °C, 200 °C, and 220 °C). Veneer color darkened with increasing THM densification temperature. Surface roughness decreased between 160 °C and 200 °C. Wettability decreased after THM densification, but no significant difference was found between treated specimens. ATR-FTIR and XPS results confirmed that THM densification caused major chemical changes in veneer surfaces, and more pronounced at temperatures higher than 160 °C.

  14. Performance Tests of a Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Densification Ground System for the X33/RLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1997-01-01

    A concept for improving the performance of propulsion systems in expendable and single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicles much like the X33/RLV has been identified. The approach is to utilize densified cryogenic liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants to fuel the propulsion stage. The primary benefit for using this relatively high specific impulse densified propellant mixture is the subsequent reduction of the launch vehicle gross lift-off weight. Production of densified propellants however requires specialized equipment to actively subcool both the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen to temperatures below their normal boiling point. A propellant densification unit based on an external thermodynamic vent principle which operates at subatmospheric pressure and supercold temperatures provides a means for the LH2 and LOX densification process to occur. To demonstrate the production concept for the densification of the liquid hydrogen propellant, a system comprised of a multistage gaseous hydrogen compressor, LH2 recirculation pumps and a cryogenic LH2 heat exchanger was designed, built and tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This paper presents the design configuration of the LH2 propellant densification production hardware, analytical details and results of performance testing conducted with the hydrogen densifier Ground Support Equipment (GSE).

  15. Bond-breaking mechanism of vitreous silica densification by IR femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheblanov, Nikita S.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.

    2016-04-01

    The densification of the vitreous silica (v-SiO2) due to laser irradiation appears reasonable to cause the change in refractive index. In this letter, the v-SiO2 densification under IR femtosecond laser irradiation is studied within molecular-dynamics simulation. The single- and multi-pulse interactions are explored numerically with an account of the bond-breaking mechanism. By analyzing the network at nanoscale, the nature of v-SiO2 densification is assigned to the reduction of major ring fractions of six- and seven-membered rings to minor fractions of three- and four-membered rings (related to D 2 and D 1 Raman signatures, respectively). The athermal behavior of v-SiO2 densification is disclosed at different degrees of ionization for both the single- and multi-pulse cases at sub-threshold regimes. The good agreement between calculated and measured D2 defect line and Si-O-Si angle changes argues in favor of the found mechanism.

  16. The Influence of Simulated Home and Neighbourhood Densification on Perceived Liveability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. A.; Walton, D.; Lamb, S.

    2011-01-01

    This study experimentally manipulated neighbourhood density and home location to reveal the effect of these changes on perceived liveability. Two hypothetical scenarios were provided to 106 households using a Computer-Aided Personal Interview (CAPI). The first scenario examined a densification of the participant's current property, and the second…

  17. Densification and strain hardening of a metallic glass under tension at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z T; Pan, J; Li, Y; Schuh, C A

    2013-09-27

    The deformation of metallic glasses involves two competing processes: a disordering process involving dilatation, free volume accumulation, and softening, and a relaxation process involving diffusional ordering and densification. For metallic glasses at room temperature and under uniaxial loading, disordering usually dominates, and the glass can fail catastrophically as the softening process runs away in a localized mode. Here we demonstrate conditions where the opposite, unexpected, situation occurs: the densifying process dominates, resulting in stable plastic deformation and work hardening at room temperature. We report densification and hardening during deformation in a Zr-based glass under multiaxial loading, in a notched tensile geometry. The effect is driven by stress-enhanced diffusional relaxation, and is attended by a reduction in exothermic heat and hardening signatures similar to those observed in the classical thermal relaxation of glasses. The result is significant, stable, plastic, extensional flow in metallic glasses, which suggest a possibility of designing tough glasses based on their flow properties.

  18. The effect of powder sintering method on the densification and microstructure of pewter alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus Ariff, Tasnim; Gabbitas, Brian; Zhang, Deliang

    2009-08-01

    Pewter alloys made from tin, copper and antimony powders were sintered using microwave and conventional vacuum sintering. Three different compositions of the pewter alloy were used; 91Sn6Cu3Sb, 94Sn4Cu2Sb and 97Sn2Cu1Sb. The effect of densification and microstructure of the pewter alloys from varying sintering time and sintering mode were examined and compared. Samples were compacted at 40kN and sintered at 220°C. Samples in the conventional furnace were sintered 60 minutes and 120 minutes, while samples in the microwave furnace were sintered for 15 and 30 minutes. Samples sintered at longer sintering times resulted in higher density for both sintering methods. Microwave sintering produced samples with slightly smaller grain size than the conventionally sintered samples resulting in a better densification. There were no new phases formed from the sintering of pewter alloy.

  19. The densification of bio-char: Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the qualities of pellets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiang; Yang, Haiping; Yao, Dingding; Zhu, Danchen; Wang, Xianhua; Shao, Jingai; Chen, Hanping

    2016-01-01

    The densification of bio-chars pyrolyzed at different temperatures were investigated to elucidate the effect of temperature on the properties of bio-char pellets and determine the bonding mechanism of pellets. Optimized process conditions were obtained with 128MPa compressive pressure and 35% water addition content. Results showed that both the volume density and compressive strength of bio-char pellets initially decreased and subsequently increased, while the energy consumption increased first and then decreased, with the increase of pyrolysis temperature. The moisture adsorption of bio-char pellets was noticeably lower than raw woody shavings but had elevated than the corresponding char particles. Hydrophilic functional groups, particle size and binder were the main factors that contributed to the cementation of bio-char particles at different temperatures. The result indicated that pyrolysis of woody shavings at 550-650°C and followed by densification was suitable to form bio-char pellets for application as renewable biofuels.

  20. Silicon nitride-aluminum oxide solid solution (SiAION) formation and densification by pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Sanders, W. A.; Fiyalko, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stirred-ball-mill-blended Si3N4 and Al2O3 powders were pressure sintered in order to investigate the mechanism of solid solution formation and densification in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system. Powder blends with Si3N4:Al2O3 mole ratios of 4:1, 3:2, and 2:3 were pressure sintered at 27.6-MN/sq m pressure at temperatures to 17000 C (3090 F). The compaction behavior of the powder blends during pressure sintering was determined by observing the density of the powder compact as a function of temperature and time starting from room temperature. This information, combined with the results of X-ray diffraction and metallographic analyses regarding solutioning and phase transformation phenomena in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system, was used to describe the densification behavior.

  1. Enhancing the tensile properties of continuous millimeter-scale carbon nanotube fibers by densification.

    PubMed

    Hill, Frances A; Havel, Timothy F; Hart, A John; Livermore, Carol

    2013-08-14

    This work presents a study of the tensile mechanical properties of millimeter-long fibers comprising carbon nanotubes (CNTs). These CNT fibers are made of aligned, loosely packed parallel networks of CNTs that are grown in and harvested from CNT forests without drawing or spinning. Unlike typical CNT yarn, the present fibers contain a large fraction of CNTs that span the fibers' entire gauge length. The fibers are densified after growth and network formation to study how increasing the degree of interaction among CNTs in a network by various methods influences and limits the mechanical behavior of macroscopic CNT materials, particularly for the case in which the continuity of a large fraction of CNTs across the gauge length prevents failure purely by slip. Densification is carried out using various combinations of capillary-driven densification, mechanical pressure, and twisting. All methods of densification increase the fiber density and modify the nanoscale order of the CNTs. The highest strength and stiffness values (1.8 and 88.7 N tex(-1), respectively) are observed for capillary-densified fibers, whereas the highest toughness values (94 J g(-1)) and maximum reversible energy density (1.35 kJ kg(-1) or 677 kJ m(-3)) are observed for fibers densified by mechanical pressure. The results suggest that the path to higher performance CNT materials may lie not only in the use of continuous and long CNTs but also in controlling their density and nanoscale ordering through modification of the as-grown networks, such as by capillary-driven densification. PMID:23876225

  2. Densification Kinetics and Structural Evolution During Microwave and Pressureless Sintering of 15 nm Titanium Nitride Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgalat-Lozynskyy, Ostap; Ragulya, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    Microwave sintering (MWS) of commercially available 15-nm-size nanocrystalline TiN powder was studied. Densification kinetics and grain growth mechanisms of nano-TiN were evaluated using non-isothermal heating up to 1500 °C with variable heating rates. A true nanocrystalline ceramic with ~80-nm-size grains and 94.5 % theoretical density was obtained via MWS consolidation at 1400 °C. At higher temperatures, however, an uncontrolled grain growth and a formation of bimodal microstructure were noticed. A temperature dependence of grain growth suggested grain boundary sliding as a primary mechanism of densification below 1100-1200 °C. An activation energy of nano-TiN densification under MWS varied from 26 ± 3 kJ/mol at the initial stage of sintering (900-1200 °C) to 162 ± 22 kJ/mol at higher temperatures. In addition, a relationship coupling microstructural characteristics (grain size, grain boundary) with mechanical properties of titanium nitride ceramics obtained via both microwave and pressureless sintering techniques was discussed.

  3. Influence of Chemical Composition Variations on Densification During the Sintering of MOX Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudez, S.; Marlot, C.; Lechelle, J.

    2016-06-01

    The mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fabrication process is based on the preparation of UO2 and PuO2 powders. The mixture is pelletized before being sintered at 1973 K (1700 °C) in a reducing atmosphere of Ar/4pctH2/H2O. This paper shows how the densification of MOX fuel is affected during sintering by the moisture content of the gas, the plutonium content of the fuel, and the carbon impurity content in the raw materials. MOX densification can be monitored through dilatometric measurements and gas releases can be continuously analyzed during sintering in terms of their quantity and quality. Variations in the oxygen content in the fuel can be continuously recorded by coupling the dilatometer furnace with an oxygen measurement at the gas outlet. Any carbon-bearing species released, such as CO, can be also linked to densification phenomena when a gas chromatograph is installed at the outlet of the dilatometer. Recommendations on the choice of sintering atmosphere that best optimizes the fuel characteristics have been given on the basis of the results reported in this paper.

  4. Densification Process of OH Controlled Hydroxyapatite Ceramics by Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, D.; Koga, Y.; Ishida, E. H.; Ioku, K.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2:HA, is the inorganic principle component of natural bones and teeth. It has been already suggested that the amount of OH ion in the crystal structure of HA is closely related to the biocompatibility. The amount of OH ion in current HA, however, has not been controlled. In order to prepare more functional HA ceramics, the amount of OH ion must be controlled. In this study, HA ceramics with different OH amount were prepared from fine HA crystals by spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to reveal the ideal sintering conditions for preparation of transparent ceramics, densification process on SPS was investigated. The samples were pressed uniaxialy under 60 MPa, and then they were heated by SPS at 800 deg. C, 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C for 10 min with the heating rate of 25 deg. C{center_dot}min-1. The quantity of OH ion in HA ceramics sintered by SPS was decreased with increasing temperature of sintering. Transparent HA ceramics were prepared by SPS at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. In analysis of the densification behavior during sintering of HA by SPS, dominant sintering mechanism was plastic flow of densification. Transparent ceramics should be the most suitable materials to investigate the interface between human cells and ceramics.

  5. Influence of stress, temperature and crystal morphology on isothermal densification and specific surface area decrease of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory-based, experimental data for the microstructural evolution of new snow are scarce, though applications would benefit from a quantitative characterization of the main influences. To this end, we have analyzed the metamorphism and concurrent densification of new snow under isothermal conditions by means of X-ray microtomography and compiled a comprehensive data set of 45 time series. In contrast to previous measurements on isothermal metamorphism on time scales of weeks to months, we analyzed the initial 24-48 h of snow evolution at a high temporal resolution of 3 hours. The data set comprised natural and laboratory-grown snow, and experimental conditions included systematic variations of overburden stress, temperature and crystal habit to address the main influences on specific surface area (SSA) decrease rate and densification rate in a snowpack. For all conditions, we found a linear relation between density and SSA, indicating that metamorphism has an immediate influence for the densification of new snow. The slope of the linear relation, however, depends on the other parameters which were analyzed individually to derive a best-fit parameterization for the SSA decrease rate and densification rate. In the investigated parameter range, we found that the initial value of the SSA constituted the main morphological influence on the SSA decrease rate. In turn, the SSA decrease rate constituted the main influence on the densification rate.

  6. Initial stage densification during spark plasma sintering of Fe-based amorphous alloy powder: Analysis of viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tanaji; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the mechanism of densification of amorphous alloy powders is important for determining the parameters during sintering of these materials. In this paper, we report on the analysis of densification of Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6 amorphous alloy powder during spark plasma sintering. Sintering up to 1000 °C resulted in two clearly distinguishable stages of densification: stage I from 320 °C to 740 °C and stage II from 830 °C to 1000 °C. The maximum densification rate during stage I was attained at 585 °C up to which the sample remained fully amorphous. During the entire stage II, the sample was fully crystalline, and the maximum densification rate attained at 935 °C was much lower than that observed during stage I. Viscous flow during stage I was analyzed, yielding an estimate of the activation energy to be 94.0 ± 0.2 kJ mol-1 in the temperature range from 525 °C to 580 °C.

  7. Impact of densification on microstructure and transport properties of CaFe5O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacotte, C.; Hébert, S.; Hardy, V.; Bréard, Y.; Maki, R.; Mori, T.; Pelloquin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Monophasic CaFe5O7 ceramic has been synthesized by solid state route. Its microstructural features have been studied by diffraction techniques and electron microscopy images before and after Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) annealings. This work is completed by measurements of electrical and thermal properties. Especially, attention is focused around the structural and electronic transition at 360 K for which specific heat measurements have revealed a sharp peak. Densification by SPS techniques led to a significant improvement of electrical conductivity above 360 K.

  8. Formation and densification of SiAlON materials by reaction bonding and silicothermal reduction routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouquié, Yann; Jones, Mark I.

    2011-05-01

    Samples of β and O-sialon with different levels of substitution (i.e. z = 1 and 4 for β-sialon and x = 0.05 and 0.2 for O-sialon) have been synthesized by both reaction bonding and silicothermal reduction techniques in a nitrogen atmosphere. The possibility of obtaining dense sialon materials by these lower cost production methods has been investigated using a statistical design methodology. The influence of different parameters (temperature, gas pressure and additive type) on the densification and decomposition has been studied and will be discussed in this presentation.

  9. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  10. Large scale densification of a nuclear waste ceramic by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, C.L.; Larker, H.T.

    1983-12-01

    Experimental results show that loaded bellows steel canisters, evacuated and sealed, can be cold-isostatically pressed before HIP from an initial density of 26 to 46% theoretical. Calcined powders are hygroscopic and may require degassing at 600 degrees C under vaccum, and residual gas, unless removed, is an impediment to HIP densification. Results also show that degassed synroc D powder in 50 kg quantities can be HIP densified to greater than 97% theoretical density at 1100 degrees C, 150 MPa, for 5h in a bellows canister without radial buckling. The authors believe that on the basis of this preliminary study, full-scale nuclear waste monoliths can be produced by HIP.

  11. Effect of Densification on the Density of Vibrational States of Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, A.; Chumakov, A. I.; Monaco, G.; Crichton, W. A.; Rueffer, R.; Meyer, A.; Comez, L.; Fioretto, D.; Korecki, J.

    2006-09-29

    We studied the effect of densification on the vibrational dynamics of a Na{sub 2}FeSi{sub 3}O{sub 8} glass. The density of vibrational states (DOS) has been measured using nuclear inelastic scattering. The corresponding changes in the microscopic, intermediate-range, and macroscopic properties have also been investigated. The results reveal that, in the absence of local structure transformations, the Debye level and the glass-specific excess of vibrational states above it have the same dependence on density, and the evolution of the DOS is fully described by the transformation of the elastic medium.

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced stress-free ultra-densification inside porous glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Sergeev, Maksim M.; Zakoldaev, Roman A.; Danilov, Pavel A.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Antropova, Tatiana V.; Anfimova, Irina N.

    2016-05-01

    Unusually high densification  ⩽26% was obtained without lateral residual stresses within the laser beam waist inside porous glass during its multi-shot femtosecond laser irradiation, which may induce in the glass the related high refractive index change ~0.1. Corresponding laser irradiation regimes, resulting in such ultra-densification, decompaction and voids inside the glass, were revealed as a function of laser pulse energy and scanning rate, and were discussed in terms of thermal and hydrodynamic processes in the silica network.

  13. Field-assisted Densification of Superhard B6O Materials with Y2O3/Al2O3 Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, M.; Raethel, J.; Sempf, K.; Thiele, M.; Bales, A.; Sigalas, I.

    B6O is a possible candidate of superhard materials with a hardness of 45 GPa measured on single crystals. Up to now, densification of these materials was only possible at high pressure. However, recently it was found that different oxides can be utilized as effective sintering additives. In this work the effect of addition of Y2O3/Al2O3 on the densification behaviour as a function of applied pressure, its microstructure evolution, and resulting mechanical properties were investigated. A strong dependence of the densification with increasing pressure was found. The material revealed characteristic triple junctions filled with amorphous residue composed of B2O3, Al2O3 and Y2O3, while no amorphous grain-boundary films were observed along internal interfaces. Mechanical testing revealed on average hardness of 33 GPa, a fracture toughness of 4 MPam1/2, and a strength value of 500 MPa.

  14. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND UNIAXIAL PRESSURE ON THE DENSIFICATION BEHAVIOR OF SILICA AEROGEL GRANULES

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Robinson, Matthew J.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2012-10-01

    Materials are being developed in U.S. for the removal and immobilization of iodine from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing in support of the Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. The silver-functionalized silica aerogel proved to be an excellent candidate for this treatment because of its high selectivity and sorption capacity for radioiodine and its possible conversion to a durable silica-based waste form. The present study investigated with nitrogen sorption and helium pycnometry the effect of pressureless isothermal sintering at temperatures of 900-1400°C for 2.5-90 min or isothermal hot-pressing at 1200°C for 2.5 min on densification of raw and silver-functionalized silica aerogel granules. Rapid sintering was observed at 1050 and 1200°C. Only 15 min of pressureless sintering at 1200°C resulted in almost complete densification. The macropores disappeared, surface area decreased from 1114 m2/g to 25 m2/g, pore volume from 7.41 cm3/g to 0.09 cm3/g, and adsorption pore size from 18.7 to 7 nm. The skeletal density of sintered granules was similar to the bulk density of amorphous silica (2.2 g/cm3). The hot-pressing accelerated the sintering process, decreasing significantly the pore size and volume.

  15. Densification route and mechanical properties of Si3N4-bioglass biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Amaral, M; Lopes, M A; Silva, R F; Santos, J D

    2002-02-01

    The processing route and the final microstructural and mechanical characteristics of a novel biomaterial composite are described. This new material is composed of 70 wt% Si3N4 ceramic phase and 30 wt% bioglass, the later performing as a liquid sintering aid system and simultaneously providing bioactivity characteristics to the composite. The conditions for fabrication of an almost fully dense material (approximately 98% of relative density) were pursued. Optimised parameters were 1350 degrees C-40 min-30 MPa by hot-pressing technique. The very fast densification rate of the process avoided the crystallisation of the bioglass intergranular phase and therefore its intrinsic properties were maintained. Also, the large amount of glassy phase assured the densification by liquid phase assisted grain rearrangement without Si3N4 phase transformation. The final mechanical properties of the Si3N4 bioglass were as follows: fracture toughness, K(IC) = 4.4 MPa m(1/2); Vickers hardness, Hv = 10.3 GPa; Young's modulus, E = 197 GPa; bending strength, sigma(g) = 383 MPa; Weibull modulus, m = 8.3. These values provide an attractive set of properties among other bioactive materials, namely by upgrading the main drawback of bioceramcs and bioglasses for high-load medical applications, which is the lack of satisfactory fracture toughness.

  16. GNSS-based densification of the ITRF velocity field through a collaborative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Juliette; Bruyninx, Carine; Craymer, Michael; Dawson, John; Griffiths, Jake; Kenyeres, Ambrus; Rebischung, Paul; Sánchez, Laura; Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Saria, Elifuraha; Altamimi, Zuheir

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the IAG Working Group "Integration of Dense Velocity Fields in the ITRF" is to provide a GNSS-based dense, unified and reliable velocity field globally referenced in the ITRF (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) and useful for geodynamical and geophysical interpretations. The WG is embedded in IAG Sub-Commission 1.3 "Regional Reference Frames" where it coexists with the Regional Reference Frame Sub-Commissions AFREF (Africa), APREF (Asia & Pacific), EUREF (Europe), NAREF (North America), SCAR (Antarctica), SIRGAS (Latin America & Caribbean). These IAG Regional Reference Frame sub-commissions are responsible for providing GNSS-based densified weekly solutions for their region. To obtain such a densified velocity field, the WG combined the individual weekly solutions from 7 individual contributors (AFREF, APREF, EUREF, NAREF (NGS, GSB), SIRGAS, IGS) and then stacked these weekly combined solutions in order to derive a ITRF2008 densification as well as the associated residual position time series for more than 2800 sites. Here we present the latest densification results.

  17. Simulation of the densification of real open-celled foam microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydon, A. D.; Bardenhagen, S. G.; Miller, E. A.; Seidler, G. T.

    2005-12-01

    Ubiquitous in nature and finding applications in engineering systems, cellular solids are an increasingly important class of materials. Foams are an important subclass of cellular solids with applications as packing materials and energy absorbers due to their unique properties. A better understanding of foam mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructural details would facilitate manufacture of tailored materials and development of constitutive models for their bulk response. Numerical simulation of these materials, while offering great promise toward furthering understanding, has also served to convincingly demonstrate the inherent complexity and associated modeling challenges. The large range of deformations which foams are subjected to in routine engineering applications is a fundamental source of complication in modeling the details of foam deformation on the scale of foam struts. It requires accurate handling of large material deformations and complex contact mechanics, both well established numerical challenges. A further complication is the replication of complex foam microstructure geometry in numerical simulations. Here various advantages of certain particle methods, in particular their compatibility with the determination of three-dimensional geometry via X-ray microtomography, are exploited to simulate the compression of "real" foam microstructures into densification. With attention paid to representative volume element size, predictions are made regarding bulk response, dynamic effects, and deformed microstructural character, for real polymeric, open-cell foams. These predictions include a negative Poisson's ratio in the stress plateau, and increased difficulty in removing residual porosity during densification.

  18. Densification of silica glass induced by 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saliminia, A.; Nguyen, N.T.; Chin, S.L.; Vallee, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for waveguide formation in silica glass induced by 1 kHz intense femtosecond laser pulses from a Ti-sapphire laser at 0.8 {mu}m as well as from a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier at 1.5 {mu}m. It is demonstrated that the densification taking place at the irradiated region is the principal cause for refractive index change in the waveguides written with both 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m pulses. The birefringence induced by the stress arising from such densification and its behavior against thermal annealing are also studied.

  19. Influence of stress, temperature and crystal habit on isothermal densification and specific surface area decrease of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2014-03-01

    Laboratory-based, experimental data for the microstructural evolution of new snow is scarce, though applications would benefit from a quantitative characterization of the main mechanism underlying the initial microstructural changes. To this end we have analyzed the metamorphism and concurrent densification of new snow under isothermal conditions by means of X-ray microtomography and compiled a comprehensive data set of 45 time series covering the practically relevant short time behavior within the first 24-48 h in high temporal resolution. The data set comprises natural and laboratory grown snow and experimental conditions include systematic variations of overburden stress, temperature and crystal habit to address the main influences on specific surface area (SSA) decrease rate and densification rate in a natural snowpack. For all conditions we find a linear increase of the density with the SSA, indicating that metamorphism has a key influence for the densification of new snow. Corroborated by the analysis of the individual influences of external conditions we derive a best-fit parametrization for the SSA decrease rate and the densification rate as required for applications.

  20. Effect of sintering temperature on densification and mechanical properties of pressureless sintered CNT-alumina nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, N.; Khalid, F. A.; Hakeem, Abbas S.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit excellent mechanical, electrical and thermal properties thus have been considered for applications in the production of nanocomposite materials. This work presents results of sintered CNTs-reinforced alumina nanocomposites that can be used for many structural and engineering applications. Gas purging sonication (GPS) was used to achieve homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in alumina powder. Nanocomposites were synthesized by conventional pressureless sintering technique using varying amounts of CNTs in alumina matrix. Densification, hardness and fracture toughness of the resulted nanocomposites were examined. It is found that considerable improvement in fracture toughness at 1 wt% CNT-alumina nanocomposite has occurred. Role of CNTs in improving the fracture toughness of nanocomposites is explained which is attributed to well known bridging and pullout mechanism of CNTs in the matrix.

  1. Pupil densification of obstructed monolithic apertures for high-contrast coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.; Soummer, R.; Gori, P. M.

    We give in this short communication the principle of the densification of a large classical on-axis aperture, with aperture central obscuration and spider arms into a full circular unobstructed aperture, for application to high-contrast coronagraphy. An example is shown using a VLT like aperture. In space, such a technique would allow to produce a perfect null of the star image using coronagraphic techniques such as the 4QC or the PKC, at the expense of a small reduction of the transmitted light. The drawback of the technique is that a surprisingly very small ZOF is obtained, if the telescope full resolution is considered. However, if a loss of resolution of a factor 2 is accepted, then the system might behave as a perfect imaging system. The technique is found useless for ground based observations with the Strehl ratios reached at the present time.

  2. Densification effects of the carbon nanotube pillar array on field-emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Liao, Chan-Yu; Li, Yu-Ren; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a simple densification method for carbon nanotube (CNT) pillars is proposed to achieve high-performance field emission characteristics and stable emission. Through capillary force during solution evaporation, the CNT density in each pillar can be increased by about six times without causing damage to the crystallinity of CNTs. The densified CNT pillars exhibit lower series resistance, sharper pillars, better contacts, higher thermal conductivity, and better mechanical stiffness than as-grown ones. Therefore, the threshold field of the field emitter with such CNT pillars of 50 µm height can be reduced to 1.98 V/µm, as compared with 2.2 V/µm for the undensified ones. Moreover, the fluctuation of field-emission current decreases from 15.5 to 9.4% after the stress tests at a field of 2 V/µm for 1800 s. These findings imply that the densified CNT pillars are promising for the field-emission applications.

  3. Influence of oxide-based sintering additives on densification and mechanical behavior of tricalcium phosphate (TCP).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Himesh A; Kalita, Samar J

    2007-05-01

    In this research, we studied and analyzed the effects of four different oxide-based sintering additives on densification, mechanical behavior, biodegradation and biocompatibility of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramics. Selective sintering additives were introduced into pure TCP ceramics, in small quantities, through homogeneous mixing, using a mortar and pestle. The consequent powders of different compositions were pressed into cylindrical compacts, uniaxially and sintered at elevated temperatures, 1150 degrees C and 1250 degrees C, separately in a muffle furnace. X-ray powder diffraction technique was used to analyze the phase-purity of TCP after sintering. Hardness of these sintered specimens was evaluated using a Vickers hardness tester. Sintered cylindrical samples were tested under uniaxial compressive loading, as a function of composition to determine their failure strength. Biodegradation studies conducted using simulated body fluid under dynamic environment, revealed that these additives could control the rate of resorption and hardness degradation of TCP ceramics. PMID:17211718

  4. Regional Densification of the ITRF through the Integration of National Active GNSS Network Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyeres, Ambrus; Horvath, Tivadar; Stangl, Gunter; Garayt, Bruno; Hansen, Dionne; Valdes, Marcellino; Caporali, Alessandro; Figurski, Mariusz; Georgiev, Ivan; Droscak, Branislav; Franke, Peter; Jumare, Izolde; Nagl, Jaroslav; Pihlak, Priit; Huisman, Lennard

    2015-04-01

    The actual realization of the ITRS represents the most precise station positions and velocities at selected set of sites. The scientific and practical applications may require the access to the global 3D reference frame in a dense network without loss of consistency and reliability. Relying on the long term homogeneously analyzed data the dense national permanent GNSS networks shall be the ideal tool for such reference frame densification. In the frame of the ongoing EPN densification the national active networks are integrated and a homogeneous, dense position and velocity product is being derived based on the actual ITRS realization and using the EPN as backbone infrastructure. In order to minimize inconsistencies (e.g. site naming, discontinuities, constraint handling) the only way to get a uniform, homogeneous cumulative solution from national to global scales is the integration done relying on the weekly SINEX product level. The integration is being performed using the CATREF software (Altamimi et al, IGN) and based on the Minimum Constraint approach. The derived position and velocity product will be an essential material for various geokinematic studies (PGR, intraplate and plate boundary zone investigations), and also for the better definition and realization of ETRS89. This work is very well inline with the goals of relevant European initiatives in the frame of EPOS, EUREF (WG on Deformation Models), CEGRN, EUPOS, IAG (WG on Unified Dense Velocity Fields). The work is well in progress, up to 15 years of weekly SINEX files are already available and analyzed from 17 countries, and considering the countries in negotiation phase the full continental coverage will be reached within few years. The actual database contains more close to 3000 sites. In this presentation a status report is shown and the first version of the position/velocity product with related interpretation options are introduced as well.

  5. Densification behavior, doping profile and planar waveguide laser performance of the tape casting YAG/Nd:YAG/YAG ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Lin; Li, Jiang; Qu, Haiyun; Wang, Juntao; Liu, Jiao; Dai, Jiawei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Binglong; Kou, Huamin; Shi, Yun; Wang, Zheng; Pan, Yubai; Gao, Qingsong; Guo, Jingkun

    2016-10-01

    The sintering behavior and doping concentration profile of the planar waveguide YAG/Nd:YAG/YAG ceramics by the tape casting and solid-state reaction method were investigated on the basis of densification trajectory, microstructure evolution, and Nd3+ ions diffusion. The porosity of the green body by tape casting and cold isostatic pressing is about 38.6%. And the green bodies were consolidated from 1100 °C to 1800 °C for 0.5-20 h to study the densification and the doping diffusion behaviors. At the temperature higher than 1500 °C, pure YAG phase is formed, followed by the densification and grain growth process. With the increase of temperature, two sintering stages occur, corresponding to remarkable densification and significant grain growth, respectively. The mechanism controlling densification at 1550 °C is grain boundary diffusion. The diffusion of Nd3+ ions is more sensitive to temperature than the sintering time, and the minimum temperature required for the obvious diffusion of Nd3+ ions is higher than 1700 °C. Finally, planar waveguide YAG/1.5 at.%Nd:YAG/YAG transparent ceramics with in-line transmittance of 84.8% at 1064 nm were obtained by vacuum-sintering at 1780 °C for 30 h. The fluorescence lifetime of 4F3/2 state of Nd3+ in the specimen is about 259 μs. The prepared ceramic waveguide was tested in a laser amplifier and the laser pulse was amplificated from 87 mJ to 238 mJ, with the pump energy of 680 mJ.

  6. Fabrication, Densification, and Replica Molding of 3D Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Copic, Davor; Park, Sei Jin; Tawfick, Sameh; De Volder, Michael; Hart, A. John

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new materials and processes to microfabrication has, in large part, enabled many important advances in microsystems, lab-on-a-chip devices, and their applications. In particular, capabilities for cost-effective fabrication of polymer microstructures were transformed by the advent of soft lithography and other micromolding techniques 1, 2, and this led a revolution in applications of microfabrication to biomedical engineering and biology. Nevertheless, it remains challenging to fabricate microstructures with well-defined nanoscale surface textures, and to fabricate arbitrary 3D shapes at the micro-scale. Robustness of master molds and maintenance of shape integrity is especially important to achieve high fidelity replication of complex structures and preserving their nanoscale surface texture. The combination of hierarchical textures, and heterogeneous shapes, is a profound challenge to existing microfabrication methods that largely rely upon top-down etching using fixed mask templates. On the other hand, the bottom-up synthesis of nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires can offer new capabilities to microfabrication, in particular by taking advantage of the collective self-organization of nanostructures, and local control of their growth behavior with respect to microfabricated patterns. Our goal is to introduce vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which we refer to as CNT "forests", as a new microfabrication material. We present details of a suite of related methods recently developed by our group: fabrication of CNT forest microstructures by thermal CVD from lithographically patterned catalyst thin films; self-directed elastocapillary densification of CNT microstructures; and replica molding of polymer microstructures using CNT composite master molds. In particular, our work shows that self-directed capillary densification ("capillary forming"), which is performed by condensation of a solvent onto the substrate with CNT

  7. Mathematical Model and Experimental Results for Cryogenic Densification and Sub-Cooling Using a Submerged Cooling Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, J. K.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tuttle, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Among the many factors that determine overall rocket performance, propellant density is important because it affects the size of the rocket. Thus, in order to decrease the size of a rocket, it may be desirable to increase the density of propellants. This study analyzes the concept of increasing the propellant density by employing a cooling source submerged in the liquid propellant. A simple, mathematical model was developed to predict the rate of densification and the propellant temperature profile. The mathematical model is generic and applicable to multiple propellants. The densification rate was determined experimentally by submerging a cooling source in liquid oxygen at constant, positive pressure, and measuring the time rate of change in temperature with respect to vertical position. The results from the mathematical model provided a reasonable fit when compared to experimental results.

  8. Densification and residual stress induced by CO2 laser-based mitigation of SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Matthews, M J; Soules, T F; Stolken, J S

    2010-10-21

    Knowing the ultimate surface morphology resulting from CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of induced laser damage is important both for determining adequate treatment protocols, and for preventing deleterious intensification upon subsequent illumination of downstream optics. Physical effects such as evaporation, viscous flow and densification can strongly affect the final morphology of the treated site. Evaporation is a strong function of temperature and will play a leading role in determining pit shapes when the evaporation rate is large, both because of material loss and redeposition. Viscous motion of the hot molten material during heating and cooling can redistribute material due to surface tension gradients (Marangoni effect) and vapor recoil pressure effects. Less well known, perhaps, is that silica can densify as a result of structural relaxation, to a degree depending on the local thermal history. The specific volume shrinkage due to structural relaxation can be mistaken for material loss due to evaporation. Unlike evaporation, however, local density change can be reversed by post annealing. All of these effects must be taken into account to adequately describe the final morphology and optical properties of single and multiple-pass mitigation protocols. We have investigated, experimentally and theoretically, the significance of such densification on residual stress and under what circumstances it can compete with evaporation in determining the ultimate post treatment surface shape. In general, understanding final surface configurations requires taking all these factors including local structural relaxation densification, and therefore the thermal history, into account. We find that surface depressions due to densification can dominate surface morphology in the non-evaporative regime when peak temperatures are below 2100K.

  9. Vibrational dynamics of permanently densified GeO{sub 2} glasses: Densification-induced changes in the boson peak

    SciTech Connect

    Orsingher, L.; Fontana, A.; Gilioli, E.; Carini, G. Jr.; Carini, G.; Tripodo, G.; Unruh, T.; Buchenau, U.

    2010-03-28

    Vitreous GeO{sub 2}, one of the main prototypes of strong glasses, was densified at several pressures up to 6 GPa, achieving more than 20% of densification. The density dependence of the vibrational density of states and of the low temperature properties of these glasses was investigated by means of inelastic neutron scattering and calorimetric measurements. With increasing density, both the boson peak and the bump in c{sub p}/T{sup 3} versus T plot exhibit variations which are stronger than the elastic medium expectation. If one reduces the measured spectra to a common master curve, one finds that this is only possible for the densified samples; the first densification step has an additional effect, similar to other cases in the literature. Nevertheless, the existence of a master curve for the three densified samples proves that the total number of excess modes remains constant on further densification. The experimental data are discussed in the framework of different theoretical models.

  10. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Mariana; Rieu, Mathilde; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Garrelie, Florence

    2016-06-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  11. Effect of Heating Rate on the Pressureless Sintering Densification of a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Pressureless sintering of Inconel 718 has important technological applications for the densification of metal injection molding or additive manufacturing of parts with powder/binder systems. The effect of heating rates ranging from 15 to 200 K/minute on the sintering behavior of fine (-325 mesh) Inconel 718 powders was studied using the master sintering curve (MSC) concept. A pressureless pulsed electric current sintering setup was used to heat samples. The temperature at the onset of sintering increased as the heating rate increased. The formation of a supersolidus liquid fraction was shifted toward higher temperatures for increased heating rates. The apparent activation energy of sintering was obtained by least squares fitting of the sintering data to the MSC and was in good agreement with the lattice diffusion activation energy of the alloying elements present in Inconel 718. The MSC followed different kinetics for low heating rates (≤50 K/minute) and high heating rates (≥75 K/minute), and these differences were related to liquation kinetics.

  12. Enhanced densification, strength and molecular mechanisms in shock compressed porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-06-01

    In most porous materials, void collapse during shock compression couples mechanical energy to thermal energy. Increased temperature drives up pressures and lowers densities in the final Hugoniot states as compared to full-density samples. Some materials, however, exhibit an anomalous enhanced densification in their Hugoniot states when porosity is introduced. We have recently shown that silicon is such a material, and demonstrated a molecular mechanism for the effect using molecular simulation. We will review results from large-scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and Hugoniotstat simulations of shock compressed porous silicon, highlighting the mechanism by which porosity produces local shear which nucleate partial phase transition and localized melting at shock pressures below typical thresholds in these materials. Further, we will characterize the stress states and strength of the material as a function of porosity from 5 to 50 percent and with various porosity microstructures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Effect of relative humidity during tabletting on matrix formation of hydrocolloids: densification behavior of cellulose ethers.

    PubMed

    Picker, K M; Mielck, J B

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the elastic-plastic deformation behavior of the cellulose ethers hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), hydroxyethylmethylcellulose (HEMC), and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) at relative humidities (RH) of 38, 57, and 75% and assess how the release of drugs embedded in such matrices is affected by the inner structure of the tablets formed during tabletting. Sorption and desorption isotherms and glass transition temperature were determined between 32 and 75% RH. The materials were equilibrated at 38, 57, and 75% RH and tabletted to a range of graded maximum relative densities. Pressure-time and displacement-time curves were analyzed by use of the Heckel function and a modified Weibull function (pressure-time only). After equilibration at the different RHs, all materials were in the glassy state. The respective degrees of polymerization had negligible effect on the absolute content of water, the sorption isotherms, and finally the densification behavior. At 38% RH, NaCMC contains the same amount of water as HPMC and HEMC, but deforms less plastically than the latter. This is attributed to tight binding of the water of hydration in the former. With increasing RH, NaCMC becomes only a little more plastic than both HPMC and HEMC, although it contains more than twice the amount of water. The binding strength of water and its molecular mobility, not the amount, seems to determine the readiness for volume reduction under load.

  14. Crystallization kinetics and densification of YAG nanoparticles from various chelating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.G.; Kumar, R.V.; Qu, Y.F.; Krsmanovic, Dalibor

    2009-08-05

    Yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) nanoparticles were prepared using sonochemical sol-gel method with three different chelating agents and the effect of crystallization kinetics was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetry (DSC-TG). The activation energy values of crystallization for the as-synthesized YAG nanoparticles using citric acid (CA), glycine (G) or a mixture of citric acid-glycine (CA-G), as chelating agents were found to be 160.5, 142.2 and 140.4 kJ mol{sup -1} and the corresponding Avarami constants were 2.2, 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. Samples produced with the mixed chelating agent under sonification, could be crystallized to single phase YAG nanoparticles (10-65 nm) after annealing at 1100 deg. C. Pellets made from the annealed YAG particles could be sintered to a relative density greater than 99% at 1500 deg. C with a grain size of 4.5 {mu}m, made up of secondary particles formed from primary nano-crystals within the grains. Grain size and relative density increased with different chelating agents from CA to G and CA-G in the increasing order when YAG samples were sintered. Grain growth and densification occurred at a relatively low temperature of 1500 deg. C as compared to over 1800 deg. C in solid-state reactions.

  15. Improved progressive TIN densification filtering algorithm for airborne LiDAR data in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqian; Guo, Qinghua; Su, Yanjun; Xue, Baolin

    2016-07-01

    Filtering of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data into the ground and non-ground points is a fundamental step in processing raw airborne LiDAR data. This paper proposes an improved progressive triangulated irregular network (TIN) densification (IPTD) filtering algorithm that can cope with a variety of forested landscapes, particularly both topographically and environmentally complex regions. The IPTD filtering algorithm consists of three steps: (1) acquiring potential ground seed points using the morphological method; (2) obtaining accurate ground seed points; and (3) building a TIN-based model and iteratively densifying TIN. The IPTD filtering algorithm was tested in 15 forested sites with various terrains (i.e., elevation and slope) and vegetation conditions (i.e., canopy cover and tree height), and was compared with seven other commonly used filtering algorithms (including morphology-based, slope-based, and interpolation-based filtering algorithms). Results show that the IPTD achieves the highest filtering accuracy for nine of the 15 sites. In general, it outperforms the other filtering algorithms, yielding the lowest average total error of 3.15% and the highest average kappa coefficient of 89.53%.

  16. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  17. Locally enhanced dissolution rate as a probe for nanocontact-induced densification in oxide glasses.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yi-Fan; Han, Kun; Guin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface damage (nanoindentations) effect on the chemical durability of glass surfaces (silica and soda-lime silicate glasses, WG). In basic solutions, an enhanced dissolution rate is reported and quantified at indentation sites (+10.5 nm/h and +52 nm/h for silica and WG, respectively) whereas none was observed once the indented surfaces were thermally annealed at 0.9 × T(g) for 2 h, a thermal treatment known for curing high pressure-induced permanent densification in oxides glasses. A direct link between high pressure-induced structural modifications encountered during nanoindentation and the measured dissolution rates is established. It is shown that this property conjointly used with the high resolution of the atomic force microscope may be used for probing, at the nanometer scale, the size and the nature of the structurally modified area underneath residual nanoindentation impressions. As an example, for 10 mN Vickers nanoindentations on WG, the zone affected by the permanently and structurally modified zone under the residual impression is found to be equal to (741 ± 30) nm with a transition zone thickness from the fully densified material to the elastically deformed one ranging between 115 and 165 nm.

  18. The CEGRN 2011 Campaign and the densification of ETRF2000 in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, A.; Barlik, M.; Becker, M.; Gerhatova, L.; Grenerczy, G.; Hefty, J.; Krauss, A.; Legovini, P.; Medac, D.; Milev, G.; Mojzes, M.; Mulic, M.; Odalovic, O.; Rus, T.; Simek, J.; Sledzinski, J.; Stangl, G.; Stopar, B.; Vespe, F.; Virag, G.

    2012-04-01

    The CEGRN 2011 Campaign took place from 20 to 25 June 2011. It was a coordinated effort of 14 Central European Countries: Austria, Bosnia Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Rumania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Ukraine, with the involvement of some 85 stations. Data processing with state of the art software, and IGS08 orbits and antenna models according to the EPN standards is being completed by independent Analysis Centers in Austria, Hungary, Italy and Slovakia, with the Center in Graz acting as a Combination Center. The paper presents the results of the analysis and of the multiyear combination, with time series spanning a timeline of up to 17 years (1994-2011). Since all data up to and including the 2009 Campaign have been re-analysed with the reprocessed orbits and IGS05 antenna models, the derived velocity field represents a particularly valid example of evolution of the ITRF reference frame in Central Europe. The addition of the 2011 data set, based on IGS08, is not obvious. In a first step the solution, inclusive of the 2011 campaign, can be aligned to the EPN (European Permanent Network of EUREF) cumulative solution in ITRF2005 and can be transformed into the ETRF2000 frame. In a second step, the CEGRN campaigns are planned to be reprocessed with the IGS08 antenna models, provided the IGS and EPN reprocessing solutions (REPRO2) are available for the orbits. Once completed, a densification of the European regional velocity field will become available for both geodynamic studies and widespread dissemination of the ETRS89 standard of coordinates, in compliance with the EU Directive INSPIRE.

  19. The Effect of High-Pressure Devitrification and Densification on Ballistic-Penetration Resistance of Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Avuthu, V.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Galgalikar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experimental and molecular-level computational analyses have indicated that fused silica, when subjected to pressures of several tens of GPa, can experience irreversible devitrification and densification. Such changes in the fused-silica molecular-level structure are associated with absorption and/or dissipation of the strain energy acquired by fused silica during high-pressure compression. This finding may have important practical consequences in applications for fused silica such as windshields and windows of military vehicles, portholes in ships, ground vehicles, spacecraft, etc. In the present work, our prior molecular-level computational results pertaining to the response of fused silica to high pressures (and shear stresses) are used to enrich a continuum-type constitutive model (that is, the so-called Johnson-Holmquist-2, JH2, model) for this material. Since the aforementioned devitrification and permanent densification processes modify the response of fused silica to the pressure as well as to the deviatoric part of the stress, changes had to be made in both the JH2 equation of state and the strength model. To assess the potential improvements in respect to the ballistic-penetration resistance of this material brought about by the fused-silica devitrification and permanent densification processes, a series of transient non-linear dynamics finite-element analyses of the transverse impact of a fused-silica test plate with a solid right-circular cylindrical steel projectile were conducted. The results obtained revealed that, provided the projectile incident velocity and, hence, the attendant pressure, is sufficiently high, fused silica can undergo impact-induced devitrification, which improves its ballistic-penetration resistance.

  20. Remote sensing of impervious surface growth: A framework for quantifying urban expansion and re-densification mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahtahmassebi, Amir Reza; Song, Jie; Zheng, Qing; Blackburn, George Alan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Ling Yan; Pan, Yi; Moore, Nathan; Shahtahmassebi, Golnaz; Sadrabadi Haghighi, Reza; Deng, Jing Song

    2016-04-01

    A substantial body of literature has accumulated on the topic of using remotely sensed data to map impervious surfaces which are widely recognized as an important indicator of urbanization. However, the remote sensing of impervious surface growth has not been successfully addressed. This study proposes a new framework for deriving and summarizing urban expansion and re-densification using time series of impervious surface fractions (ISFs) derived from remotely sensed imagery. This approach integrates multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA), analysis of regression residuals, spatial statistics (Getis_Ord) and urban growth theories; hence, the framework is abbreviated as MRGU. The performance of MRGU was compared with commonly used change detection techniques in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. The results suggested that the ISF regression residuals were optimal for detecting impervious surface changes while Getis_Ord was effective for mapping hotspot regions in the regression residuals image. Moreover, the MRGU outputs agreed with the mechanisms proposed in several existing urban growth theories, but importantly the outputs enable the refinement of such models by explicitly accounting for the spatial distribution of both expansion and re-densification mechanisms. Based on Landsat data, the MRGU is somewhat restricted in its ability to measure re-densification in the urban core but this may be improved through the use of higher spatial resolution satellite imagery. The paper ends with an assessment of the present gaps in remote sensing of impervious surface growth and suggests some solutions. The application of impervious surface fractions in urban change detection is a stimulating new research idea which is driving future research with new models and algorithms.

  1. Effect of Heating Rate on Densification and Grain Growth During Spark Plasma Sintering of 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe Heavy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke; Li, Xiaoqiang; Qu, Shengguan; Li, Yuanyuan

    2013-09-01

    Blended 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe powders were sintered via the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique using heating rates from 10 K min-1 to 380 K min-1 (10 °C min-1 to 380 °C min-1). The kinetics of densification and grain growth were analyzed to identify heating rate effects during the SPS of 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe powders. The activation energies for densification were calculated and compared with the experimental values for diffusion and other mass transport phenomena. The results show that for the slowly heated specimens [heating rate <100 K min-1 (100 °C min-1)], densification occurs mainly through dissolution-precipitation of W through the matrix phase and W grain boundary diffusion. The concurrent grain growth is dominated by surface diffusion at a low sintering temperature and by solution-reprecipitation and Ni-enhanced W grain boundary diffusion at a higher temperature. For the specimens sintered with heating rates higher than 100 K min-1 (100 °C min-1), the apparent activation energy value for the mechanism controlling densification is a strong function of the relative density, and fast densification controlled by multiple diffusion mechanisms and intensive viscous flow dominates over the grain growth. High SPS heating rate is favorable to obtain high density and fine-grained tungsten heavy alloys.

  2. Effects of Crustal Densification in Warm Slabs on In-slab Earthquakes and Episodic Tremors and Slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.

    2003-12-01

    During subduction, dehydration may facilitate earthquake rupture in both the slab crust and slab mantle. The up to 15% rock densification that accompanies the metabasalt-eclogite transformation is expected to have several mechanical consequences. In warm slabs such as Cascadia and Nankai, this transformation and mantle serpentine breakdown begin at rather shallow depths (30 - 50 km). The pervasively hydrated upper crust transforms to eclogite under equilibrium conditions, but the transformation of the anhydrous parts of the lower crust is kinetically delayed to greater depths. Therefore, densification begins in a thin layer along the top of the slab. Volume reduction gives rise to an equivalent stretching force in the thin layer in all slab-parallel directions, activating existing faults and developing new fractures. Analogous to a weak layer sandwiched between, and bonded to, two strong layers under stretching, fracture spacing in the weak layer scales with the layer thickness. The theory predicts that the densified thin layer must be ~{!0~}shattered~{!1~}. The shattered upper crust may have numerous small earthquakes but does not favor large ruptures. In contrast, the much more uniform lower crust and mantle can host larger ruptures, although seismic ruptures occur only in the limited hydrated parts. This explains the observation that relatively few earthquakes deeper inside the slab tend to have larger magnitudes than those just below the slab surface. For example, three recent damaging events (1999 Oaxaca, Mexico; 2001 Geiyo, Nankai; 2001 Nisqually, Cascadia) in warm slabs all occurred in the lower crust or mantle. The densification is generally a steady state process: An increasingly thinner slab moves into an increasingly thinner subduction "slot" continuously, with the downdip width of transition from normal to thinned crust scaling linearly with the subduction rate. However, at the fracture scale, the process is highly nonlinear, and there must be small

  3. Finite element modeling of dental restoration through multi-material laser densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kun

    To provide guidance for intelligent selection of various parameters in the Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process for dental restorations, finite element modeling (FEM) has been carried out to investigate the MMLD process. These modeling investigations include the thermal analysis of the nominal surface temperature that should be adopted during experiments in order to achieve the desired microstructure; the effects of the volume shrinkage due to transformation from a powder compact to dense liquid on the temperature distribution and the size of the transformation zone; the evolution of transient temperature, transient stresses, residual stresses and distortions; and the effects of laser processing conditions, such as fabrication sequences, laser scanning patterns, component sizes, preheating temperatures, laser scanning rates, initial porosities, and thicknesses of each powder layer, on the final quality of the component fabricated via the MMLD process. The simulation results are compared with the experiments. It is found that the predicted temperature distribution matches the experiments very well. The nominal surface temperature applied on the dental porcelain body should be below 1273 K to prevent the forming of the un-desired microstructure (i.e., a leucite-free glassy phase). The simplified models that do not include the volume shrinkage effect provide good estimations of the temperature field and the size of the laser-densified body, although the shape of the laser-densified body predicted is different from that obtained in the experiment. It is also fount that warping and residual thermal stresses of the laser-densified component are more sensitive to the chamber preheating temperature and the thickness of each powder layer than to the laser scanning rate and the initial porosity of the powder layer. The major mechanism responsible for these phenomena is identified to be related to the change of the temperature gradient induced by these laser

  4. Sub-micron fracture mechanism in silica-based glass activated by permanent densification from high-strain loading

    DOE PAGES

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Waters, Shirley B.; Parten, Randy J.; Pye, L. David

    2016-04-26

    Several silica-based glasses were fractured at high strain energy via drop-weight testing on small specimens. A cylindrical specimen geometry was chosen to promote initially simple, axisymmetric, and uniform compressive loading. The imposed uniaxial compressive strain at impact was sufficiently high to qualitatively cause permanent densification. Produced fragments were collected for postmortem and a fraction of them, for all the silica-based glasses, consistently had distinct sub-micron-sized fractures (~ 300–1000 nm), designated here as “microkernels”, on their surfaces. They would most often appear as a sub-micron pore on the fragment - apparently if the microkernel had popped out as a consequence ofmore » the local crack plane running through it, tensile-strain release, and the associated formation of the fragment it was on. No fractographic evidence was found to show the microkernels were associated with local failure initiation. However, their positioning and habit sometimes suggested they were associated with localized crack branching and that they could have influenced secondary fracturing that occurred during overall crushing and comminution and associated fragment size and shape creation. Furthermore, the size range of these microkernels is much too small to affect structural flexure strength of these glasses for most applications but are of a size and concentration that may affect their ballistic, shock, crush, and comminution responses when permanent densification is concomitantly occurring.« less

  5. Effect of heating rate on the densification of NdFeB alloys sintered by an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Yang, Yi; Lu, Dong; Huang, Kun-lan; Wang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    This study introduces a novel method of electric field sintering for preparing NdFeB magnets. NdFeB alloy compacts were all sintered by electric fields for 8 min at 1000°C with different preset heating rates. The characteristics of electric field sintering and the effects of heating rate on the sintering densification of NdFeB alloys were also studied. It is found that electric field sintering is a new non-pressure rapid sintering method for preparing NdFeB magnets with fine grains at a relatively lower sintering temperature and in a shorter sintering time. Using this method, the sintering temperature and process of the compacts can be controlled accurately. When the preset heating rate increasing from 5 to 2000°C/s the densification of NdFeB sintered compacts gradually improves. As the preset heating rate is 2000°C/s, Nd-rich phases are small, dispersed and uniformly distributed in the sintered compact, and the magnet has a better microstructure than that made by conventional vacuum sintering. Also, the maximum energy product of the sintered magnet reaches 95% of conventionally vacuum sintered magnets.

  6. Densification of Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride with the Addition of Fine Si Powder Effects on the Sinterability and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sea-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Rae; Park, Young-Jo; Ko, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hai-Doo; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The densification behavior and strength of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides (SRBSN) that contain Lu2O3-SiO2 additives were improved by the addition of fine Si powder. Dense specimens (relative density: 99.5%) were obtained by gas-pressure sintering (GPS) at 1850oC through the addition of fine Si. In contrast, the densification of conventional specimens did not complete at 1950oC. The fine Si decreased the onset temperature of shrinkage and increased the shrinkage rate because the additive helped the compaction of green bodies and induced the formation of fine Si3N4 particles after nitridation and sintering at and above 1600oC. The amount of residual SiO2 within the specimens was not strongly affected by adding fine Si powder because most of the SiO2 layer that had formed on the fine Si particles decomposed during nitridation. The maximum strength and fracture toughness of the specimens were 991 MPa and 8.0 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  7. Controlling the oxygen potential to improve the densification and the solid solution formation of uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzati, Ségolène; Vaudez, Stéphane; Belin, Renaud C.; Léchelle, Jacques; Marc, Yves; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Heintz, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-01

    Diffusion mechanisms occurring during the sintering of oxide ceramics are affected by the oxygen content of the atmosphere, as it imposes the nature and the concentration of structural defects in the material. Thus, the oxygen partial pressure, p(O2), of the sintering gas has to be precisely controlled, otherwise a large dispersion in various parameters, critical for the manufacturing of ceramics such as nuclear oxides fuels, is likely to occur. In the present work, the densification behaviour and the solid solution formation of a mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) were investigated. The initial mixture, composed of 70% UO2 + 30% PuO2, was studied at p(O2) ranging from 10-15 to 10-4 atm up to 1873 K both with dilatometry and in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction. This study has shown that the initial oxides UO2+x and PuO2-x first densify during heating and then the solid solution formation starts at about 200 K higher. The densification and the formation of the solid solution both occur at a lower temperature when p(O2) increases. Based on this result, it is possible to better define the sintering atmosphere, eventually leading to optimized parameters such as density, oxygen stoichiometry and cations homogenization of nuclear ceramics and of a wide range of industrial ceramic materials.

  8. Mechanism of densification in silica glass under pressure as revealed by a bottom-up pairwise effective interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.

    2012-04-01

    A new short-range pairwise numerical potential for silica is presented. The potential is derived from a single ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation of molten silica using the force-matching method with the forces being represented numerically by piecewise functions (splines). The AIMD simulation is performed using the Born-Oppenheimer method with the generalized gradient approximation (BLYP) for the XC energy functional. The new effective potential includes a soft-repulsive shoulder to describe the interactions of oxygen ions at short separations. The new potential, despite being short-ranged and derived from single-phase data, exhibits a good transferability to silica crystalline polymorphs and amorphous silica. The importance of the O-O soft-repulsive shoulder interaction on glass densification under cold and shock compressions is assessed from MD simulations of silica glass under room and shock Hugoniot conditions, respectively. Results from these simulations indicate that the appearance of oxygen complexes (primarily pairs) interacting through soft-repulsive shoulder potential occurs at 8-10 GPa, and under cold compression conditions becomes notable at 40 GPa, essentially coinciding with the transition to a Si sixfold coordination state. An analysis of changes in system structure in compressed and shocked states reveals that the O ions interacting through the soft-repulsive shoulder potential in denser states of silica glass may create a mechanical multi-stability under elevated pressures and thus to contribute to the observed anomalous densification.

  9. Liquid Oxygen Propellant Densification Unit Ground Tested With a Large-Scale Flight-Weight Tank for the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    Propellant densification has been identified as a critical technology in the development of single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicles. Technology to create supercooled high-density liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) is a key means to lowering launch vehicle costs. The densification of cryogenic propellants through subcooling allows 8 to 10 percent more propellant mass to be stored in a given unit volume, thereby improving the launch vehicle's overall performance. This allows for higher propellant mass fractions than would be possible with conventional normal boiling point cryogenic propellants, considering the normal boiling point of LO2 and LH2.

  10. Volcanic sintering and densification of glassy and crystalline ash: Kinetics, strength recovery and seismogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Lavallee, Y.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    consideration permitted us to explore the effect of sintering on the stress required for dynamic macroscopic failure of synthesized samples at conditions relevant to volcanic conduits. Sintering and densification results in a non linear increase in strength and micromechanical modelling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains this trend as a function of pore fraction and size. We also assessed the ability of precursory microseismic signals to be used as a failure forecast proxy according to drastic changes in porosity (˜40 to 0%) and material strength (>100 MPa). Homogeneous single-phase liquids to heterogeneous multi-phase (pores in glasses, pores and crystals in other volcanic rocks) liquids display different microseismic patterns preceding bulk sample failure, somewhat mimicking the range of seismic precursory signals observed at volcanoes with magma of similar viscosity and mechanical characteristics. Defect-free glass for example will rapidly accumulate a huge amount of strain energy as it requires to exceed an elevated strength for failure (˜500-700 MPa) and suddenly release it via pervasing microfracturing. Associated microseismic acceleration will display almost no or very late forewarning and seismic-based failure prediction will be hard to make.

  11. Densification kinetics of glassy and crystalline volcanic ash and subsequent predictability associated with its fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jeremie; Wadsworth, Fabian; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    consideration permitted us to explore the effect of sintering on the stress required for dynamic macroscopic failure of synthesized samples at conditions relevant to volcanic conduits. Sintering and densification results in a non linear increase in strength and micromechanical modelling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains this trend as a function of pore fraction and size. We also assessed the ability of precursory microseismic signals to be used as a failure forecast proxy according to drastic changes in porosity (˜40 to 0%) and material strength (>102 MPa). Homogeneous single-phase liquids to heterogeneous multi-phase (pores in glasses, pores and crystals in other volcanic rocks) liquids display different microseismic patterns preceding bulk sample failure, somewhat mimicking the range of seismic precursory signals observed at volcanoes with magma of similar viscosity and mechanical characteristics. Defect-free glass for example will rapidly accumulate a huge amount of strain energy as it requires to exceed an elevated strength for failure (˜500-700 MPa) and suddenly release it via localised microfracturing. Microseismic acceleration associated with defect-poor rocks/magmas display trial or occasionally little forewarning with the implication that seismic-based failure prediction may be difficult to make in real-time monitoring.

  12. Garnet-forming reactions in felsic orthogneiss: Implications for densification and strengthening of the lower continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. L.; Dumond, G.; Mahan, K.; Regan, S.; Holland, M.

    2014-11-01

    Growth of garnet and pyroxene in orthogneiss from the Athabasca granulite terrane (AGT), northern Saskatchewan, provides a model for progressive densification and strengthening of the lower continental crust with implications for the recycling and long-term evolution of continental crust. Two distinct assemblages and textures are preserved in granitic and granodioritic gneiss. Low-strain orthogneiss displays igneous textures and assemblages of Opx+Kfs+Pl+Mag+Qz (± Bt, Hbl, Ilm). High-strain, dynamically recrystallized tectonites have additional garnet, clinopyroxene, and a more Na-rich plagioclase, along with relict orthopyroxene. The reaction (Opx+Ca-rich Pl=Grt+Cpx+Na-rich Pl+Qz) is informally called the “Mary reaction” after documented occurrences in the Mary granitoid batholith. The reaction represents the transition from medium-pressure to high-pressure granulite (Green and Ringwood, 1967), but reaction progress was achieved in these deep crustal rocks along an isobaric cooling path at ca. 1 GPa (35-40 km-depth). Ambient P-T conditions were well within the product (low-T-side) stability field. The abundance of the product assemblage (Grt+Cpx+Na-rich Pl) increases with deformation. Metastable igneous assemblages are widely preserved in low-strain samples. With increasing strain, garnet occurs within recrystallized mantles of plagioclase porphyroclasts, and clinopyroxene occurs in the deformed tails of orthopyroxene crystals. Deformation is interpreted to aid in the breakdown of plagioclase and/or the nucleation of garnet and clinopyroxene. Garnet and pyroxene modes have been observed to exceed 10 vol% in the AGT, but larger amounts are possible because Ca-rich plagioclase and orthopyroxene remnants are widely preserved. Densities increase from ca. 2.6 to ca. 3.0 g/cm and modeled P-wave velocities approach 7.0 km/s in felsic rocks. Densities in mafic rocks approach 3.4 cm. The reaction occurred at least twice in the AGT, 2.6 and 1.9 Ga, and may have

  13. Simulation of the Densification of Semicrystalline Polymer Powders during the Selective Laser Sintering Process: Application to Nylon-12,

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L.; Makradi, A.; Ahzi, Said; Remond, Y.; Sun, Xin

    2008-06-01

    The heating and densification processes of semi-crystalline polymer powders, during the selective laser sintering process, are simulated using the finite element method. Based on previously developed three-dimensional approach for the sintering of amorphous polymer powders, the modeling methodology is extended to semi-crystalline polymers by taking into account the effects of latent heat during melting. In these simulations, the temperature dependent thermal conductivity, specific heat, density and the effect of latent heat are computed then used as material constants for the integration of the heat equation. Results for temperature and density distribution using Nylon-12 powder are presented and discussed. The effects of processing parameters on the density distribution are also presented.

  14. Pressure-induced densification in GeO{sub 2} glass: A transmission x-ray microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu Zeng, Qiaoshi; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Wendy L.

    2013-12-23

    Nanoscale transmission x-ray microscopy measurements have been performed to determine the effect of pressure (P) on the volume (V) change in GeO{sub 2} glass up to 38.5 GPa. The P-V data show a continuous increase upon compression, indicating that the density-driven structural transformation is a gradual process. Over the pressure range studied, a transition is observed at approximately 10–13 GPa, where the material displays distinct compression behaviors. The pressure-induced densification that involves the coordination number change has been discussed. Using this newly developed high-pressure imaging technique with tens of nanometer resolution, we have provided a direct and unequivocal way for measuring density of amorphous materials to much higher pressures with accuracy rivaling x-ray diffraction of crystalline solids.

  15. Controllable film densification and interface flatness for high-performance amorphous indium oxide based thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ou-Yang, Wei E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Gao, Xu; Lin, Meng-Fang; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Nabatame, Toshihide

    2014-10-20

    To avoid the problem of air sensitive and wet-etched Zn and/or Ga contained amorphous oxide transistors, we propose an alternative amorphous semiconductor of indium silicon tungsten oxide as the channel material for thin film transistors. In this study, we employ the material to reveal the relation between the active thin film and the transistor performance with aid of x-ray reflectivity study. By adjusting the pre-annealing temperature, we find that the film densification and interface flatness between the film and gate insulator are crucial for achieving controllable high-performance transistors. The material and findings in the study are believed helpful for realizing controllable high-performance stable transistors.

  16. The effect of volume phase changes, mass transport, sunlight penetration, and densification on the thermal regime of icy regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, Fraser P.; Salvail, James R.; Matson, Dennis L.; Brown, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    The present quantitative modeling of convective, condensational, and sublimational effects on porous ice crust volumes subjected to solar radiation encompasses the effect of such insolation's penetration of visible bandpass-translucent light, but opaque to the IR bandpass. Quasi-steady-state temperatures, H2O mass fluxes, and ice mass-density change rates are computed as functions of time of day and ice depth. When the effects of latent heat and mass transport are included in the model, the enhancement of near-surface temperature due to the 'solid-state greenhouse effect' is substantially diminished. When latent heat, mass transport, and densification effects are considered, however, a significant solid-state greenhouse effect is shown to be compatible with both morphological evidence for high crust strengths and icy shell decoupling from the lithosphere.

  17. Gravity induced densification of floating crude oil by granular materials: Effect of particle size and surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin

    2016-06-15

    Densification and sedimentation of floating crude oil to the bottom of water column reduces the radius of a spill and its mobility, preventing direct contamination of beaches, coastal flora and fauna. Performances of different natural granular materials were evaluated for capturing efficiency of floating fresh South Louisiana crude oil. The granular materials studied were quartz sand with medium (20-30mesh) and fine (40-100mesh) particle size, limestone with coarse (4-10mesh) and medium (16-40mesh) particle size, beach sand (20-80mesh), and clay (kaolin with ferric oxide; passing 200mesh). Beach sand (mixture of quartz and limestone 20-80mesh) and limestone (16-40mesh) demonstrated better performance for capture, densification and submergence of the crude oil among the materials evaluated. The behavior of granular particles with the hydrophobic phase can be classified as (1) immersion entrapment inside the hydrophobic phase (slurry), and (2) partial encapsulation of the hydrophobic phase by a single layer of particles (raft). With crude oil, the particles were primarily entrapped within the hydrophobic phase. Study of the effect of particle size and morphology (i.e., porosity) of the granular materials on capture performance showed that average surface pore size did not have a significant effect on aggregation with oil, however, higher capture efficiency was observed with materials of higher surface porosity (beach sand and limestone). The experiments revealed that there is a critical particle size range (passing 10mesh) which resulted in more effective aggregation of the granular materials with crude oil.

  18. Solid-State Densification of Spun-Cast Self-Assembled Monolayers for Use in Ultra-Thin Hybrid Dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Daniel O.; Acton, Orb; Weidner, Tobias; Cernetic, Nathan; Baio, Joe E.; Castner, David G.; Ma, Hong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-thin self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-oxide hybrid dielectrics have gained significant interest for their application in low-voltage organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). A [8-(11-phenoxy-undecyloxy)-octyl]phosphonic acid (PhO-19-PA) SAM on ultrathin AlOx (2.5 nm) has been developed to significantly enhance the dielectric performance of inorganic oxides through reduction of leakage current while maintaining similar capacitance to the underlying oxide structure. Rapid processing of this SAM in ambient conditions is achieved by spin coating, however, as-cast monolayer density is not sufficient for dielectric applications. Thermal annealing of a bulk spun-cast PhO-19-PA molecular film is explored as a mechanism for SAM densification. SAM density, or surface coverage, and order are examined as a function of annealing temperature. These SAM characteristics are probed through atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). It is found that at temperatures sufficient to melt the as-cast bulk molecular film, SAM densification is achieved; leading to a rapid processing technique for high performance SAM-oxide hybrid dielectric systems utilizing a single wet processing step. To demonstrate low-voltage devices based on this hybrid dielectric (with leakage current density of 7.7×10−8 A cm−2 and capacitance density of 0.62 µF cm−2 at 3 V), pentacene thin-film transistors (OTFTs) are fabricated and yield sub 2 V operation and charge carrier mobilites of up to 1.1 cm2 V−1 s−1. PMID:24288423

  19. Firn density profile at Megadunes, East Antarctica, calls for an improved densification model for low accumulation sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, M.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    We report a density profile of the firn at Megadunes, East Antarctica (80o78'S; 124o50'E). The Megadunes site is characterized by a low mass accumulation rate (2.9 g/cm2/yr) and cold temperature (mean annual = -49.5oC). Validating existing firn densification models using a density profile of such a site is important because such models, either purely empirical or mechanistic, have been calibrated with few sites that are analogous to a glacial condition (ultralow accumulation and temperature). We make use of CO2 concentrations in the lock-in (or non-diffusive) zone to obtain the accumulation rate, assuming that the gas in the lock-in zone ages at the same rate as the surrounding ice [Battle et al., 1996], and assuming that the gas enclosure rate must equal the long-term mean accumulation rate. This estimate is preliminary and may change when results from beta analysis of cores become available. Our density profile shows that the widely used pure empirical model by Herron and Langway [1980] overestimates the close-off depth by 16 %, and the semi-mechanistic model by Pimienta and Barnola [Barnola et al., 1991] also overestimates the close-off depth by 26 %. Our study at the Megadunes site indicates that the δ 15N of N2 paradox for glacial ice from East Antarctica would have partly resulted from a poorly calibrated densification model for a `glacial-like' condition and a thick convective zone as we observed at the Megadunes site [Severinghaus et al., in prep].

  20. Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40

  1. Firn densification in a Late Noachian “icy highlands” Mars: Implications for ice sheet evolution and thermal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, James P.; Head, James W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent modeling of a thicker early CO2 martian atmosphere and Late Noachian climate predicts that for pressures beyond a fraction of a bar, atmosphere-surface thermal coupling occurs, resulting in adiabatic cooling of high areas across Mars. This promotes the transport of water ice from relatively warmer low-lying areas to the highlands, where deposition and accumulation of water ice result in an "icy highlands" Late Noachian Mars. Deposits will remain stable in the highlands under nominal Late Noachian conditions, but the potential exists for punctuated heating by both top-down (e.g. impacts, volcanism) and bottom-up (e.g. elevated geothermal heat flux) processes. Important in understanding melt generation from these processes is the state of the accumulated snow and ice. Through modeling of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" framework we assess: (1) the nature of snow accumulation and the physical growth and evolution of the predicted ice deposits, and (2) the implications for the thermal properties of the ice sheets and the response to heating events. Analysis of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" context indicates that: (1) the upper layers of the ice sheet will be more vulnerable to melting from top-down heating processes because they are comprised of the least dense and least thermally conductive ice, and (2) even with a low thermal conductivity firn layer, basal melting is only likely to occur through a combination of top-down and bottom-up heating. This is because at the nominal mean annual surface temperatures and estimated effective thermal conductivities, the predicted ice sheet thicknesses do not produce enough basal warming to initiate melting for plausible geothermal heat fluxes. Variations in spin-axis/orbital parameters alone are not predicted to cause widespread ablation (melting and sublimation) of the icy highlands ice sheets.

  2. Gravity induced densification of floating crude oil by granular materials: Effect of particle size and surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin

    2016-06-15

    Densification and sedimentation of floating crude oil to the bottom of water column reduces the radius of a spill and its mobility, preventing direct contamination of beaches, coastal flora and fauna. Performances of different natural granular materials were evaluated for capturing efficiency of floating fresh South Louisiana crude oil. The granular materials studied were quartz sand with medium (20-30mesh) and fine (40-100mesh) particle size, limestone with coarse (4-10mesh) and medium (16-40mesh) particle size, beach sand (20-80mesh), and clay (kaolin with ferric oxide; passing 200mesh). Beach sand (mixture of quartz and limestone 20-80mesh) and limestone (16-40mesh) demonstrated better performance for capture, densification and submergence of the crude oil among the materials evaluated. The behavior of granular particles with the hydrophobic phase can be classified as (1) immersion entrapment inside the hydrophobic phase (slurry), and (2) partial encapsulation of the hydrophobic phase by a single layer of particles (raft). With crude oil, the particles were primarily entrapped within the hydrophobic phase. Study of the effect of particle size and morphology (i.e., porosity) of the granular materials on capture performance showed that average surface pore size did not have a significant effect on aggregation with oil, however, higher capture efficiency was observed with materials of higher surface porosity (beach sand and limestone). The experiments revealed that there is a critical particle size range (passing 10mesh) which resulted in more effective aggregation of the granular materials with crude oil. PMID:26971215

  3. Network cation coordination in aluminoborosilicate and Mg- aluminosilicate glasses: pressure effects in recovered structural changes and densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, S.; Stebbins, J. F.; Sisson, T. W.; Hankins, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we compare the aluminum and boron coordination of glass samples recovered from piston-cylinder experiments carried out at 1 to 3 GPa and near to their ambient glass transition temperature (Tg), which we have found gives a more accurate picture of high pressure structural changes than experiments involving quenching from above the liquidus, as large pressure drops can occur in the latter. Aluminoborosilicate glasses with excess modifier (Ca, La and Y- aluminoborosilicate) quenched from melts at 1-3 GPa were studied with B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to assess relative effects on two different network cations. Structural changes in the Y-aluminoborosilicate are dramatic, going from mostly AlO4 at low pressure to mostly AlO5 and AlO6 at 3 GPa. Large increases in BO4 (vs. BO3) are also seen. Mg-aluminosilicate glasses, both tectosilicate (Mg2Al4Si6O20) and with excess modifier composition (Mg3Al2Si6O18) quenched from melts at 1-3 GPa pressure were studied with Al-27 MAS NMR. In contrast to our previous study (Bista et al., Am. Min., in press) of jadeite glass, where only 0.5% of fivefold aluminum was seen in glass recovered from 3 GPa, five and six fold aluminum species increase significantly with increasing pressure in both Mg aluminosilicate glass compositions studied here. We observe that the tectosilicate Mg aluminosilicate glass has more higher coordinated aluminum than the excess modifier containing composition in the pressure range in our study. In the previous study (Bista et al., in press) of jadeite and calcium aluminosilicate (Ca3Al2Si6O18) glasses, 6-8% densification was observed in glasses recovered from 3 GPa. In this study of Mg aluminosilicate glasses, we observe 12% densification in glasses recovered from 3 GPa. Both types of observation confirm that structural and density changes with pressure are enhanced by higher field strength modifier cations, and will be especially important in Mg- and Fe-rich mantle melts.

  4. Effects of selenization conditions on densification of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films prepared by spray deposition of CIGS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeJin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Yun, Jae Ho; Yoon, Kyung Hoon

    2009-06-01

    Spray deposited porous CIGS nanoparticle-derived thin films were selenized in a two zone rapid thermal annealing furnace and effects of various selenization parameters including Se evaporation temperature, flow rate of carrier gas, and substrate temperature on densification of the CIGS layers were investigated. It was found that higher Se supply to CIGS nanoparticles either by increasing Se evaporation temperature or by increasing the flow rate of carrier gas resulted in larger CIGS grains with higher degree of crystallinity, while it also induced formation of a thicker MoSe2 layer in-between CIGS and Mo which resulted in partial detachment of CIGS/MoSe2/Mo layers from the glass substrate. Densification of CIGS layer by growth of nanoparticles and formation of thick MoSe2 were explained by a liquid Se assisted reaction rather than by a vapor phase Se assisted reaction.

  5. On the Densification Behavior of (0.2, 0.5, and 1 Wt Pct) CNT-YSZ Ceramic Composites Processed via Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanam, Abhinav; Bichler, Lukas; Fong, Randy

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is a promising thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications due to its stability and chemical inertness. As was demonstrated with other technical ceramics ( e.g., Alumina), addition of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) to a ceramic matrix may significantly enhance its mechanical properties. In this work, 8 mol pct YSZ with 0.2, 0.5, and 1 wt pct CNT composites were fabricated via the spark plasma sintering process. The densification, Vicker's microhardness, specific gravity, and microstructure evolution of the composites were investigated. The results suggest that the addition of CNTs to YSZ hindered densification and grain growth during SPS processing leading to inhomogeneous grain size distribution. However, the CNTs had a profound impact on the hardness of the composite ceramics, with an increase from 697 HV (YSZ) to 1195 HV (1 wt pctCNT-YSZ).

  6. Understanding the densification process of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x round wires with overpressure processing and its effect on critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matras, M. R.; Jiang, J.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Hellstrom, E. E.

    2016-10-01

    Overpressure (OP) processing increases the critical current density ({{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}}) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (2212) round wires by shrinking the surrounding Ag matrix around the 2212 filaments, driving them close to full density and greatly increasing the 2212 grain connectivity. Indeed densification is vital for attaining the highest {{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}}. Here, we investigate the time and temperature dependence of the wire densification. We find that the wire diameter decreases by 3.8 ± 0.3% after full heat treatment at 50 atm and 100 atm OP. At 50 atm OP pressure, the filaments start densifying above 700 °C and reach a 3.30 ± 0.07% smaller diameter after 2 h at 820 °C, which is below the melting point of 2212 powder. The densification is homogeneous and does not change the filament shape before melting. The growth of non-superconducting phases is observed at 820 °C, suggesting that time should be minimized at high temperature prior to melting the 2212 powder. Study of an open-ended 2.2 m long wire sample shows that full densification and the high OP {{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}} ({{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}} varies by about 3.1 times over the 2.2 m long wire) is reached about 1 m from the open ends, thus showing that coil-length wires can be protected from leaky seals by adding at least 1 m of sacrificial wire at each end.

  7. Influence of processing parameters on laser penetration depth and melting/re-melting densification during selective laser melting of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guanqun; Gu, Dongdong; Dai, Donghua; Xia, Mujian; Ma, Chenglong; Chang, Kun

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional mesoscopic model, considering the powder-to-solid transition, motion of gas bubbles within molten pool and the effect of surface tension, has been established in order to investigate the evolution rule of pores and re-melting densification mechanism during selective laser melting of AlSi10Mg. The results indicated that re-melting phenomenon of previous fabricated layer induced by laser melting of current powder layer played a crucial role on the increase in densification rate. During the re-melting process, the trapped gas pores in previous layer rose up swiftly and came to the surface consequently, resulting in remarkably elevated densification in previous layer. The influences of laser scan speed on the single-track morphology, types of pores and laser penetration depth have also been studied. It showed that the maximum re-melting depth (31 µm) was attained, and meanwhile, pores left in preceding layer got eliminated completely due to the mass transfer within molten pool, when an appropriate laser scan speed (150 mm/s) was applied. In this case, reasonable laser energy per unit length and irradiation time tended to enhance the laser penetration depth for powder bed and decrease the porosity in as-fabricated layer. A series of experimental study were performed to verify the reliability of the above mesoscopic simulation, including the surface topography of single track and the types of pores. The redistribution of bubbles between the adjacent layers as well as the localized re-melting densification, which were observed from the longitudinal section of samples, was in good agreement with simulation results.

  8. Real-time assessment of granule densification in high shear wet granulation and application to scale-up of a placebo and a brivanib alaninate formulation.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Sheverev, Valery A; Stepaniuk, Vadim; Badawy, Sherif; Stevens, Tim; Macias, Kevin; Wolf, Avi; Pandey, Preetanshu; Bindra, Dilbir; Varia, Sailesh

    2015-03-01

    Real-time monitoring and control of high shear wet granulation (HSWG) using process analytical technologies is crucial to process design, scale-up, and reproducible manufacture. Although significant progress has been made in real-time measurement of granule size distribution using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), real-time in-line assessment of granule densification remains challenging. In this study, a drag force flow (DFF) sensor was developed and used to probe wet mass consistency in real-time. In addition, responses from FBRM and DFF sensors were compared to assess complementarity of information on granulation progress from the two probes. A placebo and a brivanib alaninate formulation were granulated with different concentrations of binder or water, respectively, while measuring granule size growth, densification, and DFF sensor response. The DFF sensor was able to quantitatively characterize with high resolution a response of wet mass consistency distinct from granule size distribution. The wet mass consistency parameter correlated well with granule densification, which was shown as a critical material attribute that correlated with tablet dissolution. In addition, application of DFF sensor to scale-up of granulation was demonstrated. These results showed the value of wet mass consistency measurement using DFF for WG monitoring and control. PMID:25470221

  9. Enhanced Densification of Carbonyl Iron Powder Compacts by the Retardation of Exaggerated Grain Growth through the Use of High Heating Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kuen-Shyang; Lu, Yung-Chung; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chen, Bor-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    An investigation of the effect of heating rates on the densification behavior of carbonyl iron powder compacts, particularly on the exaggerated grain growth during the α- γ phase transformation, was carried out in this study. Compacts heated at 1200 °C/min and then sintered for 90 minutes at 1200 °C attained 7.14 g/cm3, while those heated at 10 °C/min reached only 6.61 g/cm3. Dilatometer curves using heating rates of 2 °C/min, 5 °C/min, 10 °C/min, 30 °C/min, and 90 °C/min demonstrate that 90 °C/min yields the highest sintered density. The microstructure analysis shows that high heating rates inhibit exaggerated grain growth during the phase transformation by keeping the interparticle neck size small and pinning the grain boundaries. This explanation is supported by the calculation that shows that the energy barrier preventing the grain boundary from breaking away from the neck is reduced hyperbolically as the neck size and the amount of shrinkage increase. The high heating rate, however, shows little beneficial effect for materials that have no allotropic phase transformation or have less drastic grain growth during heating, such as nickel and copper. Thus, bypassing the low temperatures to suppress the surface diffusion mechanism, which does not contribute to densification, is ruled out as the main reason for the enhanced densification of carbonyl iron powders.

  10. Real-time assessment of granule densification in high shear wet granulation and application to scale-up of a placebo and a brivanib alaninate formulation.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Sheverev, Valery A; Stepaniuk, Vadim; Badawy, Sherif; Stevens, Tim; Macias, Kevin; Wolf, Avi; Pandey, Preetanshu; Bindra, Dilbir; Varia, Sailesh

    2015-03-01

    Real-time monitoring and control of high shear wet granulation (HSWG) using process analytical technologies is crucial to process design, scale-up, and reproducible manufacture. Although significant progress has been made in real-time measurement of granule size distribution using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), real-time in-line assessment of granule densification remains challenging. In this study, a drag force flow (DFF) sensor was developed and used to probe wet mass consistency in real-time. In addition, responses from FBRM and DFF sensors were compared to assess complementarity of information on granulation progress from the two probes. A placebo and a brivanib alaninate formulation were granulated with different concentrations of binder or water, respectively, while measuring granule size growth, densification, and DFF sensor response. The DFF sensor was able to quantitatively characterize with high resolution a response of wet mass consistency distinct from granule size distribution. The wet mass consistency parameter correlated well with granule densification, which was shown as a critical material attribute that correlated with tablet dissolution. In addition, application of DFF sensor to scale-up of granulation was demonstrated. These results showed the value of wet mass consistency measurement using DFF for WG monitoring and control.

  11. Liquid Oxygen Propellant Densification Production and Performance Test Results With a Large-Scale Flight-Weight Propellant Tank for the X33 RLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.; Meyer, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes in-detail a test program that was initiated at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) involving the cryogenic densification of liquid oxygen (LO2). A large scale LO2 propellant densification system rated for 200 gpm and sized for the X-33 LO2 propellant tank, was designed, fabricated and tested at the GRC. Multiple objectives of the test program included validation of LO2 production unit hardware and characterization of densifier performance at design and transient conditions. First, performance data is presented for an initial series of LO2 densifier screening and check-out tests using densified liquid nitrogen. The second series of tests show performance data collected during LO2 densifier test operations with liquid oxygen as the densified product fluid. An overview of LO2 X-33 tanking operations and load tests with the 20,000 gallon Structural Test Article (STA) are described. Tank loading testing and the thermal stratification that occurs inside of a flight-weight launch vehicle propellant tank were investigated. These operations involved a closed-loop recirculation process of LO2 flow through the densifier and then back into the STA. Finally, in excess of 200,000 gallons of densified LO2 at 120 oR was produced with the propellant densification unit during the demonstration program, an achievement that s never been done before in the realm of large-scale cryogenic tests.

  12. Zirconium Carbide Produced by Spark Plasma Sintering and Hot Pressing: Densification Kinetics, Grain Growth, and Thermal Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, Xialu; Back, Christina; Izhvanov, Oleg; Haines, Christopher; Olevsky, Eugene

    2016-07-14

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been employed to consolidate a micron-sized zirconium carbide (ZrC) powder. ZrC pellets with a variety of relative densities are obtained under different processing parameters. The densification kinetics of ZrC powders subjected to conventional hot pressing and SPS are comparatively studied by applying similar heating and loading profiles. Due to the lack of electric current assistance, the conventional hot pressing appears to impose lower strain rate sensitivity and higher activation energy values than those which correspond to the SPS processing. A finite element simulation is used to analyze the temperature evolution within the volume of ZrCmore » specimens subjected to SPS. The control mechanism for grain growth during the final SPS stage is studied via a recently modified model, in which the grain growth rate dependence on porosity is incorporated. Finally, the constant pressure specific heat and thermal conductivity of the SPS-processed ZrC are determined to be higher than those reported for the hot-pressed ZrC and the benefits of applying SPS are indicated accordingly.« less

  13. Mass densification and defect restoration in chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using Ar plasma excited by microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Kazumasa Motoya, Tsukasa; Uehara, Yasushi; Teramoto, Akinobu; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2014-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been treated with Ar plasma excited by microwave. The changes of the mass densities, carrier trap densities, and thicknesses of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films with the Ar plasma treatments were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) analysis using synchrotron radiation. The densities of carrier trap centers due to defects of Si-O bond network were estimated with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) time-dependent measurement. The changes of the thicknesses due to the oxidation of Si substrates were estimated with the XRR and XPS. The mass densities of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are increased by the Ar plasma treatments. The carrier trap densities of the films are decreased by the treatments. The thicknesses of the films are not changed by the treatments. It has been clarified that the mass densification and defect restoration in the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are caused by the Ar plasma treatments without the oxidation of the Si substrates.

  14. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  15. Liquid propellant densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor); Petrilla, Steve P. (Inventor); Lozano, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Super cooling the cryogenic liquid propellant in a vehicle propellant tank densities the propellant allowing the vehicle propellant tank to carry more fuel in the same volume tank while lowering the vapor pressure and thus the tank operating pressure. Lowering the tank operating pressure reduces the stress and therefore allows the walls of the tank to be thinner. Both the smaller tank volume and thinner tank wall results in an overall smaller and lighter vehicle with increased payload capability. The cryogenic propellant can be supercooled well below the normal boiling point temperature level by transporting the liquid propellant from the vehicle tanks to a ground based cooling unit which utilizes a combination of heat exchanger and compressor. The compressor lowers the coolant fluid bath pressure resulting in a low temperature boiling liquid which is subsequently used to cool the recirculating liquid. The cooled propellant is then returned to the vehicle propellant tank. In addition to reducing the vehicle size and weight the invention also allows location of the vent valve on the ground, elimination of on-board recirculation pumps or bleed systems, smaller and lighter engine pumps and valves, lighter and more stable ullage gas, and significant reduction in tank fill operation. All of these mentioned attributes provide lower vehicle weight and cost.

  16. DEVELOPING FIRST-PRINCIPLES REACTIVE FORCE FIELDS AND DENSIFICATION PROCESS FOR Y-DOPED BaZrO3 PROTON-CONDUCTING CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Boris Merinov; Adri van Duin; Sossina Haile; William A. Goddard III

    2004-04-30

    During the third semi-annual period we have mostly finished a series of QM calculations on relevant metals (Pt, Zr, Y, Ba), metal alloys (Y/Zr), metal oxides (ZrO{sub 2}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BaO) and Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}. Based on these data we started developing ReaxFF for further MD simulations of different physico-chemical processes in the electrolyte and at the electrode/electrolyte interface. To accelerate the densification process of BaZrO{sub 3} ceramics at lower temperature an initial screening of all transition elements in the series Sc to Zn has been carried out. It turned out that NiO, CuO and ZnO are the most effective additives for enhancing barium zirconate densification. Characterization (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy) of Zn-, Cu- and Ni-modified BYZ has been performed. The temperature dependence of the bulk conductivity {sigma}{sub gi}, grain boundary conductivity {sigma}{sub gb}, and specific grain boundary conductivity {sigma}{sub sp.gb} were measured. The bulk conductivity of BYZ-Zn4 is slightly lower than that of unmodified BYZ.

  17. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  18. The Impact of Densification by Means of Informal Shacks in the Backyards of Low-Cost Houses on the Environment and Service Delivery in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Govender, Thashlin; Barnes, Jo M.; Pieper, Clarissa H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the state-sponsored low cost housing provided to previously disadvantaged communities in the City of Cape Town. The strain imposed on municipal services by informal densification of unofficial backyard shacks was found to create unintended public health risks. Four subsidized low-cost housing communities were selected within the City of Cape Town in this cross-sectional survey. Data was obtained from 1080 persons with a response rate of 100%. Illegal electrical connections to backyard shacks that are made of flimsy materials posed increased fire risks. A high proportion of main house owners did not pay for water but sold water to backyard dwellers. The design of state-subsidised houses and the unplanned housing in the backyard added enormous pressure on the existing municipal infrastructure and the environment. Municipal water and sewerage systems and solid waste disposal cannot cope with the increased population density and poor sanitation behaviour of the inhabitants of these settlements. The low-cost housing program in South Africa requires improved management and prudent policies to cope with the densification of state-funded low-cost housing settlements. PMID:21695092

  19. A {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li MAS-NMR study of sol-gel lithium triborate glass subjected to thermal densification

    SciTech Connect

    Mustarelli, P.; Quartarone, E.; Benevelli, F.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of thermal densification on a sol-gel lithium triborate glass have been studied by {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li NMR both static and at the magic angle (MAS). {sup 11}B spectra show that the boron average coordination is similar in sol-gel and melt-quenched samples and it does not change upon annealing. {sup 7}Li T{sub 1} is shorter ({approximately}8.5 s) in sol-gel glass as prepared than in its melt-quenched counterpart ({approximately}13 s) due to dipolar-dipolar Li-H interaction. {sup 7}Li longitudinal relaxation behavior captures a part of a complex devitrification process which is driven by the loss of both residual solvent and moisture.

  20. A comparison study on the densification behavior and mechanical properties of gelcast vs conventionally formed B{sub 4}C sintered conventionally and by microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Menchhofer, P.A.; Kiggans, J.O.; Morrow, M.S.; Schechter, D.E.

    1996-06-01

    The utilization of microwave energy for reaching high temperatures necessary to densify B{sub 4}C powder is compared with conventional means of sintering by evaluating the mechanical properties after densification. Microwave energy has been shown to be an effective means for achieving high sintered densities, even though temperatures of {approximately} 2,250 C are required. In this study, green preforms of B{sub 4}C specimens were sintered by both conventional and microwave heating. This study also utilized an advanced forming method called ``Gelcasting`` developed at ORNL. Gelcasting is a fluid forming process whereby high solids suspensions of powders containing dissolved monomers are cast into a mold, then polymerized or ``gelled`` in situ. This investigation compares microstructures and mechanical properties of both Gelcast B{sub 4}C and ``conventionally`` die-pressed B{sub 4}C. The microstructures and final mechanical properties of B{sub 4}C specimens are discussed.

  1. Magnetic properties and densification of Manganese-Zinc soft ferrites (Mn 1-xZn xFe 2O 4) doped with low melting point oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.

    Mn-Zn ferrites have high electrical resistivity, low power loss and high initial permeability up to several MHz range. Oxide additives can greatly affect the magnetic properties of these ferrites. The effects of the additives on the sintering behaviour and magnetic properties of Mn-Zn ferrites are different. Some low melting point additives such as Bi 2O 3 enhance the sintering by forming a liquid phase in the ferrites. The additive V 2O 5 enhances the sintering by increasing bulk diffusion due to the increased vacancy concentration which is accompanied by the solubility of V 5+ in the ferrites. Some additives are cations that are soluble in the host lattice and enter regular positions on the tetrahedral or octahedral sites. This paper investigates the effect of several low melting point oxides on the magnetic properties, microstructure and densification of Mn-Zn soft ferrites.

  2. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  3. Influences of Gd2Ti2O7 sintering aid on the densification, ionic conductivity and thermal expansion of Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ting; Zhang, Lei; Song, Xiao; Dong, Xiaolei; Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Wang, Meng; Li, Ming; Wang, Haiqian

    2014-09-01

    The effects of Gd2Ti2O7 (GT) as sintering aid on the densification, electrical properties and thermal expansion of Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 (GDC) are examined. Samples added with TiO2 sintering aid are also tested for comparison. It is found that by sintering at a moderate temperature of 1400 °C for 5 h, the relative density of the GT-added GDC can reach over 97% as the molar ratio of GT/GDC reaches 0.02 or higher. XRD analysis indicates that GT does not react with GDC, while TiO2 reacts with Gd in GDC to form GT. The ionic conductivities of the GT-added and the TiO2-added GDC are analyzed by AC impedance spectroscopy at 500-700 °C. The result shows that although the ionic conductivity of the GT-added GDC decreases as the GT/GDC molar ratio increases up to 0.05, it is still higher than that of 8YSZ and much higher than that of the GDC added with an equivalent amount of TiO2. It is also found that the thermal expansion coefficient of GDC decreases as the amount of GT increases. These results show that GT is an excellent sintering aid for GDC, and the optimal molar ratio of GT/GDC is 0.02 in terms of densification and ionic conductivity.

  4. Matlab based automatization of an inverse surface temperature modelling procedure for Greenland ice cores using an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Michael; Kobashi, Takuro; Kindler, Philippe; Guillevic, Myriam; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In order to study Northern Hemisphere (NH) climate interactions and variability, getting access to high resolution surface temperature records of the Greenland ice sheet is an integral condition. For example, understanding the causes for changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and related effects for the NH [Broecker et al. (1985); Rahmstorf (2002)] or the origin and processes leading the so called Dansgaard-Oeschger events in glacial conditions [Johnsen et al. (1992); Dansgaard et al., 1982] demand accurate and reproducible temperature data. To reveal the surface temperature history, it is suitable to use the isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ15N) from ancient air extracted from ice cores drilled at the Greenland ice sheet. The measured δ15N record of an ice core can be used as a paleothermometer due to the nearly constant isotopic composition of nitrogen in the atmosphere at orbital timescales changes only through firn processes [Severinghaus et. al. (1998); Mariotti (1983)]. To reconstruct the surface temperature for a special drilling site the use of firn models describing gas and temperature diffusion throughout the ice sheet is necessary. For this an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model [Schwander et. al. (1997)] is used. Thereby, a theoretical δ15N record is generated for different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios and compared with measurement data in terms of mean square error (MSE), which leads finally to an optimization problem, namely the finding of a minimal MSE. The goal of the presented study is a Matlab based automatization of this inverse modelling procedure. The crucial point hereby is to find the temperature and accumulation rate input time series which minimizes the MSE. For that, we follow two approaches. The first one is a Monte Carlo type input generator which varies each point in the input time series and calculates the MSE. Then the solutions that fulfil a given limit

  5. Matlab based automatization of an inverse surface temperature modelling procedure for Greenland ice cores using an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Michael; Kobashi, Takuro; Kindler, Philippe; Guillevic, Myriam; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In order to study Northern Hemisphere (NH) climate interactions and variability, getting access to high resolution surface temperature records of the Greenland ice sheet is an integral condition. For example, understanding the causes for changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and related effects for the NH [Broecker et al. (1985); Rahmstorf (2002)] or the origin and processes leading the so called Dansgaard-Oeschger events in glacial conditions [Johnsen et al. (1992); Dansgaard et al., 1982] demand accurate and reproducible temperature data. To reveal the surface temperature history, it is suitable to use the isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ15N) from ancient air extracted from ice cores drilled at the Greenland ice sheet. The measured δ15N record of an ice core can be used as a paleothermometer due to the nearly constant isotopic composition of nitrogen in the atmosphere at orbital timescales changes only through firn processes [Severinghaus et. al. (1998); Mariotti (1983)]. To reconstruct the surface temperature for a special drilling site the use of firn models describing gas and temperature diffusion throughout the ice sheet is necessary. For this an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model [Schwander et. al. (1997)] is used. Thereby, a theoretical δ15N record is generated for different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios and compared with measurement data in terms of mean square error (MSE), which leads finally to an optimization problem, namely the finding of a minimal MSE. The goal of the presented study is a Matlab based automatization of this inverse modelling procedure. The crucial point hereby is to find the temperature and accumulation rate input time series which minimizes the MSE. For that, we follow two approaches. The first one is a Monte Carlo type input generator which varies each point in the input time series and calculates the MSE. Then the solutions that fulfil a given limit

  6. HIP densification project. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Finkelstein, W.

    1997-08-29

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of HIPed aluminum castings as near-net-shape blanks for large electrostatic focusing electrodes in ion lithography machines. The electrodes must have very smooth finishes which are free of pores and other defects. This has heretofore been achieved by rough-machining the blanks out of large forged aluminum billets and final diamond-turning. The use of a near-net-shape casting for the blank was expected to save a significant amount of money and time. The test was conducted on a single cast blank which was supplied by the Partner in the HIPed and stress relieved condition. Rough machining and diamond turning operations conducted by LMES/ER revealed that the casting contained unacceptably large defects. The conclusion was reached that HIPed aluminum castings in the large sizes and of the quality levels required would probably be unobtainable in a cost-effective manner. An alternative approach, using ring forgings assembled by electron beam welding was proposed and investigated by LMES/ER. Although an electrode blank was not obtained, the study indicated that this approach would be successful and cost-effective.

  7. Geospatial Modelling Approach for 3d Urban Densification Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziatek, O.; Dragićević, S.; Li, S.

    2016-06-01

    With growing populations, economic pressures, and the need for sustainable practices, many urban regions are rapidly densifying developments in the vertical built dimension with mid- and high-rise buildings. The location of these buildings can be projected based on key factors that are attractive to urban planners, developers, and potential buyers. Current research in this area includes various modelling approaches, such as cellular automata and agent-based modelling, but the results are mostly linked to raster grids as the smallest spatial units that operate in two spatial dimensions. Therefore, the objective of this research is to develop a geospatial model that operates on irregular spatial tessellations to model mid- and high-rise buildings in three spatial dimensions (3D). The proposed model is based on the integration of GIS, fuzzy multi-criteria evaluation (MCE), and 3D GIS-based procedural modelling. Part of the City of Surrey, within the Metro Vancouver Region, Canada, has been used to present the simulations of the generated 3D building objects. The proposed 3D modelling approach was developed using ESRI's CityEngine software and the Computer Generated Architecture (CGA) language.

  8. Densification of Herbaceous Bioenergy Feedstocks for Transportation and Handling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vital component of a sustainable bioconversion industry that continues to be conceptualized and addressed by many is the supply, collection, and delivery of lignocellulosic feedstocks --- the feedstock supply system --- to bioconversion facilities. Lindley and Backer (1994) identified that low bul...

  9. APPARATUS FOR THE DENSIFICATION AND ENERGIZATION OF CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1962-12-18

    This patent relates to a device for materially increasing the energy and density of a plasma to produce conditions commensurate with the establishment and promotion of controlled thermonuclear reactions. To this end the device employs three successive stages of magnetic compression, each stage having magnetic mirrors to compress a plasma, the mirrors being moveable to transfer the plasma to successive stages for further compression. Accordingly, a plasma introduced to the first stage is increased in density and energy in stepwide fashion by virtue of the magnetic compression in the successive stages such that the plasma upon reaching the last stage is of extremely high energy and density commensurate the plasma particles undergoing thermonuclear reactions. The principal novelty of the device resides in the provision of a unidirectional magnetic field which increases in stepwise fashion in coaxially communicating compression chambers of progressively decreasing lengths and diameters. Pulsed magnetic fields are superimposed upon the undirectional field and are manipulated to establish resultant magnetic compression fields which increase in intensity and progressively move, with respect to time, through the compression chambers in the direction of the smallest one thereof. The resultant field in the last compression chamber is hence of relatively high intensity, and the density and energy of the plasma confined therein are correspondingly high. (AEC)

  10. Firn Densification and Meltwater Runoff in Western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, J. T.; Humphrey, N. F.; Pfeffer, W. T.; Brown, J. M.; West, D.; Bradford, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from a field campaign focused on meltwater infiltration and horizontal water transport processes in firn of western Greenland. Data were collected during 2007-2009 along a 90 km transect extending from 2000-1300 m elevation. Fifteen intensive study sites were spaced 5-10 km along the transect. Near-surface heat flow was measured at each site with 33 channel thermister strings extending to 10 m depth and logging year-round on a 30 min time base. Firn stratigraphy and density were measured in 10 m deep ice cores, with 2 or more cores at each study site for a total of 34 cores. Ground-based radar surveys were conducted at each site and between sites. Radar data imaged firn stratigraphy and are used to characterize firn/ice density to a depth of ~80 m from analysis of electromagnetic velocity. We used two methods to solve for velocity: 1) common mid-point reflection analysis solving for velocity with a ray-based model inversion technique, and 2) multi-offset, single line acquisition solving for velocity with a reflection tomography inversion technique. We find that from 2000-1625 m elevation surface melt is minimal and melt water infiltrates vertically to form thin ice layers. Between ~1625-1475 m elevation strong surface melt infiltrates to fill about half of the available pore space of the upper 10 m. Infiltration shows a high degree of spatial variability in this elevation zone, with some water moving vertically and some water moving horizontally on top of decimeter to m thick ice layers of irregular extent. In places, melt water infiltrates to more than 10 m depth, and through multi-decade old firn (i.e., well below the previous year’s accumulation). Below ~1475 m elevation, nearly all pore space is filled by infiltrated meltwater and excess water runs off. Both our thermal and density measurements indicate that the runoff limit is above equilibrium line by on the order of 300 m in elevation and a distance of 30 km. Our results have implications for understanding the mass balance and surface elevation changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  11. Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, M. Clayton; van Walsum, G. Peter; Schwartz, Thomas J.; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2013-01-29

    A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

  12. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  13. ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS

    SciTech Connect

    E. James Davis

    1999-12-18

    The objective of this research was to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. The specific objectives were: Design and develop a scaleable electrophoresis apparatus to clarify suspensions of colloidal coal and clay particles; Demonstrate the separation process using polluted waste water from the coal-washing facilities at the coal-fired power plants in Centralia, WA; Develop a mathematical model of the process to predict the rate of clarification and the suspension electrical properties needed for scale up.

  14. A REVIEW ON BIOMASS DENSIFICATION TECHNOLOGIE FOR ENERGY APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    JAYA SHANKAR TUMULURU; CHRISTOPHER T. WRIGHT

    2010-08-01

    The world is currently facing challenges to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is finding more uses as it is considered carbon neutral since the carbondioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle (Arias et al., 2008). Increasing the utilization of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help to meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol (UN, 1998). Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes like thermochemical (combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation) or chemical (esterification) where direct combustion can provide a direct near-term energy solution (Arias et al., 2008). Some of the inherent problems with raw biomass materials, like low bulk density, high moisture content, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value, limit the ease of use of biomass for energy purposes (Arias et al., 2008). In fact, due to its low energy density compared to fossil fuels, high volumes of biomass will be needed; adding to problems associated with storage, transportation and feed handling at a cogeneration plant. Furthermore, grinding biomass pulverizes, can be very costly and in some cases impractical. All of these drawbacks have given rise to the development of new technologies in order to increase the quality of biomass fuels. The purpose of the work is mainly in four areas 1) Overview of the torrefaction process and to do a literature review on i) Physical properties of torrefied raw material and torrefaction gas composition. 2) Basic principles in design of packed bed i) Equations governing the flow of material in packed bed ii) Equations governing the flow of the gases in packed bed iii) Effect of physical properties of the raw materials on the packed bed design 3) Design of packed bed torrefier of different capacities. 4) Development of an excel sheet for calculation of length and diameter of the packed bed column based on the design considerations.

  15. Densification of nano-yttria powders for IR window applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingham, Charles B.; Wahl, Joseph M.; Hogan, Patrick K.; Kupferberg, Lenn C.; Wong, Thomas Y.; De, Alok M.

    2003-09-01

    Commerically available yttrium oxide nanopowders were evaluated as starting materials for preparation of transparent materials. The objective is an yttria optical ceramic exhibiting approximately one micrometer grain size to provide increased strength and thermal shock resistance. Three vendors were selected to provide nanoscale powders for testing and evaluation. They were compared to a conventional (5 μm) powder previously used to prepare optical quality ceramic yttria. While all of the selected nanopowders had impurity levels that were too high to allow processing to full transparency, two of the samples were processed to full density and moderate transparency was produced in one. In preparation for processing via Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) samples were sintered to a closed pore state at temperatures as low as 1400 °C, and with soak times as short as 12 minutes at 1550 °C. The use of ultrasonic attenuation as a technique for measuring particle size distributions in slurries was explored and found to be an invaluable tool when colloidally processing nanopowders. Finally, the areas most important for continued improvements were identified.

  16. Synthesis and densification of lutetium pyrosilicate from lutetia and silica

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Himansu S.; Sarin, Vinod K. . E-mail: sarin@bu.edu

    2007-02-15

    Cerium-doped lutetium pyrosilicate (Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce) powder was synthesized by solid state reaction of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. Stoichiometric mixtures of the starting materials were heat treated at various different temperatures and their phase contents were measured by XRD technique. It was found that the first step in the formation of Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LPS) is the appearance of Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (LSO). This takes place at 1100 deg. C, fully 300 deg. C below the first appearance of LPS. Between 1400 and 1500 deg. C both LSO and LPS coexist in the calcined batch, but by 1550 deg. C all LSO is completely converted to LPS. LPS formation temperature does not have appreciable effect on the density of the hot pressed samples. Hot pressed samples obtained from powder synthesized at 1650 deg. C are nearly transparent, although the particle size of the starting powder is higher than that of the powder formed at lower temperatures.

  17. Method and apparatus for in-situ densification of geomaterials for sealing applications

    DOEpatents

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus is described for forming improved seals in boreholes formed in host rock by using the apparatus to introduce a feedstock into the borehole and simultaneously subjecting the introduced feedstock to both compressive and shear stresses until the borehole becomes filled and sealed. 3 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for in-densification of geomaterials for sealing applications

    DOEpatents

    Finley, Ray E.; Zeuch, David H.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10) for forming improved seals in boreholes (101) formed in host rock (100) by using the apparatus (10) to introduce a feedstock (60) into the borehole (101) and simultaneously subject the introduced feedstock to both compressive and shear stresses until the borehole becomes filled and sealed.

  19. Sol-gel synthesis and densification of aluminoborosilicate powders. Part 1: Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Selvaduray, Guna; Leiser, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Aluminoborosilicate powders high in alumina content were synthesized by the sol-gel process utilizing various methods of preparation. Properties and microstructural effects related to these syntheses were examined. After heating to 600 C for 2 h in flowing air, the powders were amorphous with the metal oxides comprising 87 percent of the weight and uncombusted organics the remainder. DTA of dried powders revealed a T(sub g) at approximately 835 C and an exotherm near 900 C due to crystallization. Powders derived from aluminum secbutoxide consisted of particles with a mean diameter 5 microns less than those from aluminum isopropoxide. Powders synthesized with aluminum isopropoxide produced agglomerates comprised of rod shaped particulates while powders made with the secbutoxide precursor produced irregular glassy shards. Compacts formed from these powders required different loadings for equivalent densities according to the method of synthesis.

  20. Densification of salt-occluded zeolite a powders to a leach-resistant monolith

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Murhpy, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) yields a salt waste of LiCl-KCl that contains approximately 6 wt% fission products, primarily as CsCl and SrCl{sub 2}. Past work has shown that zeolite A will preferentially sorb cesium and strontium and will encapsulate the salt waste in a leach-resistant, radiation-resistant aluminosilicate matrix. However, a method is sill needed to convert the salt-occluded zeolite powders into a form suitable for geologic disposal. We are thus investigating a method that forms bonded zeolite by hot pressing a mixture of glass frit and salt-occluded zeolite powders at 990 K (717{degree}C) and 28 MPa. The leach resistance of the bonded zeolite was measured in static leach tests run for 28 days in 363 K (90{degree}C) deionized water. Normalized release rates of all elements in the bonded zeolite were low, <1 g/m{sup 2} d. Thus, the bonded zeolite may be a suitable waste form for IFR salt waste.

  1. Cladding hull decontamination and densification process. Part 1. The prototype cladding hull decontamination system

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, T.M.; Montgomery, D.R.

    1980-04-01

    A prototype system for decontaminating Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls has been assembled and tested at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The decontamination process consists of treatment with a gaseous mixture of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and argon (Ar) followed by a dilute aqueous etch of ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. The continuous cleaning process described in this report successfully descaled small portions of most charges, but was unable to handle the original design capacity of 4 kg/hr because of problems in the following areas: control of HF reactor temperatures, regulation of HF and argon mixtures and flows, isolation of the HF reactor atmosphere from the aqueous washer/rinser atmosphere, regulation of undesirable side reactions, and control over hull transport through the system. Due to the limited time available to solve these problems, the system did not attain fully operational status. The work was performed with unirradiated hulls that simulated irradiated hulls. The system was not built to be remotely operable. The process chemistry and system equipment are described in this report with particular emphasis on critical operating areas. Recommendations for improved system operation are included.

  2. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen.

  3. Environmental Education Excursions and Proximity to Urban Green Space--Densification in a "Compact City"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolsink, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The value of urban green space for environmental education fieldwork is empirically investigated in a study among all secondary schools in Amsterdam. The article describes how the proximity of schools to green spaces emerges as a new factor in the "sustainable city" and the "compact city" debate. For fieldwork excursions…

  4. A GPS Network Densification in Saudi Arabia in Support of Geophysical Investigations in the Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuslmani, B.; Al-Motari, E.; Bingley, R. M.; Teferle, F. N.; Moore, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through a collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), densified the GPS network in Saudi Arabia, covering nearly two thirds of the tectonic plate. Since July 2002, a network of 32 GPS stations has been established at locations of the Saudi Arabia geodetic network. At all of these GPS stations a concrete pillar has been used as the monument and the locations have been selected in order to give the broadest distribution of observing sites. During 2005, 27 additional GPS stations in the Hejaz and Asser Mountains in the south-western part of Saudi Arabia, have been established, with the GDMS GPS network now comprising a total of 59 stations. In this presentation we will introduce the new GPS network in Saudi Arabia established by GDMS and will present the initial results from campaigns in March 2003 and March 2005. We show preliminary estimates of absolute and relative Arabian plate motions inferred from the GPS network and a detailed comparison of the results based on the Bernese GPS software versions 4.2 and 5.0.

  5. Synthesis and densification of Ni{sub 3}(Si, Ti) intermetallics by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyck, S.; Delaey, L.; Froyen, L.; Buekenhout, L.

    1996-12-31

    The production of complex parts from Ni{sub 3}(Si, Ti) intermetallic materials by reactive powder metallurgy offers significant advantages over more conventional processing techniques. The main problem associated with reactive powder metallurgy is controlling the exothermic reaction accompanying the synthesis of the intermetallic compound. The uncontrolled release of heat during the conversion of the reactants into nickel silicide leads to unacceptable deformation and melting of the part. The thermal evolution of a part during reactive synthesis of the intermetallic phase is described based on kinetic and heat transfer equations, giving the temperature and phase change as a function of the applied temperature cycle and the mass and size of the part under consideration. From this model, methods for controlling the exothermic reaction during synthesis are derived. When preparing nickel silicides by reactive powder metallurgy, the application of external pressure is required to eliminate porosity and to obtain good mechanical properties. The properties of materials produced by hot isostatic pressing, with different methods of reaction control, are compared to materials prepared from prealloyed powders. It is shown that by reactive HIP, materials can be obtained with a fracture strength exceeding 2,000 MPa.

  6. Correction and Densification of Uas-Based Photogrammetric Thermal Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, O.; Erenoglu, R. C.; Erenoglu, O.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetric processing algorithms can suffer problems due to either the initial image quality (noise, low radiometric quality, shadows and so on) or to certain surface materials (shiny or textureless objects). This can result in noisy point clouds and/or difficulties in feature extraction. Specifically, dense point clouds which are generated with photogrammetric method using a lightweight thermal camera, are more noisy and sparse than the point clouds of high-resolution digital camera images. In this paper, new method which produces more reliable and dense thermal point cloud using the sparse thermal point cloud and high resolution digital point cloud was considered. Both thermal and digital images were obtained with UAS (Unmanned Aerial System) based lightweight Optris PI 450 and Canon EOS 605D camera images. Thermal and digital point clouds, and orthophotos were produced using photogrammetric methods. Problematic thermal point cloud was transformed to a high density thermal point cloud using image processing methods such as rasterizing, registering, interpolation and filling. The results showed that the obtained thermal point cloud - up to chosen processing parameters - was 87% more densify than the original point cloud. The second improvement was gained at the height accuracy of the thermal point cloud. New densified point cloud has more consistent elevation model while the original thermal point cloud shows serious deviations from the expected surface model.

  7. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m(0.5). Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications. PMID:26503706

  8. YAG laser surface densification of a zircon refractory by adding AlN nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.Y.; Wang, A.H. . E-mail: pmahwang@public.wh.hb.cn; Zeng, D.W.; Bai, Z.K.; Xie, C.S.; Song, W.L.; Zhu, X.C.

    2006-04-15

    A zircon refractory zirconium silicate was surface melted with a pulsed YAG laser to introduce AlN nanoparticles, with the aim of improving its surface density and modifying the corresponding microstructure. The microstructure and phase structure features of the refractory induced by the laser beam were studied by scanning transmission microscopy, incorporating energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analysis. Results show that the addition of AlN nanoparticles into the refractory surface significantly reduced the laser beam energy required to melt the surface of the refractory. The laser-melted depth was increased with an increase of laser power from 133 to 200 W. The microstructure of the laser-treated zone with the addition of AlN nanoparticles has a much finer dendritic structure with undeveloped primary dendrite arms while without the addition of AlN nanoparticles, a coarser dendrite with much long primary dendrite arms was observed. The phase structure of the laser-treated layer with the addition of AlN nanoparticles was found to be composed of m-ZrO{sub 2}, c-ZrO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4} and H-AlN.

  9. Optimization of Preprocessing and Densification of Sorghum Stover at Full-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Neal A. Yancey; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Craig C. Conner; Christopher T. Wright

    2011-08-01

    Transportation costs can be a prohibitive step in bringing biomass to a preprocessing location or biofuel refinery. One alternative to transporting biomass in baled or loose format to a preprocessing location, is to utilize a mobile preprocessing system that can be relocated to various locations where biomass is stored, preprocess and densify the biomass, then ship it to the refinery as needed. The Idaho National Laboratory has a full scale 'Process Demonstration Unit' PDU which includes a stage 1 grinder, hammer mill, drier, pellet mill, and cooler with the associated conveyance system components. Testing at bench and pilot scale has been conducted to determine effects of moisture on preprocessing, crop varieties on preprocessing efficiency and product quality. The INLs PDU provides an opportunity to test the conclusions made at the bench and pilot scale on full industrial scale systems. Each component of the PDU is operated from a central operating station where data is collected to determine power consumption rates for each step in the process. The power for each electrical motor in the system is monitored from the control station to monitor for problems and determine optimal conditions for the system performance. The data can then be viewed to observe how changes in biomass input parameters (moisture and crop type for example), mechanical changes (screen size, biomass drying, pellet size, grinding speed, etc.,), or other variations effect the power consumption of the system. Sorgum in four foot round bales was tested in the system using a series of 6 different screen sizes including: 3/16 in., 1 in., 2 in., 3 in., 4 in., and 6 in. The effect on power consumption, product quality, and production rate were measured to determine optimal conditions.

  10. Spatiotemporal densification of river water level time series by multimission satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourian, M. J.; Tarpanelli, A.; Elmi, O.; Qin, T.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Sneeuw, N.

    2016-02-01

    Limitations of satellite radar altimetry for operational hydrology include its spatial and temporal sampling as well as measurement problems caused by local topography and heterogeneity of the reflecting surface. In this study, we develop an approach that eliminates most of these limitations to produce an approximately 3 day temporal resolution water level time series from the original typically (sub)monthly data sets for the Po River in detail, and for Congo, Mississippi, and Danube Rivers. We follow a geodetic approach by which, after estimating and removing intersatellite biases, all virtual stations of several satellite altimeters are connected hydraulically and statistically to produce water level time series at any location along the river. We test different data-selection strategies and validate our method against the extensive available in situ data over the Po River, resulting in an average correlation of 0.7, Root-Mean-Square Error of 0.8 m, bias of -0.4 m, and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency coefficient of 0.5. We validate the transferability of our method by applying it to the Congo, Mississippi, and Danube Rivers, which have very different geomorphological and climatic conditions. The methodology yields correlations above 0.75 and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.84 (Congo), 0.34 (Mississippi), and 0.35 (Danube).

  11. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  12. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-27

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m(0.5). Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  13. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675–1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications. PMID:26503706

  14. Ensuring near-optimum homogeneity and densification levels in nano-reinforced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Barkoula, Nektaria-Marianthi; Alafogianni, Panagiota; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of high temperature ceramic materials for aerospace applications, reinforced at a scale closer to the molecular level and three orders of magnitude less than conventional fibrous reinforcements, by embedded carbon nanotubes, has recently emerged as a uniquely challenging scientific effort. The properties of such materials depend strongly on two main factors: i) the homogeneity of the dispersion of the hydrophobic medium throughout the ceramic volume and ii) the ultimate density of the resultant product after sintering of the green body at the high-temperatures and pressures required for ceramic consolidation. The present works reports the establishment of two independent experimental strategies which ensure achievement of near perfect levels of tube dispersion homogeneity and fully dense final products. The proposed methodologies are validated across non-destructive evaluation data of materials performance.

  15. Oxidative torrefaction of biomass residues and densification of torrefied sawdust to pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congwei; Peng, Jianghong; Li, Hui; Bi, Xiaotao T; Legros, Robert; Lim, C J; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative torrefaction of sawdust with a carrier gas containing 3-6% O(2) was investigated in a TG and a fluidized bed reactor, with the properties of the torrefied sawdust and pellets compared with traditional torrefaction without any O(2), as well as the dry raw material. It is found that the oxidative torrefaction process produced torrefied sawdust and pellets of similar properties as normally torrefied sawdust and corresponding pellets, especially on the density, energy consumption for pelletization, higher heating value and energy yield. For moisture absorption and hardness of the torrefied pellets, the oxidative torrefaction process showed slightly poor but negligible performance. Therefore, it is feasible to use oxygen laden combustion flue gases as the carrier gas for torrefaction of biomass. Besides, torrefied sawdust can be made into dense and strong pellets of high hydrophobicity at a higher die temperature than normally used in the production of traditional control pellets.

  16. Study of Material Densification of In718 in the Higher Throughput Parameter Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordner, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process used increasingly in the aerospace industry to reduce the cost, weight, and fabrication time for complex propulsion components. Previous optimization studies for SLM using the Concept Laser M1 and M2 machines at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have centered on machine default parameters. The objective of this project is to characterize how heat treatment affects density and porosity from a microscopic point of view. This is performs using higher throughput parameters (a previously unexplored region of the manufacturing operating envelope for this application) on material consolidation. Density blocks were analyzed to explore the relationship between build parameters (laser power, scan speed, and hatch spacing) and material consolidation (assessed in terms of density and porosity). The study also considers the impact of post-processing, specifically hot isostatic pressing and heat treatment, as well as deposition pattern on material consolidation in the higher energy parameter regime. Metallurgical evaluation of specimens will also be presented. This work will contribute to creating a knowledge base (understanding material behavior in all ranges of the AM equipment operating envelope) that is critical to transitioning AM from the custom low rate production sphere it currently occupies to the world of mass high rate production, where parts are fabricated at a rapid rate with confidence that they will meet or exceed all stringent functional requirements for spaceflight hardware. These studies will also provide important data on the sensitivity of material consolidation to process parameters that will inform the design and development of future flight articles using SLM.

  17. Impact of Mixed Feedstocks and Feedstock Densification on Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Shi; Vicki S. Thompson; Neal A. Yancey; Vitalie Stavila; Blake A. Simmons; Seema Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lignocellulosic biorefineries must be able to efficiently process the regional feedstocks that are available at cost-competitive prices year round. These feedstocks typically have low energy densities and vary significantly in composition. One potential solution to these issues is blending and/or densifying the feedstocks in order to create a uniform feedstock. Results/discussion: We have mixed four feedstocks - switchgrass, lodgepole pine, corn stover, and eucalyptus - in flour and pellet form and processed them using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Sugar yields from both the mixed flour and pelletized feedstocks reach 90% within 24 hours of saccharification. Conclusions: Mixed feedstocks, in either flour or pellet form, are efficiently processed using this pretreatment process, and demonstrate that this approach has significant potential.

  18. Microwave sintering of nanopowder ZnNb2O6: Densification, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafrooei, H. Barzegar; Nassaj, E. Taheri; Hu, C. F.; Huang, Q.; Ebadzadeh, T.

    2014-12-01

    High density ZnNb2O6 ceramics were successfully fabricated by microwave sintering of ZnO-Nb2O5 and ZnNb2O6 nanopowders. Phase formation, microstructure and microwave electrical properties of the microwave sintered (MS) and microwave reaction sintered (MRS) specimens were examined using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and microwave dielectric properties measurement. Specimens were sintered in a temperature range from 950 to 1075 °C for 30 min at an interval of 25 °C using a microwave furnace operated at 2.45 GHz frequency, 3 kW power. XRD pattern revealed the formation of pure columbite phase of ZnNb2O6. The SEM micrographs show grain growth and reduction in porosity of specimens with the increase in sintering temperature. Good combination of microwave dielectric properties (εr~23.6, Qf~64,300 GHz and τf~-66 ppm/°C and εr~24, Qf~75,800 GHz and τf~-64 ppm/°C) was obtained for MS- and MRS-prepared samples at 1000 °C and 1050 °C for 30 min, respectively.

  19. Characterization of pore evolution in ceramics during creep failure and densification. Final report, April 15, 1984--April 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.A.; Chan, K.S.

    1995-04-01

    This research program was divided into two phases, one involving creep cavitation, the other cavity evolution during sintering. In the former, work was aimed at determining the effect of microstructure and stress state upon creep cavitation, while in the latter, the principal objective was the characterization of pore evolution during sintering. In order to meet these objectives, the creep cavitation portion of the program was centered around small-angle neutron scattering, supplemented by electron microscopy and precision density measurements. The neutron scattering measurements yielded cavity nucleation and growth rates, and average pore, size, distribution, and morphology. These data were used to evaluate current cavitation models, and to implement improved modelling efforts. Additionally, stereoimaging analysis was used to determine grain boundary sliding displacements, which appear to be the critical driving force responsible for cavity nucleation and early growth. Effort in the pore sintering phase focussed on characterization of pore evolution during intermediate and final stage sintering of alumina using both single and multiple scattering techniques. Electron microscopy, density measurements, and mercury intrusion porosimetry measurements complemented the scattering results. The effects of sintering trajectory, green state, powder morphology, and additives were evaluated. These results were compared to current sintering models.

  20. Urban Change: Understanding how expansion and densification relate to demographic change and their implications for climate change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, D.; Jones, B.; Liu, Z.; Nghiem, S. V.; Pesaresi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization is the most demographic significant trend of the 21st century particularly in Asia. Characterizing it in a spatial context is difficult given the moderate resolution data provided by traditional sources of demographic data. Previous work on Saigon has shown by using these data together that much more about the correlates and potential consequences of change in the form and expansion of urban change can be learned than with a single data source alone. In this paper, we expand our analysis to two other much different urban and socioeconomic settings: Dhaka and Beijing. Particularly, where the demographic and socioeconomic indicators of change are too infrequent to capture annual change, use of satellites in combination with demographic data may be especially useful for capturing change in exurban and periurban areas, or in smaller cities within larger urban agglomerations. Using spatial regression techniques, we estimate statistical relationships between remotely sensed data sets to assess the ability demographic changes to predict urban changes as detected by two different satellite measures of change 2000-2010 in Dhaka, Saigon, and Beijing. We then predict socioeconomic outcomes associated with emissions and vulnerability proxies. We use two much different types of satellite data -- the Dense Sample Method (DSM) analysis of the NASA scatterometer data and new built-up area data from the Global Human Settlement Layer of the JRC - which respectively proxy for increases in building heights (vertical expansion) and impervious surface-type changes (horizontal expansion). These different data products help us to better understand the evolution of the built environment and urban form, while the underlying demographic data provide information regarding composition of urban population change, at different levels of economic development, built-upness, and population density. Combining these types of data yields important, high resolution spatial information that provides a more accurate understanding of urban processes, particularly in the context of climate change (as shown in Figure 1). Together these will help understand the form of urban change as well as the relationship between urban change, vulnerability and population distribution within and on the periphery of growing cities.

  1. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  2. Granular encapsulation of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) in LHL-salt water systems: Particle induced densification with quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin; Sukop, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Addition of granular materials to floating crude oil slicks can be effective in capturing and densifying the floating hydrophobic phase, which settles by gravity. Interaction of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) with quartz sand was investigated in LHL-salt water systems. The LHLs studied were decane, tetradecane, hexadecane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 2-cholorotoluene. Experiments were conducted with fine quartz sand (passing sieve No. 40 with openings 0.425 mm). Each LHL was dyed with few crystals of Sudan IV dye for ease of visual observation. A volume of 0.5 mL of each LHL was added to 100 mL salt water (34 g/L). Addition of one gram of quartz sand to the floating hydrophobic liquid layer resulted in formation of sand-encapsulated globules, which settled due to increased density. All LHLs (except for a few globules of decane) formed globules covered with fine sand particles that were heavy enough to settle by gravity. The encapsulated globules were stable and retained their shape upon settling. Polarity of hydrophobic liquids as the main factor of aggregation with minerals was found to be insufficient to explain LHL aggregation with sand. Contact angle measurements were made by submerging a large quartz crystal with the LHL drop on its surface into salt water. A positive correlation was observed between the wetting angle of LHL and the LHL volume captured (r = 0.75). The dependence of the globule density on globule radius was analyzed in relation to the coverage (%) of globule surface (LHL-salt water interface) by fine quartz particles. PMID:26490430

  3. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  4. Granular encapsulation of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) in LHL-salt water systems: Particle induced densification with quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin; Sukop, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Addition of granular materials to floating crude oil slicks can be effective in capturing and densifying the floating hydrophobic phase, which settles by gravity. Interaction of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) with quartz sand was investigated in LHL-salt water systems. The LHLs studied were decane, tetradecane, hexadecane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 2-cholorotoluene. Experiments were conducted with fine quartz sand (passing sieve No. 40 with openings 0.425 mm). Each LHL was dyed with few crystals of Sudan IV dye for ease of visual observation. A volume of 0.5 mL of each LHL was added to 100 mL salt water (34 g/L). Addition of one gram of quartz sand to the floating hydrophobic liquid layer resulted in formation of sand-encapsulated globules, which settled due to increased density. All LHLs (except for a few globules of decane) formed globules covered with fine sand particles that were heavy enough to settle by gravity. The encapsulated globules were stable and retained their shape upon settling. Polarity of hydrophobic liquids as the main factor of aggregation with minerals was found to be insufficient to explain LHL aggregation with sand. Contact angle measurements were made by submerging a large quartz crystal with the LHL drop on its surface into salt water. A positive correlation was observed between the wetting angle of LHL and the LHL volume captured (r = 0.75). The dependence of the globule density on globule radius was analyzed in relation to the coverage (%) of globule surface (LHL-salt water interface) by fine quartz particles.

  5. Influence of La2Zr2O7 Additive on Densification and Li+ Conductivity for Ta-Doped Li7La3Zr2O12 Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao; Shen, Chen; Rui, Kun; Jin, Jun; Wu, Meifen; Wu, Xiangwei; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2016-10-01

    A high-conductivity solid electrolyte, La2Zr2O7 (LZO) added to Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12 (LLZTO), was prepared via conventional solid-state reactions and sintered at 1100°C for 10 h, which is tens of Celsius degrees lower than the typical sintering temperature for LLZTO. The addition of LZO did not bring in any impurities. LZO acted as a sintering aid to densify the LLZTO from a relative density of 77% up to 90%, which was comparable to that of pure LLZTO sintered at 1200°C. The 6 wt.% LZO-LLZTO samples sintered at 1100°C and 1200°C exhibited a room-temperature conductivity of 1.92 × 10-4 S/cm and 5.84 × 10-4 S/cm, respectively, which were higher than that of pure LLZTO samples. Glass-like phases observed at grain boundaries in LZO-LLZTO ceramics indicated that LZO promoted the formation of the glass-like phases binding together LLZTO grains and thus leading to enhanced density and conductivity of LLZTO.

  6. The effect of mixing methods and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles on the densification of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chunghao; Tulenko, J. S.; Baney, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of mixing methods on the fabrication of silicon carbide (SiC) inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route was investigated in order to break up the agglomerates of the SiC particles observed in earlier studies. It was found that a high energy shaker mill could effectively break up the agglomerates and thereby achieve a higher pellet density. Moreover, it was found that the pellet density depended less on the pressing pressure, when the particles are well mixed. SEM images showed cracks caused by the springback effect on pellets with a high cold pressing pressure of 600 MPa, but no signs of springback effect were observed for the 200 MPa pressed pellets. The polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles were used to further increase the pellet density and close the open pores. The first PIP cycle was found to increase the theoretical density of the pellets from 81.2% to 86.0% and close ˜50% of the open pores. The pore size distribution showed that most of the remaining open pores had diameters smaller than 10 nm. The successive second PIP cycle is not as effective on either the density or the pore size distribution because the small pores present before the second PIP cycle made the infiltration process difficult.

  7. On the densification of cubic ZrO{sub 2} nanocondensates by capillarity force and turbostratic C–Si–H multiple shell

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chao-Hsien; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2013-04-15

    A turbostratic C–Si–H lamellar phase with 0.35–0.39 nm interspacing and ZrO{sub 2} condensates having cubic (c), tetragonal and monoclinic structures stabilized by increasing particle size were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation on Zr plate in TEOS and characterized by X-ray/electron diffraction and optical spectroscopy. The c-ZrO{sub 2} phase ca. 10% denser than the ambient lattice was stabilized as 3–10 nm sized cubo-octahedral nanoparticles but as abnormal large-sized (up to 30 nm) ones when encapsulated by the C{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}:H multiple shell with defective graphite-like structure units to exert an effective compressive stress. The potential application of such core–shell nanostructure with enhanced binding of Zr and O ions and implication for natural dynamic occurrence of the C{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}:H phase are addressed. - Graphical abstract: Lattice image of a typical cubic-ZrO{sub 2} particle densified by the turbostratic Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x}:H shell. Highlights: ► Turbostratic C–Si–H lamellar phase and ZrO{sub 2} condensates were synthesized by PLA. ► The c-ZrO{sub 2} phase ca. 10% denser than the ambient lattice was stabilized as 3–10 nm. ► The c-ZrO{sub 2} particles up to 30 nm were densified when encapsulated by the C{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}:H multiple shell. ► Tight ion binding of the c-ZrO{sub 2} due to capillarity force and turbostratic shell.

  8. Heat treatment of Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 bioactive glasses: densification processes and postsintering bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Sola, A; Bellucci, D; Raucci, M G; Zeppetelli, S; Ambrosio, L; Cannillo, V

    2012-02-01

    Because of their excellent bioactivity, bioactive glasses are increasingly diffused to produce biomedical devices for bone prostheses, to face the dysfunctions that may be caused by traumatic events, diseases, or even natural aging. However, several processing routes, such as the production of scaffolds or the deposition of coatings, include a thermal treatment to apply or sinter the glass. The exposure to high temperature may induce a devetrification phenomenon, altering the properties and, in particular, the bioactivity of the glass. The present contribution offers an overview of the thermal behavior and properties of two glasses belonging to the Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 system, to be compared to the standard 45S5 Bioglass(®). The basic goal is to understand the effect of both the original composition and the thermal treatment on the performance of the sintered glasses. The new glasses, the one (BG_Na) with a high content of Na2O, the other (BG_Ca) with a high content of CaO, were fully characterized and sintering tests were performed to define the most interesting firing cycles. The sintered samples, treated at 880°C and 800°C respectively, were investigated from a microstructural point of view and their mechanical properties were compared to those of the bulk (not sintered) glass counterparts. The effect of sintering was especially striking on the BG_Ca material, whose Vickers hardness increased from 598.9 ± 46.7 HV to 1053.4 ± 35.0 HV. The in vitro tests confirmed the ability of the glasses, both in bulk and sintered form, of generating a hydroxyapatite surface layer when immersed in a simulated body fluid. More accurate biological tests performed on the sintered glasses proved the high bioactivity of the CaO-rich composition even after a heat treatment.

  9. Influence of La2Zr2O7 Additive on Densification and Li+ Conductivity for Ta-Doped Li7La3Zr2O12 Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao; Shen, Chen; Rui, Kun; Jin, Jun; Wu, Meifen; Wu, Xiangwei; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2016-08-01

    A high-conductivity solid electrolyte, La2Zr2O7 (LZO) added to Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12 (LLZTO), was prepared via conventional solid-state reactions and sintered at 1100°C for 10 h, which is tens of Celsius degrees lower than the typical sintering temperature for LLZTO. The addition of LZO did not bring in any impurities. LZO acted as a sintering aid to densify the LLZTO from a relative density of 77% up to 90%, which was comparable to that of pure LLZTO sintered at 1200°C. The 6 wt.% LZO-LLZTO samples sintered at 1100°C and 1200°C exhibited a room-temperature conductivity of 1.92 × 10-4 S/cm and 5.84 × 10-4 S/cm, respectively, which were higher than that of pure LLZTO samples. Glass-like phases observed at grain boundaries in LZO-LLZTO ceramics indicated that LZO promoted the formation of the glass-like phases binding together LLZTO grains and thus leading to enhanced density and conductivity of LLZTO.

  10. Studies on densification, mechanical, micro-structural and structure–properties relationship of magnesium aluminate spinel refractory aggregates prepared from Indian magnesite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Chandrima; Ghosh, Arup; Haldar, Manas Kamal

    2015-01-15

    The present work intends to study the development of magnesium aluminate spinel aggregates from Indian magnesite in a single firing stage. The raw magnesite has been evaluated in terms of chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The experimental batch containing Indian magnesite and calcined alumina has been sintered in the temperature range of 1550 °C–1700 °C. The sintered material has been characterized in terms of physico-chemical properties like bulk density, apparent porosity, true density, relative density and thermo-mechanical/mechanical properties like hot modulus of rupture, thermal shock resistance, cold modulus of rupture and structural properties by X-ray diffraction in terms of phase identification and evaluation of crystal structure parameters of corresponding phases by Rietveld analysis. The microstructures developed at different temperatures have been analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope study and compositional analysis of the developed phase has been carried out by energy dispersive X-ray study. - Highlights: • The studies have been done to characterize the developed magnesium aluminate spinel. • The studies reveal correlation between refractory behavior of spinel and developed microstructures. • The studies show the values of lattice parameters of developed phases.

  11. Effect of an organic additive on the rheology of an aluminous cement paste and consequences on the densification of the hardened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hafiane, Y.; Smith, A.; Bonnet, J. P.; Tanouti, B.

    2005-03-01

    The material used in the present work is Secar 71 (Lafarge) mixed with water containing an organic additive (acetic acid noted HOAc). The rheological behavior of these pastes is studied. The best dispersion is obtained when the mass content of the additive with respect to the cement is equal to 0.5%. The microstructural characterizations of samples aged 4 days at 20° C and 95 % relative humidity reveal a significant increase in the density and a reduction in porosity for very small percentages of additive. The remarkable effect of the acetic acid on the microstructure of hardened material is correlated with its good dispersing action.

  12. Direct observation of large shock impedance jump upon shock-induced densification of powdered materials confirmed by in situ shock pressure and particle velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takamichi

    2014-07-01

    Shock pressure and particle velocity measurements have been performed separately on a powdered material under a similar shock loading condition by employing time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy and velocity interferometry (VISAR). Shock pressure measurement adopts the pressure-shift characteristic of ruby crystal that is used as a window material. Exactly the same shock condition could be realized for the particle velocity measurement by using a sapphire crystal as a window. A good agreement between the results of two different measurements has been obtained and they indicate a 7 times or more increase in shock impedance of the powdered material.

  13. Heat treatment of Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 bioactive glasses: densification processes and postsintering bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Sola, A; Bellucci, D; Raucci, M G; Zeppetelli, S; Ambrosio, L; Cannillo, V

    2012-02-01

    Because of their excellent bioactivity, bioactive glasses are increasingly diffused to produce biomedical devices for bone prostheses, to face the dysfunctions that may be caused by traumatic events, diseases, or even natural aging. However, several processing routes, such as the production of scaffolds or the deposition of coatings, include a thermal treatment to apply or sinter the glass. The exposure to high temperature may induce a devetrification phenomenon, altering the properties and, in particular, the bioactivity of the glass. The present contribution offers an overview of the thermal behavior and properties of two glasses belonging to the Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 system, to be compared to the standard 45S5 Bioglass(®). The basic goal is to understand the effect of both the original composition and the thermal treatment on the performance of the sintered glasses. The new glasses, the one (BG_Na) with a high content of Na2O, the other (BG_Ca) with a high content of CaO, were fully characterized and sintering tests were performed to define the most interesting firing cycles. The sintered samples, treated at 880°C and 800°C respectively, were investigated from a microstructural point of view and their mechanical properties were compared to those of the bulk (not sintered) glass counterparts. The effect of sintering was especially striking on the BG_Ca material, whose Vickers hardness increased from 598.9 ± 46.7 HV to 1053.4 ± 35.0 HV. The in vitro tests confirmed the ability of the glasses, both in bulk and sintered form, of generating a hydroxyapatite surface layer when immersed in a simulated body fluid. More accurate biological tests performed on the sintered glasses proved the high bioactivity of the CaO-rich composition even after a heat treatment. PMID:22052581

  14. Crystallization, densification and dielectric properties of CaO–MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass with ZrO{sub 2} as nucleating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, Hsing-I; Yung, Shi-Wen; Wang, Chung-Ching

    2014-12-15

    SEM micrographs for the pure CaO–MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass sintered at 850–1000 °C (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C, (d) 1000 °C. - Highlights: • ZrO{sub 2} effects on the crystallization of LTCC glass system were investigated. • ZrO{sub 2} effects on the dielectric properties of LTCC glass system were investigated. • LTCC with a dielectric constant of 6.65 and a low dielectric loss can be obtained. - Abstract: The zirconium oxide effects on the crystallization and dielectric properties of CaO–MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} (CMAS) glass were investigated. The results showed that phyllosiloxide and anorthite crystallites were observed in sequence during sintering. For glass added with 8 wt% ZrO{sub 2}, homogeneously dispersed tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} crystallites were observed at 850 °C. The as-prepared CMAS glass–ceramics exhibited a dielectric constant of about 6–7 and a dielectric loss below 0.005 at 100 MHz. The dielectric properties of CMAS glass with 8 wt% ZrO{sub 2} sintered at 850 °C show a low dielectric constant of 6.65 and a dielectric loss tangent of about 2.5 × 10{sup −3}, which provides a promising candidate for LTCC applications.

  15. Smooth-Surfaced Carbon/Carbon Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Jacoy, Paul J.; Porter, Christopher C.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    Surface-densification technique integral to fabrication of reflective, lightweight, low-outgassing radio-antenna-reflector panels including carbon/carbon surface laminates supported by carbon/carbon core structures. Densification prevents "print-through" of carbon fibers on surface. When properly densified, surface polished to smooth finish.

  16. Sintering stress and microstructure in ceramic powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, May-Ying California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    The behavior of the sintering stress and microstructure during sintering is studied under various thermal and physical conditions. Specifically, the study includes sintering under isothermal or constant heating rate conditions; and altering the starting compact structure by pre-coarsening to increase the particle size, or by compaction to increase the starting density. Loading dilatometry is used to measure the ratio of the densification strain rate to the creep strain rate and the continuous shrinkage history of the systems. The data show that the ratio of the densification to the creep strain rate is remarkably constant within a wide temperature range for densification, from the earliest stages of densification to at least the onset of the final stage. As a consequence, the sintering stress, which is proportional to the strain rate ratio, is nearly independent of sintered density or of temperature. Analysis leads to a simple method for determining the simultaneous densification strain rate over the creep strain rate ratio. A rigorous densification strain rate equation is derived for a model system. The constant sintering stress allows progress on formulating a sintering equation to predict the densification behavior of powder compacts. Analysis of dilatometry data from compacts sintered at various heating rates, and of numerical computations, indicate the need to include separate coarsening processes with different activation energies. The same model is used to describe the differences in pore spacing evolution between pre-coarsened and as-received systems.

  17. Hardness of dense beta-Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greskovich, C.; Yeh, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of small changes in the concentration of an oxygen content densification aid on the room temperature microhardness of hot isostatically pressed and sintered beta-Si3N4 ceramics are studied. The compositions studied were Si3N4 containing 7 wt. pct BeSiN2, a fixed nonoxide densification aid, and 1.9-3.7 wt. pct oxygen as a second, variable densification aid. A proportional relationship between high density and high oxygen content, regardless of heat treatment type, is noted.

  18. Yttria doping and sintering of submicrometer-grained {alpha}-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Eiichi; Carry, C.

    1996-08-01

    The sintering behavior of {alpha}-alumina powders doped with magnesia (500 or 1,500 ppm) and yttria (0, 500, or 1,500 ppm) was investigated using constant-heating-rate dilatometric experiments. The apparent activation energies for the intermediate stage of sintering were 740, 800, and 870 kJ/mol for 0, 500, and 1,500 ppm yttria doping levels, respectively; these were independent of magnesia doping. Yttria-doped powder compacts exhibited systematic anomalous second peaks in the densification rate curves at certain grain sizes which were determined only by yttria doping levels. Before the anomalous peak, with lower yttrium contents at grain boundaries, yttrium in an atomic state delays densification and raises the apparent activation energy. Beyond the peak, with higher yttrium contents at grain boundaries, yttria-rich precipitation delays the densification. Within the peak, yttrium segregation near the saturation level enhances densification.

  19. Determination of densified biomass mass properties using 3D laser scanning and image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass densification is viewed as the indispensable feedstock preprocessing operation for efficient transport, storage, material flow through machines, and handling activities. Accurate mass properties of densified biomass such as surface area, volume, and envelope density form fundamental data for...

  20. Application of 3D Scanned Imaging Methodology for Volume, Surface Area, and Envelope Density Evaluation of Densified Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of surface area, volume, and density is an essential for quantifying, evaluating, and designing the biomass densification, storage, and transport operations. Acquiring accurate and repeated measurements of these parameters for hygroscopic densified biomass are not straightforward and on...

  1. Lunar regolith and structure mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Frank; Ko, Hon-Yim; Sture, Stein; Carter, Tyrone R.; Evenson, Kraig A.; Nathan, Mark P.; Perkins, Steve W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: modeling of regolith-structure interaction in extraterrestrial constructed facilities; densification of lunar soil simulant; and vibration assisted penetration of lunar soil simulant.

  2. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard; Delaforce, Philip Mark

    2016-03-08

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having an interconnect that reduces or eliminates diffusion (leakage) of fuel and oxidant by providing an increased densification, by forming the interconnect as a ceramic/metal composite.

  3. Comparison of the halving of tablets prepared with eccentric and rotary tablet presses.

    PubMed

    Sovány, T; Kása, P; Pintye-Hódi, K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the densification of powder mixtures on eccentric and rotary tablet presses and to establish relationships with the halving properties of the resulting scored tablets. This is an important problem because the recent guidelines of EU require verification of the equal masses of tablet halves. The models of Walker, Heckel, and Kawakita were used to describe the powder densification on the two machines. The calculated parameters revealed that the shorter compression cycle of rotary machines results in poorer densification and lower tablet hardness at a given compression force. This is manifested in poorer halving properties, which are influenced mainly by the hardness. Better densification improves the halving even at lower tablet hardness. This demonstrates that these parameters can be good predictors of tablet halving properties. PMID:19381830

  4. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  5. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  6. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  7. Hugoniot measurements on unsintered metal powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.; Weinland, S.L.

    1983-07-01

    We have determined the Hugoniots of unsintered copper, aluminum alloy, and steel powders using carbon gauges. We find no evidence for an elastic precursor in our specimens. The copper and aluminum Hugoniots are well described by models which assume full densification. Complete densification of the steel powder, however, does not occur for stresses less than 3.0 GPa. Although carbon gauges perform well, systematic errors in gauge calibration are observed.

  8. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  9. Fabrication of Mechanically Tunable and Bioactive Metal Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Do; Lee, Hyun; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Song, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Biometal systems have been widely used for biomedical applications, in particular, as load-bearing materials. However, major challenges are high stiffness and low bioactivity of metals. In this study, we have developed a new method towards fabricating a new type of bioactive and mechanically reliable porous metal scaffolds-densified porous Ti scaffolds. The method consists of two fabrication processes, 1) the fabrication of porous Ti scaffolds by dynamic freeze casting, and 2) coating and densification of the porous scaffolds. The dynamic freeze casting method to fabricate porous Ti scaffolds allowed the densification of porous scaffolds by minimizing the chemical contamination and structural defects. The densification process is distinctive for three reasons. First, the densification process is simple, because it requires a control of only one parameter (degree of densification). Second, it is effective, as it achieves mechanical enhancement and sustainable release of biomolecules from porous scaffolds. Third, it has broad applications, as it is also applicable to the fabrication of functionally graded porous scaffolds by spatially varied strain during densification. PMID:26709604

  10. Sintering behavior of doped ZnO powders for high field varistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirlanda, M.

    1990-08-01

    The sintering of ZnO varistor precursor powders, doped with Co, Mn and different concentrations of Bi and Al, is investigated and discussed in relation with sintering models. One purpose of the present study is to provide information valuable for the fabrication of high field varistors. As the fundamental parameter of these electronic components is the breakdown voltage per unit of thickness, which is determined by the number of grain boundaries per linear dimension, the grain size and the sintered density are crucial variables, and the sintering is a central step in the manufacturing of such varistors. Sintering experiments performed at constant heating rate in a loading dilatometer provide data on the densification and creep of the compacted powders. Another goal of the present study is to provide an experimental basis for the interpretation of the evolution of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate in terms of competition between densification and microstructure coarsening. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the variety of sintering behaviors that takes place in the system ZnO-Bi-Al: the comparison of these behaviors allows us to correlate the macroscopic sintering parameters to the evolution of the microstructure. It results that, while in non-doped powders densification and coarsening develop in a balanced way, resulting in the constancy of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate, the effect of the dopants on the sintering kinetics alters such a balance, leading this ratio to vary. 17 figs.

  11. The processing and potential applications of porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Syyuan Shieh

    1992-07-01

    Stability of a cylindrical pore under the influence of surface energy is important for porous silicon (PS) processing in the integrated circuit industry. Once the zig-zag cylindrical pores of porous silicon or oxidized porous silicon (OPS) are unstable and breakup into rows of isolated spherical pores, oxidation of PS and densification/nitridation of OPS become difficult. Swing to difficulty transport of reactant gas (O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}) or the trapped gas (for densification of OPS). A first order analysis of the stability of a cylindrical pore or cylinder is considered first. Growth of small sinusoidal perturbations by viscous flow or evaporation/condensation result in dependence of perturbation growth rate on perturbation wavelength. Rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) of porous silicon is proposed as an alternative for the tedious two-step 300 and 800C oxidation process. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy ESCA are used for quality control. Also, rapid thermal nitridation of oxidized porous silicon in ammonia is proposed to enhance OPS resistance to HF solution. Pores breakup of OPS results in a trapped gas problem during densification. Wet helium is proposed as OPS densification ambient gas to shorten densification time. Finally, PS is proposed to be an extrinsic gettering center in silicon wafers. The suppression of oxidation-induced stacking faults is used to demonstrate the gettering ability. Possible mechanism is discussed.

  12. Sintering aid for lanthanum chromite refractories

    DOEpatents

    Flandermeyer, Brian K.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Dusek, Joseph T.; Anderson, Harlan U.

    1988-01-01

    An electronically conductive interconnect layer for use in a fuel cell or other electrolytic device is formed with sintering additives to permit densification in a monolithic structure with the electrode materials. Additions including an oxide of boron and a eutectic forming composition of Group 2A metal fluorides with Group 3B metal fluorides and Group 2A metal oxides with Group 6B metal oxides lower the required firing temperature of lanthanum chromite to permit densification to in excess of 94% of theoretical density without degradation of electrode material lamina. The monolithic structure is formed by tape casting thin layers of electrode, interconnect and electrolyte materials and sintering the green lamina together under common densification conditions.

  13. Numerical investigation of FAST powder consolidation of Al2O3 and additive free β-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. B.; Cornwell, C. F.; Carlson, T.; Marsh, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we examine ceramic synthesis through powder consolidation and the field assisted sintering technique. In particular, we investigate the sintering of Al2O3 and additive free β -SiC from both an experimental and numerical perspective. For the numerical model, the continuum theory of sintering model is employed, and the densification mechanisms corresponding to power law creep and grain boundary diffusion are considered. Experiments are used for comparison and validation purposes. The results indicate that in general, the densification kinetics simulated by the numerical model compare favorably with the experimental results. Parametric studies involving initial grain size, heating rate, and applied stress are also examined using the numerical model, and confirm many of the expected results from previous research, including increased densification due to higher heating rates, smaller grain sizes, and increased applied loading conditions.

  14. One step sintering of homogenized bauxite raw material and kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chang-he; Jiang, Peng; Li, Yong; Sun, Jia-lin; Zhang, Jun-jie; Yang, Huan-ying

    2016-10-01

    A one-step sintering process of bauxite raw material from direct mining was completed, and the kinetics of this process was analyzed thoroughly. The results show that the sintering kinetics of bauxite raw material exhibits the liquid-phase sintering behavior. A small portion of impurities existed in the raw material act as a liquid phase. After X-ray diffraction analyses, scanning electron microscopy observations, and kinetics calculations, sintering temperature and heating duration were determined as the two major factors contributing to the sintering process and densification of bauxite ore. An elevated heating temperature and longer duration favor the densification process. The major obstacle for the densification of bauxite material is attributed to the formation of the enclosed blowhole during liquid-phase sintering.

  15. Detailed subsurface damage measurement and efficient damage-free fabrication of fused silica optics assisted by ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenlin; Dai, Yifan; Liu, Zongzheng; Xie, Xuhui; Nie, Xuqing; Xu, Mingjin

    2016-02-22

    Formation of subsurface damage has an inseparable relationship with microscopic material behaviors. In this work, our research results indicate that the formation process of subsurface damage often accompanies with the local densification effect of fused silica material, which seriously influences microscopic material properties. Interestingly, we find ion beam sputtering (IBS) is very sensitive to the local densification, and this microscopic phenomenon makes IBS as a promising technique for the detection of nanoscale subsurface damages. Additionally, to control the densification effect and subsurface damage during the fabrication of high-performance optical components, a combined polishing technology integrating chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) and ion beam figuring (IBF) is proposed. With this combined technology, fused silica without subsurface damage is obtained through the final experimental investigation, which demonstrates the feasibility of our proposed method.

  16. Synthesis of MgO-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 nanocomposite powder by polymeric complex method as a novel sintering additive of AlN ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwa-Jun; Cho, Woo-Seok; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Pan, Wei; Shahid, Mohammad; Ryu, Sung-Soo

    2016-09-01

    A MgO-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (MCAS) nanocomposite powder with a particle size of 50 nm and a specific surface area of 40.6 m2/g was successfully synthesized via heat-treatment of polymeric precursors containing Mg, Ca, Al and Si in air at 700 °C for 5 h. It was characterized as a novel sintering additive for the densification AlN ceramics at a low temperature below 1600 °C. It was found that the nanosized MCAS powder was suitable for the densification of AlN ceramics. In particular, full densification could be achieved when only 1.0 wt% MCAS additive-doped AlN powder compact was sintered for 1 h at 1600 °C, and a thermal conductivity of 84 W/m·K was attained.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of Si3N4 ceramics without additives by high pressure hot pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, M.; Tanaka, A.; Yamada, T.; Koizumi, M.

    1984-01-01

    High pressure hot-pressing of Si3N4 without additives was performed using various kinds of Si3N4 powder as starting materials, and the relation between densification and alpha-beta phase transformation was studied. The temperature dependences of Vickers microhardness and fracture toughness were also examined. Densification of Si3N4 was divided into three stages, and it was found that densification and phase transformation of Si3N4 under pressure were closely associated. The results of the temperature dependence of Vickers microhardness indicated that the high-temperature hardness was strongly influenced not only by the density and microstructure of sintered body but also by the purity of starting powder. The fracture toughness values of Si3N4 bodies without additives were 3.29-4.39 MN/m to the 3/2 power and independent of temperature up to 1400 C.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Microwave Sintered Silica Xerogel Produced from Rice Husk Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudiana, I. N.; Mitsudo, S.; Nishiwaki, T.; Susilowati, P. E.; Lestari, L.; Firihu, M. Z.; Aripin, H.

    2016-08-01

    Silica xerogel ceramic produced from rice husk ash (RHA) taken from South East Sulawesi Indonesia has been successfully sintered by using a millimeter waves (MMW) heating system with a 28 GHz gyrotron as radiation source. The ceramic was also sintered by using an electric furnace where served as a comparison. Densification, microstructural, and morphological characterization of the silica were then investigated by using an Archimedes densification measurement method device, a X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), respectively. Effect of microwave energy on the properties of silica xerogel ceramic were evaluated and discussed and compared to conventionally sintered results. The notably different densification and microstructure of sintered samples after sintering were found. The results suggest that microwave radiation provides a microwave effect during sintering.

  19. Superabrasive cubic boron nitride-oxide composites prepared by sol-gel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Nazeri-Eshghi, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superabrasive cubic boron nitride (CBN) grains were incorporated in different oxide matrices prepared through sol-gel processing. CBN grains of different particle size from 0.5 to 25 microns were homogeneously dispersed in alumina, alumina-silicate and silica gels. Monolithic composites were achieved upon firing to higher temperatures either by sintering or hot-pressing. Densification of these composites versus temperature was monitored by continuous shrinkage measurements in a dilatometer. The effect of particle size and the volume content of CBN on densification of the gel matrix was investigated. Experimental results were compared with the theories on gel shrinkage and densification of heterogeneous ceramic powders. Reactions at the interface between the CBN particles and the gel matrix and some mechanical properties of the composites were studied.

  20. Mechanical and Electrochemical Characterization of Super-Solidus Sintered Austenitic Stainless Steel (316L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuchamy, A.; Raja Annamalai, A.; Ranka, Rishabh

    2016-08-01

    The present study compares the mechanical and electrochemical behaviour of austenitic (AISI 316L) stainless steel compacted at various pressures (200, 400 and 600 MPa) and conventionally sintered at super-solidus temperature of 1,400°C. The electrochemical behaviour was investigated in 0.1 N H2SO4 solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The shrinkage decreased and densification has been increased with increasing pressure. The mechanical and electrochemical behaviour with pressure has been correlated with densification response and microstructure (pore type, volume and morphology). Highest densification (~92% theoretical) achieved at 600 MPa (compaction pressure) and 1,400°C (sintering temperature) resulted in excellent combination of tensile strength and ductility (456 ± 40 MPa, 25 ± 1.1%), while showing excellent corrosion resistance (0.1 mmpy or 4.7 mpy).

  1. Multi-particle FEM modeling on microscopic behavior of 2D particle compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; An, X. Z.; Zhang, Y. L.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the discrete random packing and various ordered packings such as tetragonal and hexagonal close packed structures generated by discrete element method and honeycomb, which is manually generated were input as the initial packing structures into the multi-particle finite element model (FEM) to study their densification during compaction, where each particle is discretized as a FEM mesh. The macro-property such as relative density and micro-properties such as local morphology, stress, coordination number and densification mechanism obtained from various initial packings are characterized and analyzed. The results show that the coupling of discrete feature in particle scale with the continuous FEM in macro-scale can effectively conquer the difficulties in traditional FEM modeling, which provides a reasonable way to reproduce the compaction process and identify the densification mechanism more accurately and realistically.

  2. Dilatometric study of U1-xAmxO2±δ and U1-xCexO2±δ reactive sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlait, Denis; Feledziak, Alex; Lebreton, Florent; Clavier, Nicolas; Prieur, Damien; Dacheux, Nicolas; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2013-10-01

    In order to reduce the radiotoxicity of nuclear fuel waste, the transmutation of americium in U1-xAmxO2±δ dedicated fuels is considered. A convenient route to produce such fuels is reactive sintering from a UO2+δ/AmO2-δ green pellet, i.e., a single heat treatment during which both the densification and the formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution occur. The mechanisms of such sintering are however barely known and require experimental data. In this aim, the densification through reactive sintering of a UO2+δ/AmO2-δ sample was monitored by dilatometry. The obtained results were compared to those reported for the formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution monitored by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. To assess the use of Ce as a substitute of Am, similar dilatometric studies were also carried out on UO2+δ/CeO2 pellets. Obtained results show that the use of a reactive sintering causes a delay in the densification process associated to the competition between solid solution formation and densification, which yields limitations in pellet final densities. The importance of redox behavior of Am (or Ce) on the achievement of solid solution formation and densification are also discussed, especially based on discrepancies in densification behavior between UO2+δ/AmO2-δ and UO2+δ/CeO2.

  3. Photonic non-destructive measurement methods for investigating the evolution of polar firn and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Daniel James

    When snow falls on glaciers or ice sheets, it persists for many tens, hundreds and sometimes thousands of years before becoming ice. The granular material in between fresh snow and glacial ice is known as firn and is generally 50 to 100 m thick over polar ice sheets. The compaction mechanism of firn into ice (called densification) has important glaciological ramifications in determination of ice sheet stability and related sea level rise effects via remote sensing altimetry. Firn densification is also important for correctly interpreting ice core paleoclimate records, especially those analyzing gases trapped in air bubbles within the glacial ice. Densification is thought to depend strongly on microstructure: the sizes, shapes, orientations and inter-particle bonds of the ice grains that make up polar firn. Microstructure-dependent densification is poorly understood and occurs in the region where two-thirds of the overall densification takes place. This work focuses on developing non-destructive methods for simultaneously evaluating changes in both the bulk density and microstructure of polar firn to better understand structure- dependent densification processes. The first method is an automated density gauge which uses gamma-ray transmission methods to non-destructively produce high resolution (3.3 mm) and high precision (+/-4 kg m-3) density profiles of firn and ice cores. This instrument was used to collect a density profile for the first 160 m of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide WDCO6A deep ice core. The second method involves optical scattering measurements on firn and ice cores to determine the important microstructural parameters of ice grain and air bubble size and air-ice interface surface area. These measurements are modeled using both Monte Carlo radiative transfer and ray-tracing geometric optics methods, and are then tested against experiment using digital photography of the WDC06A core. Combining the results of both bulk density and optical

  4. Sintering Phenomena of Lead Magnesium Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Stephen Allen

    The sintering characteristics of lead magnesium niobate, Pb(Mg_{1/3}Nb _{2/3})O_3 (PMN), were investigated systematically in order to provide an insight into the physical and chemical changes taking place during this process. A controlled-profile sintering technique was used that provided the ability to control sintering profiles to the following extent for heating rates up to 120 ^circC/min: (1) soak temperature: +/-0.5^circC, (2) starting time at temperature (T_0): +/-10 sec, (3) heating rate: +/-2%. This permitted the tracking of densification and microstructural evolution during isothermal sintering, particularly at higher temperatures where the kinetics were rapid. High densities (97-98%) were achieved at temperatures as low as 950^circC when using a heating rate of 120^circC/min. The low sintering temperature is attributed, in part, to the high surface area fissured substructure of the PMN particles resulting from the formation of perovskite PMN via the magnocolumbite method. This led to inhomogeneous densification, and a limit to final density of 98%. It is also proposed that vapor transport influences all stages of sintering and is beneficial to the densification process by providing a source for liquid phase in the early stages, and inhibiting grain growth in all stages. Because of the slow coarsening rates, lower heating rates (investigated down to 5^circC/min.) had no discernable influence on densification kinetics or grain growth. The activation energy for densification in the intermediate stage was 58 kcal/mol and 91 kcal/mol, below and above 85% density, respectively. The change in activation energy is attributed to the preferential removal of the small pore population during inhomogeneous densification. Powders milled for extended periods of time demonstrated more rapid intermediate stage kinetics due to a reduction in the degree of inhomogeneous densification, and an optimization of the densification/grain growth trajectory. Dielectric evaluations

  5. Reaction synthesis of heat-resistant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    Exothermicity associated with the synthesis of aluminides can be utilized to obtain aluminides of transition metals. Combustion synthesis, extrusion, and hot pressing were utilized to obtain dense intermetallics and their composites. Composites were analyzed by X- ray diffraction and microscopy techniques, and tensile properties were measured on button-head and sheet specimens of intermetallics and their composites. Mechanical properties of intermetallics obtained by reaction synthesis and densification compare well with conventionally processed materials. Reaction-synthesis principles were also extended to weld overlays. Possible approaches to obtaining dense products by reaction synthesis and densification are summarized in a schematic illustration. 19 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Cast iron freezing mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillybeck, N. P.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This task focused on liquid phase sintering and infiltration studies of refractory metals and metal composites. Particular emphases was placed on those powered metal compacts which produce liquid alloys in sintering. For this class of materials, heating to a two phase region causes the constituent components to react, forming an alloy liquid which must wet the solid phase. Densification is initially driven by the free energy effects which cause rapid rearrangement. Further densification occurs by evaporation and condensation, surface diffusion, bulk flow, and volume diffusion.

  7. Hot isostatic pressing: Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Hebeisen, J.; Widmer, R.

    1996-12-31

    The International Conference on Hot Isostatic Pressing was held on May 20-22, 1996, in Andover, Massachusetts. This conference discussed the state-of-the-art of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and competing compaction techniques. HIP allows complex cost-effective near net shapes to be produced from powder products, densification of castings thereby enhancing performance, retention of metastable structures such as nano-sized grains, and even creative food processing. Sections in the conference covered such items as fundamentals, mathematical modeling, equipment and instrumentation, advanced materials and processes, composite materials, casting densification, surface treatments, HIP bonding, and competing technologies. Forty five papers were processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  9. Temperature dependence of inductively coupled plasma assisted growth of TiN thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W. J.; Curtis, T. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.

    1999-11-01

    The use of low pressure high density plasmas to assist the synthesis of ceramic thin film materials is in its infancy. Using an inductively coupled plasma assisted magnetron sputtering system, we examine the dependence of plasma-assisted growth of TiN thin films on growth temperature at different ratios of ion flux to neutral atom flux. Our results indicate that a temperature independent densification of TiN films occurs above a certain ion to neutral atom flux ratio. As an example of this temperature independent densification, we demonstrate the formation of dense B1 TiN crystalline thin films at growth temperatures down to {approx}100 K.

  10. Effect of milling and leaching on the structure of sintered silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Glascow, T. K.; Herbell, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Sintering was performed in He for 16 hours at 1200, 1250, and 1300 C. Compacts of as-received Si did not densify during sintering. Milling reduced the average particle size to below 0.5 micrometer and enhanced densification (1.75 g/cc). Leaching milled Si further enhanced densification (1.90 g/cc max.) and decreased structural coarsening. After sintering, the structure of the milled and leached powder compacts appears favorable for the production of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  11. Effect of milling and leaching on the structure of sintered silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Glasgow, T. K.; Herbell, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of attrition milling and acid leaching on the sintering behavior and the resultant structures of two commercial silicon powders were investigated. Sintering was performed in He for 16 hours at 1200, 1250, and 1300 C. Compacts of as-received Si did not densify during sintering. Milling reduced the average particle size to below 0.5 microns and enhanced densification (1.75 g/cc). Leaching milled Si further enhanced densification (1.90 g/cc max.) and decreased structural coarsening. After sintering, the structure of the milled and leached powder compacts appears favorable for the production of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  12. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  13. Basic science of new aerogels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Feasibility of making monolithic composite aerogels containing silica and natural clay minerals, synthetic clay minerals or zeolites has been demonstrated, using two different processes; up to 30 wt% of the mineral phase has been successfully added. Addition of natural and synthetic clay minerals or zeolites to silica aerosols was shown to retard densification. Composite silica aerogels showed significant surface area still present after sintering at 800 or 1000 C. For most samples, 1 wt% of the second phase is equally effective in retarding densification as 10 wt%. Composite aerogels, in general, had lower hardness values than pure silica. Hardness values were inversely proportional to aerogel pore radius.

  14. Effect on scattering of complex morphology of DKDP bulk damage sites

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Muyco, J J; Rubenchik, A M

    2004-11-10

    Bulk damage sites in frequency conversion crystals scatter and/or absorb laser light leading to interference and downstream intensification .We find that laser induced bulk damage sites in DKDP exhibit a 'shell' of structurally and/or chemically modified material surrounding a central core as indicated by SEM and optical micrographs and micro Raman spectral maps. We hypothesize that the modified material has been shock wave densified and estimate the amount of densification and its effect on scattering. A simple model indicates that densification of several percent is likely and that the scattering cross section may be larger than the geometric area of the inner core by an order of magnitude.

  15. Abrasion resistant silicon nitride based articles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.K.; Buijan, S.T.; Penty, R.A.

    1984-02-28

    A composite article and cutting tool are prepared by densification to form a body consisting essentially of particles of hard refractory material uniformly distributed in a matrix consisting essentially of a first phase and a second phase, said first phase consisting essentially of crystalline silicon nitride and said second phase being an intergranular refractory phase comprising silicon nitride and a suitable densification aid selected from the group consisting of yttrium oxide, zirconium oxide, hafnium oxide and the lanthanade rare earth oxides and mixture thereof.

  16. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the

  17. Gravitational Effects on Distortion in Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    German, Randall M.

    2003-01-01

    During sintering a powder compact gains strength through low-temperature interparticle bonding, usually induced by solid-state surface diffusion, followed by further strength contributions from high-temperature densification. In cases where a liquid phase forms, sintering densification is accelerated and shape retention is sustained while open pores remain and contribute capillary forces. Unfortunately, sintering densification requires the compact become thermally softened to a point where creep strain rates reach levels near 10(exp -2)/s when the liquid forms. On the other hand, thermal softening of the powder compact substantially reduces the strength at high temperatures. Therefore, the in situ strength evolution during sintering is a primary focus to separate compact densification (as required for high performance) with minimized distortion (as required for net-shaping). With respect to gravitation effects on distortion during sintering there are two points of substantial weakness - prior to significant interparticle bonding and during final pore closure. This research is focused on understanding the competition among interparticle neck growth, densification, thermal softening, grain boundary wetting, capillary effects associated with liquid wetting and residual porosity, and gravity. Most surprising is the apparent role of gravity, where the deviatoric stress acting on the powder structure induces skeletal formation that reduces distortion. In contrast with theory, microgravity samples exhibit more distortion yet fail to fully densify. Results are presented on the experimental concepts supporting an emerging model of sintering strength evolution that enables understanding of both distortion and densification. The experiments have relied on tungsten heavy alloys, various combinations of dihedral angle, pore size, initial porosity, liquid:solid ratio, and heating rates. On Earth, the dominant factor with respect to distortion is the starting body heterogeneity

  18. Non-Lithostatic Pressure and Transformation-Induced Boudinage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    (Ultra) high pressure rocks often found as competent boudanes within lower pressure less competent rocks. Competent layer parallel extension would cause underpressure. We explore densification as the reason for boudinage, monitor related evolution of the pressure field and discuss its geodynamic implications.

  19. Electro-induced mechanical and thermal responses of carbon nanotube fibers.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fancheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Ru; Zhao, Jingna; Xuan, Xiaohui; Wang, Xinhao; Zou, Jingyun; Li, Qingwen

    2014-04-23

    The electromechanical and electrothermal responses of carbon nanotube fibers provide new ways to use energy conversion, including the modulation of assembly structures by alternative densification and relaxation. The most efficient way to strengthen the tensile strength up to 2.32-2.50 GPa is shown as well as a microscale, nanotube-based Chinese calligraphy brush. PMID:24677297

  20. Research on ultra-high-temperature materials, monolithic ceramics, ceramic matrix composites and carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. J.; Grimes, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    Research on three classes of materials that show potential for allowing significant increases in operating temperatures in gas turbine engines is discussed. Monolithic ceramics, ceramic matrix composites, and carbon-carbon composites are discussed. Sintering, hot pressing, and densification are discussed.

  1. Reduced-temperature processing and consolidation of ultra-refractory Ta4HfC5

    SciTech Connect

    Gaballa, Osama; Cook, B. A.; Russell, A. M.

    2013-04-26

    TaC, HfC, and WC powders were subjected to high-energy milling and hot pressing to produce Ta4HfC5, a composite of Ta(4)HfC5 + 30 vol.% WC, and a composite of Ta4HfC5 + 50 vol.% WC. Sub-micron powders were examined after four different milling intervals prior to hot pressing. XRD was used to verify proper phase formation. SEM, relative density, and hardness measurements were used to examine the resulting phases. Hot pressed compacts of Ta4HfC5 showed densification as high as 98.6% along with Vickers hardness values of 21.4 GPa. Similarly, Ta4HfC5 + 30 vol.% WC exhibited 99% densification with a Vickers hardness of 22.5 GPa. These levels of densification were achieved at 1500 degrees C, which is lower than any previously reported sintering temperature for Ta4HfC5. Microhardness values measured in this study were higher than those previously reported for Ta4HfC5. The WC additions to Ta4HfC5 were found to improve densification and increase microhardness. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic pinch compression of silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    SiO2 glass has been irreversibly densified by pressures up to 250 kbar produced in a magnetic pinch apparatus. The threshold for significant densification was about 60 kbar. The recovered densities agree better with published shock wave results than with static results.

  3. Impact of reductive N2/H2 plasma on porous low-dielectric constant SiCOH thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hao; Carter, Richard J.; Moore, Darren L.; Peng, Hua-Gen; Gidley, David W.; Burke, Peter A.

    2005-06-01

    Porous low-dielectric constant (low-κ) SiCOH thin films deposited using a plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition have been comprehensively characterized before and after exposure to a reactive-ion-etch-type plasma of N2 and H2 chemistry. The low-κ film studied in this work is a carbon-doped silicon oxide film with a dielectric constant (κ) of 2.5. Studies show that a top dense layer is formed as a result of significant surface film densification after exposure to N2/H2 plasma while the underlying bulk layer remains largely unchanged. The top dense layer is found to seal the porous bulk SiCOH film. SiCOH films experienced significant thickness reduction, κ increase, and leakage current degradation after plasma exposure, accompanied by density increase, pore collapse, carbon depletion, and moisture content increase in the top dense layer. Both film densification and removal processes during N2/H2 plasma treatment were found to play important roles in the thickness reduction and κ increase of this porous low-κ SiCOH film. A model based upon mutually limiting film densification and removal processes is proposed for the continuous thickness reduction during plasma exposure. A combination of surface film densification, thickness ratio increase of top dense layer to bulk layer, and moisture content increase results in the increase in κ value of this SiCOH film.

  4. Gas pressure sintering of silicon nitride to optimize fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Nunn, S.D.; Beavers, T.M.; Menchhofer, P.A.; Barker, D.L.; Coffey, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Gas-pressure sintering (GPS) can be used to densify silicon nitride containing a wide variety of sintering additives. Parameters affecting the sintering behavior include densification temperature, densification time, grain growth temperature, grain growth time and heating rates. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples sintered to high densities at all conditions used in the present study, whereas the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} samples required the highest temperatures and longest times to achieve densities {ge}98 % T. D. The main effect on the fracture toughness for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples was the use of a lower densification temperature, which was 1900C in the present study. For the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}SiO4{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} composition, fracture toughness was sensitive to and improved by a slower heating rate (10c/min), a lower densification temperature (1900`), a higher grain growth temperature (2000C), and a longer grain growth time (2 h).

  5. Physical and chemical evaluation of furniture waste briquettes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana Isabel; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Furniture waste is mainly composed of wood and upholstery foam (mostly polyurethane foam). Both of these have a high calorific value, therefore, energy recovery would be an appropriate process to manage these wastes. Nevertheless, the drawback is that the energy content of these wastes is limited due to their low density mainly that of upholstery foam. Densification of separate foam presents difficulties due to its elastic character. The significance of this work lies in obtaining densified material by co-densification of furniture wood waste and polyurethane foam waste. Densification of furniture wood and the co-densification of furniture wood waste with polyurethane foam have been studied. On the one hand, the parameters that have an effect on the quality of the furniture waste briquettes have been analysed, i.e., moisture content, compaction pressure, presence of lignin, etc. The maximum weight percentage of polyurethane foam that can be added with furniture wood waste to obtain durable briquettes and the optimal moisture were determined. On the other hand, some parameters were analysed in order to evaluate the possible effect on the combustion. The chemical composition of waste wood was compared with untreated wood biomass; the higher nitrogen content and the concentration of some metals were the most important differences, with a significant difference of Ti content. PMID:26856442

  6. Compressional characteristics of four starches.

    PubMed

    Paronen, P; Juslin, M

    1983-10-01

    Compression data about barley, corn, potato and wheat starches were obtained by two methods: the ejected tablet method and the tablet-in-die-method. These data were analysed using the Heckel and the Cooper-Eaton equations. The Heckel equation appeared to be the more sensitive in distinguishing the various stages during the compression. Die filling and rearrangement processes for the starches were especially dependent on particle size and shape and thus on contact area between particles. Densification of large starch particles (potato starch) owed more to die filling and less to rearrangement. Densification of small particles (corn starch) was the reverse. Starch having a wide particle size distribution (wheat) or an irregular particle shape (barley) underwent a relatively small amount of densification as a result of die filling and a relatively great amount of densification because of rearrangement of particles during tableting. The tendency of the starches to total and pure plastic deformation was dependent on particle size, size distribution and particle shape. Corn starch was the most prone to plastic flow with only little elastic recovery. Potato starch also flowed plastically with ease. Barley and wheat starches were the more elastic. PMID:6139430

  7. 75 FR 16202 - Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... densification in light-water-cooled nuclear power reactors. To meet these objectives, the guide describes... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Notice of Issuance of Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice...

  8. Eddy current sensing of intermetallic composite consolidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharmasena, Kumar P.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to explore the feasibility and optimization of a probe-type eddy current sensor for determining the thickness of plate specimens during a hot isostatic pressing cycle. The dependence of the sensor's impedance upon sample-sensor separation in the high frequency limit is calculated, and factors that maximize sensitivity to the final stages of densification are identified.

  9. Dilatometric Analysis and Microstructural Investigation of the Sintering Mechanisms of Blended Elemental Ti-6Al-4V Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngmoo; Lee, Junho; Lee, Bin; Ryu, Ho Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-09-01

    The densification behavior of mixed Ti and Al/V master alloy powders for Ti-6Al-4V was investigated by a series of dilatometry tests to measure the shrinkage of the samples with the sintering temperature. The corresponding microstructural changes were examined under various sintering conditions with optical microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. From these results, the consolidation of the mixed powders was divided into two domains: (i) sintering densification and solute homogenization of Ti and Al/V master alloy particles below 1293 K (1020 °C), and (ii) densification of Ti alloy phases above 1293 K (1020 °C). In the lower temperature region, the inter-diffusion between Ti and Al/V master alloy particles dominated the sintering of the mixed powders because the chemical gradient between two types of particles outweighed the surface energy reduction. Following chemical homogenization, the densification induced the shrinkage of the Ti alloy phases to reduce their surface energies. These tendencies are also supported by the density and grain size variations of the sintered specimens with temperature. The apparent activation energies of the sintering and grain growth for Ti alloy particles are 85.91 ± 6.93 and 37.33 kJ/mol, respectively, similar to or slightly lower than those of pure Ti particles. The difference was attributed to the slower self-diffusion of Ti resulting from the alloying of Al and V into in the Ti matrix.

  10. Preparation of cermets

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.

    1978-01-01

    Cermets are produced by the process of forming a physical mixture of a ceramic powder material with an elemental metal precursor compound and by decomposing the elemental metal precursor compound within the mixture. The decomposition step may be carried out either prior to or during a forming and densification step.

  11. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  12. Electro-induced mechanical and thermal responses of carbon nanotube fibers.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fancheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Ru; Zhao, Jingna; Xuan, Xiaohui; Wang, Xinhao; Zou, Jingyun; Li, Qingwen

    2014-04-23

    The electromechanical and electrothermal responses of carbon nanotube fibers provide new ways to use energy conversion, including the modulation of assembly structures by alternative densification and relaxation. The most efficient way to strengthen the tensile strength up to 2.32-2.50 GPa is shown as well as a microscale, nanotube-based Chinese calligraphy brush.

  13. Fuel densifier converts biomass into fuel cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    A new cost-effective means to produce clean-burning and low cost commercial and industrial fuel is being introduced by Columbia Fuel Densification Corp., Phoenix. The Columbia Commercial Hydraulic Fuel Densifier converts raw biomass materials such as wood chips, paper, peat moss and rice hulls into densified fuel cubes. The densifier is mobile and its operation is briefly outlined.

  14. Reactive sintering of SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation of the sintering processes involved in the sintering of SiC revealed a connection between the types and quantities of sintering additives or catalysts and densification, initial shrinkage, and weight loss of the sintered SiC material. By sintering processes, is meant the methods of mass transport, namely solid vapor transport and grain boundary diffusion.

  15. Laser peening for reducing hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Zaleski, Tania M.; Chen, Hao-Lin; Hill, Michael R.; Liu, Kevin K.

    2010-05-25

    A laser peening process for the densification of metal surfaces and sub-layers and for changing surface chemical activities provides retardation of the up-take and penetration of atoms and molecules, particularly Hydrogen, which improves the lifetime of such laser peened metals. Penetration of hydrogen into metals initiates an embrittlement that leaves the material susceptible to cracking.

  16. Physical and chemical evaluation of furniture waste briquettes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana Isabel; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Furniture waste is mainly composed of wood and upholstery foam (mostly polyurethane foam). Both of these have a high calorific value, therefore, energy recovery would be an appropriate process to manage these wastes. Nevertheless, the drawback is that the energy content of these wastes is limited due to their low density mainly that of upholstery foam. Densification of separate foam presents difficulties due to its elastic character. The significance of this work lies in obtaining densified material by co-densification of furniture wood waste and polyurethane foam waste. Densification of furniture wood and the co-densification of furniture wood waste with polyurethane foam have been studied. On the one hand, the parameters that have an effect on the quality of the furniture waste briquettes have been analysed, i.e., moisture content, compaction pressure, presence of lignin, etc. The maximum weight percentage of polyurethane foam that can be added with furniture wood waste to obtain durable briquettes and the optimal moisture were determined. On the other hand, some parameters were analysed in order to evaluate the possible effect on the combustion. The chemical composition of waste wood was compared with untreated wood biomass; the higher nitrogen content and the concentration of some metals were the most important differences, with a significant difference of Ti content.

  17. Synthesis of increased-density bismuth-based superconductors with cold isostatic pressing and heat treating

    DOEpatents

    Lanagan, Michael T.; Picciolo, John J.; Dorris, Stephen E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing high temperature superconducting ceramic materials. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a process that enhances the densification of Bi.sub.1.8 Pb.sub.0.4 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.10 "BSCCO" ceramics.

  18. Briquetting biomass: Current situation of the Spanish market

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, L.; Miguez, J.L.; Granada, E.

    1996-12-31

    One of the most important problems of wood industries is avoiding environmental damage by wood residues. The great volume of these residues creates storage and management problems. An interesting way to solve this is to density the wastes for marketing as a high-quality fuel. This paper analysis the evolution from 1990 to 1995, and the current situation, of Spanish wood residue densification, beginning with distribution and source of the residues. It is based on data from visits to all wood densification factories in Spain. Also an analysis of Spanish manufacturers, commercial units, and installed units, densification technology, power and remarks about the evolution of densification technology are included. The characterization of Spanish briquettes analyzed by the authors allows their classification as a fuel and comparison of their price/energy ratio with competing conventional fuels. The chemical-physical-energetic properties and the market distribution determine which area are suitable. The study of the industry production guides the optimum size in a sector where supply of residues and distribution of briquettes is a problem.

  19. Attachment system for silica tiles. [thermal protection for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Holt, J. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved method for markedly increasing the bond strength between a rigid, porous refractory material and non-rigid substrate by densifying the face of the rigid material opposing the substrate is discussed. Densification is accomplished by wetting the refractory material and then impregnating it with a composite slurry having a particle size to fill voids of the porous material.

  20. Effect of low temperature anneals and nonthermal treatments on the properties of gap fill oxides used in SiGe and III-V devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E. Todd; Morin, Pierre; Madan, Anita; Mehta, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Silicon dioxide is used to electrically isolate CMOS devices such as fin field effect transistors by filling gaps between the devices (also known as shallow trench isolation). The gap fill oxide typically requires a high temperature anneal in excess of 1000 °C to achieve adequate electrical properties and oxide densification to make the oxide compatible with subsequent fabrication steps such as fin reveal etch. However, the transition from Si-based devices to high mobility channel materials such as SiGe and III-V semiconductors imposes more severe thermal limitations on the processes used for device fabrication, including gap fill oxide annealing. This study provides a framework to quantify and model the effect of anneal temperature and time on the densification of a flowable silicon dioxide as measured by wet etch rate. The experimental wet etch rates allowed the determination of the activation energy and anneal time dependence for oxide densification. Dopant and self-diffusion can degrade the channel material above a critical temperature. We present a model of self-diffusion of Ge and Si in SiGe materials. Together these data allowed us to map the thermal process space for acceptable oxide wet etch rate and self-diffusion. The methodology is also applicable to III-V devices, which require even lower thermal budget. The results highlight the need for nonthermal oxide densification methods such as ultraviolet (UV) and plasma treatments. We demonstrate that several plasma treatments, in place of high temperature annealing, improved the properties of flowable oxide. In addition, UV curing prior to thermal annealing enables acceptable densification with dramatically reduced anneal temperature.

  1. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Ice Sheet Surface Elevation at the Summit of Greenland: Observed and Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Jun, Li; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observed seasonal and interannual variations in the surface elevation over the summit of the Greenland ice sheet are modeled using a new temperature-dependent formulation of firn-densification and observed accumulation variations. The observed elevation variations are derived from ERS (European Remote Sensing)-1 and ERS-2 radar altimeter data for the period between April 1992 and April 1999. A multivariate linear/sine function is fitted to an elevation time series constructed from elevation differences measured by radar altimetry at orbital crossovers. The amplitude of the seasonal elevation cycle is 0.25 m peak-to-peak, with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. Inter-annually, the elevation decreases to a minimum in 1995, followed by an increase to 1999, with an overall average increase of 4.2 cm a(exp -1) for 1992 to 1999. Our densification formulation uses an initial field-density profile, the AWS (automatic weather station) surface temperature record, and a temperature-dependent constitutive relation for the densification that is based on laboratory measurements of crystal growth rates. The rate constant and the activation energy commonly used in the Arrhenius-type constitutive relation for firn densification are also temperature dependent, giving a stronger temperature and seasonal amplitudes about 10 times greater than previous densification formulations. Summer temperatures are most important, because of the strong non-linear dependence on temperature. Much of firn densification and consequent surface lowering occurs within about three months of the summer season, followed by a surface build-up from snow accumulation until spring. Modeled interannual changes of the surface elevation, using the AWS measurements of surface temperature and accumulation and results of atmospheric modeling of precipitation variations, are in good agreement with the altimeter observations. In the model, the surface elevation decreases about 20 cm over the seven years due

  2. Consolidation of Si3N4 without additives (by hot isostatic pressing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of using hot isostatic pressing (HIP'ing) technique to produce dense silicon nitride materials without or with a reduced amount of additives (much less than 5 w/o) was investigated. Hot isostatic pressing technique can provide higher pressure and temperature than hot pressing can, thus has the potential of requiring less densification aids to consolidate Si3N4 materials. It was anticipated that if such dense materials could be fabricated, the high temperature strength of the material should be improved significantly. Observations on the phase transformation, densification behavior, and microstructures of the samples are also documented. Density, microhardness, four point bend strength (room temperature and 1370 C) were measured on selected densified materials.

  3. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium-silicate-hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials. PMID:27417911

  4. Miniature lowpass filters in low loss 9k7 LTCC

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steve; Hsieh, Lung -Hwa

    2015-07-01

    DuPont 9k7 low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) is a low loss, or high quality factor Q, tape system targeting at radio frequency (RF) applications. This paper reports the effect of a critical process parameter, heating rate, on the densification and dielectric properties of the 9k7 LTCC. The role of competing densification and crystallization during the sintering of 9k7 is discussed. The high Q of DuPont 9K7 can be used to improve RF system performance, for example a better receiver noise figure, by designing embedded passive RF components such as inductors, capacitors and filters. As a result, miniaturized multilayer low pass filters (LPF) with a wide stopband were fabricated to showcase the technology.

  5. Miniature low-pass filter in low-loss 9k7 LTCC

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steve Xunhu; Hsieh, Lung -Hwa

    2015-09-30

    DuPont 9k7 low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) is a low-loss, or high-quality-factor Q, tape system targeting at radio frequency (RF) applications. This paper reports on the effect of a critical process parameter, the heating rate, on the densification and dielectric properties of the 9k7 LTCC. The role of competing densification and crystallization during the sintering of 9k7 is discussed. The high Q of DuPont 9K7 can be used to improve RF system performance, for example a better receiver noise figure, by designing embedded passive RF components such as inductors, capacitors and filters. Furthermore, miniaturized multilayer low-pass filters (LPF) with a wide stopband were fabricated to showcase the technology.

  6. Reaction sintering and mechanical behavior of cordierite containing sapphirine dispersoids

    SciTech Connect

    Genevrier, M.; Mocellin, A.

    1996-08-01

    The preparation of cordierite-sapphirine composites through additions of magnesia-alumina mixtures to a cordierite powder has been studied. Kinetic experiments have shown that the reaction sequence varies little with composition, always involving the transient presence of spinel before sapphirine forms. The appearance of a liquid phase, that can be accounted for by phase-diagram considerations, leads to some differences in the reaction-sintering paths and microstructures. The reaction-densification range remains narrow in most composites. However, the addition of 1 wt% titania has proved efficient in improving both densification and reaction behaviors. Relative fracture energy and strength increases up to 30% and 100%, respectively, have been obtained. The results are qualitatively rationalized with reference to differences in the modes of testing. Cracks propagate at moderate velocities (work of fracture) entirely within the matrix, whereas they may reach particle-matrix interfaces at higher rates (strength tests), thus allowing other energy-dissipating processes to occur.

  7. Integral throat entrance development, qualification and production for the Antares 3 nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, F. I.; Dirling, R. B.; Eitman, D. A.; Loomis, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Although design analyses of a G-90 graphite integral throat entrance for the Antares 3 solid rocket motor nozzle indicated acceptable margins of safety, the nozzle throat insert suffered a thermostructural failure during the first development firing. Subsequent re-analysis using properties measured on material from the same billet as the nozzle throat insert showed negative margins. Carbon-carbon was investigated and found to result in large positive margins of safety. The G-90 graphite was replaced by SAI fast processed 4-D material which uses Hercules HM 10000 fiber as the reinforcement. Its construction allows powder filling of the interstices after preform fabrication which accelerates the densification process. Allied 15V coal tar pitch is then used to complete densification. The properties were extensively characterized on this material and six nozzles were subjected to demonstration, development and qualification firings.

  8. Challenges in scaling up biofuels infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Richard, Tom L

    2010-08-13

    Rapid growth in demand for lignocellulosic bioenergy will require major changes in supply chain infrastructure. Even with densification and preprocessing, transport volumes by mid-century are likely to exceed the combined capacity of current agricultural and energy supply chains, including grain, petroleum, and coal. Efficient supply chains can be achieved through decentralized conversion processes that facilitate local sourcing, satellite preprocessing and densification for long-distance transport, and business models that reward biomass growers both nearby and afar. Integrated systems that are cost-effective and energy-efficient will require new ways of thinking about agriculture, energy infrastructure, and rural economic development. Implementing these integrated systems will require innovation and investment in novel technologies, efficient value chains, and socioeconomic and policy frameworks; all are needed to support an expanded biofuels infrastructure that can meet the challenges of scale. PMID:20705852

  9. Novel preparation techniques for thin metal-ceramic composite membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, K.L.; Varma, A.

    1995-09-01

    Composite metal membranes obtained by supporting thin metallic films on ceramic substrates have good thermal and mechanical stability. The use of a thin metal film increases transmembrane flux, while retaining high permselectivity that is characteristic of metallic membranes. Novel techniques have been developed for preparing metal-ceramic composite membranes. By the appropriate use of osmotic pressure, the microstructure, porosity, and thickness of the deposited metal can be systematically manipulated. Three new procedures are described for film densification and fabrication: (1) the osmotic pressure is used to densify an existing supported metal membrane; (2) densification and growth of the film is managed under the influence of osmotic pressure by using a dilute plating solution; and (3) films of varying porosity are deposited on the ceramic membrane by combining electroless deposition and osmotic pressure. Silver, palladium, and palladium-silver films prepared by these techniques on a commercial alumina membrane (Membralox) are thermally more stable than similar films deposited by conventional electroless plating.

  10. Indentation size effect and the plastic compressibility of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-06-23

    Oxide glasses exhibit significant densification under an applied isostatic pressure at the glass transition temperature. The glass compressibility is correlated with the chemical composition and atomic packing density, e.g., borate glasses with planar triangular BO{sub 3} units are more disposed for densification than silicate glasses with tetrahedral units. We here show that there is a direct relation between the plastic compressibility following hot isostatic compression and the extent of the indentation size effect (ISE), which is the decrease of hardness with indentation load exhibited by most materials. This could suggest that the ISE is correlated with indentation-induced shear bands, which should form in greater density when the glass network is more adaptable to volume changes through structural and topological rearrangements under an applied pressure.

  11. Challenges in scaling up biofuels infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Richard, Tom L

    2010-08-13

    Rapid growth in demand for lignocellulosic bioenergy will require major changes in supply chain infrastructure. Even with densification and preprocessing, transport volumes by mid-century are likely to exceed the combined capacity of current agricultural and energy supply chains, including grain, petroleum, and coal. Efficient supply chains can be achieved through decentralized conversion processes that facilitate local sourcing, satellite preprocessing and densification for long-distance transport, and business models that reward biomass growers both nearby and afar. Integrated systems that are cost-effective and energy-efficient will require new ways of thinking about agriculture, energy infrastructure, and rural economic development. Implementing these integrated systems will require innovation and investment in novel technologies, efficient value chains, and socioeconomic and policy frameworks; all are needed to support an expanded biofuels infrastructure that can meet the challenges of scale.

  12. Effect of powder characteristics on gas-pressure sintering of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with rare earth additives

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Nunn, S.D.; Walls, C.A.; Barker, D.; Davisson, C.; Jones, P.J.

    1993-09-01

    Several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powders, synthesized by various methods and having different surface areas, oxygen contents and impurity levels, were examined. During early stage densification, all powders showed similar shrinkage with the diimide ederived powder exhibiting delayed {alpha}/{beta} transformation compared to the other powders. The diimide and gas-phase derived powders achieved the highest final densities. Improved densification was observed by increasing the oxygen content and this also resulted in high toughness for some materials with rare earth apatite additives. However, the increased oxygen resulted in reduced high temperature strength. Fracture toughnesses (K{sub Ic}) up to 10 MPa{radical}m were obtained for some compositions.

  13. Modeling of fibrous preforms for CVI fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.

    1995-08-01

    This program involves modeling the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of tube shapes in support of experimental process development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The previously developed tube model, including radiative heat transfer, has been modified to match the new, larger reactor at ORNL. For infiltrating tubes 4{double_prime} OD and 12-18{double_prime} L, higher reactant flow rate is needed for rapid densification. Two new processing schemes are being investigated. In the first, the processing parameters - temperature, flow rate, etc. - are varied through the run in order to maintain optimum densification performance. in the second, processing conditions near the end of the run are adjusted to close residual porosity and to produce a gas-tight tube. For each of these, model runs will identify process schedules prior to experimental runs at ORNL.

  14. Life considerations of the shuttle orbiter densified-tile thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Sawyer, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Shuttle orbiter themal protection system (TPS) incorporates ceramic reusable surface insulation tiles bonded to the orbiter substructure through a strain isolation pad. Densification of the bonding surface of the tiles increases the static strength of the tiles. The densification proces does not, however, necessarily lead to an equivalent increase in fatigue strength. Investigation of the expected lifetime of densified tile TPS under both sinusoidal loading and random loading simulating flight conditions indicates that the strain isolation pads are the weakest components of the TPS under fatigue loading. The felt pads loosen under repetitive loading and, in highly loaded regions, could possibly cause excessive step heights between tiles causing burning of the protective insulation between tiles. A method of improving the operational lifetime of the TPS by using a strain isolation pad with increased stiffness is presented as is the consequence of the effect of increased stiffness on the tile inplane strains and transverse stresses.

  15. Chemical Preconversion: Application of Low-Severity Pretreatment Chemistries for Commoditization of Lignocellulosic Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    David N. Thompson; Timothy Campbell; Bryan Bals; Troy Runge; Farzaneh Teymouri

    2013-05-01

    Securing biofuels project financing is challenging, in part because of risks in feedstock supply. Commoditization of the feedstock and decoupling its supply from the biorefinery will promote greater economies of scale, reduce feedstock supply risk and reduce the need for overdesign of biorefinery pretreatment technologies. We present benefits and detractions of applying low-severity chemical treatments or ‘chemical preconversion treatments’ to enable this approach through feedstock modification and densification early in the supply chain. General structural modifications to biomass that support cost-effective densification and transportation are presented, followed by available chemistries to achieve these modifications with minimal yield loss and the potential for harvesting value in local economies. A brief review of existing biomass pretreatment technologies for cellulolytic hydrolysis at biorefineries is presented, followed by a discussion toward economically applying the underlying chemistries at reduced severity in light of capital and operational limitations of small-scale feedstock depots.

  16. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, B.J.

    1998-12-01

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter.

  17. In Situ Synthesis Aluminum Borate Whiskers Reinforced TiB2 Matrix Composites for Application in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Yang, Jianhong

    2013-11-01

    The TiB2 matrix ceramics reinforced by aluminum borate whiskers (Al18B4O33 w) had been prepared by the pressureless sintering method. The mechanical properties and densification behavior of the TiB2 matrix ceramics were investigated. The results showed that Al18B4O33 w was in situ synthesized by the reaction of boehmite (AlOOH) and TiB2 powders during the sintering process. Increasing the sintering temperature had benefited for densification of the TiB2 matrix ceramics. Al18B4O33 w could increase the flexural strength and Vicker's hardness. It is obtained that the maximum value Vicker's hardness with 1.81 GPa and flexural strength with 82 MPa for samples sintered at 1600°C.

  18. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  19. Investigation of TiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and TiN-coated TiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jow-Lay Huang; Boy-Yuan Shew; Ding-Fwu Lii

    1996-12-31

    Silicon nitride containing various compositions of as received TiC and TiN-coated TiC were hot pressed at 1800{degrees}C for 1 h in a nitrogen atmosphere. In TiN-coated TiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites, TiC reacted firstly with the TiN coating to form a titanium carbonitride interlayer at 1450{degrees}C, which essentially reduced further reactions between TiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and enhanced densification. TiN-coated TiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites exhibited better densification, flexural strength and fracture toughness than those of as received TiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  20. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  1. Development of an improved toughness hyperpure silica reflective heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusert, E. L.; Hackett, T. L.; Drennan, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    High purity three dimensionally woven silica-silica materials were evaluated for use as a tough reflective heat shield for planetary entry probes. A special weave design was selected to minimize light piping effects through the heat shield thickness. Various weave spacings were evaluated for densification efficiency with an 0.7 micron particle size high purity silica. Spectral hemispherical reflectance was measured from 0.2 to 2.5 microns at room temperature. Reflectance increases due to densification and purity of material were measured. Reflectance of 3D hyperpure silica was higher than 3D astroquartz silica for all wavelengths. Mechanical properties were measured in beam flexure and beam shear tests. Results indicated strengths lower than reported for slip cast fused silica. Low strengths were attributed to low densities achieved through vacuum impregnation.

  2. Discrete element simulation of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing with low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Nosewicz, Szymon; Jurczak, Kamila; Chmielewski, Marcin; Bochenek, Kamil; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing. The powder compaction in this work is considered as an initial stage of a hot pressing process so it is realized with relatively low pressure (up to 50 MPa). Hence the attention has been focused on the densification mechanisms at this range of pressure and models suitable for these conditions. The discrete element method employing spherical particles has been used in the numerical studies. Numerical simulations have been performed for two different contact models—the elastic Hertz-Mindlin-Deresiewicz model and the plastic Storåkers model. Numerical results have been compared with the results of laboratory tests of the die compaction of the NiAl powder. Comparisons have shown that the discrete element method is capable to represent properly the densification mechanisms by the particle rearrangement and particle deformation.

  3. Effect of sintering on the relative density of Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Xu, Hui; Chen, Jian-hao; Ren, Shu-bin; He, Xin-bo; Qu, Xuan-hui

    2016-06-01

    Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites were prepared by spark plasma sintering. The effects of sintering pressure, sintering temperature, sintering duration, and Cu powder particle size on the relative density and thermal conductivity of the composites were investigated in this paper. The influence of these parameters on the properties and microstructures of the composites was also discussed. The results show that the relative density of Cr-coated diamond/Cu reaches ~100% when the composite is gradually compressed to 30 MPa during the heating process. The densification temperature increases from 880 to 915°C when the diamond content is increased from 45vol% to 60vol%. The densification temperature does not increase further when the content reaches 65vol%. Cu powder particles in larger size are beneficial for increasing the relative density of the composite.

  4. Effects of applied pressure on hot-pressing of Beta-SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwasa, M.; Hayami, R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of applied pressure on the densification during hot pressing of beta-SiC compacts were investigated. Beta-SiC powder is Starck made and has the average particle size of about 0.7 micrometer. Hot pressing experiments were carried out in graphite dies at temperatures of 1700 deg to 2300 deg C and at the pressures up to 1000 kg/sq cm. The compacts containing 1 weight percent B4C were examined. Sintered compacts were examined for microstructure and the Rockwell A-scale hardness was measured. The B4C addition was very effective to mitigate the hot pressing conditions. It is found that densification goes with the strengthening of the bonding and does not occur in particle deformation due to concentrated stress.

  5. Sintering characteristics of nanocrystalline TiO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Logas, J.; Averback, R.S. Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 )

    1990-03-01

    The microstructural development of compacted nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} powder was studied as a function of sintering temperature up to 1000 {degree}C. Grain growth was monitored using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area and total porosity were determined quantitatively using the nitrogen adsorption BET. The density was measured by gravimetry using Archimedes principle. The green body density of compacted {ital n}-TiO{sub 2} with average grain size of 14 nm is as high as 75% of theoretical bulk density. Low temperature surface diffusion leads to the disappearance of small pores, while noticeable densification commences at 600 {degree}C and reaches near theoretical values at 900 {degree}C. Grain growth also begins at 600 {degree}C, accelerating rapidly by 1000 {degree}C. Hot isostatic pressing is observed to enhance densification while suppressing grain growth.

  6. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium-silicate-hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials.

  7. Operational Testing of Densified Hydrogen Using G-M Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Baik, J. H.; McIntosh, G. E.

    2004-06-01

    Propellant densification has many beneficial properties when space launch systems are considered. Among these are reduced tank volumes, decreased vapor pressures, and increased enthalpy gain before boil off. Previous NASA investigations have focused on advanced methods of producing densified propellants, but not much work has been accomplished in the area of storing and handling densified propellants. NASA KSC has 50+ years experience in handling cryogenic propellants, but all that experience is with saturated liquids. This work is focused on using existing cryogenic refrigeration technology to subcool hydrogen, and to develop a testbed where propellant handling techniques are researched. Among these topics include continuous operation, zero boil off storage, densification, pressurization techniques, handling of stratification layers, liquefaction, and recovery of boil off losses from chill down procedures.

  8. Cold Sintering: A Paradigm Shift for Processing and Integration of Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Guo, Hanzheng; Baker, Amanda L; Lanagan, Michael T; Kupp, Elizabeth R; Messing, Gary L; Randall, Clive A

    2016-09-12

    This paper describes a sintering technique for ceramics and ceramic-based composites, using water as a transient solvent to effect densification (i.e. sintering) at temperatures between room temperature and 200 °C. To emphasize the incredible reduction in sintering temperature relative to conventional thermal sintering this new approach is named the "Cold Sintering Process" (CSP). Basically CSP uses a transient aqueous environment to effect densification by a mediated dissolution-precipitation process. CSP of NaCl, alkali molybdates and V2 O5 with small concentrations of water are described in detail, but the process is extended and demonstrated for a diverse range of chemistries (oxides, carbonates, bromides, fluorides, chlorides and phosphates), multiple crystal structures, and multimaterial applications. Furthermore, the properties of selected CSP samples are demonstrated to be essentially equivalent as samples made by conventional thermal sintering. PMID:27513705

  9. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium–silicate–hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials. PMID:27417911

  10. Synthesis of high-strength W-Ta ultrafine-grain composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, R. T.; Yang, X. Y.; Guyer, D. E.; Chauhan, S.; Sordelet, D. J.

    2015-09-30

    Bulk samples of an ultrafine-grained tungsten–tantalum composite alloy have been synthesized by consolidating mechanically milled composite powders. The grain growth during densification is limited due to the submicron-scale layering of the individual metals in the composite particles and the relatively low sintering temperature (1300 °C). The ultrafine microstructure of the high-density (~99% theoretical density) samples leads to a high yield stress of ~3 GPa under quasi-static uniaxial compression. A tendency for Ta-rich solid-solution formation during densification was observed, and the high-temperature phase equilibria in the composite powders were examined further using high-energy x-ray diffraction at temperatures up to 1300 °C.

  11. Miniature low-pass filter in low-loss 9k7 LTCC

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Steve Xunhu; Hsieh, Lung -Hwa

    2015-09-30

    DuPont 9k7 low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) is a low-loss, or high-quality-factor Q, tape system targeting at radio frequency (RF) applications. This paper reports on the effect of a critical process parameter, the heating rate, on the densification and dielectric properties of the 9k7 LTCC. The role of competing densification and crystallization during the sintering of 9k7 is discussed. The high Q of DuPont 9K7 can be used to improve RF system performance, for example a better receiver noise figure, by designing embedded passive RF components such as inductors, capacitors and filters. Furthermore, miniaturized multilayer low-pass filters (LPF) with a widemore » stopband were fabricated to showcase the technology.« less

  12. Miniature lowpass filters in low loss 9k7 LTCC

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Steve; Hsieh, Lung -Hwa

    2015-07-01

    DuPont 9k7 low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) is a low loss, or high quality factor Q, tape system targeting at radio frequency (RF) applications. This paper reports the effect of a critical process parameter, heating rate, on the densification and dielectric properties of the 9k7 LTCC. The role of competing densification and crystallization during the sintering of 9k7 is discussed. The high Q of DuPont 9K7 can be used to improve RF system performance, for example a better receiver noise figure, by designing embedded passive RF components such as inductors, capacitors and filters. As a result, miniaturized multilayer low passmore » filters (LPF) with a wide stopband were fabricated to showcase the technology.« less

  13. Spark Plasma Sintering of Titanium Spherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Mohammad; Moskovskikh, Dmitry O.; Rogachev, Alexander S.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-10-01

    The densification kinetics for sintering of titanium spherical particles under two different experimental schemes, i.e., current-assisted and current-insulated were investigated. It was shown that measurable densification rate differences between the two schemes are recognized only for the preheating stage. For current-assisted experiments, consolidation starts at lower temperatures than for current-insulated samples. Also at high heating rates, the change of sample porosity all through the preheating stage is higher for current-assisted conditions, while at relatively low heating rates ( i.e., less than 100 K/min) they are comparable. All through the isothermal sintering stage, at a temperature of 1073 K (800 °C), the shrinkage rates are comparable for both experimental schemes within the measurement accuracy. The explanation of the observed effects within the framework of conventional sintering theory is also provided.

  14. The fabrication of Stainless Stell Parts for MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Terry J. Garino

    2002-01-01

    A micro-molding process was used to fabricate parts in the 0.1 to 10 mm size range from a stainless steel nano-powder. The two types of molds used were both produced from parts fabricated using the LIGA process so that they had precise dimensional tolerance and straight sidewalls. Rigid PMMA molds were made by injection molding and flexible silicone rubber molds were made by casting. Mold filling was accomplished by mixing the powder with epoxy to form a putty-like material that was then pressed into the mold cavities and allowed to cure. After pyrolysis of the epoxy, the parts were sintered in forming gas. The densification kinetics were measured in situ using a video system. Full densification was achieved after 1 hour at 1350 C. The microstructure of the sintered parts was examined using the SEM. The hardness, dimensional tolerance and surface roughness of the sintered parts were also measured.

  15. Metallurgical and mechanical phenomena due to rubbing of titanium against sintered powder Nichrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenas, R.; Archbold, T.; Wolak, J.; Emery, A. F.; Etemad, S.

    1985-01-01

    Metallurgical and mechanical changes occurring during high-speed rubbing of Ti-6Al-4V blade specimens against an abradable Nichrome aircraft engine seal material were studied using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and microhardness techniques. Evidence of temperatures above the beta transus of Ti-6Al-4V (1000 C) and of thermal hardening was found on blade tips that exhibited undesirable abrading characteristics resulting in high forces of interaction, high temperatures, and smearing. The material within the layer of the corresponding seals was found to be work-hardened to a depth of about 0.1 mm and showed evidence of densification extending to a depth of about 0.5 mm below the rubbed surface. Wear particles produced by rub interactions that generated cleanly abraded seal surfaces were found to be several times larger than those produced during interactions which showed evidence of surface smearing and seal densification.

  16. Compressive behavior of a turtle's shell: experiment, modeling, and simulation.

    PubMed

    Damiens, R; Rhee, H; Hwang, Y; Park, S J; Hammi, Y; Lim, H; Horstemeyer, M F

    2012-02-01

    The turtle's shell acts as a protective armor for the animal. By analyzing a turtle shell via finite element analysis, one can obtain the strength and stiffness attributes to help design man-made armor. As such, finite element analysis was performed on a Terrapene carolina box turtle shell. Experimental data from compression tests were generated to provide insight into the scute through-thickness behavior of the turtle shell. Three regimes can be classified in terms of constitutive modeling: linear elastic, perfectly inelastic, and densification regions, where hardening occurs. For each regime, we developed a model that comprises elasticity and densification theory for porous materials and obtained all the material parameters by correlating the model with experimental data. The different constitutive responses arise as the deformation proceeded through three distinctive layers of the turtle shell carapace. Overall, the phenomenological stress-strain behavior is similar to that of metallic foams. PMID:22301179

  17. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  18. Spark Plasma Sintering of Titanium Spherical Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Mohammad; Moskovskikh, Dmitry O.; Rogachev, Alexander S.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-07-01

    The densification kinetics for sintering of titanium spherical particles under two different experimental schemes, i.e., current-assisted and current-insulated were investigated. It was shown that measurable densification rate differences between the two schemes are recognized only for the preheating stage. For current-assisted experiments, consolidation starts at lower temperatures than for current-insulated samples. Also at high heating rates, the change of sample porosity all through the preheating stage is higher for current-assisted conditions, while at relatively low heating rates (i.e., less than 100 K/min) they are comparable. All through the isothermal sintering stage, at a temperature of 1073 K (800 °C), the shrinkage rates are comparable for both experimental schemes within the measurement accuracy. The explanation of the observed effects within the framework of conventional sintering theory is also provided.

  19. Fabrication and properties of erbium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, A.; Platero, M.; Romero, R.; McClellan, K.J.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is a rare earth oxide of interest because of its chemical and thermal stability and high melting point, 2,430 C. However, there is relatively little information available regarding the relation between the structure and the mechanical properties of this material. A densification study of polycrystalline erbium oxide powders is reported here. Erbium oxide pellets were uniaxially pressed (40--280 MPa) and sintered (1,500--1,800 C) in order to obtain density data for as-received commercial powders. In addition, the particle size and distribution of as-received powders were varied by milling and the effects on densification were studied. The powders were characterized for particle size, phase and impurity content and surface area. The mechanical properties of high density sintered erbium oxide bodies were characterized using indentation hardness and toughness as a function of temperature and microstructure. Relations between the microstructure and mechanical properties are described.

  20. Influence of surface silica impurities on the sintering behavior of alumina powders

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, J.S.; Pask, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    The filtering, pressing and sintering behavior of an alumina powder with and without silica impurity on surface has been studied. When silica is removed from surface by HF-treatment and compactibility is considerably enhanced due to the different acidity/basicity nature of the OH of the hydroxyl layers. The silica impurity decreases the activation energy of the initial stage of sintering and grain boundary energy, improves the densification process and exerts a moderate inhibitor effect on the grain growth.

  1. Powder processing of oxides. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the properties and applications of metal oxide ceramics and refractories. Citations consider cold isostatic pressing, compacting, densification, firing, grinding, hot isostatic pressing, laser beam processing, and sintering. Aluminum oxide, berylium oxide, hafnium oxide, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide are covered. Uses in insulation, propulsion systems, electric devices, and cylinder heads are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU LH2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William U.

    2015-01-01

    When the technology associated with zero loss storage and transfer is implemented, NASA can reduce the LH2 losses and procurement costs by up to 30 compared to historical Shuttle numbers. This return on investment is based on the mission manifest and commodity use. LH2 densification can provide improved launch vehicle ascent performance by minimizing the size of the LH2 tanks or storing more mass of propellant in the given tank volume.

  3. AS, DISH or something else?

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Kushal; Naha, Sowjanya; Vivek, Ganapathiraman; Ramachandran, Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old farmer presented with progressively worsening pain in multiple joints associated with stiffening for 9 months. Locomotor examination revealed grossly restricted movement of the axial skeleton. There were no neurological deficits. Radiological evaluation demonstrated diffuse bone densification and extraspinal calcification with bony ankylosis reminiscent of ankylosing spondylitis. Laboratory tests subsequently yielded the true diagnosis. The patient was counselled accordingly and started on appropriate therapy. PMID:25267806

  4. Proton conducting ceramics in membrane separations

    DOEpatents

    Brinkman, Kyle S; Korinko, Paul S; Fox, Elise B; Chen, Frank

    2015-04-14

    Perovskite materials of the general formula SrCeO.sub.3 and BaCeO.sub.3 are provided having improved conductivity while maintaining an original ratio of chemical constituents, by altering the microstructure of the material. A process of making Pervoskite materials is also provided in which wet chemical techniques are used to fabricate nanocrystalline ceramic materials which have improved grain size and allow lower temperature densification than is obtainable with conventional solid-state reaction processing.

  5. Powder processing of oxides. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials Abstracts). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the properties and applications of metal oxide ceramics and refractories. Citations consider cold isostatic pressing, compacting, densification, firing, grinding, hot isostatic pressing, laser beam processing, and sintering. Aluminum oxide, berylium oxide, hafnium oxide, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide are covered. Uses in insulation, propulsion systems, electric devices, and cylinder heads are included. (Contains a minimum of 225 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. The study of dielectric, pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties on hot pressed PZT-PMN systems

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Geetika; Umarji, A. M.; Maglione, Mario

    2012-12-15

    Hot uniaxial pressing technique has been adopted for the densification of PZT-PMN system with an aim to yield dense ceramics and to lower the sintering temperature and time for achieving better and reproducible electronic properties. The ceramics having >97% theoretical density and micron size grains are investigated for their dielectric, pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties. The effect of Li and Mn addition has also been studied.

  7. Effect of strain rate on the compressive deformation behaviors of lotus-type porous copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-hua; Huang, Hai-you; Xie, Jian-xin

    2014-07-01

    Lotus-type porous copper was fabricated by unidirectional solidification, and compressive experiments were subsequently conducted in the strain rate range of 10-3-2400 s-1 with the compressive direction parallel to the pores. A GLEEBLE-1500 thermal-mechanical simulation system and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) were used to investigate the effect of strain rate on the compressive deformation behaviors of lotus-type porous copper. The influence mechanism of strain rate was also analyzed by the strain-controlling method and by high-speed photography. The results indicated that the stress-strain curves of lotus-typed porous copper consist of a linear elastic stage, a plateau stage, and a densification stage at various strain rates. At low strain rate (< 1.0 s-1), the strain rate had little influence on the stress-strain curves; but when the strain rate exceeded 1.0 s-1, it was observed to strongly affect the plateau stage, showing obvious strain-rate-hardening characteristics. Strain rate also influenced the densification initial strain. The densification initial strain at high strain rate was less than that at low strain rate. No visible inhomogeneous deformation caused by shockwaves was observed in lotus-type porous copper during high-strain-rate deformation. However, at high strain rate, the bending deformation characteristics of the pore walls obviously differed from those at low strain rate, which was the main mechanism by which the plateau stress exhibited strain-rate sensitivity when the strain rate exceeded a certain value and exhibited less densification initial strain at high strain rate.

  8. In situ Brillouin study of sodium alumino silicate glasses under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneville, C.; De Ligny, D.; Mermet, A.; Champagnon, B.; Martinet, C.; Henderson, G. H.; Deschamps, T.; Margueritat, J.; Barthel, E.

    2013-08-01

    The in situ elastic and plastic behaviors of sodium aluminosilicate glasses with different degrees of depolymerization were analyzed using Brillouin spectroscopy. The observed elastic anomaly progressively vanished with depolymerization. The densification process appears to be different from that observed in pure silica glass. In the plastic regime of densified glasses hysteresis loops were observed and related to modification of the local silicon environment facilitated by the addition of sodium.

  9. Pest resistant MoSi2-based materials containing in-situ grown .beta.-Si3N4 whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A MoSi.sub.2 pest resistant material includes in-situ grown .beta.-Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 whiskers. In addition to excellent pest resistance, the material provides a lower coefficient of thermal expansion for better match with continuous reinforcing fibers such as SiC fibers. A two stage heating and pressing production technique enables lower temperature processing with substantially full densification.

  10. Pest resistant MoSi2-based materials containing in-situ grown .beta.-Si3N4whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A MoSi.sub.2 pest resistant material includes in-situ grown .beta.-Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 whiskers. In addition to excellent pest resistance, the material provides a lower coefficient of thermal expansion for better match with continuous reinforcing fibers such as SiC fibers. A two stage heating and pressing production technique enables lower temperature processing with substantially full densification.

  11. Monolithic microcircuit techniques and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussions of the techniques used to make dielectric and metal thin film depositions for monolithic circuits are presented. Silicon nitride deposition and the properties of silicon nitride films are discussed. Deposition of dichlorosilane and thermally grown silicon dioxide are reported. The deposition and thermal densification of borosilicate, aluminosilicate, and phosphosilicate glasses are discussed. Metallization for monolithic circuits and the characteristics of thin films are also included.

  12. Modelling of Coalescence of PMMA Particles/Farz Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzaneh, S.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this study we are interested by sintering phenomenon during rotational molding of PMMA. It is well known that sintering begins by coalescence of grains and follows by powder densification. First we have followed the coalescence of two grains; then the coalescence of several grains is studied in order to see the effect of other grains on this phenomenon. In the basis of the Bellehumeur's model, a new model has been proposed to consider this effect. This model was validated by the experiments.

  13. Ductile compaction in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Silicic magmas typically outgas through connected pore and crack networks with a high gas permeability without the need for decoupled movement of pores in the melt. It is the efficiency with which this process can occur which governs the pressure in the pore network. However, such a connected coupled network is generally mechanically unstable and will relax until volume equilibrium when the pores become smaller and isolated. Consequently, gas permeability can be reduced during densification. Cycles of outgassing events recorded in gas monitoring data show that permeable flow of volatiles is often transient, which is interpreted to reflect magma densification and the closing of pore-networks. Understanding the timescale over which this densification process occurs is critical to refining conduit models that seek to predict the pressure evolution in a pore-network leading to eruptions. We conduct uniaxial compaction experiments to parameterize non-linear creep and relaxation processes that occur in magmas with total pore fractions 0.2-0.85. We analyze our results by applying both viscous sintering and viscoelastic deformation theory to test the applicability of currently accepted models to flow dynamics in the uppermost conduit involving highly porous magmas. We show that purely ductile compaction can occur rapidly and that pore networks can close over timescales analogous to the inter-eruptive periods observed during classic cyclic eruptions such as those at Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, in 1997. At upper-conduit axial stresses (0.1-5 MPa) and magmatic temperatures (830-900 oC), we show that magmas can evolve to porosities analogous to dome lavas erupted at the same volcano. Such dramatic densification events over relatively short timescales and in the absence of brittle deformation show that permeable flow will be inhibited at upper conduit levels. We therefore propose that outgassing is a key feature at many silicic volcanoes and should be incorporated into

  14. Processing and characterization of boron carbide-hafnium diboride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James

    Hafnium diboride based ceramics are promising candidate materials for advanced aerospace and nuclear reactor components. The effectiveness of boron carbide and carbon as HfB2 sintering additives was systematically evaluated. In the first stage of the research, boron carbide and carbon additives were found to improve the densification behavior of milled HfB2 powder in part by removing oxides at the HfB2 surface during processing. Boron carbide additives reduced the hot pressing temperature of HfB2 by 150°C compared to carbon, which reduced the hot pressing temperature by ˜50°C. Reduction of oxide impurities alone could not explain the difference in sintering enhancement, however, and other mechanisms of enhancement were evaluated. Boron carbides throughout the homogeneity range were characterized to understand other mechanisms of sintering enhancement in HfB2. Heavily faulted carbon rich and boron rich boron carbides were synthesized for addition to HfB2. The greatest enhancement to densification was observed in samples containing boron- and carbon-rich compositions whereas B6.5 C provided the least enhancement to densification. It is proposed that carbon rich and boron rich boron carbides create boron and hafnium point defects in HfB2, respectively, which facilitate densification. Evaluation of the thermal conductivity (kth) between room temperature and 2000°C suggested that the stoichiometry of the boron carbide additives did not significantly affect kth of HfB2-BxC composites. The improved sinterability and the high kth (˜110 W/m-K at 300K and ˜90 W/m-K at 1000°C ) of HfB2-BxC ceramics make them excellent candidates for isotopically enriched reactor control materials.

  15. Characterisation of Mg biodegradable stents produced by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmrabet, N.; Botterill, N.; Grant, D. M.; Brown, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Novel Mg-minitubes for biodegradable stent applications have been produced using PVD magnetron sputtering. The minitubes were characterised, as a function of annealing temperature, using a combination of SEM/EDS, XRD and hardness testing. The as-deposited minitubes exhibited columnar grain structures with high levels of porosity. Slight alteration to the crystal structure from columnar to equiaxed grain growth was demonstrated at elevated temperature, along with increased material densification, hardness and corrosion resistance.

  16. Pelletization process of postproduction plant waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obidziński, S.

    2012-07-01

    The results of investigations on the influence of material, process, and construction parameters on the densification process and density of pellets received from different mixtures of tobacco and fine-grained waste of lemon balm are presented. The conducted research makes it possible to conclude that postproduction waste eg tobacco and lemon balm wastes can be successfully pelletized and used as an ecological, solid fuels.

  17. "Densified" tiles form stronger bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Holt, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Application of colloidal silica more than doubles bond strength of ceramic tile/substrate attachments. "Densification" process strengthens surface where tile attaches to felt strain-isolator pad, redistributing stresses and preventing failures at that point. First, isopropyl alcohol is applied to bottom tile surface. Second, aqueous mixture of cementing colloidal silica and reinforcing ball-milled silica particles is painted on tile. Finally, after drying, tile is rewaterproofed by exposure to vapors or methyltrimethoxysilane and acetic acid.

  18. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clougherty, E. V.; Pober, R. L.; Kaufman, L.

    1972-01-01

    Significant results were obtained in fabrication studies of the role of metallic additives of Zr, Ti, Ni, Fe and Cr on the densification of ZrB2. All elemental additions lower the processing temperatures required to effect full densification of ZrB2. Each addition effects enhanced densification by a clearly distinguishable and different mechanism and the resulting fabricated materials are different. A significant improvement in strength and fracture toughness was obtained for the ZrB2/Ti composition. Mechanical characterization studies for the ZrB2/SiC/C composites and the new ZrB2/Metal materials produced data relevant to the effect of impacting load on measured impact energies, a specimen configuration for which controlled fracture could occur in a suitably hard testing apparatus, and fracture strength data. Controlled fracture--indicative of measurable fracture toughness--was obtained for the ZrB2-SiC-C composite, and a ZrB2/Ti composite fabricated from ZrB2 with an addition of 30 weight per cent Ti. The increased strength and toughness of the ZrB2/Ti composite is consistent with the presence of a significantly large amount of a fine grained acicular phase formed by reaction of Ti with ZrB2 during processing.

  19. Shrinkage and Sintering Behavior of a Low-Temperature Sinterable Nanosilver Die-Attach Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhao, Meihua; Chen, Xu; Lu, Guo-Quan; Ngo, Khai; Luo, Shufang

    2012-09-01

    The drying and densification behavior of a nanosilver paste was studied by shrinkage and weight-loss measurements to provide fundamental understanding on the sintering behavior of the nanomaterial for packaging power devices and modules. The measured shrinkage behavior was found to be in good agreement with the weight-loss behavior of the paste as measured by thermogravitational analysis, and the comparison offered direct evidence of ~10% shrinkage contributed by late-stage densification of silver nanoparticles (NPs). It was found that sintered silver joints could be achieved without cracks or delamination under a ramp-soak temperature profile for bonding small-area chips, e.g., 3 mm × 3 mm or smaller. However, for bonding large-area chips, e.g., 5 mm × 5 mm or larger, rapid evaporation of the entrapped organic species caused the chips to delaminate, leading to large longitudinal cracks at the joint interface. Finally, examination of the microstructure evolution of the silver die-attach material revealed that binder molecules inhibited necking of the silver NPs and delayed densification during the sintering process of the nanosilver paste.

  20. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  1. Intelligent HIP processing of a Spraycast-X{reg_sign} superalloy for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zahrah, T.F.; Dalal, R.; Kissinger, R.

    1996-12-31

    An eddy current sensor system has been developed to monitor densification during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of Spraycast-X{reg_sign} superalloy components for aerospace applications. The sensor system was designed, implemented and demonstrated by MATSYS personnel at the Howmet Corporation HIP facility. The eddy current sensor was used to monitor densification of Spraycast-X{reg_sign} Rene`41 ring segments from 95 to 98 percent relative density to full density. The sensor data were verified and validated by metallographic examinations of HIPed specimens. The grain size of the Spraycast-X{reg_sign} Rene`41 was not affected by HIP at both 1,066 C (1,950 F) and 1,121 C (2,050 F). Tensile strengths and 0.2% creep rupture properties were not sensitive to changes in HIP processing conditions. However, tensile ductilities and low cycle properties showed a strong correlation to HIP time at 1,121 C/103 MPa (2,050 F/15 KSI). As hole time at maximum temperature and pressure was increased from 1 to 4 hours, tensile ductilities and low cycle fatigue lives increased. The sensor system can be integrated with an intelligent closed loop control system to monitor and control densification rate and shape distortion.

  2. Nd:YAG transparent ceramics fabricated by direct cold isostatic pressing and vacuum sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Lin; Li, Jiang; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Binglong; Xie, Tengfei; Liu, Jing; Kou, Huamin; Shi, Yun; Pan, Yubai; Guo, Jingkun

    2015-12-01

    The sintering behavior of neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) ceramics was investigated on the basis of densification trajectory, microstructure evolution and transmittance. Nd:YAG ceramics with in-line transmittance of 83.9% at 1064 nm and 82.5% at 400 nm were obtained by direct cold isostatic pressing (CIP) at 250 MPa and solid-state reactive sintering at 1790 °C for 30 h under vacuum. Compared with the porosity and the average pore diameter of the sample from uniaxial dry-pressing followed by CIP, those from direct CIP are much smaller. The samples pressed at 250 MPa were sintered from 1500 °C to 1750 °C for 0.5-20 h to study their sintering behavior. At the temperature higher than 1500 °C, pure YAG phase is formed, followed by the densification and grain growth process. The relative density and the grain size increase with the increase of sintering time and temperature, and the sintering behavior is more sensitive to temperature than holding time. The mechanism controlling densification and grain growth at sintering temperature of 1550 °C is grain boundary diffusion.

  3. Evolution of gel structure during thermal processing of Na-geopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Duxson, Peter; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2006-10-10

    The present work examines how the gel structure and phase composition of Na-geopolymers derived from metakaolin with varied Si/Al ratio evolve with exposure to temperatures up to 1000 degrees C. Gels were thermally treated and characterized using quantitative XRD, DTA, and FTIR to elucidate the changes in gel structure, phase composition, and porosity at each stage of heating. It is found that the phase stability, defined by the amount and onset temperature of crystallization, is improved at higher Si/Al ratios. Two different mechanisms of densification have been isolated by FTIR, related to viscous flow and collapse of the highly distributed pore network in the gel. Gels with low Si/Al ratio only experience viscous flow that correlates with low thermal shrinkage. Gels at a higher Si/Al ratio, which have a homogeneous microstructure composed of a highly distributed porosity, undergo both densification processes corresponding to a large extent of thermal shrinkage during densification. This work elucidates the intimate relationship between gel microstructure, chemistry, and thermal evolution of Na-geopolymer gels.

  4. Quantitative analysis for in situ sintering of 3% yttria-stablized zirconia in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Hasti; Holland, Troy B; van Benthem, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Studying particle-agglomerate systems compared to two-particle systems elucidates different stages of sintering by monitoring both pores and particles. We report on in situ sintering of 3% yttria-stablized zirconia particle agglomerates in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Real-time TEM observations indicate neck formation and growth, particle coalescence and pore closure. A MATLAB-based image processing tool was developed to calculate the projected area of the agglomerate with and without internal pores during in situ sintering. We demonstrate the first densification curves generated from sequentially acquired TEM images. The in situ sintering onset temperature was then determined to be at 960 °C. Densification curves illustrated that the agglomerate projected area which excludes the internal observed pores also shrinks during in situ sintering. To overcome the common projection problem for TEM analyses, agglomerate mass-thickness maps were obtained from low energy-loss analysis combined with STEM imaging. The decrease in the projected area was directly related to the increase in mass-thickness of the agglomerate, likely caused by hidden pores existing in the direction of the beam. Access to shrinkage curves through in situ TEM analysis provides a new avenue to investigate fundamental mechanisms of sintering through directly correlating microstructural changes during consolidation with mesoscale densification behavior. PMID:25600824

  5. Behavior of sodium borosilicate glasses under compression using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kilymis, D. A.; Ispas, S.; Delaye, J.-M.

    2015-09-07

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to study the changes under compression in the local and medium range structural properties of three sodium borosilicate glasses with varying sodium content. These glasses have been isostatically compressed up to 20 GPa and then decompressed in order to analyze the different mechanisms that affect densification, alongside with the permanent modifications of the structure after a full compression/decompression cycle. The results show that the atomic packing is the prominent characteristic that governs the amount of densification in the glass, as well as the setup of the permanent densification. During compression, the bulk modulus increases linearly up to approximately 15 GPa and more rapidly for higher pressures, a behavior which is reflected on the rate of increase of the average coordination for B and Na. Radial distribution functions at different pressures during the cycle help to quantify the amount of distortions in the elementary structural units, with a pronounced shortening of the Na–Na and Na–O bond lengths during compression. A subsequent decomposition of the glassy matrix into elementary Voronoi volumes verifies the high compressibility of Na-rich regions.

  6. Linking high-pressure structure and density of albite liquid near the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, Sarah J.; Lesher, Charles E.; Maekawa, Hideki; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2015-05-01

    The pressure-induced densification of NaAlSi3O8 liquid is determined following annealing immediately above the glass transition and upon quenching from superliquidus temperatures. High-field 27Al magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy is used to investigate the corresponding changes in Al coordination environment that accompany the densification. We show that samples synthesized by quenching from superliquidus temperatures record lower fictive pressures (Pf) than annealed samples at the same nominal load and have lower recovered densities and average Al coordination number. Accounting for differences in Pf brings melt-quench and annealed samples into excellent agreement. The proportion of [5]Al increases from ∼3% to 29% and [6]Al from 0% to 8% between 1.8 and 7.2 GPa. The production of high-coordinated Al ([5]Al + [6]Al) with pressure is most dramatic above 3 GPa. Changes in network topology and structural disorder as revealed by the high-field 27Al NMR spectra provide new insights into the structural mechanisms of densification of the albite liquid. We posit that it is an overall weakening of the network structure on compression that is largely responsible for the anomalous pressure dependence of the transport properties observed for this liquid below ∼5 GPa.

  7. Water in the formation of biogenic minerals: peeling away the hydration layers.

    PubMed

    Dorvee, Jason R; Veis, Arthur

    2013-08-01

    Minerals of biogenic origin form and crystallize from aqueous environments at ambient temperatures and pressures. The in vivo environment either intracellular or intercellular, contains many components that modulate both the activity of the ions which associate to form the mineral, as well as the activity and structure of the crowded water. Most of the studies about the mechanism of mineralization, that is, the detailed pathways by which the mineral ions proceed from solution to crystal state, have been carried out in relatively dilute solutions and clean solutions. These studies have considered both thermodynamic and kinetic controls. Most have not considered the water itself. Is the water a passive bystander, or is it intimately a participant in the mineral ion densification reaction? A wide range of experiments show that the mineralization pathways proceed through a series of densification stages with intermediates, such as a "dense liquid" phase and the prenucleation clusters that form within it. This is in contrast to the idea of a single step phase transition, but consistent with the Gibbs concept of discontinuous phase transitions from supersaturated mother liquor to crystal. Further changes in the water structure at every surface and interface during densification guides the free energy trajectory leading to the crystalline state. In vertebrates, mineralization takes place in a hydrated collagen matrix, thus water must be considered as a direct participant. Although different in detail, the crystallization of calcium phosphates, as apatite, and calcium carbonates, as calcite, are mechanistically identical from the viewpoint of water.

  8. Effects of Thermal and Pressure Histories on the Chemical Strengthening of Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz; Thirion, Lynn; Youngman, Randall; Mauro, John; Bauchy, Mathieu; Rzoska, Sylwester; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten

    2016-03-01

    Glasses can be chemically strengthened through the ion exchange process, wherein smaller ions in the glass (e.g., Na+) are replaced by larger ions from a salt bath (e.g., K+). This develops a compressive stress (CS) on the glass surface, which, in turn, improves the damage resistance of the glass. The magnitude and depth of the generated CS depends on the thermal and pressure histories of the glass prior to ion exchange. In this study, we investigate the ion exchange-related properties (mutual diffusivity, CS, and hardness) of a sodium aluminosilicate glass, which has been densified through annealing below the initial fictive temperature of the glass or through pressure-quenching from the glass transition temperature at 1 GPa prior to ion exchange. We show that the rate of alkali interdiffusivity depends only on the density of the glass, rather than on the applied densification method. However, we also demonstrate that for a given density, the increase in CS and increase in hardness induced by ion exchange strongly depends on the densification method. Specifically, at constant density, the CS and hardness values achieved through thermal annealing are larger than those achieved through pressure-quenching. These results are discussed in relation to the structural changes in the environment of the network-modifier and the overall network densification.

  9. Development of the tailored SiC/SiC composites by the combined fabrication process of ICVI and NITE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoda, Kazuya; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the thermo-mechanical performances of SiC/SiC composite, process improvement and modification by the combination of nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase (NITE) method and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) method were studied. Multilayered PyC/SiC fiber coating and matrix infiltration within fiber-tows were prepared with isothermal/isobaric CVI (ICVI) method and full-densification of SiC matrix was examined with NITE methods using four kinds of processing options. Applied pressure was useful for nearly-full matrix densification due to the promoting infiltration driving force of SiC nano-powder intra-fiber-tows, but simultaneously caused the sever degradation of fibers and interphase with fracture, resulting in lower strength. Increase of additives amount and additional polymer were effective ways for matrix densification by SiC nano-power infiltration intra-fiber bundles without pressure. Thermal conductivity was greatly improved with the decrease of matrix porosity. The tailoring of thermo-mechanical properties might be easily controlled by the SiC matrix porosity without processinduced fibers and interphases degradations.

  10. Natural binders and solid bridge type binding mechanisms in briquettes and pellets made from corn stover and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Kaliyan, Nalladurai; Morey, R Vance

    2010-02-01

    Corn stover and switchgrass are two important feedstocks considered for producing renewable fuels and energy in the US. Densification of these biomass feedstocks into briquettes/pellets would help reduce the problems and costs of bulk transportation, handling, and storage of biomass feedstocks. In this study, the role of the natural binders in corn stover and switchgrass to make durable particle-particle bonding in briquettes/pellets was investigated by micro-structural analyses. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of briquettes made by using a uniaxial piston-cylinder densification apparatus in the laboratory, briquettes made by using a pilot-scale roll-press briquetting machine, and pellets made by using a pilot-scale conventional ring-die pelleting machine were analysed. The SEM images showed that the bonding between particles was created mainly through solid bridges. The solid bridges between particles were made by natural binders in the biomass expressed during the densification process. UV auto-fluorescence images of briquettes and pellets further confirmed that the solid bridges were made mainly by natural binders such as lignin and protein. It was found that activating (softening) the natural binders using moisture and temperature in the range of glass transition is important to make durable particle-particle bonding. PMID:19796933

  11. The effects of composition, temperature and sample size on the sintering of chem-prep high field varistors.

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.

    2007-09-01

    The sintering behavior of Sandia chem-prep high field varistor materials was studied using techniques including in situ shrinkage measurements, optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. A thorough literature review of phase behavior, sintering and microstructure in Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO varistor systems is included. The effects of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content (from 0.25 to 0.56 mol%) and of sodium doping level (0 to 600 ppm) on the isothermal densification kinetics was determined between 650 and 825 C. At {ge} 750 C samples with {ge}0.41 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} have very similar densification kinetics, whereas samples with {le}0.33 mol% begin to densify only after a period of hours at low temperatures. The effect of the sodium content was greatest at {approx}700 C for standard 0.56 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and was greater in samples with 0.30 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} than for those with 0.56 mol%. Sintering experiments on samples of differing size and shape found that densification decreases and mass loss increases with increasing surface area to volume ratio. However, these two effects have different causes: the enhancement in densification as samples increase in size appears to be caused by a low oxygen internal atmosphere that develops whereas the mass loss is due to the evaporation of bismuth oxide. In situ XRD experiments showed that the bismuth is initially present as an oxycarbonate that transforms to metastable {beta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} by 400 C. At {approx}650 C, coincident with the onset of densification, the cubic binary phase, Bi{sub 38}ZnO{sub 58} forms and remains stable to >800 C, indicating that a eutectic liquid does not form during normal varistor sintering ({approx}730 C). Finally, the formation and morphology of bismuth oxide phase regions that form on the varistors surfaces during slow cooling were studied.

  12. Firn compaction modelling of the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenberg, Bianca; Tregoning, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Satellite altimetry missions detect elevation changes in ice sheets that are not only related to variations in ice mass balance, but also to snow densification. The compaction of snow induces a change in thickness but not in mass and therefore has to be removed from the altimetry measurements when estimating mass loss from height changes. The densification of snow is time dependent and varies with temperature, accumulation rate and depth. Different types of densification processes occur in Antarctica due to the climatic differences from warm and moist coastal areas to a cold and dry desert in the Antarctic interior. The intermediate product between snow and ice is called firn and the transition from snow to ice is a slow process that can take up to millennia in some areas. During the compression snow grains undergo different stages with a density change from around 300 kg/m3 for fresh snow to around 900 kg/m3 for glacier ice. The change in density with temperature and depth is not well known and can only be compared with some snow pits that have been taken at a few locations in Antarctica, thus the density profile is of great importance. The lack of data complicates the generation of an accurate firn compaction model and so far only a few models have been established about expected firn densification processes in Antarctica. We present a time-dependent firn compaction model for Antarctica based on the standard heat-transfer equation after Paterson (1994)* for the temperature profile, and the concept of firn compaction after Zwally & Li (2002)*. By incorporating a time-dependent accumulation rate, our numerical multilayer model considers not only existing snow layers but also freshly deposited accumulation at the surface as a new introduced layer. The initial density profile as been obtained by spinning up the model until the entire firn layer is refreshed. We compare our results with previous firn compaction models and available in-situ measurements of snow pits

  13. Surface tension driven processes densify and retain permeability in magma and lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ben M.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Ian Schipper, C.; Mark Jellinek, A.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kelly Russell, J.; Lavallée, Yan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We offer new insights into how an explosive eruption can transition into an effusive eruption. Magma containing >0.2 wt% dissolved water has the potential to vesiculate to a porosity in excess of 80 vol.% at atmospheric pressure. Thus all magmas contain volatiles at depth sufficient to form foams and explosively fragment. Yet gas is often lost passively and effusive eruptions ensue. Magmatic foams are permeable and understanding permeability in magma is crucial for models that predict eruptive style. Permeability also governs magma compaction models. Those models generally imply that a reduction in magma porosity and permeability generates an increased propensity for explosivity. Here, our experimental results show that surface tension stresses drive densification without creating an impermeable 'plug', offering an additional explanation of why dense magmas can avoid explosive eruption. In both an open furnace and a closed autoclave, we subject pumice samples with initial porosity of ∼70 vol.% to a range of isostatic pressures (0.1-11 MPa) and temperatures (350-950 °C) relevant to shallow volcanic environments. Our experimental data and models constrain the viscosity, permeability, timescales, and length scales over which densification by pore-scale surface tension stresses competes with density-driven compaction. Where surface tension dominates the dynamics, densification halts at a plateau connected porosity of ∼25 vol.% for our samples. SEM, pycnometry and micro-tomography show that in this process (1) microporous networks are destroyed, (2) the relative pore network surface area decreases, and (3) a remaining crystal framework enhances the longevity of macro-pore connectivity and permeability critical for sustained outgassing. We propose that these observations are a consequence of a surface tension-driven retraction of viscous pore walls at areas of high bubble curvature (micro-vesicular network terminations), and that this process drives bulk

  14. Timescales for permeability reduction and strength recovery in densifying magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Farquharson, J. I.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Transitions between effusive and explosive behaviour are routine for many active volcanoes. The permeability of the system, thought to help regulate eruption style, is likely therefore in a state of constant change. Viscous densification of conduit magma during effusive periods, resulting in physical and textural property modifications, may reduce permeability to that preparatory for an explosive eruption. We present here a study designed to estimate timescales of permeability reduction and strength recovery during viscous magma densification by coupling measurements of permeability and strength (using samples from a suite of variably welded, yet compositionally identical, volcanic deposits) with a rheological model for viscous compaction and a micromechanical model, respectively. Bayesian Information Criterion analysis confirms that our porosity-permeability data are best described by two power laws that intersect at a porosity of 0.155 (the "changepoint" porosity). Above and below this changepoint, the permeability-porosity relationship has a power law exponent of 8.8 and 1.0, respectively. Quantitative pore size analysis and micromechanical modelling highlight that the high exponent above the changepoint is due to the closure of wide (∼200-300 μm) inter-granular flow channels during viscous densification and that, below the changepoint, the fluid pathway is restricted to narrow (∼50 μm) channels. The large number of such narrow channels allows porosity loss without considerable permeability reduction, explaining the switch to a lower exponent. Using these data, our modelling predicts a permeability reduction of four orders of magnitude (for volcanically relevant temperatures and depths) and a strength increase of a factor of six on the order of days to weeks. This discrepancy suggests that, while the viscous densification of conduit magma will inhibit outgassing efficiency over time, the regions of the conduit prone to fracturing, such as the margins, will

  15. The evolution of pore connectivity in magma: Insights on eruptive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombier, Mathieu; Scheu, Bettina; Kueppers, Ulrich; Gurioli, Lucia; Di Muro, Andrea; Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Dingwell, Donald

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of pore space in magma as well as its connectivity is subjected to continuous changes over an eruptive cycle from magma ascent to eruption and emplacement. Main processes contributing to this evolution are vesiculation (bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence) and densification (bubble collapse, crystallization, compaction, sintering). The evolution of connectivity with respect to porosity during these processes is investigated based on a database compiled from new data acquired by Helium pycnometry and literature data. The database comprises more than 2500 analyses of rock samples covering a broad range of eruptive styles and incorporates the effects of crystallinity, glass H2O content and chemistry. Further it is supplemented by textural images in 2D and 3D and permeability data. We evaluate the trends of the natural samples from our database in the light of experiments on vesiculation (Okumura et al. 2008) and densification (Okumura et al. 2013; Vasseur et al. 2013). In general, we find that pumices from Plinian, sub-Plinian and Phreatoplinian eruptions and scoria from Hawaiian and Strombolian eruptions plot together at high porosity and cover a broad range of connectivity. The high porosity and the abrupt increase of connectivity with porosity observed for these datasets suggest a high percolation threshold above 40 %. Pumices and breadcrust bombs from Vulcanian eruptions form a cluster at intermediate porosities. They follow the experimental vesiculation trend with an increase of connectivity with porosity suggesting much a lower percolation threshold at around 20-30%. Finally, dense volcanic rocks from lava domes, lavas and block and ash flow deposits follow the experimental densification trend. In contrast with permeability, connectivity is not sensitive to pore aperture and tortuosity but only depends on the degree of pore nucleation, coalescence and collapse. We propose that this metric of connectivity permits diagnostic differentiation of

  16. The properties of Co- and Fe-doped GDC for low-temperature processing of solid oxide fuel cell by electron-beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seon-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Choi, Hyung-Wook

    2013-08-01

    This study is transition metal oxides (FeO and CoO) were added to Gd-doped ceria (Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95, GDC) powder for preparing the thin-film electrolyte used in the Ni-GDC anode-supported intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Recently much attention was aimed at successful powder preparation with high sinter activity and conductivity. However, one of the challenges in preparing the GDC electrolytes is the densification issue. It is difficult to achieve the densification of GDC below 1600 degrees C. To overcome this drawback, attentions of the research on the densification of the GDC electrolyte is paid more on changing of the fabrication technology, the powder properties, and the sintering mechanism. Among them, Fe3+ and Co2+ showed the significant beneficial effect on the grain boundary conductivity. So, electrolyte powder made of Co- and Fe-doped GDC by solid-state reaction method. And thin-film electrolyte was fabricated on the presintered Ni-GDC cermet anode substrate by E-beam evaporating method and then co-sintered to form the electrolyte/anode bilayer. We realized crystal structure of Co and Fe doped Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 (GDC) electrolyte by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphology was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the sintered samples were performed. The performance of the cells was evaluated over 500-800 degrees C using humidified hydrogen as fuel and air as oxidant.

  17. Effects of Rare Earth (RE) Intergranular Adsorption on the Phase Transformation and Microstructure Evolution in Silicon Nitride with RE2O3 + MgO Additives: Fracture Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Paul F; Painter, Gayle S; Shibata, Naoya; Waters, Shirley B; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2008-07-01

    Silicon nitride powders consist primarily of the alpha phase, which transforms to the beta phase during the densification and microstructural evolution of Si3N4 ceramics. The temperature at which the transformation initiates in the presence of a combination of MgO and RE2O3 densification additives is found to decrease with increasing atomic number of the rare earth (RE). This trend coincides with the predicted and observed decrease in the affinity of the rare earth to segregate to and absorb on the prism planes of hexagonal prism shaped beta grains with increase in the atomic number of the RE. When RE adsorption is diminished, Si (and N) attachment on the smooth prism planes is enhanced, which increases diametrical growth rates, normally reaction-rate limited by an attachment mechanism. Combined with the typically fast [0001] growth, it is this augmented grain growth that contributes towards the initiation of the alpha-beta transformation at lower temperatures. With the enhanced transformation, observations reveal an increase in the number of beta grains growing in the early stages of densification. On the other hand, increased RE adsorption leads to greater growth anisotropy resulting in the formation of higher aspect ratio grains. Thus, Lu2O3 generates larger diameter, yet elongated, reinforcing grains, while La2O3 results in reinforcing grains of higher aspect ratio. The Gd2O3 additive transformation and microstructual characteristics lie intermediate to those of the lanthanide end member elements. Despite these differences, a substantial fraction of large reinforcing grains were found for each additive composition. As a result, the mechanical properties of the resultant ceramics are similar with flexure strengths in excess of 1 GPa, fracture toughness values greater than 10 MPa m1/2 at room temperature and excellent strength retention (>800 MPa) at 1200 C.

  18. Ultrafast laser induced electronic and structural modifications in bulk fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchik, K.; D'Amico, C.; Velpula, P. K.; Mauclair, C.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Stoian, R.

    2013-10-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can modify the inner structure of fused silica, generating refractive index changes varying from soft positive (type I) light guiding forms to negative (type II) values with void presence and anisotropic sub-wavelength modulation. We investigate electronic and structural material changes in the type I to type II transition via coherent and incoherent secondary light emission reflecting free carrier behavior and post-irradiation material relaxation in the index change patterns. Using phase contrast microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy, we determine in a space-resolved manner defect formation, redistribution and spatial segregation, and glass network reorganization paths in conditions marking the changeover between type I and type II photoinscription regimes. We first show characteristic patterns of second harmonic generation in type I and type II traces, indicating the collective involvement of free carriers and polarization memory. Second, incoherent photoemission from resonantly and non-resonantly excited defect states reveals accumulation of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) in positive index domains and oxygen deficiency centers (ODCs) with O2- ions segregation in void-like regions and in the nanostructured domains, reflecting the interaction strength. Complementary Raman investigations put into evidence signatures of the different environments where photo-chemical densification (bond rearrangements) and mechanical effects can be indicated. NBOHCs setting in before visible index changes serve as precursors for subsequent compaction build-up, indicating a scenario of cold, defect-assisted densification for the soft type I irradiation regime. Additionally, we observe hydrodynamic effects and severe bond-breaking in type II zones with indications of phase transition. These observations illuminate densification paths in fused silica in low power irradiation regimes, and equally in energetic ranges, characterized by

  19. Glacial-interglacial dynamics of Antarctic firn columns: comparison between simulations and ice core air-?15N measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, E.; Landais, A.; Buiron, D.; Cauquoin, A.; Chappellaz, J. A.; Debret, M.; Jouzel, J.; Leuenberger, M.; Martinerie, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Mulvaney, R.; Parrenin, F.; Prié, F.

    2013-12-01

    Correct estimation of the firn lock-in depth is essential for correctly linking gas and ice chronologies in ice core studies. Here, two approaches to constrain the firn depth evolution in Antarctica are presented over the last deglaciation: outputs of a firn densification model, and measurements of δ15N of N2 in air trapped in ice core, assuming that δ15N is only affected by gravitational fractionation in the firn column. Since the firn densification process is largely governed by surface temperature and accumulation rate, we have investigated four ice cores drilled in coastal (Berkner Island, BI, and James Ross Island, JRI) and semi-coastal (TALDICE and EPICA Dronning Maud Land, EDML) Antarctic regions. Combined with available ice core air- δ15N measurements from the EPICA Dome C (EDC) site, the studied regions encompass a large range of surface accumulation rates and temperature conditions. Our δ15N profiles reveal a heterogeneous response of the firn structure to glacial-interglacial climatic changes. While firn densification simulations correctly predict TALDICE δ15N variations, they systematically fail to capture the large millennial-scale δ15N variations measured at BI and the δ15N glacial levels measured at JRI and EDML - a mismatch previously reported for central East Antarctic ice cores. New constraints of the EDML gas-ice depth offset during the Laschamp event (41 ka) and the last deglaciation do not favour the hypothesis of a large convective zone within the firn as the explanation of the glacial firn model- δ15N data mismatch for this site. While we could not conduct an in-depth study of the influence of impurities in snow for firnification from the existing datasets, our detailed comparison between the δ15N profiles and firn model simulations under different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios suggests that the role of accumulation rate may have been underestimated in the current description of firnification models.

  20. Glacial-interglacial dynamics of Antarctic firn columns: comparison between simulations and ice core air-δ15N measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, E.; Landais, A.; Buiron, D.; Cauquoin, A.; Chappellaz, J.; Debret, M.; Jouzel, J.; Leuenberger, M.; Martinerie, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Mulvaney, R.; Parrenin, F.; Prié, F.

    2013-05-01

    Correct estimation of the firn lock-in depth is essential for correctly linking gas and ice chronologies in ice core studies. Here, two approaches to constrain the firn depth evolution in Antarctica are presented over the last deglaciation: outputs of a firn densification model, and measurements of δ15N of N2 in air trapped in ice core, assuming that δ15N is only affected by gravitational fractionation in the firn column. Since the firn densification process is largely governed by surface temperature and accumulation rate, we have investigated four ice cores drilled in coastal (Berkner Island, BI, and James Ross Island, JRI) and semi-coastal (TALDICE and EPICA Dronning Maud Land, EDML) Antarctic regions. Combined with available ice core air-δ15N measurements from the EPICA Dome C (EDC) site, the studied regions encompass a large range of surface accumulation rates and temperature conditions. Our δ15N profiles reveal a heterogeneous response of the firn structure to glacial-interglacial climatic changes. While firn densification simulations correctly predict TALDICE δ15N variations, they systematically fail to capture the large millennial-scale δ15N variations measured at BI and the δ15N glacial levels measured at JRI and EDML - a mismatch previously reported for central East Antarctic ice cores. New constraints of the EDML gas-ice depth offset during the Laschamp event (~41 ka) and the last deglaciation do not favour the hypothesis of a large convective zone within the firn as the explanation of the glacial firn model-δ15N data mismatch for this site. While we could not conduct an in-depth study of the influence of impurities in snow for firnification from the existing datasets, our detailed comparison between the δ15N profiles and firn model simulations under different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios suggests that the role of accumulation rate may have been underestimated in the current description of firnification models.

  1. An Assessment of Molecular Dynamic Force Fields for Silica for Use in Simulating Laser Damage Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T F; Gilmer, G H; Matthews, M J; Stolken, J S; Feit, M D

    2010-10-21

    We compare force fields (FF's) that have been used in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of silica in order to assess their applicability for use in simulating IR-laser damage mitigation. Although pairwise FF?s obtained by fitting quantum mechanical calculations such as the BKS and CHIK potentials have been shown to reproduce many of the properties of silica including the stability of silica polymorphs and the densification of the liquid, we show that melting temperatures and fictive temperatures are much too high. Softer empirical force fields give liquid and glass properties at experimental temperatures but may not predict all properties important to laser mitigation experiments.

  2. Amorphous Zr-Based Foams with Aligned, Elongated Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Marie E.; Mathaudhu, Suveen N.; Hartwig, K. Ted; Dunand, David C.

    2010-07-01

    Interpenetrating phase composites are created by warm equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) of blended powders of amorphous Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3 (Vit106a) and a crystalline ductile metal (Cu, Ni, or W). Subsequent dissolution of the continuous metallic phase results in amorphous Vit106a foams with ~40 pct aligned, elongated pores. The extent of Vit106a powder densification in the composites improves with the strength of the crystalline metallic powder, from low for Cu to high for W, with a concomitant improvement in foam compressive strength, ductility, and energy absorption.

  3. Ion beam assisted deposition of organic molecules: a physical way to realize OLED structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moliton, André; Antony, Rémi; Troadec, David; Ratier, Bernard

    2000-05-01

    We demonstrate how the quantum efficiency of an organic light-emitting diode can be improved by a physical way based on the ion beam assisted deposition: the recombination current can be increased by an enhancement of the minority carrier injection while the total current can be decreased by generation of electron traps which reduced the majority current. The quantum efficiency of fluorescence can be also improved by a layer densification with a limitation of the nonradiative centers. As a result, the quantum efficiency of the structure ITO/Helium assisted Alq3/unassisted Alq3/Ca/Al is improved (by around a factor 10) in relation with a virgin structure.

  4. A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

  5. Sintering behaviour of feldspar and influence of electric charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallala, W.; Gaied, M. E.

    2011-04-01

    The characterization of feldspar for electric porcelain and the behaviour of these materials after heating at 1230°C were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the present phases and the densification level. Feldspar sand was treated by flotation. The floated feldspar is constituted by microcline, quartz, and minor amounts of albite. The microstructure of sintered feldspar at 1230°C is essentially vitreous with open microporosities. The dielectrical properties of composites were characterized by using the induced courant method (ICM), which indicates that the charge trapping capacity depends on the mineralogical and chemical composition of feldspar.

  6. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOEpatents

    Rabin, Barry H.; Wright, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

  7. Powder processing of nickel and other aluminides by hot consolidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K.; Stephens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Alloys based on FeAl, NiAl, and Ni3Al have been processed by extrusion of powders over a range of compositions, powder characteristics, and extrusion parameters. It is found that extrusion leads to dynamic recrystallization and that the grain size of the extrusions depends on the powder size, extrusion temperature, and extrusion ratio. Prior particle boundary oxides play an important role in controlling the grain size and uniformity by acting as obstacles to grain growth. Hot isostatic pressing and vacuum hot pressing can be used for powder densification, but prior particle oxides are not effectively broken up due to insufficient shearing deformation.

  8. Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlinger, H.P. III.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a coal slurry from waste streams using Illinois coal that is ideally suited for a gasification feed. The principle items to be studied are (1) methods of concentrating pyrite and decreasing other ash forming minerals into a high grade gasification feed using froth flotation and gravity separation techniques; (2) chemical and particle size analyses of coal slurries; (3) determination of how that slurry can be densified and to what degree of densification is optimum from the pumpability and combustibility analyses; and (4) reactivity studies.

  9. Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlinger, H.P. III

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to develop a coal slurry from waste streams using Illinois coal that is ideally suited for a gasification feed. The principle items to be studied are (1) methods of concentrating pyrite and decreasing other ash forming minerals into a high grade gasification feed using froth flotation and gravity separation techniques; (2) chemical and particle size analyses of coal slurries; (3) determination of how that slurry can be densified and to what degree of densification is optimum from the pumpability and combustibility analyses; and (4) reactivity studies.

  10. Ultrasonic Characterization of Custom Engineered Armor Grade Alumina (Al2O3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiglieri, S.; Haber, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    High frequency ultrasonic characterization was performed on a series of alumina samples of varying degrees of density. These samples were specifically fired to temperatures below and above what is considered to be appropriate for the sintering of alumina. Ultrasound attenuation coefficient and Young's modulus C-scan mapping and acoustic spectroscopy were employed in order to establish a baseline fingerprint for each temperature type. Characterization was performed using 20 MHz and 75 MHz planar transducers. This study showed the veracity of high frequency ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in characterizing the effect of densification on material properties for armor-grade alumina.

  11. TAURUS II launch vehicle lox subcooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Glen E.

    2012-06-01

    The Orbital Sciences Taurus II medium lift launch vehicle utilizes first stage engines fueled by liquid oxygen and RP-1. Performance of the Taurus II is enhanced by densifying the liquid oxygen from a saturation temperature of 94 K to a subcooled temperature of 77.9 K. Subcooling the 75.07 kg/s liquid oxygen flow is accomplished in a 1.907 megawatt heat exchanger cooled by a flow of 9.62 kg/s ambient pressure liquid nitrogen. Design, fabrication, insulation and testing of the densification heat exchanger is described in this paper.

  12. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  13. NDE x-ray computed tomography applications research. Final report, August 1989-September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, S.T.; Yancey, R.N.; Eliasen, D.S.; Phillips, D.H.

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes research efforts in X-ray computed tomography at Wright Laboratory. Attention is focused on applications development efforts that have been successful in coupling CT with engineering functions to provide new insight to materials and processing issues in a cost effective manner. A sampling of the myriad of applications to be covered in this report includes: tracking of densification during the processing of composite materials and ceramics, measuring the thickness of internal walls in castings, failure analysis of an aircraft landing gear actuator, and verification of modeling damage zones in slug impacted fiberglass armor. Extrapolation of specific studies to broader horizons are offered.

  14. Characterising the sintering behaviour of pulverised fuel ash using heating stage microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Adell, V.; Cheeseman, C.R.; Ferraris, M.; Salvo, M.; Smeacetto, F.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2007-10-15

    Heating stage microscopy was used to investigate the sintering behaviour of pulverised fuel ash (PFA). The effect of chemical composition, heating rate, maximum temperature and metal inclusions on densification was studied. It was confirmed that dimensional changes of PFA powder compacts can be controlled by selecting appropriate conditions of sintering temperature and heating rate. It was also found that the sintering behaviour of PFA can be modified with the addition of metal inclusions. The results suggest that development of pores and microstructure of lightweight aggregates (LWA) manufactured from PFA can be controlled by changing the key sintering parameters such as temperature, time and heating rate.

  15. The influence of ZrB2-SiC powders mechanical treatment on the structure of sintered ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakova, S.; Burlachenko, A.; Mirovoi, Yu; Sevostiyanova, I.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of mechanical treatment by planetary ball milling on the properties of hot pressed ZrB2 - SiC ceramics was studied. It was shown that material densification after mechanical treatment is finished at initial stages of sintering process. Addition of SiC leads to an essential increase of sample density to 99% of theoretically achievable for powder with 2% of SiC, as compared with ZrB2 with the density less than 76%. It was demonstrated that all defects that were accumulated during mechanical treatment are annealed during hot pressing, and there are no changes of CDD values in sintered ceramics.

  16. Refreezing on the Greenland ice sheet: a model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Christian; Reijmer, Carleen; van den Broeke, Michiel; Ligtenberg, Stefan; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Noël, Brice

    2016-04-01

    Mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is an important contributor to global sea level rise. Besides calving, surface melt is the dominant source of mass loss. However, only part of the surface melt leaves the ice sheet as runoff whereas the other part percolates into the snow cover and refreezes. Due to this process, part of the meltwater is (intermediately) stored. Refreezing thus impacts the surface mass balance of the ice sheet but it also affects the vertical structure of the snow cover due to transport of mass and energy. Due to the sparse availability of in situ data and the demand of future projections, it is inevitable to use numerical models to simulate refreezing and related processes. Currently, the magnitude of refrozen mass is neither well constrained nor well validated. In this study, we model the snow and firn layer, and compare refreezing on the GrIS as modelled with two different numerical models. Both models are forced with meteorological data from the regional climate model RACMO 2 that has been shown to simulate realistic conditions for Greenland. One model is the UU/IMAU firn densification model (FDM) that can be used both in an on- and offline mode with RACMO 2. The other model is SNOWPACK; a model originally designed to simulate seasonal snow cover in alpine conditions. In contrast to FDM, SNOWPACK accounts for snow metamorphism and microstructure and contains a more physically based snow densification scheme. A first comparison of the models indicates that both seem to be able to capture the general spatial and temporal pattern of refreezing. Spatially, refreezing occurs mostly in the ablation zone and decreases in the accumulation zone towards the interior of the ice sheet. Below the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) where refreezing occurs in seasonal snow cover on bare ice, the storage effect is only intermediate. Temporal patterns on a seasonal range indicate two peaks in refreezing; one at the beginning of the melt season where

  17. Combined macro-meso scale modeling of sintering. Part II, Mesoscale simulations

    SciTech Connect

    TIKARE,VEENA; OLEVSKY,EUGENE A.; BRAGINSKY,MICHAEL V.

    2000-05-23

    A mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo model is presented to simulate microstructural evolution during sintering of 2D complex microstructures which evolves by grain growth, pore migration and densification. No assumptions about the geometry of the evolving microstructure are made. The results of these simulations are used to generate sintering stress and normalize viscous bulk modulus for use in continuum level simulation of sintering. The advantage of these simulations is that they can be used to generate more accurate parameters as various assumptions regarding geometry and transport mechanism are made. The previous companion paper used the results from the mesoscale simulations to simulate shrinkage and warpage in sintering of bilayer ceramics.

  18. METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF UO$sub 2$ PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, J.R.; Taylor, A.J.

    1959-09-22

    A method is described for the preparation of highdensity UO/sub 2/ particles within the size range of 40 to 100 microns. In accordance with the invention UO/sub 2/ particles are autoclaved with an aqueous solution of uranyl ions. The resulting crystals are reduced to UO/sub 2/ and the UO/sub 2/ is heated to at least 1000 deg C to effect densification. The resulting UO/sub 2/ particles are screened, and oversize particles are crushed and screened to recover the particles within the desired size range.

  19. Microstructure of explosively compacted aluminum nitride ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.; Echer, C.J.; Cline, C.F.; Tanner, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Observations are reported of the microstructure of aluminum nitride (A1N) ceramic produced by explosive consolidation of the powder. Similarities between the grain structure of the compact and the starting powders are striking. Grain growth does not occur during densification and the 0.1 ..mu.. particle size of the powder is retained, although considerable deformation is introduced into individual grains. Of particular interest is an intergranular phase which appears throughout the compact. Observations in the transmission electron microscope indicate that this phase is amorphous.The influence of this glassy intergranular phase on bonding is discussed. 5 figures.

  20. Feasibility study of the commercial production of densified biomass fuel at Klamath Falls, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    The project began with assessments of local biomass resources which could serve as feedstock for a DBF plant, and the potential customer markets for DBF. Based on these analyses, a pilot densification plant was designed and installed for purposes of trial operations and evaluation. In addition, exploration for geothermal resources was conducted in order to confirm a suitable feedstock dehydration heat source. The results of this exploration, and of the pilot plant's trial operations, were then used to determine requirements for a commercial-scale DBF plant, and the feasibility of upgrading the pilot plant for commercial-scale operations.

  1. Indirect measurements of hydrogen: The deficit method for a many-component system

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, T.E.; Yu, Ning; Kodali, P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Mayer, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    We have developed a simple technique for determining hydrogen atomic fraction from the ion backscattering spectrometry (IBS) signals of the remaining species. This technique uses the surface heights of various IBS signals in the form of a linear matrix equation. We apply this technique to in situ analysis of ion-beam-induced densification of sol-gel zirconia thin films, where hydrogen is the most volatile species during irradiation. Attendant errors are discussed with an emphasis on stopping powers and Bragg`s rule.

  2. Flood Disaster Risk Reduction in municipality-scale in Rio de Janeiro State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japiassú Viana, Viviane; Formiga Johnsson, Rosa Maria; De Gouvello, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    In Brazil, flood disasters causing human damage, pecuniary loss and environmental damage, are mainly due to greater exposure of the population; urban densification on the riverbanks and margins, incurring vulnerability due to changes in river level and climate changes. This article presents the data and studies required in the Brazilian legal basis and analyzes the scales adopted by planners in contrast to the scales demands by the executing agencies in the context of prevention and adaptation to climate change, particularly to flood disaster reduction in municipality-scale.

  3. 193-nm-laser-induced spectral shift in HR coated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungil; Rudisill, J. Earl; Danielewicz, Edward

    2012-12-01

    High-reflectance mirrors, fabricated by use of fluoride coating materials, were irradiated for extended periods by a 193-nm kilohertz repetitive laser source. This irradiation promoted a spectral shift in the reflectance band towards shorter wavelengths. In efforts to determine the mechanism for the observed spectral shifts, various models were investigated by employing such techniques as spectrophotometry, surface profile interferometry, coating design simulation, and x-ray diffraction. The result of the investigation indicates that layers near the top surface of the coating structure underwent densification, which resulted in the observed spectral shift.

  4. Micro-Brillouin spectroscopy mapping of the residual density field induced by Vickers indentation in a soda-lime silicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Clément, S.; Vialla, R.; Vandembroucq, D.; Rufflé, B.

    2012-06-01

    High-resolution Brillouin scattering is used to achieve 3-dimensional maps of the longitudinal acoustic mode frequency shift in soda-lime silicate glasses subject to Vickers indentations. Assuming that residual stress-induced effects are simply proportional to density changes, residual densification fields are obtained. The density gradient is nearly isotropic, confirming earlier optical observations made on a similar glass. The results show that Brillouin micro-spectroscopy opens the way to a fully quantitative comparison of experimental data with predictions of mechanical models for the identification of a constitutive law.

  5. Synthesis of luminescent SrMoO{sub 4} thin films by a non-reversible galvanic cell method

    SciTech Connect

    Bi Jian; Cui Chunhua; Lai Xin; Shi Fang; Gao Daojiang

    2008-03-04

    Well-crystallized SrMoO{sub 4} thin films were synthesized directly on a molybdenum substrate by a non-reversible galvanic cell method through 150 h electrochemical reaction at room temperature. The as-synthesized thin films are a single phase SrMoO{sub 4} with a scheelite-type structure and show uniform and homogeneous surfaces. When excited by 290 nm ultraviolet ray at room temperature, the thin films emit the maximum peaks at 485 nm. The densification, chemical-physical and photoluminescence properties of the SrMoO{sub 4} thin films synthesized by the non-reversible galvanic cell method are significantly improved.

  6. Solid-State Spun Fibers from 1 mm Long Carbon Nanotube Forests Synthesized by Water-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shanju; Zhu, Lingbo; Minus, Marilyn L.; Chae, han Gi; Jagannathan, Sudhakar; Wong, Ching-Ping; Kowalik, Janusz; Roberson, Luke B.; Kumar, Satish

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we report continuous carbon nanotube fibers dry-drawn directly from water-assisted CVD grown forests with millimeter scale length. As-drawn nanotube fibers exist as aerogel and can be transformed into more compact fibers through twisting or densification with a volatile liquid. Nanotube fibers are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman microscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Mechanical behavior and electrical conductivity of the post-treated nanotube fibers are investigated.

  7. On the microphysical state of the surface of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz

    1991-01-01

    The microphysical processes involved in the pressureless sintering of particulate materials and the physical conditions likely to prevail on Triton are examined in order to investigate the processes leading to the frost metamorphism on Triton. It is argued that the presence of a well-annealed transparent nitrogen layer offers a natural explanation for most of what is seen on the surface of Triton; results of observations suggest that such a layer can form on Triton at 37 K on a seasonal time scale (about 100 earth years), provided the initial grain diameter is less than 1 micron. Grains up to 10 microns are allowed if grain growth does not hinder densification.

  8. Comparison of properties of sintered and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride fabricated by microwave and conventional heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Lin, H.T.

    1995-10-01

    A comparison of microwave and conventional processing of silicon nitride-based ceramics was performed to identify any differences between the two, such as improved fabrication parameters or increased mechanical properties. Two areas of thermal processing were examined: sintered silicon nitride (SSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). The SSN powder compacts showed improved densification and enhanced grain growth. SRBSN materials were fabricated in the microwave with a one-step process using cost-effective raw materials. The SRBSN materials had properties appropriate for structural applications. Observed increases in fracture toughness for the microwave processed SRBSN materials were attributable to enhanced elongated grain growth.

  9. Comparison of properties of sintered and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride fabricated by microwave and conventional heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Lin, H.T.; Willkens, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    A comparison of microwave and conventional processing of silicon nitride-based ceramics was performed to identify any differences between the two, such as improved fabrication parameters or increased mechanical properties. Two areas of thermal processing were examined: (1) sintered silicon nitride (SSN) and (2) sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). The SSN powder compacts showed improved densification and enhanced grain growth. SRBSN materials were fabricated in the microwave with a one-step process using cost-effective raw materials. The SRBSN materials had properties appropriate for structural applications. Observed increases in fracture toughness for the microwave processed SRBSN materials were attributable to enhanced elongated grain growth.

  10. Separation membrane development

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.W.

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  11. Silicon Oxycarbide Aerogels for High-Temperature Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Owen; Rhine, Wendell; Coutinho, Decio

    2010-01-01

    This work has shown that the use of SOC-A35 leads to aerogel materials containing a significant concentration of carbidic species and limited amorphous free carbon. Substitution of the divalent oxide species in silica with tetravalent carbidic carbon has directly led to materials that exhibit increased network viscosity, reduced sintering, and limited densification. The SiOC aerogels produced in this work have the highest carbide content of any dense or porous SiOC glass reported in the literature at that time, and exhibit tremendous long-term thermal stability.

  12. Density Fluctuations in Crystallizing Polymers: Fact or Fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, Jimmy; Van Puyvelde, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The fact that, in polymer crystallization, nucleation might be accompanied by large scale density fluctuations has been investigated for the flow-induced crystallization of isotactic poly-1-butene (PB-1). Small Angle Light Scattering (SALS) was applied to measure density and orientation fluctuations, whereas complementary results were obtained from optical microscopy. The observations seem to indicate that the detected density fluctuations result from the presence of weakly anisotropic structures, rather than being an indication of densification before the onset of crystallization. In addition, the present work provides a critical review of polymer crystallization studies using SALS.

  13. Plasma formation and structural modification below the visible ablation threshold in fused silica upon femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, J.; Puerto, D.; Gawelda, W.; Bachelier, G.; Solis, J.; Ehrentraut, L.; Bonse, J.

    2007-08-20

    We have investigated the temporal and spatial evolution of the ablation process induced in fused silica upon irradiation with single 120 fs laser pulses at 800 nm. Time-resolved microscopy images of the surface reflectivity at 400 nm reveal the existence of a transient plasma distribution with annular shape surrounding the visible ablation crater. The material in this annular zone shows an increased reflectivity after irradiation, consistent with a local refractive index increase of approximately 0.01. White light interferometry measurements indicate a shallow surface depression in this outer region, most likely due to material densification.

  14. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  15. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  16. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R.; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-02-20

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Components Fabricated by a New Powder Injection Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Miller, Megan R.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a powder injection molding (PIM) binder system for titanium that employs naphthalene as the primary constituent to facilitate easy binder removal and mitigate problems with carbon contamination. In the study presented here, we examined densification behavior, microstructure, and mechanical properties in specimens formed by this process. In general, we found that we could achieve tensile strengths comparable to wrought titanium in the PIM-formed specimens, but that maximum elongation was less than expected. Chemical and microstructural analyses suggest that use of higher purity powder and further process optimization will lead to significant improvements in ductility.

  18. Are the lunar seismic signals compatible with a deep layer of fine powder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that a sudden change in the seismic wave velocity at 25 km can be interpreted in terms of a single type of material, namely the fine rock powder that is so abundant on the lunar surface. An investigation conducted by Toksoz et al. (1972) is considered. Toksoz et al. rule out a deep powder layer and derive a velocity profile for powders from laboratory data. Differences regarding powder densification between laboratory tests and actual lunar conditions due to much longer compression times are pointed out.

  19. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  20. On the anelasticity and strain induced structural changes in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, A.; Louzguine-Luzguin, D. V.; Kawashima, A.; Inoue, A.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2011-10-24

    We report on the anelastic behavior of a cyclically loaded Zr{sub 62.5}Fe{sub 5}Cu{sub 22.5}Al{sub 10} bulk metallic glass well below its yield strength. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the glass is discussed on the basis of its structural and thermodynamic properties before and after tests. We show how the kinetically frozen anelastic deformation accumulates at room temperature and causes a structural relaxation and densification of the glass and further leads to its partial crystallization.

  1. Alcohol Dehydration on Monooxo W=O and Dioxo O=W=O Species

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Smid, Bretislav; Kim, Yu Kwon; Matolin, Vladimir; Kay, Bruce D.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2012-08-16

    The dehydration of 1-propanol on nanoporous WO3 films prepared via ballistic deposition at ~20 K has been investigated using temperature programmed desorption, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory. The as deposited films are extremely efficient in 1-propanol dehydration to propene. This activity is correlated with the presence of dioxo O=W=O groups while monooxo W=O species are shown to be inactive. Annealing of the film induces densification that results in the loss of catalytic activity due to annihilation O=W=O species.

  2. Development of improved coating for advanced carbon-carbon components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaki, Y. R.; Brown, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) was studied as a substitute coating material on the carbon-carbon material (RCC) presently used as a heat shield on the space shuttle, and on advanced carbon-carbon (ACC), a later development. On RCC, RSSN showed potential in a 538 C (1000 F) screening test in which silicon carbide coated material exhibits its highest oxidation rate; RSSN afforded less protection to ACC because of a larger thermal expansion mismatch. Organosilicon densification and metallic silicon sealing methods were studied as means of further increasing the oxidation resistance of the coating, and some improvement was noted when these methods were employed.

  3. Glacial-interglacial dynamics of Antarctic firn columns: comparison between simulations and ice core air-δ15N measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, E.; Landais, A.; Buiron, D.; Cauquoin, A.; Chappellaz, J.; Debret, M.; Jouzel, J.; Leuenberger, M.; Martinerie, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Mulvaney, R.; Parrenin, F.; Prié, F.

    2012-12-01

    Correct estimate of the firn lock-in depth is essential for correctly linking gas and ice chronologies in ice cores studies. Here, two approaches to constrain the firn depth evolution in Antarctica are presented over the last deglaciation: output of a firn densification model and measurements of δ15N of N2 in air trapped in ice core. Since the firn densification process is largely governed by surface temperature and accumulation rate, we have investigated four ice cores drilled in coastal (Berkner Island, BI, and James Ross Island, JRI) and semi coastal (TALDICE and EPICA Dronning Maud Land, EDML) Antarctic regions. Combined with available δ15N measurements performed from the EPICA Dome C (EDC) site, the studied regions encompass a large range of surface accumulation rate and temperature conditions. While firn densification simulations are able to correctly represent most of the δ15N trends over the last deglaciation measured in the EDC, BI, TALDICE and EDML ice cores, they systematically fail to capture BI and EDML δ15N glacial levels, a mismatch previously seen for Central East Antarctic ice cores. Using empirical constraints of the EDML gas-ice depth offset during the Laschamp event (~ 41 ka), we can rule out the existence of a large convective zone as the explanation of the glacial firn model-δ15N data mismatch for this site. The good match between modelled and measured δ15N at TALDICE as well as the lack of any clear correlation between insoluble dust concentration in snow and δ15N records in the different ice cores suggest that past changes in loads of impurities are not the only main driver of glacial-interglacial changes in firn lock-in depth. We conclude that firn densification dynamics may instead be driven mostly by accumulation rate changes. The mismatch between modelled and measured δ15N may be due to inaccurate reconstruction of past accumulation rate or underestimated influence of accumulation rate in firnification models.

  4. A Large Sparse Aperture Densified Pupil Hypertelescope Concept for Ground Based Detection of Extra-Solar Earth-Like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D.; Lyon, R.; Woodruff, R.; Labeyrie, A.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A concept is presented for a large (10 - 30 meter) sparse aperture hyper telescope to image extrasolar earth-like planets from the ground in the presence of atmospheric seeing. The telescope achieves high dynamic range very close to bright stellar sources with good image quality using pupil densification techniques. Active correction of the perturbed wavefront is simplified by using 36 small flat mirrors arranged in a parabolic steerable array structure, eliminating the need for large delat lines and operating at near-infrared (1 - 3 Micron) wavelengths with flats comparable in size to the seeing cells.

  5. Nanoparticle Ag-enhanced textured-powder Bi-2212/Ag wire technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellams, J. N.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Vandergrifft, J.

    2015-12-01

    A new approach to the preparation of cores for Bi-2212/Ag wire is being developed. Nanoparticle Ag is homogeneously dispersed in Bi-2212 fine powder, and the mixture is uniaxially compressed to form highly textured, cold-sintered core rods. The rods can be assembled in a silver matrix, drawn to form multifilament wire, and restacked and drawn to form multifilament wire. Preliminary studies using tablet geometry demonstrate that a nonmelt heat treatment produces densification, grain growth, intergrowth among grains, and macroscopic current transport. The status of the development is reported.

  6. Universal behavior of changes in elastic moduli of hot compressed oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Guerette, Michael; Huang, Liping; Lönnroth, Nadja; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic moduli of glasses are important for numerous applications, but predicting them based on their chemical composition and forming history remains a great challenge. In this study, we investigate the relationship between densification and changes in elastic moduli as a result of isostatic compression up to 1 GPa of various oxide compositions at elevated temperature (so-called hot compression). An approximately linear relationship is observed between the relative changes in density and elastic moduli across a variety of glass families, although these glasses exhibit a diverse range of structural responses during compression owing to their dramatically different chemistries.

  7. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R Jr; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co3O4 into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. c2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Perlite for permanent confinement of cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balencie, J.; Burger, D.; Rehspringer, J.-L.; Estournès, C.; Vilminot, S.; Richard-Plouet, M.; Boos, A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the potential use of expanded perlite, a metastable amorphous hydrated aluminium silicate, as a permanent medium for the long-term confinement of cesium. The method requires simply a loading by mixing an aqueous cesium nitrate solution and expanded perlite at 300 K followed by densification by sintering. The formation of pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, a naturally occurring mineral phase, upon careful heat treatment is demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. Leaching tests on the resulting glass-ceramics reveal a very low Cs departure of 0.5 mg m-2 d-1.

  9. Study of gamma irradiation effect on positron annihilation mechanism in PFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Li, Z. X.; Zhao, B. Z.; Zhang, P.; Lu, E. Y.; Zhang, J.; Yuan, D. Q.; Cao, X. Z.; Yu, R. S.; Wang, B. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Gamma irradiation effect on annihilation characteristics of positronium and free positron in tetrafluoroethylene-perluoro (alkoxy vinyl ether) copolymer (PFA) were studied independently by age momentum correlation (AMOC) and the correlation between Doppler broadening S parameter and o-Ps fraction (S-Io-Ps correlation). AMOC results revealed decreases in S parameter of o-Ps, owing to accumulation of polar atoms around free volume. S-Io-Ps correlation indicated a reduced intrinsic S parameter of free positron in irradiated PFA, which was caused by enhanced positron trapping on polar atoms due to densification of local segments and variation in the elemental environment around free volumes.

  10. SANS Investigations of CO2 Adsorption in Microporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; He, Lilin; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Carmichael, Justin R.

    2015-08-07

    The high pressure adsorption behavior of CO2 at T = 296 K in microporous carbon was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. A strong densification of CO2 in micropores accompanied by non-monotonic adsorption-induced pore deformation was observed. The density of confined CO2 increases rapidly with pressure and reaches the liquid –like density at 20 bar, which corresponds to the relative pressure of P/Psat ~0.3. At P > 20 bar density of confined CO2 increases slowly approaching a plateau at higher pressure. The size of micropores first increases with pressure, reaches a maximum at 20 bar, and then decreases with pressure. A complementary SANS experiment conducted on the same microporous carbon saturated with neutron-transparent and non-adsorbing inert gas argon shows no deformation of micropores at pressures up to ~200 bars. This result demonstrates that the observed deformation of micropores in CO2 is an adsorption-induced phenomenon, caused by the solvation pressure - induced strain and strong densification of confined CO2 .

  11. Bottom-up processing and low temperature transport properties of polycrystalline SnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Zhen-Hua; Wei, Kaya; Lewis, Hutton; Martin, Joshua; Nolas, George S.

    2015-05-15

    A hydrothermal approach was employed to efficiently synthesize SnSe nanorods. The nanorods were consolidated into polycrystalline SnSe by spark plasma sintering for low temperature electrical and thermal properties characterization. The low temperature transport properties indicate semiconducting behavior with a typical dielectric temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The transport properties are discussed in light of the recent interest in this material for thermoelectric applications. The nanorod growth mechanism is also discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: SnSe nanorods were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method through a bottom-up approach. Micron sized flower-like crystals changed to nanorods with increasing hydrothermal temperature. Low temperature transport properties of polycrystalline SnSe, after SPS densification, were reported for the first time. This bottom-up synthetic approach can be used to produce phase-pure dense polycrystalline materials for thermoelectrics applications. - Highlights: • SnSe nanorods were synthesized by a simple and efficient hydrothermal approach. • The role of temperature, time and NaOH content was investigated. • SPS densification allowed for low temperature transport properties measurements. • Transport measurements indicate semiconducting behavior.

  12. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, Marvin L.; Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav; Neil, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

  13. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-17

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

  14. Evaluating scale-up rules of a high-shear wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing; Pandey, Preetanshu; Bindra, Dilbir S; Gao, Julia Z; Narang, Ajit S

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the commonly used scale-up rules for high-shear wet granulation process using a microcrystalline cellulose-lactose-based low drug loading formulation. Granule properties such as particle size, porosity, flow, and tabletability, and tablet dissolution were compared across scales using scale-up rules based on different impeller speed calculations or extended wet massing time. Constant tip speed rule was observed to produce slightly less granulated material at the larger scales. Longer wet massing time can be used to compensate for the lower shear experienced by the granules at the larger scales. Constant Froude number and constant empirical stress rules yielded granules that were more comparable across different scales in terms of compaction performance and tablet dissolution. Granule porosity was shown to correlate well with blend tabletability and tablet dissolution, indicating the importance of monitoring granule densification (porosity) during scale-up. It was shown that different routes can be chosen during scale-up to achieve comparable granule growth and densification by altering one of the three parameters: water amount, impeller speed, and wet massing time. PMID:26010137

  15. Conversion of tomato-peel waste into solid fuel by hydrothermal carbonization: Influence of the processing variables.

    PubMed

    Sabio, E; Álvarez-Murillo, A; Román, S; Ledesma, B

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the influence of the variables temperature, residence time, and biomass/water ratio on the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of tomato peel was investigated. The implementation of a Design of Experiments - Response Surface Methodology approach allowed to identify the importance of each variable, as well as their interactions, in both the reactivity (solid yield) and energy densification (increase in higher heating value). The HTC residence time and specially temperature had a major effect on the process, increasing the solid yield and promoting energy densification. Ratio had a minor effect although under certain temperature and time conditions, it was a decisive parameter. Solid yields in the range 27.6% and 87.7% with corresponding high heating values 23.6-34.6 MJ kg(-1) were obtained. From the statistical processing of the experimental data obtained pseudo-second order models were developed. It was proven that these approaches envisaged the hydrochar final characteristics successfully. From the elemental analysis and the FTIR spectra, it was possible to investigate the HTC pathway, which was defined as a combination of several processes; considering dehydration and decarboxylation reactions and especially lignin depolimerization reactions, which lead to the formation of monomeric radicals. Moreover, the surface morphology of selected hydrochars by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed the original structure scaffold, with minor changes between hydrochars prepared under different conditions.

  16. Revealing spatially heterogeneous relaxation in a model nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-11-21

    The detailed nature of spatially heterogeneous dynamics of glycerol-silica nanocomposites is unraveled by combining dielectric spectroscopy with atomistic simulation and statistical mechanical theory. Analysis of the spatial mobility gradient shows no “glassy” layer, but the α-relaxation time near the nanoparticle grows with cooling faster than the α-relaxation time in the bulk and is ∼20 times longer at low temperatures. The interfacial layer thickness increases from ∼1.8 nm at higher temperatures to ∼3.5 nm upon cooling to near bulk T{sub g}. A real space microscopic description of the mobility gradient is constructed by synergistically combining high temperature atomistic simulation with theory. Our analysis suggests that the interfacial slowing down arises mainly due to an increase of the local cage scale barrier for activated hopping induced by enhanced packing and densification near the nanoparticle surface. The theory is employed to predict how local surface densification can be manipulated to control layer dynamics and shear rigidity over a wide temperature range.

  17. Compressive intrinsic stress originates in the grain boundaries of dense refractory polycrystalline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnfält, D.; Fillon, A.; Boyd, R. D.; Helmersson, U.; Sarakinos, K.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsic stresses in vapor deposited thin films have been a topic of considerable scientific and technological interest owing to their importance for functionality and performance of thin film devices. The origin of compressive stresses typically observed during deposition of polycrystalline metal films at conditions that result in high atomic mobility has been under debate in the literature in the course of the past decades. In this study, we contribute towards resolving this debate by investigating the grain size dependence of compressive stress magnitude in dense polycrystalline Mo films grown by magnetron sputtering. Although Mo is a refractory metal and hence exhibits an intrinsically low mobility, low energy ion bombardment is used during growth to enhance atomic mobility and densify the grain boundaries. Concurrently, the lateral grain size is controlled by using appropriate seed layers on which Mo films are grown epitaxially. The combination of in situ stress monitoring with ex situ microstructural characterization reveals a strong, seemingly linear, increase of the compressive stress magnitude on the inverse grain size and thus provides evidence that compressive stress is generated in the grain boundaries of the film. These results are consistent with models suggesting that compressive stresses in metallic films deposited at high homologous temperatures are generated by atom incorporation into and densification of grain boundaries. However, the underlying mechanisms for grain boundary densification might be different from those in the present study where atomic mobility is intrinsically low.

  18. TiC nanocrystal formation from carburization of laser-grown Ti/O/C nanopowders for nanostructured ceramics.

    PubMed

    Leconte, Y; Maskrot, H; Herlin-Boime, N; Porterat, D; Reynaud, C; Gierlotka, S; Swiderska-Sroda, A; Vicens, J

    2006-01-12

    Refractory carbide ceramics (TiC and ZrC) raise interest as promising materials for high-temperature applications such as structural materials for the future generation of nuclear reactors. In this context, nanostructured ceramics are expected to exhibit improved thermomechanical properties as well as better behavior under irradiation when compared to conventional materials. It is therefore necessary to synthesize carbide nanocrystals of such materials to elaborate the ceramics. We report here the formation study of TiC nanocrystals through the direct carburization of Ti/O/C nanopowders grown by laser pyrolysis. A spray of titanium tetraisopropoxide was laser pyrolyzed with ethylene as the sensitizer, leading to Ti/O/C nanopowders with various C contents controlled by the synthesis conditions. Annealing treatments performed on these nanopowders under an inert atmosphere without any C addition enabled the formation of TiC grains through the carburization of the oxide phase by free C incorporated during the synthesis. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The final TiC grain size was about 80 nm, and the grains were monocrystalline. The influence of the free C content on the grain growth during the annealing step, together with its effects on the densification of the ceramics after sintering by high-pressure flash sintering, was examined. A 93% densification was finally achieved.

  19. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma densification through magnetic compression has been suggested for time-resolved control of the wave properties in plasma-based accelerators [P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 255003 (2012)]. Using particle in cell simulations with real mass ratio, the practicality of large magnetic compression on timescales shorter than the ion gyro-period is investigated. For compression times shorter than the transit time of a compressional Alfven wave across the plasma slab, results show the formation of two counter-propagating shock waves, leading to a highly non-uniform plasma density profile. Furthermore, the plasma slab displays large hydromagnetic like oscillations after the driving field has reached steady state. Peak compression is obtained when the two shocks collide in the mid-plane. At this instant, very large plasma heating is observed, and the plasma β is estimated to be about 1. Although these results point out a densification mechanism quite different and more complex than initially envisioned, these features still might be advantageous in particle accelerators.

  20. Control of thin film processing behavior through precursor structural modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Voigt, J.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Christenson, T.A.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    In the sol-gel processing of ceramic thin films it has been frequently noted that the processing behavior, microstructure and properties of the films are dependent on the nature of the coating solution. In an attempt to understand such thin film processing-property relationships, the authors have systematically investigated the effects of varying the precursor nature on thin film densification and crystallization for ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} films. Metal alkoxide starting compounds, e.g., zirconium n-butoxide{center_dot}n-butanol and titanium i-propoxide, were reacted with acetic acid and 2,4-pentanedione to prepare coating solutions for thin film deposition. The use of these chelating ligands resulted in solution oligomeric species of different nature. Studies of thin film processing indicated that film processing characteristics, i.e., consolidation, densification and crystallization, were strongly dependent on solution precursor nature. Ligand steric size, pyrolysis behavior, extent of chelation, and precursor reactivity were found to be key variables in controlling film processing characteristics.

  1. On the development of constitutive relations for metallic powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, T. J.; Wert, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the development of elastic and plastic constitutive relations as functions of relative density for partially consolidated -100 mesh aluminum powder. First, measurements of yield stress as a function of stress state and relative density are described. Measurements of the plastic strain increments associated with yielding in unconstrained compression tests and elastic properties, both as functions of relative density, are also described. The experimental results are combined with the associated flow rule to show that the yield surface is asymmetric with respect to hydrostatic tension and compression. Second, it is shown that the yield stress results can be represented by a two-part (capped Drucker-Prager) yield surface. The consolidation yield surface moves along the hydrostatic stress axis during densification, while the shear yield surface approaches the Mises yield surface. For the Al powder used in the present investigation, superposition of shear stress on a hydrostatic stress state aids the densification process. However, the hydrostatic stress requirement was found to be reduced by only about 20 pct for relative densities below 0.98.

  2. Ground point filtering of UAV-based photogrammetric point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Niels; Seijmonsbergen, Arie; Masselink, Rens; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have proved invaluable for generating high-resolution and multi-temporal imagery. Based on photographic surveys, 3D surface reconstructions can be derived photogrammetrically so producing point clouds, orthophotos and surface models. For geomorphological or ecological applications it may be necessary to separate ground points from vegetation points. Existing filtering methods are designed for point clouds derived using other methods, e.g. laser scanning. The purpose of this paper is to test three filtering algorithms for the extraction of ground points from point clouds derived from low-altitude aerial photography. Three subareas were selected from a single flight which represent different scenarios: 1) low relief, sparsely vegetated area, 2) low relief, moderately vegetated area, 3) medium relief and moderately vegetated area. The three filtering methods are used to classify ground points in different ways, based on 1) RGB color values from training samples, 2) TIN densification as implemented in LAStools, and 3) an iterative surface lowering algorithm. Ground points are then interpolated into a digital terrain model using inverse distance weighting. The results suggest that different landscapes require different filtering methods for optimal ground point extraction. While iterative surface lowering and TIN densification are fully automated, color-based classification require fine-tuning in order to optimize the filtering results. Finally, we conclude that filtering photogrammetric point clouds could provide a cheap alternative to laser scan surveys for creating digital terrain models in sparsely vegetated areas.

  3. Spray-combustion synthesis: efficient solution route to high-performance oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Nanjia; Zeng, Li; Guo, Peijun; Xia, Yu; Alvarez, Ana; Aghion, Stefano; Lin, Hui; Yu, Junsheng; Chang, Robert P H; Bedzyk, Michael J; Ferragut, Rafael; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-03-17

    Metal-oxide (MO) semiconductors have emerged as enabling materials for next generation thin-film electronics owing to their high carrier mobilities, even in the amorphous state, large-area uniformity, low cost, and optical transparency, which are applicable to flat-panel displays, flexible circuitry, and photovoltaic cells. Impressive progress in solution-processed MO electronics has been achieved using methodologies such as sol gel, deep-UV irradiation, preformed nanostructures, and combustion synthesis. Nevertheless, because of incomplete lattice condensation and film densification, high-quality solution-processed MO films having technologically relevant thicknesses achievable in a single step have yet to be shown. Here, we report a low-temperature, thickness-controlled coating process to create high-performance, solution-processed MO electronics: spray-combustion synthesis (SCS). We also report for the first time, to our knowledge, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) transistors having densification, nanoporosity, electron mobility, trap densities, bias stability, and film transport approaching those of sputtered films and compatible with conventional fabrication (FAB) operations. PMID:25733848

  4. Mechanical and in vitro biological performance of graphene nanoplatelets reinforced calcium silicate composite.

    PubMed

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Seyed Shirazi, Seyed Farid; Baradaran, Saeid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Zandi, Keivan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared using hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1150°C. Quantitative microstructural analysis suggests that GNP play a role in grain size and is responsible for the improved densification. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that GNP survived the harsh processing conditions of the selected HIP processing parameters. The uniform distribution of 1 wt.% GNP in the CS matrix, high densification and fine CS grain size help to improve the fracture toughness by ∼130%, hardness by ∼30% and brittleness index by ∼40% as compared to the CS matrix without GNP. The toughening mechanisms, such as crack bridging, pull-out, branching and deflection induced by GNP are observed and discussed. The GNP/CS composites exhibit good apatite-forming ability in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Our results indicate that the addition of GNP decreased pH value in SBF. Effect of addition of GNP on early adhesion and proliferation of human osteoblast cells (hFOB) was measured in vitro. The GNP/CS composites showed good biocompatibility and promoted cell viability and cell proliferation. The results indicated that the cell viability and proliferation are affected by time and concentration of GNP in the CS matrix. PMID:25229540

  5. Influence of the PM-Processing Route and Nitrogen Content on the Properties of Ni-Free Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefor, Kathrin; Walter, M.; Weddeling, A.; Hryha, E.; Huth, S.; Weber, S.; Nyborg, L.; Theisen, W.

    2015-03-01

    Ni-free austenitic steels alloyed with Cr and Mn are an alternative to conventional Ni-containing steels. Nitrogen alloying of these steel grades is beneficial for several reasons such as increased strength and corrosion resistance. Low solubility in liquid and δ-ferrite restricts the maximal N-content that can be achieved via conventional metallurgy. Higher contents can be alloyed by powder-metallurgical (PM) production via gas-solid interaction. The performance of sintered parts is determined by appropriate sintering parameters. Three major PM-processing routes, hot isostatic pressing, supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS), and solid-state sintering, were performed to study the influence of PM-processing route and N-content on densification, fracture, and mechanical properties. Sintering routes are designed with the assistance of thermodynamic calculations, differential thermal analysis, and residual gas analysis. Fracture surfaces were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Tensile tests and X-ray diffraction were performed to study mechanical properties and austenite stability. This study demonstrates that SLPS process reaches high densification of the high-Mn-containing powder material while the desired N-contents were successfully alloyed via gas-solid interaction. Produced specimens show tensile strengths >1000 MPa combined with strain to fracture of 60 pct and thus overcome the other tested production routes as well as conventional stainless austenitic or martensitic grades.

  6. LTCC processed CoTi substituted M-type barium ferrite composite with BBSZ glass powder additives for microwave device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Yingli; Li, Jie; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Huaiwu; Harris, Vincent. G.

    2016-05-01

    Hexagonal magnetoplumbite ferrites typically have sintering temperatures above 1100∘C in order to stabilize a single phase compound, which is much higher than the melting point of silver leading to device fabrication challenges. Application of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) technologies may prove effective in decreasing the sintering temperature of hexagonal ferrites. Ferrite powders combined with glass frit powder is an effective pathway to lowering the sintering temperature. Here, hexagonal M-type barium ferrite (i.e., Ba(CoTi)1.5Fe9O19) ceramics, combined with BBSZ glass powder as a sintering aid were synthesized. Co and Ti ions where used to substitute for Fe cations in order to modify the magnetic anisotropy field. The density, microstructure, magnetic properties and complex permeability are reported. The BBSZ glass addition was shown to improve the densification and magnetic properties of the barium ferrite. The densification of the BaM ferrite Ba(CoTi)1.5Fe9O19 was further enhanced by the glass additive at low firing temperatures of below 900∘C because of the formation of a liquid phase. Complex permeability of ferrites sintered at 900∘C was also influenced by the BBSZ addition and the resonance frequency was shown to decrease with increased amounts of the glass modifier.

  7. High temperature compounds for turbine vanes. [of SiC, Si3N4, and Si composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, W. H.; Cannon, R. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication and microstructure control studies were conducted on SiC, Si3N and composites based on Si3N. Charpy mode impact testing to 2400 F established that Si3N4/Mo composites have excellent potential. Attempts to fabricate composites of Si3N4 with superalloys, both by hot pressing and infiltration were largely unsuccessful in comparison to using Mo, Re, and Ta which are less reactive. Modest improvements in impact strength were realized for monolithic Si3N4; however, SiC strengths increased by a factor of six and now equal values achieved for Si3N4. Correlations of impact strength with material properties are discussed. Reduced MgO densification aid additions to Si3N4 were found to decrease densification kinetics, increase final porosity, decrease room temperature bend strength, increase high temperature bend strength, and decrease bend stress rupture properties. The decrease in bend strength at high temperature for fine grain size SiC suggested that a slightly larger grain size material with a nearly constant strength-temperature relation may prove desirable in the creep and stress rupture mode.

  8. Revealing spatially heterogeneous relaxation in a model nanocomposite

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shiwang; Mirigian, Stephen; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-11-18

    The detailed nature of spatially heterogeneous dynamics of glycerol-silica nanocomposites is unraveled by combining dielectric spectroscopy with atomistic simulation and statistical mechanical theory. Analysis of the spatial mobility gradient shows no glassy layer, but the -relaxation time near the nanoparticle grows with cooling faster than the -relaxation time in the bulk and is ~20 times longer at low temperatures. The interfacial layer thickness increases from ~1.8 nm at higher temperatures to ~3.5 nm upon cooling to near bulk Tg. A real space microscopic description of the mobility gradient is constructed by synergistically combining high temperature atomistic simulation with theory. Ourmore » analysis suggests that the interfacial slowing down arises mainly due to an increase of the local cage scale barrier for activated hopping induced by enhanced packing and densification near the nanoparticle surface. As a result, the theory is employed to predict how local surface densification can be manipulated to control layer dynamics and shear rigidity over a wide temperature range.« less

  9. Oxalate co-precipitation synthesis of calcium zirconate and calcium titanate powders.

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2009-06-01

    Fine powders of calcium zirconate (CaZrO{sub 3}, CZ) and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}, CT) were synthesized using a nonaqueous oxalate co-precipitation route from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O and group(IV) n-butoxides (Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} or Zr(OBu{sup n}){sub 4}). Several reaction conditions and batch sizes (2-35 g) were explored to determine their influence on final particle size, morphology, and phase. Characterization of the as-prepared oxalate precursors, oven dried oxalate precursors (60-90 C), and calcined powders (635-900 C) were analyzed with TGA/DTA, XRD, TEM, and SEM. Densification and sintering studies on pressed CZ pellets at 1375 and 1400 C were also performed. Through the developed oxalate co-precipitation route, densification temperatures for CZ were lowered by 125 C from the 1500 C firing temperature required for conventional mixed oxide powders. Low field electrical tests of the CZ pellets indicated excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of {approx}30 and a dissipation factor of 0.0004 were measured at 1 kHz.

  10. Impacts of snow and organic soils parameterization on northern Eurasian soil temperature profiles simulated by the ISBA land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Brun, Eric; Boone, Aaron; Delire, Christine; Le Moigne, Patrick; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed how an improved representation of snowpack processes and soil properties in the multilayer snow and soil schemes of the Interaction Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model impacts the simulation of soil temperature profiles over northern Eurasian regions. For this purpose, we refine ISBA's snow layering algorithm and propose a parameterization of snow albedo and snow compaction/densification adapted from the detailed Crocus snowpack model. We also include a dependency on soil organic carbon content for ISBA's hydraulic and thermal soil properties. First, changes in the snowpack parameterization are evaluated against snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface albedo, and soil temperature at a 10 cm depth observed at the Col de Porte field site in the French Alps. Next, the new model version including all of the changes is used over northern Eurasia to evaluate the model's ability to simulate the snow depth, the soil temperature profile, and the permafrost characteristics. The results confirm that an adequate simulation of snow layering and snow compaction/densification significantly impacts the snowpack characteristics and the soil temperature profile during winter, while the impact of the more accurate snow albedo computation is dominant during the spring. In summer, the accounting for the effect of soil organic carbon on hydraulic and thermal soil properties improves the simulation of the soil temperature profile. Finally, the results confirm that this last process strongly influences the simulation of the permafrost active layer thickness and its spatial distribution.

  11. Effect of cell-size on the energy absorption features of closed-cell aluminium foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammi, S. K.; Edwards, G.; Shirvani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of cell-size on the compressive response and energy absorption features of closed-cell aluminium (Al) foam were investigated by finite element method. Micromechanical models were constructed with a repeating unit-cell (RUC) which was sectioned from tetrakaidecahedra structure. Using this RUC, three Al foam models with different cell-sizes (large, medium and small) and all of same density, were built. These three different cell-size pieces of foam occupy the same volume and their domains contained 8, 27 and 64 RUCs respectively. However, the smaller cell-size foam has larger surface area to volume ratio compared to other two. Mechanical behaviour was modelled under uniaxial loading. All three aggregates (3D arrays of RUCs) of different cell-sizes showed an elastic region at the initial stage, then followed by a plateau, and finally, a densification region. The smaller cell size foam exhibited a higher peak-stress and a greater densification strain comparing other two cell-sizes investigated. It was demonstrated that energy absorption capabilities of smaller cell-size foams was higher compared to the larger cell-sizes examined.

  12. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  13. Composition and Bonding in Amorphous Carbon Films Grown by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition: Influence of the Assistance Voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Albella, J.M.; Banks, J.C.; Climent-Font, A.; Doyle, B.L.; Gago, R.; Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.

    1998-11-12

    Amorphous carbon films have been grown by evaporation of graphite with concurrent Ar+ ions bombardment assistance. The ion energy has been varied between 0-800 V while keeping a constant ion to carbon atom arrival ratio. Film composition and density were determined by ion scattering techniques (RBS and ERDA), indicating a negligible hydrogen content and a density dependence with the assistance voltage. The bonding structure of the films has been studied by Raman and X-ray Absorption Near-Edge (XANES) spectroscopy. Different qualitative effects have been found depending on the ion energy range. For ion energies below 300 eV, there is a densification of the carbon layer due to the increase in the sp3 content. For ion energies above 300 eV sputtering phenomena dominate over densification, and thinner films are found with increasing assistance voltage until no film is grown over 600 V. The films with the highest SP3 content are grown with intermediate energies between 200-300 V.

  14. The air content of Larsen Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Paul R.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Pritchard, Hamish D.; Vaughan, David G.; Arthern, Robert J.; Jenkins, Adrian; Tedesco, Marco

    2011-05-01

    The air content of glacial firn determines the effect and attribution of observed changes in ice surface elevation, but is currently measurable only using labor-intensive ground-based techniques. Here a novel method is presented for using radar sounding measurements to decompose the total thickness of floating ice shelves into thicknesses of solid ice and firn air (or firn water). The method is applied to a 1997/98 airborne survey of Larsen Ice Shelf, revealing large spatial gradients in air content that are consistent with existing measurements and local meteorology. The gradients appear to be governed by meltwater-induced firn densification. We find sufficient air in Larsen C Ice Shelf for increased densification to account for its previously observed surface lowering, and the rate of lowering superficially agrees with published trends in melting. This does not preclude a contribution to the lowering from oceanic basal melting, but a modern repeat of the survey could conclusively distinguish atmosphere-led from ocean-led change. The technique also holds promise for the calibration of firn-density models, derivation of ice thickness from surface elevation measurements, and calculation of the sea-level contribution of changes in grounded-ice discharge.

  15. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control

    DOE PAGES

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-16

    Here, plasma densification through magnetic compression has been suggested for time-resolved control of the wave properties in plasma-based accelerators [P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 255003 (2012)]. Using particle in cell simulations with real mass ratio, the practicality of large magnetic compression on timescales shorter than the ion gyro-period is investigated. For compression times shorter than the transit time of a compressional Alfven wave across the plasma slab, results show the formation of two counter-propagating shock waves, leading to a highly non-uniform plasma density profile. Furthermore, the plasma slab displays large hydromagnetic like oscillations aftermore » the driving field has reached steady state. Peak compression is obtained when the two shocks collide in the mid-plane. At this instant, very large plasma heating is observed, and the plasmaβ is estimated to be about 1. Although these results point out a densification mechanism quite different and more complex than initially envisioned, these features still might be advantageous in particle accelerators.« less

  16. Characterization and possible uses of ashes from wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Ignacio; Arevalo, Luis F. . E-mail: fromero@ehu.es

    2005-07-01

    This work, on the ashes from the wastewater treatment plant of Galindo (Vizcaya, Spain), has been outlined with the purpose of finding their physico-chemical properties and suggesting possible applications. Ashes contain important quantities of iron, calcium, silica, alumina and phosphates. X-Ray diffraction data make it possible to estimate the mineralogical compositions of the original ashes and also, after thermal treatment at 1200 and 1300 deg. C, the main reactions occurring in thermal treatment. Particle size analysis makes it possible to classify ashes as a very fine powdered material. The thermal treatment leads to a densification of the material and provokes losses of weight mainly due to the elimination of water, carbon dioxide and sulphur trioxide. Application tests show that ashes are not suitable for landfill and similar applications, because of their plastic properties. Testing for pozzolanic character, after the ashes had been heated at 1200 deg. C, did not lead to a strong material probably due to low contents in silica and alumina or to requiring a higher heating temperature. Thermal treatment leads to densification of the material with a considerable increase of compressive strength of the probes. The use of additives (clays and powdered glass) to improve ceramic properties of ashes will be the aim of a future work.

  17. Development and characterization of solid solution tri-carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2001-02-01

    Solid-solution, binary uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels have been shown to be capable of performing at high temperatures for nuclear thermal propulsion applications. More recently, tri-carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C1+x with less than 10% metal mole fraction uranium have been studied for their application in ultra-high temperature, high performance space nuclear power systems. These tri-carbide fuels require high processing temperatures greater than 2600 K owing to their high melting points in excess of 3600 K. This paper presents the results of recent studies involving hypostoichiometric, single-phase tri-carbide fuels. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. Scanning electron microscopy and xray diffraction were used to analyze samples. Liquid phase sintering with UC1+x at temperatures near 2700 K was shown to be instrumental in achieving good densification in hyper- and near-stoichiometric mixed carbides. Hypostoichiometric carbides require even higher processing temperatures greater than 2800 K in order to achieve liquid phase sintering with a UC liquid phase and good densification of the final solid solution, tri-carbide fuel. .

  18. Responses of biomass briquetting and pelleting to water-involved pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiaotong; Shen, Fei; Wang, Zhanghong; Yang, Gang; Lin, Lili; Zhang, Yanzong; Zeng, Yongmei; Deng, Shihuai

    2014-01-01

    Although lignocellulosic biomass has been extensively regarded as the most important resource for bioethanol, the wide application was seriously restricted by the high transportation cost of biomass. Currently, biomass densification is regarded as an acceptable solution to this issue. Herein, briquettes, pellets and their corresponding undensified biomass were pretreated by diluted-NaOH and hydrothermal method to investigate the responses of biomass densification to these typical water-involved pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The densified biomass auto-swelling was initially investigated before pretreatment. Results indicated pellets could be totally auto-swollen in an hour, while it took about 24 h for briquettes. When diluted-NaOH pretreatment was performed, biomass briquetting and pelleting improved sugar conversion rate by 20.1% and 5.5% comparing with their corresponding undensified biomass. Pelleting improved sugar conversion rate by 7.0% after hydrothermal pretreatment comparing with the undensified biomass. However, briquetting disturbed hydrothermal pretreatment resulting in the decrease of sugar conversion rate by 15.0%.

  19. ASME Section VIII Recertification of a 33,000 Gallon Vacuum-jacketed LH2 Storage Vessel for Densified Hydrogen Testing at NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanger, Adam M.; Notardonato, William U.; Jumper, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) has been developed at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. GODU-LH2 has three main objectives: zero-loss storage and transfer, liquefaction, and densification of liquid hydrogen. A cryogenic refrigerator has been integrated into an existing, previously certified, 33,000 gallon vacuum-jacketed storage vessel built by Minnesota Valley Engineering in 1991 for the Titan program. The dewar has an inner diameter of 9.5 and a length of 71.5; original design temperature and pressure ranges are -423 F to 100 F and 0 to 95 psig respectively. During densification operations the liquid temperature will be decreased below the normal boiling point by the refrigerator, and consequently the pressure inside the inner vessel will be sub-atmospheric. These new operational conditions rendered the original certification invalid, so an effort was undertaken to recertify the tank to the new pressure and temperature requirements (-12.7 to 95 psig and -433 F to 100 F respectively) per ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1. This paper will discuss the unique design, analysis and implementation issues encountered during the vessel recertification process.

  20. Effect of starting powder characteristics on density, microstructure and low temperature oxidation behavior of a Si3N48w/o Y2O3 ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.; Dutta, S.

    1980-01-01

    The densification and oxidation behavior of Si3N4 - 8w/oY2O3 prepared from three commercial starting powders were studied. Bars of SN 402, SN 502, and CP 85/15 were sintered for 3 to 4.5 hours at 1750 C. A second set was hot pressed for 2 hours at 1750 C. The microstructures were studied by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, densities were determined, and the phase compositions were determined by X-ray diffraction. Densification and microstructure were greatly influenced by the starting powder morphology and impurity content. Although SN 402 exhibited the maximum weight lose, the highest sintered and hot pressed densities were obtained with this powder. All powders had both equiaxed and elongated grains. Sintered bars were composed of beta silicon nitride and n-melelite. In contrast, hot pressed bars contained beta silicon nitride, H-phase, and J-phase, but no melelite. Yttria distribution in sintered bars was related to the presence of cation impurities such as Ca, Fe, and Mg. A limited oxidation study at 750 C in air showed no instability in these Si3N4 - 8 w/oY2O3 specimens, regardless of startin powder.

  1. Analysis of an Earthquake-Initiated-Transient in a PBR

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Ougouag; J. Ortensi; H. Hiruta

    2009-05-01

    One of the Design Basis Accidents (DBA) for a Pebble Bed Reactor has been identified as the “Safe shutdown earthquake with core conduction cooling to passive mode of Reactor Cavity Cooling System.” A new methodology to analyze this particular DBA has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During the seismic event the reactor core experiences the densification of the pebbles, which produce small reactivity insertions due to the effective fuel densification. In addition, a decrease in the active core height results in the relative withdrawal of the control rods, which are assumed to remain stationary during the transient. The methodology relies on the dynamic re-meshing of the core during the transient to capture the local packing fraction changes and their corresponding effects on temperature and reactivity. The core re-meshing methodology is based on the velocity profiles of the pebbles in the core, which were obtained with the INL’s pebble mechanics code PEBBLES. The methodology has been added to the coupled code system CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK. The reactor power calculation is further improved with the use of the new advanced TRISO fuel model to better approximate the temperatures in the fuel kernels. During the transient the core is brought back to a safe condition by the strong Doppler feedback from local temperature increases.

  2. Solution ripening of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: effects on electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-04-01

    Electrophoretic deposition is a low-cost, simple, and flexible coating method for producing hydroxyapatite (Hap) coatings on metal implants. However, densification requires heating the coated metal to high temperatures, which, for commercial HAp powders, generally means at least 1200 degrees C. At such temperatures, the metal tends to react with the HAp coating, inducing decomposition, and the strength of titanium and stainless steel implants is severely degraded. With the use of raw uncalcined nanoparticulate Hap, densification can occur at 900 degrees -1050 degrees C; however, such coatings are prone to cracking due to the high drying shrinkage. This problem was solved by precipitating nanoparticulate HAp by the metathesis process [10Ca(NO3)2 + 6NH4H2PO4 + 8NH4OH] and optimizing the approximately 30 nm of nanoprecipitates by an Ostwald ripening approach, that is, by boiling and/or ambient aging in the mother liquor. While the as-precipitated nanoparticles produced severely cracked coatings, 2 h of boiling or 10 days of ambient aging ripened the "gel-like" mass into unagglomerated nanoparticles, which produced crack-free coatings. Since boiling enhanced particle size but ambient aging did not, crack elimination probably was due to the transition from the highly agglomerated gel-like state to the dispersed nanoparticulate state rather than to particle growth. Furthermore, boiling only reduced the amount of cracking whereas aging completely eliminated cracking.

  3. In-situ SEM indentation studies of the deformation mechanisms in TiN, CrN and TiN/CrN.

    PubMed

    Rzepiejewska-Malyska, K; Parlinska-Wojtan, M; Wasmer, K; Hejduk, K; Michler, J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the microstructure and the deformation mechanisms of TiN, CrN and multilayer TiN/CrN thin films on silicon substrates were investigated. Cross-sectional lamellas of nanoindents were prepared by focused ion beam milling to observe by transmission electron microscopy the microstructure of the as-deposited and deformed materials. TiN film exhibits nanocrystalline columns, whereas CrN shows large grains. The TiN/CrN multilayer presents microstructural features typical for both materials. A film hardness of 16.9GPa for CrN, 15.8GPa for TiN and 16.6GPa for TiN/CrN was found by the nanoindentation. Reduced modulus recorded for TiN and CrN reference coatings were 221.54 and 171.1GPa, respectively, and 218.6GPa for the multilayer coating. The deformation mechanisms were observed via in-situ scanning electron microscope nanoindentation. The TiN thin film showed short radial cracks, whereas CrN deformed through pile-up and densification of the material. For TiN/CrN multilayer pile-up and cracks were found. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicated that TiN deforms through grain boundary sliding and CrN via densification and material flow. The deformation mechanism observed in TiN/CrN multilayer was found to be a mixture of both modes.

  4. An Experimental Study of Briquetting Process of Torrefied Rubber Seed Kernel and Palm Oil Shell

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, M. Fadzli; Idroas, M. Yusof; Ishak, M. Zulfikar; Zainal Alauddin, Z. Alimuddin; Miskam, M. Azman; Abdullah, M. Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Torrefaction process of biomass material is essential in converting them into biofuel with improved calorific value and physical strength. However, the production of torrefied biomass is loose, powdery, and nonuniform. One method of upgrading this material to improve their handling and combustion properties is by densification into briquettes of higher density than the original bulk density of the material. The effects of critical parameters of briquetting process that includes the type of biomass material used for torrefaction and briquetting, densification temperature, and composition of binder for torrefied biomass are studied and characterized. Starch is used as a binder in the study. The results showed that the briquette of torrefied rubber seed kernel (RSK) is better than torrefied palm oil shell (POS) in both calorific value and compressive strength. The best quality of briquettes is yielded from torrefied RSK at the ambient temperature of briquetting process with the composition of 60% water and 5% binder. The maximum compressive load for the briquettes of torrefied RSK is 141 N and the calorific value is 16 MJ/kg. Based on the economic evaluation analysis, the return of investment (ROI) for the mass production of both RSK and POS briquettes is estimated in 2-year period and the annual profit after payback was approximately 107,428.6 USD. PMID:27419127

  5. Tubular ceramic-supported sol-gel silica-based membranes for flue gas carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C. Y.; Xomeritakis, George K.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiang, Ying-Bing

    2009-03-01

    Pure, amine-derivatized and nickel-doped sol-gel silica membranes have been developed on tubular Membralox-type commercial ceramic supports for the purpose of carbon dioxide separation from nitrogen under coal-fired power plant flue gas conditions. An extensive synthetic and permeation test study was carried out in order to optimize membrane CO{sub 2} permeance, CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} separation factor and resistance against densification. Pure silica membranes prepared under optimized conditions exhibited an attractive combination of CO{sub 2} permeance of 2.0 MPU (1 MPU = 1 cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm{sup -2} min{sup -1} atm{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} separation factor of 80 with a dry 10:90 (v/v) CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} feed at 25 C. However, these membranes exhibited flux decline phenomena under prolonged exposure to humidified feeds, especially in the presence of trace SO{sub 2} gas in the feed. Doping the membranes with nickel (II) nitrate salt was effective in retarding densification, as manifested by combined higher permeance and higher separation factor of the doped membrane compared to the pure (undoped) silica membrane after 168 hours exposure to simulated flue gas conditions.

  6. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-15

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6} and the ternary hexaborides Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6} (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB{sub 6} (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials.

  7. Spray-combustion synthesis: Efficient solution route to high-performance oxide transistors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinge; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Nanjia; Zeng, Li; Guo, Peijun; Xia, Yu; Alvarez, Ana; Aghion, Stefano; Lin, Hui; Yu, Junsheng; Chang, Robert P. H.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Ferragut, Rafael; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Metal-oxide (MO) semiconductors have emerged as enabling materials for next generation thin-film electronics owing to their high carrier mobilities, even in the amorphous state, large-area uniformity, low cost, and optical transparency, which are applicable to flat-panel displays, flexible circuitry, and photovoltaic cells. Impressive progress in solution-processed MO electronics has been achieved using methodologies such as sol gel, deep-UV irradiation, preformed nanostructures, and combustion synthesis. Nevertheless, because of incomplete lattice condensation and film densification, high-quality solution-processed MO films having technologically relevant thicknesses achievable in a single step have yet to be shown. Here, we report a low-temperature, thickness-controlled coating process to create high-performance, solution-processed MO electronics: spray-combustion synthesis (SCS). We also report for the first time, to our knowledge, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) transistors having densification, nanoporosity, electron mobility, trap densities, bias stability, and film transport approaching those of sputtered films and compatible with conventional fabrication (FAB) operations. PMID:25733848

  8. Characterization and processing of sintered products from Nano-crystalline powders generated by the RTDS method

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Buehler, M.F.; Linehan, J.C.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    Large quantities of nano-crystalline zirconium oxide/oxyhydroxide and nickel-chromium oxide/oxyhydroxide particles agglomerated and sieved into +320/{minus}200 mesh powders have been produced using the rapid thermal decomposition of solutes (RTDS) method. Green compacts (approximately 40% theoretical density) prepared by cold-pressing the RTDS powders at pressures of 140-280-MPa were heated to form dense (86--91% theoretical density) ZrO{sub 2} or Ni{sub 50}Cr{sub 50}components. Dimensional changes in the compacts during heating were used to extract information about the sintering kinetics in these systems. At 800C, grain-boundary diffusion coupled with some surface diffusion are the dominant mechanisms contributing toward the observed densification in the ZrO{sub 2} system. The mechanism-independent activation energy for densification was determined to be 81-kJ/mol for the ZrO{sub 2} system and 56-kj/mol for the NiCr system.

  9. Additive-free hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics-A material with exceptional mechanical properties

    DOE PAGES

    Sajgalik, P.; Sedlacek, J.; Lences, Z.; Dusza, J.; Lin, H. -T.

    2015-12-30

    Densification of silicon carbide without any sintering aids by hot-pressing and rapid hot pressing was investigated. Full density (>99% t.d.) has been reached at 1850 °C, a temperature of at least 150-200 °C lower compared to the up to now known solid state sintered silicon carbide powders. Silicon carbide was freeze granulated and heat treated prior the densification. Furthermore, evolution of microstructure, mechanical properties and creep behavior were evaluated and compared to reference ceramics from as received silicon carbide powder as well as those of commercial one. Novel method results in dense ceramics with Vickers hardness and indentation fracture toughnessmore » of 29.0 GPa and 5.25 MPam1/2, respectively. Moreover, the creep rate of 3.8 x 10–9 s–1 at 1450 °C and the load of 100 MPa is comparable to the commercial α-SiC solid state sintered at 2150 °C.« less

  10. Additive-free hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics-A material with exceptional mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sajgalik, P.; Sedlacek, J.; Lences, Z.; Dusza, J.; Lin, H. -T.

    2015-12-30

    Densification of silicon carbide without any sintering aids by hot-pressing and rapid hot pressing was investigated. Full density (>99% t.d.) has been reached at 1850 °C, a temperature of at least 150-200 °C lower compared to the up to now known solid state sintered silicon carbide powders. Silicon carbide was freeze granulated and heat treated prior the densification. Furthermore, evolution of microstructure, mechanical properties and creep behavior were evaluated and compared to reference ceramics from as received silicon carbide powder as well as those of commercial one. Novel method results in dense ceramics with Vickers hardness and indentation fracture toughness of 29.0 GPa and 5.25 MPam1/2, respectively. Moreover, the creep rate of 3.8 x 10–9 s–1 at 1450 °C and the load of 100 MPa is comparable to the commercial α-SiC solid state sintered at 2150 °C.

  11. Revealing spatially heterogeneous relaxation in a model nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shiwang; Mirigian, Stephen; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-11-18

    The detailed nature of spatially heterogeneous dynamics of glycerol-silica nanocomposites is unraveled by combining dielectric spectroscopy with atomistic simulation and statistical mechanical theory. Analysis of the spatial mobility gradient shows no glassy layer, but the -relaxation time near the nanoparticle grows with cooling faster than the -relaxation time in the bulk and is ~20 times longer at low temperatures. The interfacial layer thickness increases from ~1.8 nm at higher temperatures to ~3.5 nm upon cooling to near bulk Tg. A real space microscopic description of the mobility gradient is constructed by synergistically combining high temperature atomistic simulation with theory. Our analysis suggests that the interfacial slowing down arises mainly due to an increase of the local cage scale barrier for activated hopping induced by enhanced packing and densification near the nanoparticle surface. As a result, the theory is employed to predict how local surface densification can be manipulated to control layer dynamics and shear rigidity over a wide temperature range.

  12. Transparent Lu 2 O 3 :Eu ceramics by sinter and HIP optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Z. M.; Kuntz, J. D.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.

    2011-09-01

    Evolution of porosity and microstructure was observed during densification of lutetium oxide ceramics doped with europium (Lu 2O 3:Eu) fabricated via vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP'ing). Nano-scale starting powder was uniaxially pressed and sintered under high vacuum at temperatures between 1575 and 1850 °C to obtain densities ranging between 94% and 99%, respectively. Sintered compacts were then subjected to 200 MPa argon gas at 1850 °C to reach full density. Vacuum sintering above 1650 °C led to rapid grain growth prior to densification, rendering the pores immobile. Sintering between 1600 and 1650 °C resulted in closed porosity yet a fine grain size to allow the pores to remain mobile during the subsequent HIP'ing step, resulting in a fully-dense highly transparent ceramic without the need for subsequent air anneal. Light yield performance was measured and Lu 2O 3:Eu showed ˜4 times higher light yield than commercially used scintillating glass indicating that this material has the potential to improve the performance of high energy radiography devices.

  13. The effect of wax on compaction of microcrystalline cellulose beads made by extrusion and spheronization.

    PubMed

    Iloañusi, N O; Schwartz, J B

    1998-01-01

    The effect of wax on the deformation behavior and compression characteristics of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH-101) and acetaminophen (APAP) beads is described. Beads of Avicel PH-101 and APAP formulations were prepared using extrusion and spheronization technology. A waxy material, glyceryl behenate, N.F. (Compritol), was added to the formulations in amounts ranging from 10% to 70% of total solid weight. Beads with a selected particle size range of 16-30 mesh were compressed with an instrumented single punch Manesty F press utilizing a 7/16-in. flat-faced tooling set. Compaction profiles were generated for the tablets to evaluate the effect of wax on the densification of beads containing wax. Beads made without wax (the control formulation) required greater compression forces to form cohesive tablets. As the amount of wax in the bead formulation was increased, the beads become more plastic and compressible. The Heckel equation which relates densification to compression pressure was used to evaluate the deformation mechanisms of the bead formulations. The analysis shows that as the level of wax in the bead formulation is increased, the yield pressure decreases, indicating that the beads densify by a plastic deformation mechanism.

  14. Mechanisms of devitrification of grain boundary glassy phases in Si3N4 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hench, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    Changes in the grain boundary (g.b.) phases of Si3N4 are analyzed, the effects of composition and thermal history on devitrification of the g.b. phases are determined, devitrification of the g.b. phases of Si3N are related to mechanical behavior and oxidation sensitivity of the material. The phase relationships that occur within the grain boundaries of Si3N4 containing various densification aids are reviewed. Comparisons of the effects of MgO, Y2O3, CeO2, and Y2O3 + AL2O3 are made in terms of the phase equilibria of the Si3N4 + SiO2 + additive compositional system. Two new equilibrium phase diagrams for the Si3N4-SiO2 and Y2O3 and Si3N4-SiO2-Ce2O3 systems are preented. The effects of Y2O3 vs CeO2 densification aids on the fracture surfaces of Si3N4 are compared. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that both oxides are concentrated within the fracture surface. Scanning electron microscopy shows evidence that Si3N4 with CeO2 formed an intergranular structure of fine grained oxynitride reaction products, as predicted by phase quilibria, whereas the Y2O3 containing sample shows evidence of an intergranular glassy phase.

  15. SANS Investigations of CO2 Adsorption in Microporous Carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; He, Lilin; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Carmichael, Justin R.

    2015-08-07

    The high pressure adsorption behavior of CO2 at T = 296 K in microporous carbon was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. A strong densification of CO2 in micropores accompanied by non-monotonic adsorption-induced pore deformation was observed. The density of confined CO2 increases rapidly with pressure and reaches the liquid –like density at 20 bar, which corresponds to the relative pressure of P/Psat ~0.3. At P > 20 bar density of confined CO2 increases slowly approaching a plateau at higher pressure. The size of micropores first increases with pressure, reaches a maximum at 20 bar,more » and then decreases with pressure. A complementary SANS experiment conducted on the same microporous carbon saturated with neutron-transparent and non-adsorbing inert gas argon shows no deformation of micropores at pressures up to ~200 bars. This result demonstrates that the observed deformation of micropores in CO2 is an adsorption-induced phenomenon, caused by the solvation pressure - induced strain and strong densification of confined CO2 .« less

  16. Experimental Results of Integrated Refrigeration and Storage System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Jumper, K.

    2009-01-01

    Launch operations engineers at the Kennedy Space Center have identified an Integrated Refrigeration and Storage system as a promising technology to reduce launch costs and enable advanced cryogenic operations. This system uses a close cycle Brayton refrigerator to remove energy from the stored cryogenic propellant. This allows for the potential of a zero loss storage and transfer system, as well and control of the state of the propellant through densification or re-liquefaction. However, the behavior of the fluid in this type of system is different than typical cryogenic behavior, and there will be a learning curve associated with its use. A 400 liter research cryostat has been designed, fabricated and delivered to KSC to test the thermo fluid behavior of liquid oxygen as energy is removed from the cryogen by a simulated DC cycle cryocooler. Results of the initial testing phase focusing on heat exchanger characterization and zero loss storage operations using liquid oxygen are presented in this paper. Future plans for testing of oxygen densification tests and oxygen liquefaction tests will also be discussed. KEYWORDS: Liquid Oxygen, Refrigeration, Storage

  17. Sialon ceramic compositions and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Michael H.; Park, Blair H.

    1994-01-01

    A method of fabricating a SiAlON ceramic body includes: a) combining quantities of Si.sub.3 N.sub.4, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CeO.sub.2 to produce a mixture; b) forming the mixture into a desired body shape; c) heating the body to a densification temperature of from about 1550.degree. C. to about 1850.degree. C.; c) maintaining the body at the densification temperature for a period of time effective to densify the body; d) cooling the densified body to a devitrification temperature of from about 1200.degree. C. to about 1400.degree. C.; and e) maintaining the densified body at the devitrification temperature for a period of time effective to produce a .beta.'-SiAlON crystalline phase in the body having elemental or compound form Ce incorporated in the .beta.'-SiAlON crystalline phase. Further, a SiAlON ceramic body comprises: a) an amorphous phase; and b) a crystalline phase, the crystalline phase comprising .beta.'-SiAlON having lattice substituted elemental or compound form Ce.

  18. SiAlON ceramic compositions and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, M.H.; Park, B.H.

    1994-05-31

    A method of fabricating a SiAlON ceramic body includes: (a) combining quantities of Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and CeO[sub 2] to produce a mixture; (b) forming the mixture into a desired body shape; (c) heating the body to a densification temperature of from about 1,550 C to about 1,850 C; (d) maintaining the body at the densification temperature for a period of time effective to densify the body; (e) cooling the densified body to a devitrification temperature of from about 1,200 C to about 1,400 C; and (f) maintaining the densified body at the devitrification temperature for a period of time effective to produce a [beta][prime]-SiAlON crystalline phase in the body having elemental or compound form Ce incorporated in the [beta][prime]-SiAlON crystalline phase. Further, a SiAlON ceramic body comprises: (a) an amorphous phase; and (b) a crystalline phase, the crystalline phase comprising [beta][prime]-SiAlON having lattice substituted elemental or compound form Ce.

  19. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  20. The impact of projected increases in urbanization on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, F; Bell, V A; Davies, H N; Heinemeyer, A; Armsworth, P R; Gaston, K J

    2011-11-01

    Alteration in land use is likely to be a major driver of changes in the distribution of ecosystem services before 2050. In Europe, urbanization will probably be the main cause of land-use change. This increase in urbanization will result in spatial shifts in both supplies of ecosystem services and the beneficiaries of those services; the net outcome of such shifts remains to be determined. Here, we model changes in urban land cover in Britain based on large (16%) projected increases in the human population by 2031, and the consequences for three different services--flood mitigation, agricultural production and carbon storage. We show that under a scenario of densification of urban areas, the combined effect of increasing population and loss of permeable surfaces is likely to result in 1.7 million people living within 1 km of rivers with at least 10 per cent increases in projected peak flows, but that increasing suburban 'sprawl' will have little effect on flood mitigation services. Conversely, losses of stored carbon and agricultural production are over three times as high under the sprawl as under the 'densification' urban growth scenarios. Our results illustrate the challenges of meeting, but also of predicting, future demands and patterns of ecosystem services in the face of increasing urbanization.

  1. Structural studies and polymorphism in amorphous solids and liquids at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Martin C; Wilson, Mark; McMillan, Paul F

    2006-10-01

    When amorphous materials are compressed their structures are expected to change in response to densification. In some cases, the changes in amorphous structure can be discontinuous and they can even have the character of first-order phase transitions. This is a phenomenon referred to as polyamorphism. Most evidence for polyamorphic transitions between low and high density liquids or analogous transformations between amorphous forms of the same substance to date has been indirect and based on the changes in thermodynamic and other structure-related properties with pressure. Recent studies using advanced X-ray and neutron scattering methods combined with molecular dynamics simulations are now revealing the details of structural changes in polyamorphic systems as a function of pressure. Various "two state" or "two species" models are used to understand the anomalous densification behaviour of liquids with melting curve maxima or regions of negative melting slope. Thermodynamic analysis of the two state model leads to the possibility of low- to high-density liquid transitions caused by differences in bulk thermodynamic properties between different amorphous forms and on the degree of cooperativity between low- and high-density structural configurations. The potential occurrence of first-order transitions between supercooled liquids is identified as a critical-like phenomenon. In this tutorial review we discuss the background to polyamorphism, incorporating the experimental observations, simulation studies and the two-state models. We also describe work carried on several systems that are considered to be polyamorphic. PMID:17003901

  2. Simulation of Aluminum Powder in Tube Compaction Using Equal Channel Angular Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Reza Derakhshandeh; Jahromi, Ahmad Jenabali; Jahromi, Behnam Esfandiar

    2012-02-01

    Aluminum powder in tube compaction with a 25 mm front plug through equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) at room temperature was modeled using the finite element analysis package ABAQUS. The Gurson model was used in modeling this process. 2-D simulations in a 90° angle die showed better consolidation of powder near the inner edge of the die than the outer edge after one pass of ECAE but almost full densification occurs after two passes. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on densification of the powder was investigated by using two plugs varying in length dimension. The results obtained from the simulations were also compared with experiments conducted to compact aluminum powder with mean particle diameter of 45 μm. Optical microscopy, microhardness test, and density measurements confirmed the simulations. The simulations were extended to powder compaction in a 60° and 120° angle die. It was found that one pass of ECAE is sufficient to consolidate the aluminum powder completely and uniformly in a 60° angle die, whereas the material is still porous in a 120° angle die.

  3. Copper-rich phase segregation effects on the magnetic properties and DC-bias-superposition characteristic of NiCuZn ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, Hsing-I.; Wu, Jhao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    NiCuZn ferrites with Ni0.42Cu0.13+xZn0.45Fe2-xO4; x=0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.07, 0.1 chemical compositions were prepared using conventional solid-state reaction in this study. The effects of different NiCuZn ferrite chemical compositions on the microstructure, magnetic properties and DC superposition characteristics were investigated. The results showed that increasing the CuO content in the NiCuZn ferrites led to copper-rich phase precipitation at the grain boundaries. The liquid phase resulted from copper-rich phase melting during sintering, promoting liquid phase densification and hence lowering the maximum densification rate temperature. The non-magnetic copper-rich secondary phase at the grain boundaries reduced the effective magnetic field applied on the ferrite grain, and hence enhanced the DC superposition characteristics at low magnetic field. The sample with x=0.07 sintered at 1100 °C for 2 h exhibited excellent initial permeability (μ'=325) and superior DC superposition characteristics. A NiCuZn ferrite with superior initial permeability and DC superposition characteristics can be obtained by changing the x value to adjust the non-magnetic copper-rich precipitate thickness at the grain boundaries.

  4. Preparation of nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachari, K.R.; Huang, D.; Ostrander, S.P.; Schulze, W.A.; Stangle, G.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nanocrystalline powder with an average crystalline size of 8--12 nm, which was produced by a combustion synthesis process, was used to prepare dense, nanocrystalline articles. Green compacts of high green density were prepared by dry pressing and densified by a fast-firing process. During fast-firing, the dwell temperature significantly affected the final grain size and final density. On the other hand, the ranges of heating rates and dwell times that were used had a much less significant effect on the final density and final grain size. It was determined, however, that a high final density ({gt}99% {rho}{sub th}) and a very fine final average grain size ({lt}200 nm) can be simultaneously achieved under three different firing conditions. The high densification rates are, in part, a result of the minimal coarsening that the particles undergo when the sample is taken rapidly through the temperature regime in which surface diffusion predominates to the temperature regime in which the densification mechanisms of grain boundary and lattice diffusion predominate.

  5. The impact of projected increases in urbanization on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, F; Bell, V A; Davies, H N; Heinemeyer, A; Armsworth, P R; Gaston, K J

    2011-11-01

    Alteration in land use is likely to be a major driver of changes in the distribution of ecosystem services before 2050. In Europe, urbanization will probably be the main cause of land-use change. This increase in urbanization will result in spatial shifts in both supplies of ecosystem services and the beneficiaries of those services; the net outcome of such shifts remains to be determined. Here, we model changes in urban land cover in Britain based on large (16%) projected increases in the human population by 2031, and the consequences for three different services--flood mitigation, agricultural production and carbon storage. We show that under a scenario of densification of urban areas, the combined effect of increasing population and loss of permeable surfaces is likely to result in 1.7 million people living within 1 km of rivers with at least 10 per cent increases in projected peak flows, but that increasing suburban 'sprawl' will have little effect on flood mitigation services. Conversely, losses of stored carbon and agricultural production are over three times as high under the sprawl as under the 'densification' urban growth scenarios. Our results illustrate the challenges of meeting, but also of predicting, future demands and patterns of ecosystem services in the face of increasing urbanization. PMID:21389035

  6. Temporal changes in greenspace in a highly urbanized region.

    PubMed

    Dallimer, Martin; Tang, Zhiyao; Bibby, Peter R; Brindley, Paul; Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Zoe G

    2011-10-23

    The majority of the world's population now lives in towns and cities, and urban areas are expanding faster than any other land-use type. In response to this phenomenon, two opposing arguments have emerged: whether cities should 'sprawl' into the wider countryside, or 'densify' through the development of existing urban greenspace. However, these greenspaces are increasingly recognized as being central to the amelioration of urban living conditions, supporting biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service provision. Taking the highly urbanized region of England as a case study, we use data from a variety of sources to investigate the impact of national-level planning policy on temporal patterns in the extent of greenspace in cities. Between 1991 and 2006, greenspace showed a net increase in all but one of 13 cities. However, the majority of this gain occurred prior to 2001, and greenspace has subsequently declined in nine cities. Such a dramatic shift in land use coincides with policy reforms in 2000, which favoured densification. Here, we illustrate the dynamic and policy-responsive nature of urban land use, thereby highlighting the need for a detailed investigation of the trade-offs associated with different mechanisms of urban densification to optimize and secure the diverse benefits associated with greenspaces. PMID:21429910

  7. Effect of composition on the processing and properties of sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O.; Montgomery, F.C.; Lin, H.T.; Barker, D.L.; Snodgrass, J.D.; Sabolsky, E.M.; Coffey, D.W.

    1996-04-01

    The type of silicon powder and sintering additive were found to influence the processing and final mechanical properties of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride. High purity silicon powders produced low {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} content during nitridation. The Si powder type had no apparent effect on densification. More complete nitridation and higher room temperature mechanical properties were observed for the Si powders with higher Fe contents. However, the higher Fe contents resulted in greater high temperature strength degradation and so there was better high temperature strength retention with the higher purity Si. High {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} contents were found after nitridation with {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} seeded materials and with MgO-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the sintering additive. Densification was inhibited by refractory additives, such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}. The highest room temperature strength and fracture toughness values correlated to high nitrided {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} contents. The high temperature strength behavior was similar for all additive types.

  8. Preparation and characterization of ceramic products by thermal treatment of sewage sludge ashes mixed with different additives.

    PubMed

    Merino, Ignacio; Arévalo, Luis F; Romero, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The study of the ceramic characteristics of sludge ashes, alone or mixed with additives (kaolin, montmorillonite, illitic clay, powdered flat glass) includes characterization of additives, preparation of probes (dry or wet mixed), thermal treatment (up to 1200 degrees C, except melting or deformation) and control (densities, compressive strengths and water absorption). Thermal treatment increases the density and compressive strength of probes (both parameters go through maxima, with later decreases) and decreases the absorption of water. The densification is also revealed by the evolution of the ratio of decrease of volume/loss of mass. The maximum values of compressive strengths were obtained for 25% of illitic clay, montmorillonite and glass powder. Densification concerning probes with sludge ashes alone does not occur with kaolin. Experimental data were adjusted to exponential relationships between compressive strengths and densities for every composition, and also to a general equation for all probes. The apparent density obtained was adjusted to a non-linear dependence with temperature, leading to a maximum in density and permitting calculating the temperature of occurrence of this maximum. The adjustment was not possible for probes containing kaolin, requiring presumably higher temperatures to densify. Water absorption has low values for ashes or kaolin probes, intermediate values for illite and powdered flat glass probes and high values for montmorillonite probes. Excepting with kaolin, ceramic materials with better characteristics than sludge ashes without additives were obtained at lower treatment temperatures. PMID:17150348

  9. Nonlinear current voltage characteristics of sintered tungsten vanadium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zu-Li; Yang, Lin-Feng; Wang, Yu

    2004-04-01

    We have studied the densification behaviour, microstructure and electrical properties of WO3 ceramics with V2O5 as the additive ranging from 0.5 to 15mol%. Scanning electron microscopic photos indicated that the grain size of WO3-V2O5 specimens is smaller than that of pure WO3. The addition of V2O5 to WO3 showed a tendency to enhance the densification rate and to restrict the grain growth. Electrical properties of all specimens were measured for different electrodes at different temperatures. The formation of the grain boundary barrier layer was confirmed by the non-ohmic I-V behaviour. The nonlinear coefficient was obtained at the current density J=0.01, 0.1 and 1mA/cm2 for a series of WO3-V2O5 samples. The V0.5mol% specimen showed an abnormal phenomenon that the nonlinear characteristics appeared at 350 degrees C and disappeared at lower and higher temperatures. This implies that it could be applied as a high-temperature varistor. The double Schottky barrier model was adopted to explain the phenomena for the WO3-V2O5 varistors.

  10. On the influence of recrystallization on snow fabric and microstructure: study of a snow profile in Central East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonne, Neige; Schneebeli, Martin; Montagnat, Maurine; Matzl, Margret

    2016-04-01

    Temperature gradient metamorphism affects the Antarctic snowpack up to 5 meters depth, which lead to a recrystallization of the ice grains by sublimation of ice and deposition of water vapor. By this way, it is well known that the snow microstructure evolves (geometrical changes). Also, a recent study shows an evolution of the snow fabric, based on a cold laboratory experiment. Both fabric and microstructure are required to better understand mechanical behavior and densification of snow, firn and ice, given polar climatology. The fabric of firn and ice has been extensively investigated, but the publications by Stephenson (1967, 1968) are to our knowledge the only ones describing the snow fabric in Antarctica. In this context, our work focuses on snow microstructure and fabric in the first meters depth of the Antarctic ice sheet, where temperature gradients driven recrystallization occurs. Accurate details of the snow microstructure are observed using micro-computed tomography. Snow fabrics were measured at various depths from thin sections of impregnated snow with an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA). A definite relationship between microstructure and fabric is found and highlights the influence of metamorphism on both properties. Our results also show that the metamorphism enhances the differences between the snow layers properties. Our work stresses the significant and complex evolution of snow properties in the upper meters of the ice sheet and opens the question of how these layer properties will evolve at depth and may influence the densification.

  11. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  12. Effect of microstructure and microchemistry on improvement of hydration and slag attack resistance of ilmenite-doped refractory limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltan, Abdel Monem; Serry, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    This work studies densification, resistance to hydration and slag attack of 0.0-2.0 wt% ilmenite-doped lime refractories in relation to their thermal equilibrium and microfabric after firing at 1,400-1,700 °C. XRF, XRD, SEM-EDAX, transmitted light microscopy and mercury intrusion methods were used to characterize the fired samples. The ternary diagram CaO-C2S-C4AF was applied to the thermal equilibrium data. The rates of hydration and attack by steel-slag were also assessed using cathode-luminescence microscope. Doping limestone with 0.5 wt% ilmenite leads maximizes the rate of densification after firing for 2 h at 1,600 °C. A direct-bonded CaO-CaO network is found in the doped sample with separated islands of Ca-silicate, alumino-ferrite and TiO2-rich Ca, Mg- solid solutions all filling the pores and triple points of the lime grains. Due to the dense microstructure of the doped sample with the direct-bonded lime grains, hydration and slag-attack resistance are enhanced compared with the un-doped sample.

  13. Sintering in Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Laser sintering is a popular additive manufacturing technology, particularly for service parts. Invented by C. Deckard in the mid-1980s, the approach of using a laser to densify a powder bed selectively has been extensively researched and has been applied to metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. In the traditional powder-metallurgical sense, sintering involves solid-state atomic transport resulting in neck formation and eventual densification in a powder mass. The use of the term "sintering" as a descriptive term for the powder-bed additive manufacturing process has been problematical to the technical community, because the predominant densification mechanism has been shown for most applications to be melting and reflow. The term has perpetuated as a name for the additive manufacturing process, at least for polymers. The technical term "sintering" is accurately associated with laser sintering insofar as powder pre-processing and part post-processing are concerned. It may also be used to describe formation of "part cake". This paper describes the circumstances surrounding the coining of the term, "laser sintering" and provides some examples of how sintering is used in pre- and post-processing.

  14. Effects of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ additions on resistivity and microstructure of yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, M.; Yanagida, A.; Asada, A.

    1986-04-01

    Stabilized zirconia is a well-known oxygen ionic conductor which acts over a wide range of oxygen partial pressure. Hence the material has been developed for use in a variety of electrical applications such as oxygen sensors, oxygen pumps, and fuel cells. Since zirconia has a high melting point (approx. =2680/sup 0/C), temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C are generally required for traditional fabrication techniques. Sintering agents and/or fine zirconia powders are required for producing dense, impermeable and mechanically strong stabilized zirconia ceramics. However, in most cases, sintering agents have a negative effect on the conduction behavior of stabilized zirconia. Small additions of SiO/sub 2/ are particularly effective for the densification of CaO-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/ (CSZ), but they cause a large increase in resistivity of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/ (YSZ) at low temperatures. Additions of TiO/sub 2/ to CSZ, and of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to YSZ, are also reported to aid densification and cause moderate increases in resistivity. The effect of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ additions on the resistivity of stabilized zirconia is rather complicated.

  15. Evolution of structure and properties of granules containing microcrystalline cellulose and polyvinylpyrrolidone during high-shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Granulation behavior of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) in the presence of 2.5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was systematically studied. Complex changes in flowability and tabletability of lubricated MCC granules are correlated to changes in intragranular porosity, morphology, surface smoothness, size distribution, and specific surface area (SSA). With 2.5% PVP, the use of 45% granulation water leads to 84% reduction in tablet tensile strength and 76% improvement in powder flow factor. The changes in powder performance are explained by granule densification and surface smoothing. The granulating water level corresponding to the onset of overgranulation, 45%, is significantly lower than the 70% water required for unlubricated MCC granules without PVP. At more than 45% water levels, MCC-PVP granules flow well but cannot be compressed into intact tablets. Such changes in powder performance correspond to the rapid growth into large and dense spheres with smooth surface. Compared with MCC alone, the onset of the phase of fast granule size enlargement occurs at a lower water level when 2.5% PVP is used. Although the use of 2.5% PVP hastens granule nucleation and growth rate, the mechanisms of overgranulation are the same, that is, size enlargement, granule densification, surface smoothing, and particle rounding in both systems.

  16. An Experimental Study of Briquetting Process of Torrefied Rubber Seed Kernel and Palm Oil Shell.

    PubMed

    Hamid, M Fadzli; Idroas, M Yusof; Ishak, M Zulfikar; Zainal Alauddin, Z Alimuddin; Miskam, M Azman; Abdullah, M Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Torrefaction process of biomass material is essential in converting them into biofuel with improved calorific value and physical strength. However, the production of torrefied biomass is loose, powdery, and nonuniform. One method of upgrading this material to improve their handling and combustion properties is by densification into briquettes of higher density than the original bulk density of the material. The effects of critical parameters of briquetting process that includes the type of biomass material used for torrefaction and briquetting, densification temperature, and composition of binder for torrefied biomass are studied and characterized. Starch is used as a binder in the study. The results showed that the briquette of torrefied rubber seed kernel (RSK) is better than torrefied palm oil shell (POS) in both calorific value and compressive strength. The best quality of briquettes is yielded from torrefied RSK at the ambient temperature of briquetting process with the composition of 60% water and 5% binder. The maximum compressive load for the briquettes of torrefied RSK is 141 N and the calorific value is 16 MJ/kg. Based on the economic evaluation analysis, the return of investment (ROI) for the mass production of both RSK and POS briquettes is estimated in 2-year period and the annual profit after payback was approximately 107,428.6 USD.

  17. Processing and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Containing Alumina-Carbon Refractories Prepared by Nanocomposite Powder Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Li, Nan; Liu, Baikuan; He, Zhongyang

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have often been used as additives to improve the properties of refractories containing carbon. However, it is very difficult to evenly distribute CNTs in the matrix. In order to solve this difficulty, an alumina/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) (AM) composite powder in which MWCNTs had grown on the surfaces of Al2O3 particles was developed and used in alumina-carbon (Al2O3-C) refractories. The effects of the AM composite powders on the microstructure and properties of the Al2O3-C refractories were studied and compared with the commercial MWCNTs. The nanocomposite powders significantly improved the distribution uniformity of MWCNTs in the Al2O3-C matrix. The densification, fracture properties, thermal shock resistance, and slag corrosion resistance were enhanced due to the well-dispersed MWCNTs. On the contrary, no improvement of the densification, fracture properties, and thermal shock resistance of the refractories was achieved by addition of commercial MWCNTs due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs.

  18. Microstructural change during (liquid phase sintering) of W-Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Eun, K.Y. ); Kang, S.L

    1989-05-01

    The changes of bulk density and microstructures during heating and liquid phase sintering of 98W-1Ni-1Fe compacts prepared from 1 and 5 {mu}m W powders have been observed in order to characterize the densification behavior. The compact prepared from a fine (1 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1200{degrees}C in the solid state during heating, attaining about 95 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature of 1460{degrees}C. The compact prepared from a coarse (5 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1400{degrees}C in the solid state, attaining about 87 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature. Thus, the skeleton of grains is already formed prior to liquid formation. During the isothermal liquid phase sintering, substantial grain growth occurs, and the liquid flows into both open and closed pores, filling them sequentially from the regions with small cross-sections. The grains subsequently grow into the liquid pockets which have been formed at the pore sites. The sequential pore filling by first liquid thus is shown to be the dominant densification process during the liquid phase sintering of this alloy.

  19. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest

    SciTech Connect

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M.

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO{sub 2} content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  20. Processing of Transparent Rare Earth Doped Zirconia for High Temperature Light Emission Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    The high fracture toughness of stabilized zirconia makes it one of the most widely applicable high temperature structural materials. However, it is not typicality considered for optical applications since the microstructure achieved by traditional processing makes it opaque. The aim of this dissertation is to develop processing methods for the introducing new functionalities of light transparency and light emission (photoluminescence) and to understand the nanostructure-property relationships that make these functionalities possible. A processing study of rare-earth (RE) doped Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2, zirconia) via Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) is presented. The role of processing temperature and dopant concentration on the crystal structure, microstructure and properties of the RE: ZrO2 is studied. Microstructural shows sub-100 nm grain size and homogeneous dopant distribution. X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis show that with increased dopant concentration the material changes from monoclinic to tetragonal. Structural analysis shows the material shows high hardness and toughness values 30% greater than similarly processed yttria-stabilized zirconia. Despite birefringence in the tetragonal phase, optical characterization is presented showing the samples are both highly transparent and photo-luminescent. Special attention is paid to analyzing structural and photoluminescence development during densification, as well as the role of oxygen vacancies on the optical properties of the densified material. This material is shown to be a promising candidate for a number of applications including luminescence thermometry and high temperature light emission.

  1. The role of scattering and absorption on the optical properties of birefringent polycrystalline ceramics: Modeling and experiments on ruby (Cr:Al2O3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penilla, E. H.; Hardin, C. L.; Kodera, Y.; Basun, S. A.; Evans, D. R.; Garay, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Light scattering due to birefringence has prevented the use of polycrystalline ceramics with anisotropic optical properties in applications such as laser gain media. However, continued development of processing technology has allowed for very low porosity and fine grains, significantly improving transparency and is paving the way for polycrystalline ceramics to be used in demanding optical applications. We present a method for producing highly transparent Cr3+ doped Al2O3 (ruby) using current activated pressure assisted densification. The one-step doping/densification process produces fine grained ceramics with well integrated (doped) Cr, resulting in good absorption and emission. In order to explain the light transmission properties, we extend the analytical model based on the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation that has been previously used for undoped alumina to include absorption. The model presented captures reflection, scattering, and absorption phenomena in the ceramics. Comparison with measured transmission confirms that the model adequately describes the properties of polycrystalline ruby. In addition the measured emission spectra and emission lifetime are found to be similar to single crystals, confirming the high optical quality of the ceramics.

  2. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression

    PubMed Central

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R.; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E.; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young’s modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica. PMID:26469314

  3. Chemical stability and dielectric properties of RO-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R = Ca, Mg, Zn)-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Yeon Hwa; Kang, Min Soo; Chung, Kyung Won; Cho, Yong Soo

    2008-02-05

    New lanthanum borate (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) glasses modified with divalent oxides, such as CaO, MgO and ZnO were investigated as potential low temperature dielectrics by understanding compositional dependence of dielectric properties and chemical leaching resistance. Firing behavior, such as densification and crystallization, depended strongly on the glass composition and is found to influence the resultant dielectric performance. Specifically, the dielectric composition of 20ZnO-20La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-60B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass with 40 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a filler showed distinct enhancements of dielectric properties, i.e., k {approx} 8.3 and Q {approx} 1091 at the resonant frequency of 17.1 GHz, as a result of 850 deg. C firing. The result was believed related to earlier densification and unexpected evolvements of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and La(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} phases during firing. The Mg-containing glass sample was most stable in strong acid solutions and did not show any significant changes in microstructure even after 300 min exposure. The Ca-containing glass sample was not regarded as a promising candidate for low temperature dielectrics from the observed low quality factor and weak chemical durability.

  4. Mechanical and In Vitro Biological Performance of Graphene Nanoplatelets Reinforced Calcium Silicate Composite

    PubMed Central

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Seyed Shirazi, Seyed Farid; Baradaran, Saeid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Zandi, Keivan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) ceramic composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared using hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1150°C. Quantitative microstructural analysis suggests that GNP play a role in grain size and is responsible for the improved densification. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that GNP survived the harsh processing conditions of the selected HIP processing parameters. The uniform distribution of 1 wt.% GNP in the CS matrix, high densification and fine CS grain size help to improve the fracture toughness by ∼130%, hardness by ∼30% and brittleness index by ∼40% as compared to the CS matrix without GNP. The toughening mechanisms, such as crack bridging, pull-out, branching and deflection induced by GNP are observed and discussed. The GNP/CS composites exhibit good apatite-forming ability in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Our results indicate that the addition of GNP decreased pH value in SBF. Effect of addition of GNP on early adhesion and proliferation of human osteoblast cells (hFOB) was measured in vitro. The GNP/CS composites showed good biocompatibility and promoted cell viability and cell proliferation. The results indicated that the cell viability and proliferation are affected by time and concentration of GNP in the CS matrix. PMID:25229540

  5. Fabrication of Silica Glass from Rice Husk Ash with Spodumene Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasanapiarnpong, T.; Vorajesdarom, B.; Rujirakamort, E.; Nilpairach, S.; Mongkolkachit, C.

    2011-10-01

    Silica glass is an interesting material due to its low thermal expansion coefficient, high chemical inertness, and transparency. In this study, low cost rice husk ash waste containing mainly amorphous silica phase was used as a starting raw material. Formation of cristrobalite caused product damage during cooling down was suppressed by an addition of some sintering aids. Spodumene was selected to use as the sintering aid due to its ability to promote the sinterability of the rice husk ash by liquid phase forming. Lithium carbonate and aluminum nitrate were mixed with the rice husk ash as starting chemicals for spodumene forming. To investigate the effects of spodumene addition on densification, physical properties and thermal expansion coefficient, 25 and 50 mass% of spdumene were added to the mixture. Mixed powders were dry pressed into pellet shapes and sintered at 1000-1250 °C for 30 min in an electric furnace. It was found that 50 mass% addition of spodumene enhanced the densification of the specimens sintered at the temperature higher than 1250 °C. Water absorption was reduced to 1.11 % with bulk density of 2.12 g/cm3. Low thermal expansion coefficient of 2.70×10-6 /°C was achieved with only the petalite phase detection.

  6. Microwave assisted sintering of Al-Cu-Mg-Si-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Chandran; Upadhyaya, Anish; Agrawal, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Microwave sintering has been a well-established technique to consolidate metal powders due to its instantaneous volumetric and rapid heating as compared to conventional heating. Al-3.8Cu-1Mg-0.8Si-0.3Sn (2712) alloy powders were compacted (200 and 400 MPa) and microwave sintered at different temperatures (570 to 630 degrees C) under different atmospheres (vacuum, N2, Ar and H2). Increasing sintering temperature enhanced sintered density from 91% to 98%. Sintering under vacuum at 590 degrees C was more efficient with a densification parameter of 0.36 followed by N2, Ar and H2. Regardless of the sintering condition, phase analysis via XRD revealed the presence of only alpha-Al peak attributed to lesser time available for diffusion of alloying elements. In addition, microstructural inhomogeneity leading to more intergranular melt formation was observed for all sintered compacts. Contrasting to densification, sintering in N2 resulted in better corrosion resistance. PMID:24432468

  7. An Experimental Study of Briquetting Process of Torrefied Rubber Seed Kernel and Palm Oil Shell.

    PubMed

    Hamid, M Fadzli; Idroas, M Yusof; Ishak, M Zulfikar; Zainal Alauddin, Z Alimuddin; Miskam, M Azman; Abdullah, M Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Torrefaction process of biomass material is essential in converting them into biofuel with improved calorific value and physical strength. However, the production of torrefied biomass is loose, powdery, and nonuniform. One method of upgrading this material to improve their handling and combustion properties is by densification into briquettes of higher density than the original bulk density of the material. The effects of critical parameters of briquetting process that includes the type of biomass material used for torrefaction and briquetting, densification temperature, and composition of binder for torrefied biomass are studied and characterized. Starch is used as a binder in the study. The results showed that the briquette of torrefied rubber seed kernel (RSK) is better than torrefied palm oil shell (POS) in both calorific value and compressive strength. The best quality of briquettes is yielded from torrefied RSK at the ambient temperature of briquetting process with the composition of 60% water and 5% binder. The maximum compressive load for the briquettes of torrefied RSK is 141 N and the calorific value is 16 MJ/kg. Based on the economic evaluation analysis, the return of investment (ROI) for the mass production of both RSK and POS briquettes is estimated in 2-year period and the annual profit after payback was approximately 107,428.6 USD. PMID:27419127

  8. Density-driven structural transformations in network forming glasses: a high-pressure neutron diffraction study of GeO2 glass up to 17.5 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Philip S.; Drewitt, James W. E.; Whittaker, Dean A. J.; Zeidler, Anita; Wezka, Kamil; Bull, Craig L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Wilding, Martin C.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Marrocchelli, Dario

    2012-10-01

    The structure of GeO2 glass was investigated at pressures up to 17.5(5) GPa using in situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction with a Paris-Edinburgh press employing sintered diamond anvils. A new methodology and data correction procedure were developed, enabling a reliable measurement of structure factors that are largely free from diamond Bragg peaks. Calibration curves, which are important for neutron diffraction work on disordered materials, were constructed for pressure as a function of applied load for both single and double toroid anvil geometries. The diffraction data are compared to new molecular-dynamics simulations made using transferrable interaction potentials that include dipole-polarization effects. The results, when taken together with those from other experimental methods, are consistent with four densification mechanisms. The first, at pressures up to ≃ 5 GPa, is associated with a reorganization of GeO4 units. The second, extending over the range from ≃ 5 to 10 GPa, corresponds to a regime where GeO4 units are replaced predominantly by GeO5 units. In the third, as the pressure increases beyond ˜10 GPa, appreciable concentrations of GeO6 units begin to form and there is a decrease in the rate of change of the intermediate-range order as measured by the pressure dependence of the position of the first sharp diffraction peak. In the fourth, at about 30 GPa, the transformation to a predominantly octahedral glass is achieved and further densification proceeds via compression of the Ge-O bonds. The observed changes in the measured diffraction patterns for GeO2 occur at similar dimensionless number densities to those found for SiO2, indicating similar densification mechanisms for both glasses. This implies a regime from about 15 to 24 GPa where SiO4 units are replaced predominantly by SiO5 units, and a regime beyond ˜24 GPa where appreciable concentrations of SiO6 units begin to form.

  9. A two-dimensional model of chemical vapor infiltration with radio-frequency heating and spatio-temporal evolution of a pulsed chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midha, Vikas

    The first part of this work focused on modeling radio- frequency assisted chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) for the fabrication of fiber-reinforced composite materials. CVI involves diffusion and chemical reaction of precursor gases in a fibrous preform to deposit solid material within the pores. A two-dimensional finite-element model was developed which included the solution of Maxwell's equations for electromagnetic fields, transport equations for multicomponent gas diffusion and chemical kinetics for the deposition of solid material. Simulation results showed that densification of long cylindrical preforms initially occurred radially around the central zone and then axially towards the ends of the preform. This densification pattern resulted in significant entrapment of porosity at the center of the preform and required a relatively long time for completion. Comparison of results with reported experimental data showed agreement of important trends which could not be predicted by existing one-dimensional models. Based on the geometry of the preform, novel schemes for improved radio-frequency assisted CVI were proposed which resulted in complete densification and reduced overall processing time significantly compared to conventional isothermal processes. The second part of this work focused on modeling of high- density, low-pressure chlorine discharges used for the fabrication of sub-micron devices in the semiconductor industry. Recent experiments showed that pulsing of input power can lead to significant improvement in the etching characteristics of electronegative gas discharges. A one- dimensional model was developed which captured the transition of an electron-ion plasma in the active glow to a negative-ion dominated or ion-ion plasma in the afterglow phase of a pulse. The spatial evolution of the negative-ion density showed formation of self-sharpening fronts during the active glow and subsequent back- propagation of the fronts during the afterglow. In the

  10. Metamorphic density controls on early-stage subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duesterhoeft, Erik; Oberhänsli, Roland; Bousquet, Romain

    2013-04-01

    Subduction is primarily driven by the densification of the downgoing oceanic slab, due to dynamic P-T-fields in subduction zones. It is crucial to unravel slab densification induced by metamorphic reactions to understand the influence on plate dynamics. By analyzing the density and metamorphic structure of subduction zones, we may gain knowledge about the driving, metamorphic processes in a subduction zone like the eclogitization (i.e., the transformation of a MORB to an eclogite), the breakdown of hydrous minerals and the release of fluid or the generation of partial melts. We have therefore developed a 2D subduction zone model down to 250 km that is based on thermodynamic equilibrium assemblage computations. Our model computes the "metamorphic density" of rocks as a function of pressure, temperature and chemical composition using the Theriak-Domino software package at different time stages. We have used this model to investigate how the hydration, dehydration, partial melting and fractionation processes of rocks all influence the metamorphic density and greatly depend on the temperature field within subduction systems. These processes are commonly neglected by other approaches (e.g., gravitational or thermomechanical in nature) reproducing the density distribution within this tectonic setting. The process of eclogitization is assumed as being important to subduction dynamics, based on the very high density (3.6 g/cm3) of eclogitic rocks. The eclogitization in a MORB-type crust is possible only if the rock reaches the garnet phase stability field. This process is primarily temperature driven. Our model demonstrates that the initiation of eclogitization of the slab is not the only significant process that makes the descending slab denser and is responsible for the slab pull force. Indeed, our results show that the densification of the downgoing lithospheric mantle (due to an increase of pressure) starts in the early subduction stage and makes a significant

  11. Pressure-induced transformations in LiCl-H2O at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, G N; Bove, L E; Corti, H R; Loerting, T

    2014-09-14

    A systematic study of the properties of high-density amorphous ice (HDA) in the presence of increasing amounts of salt is missing, especially because it is challenging to avoid ice crystallization upon cooling the pressurized liquid. In order to be able to study HDA also in the presence of small amounts of salt, we have investigated the transformation behaviour of quenched aqueous LiCl solutions (mole fraction x < 0.25) upon pressurization in a piston-cylinder setup at 77 K. The sample properties were characterized by in situ dilatometry under high pressure conditions and after recovery by ex situ powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at ambient pressure. Two regimes can be identified, with a rather sharp switch at about x = 0.12. At x < 0.12 the samples show the phenomenology also known for pure water samples. They are composed mainly of hexagonal ice (Ih) and experience pressure-induced amorphization to HDA at P > 1 GPa. The observed densification is consistent with the idea that a freeze concentrated LiCl solution of x = 0.14 (R = 6) segregates, which transforms to the glassy state upon cooling, and that the densification is only due to the Ih → HDA transition. Also the XRD patterns and DSC scans are almost unaffected by the presence of the segregated glassy LiCl solution. Upon heating at ambient pressure HDA experiences the polyamorphic transition to low-density amorphous ice (LDA) at ∼120 K, even at x ∼ 0.10. Based on the latent heat evolved in the transition we suggest that almost all water in the sample transforms to an LDA-like state, even the water in the vicinity of the ions. The glassy LiCl solution acts as a spectator that does not shift the transformation temperature significantly and experiences a glass-to-liquid transition at ∼140 K prior to the crystallization to cubic ice. By contrast, at x > 0.12 the phenomenology completely changes and is now dominated by the salt. Hexagonal ice no longer forms upon

  12. Tailoring Magnetic Properties in Bulk Nanostructured Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jason Rolando

    Important magnetic properties and behaviors such as coercivity, remanence, susceptibility, energy product, and exchange coupling can be tailored by controlling the grain size, composition, and density of bulk magnetic materials. At nanometric length scales the grain size plays an increasingly important role since magnetic domain behavior and grain boundary concentration determine bulk magnetic behavior. This has spurred a significant amount of work devoted to developing magnetic materials with nanometric features (thickness, grain/crystallite size, inclusions or shells) in 0D (powder), 1D (wires), and 2D (thin films) materials. Large 3D nanocrystalline materials are more suitable for many applications such as permanent magnets, magneto-optical Faraday isolators etc. Yet there are relatively few successful demonstrations of 3D magnetic materials with nanoscale influenced properties available in the literature. Making dense 3D bulk materials with magnetic nanocrystalline microstructures is a challenge because many traditional densification techniques (HIP, pressureless sintering, etc.) move the microstructure out of the "nano" regime during densification. This dissertation shows that the Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) method, also known as spark plasma sintering, can be used to create dense, bulk, magnetic, nanocrystalline solids with varied compositions suited to fit many applications. The results of my research will first show important implications for the use of CAPAD for the production of exchange-coupled nanocomposite magnets. Decreases in grain size were shown to have a significant role in increasing the magnitude of exchange bias. Second, preferentially ordered bulk magnetic materials were produced with highly anisotropic material properties. The ordered microstructure resulted in changing magnetic property magnitudes (ex. change in coercivity by almost 10x) depending on the relative orientation (0° vs. 90°) of an externally

  13. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (<3 μm). Ball milling improved the sintering kinetics and improved the mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness). Activation energy (100 kJ/mol) and stress exponent (1.2) were obtained using the analytical model developed for power-law creep. Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack

  14. The Effect of Microstructure on Firn Gas Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M.

    The processes affecting gas transport through the firn column are important to understand in order to accurately interpret climate records from ice cores. Historically, density measurements have been used to estimate open and closed porosity in the firn layers to inform firn densification models. These densification models directly affect the gas-age ice-age calculation that is used to determine the offset between ice and air bubble proxies of the ice core climate records. Through studies of firn microstructure, we hope to learn more about pore geometry and ultimately how gas transports through firn layers. Such studies will directly influence our understanding of the gas-age ice-age difference. In this thesis, we present three examples of firn microstructure affecting the gas transport through the firn column, in ways that are inconsistent with the current understanding of the firn column. First, we examine the effect melt layers found in firn cores from dry snow region of Greenland. From permeability measurements, we find that the assumption that these melt layers are impermeable, or at least disrupt gas transport, to be incorrect. We compare the melt layers found at NEEM to other Greenlandic firn cores, to reveal that a widespread melt event occurred in 1889 and that warm temperatures combined with black carbon deposition due to forest fires were the cause of such event. The second example we examine is the lock-in zone of the NEEM firn column. We find that the lock-in depth of the NEEM firn to consist of 4.5 m of low permeability firn layers, unlike the single impermeable firn layer that is typically described. This extended lock-in depth of the NEEM lock-in zone helps in the understanding of a NEEM firn air campaign that requires a diffusion term within the lock-in zone, because the extended lock-in depth is capable of allowing a small amount of diffusion through the layers. Lastly, we examine the effect of impurities in the firn layers and their ability to

  15. The current state of seismic monitoring in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Haslinger, F.; Diehl, T.; Cauzzi, C.; Plenkers, K.; Kästli, P.; Fäh, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Swiss Seismological Service at ETH Zurich (SED) operates both the national strong motion and broadband permanent seismic networks in Switzerland, as well as supporting local real-time densifications related to projects (such as geothermal explorations and major tunneling) and a mobile pool for national and international deployments related to research and aftershock studies. This submission provides an overview of the current status of network monitoring in Switzerland. A digital high gain network has been operating since 1974 and was upgraded to a continuously recording realtime modern 24 bit broadband network comprising 30 stations from 1999-2002, with station spacing averaging ~30km across the nation. Various improvements and densifications since then have raised the number of broadband sensors to 45 and added co-located strong motion sensors at 13 sites. A notable recent densification is in the NE of Switzerland, where the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) have funded an additional 10 broadband stations (including 3 100-200m deep borehole short period stations) in order to reduce the earthquake detection threshold and increase location accuracy in regions that are identified as potential deep nuclear waste storage sites. A strong motion network has been maintained since 1990, comprising 70 12-16 bit triggered sensors located predominantly in free-field urban sites but also including arrays on dams. The free-field network is in the midst of an upgrade (2009-2018), with 30 new stations already installed from the eventual 100 new free-field 24-bit real-time continuous stations. A project has just begun to upgrade the Swiss broadband network, which will co-locate strong-motion sensors at existing broadband sites; assess and implement improvements of installation quality, e.g. by shallow post-hole installations rather than surface vaults; and potentially fill remaining gaps in station coverage. The seismic network has

  16. Improved C/SiC Ceramic Composites Made Using PIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easler, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Improved carbon-fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic-matrix composite (C/SiC CMC) materials, suitable for fabrication of thick-section structural components, are producible by use of a combination of raw materials and processing conditions different from such combinations used in the prior art. In comparison with prior C/SiC CMC materials, these materials have more nearly uniform density, less porosity, and greater strength. The majority of raw-material/processing-condition combinations used in the prior art involve the use of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) for densifying the matrix. In contrast, in synthesizing a material of the present type, one uses a combination of infiltration with, and pyrolysis of, a preceramic polymer [polymer infiltration followed by pyrolysis (PIP)]. PIP processing is performed in repeated, tailored cycles of infiltration followed by pyrolysis. Densification by PIP processing takes less time and costs less than does densification by CVI. When one of these improved materials was tested by exposure to a high-temperature, inert-gas environment that caused prior C/SiC CMCs to lose strength, this material did not lose strength. (Information on the temperature and exposure time was not available at the time of writing this article.) A material of the present improved type consists, more specifically, of (1) carbon fibers coated with an engineered fiber/matrix interface material and (2) a ceramic matrix, containing SiC, derived from a pre-ceramic polymer with ceramic powder additions. The enhancements of properties of these materials relative to those of prior C/SiC CMC materials are attributable largely to engineering of the fiber/ matrix interfacial material and the densification process. The synthesis of a material of this type includes processing at an elevated temperature to a low level of open porosity. The approach followed in this processing allows one to fabricate not only simple plates but also more complexly shaped parts. The carbon fiber

  17. Experimental and textural investigation of welding: effects of compaction, sintering, and vapor-phase crystallization in the rhyolitic Rattlesnake Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, Anita L.; Laporte, Didier; Druitt, Tim H.

    2005-04-01

    The abrupt changes in character of variably welded pyroclastic deposits have invited decades of investigation and classification. We conducted two series of experiments using ash from the nonwelded base of the rhyolitic Rattlesnake Tuff of Oregon, USA, to examine conditions of welding. One series of experiments was conducted at atmospheric pressure (1 At) in a muffle furnace with variable run times and temperature and another series was conducted at 5 MPa and 600 °C in a cold seal apparatus with variable run times and water contents. We compared the results to a suite of incipiently to densely welded, natural samples of the Rattlesnake Tuff. Experiments at 1 At required a temperature above 900 °C to produce welding, which is in excess of the estimated pre-eruptive magmatic temperature of the tuff. The experiments also yielded globular clast textures unlike the natural tuff. During the cold-seal experiments, the gold sample capsules collapsed in response to sample densification. Textures and densities that closely mimic the natural suite were produced at 5 MPa, 600 °C and 0.4 wt.% H 2O, over run durations of hours to 2 days. Clast deformation and development of foliation in 2-week runs were greater than in natural samples. Both more and less water reduced the degree of welding at otherwise constant run conditions. For 5 MPa experiments, changes in the degree of foliation of shards and of axial ratios of bubble shards and non-bubble (mainly platy) shards, are consistent with early densification related to compaction and partial rotation of shards into a foliation. Subsequent densification was associated with viscous deformation as indicated by more sintered contacts and deformation of shards. Sintering (local fusion of shard-shard contacts) was increasingly important with longer run times, higher temperatures, and greater pressures. During runs with high water concentrations, sintering was rare and adhesion between clasts was dominated by precipitation of

  18. Unique high temperature microwave sintering of aluminum nitride based ceramics with high thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gengfu

    High temperature microwave sintering is one of the most challenging areas in microwave processing of ceramics. In this dissertation, for the first time, stable, controlled "ultra" high temperature (up to 2100°C) microwave sintering was achieved by development of a unique insulation system based on BN/ZrO2 fiber composite powder synthesized by a unique processing route. It uses a system approach to mitigate the tendency of all insulation materials to interfere with specimen coupling. This insulation system allows stable, controlled ultra high microwave sintering and could be modified to microwave process materials with different thermal, dielectric properties with improved properties. In addition, unlike other high temperature microwave insulation schemes that must be replaced after each run, the insulation system is robust enough for repeated use. Using the insulation design, high density and very high thermal conductivity (˜225 W/m·K) AlN ceramics were fabricated much more efficiently (≤6 hours versus 10's to 100's of hours at high temperature) by microwave sintering than by comparable conventional sintering. A detailed data study of densification, grain growth and thermal conductivity in microwave sintered AlN indicated that there were two time regimes in the development of high thermal conductivity AlN and that oxygen removal was more important to the development of high thermal conductivity than removal of the liquid phase sintering phase. While there have been many previous studies examining processing of high thermal conductivity AlN, this was the first study of microwave processing of high thermal conductivity AlN. AlN-TiB2 composites, which had previously only been successfully densified with pressure-assisted techniques such as HIPing or hot pressing, were successfully microwave sintered in this dissertation. The effect of TiB 2 on the densification behavior and thermal, mechanical, and dielectric properties of microwave sintered AlN based composites

  19. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained within the material. Thus, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made from highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressibility. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical property predictions models are demonstrated.

  20. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained with the material. Thus to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made form highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressability. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical prediction models are demonstrated. Although more costly than its predecessors, the present analysis is based on the detailed architecture developed by one of the authors and his colleagues and accounts for many of the geometric complexities that other analyses ignore.

  1. SP-100 high-temperature advanced radiator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovang, Richard D.; Hunt, Maribeth E.; Dirling, Ray B., Jr.; Holzl, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of an advanced radiator concept design meeting SP-100 thermoelectric requirements is reported. Carbon-carbon heat pipes are used to produce this lightweight, high-performance radiator. Two feasibility problems had to be solved to enable the design: the production of a carbon-carbon heat pipe tube with integral fins, and the development of a coating that protects the carbon-carbon substrate from 875-K potassium working fluid. Carbon-carbon tubes with integral fins were successfully produced using a T-300 fiber, an angle interlocking weave architecture, and pitch densification. A barrier coating to protect the inside diameter of these tubes which employed the CVD of niobium over a thin rhenium interlayer was developed. The rhenium interlayer proved to be critical to the success of this coating technique by providing a gradation in the coefficient of thermal expansion, carrying a portion of the induced stress load, improving coating adhesion, and providing a partial carbon diffusion barrier.

  2. Layered growth of crayfish gastrolith: about the stability of amorphous calcium carbonate and role of additives.

    PubMed

    Habraken, Wouter J E M; Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Al-Sawalmih, Ali; Glazer, Lilah; Bentov, Shmuel; Fratzl, Peter; Sagi, Amir; Aichmayer, Barbara; Berman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on pre-molt gastroliths have shown a typical onion-like morphology of layers of amorphous mineral (mostly calcium carbonate) and chitin, resulting from the continuous deposition and densification of amorphous mineral spheres on a chitin-matrix during time. To investigate the consequences of this layered growth on the local structure and composition of the gastrolith, we performed spatially-resolved Raman, X-ray and SEM-EDS analysis on complete pre-molt gastrolith cross-sections. Results show that especially the abundance of inorganic phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)/citrate and proteins is not uniform throughout the organ but changes from layer to layer. Based on these results we can conclude that ACC stabilization in the gastrolith takes place by more than one compound and not by only one of these additives.

  3. Microstructures and magnetic properties of Bi-substituted NiCuZn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Huaiwu; Wu, Xiaohu; Li, Tao; Su, Hua; Liu, Baoyuan

    2012-04-01

    The effects of Bi3+ substitution on the microstructures and properties of low-temperature fired NiCuZn ferrites have been investigated. It is found that Bi3+ ions can enter into the ferrite lattice and consequently enhance the grain growth and densification in the sintering process due to the activation of the lattice, which in turn lead to an increase of quality factor and static permeability. Bi3+ substitution for Fe3+ is beneficial to forming the spinal phase and lowers the sintering temperature to about 900 °C. Pcv (power loss) was analyzed by dividing Pcv into Ph (hysteresis loss) and Pe+Pr (eddy current loss and residual loss) from the frequency dependence of the power loss. Due to the compact and uniform microstructures, and high sintering density, relatively low losses were obtained in the Bi-substituted samples.

  4. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Derkacy, James A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of .beta.-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB.sub.2. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800.degree. C. to less than the transition temperature of .beta.-SiC to .alpha.-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material.

  5. Development of carbon nanotube-reinforced hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealley, Catherine; Elcombe, Margaret; van Riessen, Arie; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports development of a production method to create a composite material that is biocompatible, which will have high mechanical strength and resilience, and be able to withstand exposure to the physiological environment. The chemical precipitation conditions necessary for the production of single-phase synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) and a HAp and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite material have been optimised. Neutron diffraction patterns collected before and after sintering show that the nanotubes have remained intact within the structure, while most of the remaining soot has burnt off. Small-angle neutron scattering, in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), also shows preservation of the CNTs. Hot isostatically pressed samples showed excellent densification. Neutron diffraction data has enabled the positions of the hydroxide bonds to be determined, and shown that the addition of the CNTs has had no effect on the structural parameters of the HAp phase, with the exception of a slight reduction in the unit cell parameter a.

  6. Graphene-stabilized copper nanoparticles as an air-stable substitute for silver and gold in low-cost ink-jet printable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luechinger, Norman A.; Athanassiou, Evagelos K.; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2008-11-01

    Metallic copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a bottom-up approach, and in situ coated with protective shells of graphene in order to get a metal nanopowder of high air stability and chemical inertness. Using an amphiphilic surfactant, a water-based copper nanocolloid could be prepared and successfully printed onto a polymer substrate by conventional ink-jet printing using household printers. The dried printed patterns exhibited strong metallic gloss and an electrical conductivity of >1 S cm-1 without the need for a sintering or densification step. This conductivity currently limits use in electronics to low current application or shielding and decorative effects. The high stability of graphene-coated copper nanoparticles makes them economically a most attractive alternative to silver or gold nanocolloids, and will strongly facilitate the industrial use of metal nanocolloids in consumer goods.

  7. Graphene-stabilized copper nanoparticles as an air-stable substitute for silver and gold in low-cost ink-jet printable electronics.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, Norman A; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Stark, Wendelin J

    2008-11-01

    Metallic copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a bottom-up approach, and in situ coated with protective shells of graphene in order to get a metal nanopowder of high air stability and chemical inertness. Using an amphiphilic surfactant, a water-based copper nanocolloid could be prepared and successfully printed onto a polymer substrate by conventional ink-jet printing using household printers. The dried printed patterns exhibited strong metallic gloss and an electrical conductivity of >1 S cm(-1) without the need for a sintering or densification step. This conductivity currently limits use in electronics to low current application or shielding and decorative effects. The high stability of graphene-coated copper nanoparticles makes them economically a most attractive alternative to silver or gold nanocolloids, and will strongly facilitate the industrial use of metal nanocolloids in consumer goods. PMID:21832722

  8. Development and testing of matrices for the encapsulation of glass and ceramic nuclear-waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, J. W.; Brite, D. W.; Gurwell, W. E.; Buckwalter, C. Q.; Bunnell, L. R.; Gray, W. J.; Blair, H. T.; Rusin, J. M.

    1982-02-01

    The results of research on the matrix encapsulation of high level wastes over the past few years are discussed. The demonstrations and tests described were designed to illustrate how the waste materials are effected when encapsulated in an inert matrix. Candidate materials evaluated for potential use as matrices for encapsulation of pelletized ceramics or glass marbles were categorized into four groups: metals, glasses, ceramics, and graphite. Two processing techniques, casting and hot pressing, were investigated as the most promising methods of formation or densification of the matrices. The major results deal with the development aspects. However, chemical durability tests (leach tests) of the matrix materials themselves and matrix-waste form composites are also reported. Matrix waste forms can provide a low porosity, waste-free barrier resulting in increased leach protection, higher impact strength and improved thermal conductivity compared to unencapsulated glass or ceramic waste materials.

  9. Development of a flexible nanocomposite TiO2 film as a protective coating for bioapplications of superelastic NiTi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aun, Diego Pinheiro; Houmard, Manuel; Mermoux, Michel; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Joud, Jean-Charles; Berthomé, Gregory; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes

    2016-07-01

    An experimental procedure to coat superelastic NiTi alloys with flexible TiO2 protective nanocomposite films using sol-gel technology was developed in this work to improve the metal biocompatibility without deteriorating its superelastic mechanical properties. The coatings were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and glazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The elasticity of the film was tested in coated specimens submitted to three-point bending tests. A short densification by thermal treatment at 500 °C for 10 min yielded a bilayer film consisting of a 50 nm-thick crystallized TiO2 at the inner interface with another 50-nm-thick amorphous oxide film at the outer interface. This bilayer could sustain over 6.4% strain without cracking and could thus be used to coat biomedical instruments as well as other devices made with superelastic NiTi alloys.

  10. Protein matrix involved in the lipid retention of foie gras during cooking: a multimodal hyperspectral imaging study.

    PubMed

    Théron, Laëtitia; Vénien, Annie; Jamme, Frédéric; Fernandez, Xavier; Peyrin, Frédéric; Molette, Caroline; Dumas, Paul; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Astruc, Thierry

    2014-06-25

    Denaturation of the protein matrix during heat treatment of duck foie gras was studied in relationship to the amount of fat loss during cooking. A low fat loss group was compared with a high fat loss group by histochemistry, FT-IR, and synchrotron UV microspectroscopy combination to characterize their protein matrix at different scales. After cooking, the high fat loss group showed higher densification of its matrix, higher ultraviolet tyrosine autofluorescence, and an infrared shift of the amide I band. These results revealed a higher level of protein denaturation and aggregation during cooking in high fat loss than in low fat loss foie gras. In addition, the fluorescence and infrared responses of the raw tissue revealed differences according to the level of fat losses after cooking. These findings highlight the importance of the supramolecular state of the protein matrix in determining the fat loss of foie gras.

  11. Das heissschlagverdichten — ein neues verfahren zur herstellung keramischer brennstofftabletten mit engen formtoleranzen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrovat, M.; Mühling, G.; Rachor, L.; Vollath, D.; Zimmermann, H.

    1984-05-01

    The hot impact densification (HID) is a new powerful method for producing ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear reactors. Green ceramic bodies are directly processed to pellets by high speed shaping in the plastic temperature region of ceramic material. Opposed to the well established press sintering procedure it can be heated, densified, and cooled by orders of magnitude faster. Therefore, at high throughputs, small equipment dimensions become possible. The fuel pellets produced meet all requirements, particular the dimensional tolerances achieved are very closed, consequently circular grinding is omitted. Furthermore, the relatively high temperature level of the impact pressing favors the mixed crystal formation of uranium and plutonium oxide. This improves the solubility of the fuel in nitric acid, an essential point at reprocessing. A prototype facility is designed so that automatic fabrication in continuous operation will be possible. The target working cycle for a fuel pellet is in the range of some seconds.

  12. Properties and fabrication of nanostructured 2Cr-Al₂O₃ composite for prosthetic bearing replacements.

    PubMed

    Park, Na-Ra; Shon, In-Jin

    2014-12-01

    Cr2O3 and Al powder were used as raw powders, and were milled by the high energy ball milling method. The nanostructured 2Cr-Al2O3 composite from the milled powder was both synthesized and densificated within a short time, by the pulsed current activated sintering (PCAS) apparatus. The relative density of the sintered 2Cr-Al2O3 composite was 99%. The hardness and the fracture toughness of the specimen were 1630 kg/mm(2), and 9.3 MPa·m(1/2), respectively. The weight loss of the composite was measured by a pin-on-disk type apparatus, without a lubricant. Lastly, the 2Cr-Al2O3 composite has a very good cell viability. PMID:25491856

  13. Nanorods of Various Oxides and Hierarchically Structured Mesoporous Silica by Sol-Gel Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Limmer, Steven J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Cao, Guozhong

    2003-01-02

    In this paper, we report the template-based growth of nanorods of oxides and hierarchically structured mesoporous silica, formed by means of a combination of sol-gel processing and elecrophoretic deposition. Both single metal oxides (TiO2) and complex oxides (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3) have been grown by this method. This method has also been applied to the growth of nanorods of mesoporous silica having an ordered pore structure, where the pores are aligned parallel to the long axis of the nanorod. Uniformly sized nanorods of about 125-200 nm in diameter and 10 um in length were grown over large areas with near unidirectional alignment. Appropriate sol preparation yielded the desired stoichiometric chemical composition and crystal structure of the oxide nanorods, with a heat treatment (500-700 C for 15-30 min) for crystallization, densification and any necessary pyrolysis.

  14. Method of deforming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a textured metallic substrate and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Dominic F.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and biaxially textured articles having a deformed epitaxial layer formed therefrom for use with high temperature superconductors, photovoltaic, ferroelectric, or optical devices. A buffer layer is epitaxially deposited onto biaxially-textured substrates and then mechanically deformed. The deformation process minimizes or eliminates grooves, or other irregularities, formed on the buffer layer while maintaining the biaxial texture of the buffer layer. Advantageously, the biaxial texture of the buffer layer is not altered during subsequent heat treatments of the deformed buffer. The present invention provides mechanical densification procedures which can be incorporated into the processing of superconducting films through the powder deposit or precursor approaches without incurring unfavorable high-angle grain boundaries.

  15. Structural and electrical properties of microwave processed Ag modified KNN-LS ceramics.

    PubMed

    Palei, Prakash; Kumar, Pawan; Agrawal, Dinesh K

    2012-01-01

    Microwave processing steps of 0.95[(K0.5Na0.5)0.94Ag0.06NbO3]-0.05[LiSbO3]/(KNAN-LS) lead free ferroelectric ceramics were optimized for better densification and electrical properties. Calcination temperature and time for single perovskite phase formation were optimized and found to be 850 degrees C for 60 min., respectively. Crystal structural study revealed the presence of mixed structure in the microwave processed (MWP) KNAN-LS ceramics. The sintering of the KNAN-LS ceramics was carried out at 1080 degrees C for 10 min, 20 min and 30 min, respectively, and the sample sintered for 20 min exhibited best properties.

  16. Bi-2212 round wire development for high field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, H.; Huang, Y.; Hong, S.; Gerace, M.; Parrell, J.

    2014-05-01

    Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST) has been continuously improving Bi-2212 round wire performance because of its potential for application in high-field magnets (> 25 T). We focused on Bi-2212 wire configuration design, filament densification and reducing carbon and hydrogen contamination to improve the engineering critical current density (JE). Several wire configurations have been developed to meet different wire diameter and operating current requirements. The swaging, cold isostatic pressing (CIP) and over-pressure heat treatment processes have been demonstrated to effectively increase Bi-2212 filament mass density in the final wire and result in high performance over long length. The JE values exceeding 550 A/mm2 at 4.2 K, 15 T have been achieved on the CIPed 1 m long sample using a 10 bar over-pressure (OP) heat treatment. The twisted Bi-2212 wire significantly reduced ac loss without the critical current degradation.

  17. Effect of Microstructural Anisotropy of PM Precursors on the Characteristic Expansion of Aluminum Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Jaime; Laguna-Gutiérrez, Ester; Solórzano, Eusebio; Rodríguez-Pérez, Miguel Angel

    2013-08-01

    This work investigates the causes of the anisotropic early expansion (below the melting point) of powder metallurgical (PM) aluminum foam precursors by evaluating the crystallographic anisotropy induced during the production of the precursor materials. A varied group of precursors prepared using different parameters and techniques (direct powder extrusion and hot uniaxial compression) has been investigated. Multidirectional foaming expansion has been registered in situ by means of the optical expandometry technique, while X-ray diffraction has been used to characterize the preferred crystallographic orientation (texture) of the pressed powders. The results point to a clear correlation between the expansion anisotropy and the microstructural crystallographic anisotropy of the precursors. Although this correlation is not a direct cause-effect phenomenon, it is a good indicator of intrinsic precursor characteristics, such as densification and powder interparticle bonding, which govern the expansion behavior during the early stages when the material is still in a solid or semisolid state.

  18. Effects of thermomechanical processing on the resulting mechanical properties of 6101 aluminum foam

    SciTech Connect

    Margevicius, R.W.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1998-12-01

    Porous materials represent a tremendous weight savings for light-weight structural applications. The fabrication path can play a critical role in the resulting properties. High porosity aluminum was fabricated in a number of ways. The starting material was a cast 6101 aluminum that had a relative density of 9.8%. The cast aluminum block was compressed by uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial densification. Uniaxial compression was done at room temperature and 200 C. Biaxial compression was achieved by unidirectional rolling at room temperature and 200 C. Triaxial compression was done by cold isostatic pressing at 3.4, 6.7, and 34 MPa (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ksi). Metallography and mechanical test specimens were machines from the processed bars. The mechanical properties showed that the relative yield strength depended both on relative density and processing temperature.

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2000). Volume 85

    SciTech Connect

    Sources, John M.

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2000, begins with an article by R. Betti, M. Umansky, V. Lobatchev, V. N. Goncharov, and R. L. McCrory, who report on the development of a model for the deceleration phase of an imploding inertial fusion capsule (p. 1). The model shows that the ablative flow off the inner shell surface plays a critical role in reducing the growth rate and suppressing short-wavelength modes in the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Other articles in this volume are: The Effect of Shock Heating on the Stability of Laser-Driven Targets; Spherical Cavity Expansion in Material with Densification; Design and Performance of a Selectable-Rate Streak-Camera Deflection Ramp Generator; Unique High-Bandwidth, UV Fiber Deliver System for OMEGA Diagnostics Applications; Fabrication and Properties of an Ultrafast NbN Hot-Electron Single-Photon detector; and, Preliminary Design of NIF 2-D SSD.

  20. Implementation of a spark plasma sintering facility in a hermetic glovebox for compaction of toxic, radiotoxic, and air sensitive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrpekl, V. E-mail: vaclav.tyrpekl@gmail.com; Berkmann, C.; Holzhäuser, M.; Köpp, F.; Cologna, M.; Somers, J.; Wangle, T.

    2015-02-15

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a rapidly developing method for densification of powders into compacts. It belongs to the so-called “field assisted sintering techniques” that enable rapid sintering at much lower temperatures than the classical approaches of pressureless sintering of green pellets or hot isostatic pressing. In this paper, we report the successful integration of a SPS device into a hermetic glovebox for the handling of highly radioactive material containing radioisotopes of U, Th, Pu, Np, and Am. The glovebox implantation has been facilitated by the replacement of the hydraulic system to apply pressure with a compact electromechanical unit. The facility has been successfully tested using UO{sub 2} powder. Pellets with 97% of the theoretical density were obtained at 1000 °C for 5 min, significantly lower than the ∼1600 °C for 5-10 h used in conventional pellet sintering.