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Sample records for density fluctuation parameter

  1. Turbulent magnetohydrodynamic density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Montgomery, David

    1988-01-01

    A spectral-method numerical code is used to compute mass-density fluctuation spectra in turbulent magnetofluids. The computations are used to test and extend the analytical theory of density variations in slightly compressible magnetofluids given by Montgomery, et al. (1987) and used to infer inertial-range density-fluctuation spectra for the nearby interstellar medium and solar wind. A local equation of state is assumed, relating density to pressure. Constant, scalar resistivities and viscosities are used. In the limit of low Mach numbers and high mechanical-to-magnetic pressure ratios, the fit of the computations to the analytical theory is seen to be close.

  2. Constraints on the neutrino mass and the primordial magnetic field from the matter density fluctuation parameter {sigma}{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-05-15

    We have made an analysis of limits on the neutrino mass based upon the formation of large-scale structure in the presence of a primordial magnetic field. We find that a new upper bound on the neutrino mass is possible based upon fits to the cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum when the existing independent constraints on the matter density fluctuation parameter {sigma}{sub 8} and the primordial magnetic field are taken into account.

  3. Effective parameters of metal-dielectric composites: influence of eddy currents due to density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Burokur, N.; Zouhdi, S.

    2009-06-01

    It is shown that the space fluctuations of concentration of conducting inclusions might be responsible for the well-known disagreement between theory and experiment at determining microwave losses in metal-dielectric mixture: the theories (percolation theory, effective medium theory, etc.) predict much lower losses than those measured in experiment. It is demonstrated that if the effective skin depth in the regions occupied by the fluctuation is comparable to the mean diameter of these regions we can expect additional losses.

  4. Density Fluctuations in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Tse, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The density distributions and fluctuations in grids of varying size in liquid water at ambient pressure, both above the freezing point and in the supercooled state, are analyzed from the trajectories obtained from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the occurrence of low- and high-density regions (LDL and HDL) is transient and their respective residence times are dependent on the size of the simulated system. The spatial extent of density-density correlation is found to be within 7 Å or less. The temporal existence of LDL and HDL arises as a result of natural density fluctuations of an equilibrium system. The density of bulk water at ambient conditions is homogenous.

  5. Density fluctuations from warm inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Chris; Moss, Ian G. E-mail: ian.moss@ncl.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    Thermal fluctuations provide the main source of large scale density perturbations in warm inflationary models of the early universe. For the first time, general results are obtained for the power spectrum in the case when the friction coefficient in the inflaton equation of motion depends on temperature. A large increase in the amplitude of perturbations occurs when the friction coefficient increases with temperature. This has to be taken into account when constructing models of warm inflation. New results are also given for the thermal fluctuations in the weak regime of warm inflation when the friction coefficient is relatively small.

  6. Origin of cosmological density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    The density fluctuations required to explain the large-scale cosmological structure may have arisen spontaneously as a result of a phase transition in the early Universe. There are several ways in which such fluctuations may have ben produced, and they could have a variety of spectra, so one should not necessarily expect all features of the large-scale structure to derive from a simple power law spectrum. Some features may even result from astrophysical amplification mechanisms rather than gravitational instability. 128 references.

  7. Quantum density fluctuations in classical liquids.

    PubMed

    Ford, L H; Svaiter, N F

    2009-01-23

    We discuss the density fluctuations of a fluid due to zero point motion, assuming a linear dispersion relation. We argue that density fluctuations in a fluid can be a useful analog model for better understanding fluctuations in relativistic quantum field theory. We calculate the differential cross section for light scattering by the zero point density fluctuations, and find a result proportional to the fifth power of the light frequency. We give some estimates of the relative magnitude of this effect compared to the scattering by thermal density fluctuations, and find that it can be of the order 13% for liquid neon at optical frequencies. This relative magnitude is proportional to frequency and inversely proportional to temperature. Although the scattering by zero point density fluctuation is small, it may be observable.

  8. Multicellular density fluctuations in epithelial monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, Steven M.; Wiatt, Marina K.; Uruena, Juan M.; Dunn, Alison C.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2015-09-01

    Changes in cell size often accompany multicellular motion in tissue, and cell number density is known to strongly influence collective migration in monolayers. Density fluctuations in other forms of active matter have been explored extensively, but not the potential role of density fluctuations in collective cell migration. Here we investigate collective motion in cell monolayers, focusing on the divergent component of the migration velocity field to probe density fluctuations. We find spatial patterns of diverging and converging cell groups throughout the monolayers, which oscillate in time with a period of approximately 3-4 h. Simultaneous fluorescence measurements of a cytosol dye within the cells show that fluid passes between groups of cells, facilitating these oscillations in cell density. Our findings reveal that cell-cell interactions in monolayers may be mediated by intercellular fluid flow.

  9. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  10. Density fluctuations from strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilenkin, A.; Shafi, Q.

    1983-01-01

    The spectra of density fluctuations caused by strings in a universe dominated either by baryons, neutrinos, or axions are presented. Realistic scenarios for galaxy formation seem possible in all three cases. Examples of grand unified theories which lead to strings with the desired mass scales are given.

  11. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu; Lehtinen, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|eiφ, the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  12. Turbulence velocimetry of density fluctuation imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Gupta, D. K.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G.

    2004-10-01

    Analysis techniques to measure the time-resolved flow field of turbulence are developed and applied to images of density fluctuations obtained with the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic system on the DIII-D tokamak. Velocimetry applications include measurement of turbulent particle flux, zonal flows, and the Reynolds stress. The flow field of turbulent eddies exhibits quasisteady poloidal flows as well as high-frequency radial and poloidal motion associated with electrostatic potential fluctuations and strongly nonlinear multifield interactions. The orthogonal dynamic programming technique, developed for fluid-based particle and amorphous shape (smoke) flow analysis, is investigated to measure such turbulence flows. Sensitivity and accuracy are assessed and sample results discussed.

  13. Density fluctuations in vibrated granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, E.R.; Knight, J.B.; Ben-Naim, E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Nagel, S.R.

    1998-02-01

    We report systematic measurements of the density of a vibrated granular material as a function of time. Monodisperse spherical beads were confined to a cylindrical container and shaken vertically. Under vibrations, the density of the pile slowly reaches a final steady-state value about which the density fluctuates. We have investigated the frequency dependence and amplitude of these fluctuations as a function of vibration intensity {Gamma}. The spectrum of density fluctuations around the steady state value provides a probe of the internal relaxation dynamics of the system and a link to recent thermodynamic theories for the settling of granular material. In particular, we propose a method to evaluate the compactivity of a powder, first put forth by Edwards and co-workers, that is the analog to temperature for a quasistatic powder. We also propose a stochastic model based on free volume considerations that captures the essential mechanism underlying the slow relaxation. We compare our experimental results with simulations of a one-dimensional model for random adsorption and desorption. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Density fluctuations and correlations of confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varea, C.; Robledo, A.

    The density fluctuations about the equilibrium structure of fluids confined by parallel planar walls are analyzed for the cases of identical and symmetrically opposed fields at the walls. We determine the stability matrix (of the second derivatives of the free energy functional with respect to the density) for conditions both above and below the wetting transition temperature Tw of the semi-infinite system and corroborate in all cases that the equilibrium configurations are stable. We identify the fluctuations close to the walls and in the middle of the slab and discuss their effect when the wall separation L diverges. For competing walls above Tw the localized fluctuation with lowest eigenvalue describes the displacements of the incipient wetting films that become unimpeded interfacial translations for L→∞. Below Tw the fluctuations with lowest eigenvalue correspond to stiffer deformations extended across the slab. For identical walls above Tw coexisting states display incipient prewetting films and the lowest eigenvalue describes the nature of their growth as L increases. We also calculate the pair correlation function for the inhomogeneous states and, for symmetrically opposed walls, we obtain standard Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) behavior at the walls, but find significant deviations from this law at the interface-like region in the middle of the slab. To model fluids with short-ranged forces we use a ferromagnetic Ising-type Hamiltonian in mean-field approximation.

  15. Density dependence in demography and dispersal generates fluctuating invasion speeds.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lauren L; Li, Bingtuan; Miller, Tom E X; Neubert, Michael G; Shaw, Allison K

    2017-05-09

    Density dependence plays an important role in population regulation and is known to generate temporal fluctuations in population density. However, the ways in which density dependence affects spatial population processes, such as species invasions, are less understood. Although classical ecological theory suggests that invasions should advance at a constant speed, empirical work is illuminating the highly variable nature of biological invasions, which often exhibit nonconstant spreading speeds, even in simple, controlled settings. Here, we explore endogenous density dependence as a mechanism for inducing variability in biological invasions with a set of population models that incorporate density dependence in demographic and dispersal parameters. We show that density dependence in demography at low population densities-i.e., an Allee effect-combined with spatiotemporal variability in population density behind the invasion front can produce fluctuations in spreading speed. The density fluctuations behind the front can arise from either overcompensatory population growth or density-dependent dispersal, both of which are common in nature. Our results show that simple rules can generate complex spread dynamics and highlight a source of variability in biological invasions that may aid in ecological forecasting.

  16. Exploiting intrinsic fluctuations to identify model parameters.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph; Sahle, Sven; Pahle, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Parameterisation of kinetic models plays a central role in computational systems biology. Besides the lack of experimental data of high enough quality, some of the biggest challenges here are identification issues. Model parameters can be structurally non-identifiable because of functional relationships. Noise in measured data is usually considered to be a nuisance for parameter estimation. However, it turns out that intrinsic fluctuations in particle numbers can make parameters identifiable that were previously non-identifiable. The authors present a method to identify model parameters that are structurally non-identifiable in a deterministic framework. The method takes time course recordings of biochemical systems in steady state or transient state as input. Often a functional relationship between parameters presents itself by a one-dimensional manifold in parameter space containing parameter sets of optimal goodness. Although the system's behaviour cannot be distinguished on this manifold in a deterministic framework it might be distinguishable in a stochastic modelling framework. Their method exploits this by using an objective function that includes a measure for fluctuations in particle numbers. They show on three example models, immigration-death, gene expression and Epo-EpoReceptor interaction, that this resolves the non-identifiability even in the case of measurement noise with known amplitude. The method is applied to partially observed recordings of biochemical systems with measurement noise. It is simple to implement and it is usually very fast to compute. This optimisation can be realised in a classical or Bayesian fashion.

  17. Quantum phase fluctuations and density of states in superconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkevich, Alexey; Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2017-08-01

    We argue that quantum fluctuations of the phase of the order parameter may strongly affect the electron density of states (DOS) in ultrathin superconducting wires. We demonstrate that the effect of such fluctuations is equivalent to that of a quantum dissipative environment formed by soundlike plasma modes propagating along the wire. We derive a nonperturbative expression for the local electron DOS in superconducting nanowires which fully accounts for quantum phase fluctuations. At any nonzero temperature these fluctuations smear out the square-root singularity in DOS near the superconducting gap and generate quasiparticle states at subgap energies. Furthermore, at sufficiently large values of the wire impedance this singularity is suppressed down to T =0 in which case DOS tends to zero at subgap energies and exhibits the power-law behavior above the gap. Our predictions can be directly tested in tunneling experiments with superconducting nanowires.

  18. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, K Yu; Lehtinen, J S

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|e(iφ), the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  19. Order parameter fluctuations at a buried quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yejun; Wang, Jiyang; Jaramillo, R.; van Wezel, Jasper; Haravifard, S.; Srajer, G.; Liu, Y.; Xu, Z.-A.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an X-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe2 at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase; and in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the long-standing expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low-dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface. PMID:22529348

  20. Order parameter fluctuations at a buried quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yejun; Wang, Jiyang; Jaramillo, R; van Wezel, Jasper; Haravifard, S; Srajer, G; Liu, Y; Xu, Z-A; Littlewood, P B; Rosenbaum, T F

    2012-05-08

    Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an X-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe(2) at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase; and in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the long-standing expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low-dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface.

  1. Coherent Density Fluctuations in the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Smoniewski, J.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2015-11-01

    A multi-channel interferometer system is used to measure equilibrium density profile and its fluctuations in the HSX stellarator. Low-frequency, coherent density fluctuations are observed in certain quasi-helically symmetric (QHS) plasma conditions and has characteristic frequency of 15kHz. The mode is observed for small displacement of the 1st harmonic O-mode ECRH location inward from the magnetic axis. This mode is also observed on magnetic fluctuation signal, using external coils, which shows n =1. When HSX is operated without quasi-helical symmetry (mirror configuration), a coherent electrostatic mode at 28 kHz is observed. While the coherent mode in QHS plasmas shows ballooning effect, the coherent mode in Mirror plasma exhibits an anti-ballooning characteristic. Mode radial structure can be obtained from inversion of interferometer measurement when the m number is known. Under certain Mirror conditions, the coherent modes display strong bi-coherence on Langmuir probe signals. Detailed characterization of the observed coherent modes will be reported and their identification will be explored. Supported by USDOE grants DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  2. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantz, N. W. M.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Vandoren, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, following an introduction to the concept of intrinsic dynamics and its implementation within holographic models, we compute the intrinsic spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase, using a fully backreacted bulk geometry. We also present a vector-like large-N version of the Ginzburg–Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC–BCS crossover.

  3. Designing density fluctuation spectra in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Bond, J. R.; Bardeen, J. M.

    1989-09-01

    Scale-invariant (flat) fluctuation spectra are the most natural outcomes of inflation. Nonetheless current large-scale-structure observations seem to indicate more fluctuation power on large scales than flat spectra give. We consider a wide variety of models based on the chaotic inflation paradigm and sketch the effects that varying the expansion rate, structure of the potential surface, and the curvature coupling constants have on the quantum fluctuation spectra. We calculate in detail the quantum generation of fluctuation spectra by numerically solving the linearized perturbation equations for multiple scalar fields, the metric, and the radiation into which the scalars dissipate, following the evolution from inside the horizon through reheating. We conclude that (1) useful extended nonflat power laws are very difficult to realize in inflation, (2) double inflation leading to a mountain leveling off at a high-amplitude plateau at long wavelengths is generic, but to tune the cliff rising up to the plateau to lie in an interesting wavelength range, a special choice of initial conditions and/or scalar field potentials is required, and (3) small mountains (moguls) on the potential surface lead to mountains of extra power in the fluctuations added on top of an underlying flat spectrum. For quadratic and quartic couplings, the mountain fluctuations may obey Gaussian statistics but the spectral form will be very sensitive to initial conditions as well as potential parameters; non-Gaussian mountain fluctuations which depend upon potential parameters but not on initial field conditions will be the more likely outcome. However, adding cubic couplings can give mountains obeying Gaussian statistics independently of initial conditions. Since observations only probe a narrow patch of the potential surface, it is possible that it is littered with moguls, leading to arbitrarily complex ``mountain range'' spectra that can only be determined phenomenologically. We also construct an

  4. Vacuum density fluctuations in extended chaotic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Gundlach, Carsten; Langlois, David

    1992-12-01

    An inflaton (scalar field) with the potential cσ2n is coupled to gravity within the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory. The corresponding inflationary model (that is, a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker solution with a slowly varying inflaton) is constructed for all values of the coupling β of the inflaton to the dilaton (Brans-Dicke scalar field). The linearized perturbations of the metric, the dilaton, and the inflaton are then quantized within a gauge-invariant formalism. The power spectrum of the vacuum density fluctuations is calculated as a function of c,n, and β. It is the juxtaposition of two powers of the wave number corresponding, respectively, to the contribution of the inflaton and the dilaton. We find the value of β for which the dilaton contribution dominates on observable cosmological scales.

  5. Energy density fluctuations in early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Ruggieri, M.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    The primordial nucleosinthesys of the element can be influenced by the transitions of phase that take place after the Big Bang, such as the QCD transition. In order to study the effect of this phase transition, in this work we compute the time evolution of thermodynamical quantities of the early universe, focusing on temperature and energy density fluctuations, by solving the relevant equations of motion using as input the lattice QCD equation of state to describe the strongly interacting matter in the early universe plasma. We also study the effect of a primordial strong magnetic field by means of a phenomenological equation of state. Our results show that small inhomogeneities of strongly interacting matter in the early Universe are moderately damped during the crossover.

  6. The Phase Coherence of Interstellar Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of MHD turbulence often investigate the Fourier power spectrum to provide information on the nature of the turbulence cascade. However, the Fourier power spectrum only contains the Fourier amplitudes and rejects all information regarding the Fourier phases. Here, we investigate the utility of two statistical diagnostics for recovering information on Fourier phases in ISM column density maps: the averaged amplitudes of the bispectrum and the phase coherence index (PCI), a new phase technique for the ISM. We create three-dimensional density and two-dimensional column density maps using a set of simulations of isothermal ideal MHD turbulence with a wide range of sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers. We find that the bispectrum averaged along different angles with respect to either the k 1 or k 2 axis is primarily sensitive to the sonic Mach number while averaging the bispectral amplitudes over different annuli is sensitive to both the sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers. The PCI of density suggests that the most correlated phases occur in supersonic sub-Alfvénic turbulence and near the shock scale. This suggests that nonlinear interactions with correlated phases are strongest in shock-dominated regions, in agreement with findings from the solar wind. Our results suggest that the phase information contained in the bispectrum and PCI can be used to find the turbulence parameters in column density maps.

  7. The Transport of Density Fluctuations Throughout the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Jetha, N.; Hu, Q.; Hunana, P.

    2012-01-01

    The solar wind is recognized as a turbulent magnetofluid, for which the properties of the turbulent velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are often described by the equations of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). However, low-frequency density turbulence is also ubiquitous. On the basis of a nearly incompressible formulation of MHD in the expanding inhomogeneous solar wind, we derive the transport equation for the variance of the density fluctuations (Rho(exp 2)). The transport equation shows that density fluctuations behave as a passive scalar in the supersonic solar wind. In the absence of sources of density turbulence, such as within 1AU, the variance (Rho(exp 2)) approximates r(exp -4). In the outer heliosphere beyond 1 AU, the shear between fast and slow streams, the propagation of shocks, and the creation of interstellar pickup ions all act as sources of density turbulence. The model density fluctuation variance evolves with heliocentric distance within approximately 300 AU as (Rho(exp 2)) approximates r(exp -3.3) after which it flattens and then slowly increases. This is precisely the radial profile for the density fluctuation variance observed by Voyager 2. Using a different analysis technique, we confirm the radial profile for Rho(exp 2) of Bellamy, Cairns, & Smith using Voyager 2 data. We conclude that a passive scalar description for density fluctuations in the supersonic solar wind can explain the density fluctuation variance observed in both the inner and the outer heliosphere.

  8. Density-noise power fluctuations in vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, E. R.; Grushin, A.; Barnum, A. C.; Weissman, M. B.

    2001-02-01

    The noise power spectra of the fluctuations in density of a vibrated column of granular material are found to be time dependent. Spectral analysis of these noise power fluctuations shows nontrivial frequency dependences. The noise powers at different frequencies are also found to fluctuate in a partially correlated way. In most instances, the slow variations of the noise are strongly correlated over a broad range of frequencies. These results indicate that highly cooperative interactions exist between fluctuators. In contrast, effects of such strongly coupled fluctuators are absent in the one-dimensional parking-lot-model, one of the simplest systems used to provide a model for recent granular compaction experiments.

  9. Fermion pseudogap from fluctuations of an order parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernyshyov, Oleg Vladimirovich

    Pseudogap behavior, observed in cuprate superconductors and Peierls chains, is studied using various phenomenological approaches. (1) A work of M. V. Sadovskii on Peierls chains with Gaussian fluctuations of the order parameter is revisited. A more transparent diagrammatic method is given and a serious error is pointed out. The method is applied to a recent work of J. Schmalian, B. Stojkovic and D. Pines on "hot spots". It is shown that, while their model is not affected by Sadovskii's mistake, it predicts no pseudogap in the local density of states. (2) A simple analytical treatment based on the self-consistent t-matrix approach is suggested to describe Cooper pair fluctuations deeply in the pseudogap regime. It is argued that a pronounced depletion of the fermion density of states by the pseudogap suppresses the decay of pairing fluctuations, giving them a propagating, rather than diffusing, nature. In view of an approximate particle-hole symmetry at the Fermi surface, both electron pairs and hole pairs should exist in the pseudogap regime, in addition to gapped fermions. Near 2 dimensions, the condensation temperature of these pairs is linearly proportional to the fermion density (the Uemura scaling). (3) A work of J. R. Schrieffer and A. R. Kampf on the crossover between an antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulator and a Fermi liquid is complemented by an exactly solvable toy model with all essential features intact. Based on that solution, the three bands of Schrieffer and Kampf are reinterpreted as just two AFM bands with a gap slowly varying in time or across the sample.

  10. How plasma parameters fluctuations influence emissive probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bousselin, G. Plihon, N.; Lemoine, N.; Heuraux, S.; Cavalier, J.

    2015-05-15

    Relationship between the floating potential of an emissive probe and plasma potential oscillations is studied in the case of controlled oscillations of plasma parameters. This relationship is compared to a quasi-static model for floating potential oscillations that assumes a constant emission current and includes the fluctuations of plasma parameters (density and electron temperature). Two different plasma regimes are considered. In the first one, the model is coherent with experimental results. In the second, the model does not fulfill one of the assumption due to the evidence of emission current oscillations when the mean emission current exceeds a given threshold. This second regime highlights the importance of taking into account emission current oscillations in the interpretation of emissive probe measurements. Nevertheless, discrepancies are still observed between emissive probe floating potential and plasma potential oscillations.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission as a density fluctuation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.G.; Phillips, P.E.; Hubbard, A.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique for measuring density fluctuations using a high-resolution heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed. Although ECE radiometry is typically used for electron temperature measurements, the unique viewing geometry of this system's quasioptical antenna has been found to make the detected emission extremely sensitive to refractive effects under certain conditions. This sensitivity gives the diagnostic the ability to measure very low levels of density fluctuations in the core of Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The refractive effects have been modeled using ray-tracing methods, allowing estimates of the density fluctuation magnitude and spatial localization.

  12. Interplay between density and superconducting quantum critical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Caprara, S; Bergeal, N; Lesueur, J; Grilli, M

    2015-10-28

    We consider the case of a density-driven metal-superconductor transition in the proximity of an electronic phase separation. In particular, we investigate the interplay between superconducting fluctuations and density fluctuations, which become quantum critical when the electronic phase separation vanishes at zero temperature into a quantum critical point. In this situation, the critical dynamical density fluctuations strongly affect the dynamics of the Cooper-pair fluctuations, which acquire a more singular character with a z  =  3 dynamical critical index. This gives rise to a scenario that possibly rules the disappearance of superconductivity when the electron density is reduced by electrostatic gating at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  13. Modification of Boundary Parameters and Fluctuations by IBW and LHCD in the HT-7 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei; Wan, Baonian; Xu, Guosheng; Liu, Haiqing; Ling, Bili; Li, Chengfu; Zhou, Liwu

    2003-08-01

    Measurements of boundary parameters and their fluctuations have been performed in ohmic (OH) plasma and Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) enhanced confinement plasma using a pneumatically driven Langmuir probe array on HT-7 tokamak. In the enhanced confinement plasma, the gradients of electron density and temperature become higher and a transport barrier comes into being in the vicinity of the limiter. The boundary potential shows a clear modification in the same region. The fluctuation levels are significantly depressed and the coherences between fluctuations are reduced evidently in the enhanced plasma. Meanwhile, we obtained the spectral features and the poloidal phase velocity of fluctuations using a two-point correlation technique and found obvious modifications of the turbulence and the poloidal flow. The results suggest that the improved confinement in the IBW and LHCD enhanced plasma is at least partially due to the modification of the boundary parameters and the suppression of the boundary fluctuations and fluctuation induced fluxes.

  14. The power associated with density fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Direct observations from Pioneer 6 of solar-wind-proton fluctuations have been used to obtain the power spectra associated with solar-wind-proton number density and velocity fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz, extending previous analyses by an order of magnitude at the higher frequencies. The slopes of the power spectra associated with the density fluctuations and the velocity fluctuations are similar and are in agreement with the shape of the power spectra found at the lower frequencies. The power spectra indicate that the power-law density spectrum observed at lower frequencies extends to at least 0.01 Hz. This smooth variation in the spectrum at these frequencies is consistent with previous extrapolations of both spacecraft and interplanetary scintillation observations.

  15. The power associated with density fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Direct observations from Pioneer 6 of solar-wind-proton fluctuations have been used to obtain the power spectra associated with solar-wind-proton number density and velocity fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz, extending previous analyses by an order of magnitude at the higher frequencies. The slopes of the power spectra associated with the density fluctuations and the velocity fluctuations are similar and are in agreement with the shape of the power spectra found at the lower frequencies. The power spectra indicate that the power-law density spectrum observed at lower frequencies extends to at least 0.01 Hz. This smooth variation in the spectrum at these frequencies is consistent with previous extrapolations of both spacecraft and interplanetary scintillation observations.

  16. Density fluctuations of polymers in disordered media

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Joshua M.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2011-03-02

    We study self-avoiding random walks in an environment where sites are excluded randomly, in two and three dimensions. For a single polymer chain, we study the statistics of the time averaged monomer density and show that these are well described by multifractal statistics. This is true even far from the percolation transition of the disordered medium. We investigate solutions of chains in a disordered environment and show that the statistics cease to be multifractal beyond the screening length of the solution.

  17. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-02-16

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  18. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  19. Measurement of high-frequency, small scale density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Sarff, J. S.; Carmody, D.; Terry, P. W.; den Hartog, D. J.; Morton, L. A.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; MST Team

    2014-10-01

    In standard MST RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. Using pulsed parallel current drive, tearing is significantly reduced and smaller-scale fluctuations are likely important to electron particle and heat transport for these improved confinement plasmas. On MST, an 11-chord FIR laser-based interferometry diagnostic, with ~ 8 cm chord spacing, is used to measure electron density fluctuations with wavenumbers k < 1-2 cm-1. An upgrade underway will allow resolution up to k ~ 15 cm-1. A fast magnetic coil array is employed for magnetic fluctuations. High-frequency (>50 kHz) small-scale (n > 15) density and magnetic fluctuations have been observed in the edge plasma, where density and temperature gradients are largest. These fluctuations are distinct from tearing and have amplitudes that correlate with the density gradient and electron beta. The MST is well suited to explore beta scaling given the large dynamic range (9-26%) found in the device. Correlation of the measured density fluctuations with plasma parameters in high beta plasmas will serve to identify the drive and contribute to validation of gyrokinetic codes. Work supported by DOE and NSF.

  20. Cosmological models with the energy density of random fluctuations and the Hubble-constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    The fluctuation energy is derived from adiabatic random fluctuations due to second-order perturbation theory, and the evolutionary relation for it is expressed in the form of ρ_f = ρ_f (ρ), where ρ and ρ_f are the densities of ordinary dust and the fluctuation energy, respectively. The pressureless matter as a constituent of the universe at the later stage is assumed to consist of ordinary dust and the fluctuation energy. Next, cosmological models including the fluctuation energy as a kind of dark matter are derived using the above relation, and it is found that the Hubble parameter and the other model parameters in the derived models can be consistent with the recent observational values. Moreover, the perturbations of ρ and ρ_f are studied.

  1. Mesonic and nucleon fluctuation effects at finite baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejős, G.; Hosaka, A.

    2017-06-01

    Mesonic and nucleon fluctuation effects are investigated in medium. We couple the nucleon field to the 2 +1 flavor meson model and investigate the finite temperature and density behavior of the system, in particular, the axial anomaly function. Somewhat contrary to earlier expectations, we find that it tends to strengthen at finite density. At lower temperatures, nucleon density fluctuations can cause a relative difference in the UA(1 ) axial anomaly of about 20%. This has important consequences on the mesonic spectra, especially on the η -η' system, as we observe no drop in the η' mass as a function of the baryochemical potential, irrespective of the temperature. Based on the details of chiral symmetry restoration, it is argued that there has to be a competition between underlying QCD effects of the anomaly and fluctuations of the low energy hadronic degrees of freedom, and the fate of the UA(1 ) coefficient should be decided by taking into account both effects simultaneously.

  2. MEASUREMENTS OF RAPID DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, D. M.; Ergun, R. E.; Kellogg, P. J.; Bale, S. D.

    2010-03-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations in the solar wind is inferred by tracking small timescale changes in the electron plasma frequency during periods of strong Langmuir wave activity. STEREO electric field waveform data are used to produce time profiles of plasma density from which the density power spectrum is derived. The power spectra obtained by this method extend the observed frequency range by an order of magnitude while remaining consistent with previous results near a few Hertz. Density power spectral indices are found to be organized by the angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind direction, indicating significant anisotropy in solar wind high-frequency density turbulence.

  3. Density fluctuation measurements by using the Fraunhofer diffraction method in GAMMA10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.

    2013-12-01

    We applied Fraunhofer diffraction (FD) method to GAMMA10 plasma. The FD method can measure the density fluctuation in detail and the wave number of the fluctuation. We successfully obtained the density fluctuation spectra in GAMMA 10. Analyzing the FD method signals of radial fluctuation intensity profile, we can successfully obtain the wave number and the phase velocity of the low frequency density fluctuation.

  4. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <{tilde j}{sub {parallel}} {tilde B}{sub r}>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  5. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <$\\tilde{j}$$\\parallel$ $\\tilde{B}$r>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  6. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, Christian; Su, Edward J.; Keshet, Aviv; Gommers, Ralf; Shin, Yong-il; Huang Wujie; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-07-23

    We study density profiles of an ideal Fermi gas and observe Pauli suppression of density fluctuations (atom shot noise) for cold clouds deep in the quantum degenerate regime. Strong suppression is observed for probe volumes containing more than 10 000 atoms. Measuring the level of suppression provides sensitive thermometry at low temperatures. After this method of sensitive noise measurements has been validated with an ideal Fermi gas, it can now be applied to characterize phase transitions in strongly correlated many-body systems.

  7. Radial evolution of the intermittency of density fluctuations in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Telloni, D.; Primavera, L.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2014-05-01

    We study the radial evolution of the intermittency of density fluctuations in the fast solar wind. The study is performed by analyzing the plasma density measurements provided by Helios 2 in the inner heliosphere between 0.3 and 0.9 AU. The analysis is carried out by means of a complete set of diagnostic tools, including the flatness factor at different timescales to estimate intermittency, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to estimate the degree of intermittency, and the Fourier transform to estimate the power spectral densities of these fluctuations. Density fluctuations within the fast wind are rather intermittent and their level of intermittency, together with the amplitude of intermittent events, decreases with the distance from the Sun, at odds with the intermittency of both magnetic field and all other plasma parameters. Furthermore, the intermittent events are strongly correlated, exhibiting temporal clustering. This indicates that the mechanism underlying their generation departs from a time-varying Poisson process. A remarkable, qualitative similarity with the behavior of plasma density fluctuations obtained from a numerical study of the nonlinear evolution of parametric instability in the solar wind supports the idea that this mechanism has an important role in governing density fluctuations in the inner heliosphere.

  8. Discriminating the trapped electron modes contribution in density fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnichand, H.; Sabot, R.; Hacquin, S.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Bourdelle, C.; Citrin, J.; Garbet, X.; Giacalone, J. C.; Guirlet, R.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Meneses, L.

    2015-09-01

    Quasi-coherent (QC) modes have been reported for more than 10 years in reflectometry fluctuations spectra in the core region of fusion plasmas. They have characteristics in-between coherent and broadband fluctuations as they oscillate at a marked frequency but have a wide spectrum. This work presents further evidences of the link recently established between QC modes and the trapped electron modes (TEM) instabilities (Arnichand et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 123017). In electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges of Tore Supra, an enhancement of QC modes amplitude is observed in a region where TEM cause impurity transport and turbulence. In JET Ohmic plasmas, QC modes disappear during density ramp-up and current ramp-down. This is reminiscent of Tore Supra and TEXTOR observations during transitions from the linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) to the saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regimes. Evidencing TEM activity then becomes experimentally possible via analysis of fluctuation spectra.

  9. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-jie; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward by Fu and Pawlowski [Phys. Rev. D 92, 116006 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.116006 and Phys. Rev. D 93, 091501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.091501]. In the present work, we aim to improve the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and, in partitular, large densities, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov-loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results, and recent experimental data from STAR.

  10. Core density gradient fluctuation measurement by differential interferometry in the helically symmetric experiment stellaratora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    The interferometer system on the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) stellarator uses an expanded beam and linear detector array to realize a multichord measurement. Unlike conventional interferometry which determines the plasma phase shift with respect to a reference, directly evaluating the phase between two adjacent chords can be employed to measure the change in plasma phase with impact parameter. This approach provides a measure of the equilibrium density gradient or the density gradient fluctuations and is referred to as differential interferometry. For central chords, measurements are spatially localized due to a geometrical weighting factor and can provide information on core density gradient fluctuations. The measurement requires finite coherence between fluctuations in the two spatially offset chords. This technique is applied on the HSX stellarator to measure both broadband turbulence and coherent modes. Spatial localization is exploited to isolate core turbulence changes associated with change in magnetic configuration or heating location.

  11. Langmuir turbulence driven by beams in solar wind plasmas with long wavelength density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.

    2016-03-25

    The self-consistent evolution of Langmuir turbulence generated by electron beams in solar wind plasmas with density inhomogeneities is calculated by numerical simulations based on a 1D Hamiltonian model. It is shown, owing to numerical simulations performed with parameters relevant to type III solar bursts’ conditions at 1 AU, that the presence of long-wavelength random density fluctuations of sufficiently large average level crucially modifies the well-known process of beam interaction with Langmuir waves in homogeneous plasmas.

  12. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters.

    PubMed

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations show cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant phenotypic differences. Noise-induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We show that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  13. Radial evolution of the energy density of solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of transport theories appropriate to a radially expanding solar wind, we describe new results for the radial evolution of the energy density in solar wind fluctuations at MHD scales. These models include the effects of 'mixing' and driving as well as the possibility of non-isotropic MHD turbulence. Implications of these results for solar wind heating, cosmic ray diffusion and interstellar pick-up ions will also be addressed.

  14. Radial evolution of the energy density of solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of transport theories appropriate to a radially expanding solar wind, we describe new results for the radial evolution of the energy density in solar wind fluctuations at MHD scales. These models include the effects of 'mixing' and driving as well as the possibility of non-isotropic MHD turbulence. Implications of these results for solar wind heating, cosmic ray diffusion and interstellar pick-up ions will also be addressed.

  15. Amplitude of primeval fluctuations from cosmological mass density reconstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We use the POTENT reconstruction of the mass density field in the nearby universe to estimate the amplitude of the density fluctuation power spectrum for various cosmological models. We find that sigma(sub 8) Omega(sub m sup 0.6) = 1.3(sub -0.3 sup +0.4), almost independently of the power spectrum. This value agrees well with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization for the standard cold dark matter model, while alternative models predict an excessive amplitude compared with COBE. Flat, low Omega(sub m) models and tilted models with spectral index n less than 0.8 are particularly discordant.

  16. Amplitude of primeval fluctuations from cosmological mass density reconstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We use the POTENT reconstruction of the mass density field in the nearby universe to estimate the amplitude of the density fluctuation power spectrum for various cosmological models. We find that sigma(sub 8) Omega(sub m sup 0.6) = 1.3(sub -0.3 sup +0.4), almost independently of the power spectrum. This value agrees well with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization for the standard cold dark matter model, while alternative models predict an excessive amplitude compared with COBE. Flat, low Omega(sub m) models and tilted models with spectral index n less than 0.8 are particularly discordant.

  17. Effect of Heating on Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Noise Generation From High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.; Eck, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Heated jets in a wide range of temperature ratios (TR), and acoustic Mach numbers (Ma) were investigated experimentally using far field microphones and a molecular Rayleigh scattering technique. The latter provided density fluctuations measurements. Two sets of operating conditions were considered: (1) TR was varied between 0.84 and 2.7 while Ma was fixed at 0.9; (2) Ma was varied between 0.6 and 1.48, while TR was fixed at 2.27. The implementation of the molecular Rayleigh scattering technique required dust removal and usage of a hydrogen combustor to avoid soot particles. Time averaged density measurements in the first set of data showed differences in the peripheral density shear layers between the unheated and heated jets. The nozzle exit shear layer showed increased turbulence level with increased plume temperature. Nevertheless, further downstream the density fluctuations spectra are found to be nearly identical for all Mach number and temperature ratio conditions. To determine noise sources a correlation study between plume density fluctuations and far field sound pressure fluctuations was conducted. For all jets the core region beyond the end of the potential flow was found to be the strongest noise source. Except for an isothermal jet, the correlations did not differ significantly with increasing temperature ratio. The isothermal jet created little density fluctuations. Although the far field noise from this jet did not show any exceptional trend, the flow-sound correlations were very low. This indicated that the density fluctuations only acted as a "tracer parameter" for the noise sources.

  18. Effect of Heating on Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Noise Generation From High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.; Eck, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Heated jets in a wide range of temperature ratios (TR), and acoustic Mach numbers (Ma) were investigated experimentally using far field microphones and a molecular Rayleigh scattering technique. The latter provided density fluctuations measurements. Two sets of operating conditions were considered: (1) TR was varied between 0.84 and 2.7 while Ma was fixed at 0.9; (2) Ma was varied between 0.6 and 1.48, while TR was fixed at 2.27. The implementation of the molecular Rayleigh scattering technique required dust removal and usage of a hydrogen combustor to avoid soot particles. Time averaged density measurements in the first set of data showed differences in the peripheral density shear layers between the unheated and heated jets. The nozzle exit shear layer showed increased turbulence level with increased plume temperature. Nevertheless, further downstream the density fluctuations spectra are found to be nearly identical for all Mach number and temperature ratio conditions. To determine noise sources a correlation study between plume density fluctuations and far field sound pressure fluctuations was conducted. For all jets the core region beyond the end of the potential flow was found to be the strongest noise source. Except for an isothermal jet, the correlations did not differ significantly with increasing temperature ratio. The isothermal jet created little density fluctuations. Although the far field noise from this jet did not show any exceptional trend, the flow-sound correlations were very low. This indicated that the density fluctuations only acted as a "tracer parameter" for the noise sources.

  19. Compaction and density fluctuations in vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, A. C. B.; Ozbay, A.; Nowak, E. R.

    2002-03-01

    We report measurements of the density of a vibrated granular material as a function of time or taps. The material studied consists of monodisperse spherical glass beads confined to a long, thin cylindrical tube. Changes in vibration intensity are used to induce transitions between two steady state densities that depend on the intensity of the vibrations. We find a complex time evolution similar to previous work on the irreversible relaxation from a loose state toward a steady state. In addition, frequency dependent third order moments of the density fluctuations are measured. The data indicate a coupling between large variations in density on one time scale and noise power over a broad range of higher-frequency scales. This work was partly supported by Petroleum Research Foundation under award No. 35861-G5.

  20. Compaction and Density Fluctuations in Vibrated Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, A. C. B.; Ozbay, Arif; Nowak, E. R.

    We report measurements of the density of a vibrated granular material as a function of time or taps. The material studied consists of monodisperse spherical glass beads confined to a long, thin cylindrical tube. Changes in vibration intensity are used to induce transitions between two steady state densities that depend on the intensity of the vibrations. We find a complex time evolution similar to previous work on the irreversible relaxation from a loose state toward a steady state. In addition, frequency dependent third order moments of the density fluctuations are measured. The data indicate a coupling between large variations in density on one time scale and noise power over a broad range of higher-frequency scales.

  1. Spontaneous density fluctuations in granular flow and traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans J.

    It is known that spontaneous density waves appear in granular material flowing through pipes or hoppers. A similar phenomenon is known from traffic jams on highways. Using numerical simulations we show that several types of waves exist and find that the density fluctuations follow a power law spectrum. We also investigate one-dimensional traffic models. If positions and velocities are continuous variables the model shows self-organized criticality driven by the slowest car. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann models reproduce the experimentally observed effects. Density waves are spontaneously generated when the viscosity has a non-linear dependence on density or shear rate as it is the case in traffic or granular flow.

  2. Cluster evolution as a probe of primordial density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Myers, Steven T.

    1993-01-01

    Although COBE's detection of large angle microwave background anisotropies fixes the amplitude of density fluctuations on length scales k exp -1 approximately = (300-6000) h(exp -1)Mpc, what is crucial for the level of large scale clustering is the amplitude of density fluctuations on scales (5-50) h(exp -1)Mpc. The level of dynamical clustering is usually parameterized by the size of the mass fluctuations in 8 h exp -1 Mpc spheres, sigma sub 8. For the cold dark matter model, COBE gives sigma sub 8 approximately = 1, while models with extra large scale power give sigma sub 8 approximately = 1/2. The most massive clusters of galaxies (greater than or approximately = 10 exp 15 solar mass) form from rare 'peak patches' found in the initial mass density distribution. Their abundance as a function of redshift is a sensitive probe of the wave number band k(exp -1) approx. (3-8) h(exp -1)Mpc, hence of sigma sub 8, and so cluster evolution can discriminate among models allowed by the COBE results. We use our Hierarchical Peaks Method, which accurately reproduces the results of P3M N-body simulations, to calculate the evolution of cluster x-ray flux counts, luminosity, and temperature functions as a function of sigma sub 8 for CDM models and those with more large scale power. We find that the EMSS and Edge et al. cluster samples support sigma sub 8 in the range from approx. 0.6-0.9, and that models with more large scale power (and hence flatter fluctuation spectra in the cluster regime) fit the x-ray bright end better.

  3. Lyman-alpha clouds as a relic of primordial density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. R.; Szalay, A. S.; Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    Primordial density fluctuations are studied using a CDM model and primordial clouds some of which are expanding, driven by pressure gradients created when the medium is photionized, and some of which are massive enough to continue collapsing in spite of the pressure. Normalization of CDM models to the clustering properties on large scales are used to predict the parameters of collapsing clouds of subgalactic mass at early epochs. It is shown that the abundance and dimensions of these clouds are comparable to those of the Lyman-alpha systems. The evolutionary history of the clouds is computed, utilizing a spherically symmetric hydrodynamics code with the dark matter treated as a collisionless fluid, and the H I column density distribution is evaluated as a function of N(H I) and redshift. The observed cloud parameters come out naturally in the CDM model and suggest that Lyman-alpha clouds are the missing link between primordial density fluctuations and the formation of galaxies.

  4. Fluctuation-induced pair density wave in itinerant ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conduit, G. J.; Pedder, C. J.; Green, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic fluctuations near to quantum criticality can have profound effects. They lead to characteristic scaling at high temperature which may ultimately give way to a reconstruction of the phase diagram and the formation of new phases at low temperatures. The ferromagnet UGe2 is unstable to p-wave superconducting order—an effect presaged by the superfluidity in 3He—whereas in CeFePO fluctuations drive the formation of spiral magnetic order. Here we develop a general quantum order-by-disorder description of these systems that encompasses both of these instabilities within a unified framework. This allows us to demonstrate that in fact these instabilities intertwine to form a pair density wave.

  5. Density fluctuations due to Raman forward scattering in quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Punit Singh, Shiv; Rathore, Nisha Singh

    2016-05-06

    Density fluctuations due Raman forward scattering (RFS) is analysed in the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with high density quantum plasma. The interaction model is developed using the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model which consist of a set of equations describing the transport of charge, density, momentum and energy of a charged particle system interacting through a self-consistent electrostatic potential. The nonlinear source current has been obtained incorporating the effects of quantum Bohm potential, Fermi pressure and electron spin. The laser spectrum is strongly modulated by the interaction, showing sidebands at the plasma frequency. Furthermore, as the quiver velocity of the electrons in the high electric field of the laser beam is quit large, various quantum effects are observed which can be attributed to the variation of electron mass with laser intensity.

  6. Observations of ULF wave related equatorial electrojet and density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Anad, F.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    Global magnetospheric Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) pulsations with frequencies in the Pc 4-5 range (f = 1.0 - 8 mHz) have been observed for decades in space and on Earth. ULF pulsations contribute to magnetospheric particle transport and diffusion and play an important role in magnetospheric dynamics. However, only a few studies have been performed on ionospheric observations of ULF wave-related perturbations in the vicinity of the equatorial region. In this paper we report on Pc5 wave related electric field and thus vertical drift velocity oscillations at the equator as observed by ground magnetometers and radar. We show that the magnetometer estimated equatorial ExB drift oscillate with the same frequency as ULF Pc5 waves, creating significant ionospheric density fluctuations. For independent confirmation of the vertical drift velocity fluctuation, we used JULIA 150 km radar drift velocities and found similar fluctuation with the period of 8-10 minutes. We also show ionospheric density fluctuations during the period when we observed ULF wave activities. All these demonstrate that the Pc5 wave can penetrate to the equatorial ionosphere and modulate the equatorial electrodynamics. Finally, in order to detect the ULF activities both on the ground and in space, we use groundbased magnetometer data from African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and the South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA). From space, we use magnetic field observations from the GOES 12 and the Communication/Navigation Outage and Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellites. Using the WIND spacecraft as the upstream solar wind monitor, we present direct evidence that solar wind number density and ram pressure fluctuations observed far upstream from the terrestrial magnetosphere are the main drivers of ULF wave activity inside the magnetosphere. Finally, we show that the ULF waves in the same frequency range are observed in the magnetosphere by the geosynchronous GOES spacecraft, in the

  7. Penetration and scattering of lower hybrid waves by density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2014-02-12

    Lower Hybrid [LH] ray propagation in toroidal plasma is controlled by a combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched from the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the density fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial RF wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the turbulence. The electron temperature gradient [ETG] spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and parallel phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current density giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH-driven plasma currents. The scattered LH spectrum is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with a diffusivity proportional to the fluctuations. The LH ray diffusivity is large giving transport in the poloidal and radial wavenumber spectrum in one - or a few passes - of the rays through the core plasma.

  8. Density fluctuation spectrum of two-dimensional correlated fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Akihiro; Hirashima, Dai

    2012-12-01

    Density fluctuation spectrum of two-dimensional fermions that interact with short-range repulsive interaction is calculated with the self-consistent perturbation theory. The spectrum extends beyond the particle-hole continuum band in the noninteracting case because of the multiparticle excitations. At a large wave vector, a peak develops in the spectrum near the lower threshold of the particle-hole continuum. These results are compared with the recent inelastic neutron scattering experiment on two-dimensional 3He adsorbed on graphite.

  9. Kinetic effects of Alfven wave nonlinearity. I - Ponderomotive density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    The Vlasov theory is used to study kinetic corrections to fluid descriptions of Alfven wave nonlinearity. The method is to obtain an expression for the second-order perturbed distribution function produced by a nonlinear Alfven wave. From this distribution function a kinetically correct expression is obtained for the plasma density perturbation associated with an envelope-modulated Alfven wave. This kinetic theory result differs substantially from the fluid expression when the plasma beta is greater than about 1, and the electron and ion temperatures are approximately equal. This result is of interest because density fluctuations are an observationally accessible indicator of wave nonlinearity in solar system Alfven waves. It also will assist in the determination of properties of Alfven waves in the interstellar medium. Finally, this analysis also yields a kinetically correct expression for u, the magnetic field-aligned component of the plasma fluid velocity.

  10. Intermittency of density fluctuations upstream and downstream interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazantseva, Maria; Budaev, Viacheslav; Rakhmanova, Lyudmila; Borodkova, Natalia; Zastenker, Georgy; Yermolaev, Yuri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Pitna, Alexander; Prech, Lubomir

    2017-04-01

    The statistical properties of density fluctuations in a turbulent solar wind flow in the vicinity of interplanetary (IP) shocks are observed. We analyze probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz according to measurements of the BMSW instrument on board of Spektr-R. We determine high order structure functions, their moments and scaling properties of PDFs upstream and downstream IP shocks. The experimental scaling is compared with the scaling predicted by the traditional Kolmogorov and by log-Poisson models taking into account intermittency. We produce the parameterization of scaling using She-Leveque-Dubrulle implementation of the log-Poisson model and reveal the difference in the level of intermittency. These levels can vary depending on many plasma agents, but generally, solar wind plasma shows the universal statistical properties not depending on a level of intermittency upstream and downstream IP shocks. The best agreement of experimental scaling is shown for the log-Poisson model with assumption of predominance of a filamentary geometry for singular dissipative structures.

  11. Spatial structure of lemming populations (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus) fluctuating in density.

    PubMed

    Ehrich, D; Jorde, P E; Krebs, C J; Kenney, A J; Stacy, J E; Stenseth, N C

    2001-02-01

    The pattern and scale of the genetic structure of populations provides valuable information for the understanding of the spatial ecology of populations, including the spatial aspects of density fluctuations. In the present paper, the genetic structure of periodically fluctuating lemmings (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus) in the Canadian Arctic was analysed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences and four nuclear microsatellite loci. Low genetic variability was found in mtDNA, while microsatellite loci were highly variable in all localities, including localities on isolated small islands. For both genetic markers the genetic differentiation was clear among geographical regions but weaker among localities within regions. Such a pattern implies gene flow within regions. Based on theoretical calculations and population census data from a snap-trapping survey, we argue that the observed genetic variability on small islands and the low level of differentiation among these islands cannot be explained without invoking long distance dispersal of lemmings over the sea ice. Such dispersal is unlikely to occur only during population density peaks.

  12. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Yun, G S; Lee, W; Choi, M J; Kim, J B; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Tobias, B; Liang, T; Kong, X; Luhmann, N C; Donné, A J H

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  13. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-10-15

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  14. Listening to the Noise: Random Fluctuations Reveal Gene Network Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations exhibit cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant prototypical differences. Noise induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified using flow cytometry, single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, time lapse fluorescence microscopy and other single cell and single molecule measurement techniques. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. We use theoretical investigations to establish experimental guidelines for the identification of gene regulatory networks, and we apply these guideline to experimentally identify predictive models for different regulatory mechanisms in bacteria and yeast.

  15. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  16. Measurements of Electron Density Profile and Fluctuations on HSX*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Probert, P.; Radder, J.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    The 288 GHz interferometer system on the quasi-helical stellarator HSX views the plasma cross section along 9 adjacent chords with 1.5 cm spacing. At this frequency refraction is manageable but requires correction when performing inversions. The interferometer has sensitivity n_edl = 8 x 10^11 cm-2 and frequency response up to 1 MHz. Improved time response permits measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations as well as fast changes to the equilibrium profile. First results from HSX with 2nd harmonic ECH at 28 GHz, using a 5 chord version of the interferometer, indicate that the density profile is quite peaked for both quasi-helically symmetric (QHS) plasmas and those where the quasisymmetry is broken (mirror mode) for ne = 1 x 10^12 cm-3. However, for densities ne = 3 x 10^11 cm-3, the profile for the QHS plasma (high stored energy) is narrower when compared to the mirror mode (low stored energy). Density profile variation with plasma configuration and resonant heating location using the 9 channel interferometer will be described. For high density HSX plasmas, ne > 3 x 10^12 cm-3, coherent oscillations are observed in the line-integrated density traces which are out of phase across the magnetic axis. These m=1 oscillations are observed at frequencies of 1-2 kHz and result in a periodic displacement of the density profile. *Supported by USDOE under grant DE-FG03-01ER-54615, Task III and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  17. Density of States and Its Local Fluctuations Determined by Capacitance of Strongly Disordered Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong; Wang, Lin; He, Yuheng; Wu, Zefei; Cai, Yuan; Zhang, Mingwei; Wang, Yang; Han, Yu; Lortz, Rolf W.; Zhang, Zhao-Qing; Sheng, Ping; Wang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that fluctuations of the local density of states (LDOS) in strongly disordered graphene play an important role in determining the quantum capacitance of the top-gate graphene devices. Depending on the strength of the disorder induced by metal-cluster decoration, the measured quantum capacitance of disordered graphene can dramatically decrease in comparison with pristine graphene. This is opposite to the common belief that quantum capacitance should increase with disorder. To explain this counterintuitive behavior, we present a two-parameter model which incorporates both the non-universal power law behavior for the ADOS and a lognormal distribution of LDOS. We find excellent quantitative agreements between the model and measured quantum capacitance for three disordered samples in a wide range of Fermi energies. Thus, by measuring the quantum capacitance, we can simultaneously determine the ADOS and its fluctuations. It is the LDOS fluctuations that cause the dramatic reduction of the quantum capacitance.

  18. The nucleation process and the roles of structure and density fluctuations in supercooled liquid Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rong; Wu, Yongquan Xiao, Junjiang

    2014-01-21

    We observed homogeneous nucleation process of supercooled liquid Fe by molecular dynamics simulations. Using bond-orientational order parameters together with Voronoi polyhedron method, we characterized local structure, calculated the volume of Voronoi polyhedra of atoms and identified the structure and density fluctuations. We monitored the formation of nucleus and analyzed its inner structure. The birth and growth of the pre-nucleus and nucleus are accompanied with aggregating and disaggregating processes in the time scale of femtosecond. Only the initial solid-like clusters (ISLC), ranging from 1 to 7 atoms, pop up directly from liquid. The relation between the logarithm of number of clusters and the cluster size was found to be linear for ISLCs and was observed to be parabolic for all solid-like clusters (SLC) due to aggregating and disaggregating effects. The nucleus and pre-nuclei mainly consist of body centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal close packed atoms, while the BCC atoms tend to be located at the surface. Medium-range structure fluctuations induce the birth of ISLCs, benefit the aggregation of embryos and remarkably promote the nucleation. But density fluctuations contribute little to nucleation. The lifetime of most icosahedral-like atoms (ICO) is shorter than 0.7 ps. No obvious relationship was found between structure/density fluctuations and the appearance of ICO atoms.

  19. The nucleation process and the roles of structure and density fluctuations in supercooled liquid Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Wu, Yongquan; Xiao, Junjiang

    2014-01-01

    We observed homogeneous nucleation process of supercooled liquid Fe by molecular dynamics simulations. Using bond-orientational order parameters together with Voronoi polyhedron method, we characterized local structure, calculated the volume of Voronoi polyhedra of atoms and identified the structure and density fluctuations. We monitored the formation of nucleus and analyzed its inner structure. The birth and growth of the pre-nucleus and nucleus are accompanied with aggregating and disaggregating processes in the time scale of femtosecond. Only the initial solid-like clusters (ISLC), ranging from 1 to 7 atoms, pop up directly from liquid. The relation between the logarithm of number of clusters and the cluster size was found to be linear for ISLCs and was observed to be parabolic for all solid-like clusters (SLC) due to aggregating and disaggregating effects. The nucleus and pre-nuclei mainly consist of body centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal close packed atoms, while the BCC atoms tend to be located at the surface. Medium-range structure fluctuations induce the birth of ISLCs, benefit the aggregation of embryos and remarkably promote the nucleation. But density fluctuations contribute little to nucleation. The lifetime of most icosahedral-like atoms (ICO) is shorter than 0.7 ps. No obvious relationship was found between structure/density fluctuations and the appearance of ICO atoms.

  20. Nonlocal Parameters for Multiparticle Density Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, N.; Popescu, S.; Sudbery, A.

    1999-07-01

    As far as entanglement is concerned, two density matrices of n particles are completely equivalent if one can be transformed into the other by local unitary transformations. We present two methods to find whether or not two generic density matrices of arbitrary numbers of spin-1/2 particles are equivalent. Both methods describe density matrices in terms of a finite number of invariant parameters.

  1. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  2. Scale invariance of the density fluctuations in films and macromolecular aggregates in poly(styrene) solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Krasovskiĭ, A. N.; Osmolovskaya, N. A.; Efremov, V. I.

    2007-02-01

    The specific features of the transformation of a polymer solution into a solid state (film) of an amorphous polymer are investigated using electron microscopy. The correspondence between the characteristics of fractal macromolecular aggregates in a solution and the parameters of the spatial distribution of density fluctuations at the surface of the film is established using a linear atactic poly(styrene) as an example. The correspondence exists under the condition that the packing density of coils does not exceed a critical value at the liquid-solid phase transition point and the polymer concentration in the solution provides the formation of a continuous network of entangled macromolecules.

  3. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  4. The influence of stochastic density fluctuations on the infrared emissions of interstellar dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, M.; Hegmann, M.; Sedlmayr, E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effects of stochastic density fluctuations on the dust temperatures and the resulting infrared (IR) emission spectra of interstellar clouds as an extension of preceding investigations by Hegmann & Kegel. We consider absorption and scattering by dust grains in spherical clouds which are, on average, homogeneous but have a fluctuating density. The spatial variation of the density is described by means of a Markov process. This clump model introduces two parameters: the correlation length ln and the Gaussian width σn of the density fluctuations. As the intensity Iλ,n inherits the randomness of the density n, the ordinary radiative transfer equation has to be replaced by a generalized transfer equation of Fokker-Planck type. In the first part, we investigate the influence of our model parameters on the radiative transport in the ultraviolet (UV) and use the results to calculate the dust temperature in radiative equilibrium. Afterwards, the IR emission of the dust is modelled for the same set of clump parameters. We find that the presence of clumps decreases the effective extinction and therefore leads to substantial differences in UV illumination and dust temperatures, compared with the homogeneous case. Because of the distribution of dust temperatures, the presence of clumps also affects the IR emission and thus possible observations. In the second part, we use a fit with two blackbody spectra to determine the cloud dust mass from our synthetic IR fluxes. It is shown that in a clumpy environment the overall dust mass is generally underestimated. This effect correlates with the degree of cloud fragmentation.

  5. Density fluctuations at high density in the ergodic divertor configuration of Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Garbet, X.; Antar, G.; Beyer, P.; Boucher, C.; Honore, C.; Gervais, F.; Hennequin, P.; Quémeneur, A.; Truc, A.

    2001-03-01

    The effect of the ergodic divertor on the plasma edge in Tore Supra is to enhance the perpendicular transport through ergodization of the magnetic field lines [Ph. Ghendrih et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 32 (3&4) (1992) 179]. Nevertheless, the hot spots observed on the divertor plates during ergodic divertor operation indicate that the cross-field transport driven by the fluctuations is still playing an important role, although measurements by CO 2 laser scattering and reflectometry show a decrease of the turbulence level [J. Payan, X. Garbet, J.H. Chatenet et al., Nucl. Fusion 35 (1995) 1357; P. Beyer, X. Garbet, P. Ghendrih, Phys. Plasmas 5 (12) (1998) 4271]. In order to gain more understanding, fluctuation level and poloidal velocity have been measured with a reciprocating Langmuir probe biased to collect the ion saturation current ( jsat) and with a CO 2 laser scattering diagnostic. Though the relative fluctuation level behaves as previously observed at low density, a new interesting result is that this picture is gradually modified when the density is increased. Both diagnostics observe an increase of δn/ n with density in the ergodic region, which is not the usual behavior observed in limiter configuration. This increase is detected on both sides of the Er inversion radius and is therefore also affecting the plasma bulk. Finally, the confinement time is found to follow an L-mode law at all densities indicating that the ergodic divertor does not change the global confinement properties of the plasma.

  6. Collective motion and density fluctuations in bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Be'Er, Avraham; Florin, E.-L.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2010-03-01

    The emergence of collective motion such as in fish schools and swarming bacteria is a ubiquitous self-organization phenomenon. Such collective behavior plays an important role in a range of phenomenon, such as formation and migration of animal or fish groups. To understand the collective motion, tracking of large numbers of individuals is needed, but such measurements have been lacking. Here we examine a microscopic system, where we are able to measure simultaneously the positions, velocities, and orientations of up to a thousand bacteria in a colony. The motile bacteria form closely-packed dynamic clusters within which they move cooperatively. The number of bacteria in a cluster exhibits a power-law distribution truncated by an exponential tail, and the probability of finding large clusters grows markedly as bacterial density increases. Mobile clusters exhibit anomalous fluctuations in bacterial density: the standard deviation (δN) grows with the mean (N) of the number of bacteria as δN˜N^3/4 rather than δN˜N^1/2, as in thermal equilibrium systems.

  7. Collective motion and density fluctuations in swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng

    2011-03-01

    The emergence of collective motion such as in fish schools, mammal herds, and insect swarms is a ubiquitous self-organization phenomenon. Such collective behavior plays an important role in a range of problems, such as spreading of deceases in animal or fish groups. Current models have provided a qualitative understanding of collective motion, but progress in quantitative modeling in hindered by the lack of experimental data. Here we examine a model microscopic system, where we are able to measure simultaneously the positions, velocities, and orientations of up to a thousand bacteria in a colony. The motile bacteria form closely-packed dynamic clusters within which they move cooperatively. The number of bacteria in a cluster exhibits a power-law distribution truncated by an exponential tail, and the probability of finding large clusters grows markedly as bacterial density increases. Mobile clusters cause anomalous fluctuations in bacterial density as found in mathematical theories and numerical models. Our results demonstrate that bacteria are an excellent system to study general phenomena of collective motion.

  8. Dynamical Selection of the Primordial Density Fluctuation Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2011-02-25

    In inflationary models, the predicted amplitude of primordial density perturbations Q is much larger than the observed value ({approx}10{sup -5}) for natural choices of parameters. To explain the requisite exponential fine-tuning, anthropic selection is often invoked, especially in cases where microphysics is expected to produce a complex energy landscape. By contrast, we find examples of ekpyrotic models based on heterotic M theory for which dynamical selection naturally favors the observed value of Q.

  9. Electron density fluctuation measurements using a multichannel microwave interferometer in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M.; Shima, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Nakahara, A.; Yanagi, N.; Itakura, A.; Hojo, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Matama, K.; Tatematsu, Y.; Imai, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Cho, T.

    2006-10-15

    Measurement of fluctuation in plasma is important for studying the improvement in plasma confinement by the formation of the plasma confinement potential. The density fluctuation is observed by microwaves by methods such as interferometry, reflectometry and Fraunhofer diffraction method. We have constructed a new multichannel microwave interferometer to measure the plasma density and fluctuation radial profiles in a single plasma shot. We successfully measured the time-dependent density and line-integrated density fluctuation radial profiles in a single plasma shot using the multichannel microwave interferometer. Thus, we have developed a useful tool for studying the improvement in plasma confinement by the formation of plasma confinement potential.

  10. Are metastable, precrystallisation, density-fluctuations a universal phenomena?

    PubMed

    Heeley, Ellen L; Poh, C Kit; Li, Wu; Maidens, Anna; Bras, Wim; Dolbnya, Igor P; Gleeson, Anthony J; Terrill, Nicolas J; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Olmsted, Peter D; Ristic, Rile I; Hounslow, Micheal J; Ryan, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    In-situ observations of crystallisation in minerals and organic polymers have been made by simultaneous, time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) techniques. In isotactic polypropylene slow quiescent crystallisation shows the onset of large scale ordering prior to crystal growth. Rapid crystallisations studied by melt extrusion indicate the development of well resolved oriented SAXS patterns associated with long range order before the development of crystalline peaks in the WAXS region. Block copolymers self-assemble into mesophases in polymer melts above a critical chain length (or above a critical temperature) and this self-assembly process is shown to be susceptible to an incipient crystallisation. Mesophase formation is observed at anomalously high temperatures in ethylene-oxide containing block copolymers below the normal melting point of the polyoxy ethylene chains. Formation of calcium carbonate from aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and calcium nitrate is observed to be a two-stage process and precipitation proceeds by the production of an amorphous metastable phase. This phase grows until it is volume filling and leads to the formation of the two polymorphs Calcite and Vaterite. These three sets of results suggest pre-nucleation density fluctuations, leading to a metastable phase, play an integral role in all three classes of crystallisation. In due course, this phase undergoes transformation to "normal" crystals.

  11. The effect of density fluctuations on ECRH beam broadening and implications to NTM mitigation on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snicker, Antti; Guidi, Lorenzo; Kohn, Alf; Maj, Omar; Weber, Hannes; Poli, Emanuele

    2016-10-01

    We present state-of-the-art computations of propagation and absorption of electron cyclotron waves, retaining the effects of scattering due to density fluctuations. In ITER, injected microwaves are foreseen to suppress NTMs by driving current at the resonant surface(s). The good localization of the absorption profile can be spoiled by beam scattering and impair the NTM control capabilities. A novel tool based on the wave kinetic equation has been developed, which retains diffraction, an integral form of the scattering operator assuming the Born scattering approximation, full tokamak geometry and determination of the power absorption profile. This approach has been implemented in the code WKBeam, which has been benchmarked against the beam-tracing code TORBEAM and the full-wave code IPF-FDMC, in particular to verify usage of the Born approximation for ITER parameters. We show that in ITER the radiation transport is diffusive unlike in existing machines. Using WKBeam we demonstrate through parameter scans that the width of the deposition profile in ITER depends on the assumptions on the fluctuations and beam parameters: the effect can be of the order of 100%. A method to quantify mode-to-mode scattering induced by fluctuations has been developed and first results are presented.

  12. Effects of Finite Density Fluctuations and of the Upper Hybrid Resonance on O-X Correlation Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.

    2001-02-10

    The correlation between O-mode and X-mode reflectometer signals is studied with a 1-D reflectometer model taking into account the influence of finite density fluctuation levels and the upper hybrid resonance. It is found that a high level of O-X correlation can only be achieved for sufficiently small density fluctuation levels (typically much less than 1%) or very low magnetic field strengths. The influence of the upper hybrid resonance on the O-X correlation was found to also degrade the correlation between the O and X mode signals for very low magnetic field strengths or for very short density scale lengths. The extrapolation of these results to reactor-scale parameters indicates that the magnetic field strength can reliably be measured in the core plasma provided the density fluctuation level is typically much less than 1%.

  13. Statistics of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient fluctuations: Reduced-parameter approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-09-15

    A reduced-parameter (RP) model of quasilinear wave-plasma interactions is used to analyze statistical properties of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient density fluctuations. The probability distribution of wave energies in such a system is shown to have a relatively narrow peak just above the thermal wave level, and a power-law tail at high energies, the latter becoming progressively more evident for increasing characteristic amplitude of the ambient fluctuations. To better understand the physics behind these statistical features of the waves, a simplified model of stochastically driven thermal waves is developed on the basis of the RP model. An approximate analytic solution for stationary statistical distribution of wave energies W is constructed, showing a good agreement with that of the original RP model. The 'peak' and 'tail' features of the wave energy distribution are shown to be a result of contributions of two groups of wave clumps: those subject to either very slow or very fast random variations of total wave growth rate (due to fluctuations of ambient plasma density), respectively. In the case of significant ambient plasma fluctuations, the overall wave energy distribution is shown to have a clear power-law tail at high energies, P(W){proportional_to}W{sup -{alpha}}, with nontrivial exponent 1<{alpha}<2, while for weak fluctuations it is close to the lognormal distribution predicted by pure stochastic growth theory. The model's wave statistics resemble the statistics of plasma waves observed by the Ulysses spacecraft in some interplanetary type III burst sources. This resemblance is discussed qualitatively, and it is suggested that the stochastically driven thermal waves might be a candidate for explaining the power-law tails in the observed wave statistics without invoking mechanisms such as self-organized criticality or nonlinear wave collapse.

  14. Effects of stream-associated fluctuations upon the radial variation of average solar-wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of nonlinear fluctuations due to solar wind streams upon radial gradients of average solar wind parameters are computed, using a numerical MHD model for both spherically symmetric time dependent and corotating equatorial flow approximations. Significant effects of correlations are found between fluctuations upon the gradients of azimuthal magnetic fields, radial velocity, density and azimuthal velocity. Between 400 to 900 solar radii stream interactions have transferred the major portion of the angular momentum flux to the magnetic field; at even greater distances the plasma again carries the bulk of the angular momentum flux. The average azimuthal component of the magnetic field may decrease as much as 10% faster than the Archimedean spiral out to 6 AU due to stream interactions, but this result is dependent upon inner boundary conditions.

  15. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U.; Speck, T.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  16. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining.

    PubMed

    Leonard, T; Lander, B; Seifert, U; Speck, T

    2013-11-28

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  17. Response of seabirds to fluctuations in forage fish density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, John F.

    2002-01-01

    Following the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS), one concern was that prevailing ecological conditions in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) would not favor recovery of damaged seabird populations. To address this issue, we examined relationships between oceanography, forage fish and seabirds near three seabird colonies in lower Cook Inlet (LCI) in 1995-1999 (some colony work continued until 2001). Upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich GOA waters at the entrance to the shallow LCI estuary supports a high density of juvenile pollock, sand lance, and capelin; which in turn are exploited by high densities of breeding seabirds (murres, kittiwakes, puffins, etc.) on the east side of LCI. Waters on the west side of LCI are oceanographically distinct (warmer, less saline, outflowing), and much less productive for forage fish and seabirds. Patterns of seabird foraging behavior, productivity and population change reflected patterns of forage fish abundance and distribution, which in turn depended on local oceanography. Most seabird parameters varied with forage fish density in a non-linear (e.g., sigmoidal, exponential) fashion, and in some areas and years, productivity was limited by food availability.  Current and projected ecological conditions favor recovery of seabirds from the EVOS at some colonies. In 14 chapters, this report summarizes data and compiles it into 247 tables, figures and appendices. Chapter 14 provides a thorough synthesis of overall project findings. Final analyses and interpretations of data will be published later in peer-reviewed journals (in addition to 61 articles already completed).

  18. Kinetic field theory: effects of momentum correlations on the cosmic density-fluctuation power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Fabis, Felix; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Dombrowski, Johannes; Mildenberger, Julius

    2017-08-01

    In earlier work, we have developed a kinetic field theory (KFT) for cosmological structure formation and showed that the nonlinear density-fluctuation power spectrum known from numerical simulations can be reproduced quite well even if particle interactions are taken into account to first order only. Besides approximating gravitational interactions, we had to truncate the initial correlation hierarchy of particle momenta at the second order. Here, we substantially simplify KFT. We show that its central object, the free generating functional, can be factorised, taking the full hierarchy of momentum correlations into account. The factors appearing in the generating functional, which we identify as nonlinearly evolved density-fluctuation power spectra, have a universal form and can thus be tabulated for fast access in perturbation schemes. In this paper, we focus on a complete evaluation of the free generating functional of KFT, not including particle interactions yet. This implies that the nonlinearly evolved power spectra contain a damping term which reflects that structures are being wiped out at late times by free streaming. Once particle interactions will be taken into account, they will compensate this damping. If we suppress this damping in a way suggested by the fluctuation-dissipation relations of KFT, our results show that the complete hierarchy of initial momentum correlations is responsible for a large part of the characteristic nonlinear deformation and the mode transport in the density-fluctuation power spectrum. Without any adjustable parameters, KFT accurately reproduces the scale at which nonlinear evolution sets in. Finally, we further develop perturbation theory based on the factorisation of the generating functional and propose a diagrammatic scheme for the perturbation terms.

  19. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  20. Spatial density fluctuations and selection effects in galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Labini, Francesco Sylos; Tekhanovich, Daniil; Baryshev, Yurij V. E-mail: d.tekhanovich@spbu.ru

    2014-07-01

    One of the main problems of observational cosmology is to determine the range in which a reliable measurement of galaxy correlations is possible. This corresponds to determining the shape of the correlation function, its possible evolution with redshift and the size and amplitude of large scale structures. Different selection effects, inevitably entering in any observation, introduce important constraints in the measurement of correlations. In the context of galaxy redshift surveys selection effects can be caused by observational techniques and strategies and by implicit assumptions used in the data analysis. Generally all these effects are taken into account by using pair-counting algorithms to measure two-point correlations. We review these methods stressing that they are based on the a-priori assumption that galaxy distribution is spatially homogeneous inside a given sample. We show that, when this assumption is not satisfied by the data, results of the correlation analysis are affected by finite size effects. In order to quantify these effects, we introduce a new method based on the computation of the gradient of galaxy counts along tiny cylinders. We show, by using artificial homogeneous and inhomogeneous point distributions, that this method identifies redshift dependent selection effects and disentangles them from the presence of large scale density fluctuations. We then apply this new method to several redshift catalogs and we find evidence that galaxy distribution, in those samples where selection effects are small enough, is characterized by power-law correlations with exponent γ=0.9 up to 20 Mpc/h followed by a change of slope that, in the range 20–100 Mpc/h, corresponds to a power-law exponent γ=0.25. Whether a crossover to spatial uniformity occurs at ∼ 100 Mpc/h or larger scales cannot be clarified by the present data.

  1. Parallel-beam correlation technique for measuring density fluctuations in plasmas with strong magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1981-04-01

    A laser diagnostic scheme is described which facilitates localization of density fluctuations along the line of sight. The method exploits both the generally observed anisotropy of density fluctuations in low-beta plasmas, as well as the twisting of the magnetic field which occurs across the minor diameter of reversed-field pinches, spheromaks, etc. Both interferometric and schlieren variations are discussed.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Short Scalelength Density Fluctuations in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Glenzer, S.H.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Kruer, W.L.; Williams, E.A.; Stone, G.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Schmitt, A.J.

    1999-11-01

    The technique of near forward laser. scattering is used to infer characteristics of intrinsic and controlled density fluctuations in laser-produced plasmas. Intrinsic fluctuations are studied in long scalelength plasmas where the fluctuations exhibit scale sizes related to the size of the intensity variations in the plasma forming and interaction beams. Stimulated Brillouin forward scattering and filamentation appear to be the primary mechanism through which these fluctuations originate. The beam spray which results from these fluctuations is important to understand since it can affect symmetry in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment. Controlled fluctuations are studied in foam and exploding foil targets. Forward scattered light from foam targets shows evidence that the initial target inhomogeneities remain after the target is laser heated. Forward scattered light from an exploding foil plasma shows that a regular intensity pattern can be used to produce a spatially correlated density fluctuation pattern. These results provide data which can be used to benchmark numerical models of beam spray.

  3. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  4. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  5. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. S.

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  6. Non-equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard

    2007-07-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow us to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (for example, non-Gaussian fluctuations of density or non-convexity of the large deviation function which generalizes the notion of free energy) are compared with those of systems at equilibrium.

  7. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  8. Time evolution of density fluctuation in supercritical region. I. Non-hydrogen-bonded fluids studied by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Saitow, Ken-Ichi; Kajiya, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2005-01-13

    The time evolution of the density fluctuation of molecules inhomogeneously dispersing in a mesoscopic volume is investigated by dynamic light scattering in several fluids in supercritical states. This study is the first time-domain investigation to compare the dynamics of density fluctuation among several fluids. The samples used are non-hydrogen-bonded fluids in the supercritical states: CHF(3), C(2)H(4), CO(2), and xenon. These four molecules have different properties but are of similar size. Under these conditions, the relationship between dynamic and static density inhomogeneities is studied by measuring the time correlation function of the density fluctuation. In all cases, this function is characterized by a single exponential function, decaying within a few microseconds. While the correlation times in the four fluids show noncoincidence, those values agree well with each other when scaled to a dimensionless parameter. From the results of this scaling based on the Kawasaki theory and Landau-Placzek theory, the relation between dynamics and static structures is analyzed, and the following four insights are obtained: (i) viscosity is the main contributor to the time evolution of density fluctuation; (ii) the principle of corresponding state is observed by the use of time-domain data; (iii) the Kawasaki theory and the Landau-Placzek theory are confirmed to be applicable to polar, nonpolar, and nondipolar fluids that have no hydrogen bonding, at temperatures relatively far from critical temperature; and (iv) the density fluctuation correlation length and the value of density fluctuation are estimated from the time-domain data and agree with the values from other experiments and calculations.

  9. Additivity, density fluctuations, and nonequilibrium thermodynamics for active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Subhadip; Mishra, Shradha; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Using an additivity property, we study particle-number fluctuations in a system of interacting self-propelled particles, called active Brownian particles (ABPs), which consists of repulsive disks with random self-propulsion velocities. From a fluctuation-response relation, a direct consequence of additivity, we formulate a thermodynamic theory which captures the previously observed features of nonequilibrium phase transition in the ABPs from a homogeneous fluid phase to an inhomogeneous phase of coexisting gas and liquid. We substantiate the predictions of additivity by analytically calculating the subsystem particle-number distributions in the homogeneous fluid phase away from criticality where analytically obtained distributions are compatible with simulations in the ABPs.

  10. Density fluctuations and dielectric constant of water in low and high density liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik; Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia A.; Franzese, Giancarlo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-02-01

    The hypothesis of a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in the phase diagram of water, though first published many years ago, still remains the subject of a heated debate. According to this hypothesis there exists a critical point near T 244 K, and P 215 MPa, located at the end of a coexistence line between a high density liquid (HDL) and a low density liquid state (LDL). The LLCP lies below the homogenous nucleation temperature of water and it has so far remained inaccessible to experiments. We study a model of water exhibiting a liquid-liquid phase transition (that is a liquid interacting through the ST2 potential) and investigate the properties of dipolar fluctuations as a function of density, in the HDL and LDL. We find an interesting correlation between the macroscopic dielectric constants and the densities of the two liquids in the vicinity of the critical point, and we discuss possible implications for measurements close to the region where the LLCP may be located.

  11. Wavelet analysis of the parameters of edge plasma fluctuations in the L-2M stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, S. A.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Kholnov, Yu V.; Skvortsova, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Wavelet analysis results are presented for evolution of the spectral fluctuation characteristics of the edge plasma density and potential in the L-2M stellarator for fast and slow transport transitions. The fast transition comes out as a sharp increase of the energy and electron density within ∼0.1ms and the slow one as a weak parameter change during a 0.5 to 1 ms time interval. It is shown that the use of the “Mexican hat” and Morlet wavelets allows one to detect the moment of the fast transition, whereas applying the Haar wavelet adds to this also an estimate of its duration, conforming to the analytical calculations, and reveals the temporal structure of the slow transition.

  12. Density Fluctuation Induced Kinetic Dynamo and Tearing Mode Nonlinear Saturation in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weixing; Lin, Liang; Duff, J. R.; Brower, D. L.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    In the MST reversed field pinch (RFP), the evolution of core tearing mode nonlinear evolution is partially determined by the electron current density profile along with nonlinear interactions among multiple tearing modes. Density fluctuations driven by intrinsic magnetic perturbations are usually large, approximately 1%, in RFP plasmas. These density fluctuations can modify the current density profile via the kinetic dynamo effect, defined as the correlated product of parallel electron pressure and radial magnetic field fluctuations, which alters the temporal dynamics of tearing modes in MST. A component of the kinetic dynamo originating from the correlated product of density and radial magnetic fluctuations has been measured using a high-speed, low phase noise polarimetry-interferometry diagnostic. Between sawtooth crashes it is found that the measured kinetic dynamo has finite amplitude that generates an anti-dynamo in the plasma core, which would tend to flatten the current density profile. These measurements suggest that density fluctuations passively driven by magnetic fluctuations can actively alter tearing modes via fluctuation-induced current transport. Work supported by US DOE and NSF.

  13. Observations of density fluctuations in an elongated Bose gas: ideal gas and quasicondensate regimes.

    PubMed

    Esteve, J; Trebbia, J-B; Schumm, T; Aspect, A; Westbrook, C I; Bouchoule, I

    2006-04-07

    We report in situ measurements of density fluctuations in a quasi-one-dimensional 87Rb Bose gas at thermal equilibrium in an elongated harmonic trap. We observe an excess of fluctuations compared to the shot-noise level expected for uncorrelated atoms. At low atomic density, the measured excess is in good agreement with the expected "bunching" for an ideal Bose gas. At high density, the measured fluctuations are strongly reduced compared to the ideal gas case. We attribute this reduction to repulsive interatomic interactions. The data are compared with a calculation for an interacting Bose gas in the quasicondensate regime.

  14. Density fluctuations in solar wind flow types at 1 AU: Comparison to Doppler scintillation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Woo, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1995-01-01

    Density fluctuations with periods 10 minutes to 1 hour have been investigated in ISEE 3 plasma measurements of solar wind flows at l AU. Coronal hole, interstream, plasma sheet, coronal mass ejection, and interaction region flow types are considered. The ISEE 3 results support the interpretation of the large-scale variations in density fluctuations observed by Doppler scintillation measurement techniques inside 0.2 AU. The highest absolute and relative density fluctuations occur ahead of and within the plasma from coronal mass ejections, with the maximum values occurring between the associated interplanetary shocks and the driver gas. For the quasi-stationary solar wind, density and relative density fluctuations are highest around the heliospheric current sheet and lowest in the high-speed coronal flow. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the region of enhanced density fluctuations and its abrupt boundaries observed in the vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet near the Sun persists to l AU, providing further support for the filamentary nature of the extensions of coronal streamers. The results of this study confirm the advantages of using density fluctuations rather than density as a tracer of solar wind flows with differing origins at the Sun and as a detector of propagating interplanetary disturbances.

  15. Intermittent dislocation density fluctuations in crystal plasticity from a phase-field crystal model.

    PubMed

    Tarp, Jens M; Angheluta, Luiza; Mathiesen, Joachim; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2014-12-31

    Plastic deformation mediated by collective dislocation dynamics is investigated in the two-dimensional phase-field crystal model of sheared single crystals. We find that intermittent fluctuations in the dislocation population number accompany bursts in the plastic strain-rate fluctuations. Dislocation number fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectral density 1/f2 at high frequencies f. The probability distribution of number fluctuations becomes bimodal at low driving rates corresponding to a scenario where low density of defects alternates at irregular times with high populations of defects. We propose a simple stochastic model of dislocation reaction kinetics that is able to capture these statistical properties of the dislocation density fluctuations as a function of shear rate.

  16. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui; Stone, James M.

    2017-08-01

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ, of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  17. DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream–stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock; thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  18. Density Fluctuations Upstream and Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream-stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  19. Micrometer-scale electrical breakdown in high-density fluids with large density fluctuations: Numerical model and experimental assessment.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    Experimentally observed electrical breakdown voltages (U(B)) in high-pressure gases and supercritical fluids deviate from classical theories for low-pressure gas discharges, and the underlying breakdown mechanisms for the high-density fluids making the U(B) differ from those in the classical discharges are not yet well understood. In this study, we developed an electrical breakdown model for the high-density fluids taking into account the effects of density fluctuations and ion-enhanced field emission (IEFE). The model is based on the concept that a critical anomaly of the U(B) (local minimum near the critical point) is caused by long mean free electron path leading to a large first Townsend coefficient in locally low-density spatial domains generated by the density fluctuations. Also, a modified Paschen's curve considering the effect of the IEFE on the second Townsend coefficient was used to reproduce the U(B) curve in the high-density fluids. Calculations based on the novel model showed good agreements with the experimentally measured U(B) even near the critical point and it also suggested that the critical anomaly of the U(B) depends on the gap distance. These results indicate that both the density fluctuations and the IEFE have to be considered to comprehend the plasmas in high-density and density-fluctuating fluids.

  20. Optimum parameter for estimating phase fluctuations on transionospheric signals at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Biagio; Materassi, Massimo; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Romano, Vincenzo; de Franceschi, Giorgiana; Spalla, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Transionospheric radio signals may experience fluctuations in their amplitude and phase due to irregularity in the spatial electron density distribution, referred to as scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation is responsible for transionospheric signal degradation that can affect the performance of satellite based navigation systems. Usually, the scintillation activity is measured by means of indices such as the normalised standard deviation of the received intensity S4 and the standard deviation of the received phase σϕ typically calculated over 1 min of data. Data from a GPS scintillation monitor based on 50 Hz measurements recorded at Dirigibile Italia Station (Ny-Alesund, Svalbard), in the frame of the ISACCO project (De Franceschi et al., 2006) are used to investigate possible adoption of an alternative parameter for the estimate of phase fluctuations: i.e., the standard deviation of the phase rate of change Sϕ. This parameter is shown to better correlate with S4 being much less detrending dependent than σϕ. The couple (S4, Sϕ) should be then considered a more physical proxy of radio scintillation than the couple (S4, σϕ).

  1. Properties of Geodesic Acoustic Modes and the Relation to Density Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Soldatov, S.; Koslowski, H. R.; Zimmermann, O.

    2006-07-28

    The geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is a high frequency branch of zonal flows, which is observed in toroidal plasmas. Because of toroidal curvature effects, density fluctuations are excited, which are investigated with the O-mode correlation reflectometer at TEXTOR. This Letter reports on the poloidal distribution of GAM induced density fluctuation and compares them with theoretical predictions. The influence of the GAM flows on the ambient turbulence is studied, too.

  2. Quenching of the beam-plasma instability by 3-D spectra of large scale density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschietti, L.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented to explain the highly variable yet low level of Langmuir waves measured in situ by spacecraft when electron beams associated with Type III solar bursts are passing by; the low level of excited waves allows the propagation of such streams from the Sun to well past 1 AU without catastrophic energy losses. The model is based, first, on the existence of large scale density fluctuations that are able to efficiently diffuse small k beam unstable Langmuir waves in phase space, and, second, on the presence of a significantly isotropic nonthermal tail in the distribution function of the background electron population, which is capable of stabilizing larger k modes. The strength of the model lies in its ability to predict various levels of Langmuir waves depending on the parameters. This feature is consistent with the high variability actually observed in the measurements.

  3. Extraction of the Density Fluctuations in Diatomic Fluids Around the Critical Points Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shin-Ichi; Tomi, Masato; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Ikawa, Shohei; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The objective in this study is the investigation of the principle of corresponding state for the density fluctuation around the critical points of non-polar diatomic fluids. In this paper, we conducted Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation for the extraction of the fluctuation structure around the critical points of 2-Center-Lennard-Jones (2CLJ) fluids, which have anisotropy depending on the molecular elongation. As a result, in the 2CLJ fluids which have comparatively shorter molecular elongations, the principle of corresponding state can be satisfied because almost all density fluctuations in each elongation showed the similar values. On the other hand, some of the results suggested that the 2CLJ fluids which have the longer elongation decrease the density fluctuation although the further detailed investigation is necessary.

  4. Investigation of zonal flows by using the collective scattering measurement of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. G.; Yu, Y.; Lan, T.; Li, Y. D.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ti, A.; Li, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The poloidal {{E}r}× {{B}\\text{T}} rotation velocities in the core plasma region are studied using the instantaneous frequency method (IFM) with the density fluctuations measured by the CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostics on the HT-7 tokamak. A coherent mode is observed in the fluctuations of poloidal velocities with the mode frequency from 10 to 20 kHz. It is identified as geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) zonal flow with poloidal symmetry (m = 0) and its mode frequency coinciding with the theoretical expected GAM frequency. The nonlinear interactions are investigated by applying the envelope analysis on the density fluctuations. The results confirm that the envelope modulation in the high frequency density fluctuations only comes from the shearing by GAM. The comparison between IFM and envelope analysis is also discussed.

  5. On the Role of Nonspherical Cavities in Short Length-Scale Density Fluctuations in Water.

    PubMed

    Sosso, Gabriele Cesare; Caravati, Sebastiano; Rotskoff, Grant; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayan; Hassanali, Ali

    2017-01-12

    Density fluctuations in liquid water are at the heart of numerous phenomena associated with hydrophobic effects such as protein folding and the interaction between biomolecules. One of the most fundamental processes in this regard is the solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water. The vast majority of theoretical and numerical studies examine density fluctuations at the short length scale focusing exclusively on spherical cavities. In this work, we use both first-principles and classical molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that density fluctuations in liquid water can deviate significantly from the canonical spherical shapes. We show that regions of empty space are frequently characterized by exotic, highly asymmetric shapes that can be quite delocalized over the hydrogen bond network. Interestingly, density fluctuations of these shapes are characterized by Gaussian statistics with larger fluctuations. An important consequence of this is that the work required to create non spherical cavities can be substantially smaller than that of spheres. This feature is also qualitatively captured by the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory. The scaling behavior of the free energy as a function of the volume at short length scales is qualitatively different for the nonspherical entities. We also demonstrate that nonspherical density fluctuations are important for accommodating the hydrophobic amino acid alanine and are thus likely to have significant implications when it comes to solvating highly asymmetrical species such as alkanes, polymers, or biomolecules.

  6. Study of Density Fluctuations and Particle Transport at the Edge of I-Mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Arturo

    The wide range of plasma parameters available on Alcator C-Mod has led to the accessibility of many regimes of operation. Since its commissioning, C-Mod has accessed the Linear ohmic confinement, Saturated ohmic confinement, L-Mode and ELM-free, ELMy and Enhanced Dalpha H-Mode regimes. Recently, another novel regime, the I-Mode, has been identified. I-modes feature the presence of steep H-Mode-like electron and ion temperature gradients at the edge of the plasma with L-Mode-like density profiles. The I-Mode, in contrast to the H-mode, shows very weak degradation of energy confinement with increased input power, and routinely reaches H 98 > 1 while operating at low edge collisionalities ( n*ped ˜0.1), making it a good candidate for reactor relevant tokamaks. Also relevant for reactors, this regime can be sustained in steady state for more than ˜15 energy confinement times without the need for ELMs to regulate particle and impurity confinement. Changes in edge density, temperature and magnetic field fluctuations accompany the L-mode to I-mode transition, with reduction of fluctuations in the 50--150kHz range as well as the appearance of a Weakly Coherent Mode (WCM) in the 200-300kHz range, analogous to the Quasi-Coherent Mode (QCM) characteristic of the Enhanced D alpha H-mode. Previous work has established a connection between the midrange fluctuation suppression and reduction in the effective thermal diffusivity, chi eff, in the pedestal region. The mechanism in I-mode for maintaining sufficient particle transport to avoid impurity accumulation and instabilities has been unclear. The O-mode reflectometry system has been extensively used for the characterization and detection of the I-mode and the WCM, in part, enhanced by upgrades to the system which enabled the broadband detection of density fluctuations at an array of cutoff locations at the edge of the plasma. Using a novel model, the autopower signals of reflectometry channels detecting the density

  7. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  8. Statistical parameter characteristics of gas-phase fluctuations for gas-liquid intermittent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, G.; Monji, H.; Takaguchi, M.

    1995-09-01

    This study deals with theoretical analysis on the general behaviour of statistical parameters of gas-phase fluctuations and comparison of statistical parameter characteristics for the real void fraction fluctuations measured with those for the wave form modified the real fluctuations. In order to investigate the details of the relation between the behavior of the statistical parameters in real intermittent flow and analytical results obtained from information on the real flow, the distributions of statistical parameters for general fundamental wave form of gas-phase fluctuations are discussed in detail. By modifying the real gas-phase fluctuations to a trapezoidaly wave, the experimental results can be directly compared with the analytical results. The analytical results for intermittent flow show that the wave form parameter, and the total amplitude of void fraction fluctuations, affects strongly on the statistical parameter characteristics. The comparison with experiment using nitrogen gas-water intermittent flow suggests that the parameters of skewness and excess may be better as indicators of flow pattern. That is, the macroscopic nature of intermittent flow can be grasped by the skewness and the excess, and the detailed flow structure may be described by the mean and the standard deviation.

  9. Cosmological Inflation with Multiple Fields and the Theory of Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tent, B. J. W.

    2002-09-01

    Inflation is a stage of extremely rapid expansion in the very early universe. It was proposed to solve a number of problems in the standard Big Bang theory. In particular it others an explanation for the origin of structures like (clusters of) galaxies on the one hand (by generating small density fluctuations that act as gravitational seeds), and for the largescale homogeneity of the universe on the other hand (because of the enormous expansion). Inflation is driven by one or more scalar fields with an appropriate potential. In this thesis we develop an analytical formalism to describe the generation of density fluctuations during inflation with multiple scalar fields. We allow these fields to live on a non-trivial (curved) field manifold, as is often the case in high-energy theories. We also treat the evolution of the fluctuations after inflation, until the time of recombination when the cosmic microwave background radiation was formed. Using our formalism observations of the CMBR can then be used to set constraints on the parameters in (multiple-field) inflation models. In more detail this thesis covers the following topics. After introductory chapters on cosmology in general and single-field inflation, the theory of inflation with multiple fields and a general (non-trivial) field metric is derived. In particular we introduce a basis in field space that is induced by the background dynamics and allows a clear distinction between effectively single-field and truly multiple-field effects. The important slow-roll approximation is generalized to the case of multiple fields. Next we derive how scalar and tensor fluctuations are generated from a quantum origin during multiple-field inflation, paying special attention to the transition that occurs when a perturbation mode crosses the Hubble scale. Using some simplifying assumptions the evolution of both adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation modes after inflation is treated. The final results are expressions for the

  10. High Speed Digital Holography for Density and Fluctuation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    ThomasJr., C. E.; Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A; Granstedt, E. M.; Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art in electro-optics has advanced to the point where digital holographic acquisition of wavefronts is now possible. Holographic wavefront acquisition provides the phase of the wavefront at every measurement point. This can be done with accuracy on the order of a thousandth of a wavelength, given that there is sufficient care in the design of the system. At wave frequencies which are much greater than the plasma frequency, the plasma index of refraction is linearly proportional to the electron density and wavelength, and the measurement of the phase of a wavefront passing through the plasma gives the chord-integrated density directly for all points measured on the wavefront. High-speed infrared cameras up to 40 000 fps at 644 pixels with resolutions up to 640512 pixels suitable for use with a CO2 laser are readily available, if expensive.

  11. High speed digital holography for density and fluctuation measurements (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C. E. Jr.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Granstedt, E. M.; Majeski, R. P.; Kaita, R.

    2010-10-15

    The state of the art in electro-optics has advanced to the point where digital holographic acquisition of wavefronts is now possible. Holographic wavefront acquisition provides the phase of the wavefront at every measurement point. This can be done with accuracy on the order of a thousandth of a wavelength, given that there is sufficient care in the design of the system. At wave frequencies which are much greater than the plasma frequency, the plasma index of refraction is linearly proportional to the electron density and wavelength, and the measurement of the phase of a wavefront passing through the plasma gives the chord-integrated density directly for all points measured on the wavefront. High-speed infrared cameras (up to {approx}40 000 fps at {approx}64x4 pixels) with resolutions up to 640x512 pixels suitable for use with a CO{sub 2} laser are readily available, if expensive.

  12. High speed digital holography for density and fluctuation measurements (invited).

    PubMed

    Thomas, C E; Baylor, L R; Combs, S K; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A; Granstedt, E M; Majeski, R P; Kaita, R

    2010-10-01

    The state of the art in electro-optics has advanced to the point where digital holographic acquisition of wavefronts is now possible. Holographic wavefront acquisition provides the phase of the wavefront at every measurement point. This can be done with accuracy on the order of a thousandth of a wavelength, given that there is sufficient care in the design of the system. At wave frequencies which are much greater than the plasma frequency, the plasma index of refraction is linearly proportional to the electron density and wavelength, and the measurement of the phase of a wavefront passing through the plasma gives the chord-integrated density directly for all points measured on the wavefront. High-speed infrared cameras (up to ∼40,000 fps at ∼64×4 pixels) with resolutions up to 640×512 pixels suitable for use with a CO(2) laser are readily available, if expensive.

  13. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-07

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30 ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity v{sub D} on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  14. High power fast wave experiments in LAPD: interaction with density fluctuations and status/plans for ICRH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Troy; Martin, Michael; van Compernolle, Bart; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Pat; Vincena, Stephen; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Eester, Dirk; Crombe, Kristel

    2016-10-01

    The LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA is a 17 m long, up to 60 cm diameter magnetized plasma column with typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV, and B 1 kG. A new high-power ( 200 kW) RF system and antenna has been developed for LAPD, enabling the generation of large amplitude fast waves in LAPD. Interaction between the fast waves and density fluctuations is observed, resulting in modulation of the coupled RF power. Two classes of RF-induced density fluctuations are observed. First, a coherent (10 kHz) oscillation is observed spatially near the antenna in response to the initial RF turn-on transient. Second, broadband density fluctuations are enhanced when the RF power is above a threshold a threshold. Strong modulation of the fast wave magnetic fluctuations is observed along with broadening of the primary RF spectral line. Ultimately, high power fast waves will be used for ion heating in LAPD through minority species fundamental heating or second harmonic minority or majority heating. Initial experimental results from heating experiments will be presented along with a discussion of future plans. BaPSF supported by NSF and DOE.

  15. Density fluctuation measurement using motional Stark effect optics in JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Fujita, T.; Oyama, N.; Isayama, A.; Matsunaga, G.; Oikawa, T.; Asakura, N.; Takechi, M.

    2006-10-15

    The multichannel motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic system in JT-60U has been upgraded to measure density fluctuation profile. A 16-channel fast-sampling digitizer has been added in order to measure photomultiplier-tube signals at measurement frequency of 0.5-1 MHz. The new system works as a MSE and beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Spatially resolved electron density fluctuation profile measurement in various operation regimes is presented. In the core plasma, density fluctuation induced by rotation of tearing mode islands was observed. Temporal evolution of the fluctuation frequency agrees with that measured by Mirnov coils (poloidal and toroidal mode numbers: 2 and 1, respectively). The phases of the fluctuations on either side of the q=2 surface are inverted, which is consistent with electron cyclotron emission. These measurements show that the density fluctuation is caused by a rotating magnetic island structure induced by the tearing mode. In the scrape-off layer of a H-mode plasma with edge-localized-mode (ELM), i. e., ELMy H-mode outward propagation of strong intermittent emission corresponding to ELM crash was also observed. The propagation velocity is 0.69-2.2 km/s along the MSE measurement points, the time lag and distance between adjacent channels being 67{+-}35 {mu}s and 70 mm, respectively.

  16. Stochastic density effects on adult fish survival and implications for population fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Daniel K; Schmitt, Russell J; Holbrook, Sally J

    2015-11-26

    The degree to which population fluctuations arise from variable adult survival relative to variable recruitment has been debated widely for marine organisms. Disentangling these effects remains challenging because data generally are not sufficient to evaluate if and how adult survival rates are regulated by stochasticity and/or population density. Using unique time series for a largely unexploited reef fish, we found both population density and stochastic food supply impacted adult survival. The estimated effect of variable survival on adult abundance (both mean and variability) rivalled that of variable recruitment. Moreover, we show density-dependent adult survival can dampen impacts of stochastic recruitment. Thus, food variability may alter population fluctuations by simultaneously regulating recruitment and compensatory adult survival. These results provide an additional mechanism for why intensified density-independent mortality (via harvest or other means) amplifies population fluctuations and emphasises need for research evaluating the causes and consequences of variability in adult survival. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Theory of density fluctuations in strongly radiative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. E.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.

    2016-03-01

    Derivation of the dynamic structure factor, an important parameter linking experimental and theoretical work in dense plasmas, is possible starting from hydrodynamic equations. Here we obtain, by modifying the governing hydrodynamic equations, a new form of the dynamic structure factor which includes radiative terms. The inclusion of such terms has an effect on the structure factor at high temperatures, which suggests that its effect must be taken into consideration in such regimes.

  18. Fluctuational parameters based on the Bhatia-Thornton theory for supercritical solutions: Application to a supercritical aqueous solution of n-pentane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuta, Satoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Keiko; Morita, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    To study the structural fluctuation of supercritical solutions, we introduced three fluctuational parameters, a scattering factor, a density factor and a volume factor, which were based on the Bhatia-Thornton theory. In the present study, the density dependence of the structural inhomogeneity in a supercritical aqueous solution of n-pentane was discussed using the scattering factor and the density factor obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering and the fluid density measurements, respectively. Although both these factors have their maxima at the same density position in the case of neat supercritical fluids, a significant difference between the two factors is observed in the binary solution. The large difference occurs by the contribution of the concentration fluctuation in the system. Based on the difference between the factors, it is suggested that a phase separation of the system exists in the higher-fluid-density region.

  19. Measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Anderson, J. K.; Sarff, J. S.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    In standard RFP plasmas, transport is dominated by global magnetic tearing modes. For improved-confinement plasmas using inductive current profile control (PPCD), smaller-scale fluctuations at higher frequencies (>50 kHz) may become more important as the global tearing modes are significantly reduced. In particular, drift-wave-like instabilities are theoretically unstable to the higher temperature and density gradients achieved during PPCD discharges. On the MST, an eleven chord Far-Infrared (FIR) laser-based diagnostic system with ~ 8 cm spacing is used to measure electron density fluctuations by interferometry and far-forward collective scattering. The existing diagnostic measures line-integrated density fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering a wavenumber range k-< 1.3 cm-1, corresponding to k-ρs < 1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius). Experimentally, in PPCD plasmas, global tearing modes are reduced while high frequency coherent modes (50 < f < 140 kHz) emerge among broadband fluctuations. Correlations of these modes with sources of free energy, such as temperature and density gradients, will be investigated. Additionally, effects of increased plasma flow from a 1MW tangential NBI on high frequency density fluctuations will also be explored. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  20. Shock-associated MHD waves - A model for interstellar density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the density fluctuations responsible for radio scintillations could be due to ion-beam-generated MHD waves near interstellar shock waves is discussed. This suggestion is inspired by spacecraft observations which reveal these phenomena near shocks in the solar system. The model quite naturally accounts for the scale on which these fluctuations occur; it is dictated by the wavelength of the unstable waves.

  1. Density fluctuations represent a key process maintaining personality variation in a wild passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Nicolaus, Marion; Tinbergen, Joost M; Ubels, Richard; Both, Christiaan; Dingemanse, Niels J

    2016-04-01

    Heritable personality variation is subject to fluctuating selection in many animal taxa; a major unresolved question is why this is the case. A parsimonious explanation must involve a general ecological process: a likely candidate is the omnipresent spatiotemporal variation in conspecific density. We tested whether spatiotemporal variation in density within and among nest box plots of great tits (Parus major) predicted variation in selection acting on exploratory behaviour (n = 48 episodes of selection). We found viability selection favouring faster explorers under lower densities but slower explorers under higher densities. Temporal variation in local density represented the primary factor explaining personality-related variation in viability selection. Importantly, birds did not anticipate changes in selection by means of adaptive density-dependent plasticity. This study thereby provides an unprecedented example of the key importance of the interplay between fluctuating selection and lack of adaptive behavioural plasticity in maintaining animal personality variation in the wild. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Short Scalelength Density Fluctuations in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Glenzer, S.H.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Kruer, W.L.; Montgomery, D.S.; Schmitt, A.J.; Williams, E.A.; Stone, G.F.

    2000-01-05

    The technique of near forward laser scattering is used to infer characteristics of intrinsic and controlled density fluctuations in laser-produced plasmas. Intrinsic fluctuations are studied in long-scale length plasmas where we find that the fluctuations exhibit scale sizes related to the intensity variation scales in the plasma-forming and interaction beams. Stimulated Brillouin forward scattering and filamentation appear to be the primary mechanism through which these fluctuations originate. The beam spray resulting from these fluctuations is important to understand since it can affect symmetry in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment. Controlled fluctuations are studied in foam and exploding foil targets. Forward scattered light from foam targets shows evidence that the initial target inhomogeneities remain after the target is laser heated. Forward scattered light from an exploding foil plasma shows that a regular intensity pattern can be used to produce a spatially correlated density fluctuation pattern. These results provide data which are being used to benchmark numerical models of beam spray.

  3. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A.; Fawcett, E.; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G.

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  4. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A. . Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. . Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  5. Maps of the little bangs through energy density and temperature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sumit Chatterjee, Rupa; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2016-01-22

    Heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are often referred to as little bangs. We propose for the first time to map the heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies, similar to the maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation, using fluctuations of energy density and temperature in small phase space bins. We study the evolution of fluctuations at each stage of the collision using an event-by-event hydrodynamic framework. We demonstrate the feasibility of making fluctuation maps from experimental data and its usefulness in extracting considerable information regarding the early stages of the collision and its evolution.

  6. Density Fluctuation in Asymmetric Nozzle Plumes and Correlation with Far Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    A comparative experimental study of air density fluctuations in the unheated plumes of a circular, 4-tabbed-circular, chevron-circular and 10-lobed rectangular nozzles was performed at a fixed Mach number of 0.95 using a recently developed Rayleigh scattering based technique. Subsequently, the flow density fluctuations are cross-correlated with the far field sound pressure fluctuations to determine sources for acoustics emission. The nearly identical noise spectra from the baseline circular and the chevron nozzles are found to be in agreement with the similarity in spreading, turbulence fluctuations, and flow-sound correlations measured in the plumes. The lobed nozzle produced the least low frequency noise, in agreement with the weakest overall density fluctuations and flow-sound correlation. The tabbed nozzle took an intermediate position in the hierarchy of noise generation, intensity of turbulent fluctuation and flow-sound correlation. Some of the features in the 4-tabbed nozzle are found to be explainable in terms of splitting of the jet in a central large core and 4 side jetlets.

  7. Poynting vector, energy densities, and pressure of collective transverse electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-01-15

    A systematic calculation of the electromagnetic properties (Poynting vector, electromagnetic energy, and pressure) of the collective transverse fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas with velocity-anisotropic plasma particle distributions functions is presented. Time-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly damped wave-like fluctuations and space-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly propagating and aperiodic fluctuations are calculated. For aperiodic fluctuations, the Poynting vector as well as the sum of the space-averaged electric and magnetic field energy densities vanish. However, aperiodic fluctuations possess a positive pressure given by its magnetic energy density. This finite pressure density p{sub a} of aperiodic fluctuations has important consequences for the dynamics of cosmic unmagnetized plasmas such as the intergalactic medium after reionization. Adopting the standard cosmological evolution model, we show that this additional pressure changes the expansion law of the universe leading to further deceleration. Negative vacuum pressure counterbalances this deceleration to an accelerating universe provided that the negative vacuum pressure is greater than 1.5p{sub a}, which we estimate to be of the order 2.1 {center_dot} 10{sup -16} dyn cm{sup -2}.

  8. Large-amplitude electron density and Hα fluctuations in the sustained spheromak physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.; Wurden, G. A.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Woodruff, S.

    2002-06-01

    New types of toroidally rotating fluctuations (toroidal mode numbers n = 1 and n = 2) of line-integrated electron density and Hα emission, with frequencies ranging from 10 to 100 kHz, are observed in the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX). The rotating directions of these fluctuations are the same as the direction determined by E×B, while the E and B directions are determined by the gun voltage and gun magnetic flux polarities, respectively. These results take advantage of one distinctive signature of spheromaks, i.e. it is possible to observe toroidal MHD activity during decay and sustainment at any toroidal angle. A theoretical constraint on line-integrated measurement is proposed and is found to be consistent with experimental observations. Fluctuation analysis in the time and frequency domains indicates that the observed density and Hα fluctuations correlate with magnetic modes. Observation of Hα fluctuations correlating with magnetic fluctuations indicates that, at least in some cases, MHD n = 1 modes are due to the so-called `dough-hook' current paths that connect the coaxial gun to the flux conserver, rather than internal kink instabilities. These results also show that electron density and Hα emission diagnostics complement other tools for spheromak mode study.

  9. Density fluctuation measurements on the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) using a two-frequency reflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anabitarte, E. . Inst. de Energias Renovables); Hanson, G.R.; Harris, J.H.; Wilgen, J.B.; Bell, J.D.; Dunlap, J.L.; Hidalgo, C.; Thomas, C.E.; Uckan, T. )

    1990-01-01

    A microwave reflectometer system has been installed and operated on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) to measure density fluctuations. This system consists of two individual reflectometers that use the same antenna system and operate in the 30- to 40-GHz band. This arrangement allows operation at two frequencies along the same radial chord so that radial coherence measurements are possible. During the initial operating period of the reflectometer, a correlation was observed between a change in the edge density fluctuation spectrum and a transition to improved confinement. Recently, local measurements of the density fluctuation spectra in electron-cyclotron-heated (ECH) plasmas has been shown to agree with Langmuir probe measurements at the edge. Furthermore, structure in the spectra has been observed in some ECH plasmas. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Walther, J. H.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids.

  11. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids.

    PubMed

    Kotsalis, E M; Walther, J H; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids.

  12. Time evolution of density fluctuation in the supercritical region. 2. Comparison of hydrogen- and non-hydrogen-bonded fluids.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Keiko; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2005-08-25

    The time evolution of the density fluctuation of molecules is investigated by dynamic light scattering in six neat fluids in supercritical states. This study is the first to compare the dynamics of density inhomogeneity between hydrogen- and non-hydrogen-bonded fluids. Supercritical methanol and ethanol are used as hydrogen-bonded fluids, whereas four non-hydrogen-bonded fluids were used: CHF(3), C(2)H(4), CO(2), and Xe. We measure the time correlation function of the density fluctuation of each fluid at the same reduced temperatures and densities and investigate the relationship between the dynamic and static density inhomogeneities of those supercritical fluids. In all cases, the profile of the time correlation function of the density fluctuation is characterized by a single-exponential function, whose decay is responsible for the dynamics characterized by hydrodynamic conditions. We obtain correlation times from the time correlation function and discuss dynamic and static inhomogeneity using the Kawasaki theory and the Landau-Placzek theory. While the correlation times in the six fluids show noncoincidence, those values agree well with each other except for the supercritical alcohols when scaled to a dimensionless parameter. Although the principle of corresponding state is observed in the non-hydrogen-bonded fluids, both the supercritical methanol and ethanol deviate from that principle. This deviation is attributed to the presence of hydrogen bonding among alcohol molecules at high temperature and low density. The average cluster size of each fluid is estimated under the same thermodynamic conditions, and it is shown that the clusters of supercritical alcohols are on average 1.5-1.7 times larger than those of the four non-hydrogen-bonded fluids. Moreover, the thermal diffusivity of each neat fluid is obtained over wide ranges of density and temperature.

  13. Investigation of Density Fluctuations in Supersonic Free Jets and Correlation with Generated Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The air density fluctuations in the plumes of fully-expanded, unheated free jets were investigated experimentally using a Rayleigh scattering based technique. The point measuring technique used a continuous wave laser, fiber-optic transmission and photon counting electronics. The radial and centerline profiles of time-averaged density and root-mean-square density fluctuation provided a comparative description of jet growth. To measure density fluctuation spectra a two-Photomultiplier tube technique was used. Crosscorrelation between the two PMT signals significantly reduced electronic shot noise contribution. Turbulent density fluctuations occurring up to a Strouhal number (Sr) of 2.5 were resolved. A remarkable feature of density spectra, obtained from the same locations of jets in 0.5< M<1.5 range, is a constant Strouhal frequency for peak fluctuations. A detailed survey at Mach numbers M = 0.95, 1.4 and 1.8 showed that, in general, distribution of various Strouhal frequency fluctuations remained similar for the three jets. In spite of the similarity in the flow fluctuation the noise characteristics were found to be significantly different. Spark schlieren photographs and near field microphone measurements confirmed that the eddy Mach wave radiation was present in Mach 1.8 jet, and was absent in Mach 0.95 jet. To measure correlation between the flow and the far field sound pressure fluctuations, a microphone was kept at a distance of 50 diameters, 30 deg. to the flow direction, and the laser probe volume was moved from point to point in the flow. The density fluctuations in the peripheral shear layer of Mach 1.8 jet showed significant correlation up to the measurement limit of Sr = 2.5, while for Mach 0.95 jet no correlation was measured. Along the centerline measurable correlation was found from the end of the potential core and at the low frequency range (Sr less than 0.5). Usually the normalized correlation values increased with an increase of the jet Mach

  14. Comparison of density fluctuation measurements between O-mode and X-mode reflectometry on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbaud, T.; Clairet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.; Vermare, L.

    2006-10-15

    Reflectometry is a versatile diagnostic which allows both electronic density profile and density fluctuation measurements. Fast sweep heterodyne technique is particularly suitable for precise measurement of the phase of the reflected signal, which records the story of the wave propagation through the plasma up to the cutoff layer, including the density fluctuations. The present article exhibits a comparison of the density fluctuation radial profile measurements between fast sweep frequency technique, both using O-mode and X-mode polarizations, and fixed frequency technique. The correct agreement between all measurements of the relative values of the density fluctuation profiles reinforces the validity of the approximations used.

  15. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  16. Dispersion relations of electron density fluctuations in a Hall thruster plasma, observed by collective light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Pisarev, V.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2009-03-15

    Kinetic models and numerical simulations of E-vectorxB-vector plasma discharges predict microfluctuations at the scales of the electron cyclotron drift radius and the ion plasma frequency. With the help of a specially designed collective scattering device, the first experimental observations of small-scale electron density fluctuations inside the plasma volume are obtained, and observed in the expected ranges of spatial and time scales. The anisotropy, dispersion relations, form factor, amplitude, and spatial distribution of these electron density fluctuations are described and compared to theoretical expectations.

  17. Effects of periodic fluctuations of photon flux density on anatomical and photosynthetic characteristics of soybean leaves.

    PubMed

    Gaudillere, J P; Drevon, J J; Bernoud, J P; Jardinet, F; Euvrard, M

    1987-01-01

    The development of soybean leaves grown at fluctuating photon flux density between 100 and 1500μM m(-2)s(-1) with a period of 160 sec were compared to leaves developed under continuous light with the same mean photon flux density. Number of epidermal cells and stomata, leaf area and specific leaf weight were not affected by the periodic fluctuation of photon flux density. Chloroplastic pigment concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence reveal some photoinhibitory effects of the high photon flux density phase. Stomatal and internal CO2 conductance and the quantum yield were not affected by the light regime. In contrast ribulose 1.5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity before in vitro activation by CO2 and Mg(++) was stimulated by the periodic illumination whereas the total amount of the enzyme and the internal leaf CO2 conductance remained steady. In conclusion, there was no major difference between leaves of plant grown either under a steady or under a periodic fluctuation of the photon flux density except some photoinhibitory symptoms under fluctuating illumination, and a higher in vivo level of activation of the Rubisco.

  18. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arévalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ˜10-30 kpc within radii of 30-220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km s-1 on ˜20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km s-1 on smaller scales ˜7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7-8 per cent for radii ˜30-220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3-4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density-velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  19. A molecular Rayleigh scattering setup to measure density fluctuations in thermal boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, J.

    2016-12-01

    A Rayleigh scattering-based density fluctuation measurement system was set up inside a low-speed wind tunnel of NASA Ames Research Center. The immediate goal was to study the thermal boundary layer on a heated flat plate. A large number of obstacles had to be overcome to set up the system, such as the removal of dust particles using air filters, the use of photoelectron counting electronics to measure low intensity light, an optical layout to minimize stray light contamination, the reduction in tunnel vibration, and an expanded calibration process to relate photoelectron arrival rate to air density close to the plate surface. To measure spectra of turbulent density fluctuations, a two-PMT cross-correlation system was used to minimize the shot noise floor. To validate the Rayleigh measurements, temperature fluctuations spectra were calculated from density spectra and then compared with temperature spectra measured with a cold-wire probe operated in constant current mode. The spectra from the downstream half of the plate were found to be in good agreement with cold-wire probe, whereas spectra from the leading edge differed. Various lessons learnt are discussed. It is believed that the present effort is the first measurement of density fluctuations spectra in a boundary layer flow.

  20. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  1. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  2. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-10-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  3. Density matrix of radiation of a black hole with a fluctuating horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iofa, Mikhail Z.

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix of Hawking radiation is calculated in the model of a black hole with a fluctuating horizon. Quantum fluctuations smear the classical horizon of a black hole and modify the density matrix of radiation producing the off-diagonal elements. The off-diagonal elements may store information on correlations between the radiation and the black hole. The smeared density matrix was constructed by convolution of the density matrix calculated with the instantaneous horizon with the Gaussian distribution over the instantaneous horizons. The distribution has the extremum at the classical radius of the black hole and the width of order of the Planck length. Calculations were performed in the model of a black hole formed by the thin collapsing shell which follows a trajectory that is a solution of the matching equations connecting the interior and exterior geometries.

  4. Generalized time-dependent density-functional-theory response functions for spontaneous density fluctuations and nonlinear response: Resolving the causality paradox in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2005-02-01

    Time-ordered superoperators are used to develop a unified description of nonlinear density response and spontaneous fluctuations of many-electron systems. The pth -order density response functions are decomposed into 2p+1 non-causal Liouville space pathways. Individual pathways are symmetric to the interchange of their space, time, and superoperator indices and can thus be calculated as functional derivatives. Other combinations of these pathways represent spontaneous density fluctuations and the response of such fluctuations to an external field. The resolution of the causality paradox of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is shown to be intimately connected with the nonretarded nature of fluctuations.

  5. Parameter Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Transition in the Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Ja, Ya; Tang, Jun; Chen, Yong

    Parameter fluctuation, which is often induced by the noise, temperature, deformation of the media etc., plays an important role in changing the dynamics of the system. In this paper, the problem of parameter fluctuation-induced pattern transition in the Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) is investigated. At first, the perpendicular-gradient initial values are used to generate spiral wave and spiral turbulence under appropriate parameters. At second, the parameter is perturbed with the periodical and/or random signal to simulate the parameter fluctuation, respectively. Then a class of linear error feedback is used to induce transition of the spiral wave and spiral turbulence. It is found that target waves can be induced by the complete feedback forcing, while the local feedback forcing seldom induce a target wave. In the case of spiral turbulence, spiral wave is generated and the spiral turbulence is removed by the new appeared spiral wave as the linear error feedback began to work on the whole media. Finally, the common negative feedback is also used to control the parameter-fluctuated CGLE, and the results are compared with the linear error feedback control, it is found that the whole system become homogeneous when the negative feedback is imposed on the whole media, and the local negative feedback can induce new target wave to remove the spiral wave while it is in vain to generate new target or spiral wave to overcome and eliminate the spiral turbulence.

  6. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  7. A multi-chain polymer slip-spring model with fluctuating number of entanglements: Density fluctuations, confinement, and phase separation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Peters, Brandon L; Schneider, Ludwig; Andreev, Marat; Schieber, Jay D; Müller, Marcus; de Pablo, Juan J

    2017-01-07

    Coarse grained simulation approaches provide powerful tools for the prediction of the equilibrium properties of polymeric systems. Recent efforts have sought to develop coarse-graining strategies capable of predicting the non-equilibrium behavior of entangled polymeric materials. Slip-link and slip-spring models, in particular, have been shown to be capable of reproducing several key aspects of the linear response and rheology of polymer melts. In this work, we extend a previously proposed multi-chain slip-spring model in a way that correctly incorporates the effects of the fluctuating environment in which polymer segments are immersed. The model is used to obtain the equation of state associated with the slip-springs, and the results are compared to those of related numerical approaches and an approximate analytical expression. The model is also used to examine a polymer melt confined into a thin film, where an inhomogeneous distribution of polymer segments is observed, and the corresponding inhomogeneities associated with density fluctuations are reflected on the spatial slip-spring distribution.

  8. Zero-point fluctuations in naphthalene and their effect on charge transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Frost, Jarvist M; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2008-09-25

    We calculate the effect of vibronic coupling on the charge transport parameters in crystalline naphthalene, between 0 and 400 K. We find that nuclear fluctuations can cause large changes in both the energy of a charge on a molecule and on the electronic coupling between molecules. As a result, nuclear fluctuations cause wide distributions of both energies and couplings. We show that these distributions have a small temperature dependence and that, even at high temperatures, vibronic coupling is dominated by the effect of zero-point fluctuations. Because of the importance of zero-point fluctuations, we find that the distributions of energies and couplings have substantial width, even at 0 K. Furthermore, vibronic coupling with high energy modes may be significant, even though these modes are never thermally activated. Our results have implications for the temperature dependence of charge mobilities in organic semiconductors.

  9. Propagation of the lower hybrid wave in a density fluctuating scrape-off layer (SOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Kabalan, K. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The perturbation of the lower hybrid wave (LH) power spectrum by fluctuations of the plasma in the vicinity of the antenna is investigated by solving the full wave equation in a slab geometry using COMSOL Multiphysics®. The numerical model whose generality allows to study the effect of various types of fluctuations, including those with short characteristic wavelengths is validated against a coupling code in quiescent regimes. When electron density fluctuations along the toroidal direction are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the LH wave propagates. The diffraction effect by density fluctuations leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions and the averaged perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength. This highlights that fast toroidal inhomogeneities with short characteristics length scales in front of the grill may change significantly the initial LH power spectrum used in coupled ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations.

  10. Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a Stochastic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Particle transport and density relaxation associated with electromagnetic fluctuations is an unresolved problem of long standing in plasma physics and magnetic fusion research. In toroidal fusion plasmas, magnetic field fluctuations can arise spontaneously from global MHD instabilities, e.g., tearing fluctuations associated with sawtooth oscillations. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have also been externally imposed to mitigate the effect of edge localized modes (ELMs) by locally enhancing edge transport in Tokamaks. Understanding stochastic-field-driven transport processes is thus not only of basic science interest but possibly critical to ELM control in ITER. We report on the first direct measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport in the core of a high-temperature plasma, the MST reversed field pinch. Measurements focus on the sawtooth crash, when the stochastic field resulting from tearing reconnection is strongest, and are accomplished using newly developed, laser-based, differential interferometry and Faraday rotation techniques. The measured electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density (δn) and radial magnetic fluctuations (δbr), accounts for density profile relaxation during these magnetic reconnection events. Surprisingly, the electron diffusion is 30 times larger than estimates of ambipolarity-constrained transport in a stochastic magnetic field. A significant ion flux associated with parallel ion flow velocity fluctuations (δvi,//) correlated with δbr appears responsible for transport larger than predictions from the quasi-linear test particle model. These results indicate the need for improved understanding of particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. Work performed in collaboration with W.X. Ding, W.F. Bergerson, T.F. Yates, UCLA; D.J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, S.C. Prager, J.S. Sarff and the MST Group, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. STATISTICS OF DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS DURING THE TRANSITION FROM THE OUTER SOLAR CORONA TO THE INTERPLANETARY SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Telloni, D.; Antonucci, E.; Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Carbone, V.

    2009-11-20

    This paper investigates the evolution of the plasma density fluctuations of the fast and slow solar wind from the solar corona into the interplanetary space. The study is performed by comparing the low-frequency spectra and the phase correlation of the proton density oscillations, measured in the inner heliosphere with the Helios 2 in situ instrumentation, with those due to the large-scale density perturbations observed with UVCS/SOHO in the outer corona. We find that the characteristics of density fluctuations of the fast solar wind are maintained in the transition from the outer corona to the inner heliosphere, thus suggesting a coronal imprint for the heliospheric large-scale 1/f {sup 2} noise spectrum. In contrast, a quick dynamical evolution is observed in the slow wind, which, starting from large-scale fluctuations with strong phase correlations in the outer corona, gives rise to a Kolmogorov-like spectrum and an accumulation of density structures at small scales at 0.3 AU. This can be explained in the framework of nearly incompressible turbulence.

  12. Two Point Space-Time Correlation of Density Fluctuations Measured in High Velocity Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    Two-point space-time correlations of air density fluctuations in unheated, fully-expanded free jets at Mach numbers M(sub j) = 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a Rayleigh scattering based diagnostic technique. The molecular scattered light from two small probe volumes of 1.03 mm length was measured for a completely non-intrusive means of determining the turbulent density fluctuations. The time series of density fluctuations were analyzed to estimate the integral length scale L in a moving frame of reference and the convective Mach number M(sub c) at different narrow Strouhal frequency (St) bands. It was observed that M(sub c) and the normalized moving frame length scale L*St/D, where D is the jet diameter, increased with Strouhal frequency before leveling off at the highest resolved frequency. Significant differences were observed between data obtained from the lip shear layer and the centerline of the jet. The wave number frequency transform of the correlation data demonstrated progressive increase in the radiative part of turbulence fluctuations with increasing jet Mach number.

  13. Small-scale plasma, magnetic, and neutral density fluctuations in the nightside Venus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Brace, L. H.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of the Venus small-scale waves as they propagate into the nightsite is examined, and the small-scale structures are compared with the waves in the three components of the magnetic field, magnetic dip angle, and neutral density. It is demonstrated that the small-scale fluctuations evolve between the transterminator and antisolar regions. It is shown that atmospheric gravity waves may also be producing some of the fluctuations observed at longer wavelengths. The electron temperature and density are shown to be approximately 180 deg out of phase and exhibiting the highest correlation of any pair of variables. Waves in the electron and neutral densities are found to be correlated moderately on most orbits, while the average electron temperature is higher when the average magnetic field is more horizontal.

  14. Intermediate-k density and magnetic field fluctuations during inter-ELM pedestal evolution in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Dickinson, D.; Roach, C. M.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Kirk, A.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.; Meyer, H.; the MAST Team

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of local density and magnetic field fluctuations near the pedestal top, conditionally averaged over the edge localized mode (ELM) cycle, have been made in Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A Doppler backscattering (DBS) system installed at MAST was used to measure intermediate-k ≤ft({{k}\\bot}{ρi}≈ 3~\\text{to}~4\\right) density fluctuations at the top of the pedestal. A novel diagnostic technique combining DBS with cross-polarization scattering (CP-DBS) enabled magnetic field fluctuations to also be locally measured at similar wave numbers. Polarization isolation and other effects for CP-DBS are discussed. Both measurements were used in a series of high-β ≤ft({βn}≈ 4.0\\right. -4.5) MAST plasmas with large type-I ELMs with an ˜ 8~\\text{to}~9~\\text{ms} period where microtearing modes (MTMs) had been predicted to be unstable in similar conditions (Dickinson 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 135002). The measured density fluctuation level increased by a factor of about 4 between 2 and 4 ms after the ELM, which was correlated with the recovery of the density profile while the temperature pedestal height continued to increase slowly. Magnetic field fluctuations showed different temporal behaviors, slowly increasing throughout the ELM cycle as the local β increased. Linear GS2 calculations show both MTM and electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes unstable at similar wave numbers as the measurements (although with more overlap between ETG wave numbers and diagnostic spectral resolution) at the top of the pedestal, along with kinetic ballooning modes are unstable lower in the pedestal (at larger wavelengths). The inferred ratio of fluctuation levels from experiment was ≤ft(δ B/B\\right)/≤ft(δ n/n\\right)≈ 1/20 . The comparable ratios from GS2 were ≤ft(δ B/B\\right)/≤ft(δ n/n\\right)≈ 0.4 for the MTM and ≤ft(δ B/B\\right)/≤ft(δ n/n\\right)≈ 0.02 for the ETG. Both the experimental wave number range and the fluctuation ratio

  15. Characterising density fluctuations in liquid yttria aluminates with small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Wilding, Martin C.; Vu Van, Quang; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been measured in the wavevector range 0.01density fluctuations deriving from isothermal compressibility. With decreasing Q a minimum is located close to 0.1 A{sup -1} at the foot of the inter-atomic structure factor, below which SAXS rises, suggesting scatter from longer range fluctuating volumes.

  16. Global-density fluctuations in methane clathrate hydrates in externally applied electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Conor J.; English, Niall J.

    2017-07-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of bulk methane clathrate hydrates have been conducted in a range of externally applied electromagnetic (e/m) fields. Studies into frequencies of system(or "global")-mass-density fluctuations showed that these clathrates have three major modes: the dominant one is attributable to water molecules' librations and occurs at 720 cm-1, regardless of any applied e/m fields. One of the more minor system-density fluctuations arises at 10-12 cm-1 and is caused by the propagation of local-density fluctuations; again, this is independent of e/m fields. The final density fluctuation is caused by e/m fields, and it only becomes apparent for field strengths of 1.2 V/nm or higher. The frequency of this mode is always twice the frequency of the applied e/m field. It was shown that the main qualitative features of the translational and librational densities of states (DOSs) were unaffected by the application of e/m fields; however, a slight coupling effect was observed, producing a peak in all DOSs at the frequency of the applied field. This study showed that e/m fields below a certain intensity threshold do not lead to any marked structural distortion or dissociation effect on pre-existing bulk clathrates, in which the hydrogen-bonding structure of the lattice remains intact. This is verified by system-density and configurational-energy values as well as radial distribution functions.

  17. Global-density fluctuations in methane clathrate hydrates in externally applied electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Conor J; English, Niall J

    2017-07-14

    Non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of bulk methane clathrate hydrates have been conducted in a range of externally applied electromagnetic (e/m) fields. Studies into frequencies of system(or "global")-mass-density fluctuations showed that these clathrates have three major modes: the dominant one is attributable to water molecules' librations and occurs at 720 cm(-1), regardless of any applied e/m fields. One of the more minor system-density fluctuations arises at 10-12 cm(-1) and is caused by the propagation of local-density fluctuations; again, this is independent of e/m fields. The final density fluctuation is caused by e/m fields, and it only becomes apparent for field strengths of 1.2 V/nm or higher. The frequency of this mode is always twice the frequency of the applied e/m field. It was shown that the main qualitative features of the translational and librational densities of states (DOSs) were unaffected by the application of e/m fields; however, a slight coupling effect was observed, producing a peak in all DOSs at the frequency of the applied field. This study showed that e/m fields below a certain intensity threshold do not lead to any marked structural distortion or dissociation effect on pre-existing bulk clathrates, in which the hydrogen-bonding structure of the lattice remains intact. This is verified by system-density and configurational-energy values as well as radial distribution functions.

  18. Spin density wave fluctuations and p-wave pairing in Sr2RuO4.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jia-Wei; Rice, T M; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2013-04-19

    Recently, a debate has arisen over which of the two distinct parts of the Fermi surface of Sr(2)RuO(4) is the active part for the chiral p-wave superconductivity exhibited. Early theories proposed p-wave pairing on the two-dimensional γ band, whereas a recent proposal focuses on the one-dimensional (α, β) bands whose nesting pockets are the source of the strong incommensurate spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We apply a renormalization group theory to study quasi-one-dimensional repulsive Hubbard chains and explain the form of SDW fluctuations, reconciling the absence of long-range order with their nesting Fermi surface. The mutual exclusion of p-wave pairing and SDW fluctuations in repulsive Hubbard chains favors the assignment of the two-dimensional γ band as the source of p-wave pairing.

  19. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  20. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, M. W.; Austin, M. E.; Petty, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker "Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV," EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle "Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D," Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the Te measurements from the University of Texas's 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  1. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Brookman, M. W. Austin, M. E.; Petty, C. C.

    2015-12-10

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker “Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV,” EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle “Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D,” Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the T{sub e} measurements from the University of Texas’s 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  2. Stirring Coronal Spaghetti: Exploring Multiple Interactions Between MHD Waves and Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The solar corona has been revealed in the past few decades to be a highly dynamic nonequilibrium plasma environment. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be strongly turbulent, and models that invoke the dissipation of incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. However, many of these models neglect the mounting evidence that density and pressure variations may play an important role in the mass and energy balance of this system. In this presentation I will briefly review observations of both compressible and incompressible MHD fluctuations in the corona and solar wind, and discuss future prospects with DKIST. I will also attempt to outline the many ways that these different fluctuation modes have been proposed to interact with one another -- usually with an eye on finding ways to enhance their dissipation and heating. One under-appreciated type of interaction is the fact that Alfven waves will undergo multiple reflections and refractions in a "background plasma" filled with localized density fluctuations. It is becoming increasingly clear that models must not only include the effects of longitudinal variability (e.g., magnetoacoustic waves and pulse-like jets) but also transverse "striations" that appear naturally in a structured magnetic field with small-scale footpoint variability. Future off-limb observations, such as those with DKIST's Cryo-NIRSP instrument, will be crucial for providing us with a detailed census of MHD waves and their mutual interactions in the corona.

  3. Numerical simulation of solar wind density fluctuations and their effects on VLF radio interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Robert S., III; Jones, Dayton L.

    1990-01-01

    A mission consisting of an array of small satellites has been proposed to investigate radio sources at frequencies from approximately 2 to 20 MHz, a range unobservable from the ground because of ionospheric absorption and aberrations. Such a mission seems feasible and relatively inexpensive, but further investigation is still necessary. The solar wind is a major concern because it contains turbulence-induced random density variations that cause a fluctuating phase shift in any electromagnetic signal passing through, sometimes making radio source imaging by interferometry impossible. A numerical simulation has been developed which attempts to accurately characterize solar wind density fluctuations. Results have allowed more concrete conclusions to be drawn about observing constraints and have shown that interferometric imaging at radio frequencies below 10 MHz with baselines up to 100 km is possible at solar elongation angles of about 90 deg or more.

  4. Wavelike charge density fluctuations and van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Ferri, Nicola; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-11

    Recent experiments on noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale have challenged the basic assumptions of commonly used particle- or fragment-based models for describing van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces. We demonstrate that a qualitatively correct description of the vdW interactions between polarizable nanostructures over a wide range of finite distances can only be attained by accounting for the wavelike nature of charge density fluctuations. By considering a diverse set of materials and biological systems with markedly different dimensionalities, topologies, and polarizabilities, we find a visible enhancement in the nonlocality of the charge density response in the range of 10 to 20 nanometers. These collective wavelike fluctuations are responsible for the emergence of nontrivial modifications of the power laws that govern noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Electron-cyclotron wave scattering by edge density fluctuations in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsironis, Christos; Peeters, Arthur G.; Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Vlahos, Loukas; Strintzi, Dafni

    2009-11-15

    The effect of edge turbulence on the electron-cyclotron wave propagation in ITER is investigated with emphasis on wave scattering, beam broadening, and its influence on localized heating and current drive. A wave used for electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) must cross the edge of the plasma, where density fluctuations can be large enough to bring on wave scattering. The scattering angle due to the density fluctuations is small, but the beam propagates over a distance of several meters up to the resonance layer and even small angle scattering leads to a deviation of several centimeters at the deposition location. Since the localization of ECCD is crucial for the control of neoclassical tearing modes, this issue is of great importance to the ITER design. The wave scattering process is described on the basis of a Fokker-Planck equation, where the diffusion coefficient is calculated analytically as well as computed numerically using a ray tracing code.

  6. Measurements of density, temperature, and their fluctuations in turbulent supersonic flow using UV laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Nonintrusive measurements of density, temperature, and their turbulent fluctuation levels were obtained in the boundary layer of an unseeded, Mach 2 wind tunnel flow. The spectroscopic technique that was used to make the measurements is based on the combination of laser-induced oxygen fluorescence and Raman scattering by oxygen and nitrogen from the same laser pulse. Results from this demonstration experiment are compared with previous measurements obtained in the same facility using conventional probes and an earlier spectroscopic technique. Densities and temperatures measured with the current technique agree with the previous surveys to within 3 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The fluctuation amplitudes for both variables agree with the measurements obtained using the earlier spectroscopic technique and show evidence of an unsteady, weak shock wave that perturbs the boundary layer.

  7. Measurements of temperature, density, pressure, and their fluctuations in supersonic turbulence using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1987-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence method has been developed that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in unheated compressible flows. Pressure and its fluctuations are also deduced using the equation of state. Fluorescence is induced in nitric oxide that has been seeded into a nitrogen flow in concentrations of 100 ppm. Measurements are obtained from each laser pulse, with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a temporal resolution of 125 ns. The method was applied to a supersonic, turbulent, boundary-layer flow with a free-stream Mach number of 2. For stream conditions in the range from 150-300 K and 0.3-1 atm, temperature is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 1 percent rms, while density and pressure uncertainties are approximately 2 percent rms.

  8. Chaotic density fluctuations in L-mode plasmas of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Maggs, J. E.; Rhodes, Terry L.; Morales, G. J.

    2015-03-05

    Analysis of the time series obtained with the Doppler backscattering system (DBS) in the DIII-D tokamak shows that intermediate wave number plasma density fluctuations in low confinement (L-mode) tokamak plasmas are chaotic. Here, the supporting evidence is based on the shape of the power spectrum; the location of the signal in the complexity-entropy plane (C-H plane); and the population of the corresponding Bandt-Pompe probability distributions.

  9. Interaction between the lower hybrid wave and density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Madi, M.; Decker, J.; Kabalan, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, the perturbation of the launched power spectrum of the Lower Hybrid wave at the separatrix by electron density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer is investigated. Considering a slab geometry with magnetic field lines parallel to the toroidal direction, the full wave equation is solved using Comsol Multiphysics® for a fully active multi-junction like LH antenna made of two modules. When electron density fluctuations are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, it is shown that the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the wave propagates. The diffraction effect leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions, a feature consistent with the recently developed model that has been applied successfully to high density discharges on the Tokamak Tore Supra corresponding to the large spectral gap regime [Decker J. et al. Phys. Plasma 21 (2014) 092504]. The perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength.

  10. Interaction between the lower hybrid wave and density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Peysson, Y.; Madi, M.; Kabalan, K.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    In the present paper, the perturbation of the launched power spectrum of the Lower Hybrid wave at the separatrix by electron density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer is investigated. Considering a slab geometry with magnetic field lines parallel to the toroidal direction, the full wave equation is solved using Comsol Multiphysics® for a fully active multi-junction like LH antenna made of two modules. When electron density fluctuations are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, it is shown that the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the wave propagates. The diffraction effect leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions, a feature consistent with the recently developed model that has been applied successfully to high density discharges on the Tokamak Tore Supra corresponding to the large spectral gap regime [Decker J. et al. Phys. Plasma 21 (2014) 092504]. The perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength.

  11. Binary collision approximations for the memory function for density fluctuations in equilibrium atomic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Joyce E.

    Time correlation functions of density fluctuations of liquids at equilibrium can be used to relate the microscopic dynamics of a liquid to its macroscopic transport properties. Time correlation functions are especially useful since they can be generated in a variety of ways, from scattering experiments to computer simulation to analytic theory. The kinetic theory of fluctuations in equilibrium liquids is an analytic theory for calculating correlation functions using memory functions. In this work, we use a diagrammatic formulation of the kinetic theory to develop a series of binary collision approximations for the collisional part of the memory function. We define binary collisions as collisions between two distinct density fluctuations whose identities are fixed during the duration of a collsion. R approximations are for the short time part of the memory function, and build upon the work of Ranganathan and Andersen. These approximations have purely repulsive interactions between the fluctuations. The second type of approximation, RA approximations, is for the longer time part of the memory function, where the density fluctuations now interact via repulsive and attractive forces. Although RA approximations are a natural extension of R approximations, they permit two density fluctuations to become trapped in the wells of the interaction potential, leading to long-lived oscillatory behavior, which is unphysical. Therefore we consider S approximations which describe binary particles which experience the random effect of the surroundings while interacting via repulsive or repulsive and attractive interactions. For each of these approximations for the memory function we numerically solve the kinetic equation to generate correlation functions. These results are compared to molecular dynamics results for the correlation functions. Comparing the successes and failures of the different approximations, we conclude that R approximations give more accurate intermediate and

  12. Thermospheric Density Fluctuations Derived from the Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment Risk Reduction Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A. C.; Budzien, S. A.; Healy, L.; Davis, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE) Risk Reduction flight was launched on Dec 9, 2006 and deployed into orbit by the Space Shuttle Discovery on December 21, 2006. The primary mission objective is to test the deployment mechanism from the Shuttle for the ANDE flight in mid 2009. Scientific objectives of the ANDE risk reduction flight include: monitor total neutral density along the orbit for improved orbit determination of resident space objects, monitor the spin rate and orientation of the spacecraft, and provide a test object for polarimetry studies. The two ANDERR spacecraft decayed on December 25, 2007 and May 21, 2008, atmospheric densities derived from observations of the ANDERR spacecraft will be presented and compared to atmospheric models and drivers.

  13. Probability density of strong intensity fluctuations of laser radiation in a weakly absorbing random medium

    SciTech Connect

    Almaev, R Kh; Suvorov, A A

    2010-01-31

    Based on the quasi-optic parabolic equation, we derived analytically an expression for the probability density of strong intensity fluctuations of radiation propagating in a random attenuating medium. This probability density is compared with that obtained experimentally. It is shown that the agreement between the theory and the experiment in the entire range of variations in the radiation intensity is achieved by the combined account for the effect of small random attenuation on the radiation propagation and the action of noises on the radiation receiver. (lasers)

  14. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  15. Nonlinear saturation spectra of electric fields and density fluctuations in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The detection of drift waves in the nonlinear evolution of a space plasma process driven at long wavelengths is considered, adducing measurements of the electric field and density fluctuation power spectra as evidence. Since the driving mechanism is clearly at long wavelengths, the detection of drift waves suggests that they may play an important role in the transfer of wave energy from long to short wavelengths in a low beta plasma. The saturated spectral density is compared with theoretical results in order to estimate the anomalous diffusion rate. The observed spectral form and amplitude is in excellent agreement with drift wave predictions.

  16. The Remarkable Similarity Between the Scaling of Kurtosis with Squared Skewness for TORPEX Density Fluctuations and Sea-surface Temperature Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2008-02-28

    The striking similarity between the statistics of plasma density fluctuations in the TORPEX device [B. Labit et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 255002 (2007)] and sea-surface temperature fluctuations [Po Sura and P. D. Sardeshmukh, J. Phys. Oceanogr. 38, 638 (2007)] (SS) is discussed. A nonlinear Langevin theory due to SS is generalized to include linear wave propagation. An interpretation of the nonlinear Langevin equation based on statistical closure theory is proposed.

  17. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  18. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in a heated air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature, velocity, and density of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. Power spectral density calculations of temperature, velocity, and density fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are demonstrated for various radial locations in the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Results are compared with constant current anemometry and pitot probe measurements at the same locations.

  19. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Kasten, C P; Irby, J H; Murray, R; White, A E; Pace, D C

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with k(R) < 20.3 cm(-1) and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  20. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlis, N. V.; Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Skordas, E. S.

    2015-06-01

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold Mthres = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  1. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity.

    PubMed

    Sarlis, N V; Christopoulos, S-R G; Skordas, E S

    2015-06-01

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold Mthres = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  2. Minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of global seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlis, N. V. Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Skordas, E. S.

    2015-06-15

    It has been recently shown [N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011) and N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012)] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. Such correlations were identified by studying the variance κ{sub 1} of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity. Here, we study the fluctuations of this order parameter using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for a magnitude threshold M{sub thres} = 5.0 and focus on its behavior before major earthquakes. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013)] that similar minima of the seismicity order parameter fluctuations had preceded all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Moreover, on the basis of these minima a statistically significant binary prediction method for earthquakes of magnitude larger than 8.4 with hit rate 100% and false alarm rate 6.67% is suggested.

  3. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (˜1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ˜0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  4. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Ding, W X; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  5. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L. Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  6. Volume and surface contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy within the coherent density fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2016-07-01

    The volume and surface components of the nuclear symmetry energy (NSE) and their ratio are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model (CDFM). The estimations use the results of the model for the NSE in finite nuclei based on the Brueckner energy-density functional for nuclear matter. In addition, we present results for the NSE and its volume and surface contributions obtained by using the Skyrme energy-density functional. The CDFM weight function is obtained using the proton and neutron densities from the self-consistent HF+BCS method with Skyrme interactions. We present and discuss the values of the volume and surface contributions to the NSE and their ratio obtained for the Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains, studying their isotopic sensitivity. The results are compared with estimations of other approaches which have used available experimental data on binding energies, neutron-skin thicknesses, excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS), and also with results of other theoretical methods.

  7. Temporal fluctuations in oribatid mites indicate that density-independent factors favour parthenogenetic reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Christian; Scheu, Stefan; Maraun, Mark

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the oribatid mite density, community structure and the percentage of parthenogenetic individuals in four different forest types across three regions in Germany in 2008 and once again in 2011. We compared temporal (inter-annual) fluctuations in population densities between sexually and parthenogenetically reproducing species of oribatid mites. We hypothesized that population densities in parthenogenetic oribatid mite species fluctuate more than in sexual ones. Further, we expected species composition and dominance of parthenogenetic species to differ between forest types and regions. Oribatid mite community structure did not differ between years but varied with forest type and region, indicating low species turnover in time. As hypothesized, temporal fluctuations were more pronounced in parthenogenetic as compared to sexual species. The percentage of parthenogenetic individuals was significantly higher in coniferous than in beech forests and significantly higher in Schorfheide-Chorin than in Hainich-Dün and Schwäbische Alb. The results indicate that parthenogenetic species flourish if populations are controlled by density-independent factors and dominate at sites were resources are plentiful and easily available, such as coniferous forests, and in regions with more acidic soils and thick organic layers, such as Schorfheide-Chorin. However, historical factors also may have contributed to the increased dominance of parthenogenetic species in the Schorfheide-Chorin, as this region was more heavily glaciated and this may have favoured parthenogenetic species. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that parthenogenetic species benefit from the lack of density-dependent population control whereas the opposite is true for sexual species.

  8. Three-parameter probability distribution density for statistical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schau, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 2-D image data or data gathered from a scanning radiometer requires that both the non-Gaussian nature and finite sample size of the process be considered. To aid the statistical analysis of this data, a higher moment description density function has been defined, and parameters have been identified with the estimated moments of the data. It is shown that the first two moments may be computed from a knowledge of the Weiner spectrum, whereas all higher moments require the complex spatial frequency spectrum. Parameter identification is carried out for a three-parameter density function and applied to a scene in the IR region, 8-14 microns. Results indicate that a three-parameter distribution density generally provides different probabilities than does a two-parameter Gaussian description if maximum entropy (minimum bias) forms are sought.

  9. Density and magnetic fluctuations at JET: experimental observation and numerical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Masi, Gianluca; Predebon, Italo; Spagnolo, Silvia; Lupelli, Ivan; Hillesheim, Jon; Meneses, Luis; Maggi, Costanza; Delabie, Ephrem; JET Contributors Team

    2016-10-01

    Density and magnetic fluctuations have been experimentally observed on JET in the inter ELM phases in low beta discharges.They have been characterized in terms of typical frequency range (60-80 kHz), wavenumber (0.01 <=ky ρi <=0.1), radial localization (pedestal top) and correlation with the relevant kinetic quantities. A linear simulation with gyrokinetic code GENE, matching the experimental edge condition has been performed to gain insight on their possible physical interpretation. ITG modes turn out to be the most unstable modes for 0 <=ky ρi <=1, while microtearing modes (MTMs) are the dominant instabilities for ky ρi <= 0.1.A typical oscillation frequency of about 50-100 kHz is associated to both unstable modes, with opposite propagation direction.Different considerations suggest an interpretation in terms of MTMs for the observed magnetic fluctuations, while density fluctuations appear to be dominated by ITG instabilities. EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK.

  10. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-15

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R − R{sub 0})/a, R{sub 0} = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of k{sub θ} < 2.4 cm{sup −1}. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  11. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm(-1). The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  12. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  13. Planets in other universes: habitability constraints on density fluctuations and galactic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Fred C.; Coppess, Katherine R.; Bloch, Anthony M. E-mail: kcoppess@umich.edu

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the possibility that different versions of the laws of physics could be realized within other universes, this paper delineates the galactic structure parameters that allow for habitable planets and revisits constraints on the amplitude Q of the primordial density fluctuations. Previous work indicates that large values of Q lead to galaxies so dense that planetary orbits cannot survive long enough for life to develop. Small values of Q lead to delayed star formation, loosely bound galaxies, and compromised heavy element retention. This work generalizes previous treatments in the following directions: [A] We consider models for the internal structure of the galaxies, including a range of stellar densities, and find the fraction of the resulting galactic real estate that allows for stable, long-lived planetary orbits. [B] For high velocity encounters, we perform a large ensemble of numerical simulations to estimate cross sections for the disruption of planetary orbits due to interactions with passing stars. [C] We consider the background radiation fields produced by the galaxies: if a galaxy is too compact, the night sky seen from a potentially habitable planet can provide more power than the host star. [D] One consequence of intense galactic background radiation fields is that some portion of the galaxy, denoted as the Galactic Habitable Zone, will provide the right flux levels to support habitable planets for essentially any planetary orbit including freely floating bodies (but excluding close-in planets). As the value of Q increases, the fraction of stars in a galaxy that allow for (traditional) habitable planets decreases due to both orbital disruption and the intense background radiation. However, the outer parts of the galaxy always allow for habitable planets, so that the value of Q does not have a well-defined upper limit (due to scattering or radiation constraints). Moreover, some Galactic Habitable Zones are large enough to support more

  14. Planets in other universes: habitability constraints on density fluctuations and galactic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Coppess, Katherine R.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the possibility that different versions of the laws of physics could be realized within other universes, this paper delineates the galactic structure parameters that allow for habitable planets and revisits constraints on the amplitude Q of the primordial density fluctuations. Previous work indicates that large values of Q lead to galaxies so dense that planetary orbits cannot survive long enough for life to develop. Small values of Q lead to delayed star formation, loosely bound galaxies, and compromised heavy element retention. This work generalizes previous treatments in the following directions: [A] We consider models for the internal structure of the galaxies, including a range of stellar densities, and find the fraction of the resulting galactic real estate that allows for stable, long-lived planetary orbits. [B] For high velocity encounters, we perform a large ensemble of numerical simulations to estimate cross sections for the disruption of planetary orbits due to interactions with passing stars. [C] We consider the background radiation fields produced by the galaxies: if a galaxy is too compact, the night sky seen from a potentially habitable planet can provide more power than the host star. [D] One consequence of intense galactic background radiation fields is that some portion of the galaxy, denoted as the Galactic Habitable Zone, will provide the right flux levels to support habitable planets for essentially any planetary orbit including freely floating bodies (but excluding close-in planets). As the value of Q increases, the fraction of stars in a galaxy that allow for (traditional) habitable planets decreases due to both orbital disruption and the intense background radiation. However, the outer parts of the galaxy always allow for habitable planets, so that the value of Q does not have a well-defined upper limit (due to scattering or radiation constraints). Moreover, some Galactic Habitable Zones are large enough to support more

  15. Novel analysis technique for measuring edge density fluctuation profiles with reflectometry in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creely, A. J.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujimura, T.; Akiyama, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Emoto, M.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new method for measuring density fluctuation profiles near the edge of plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been developed utilizing reflectometry combined with pellet-induced fast density scans. Reflectometer cutoff location was calculated by proportionally scaling the cutoff location calculated with fast far infrared laser interferometer (FIR) density profiles to match the slower time resolution results of the ray-tracing code LHD-GAUSS. Plasma velocity profile peaks generated with this reflectometer mapping were checked against velocity measurements made with charge exchange spectroscopy (CXS) and were found to agree within experimental uncertainty once diagnostic differences were accounted for. Measured density fluctuation profiles were found to peak strongly near the edge of the plasma, as is the case in most tokamaks. These measurements can be used in the future to inform inversion methods of phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements. This result was confirmed with both a fixed frequency reflectometer and calibrated data from a multi-frequency comb reflectometer, and this method was applied successfully to a series of discharges. The full width at half maximum of the turbulence layer near the edge of the plasma was found to be only 1.5-3 cm on a series of LHD discharges, less than 5% of the normalized minor radius.

  16. Impact of density and environmental factors on population fluctuations in a migratory passerine.

    PubMed

    Pasinelli, Gilberto; Schaub, Michael; Häfliger, Guido; Frey, Monika; Jakober, Hans; Müller, Mathis; Stauber, Wolfgang; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Zollinger, Jean-Luc; Jenni, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    1. Populations of plants and animals typically fluctuate because of the combined effects of density-dependent and density-independent processes. The study of these processes is complicated by the fact that population sizes are typically not known exactly, because population counts are subject to sampling variance. Although the existence of sampling variance is broadly acknowledged, relatively few studies on time-series data have accounted for it, which can result in wrong inferences about population processes. 2. To increase our understanding of population dynamics, we analysed time series from six Central European populations of the migratory red-backed shrike Lanius collurio by simultaneously assessing the strength of density dependence, process and sampling variance. In addition, we evaluated hypotheses predicting effects of factors presumed to operate on the breeding grounds, at stopover sites in eastern Africa during fall and spring migration and in the wintering grounds in southern Africa. We used both simple and state-space formulations of the Gompertz equation to model population size. 3. Across populations and modelling approaches, we found consistent evidence for negative density-dependent population regulation. Further, process variance contributed substantially to variation in population size, while sampling variance did not. Environmental conditions in eastern and southern Africa appear to influence breeding population size, as rainfall in the Sahel during fall migration and in the south African wintering areas were positively related to population size in the following spring in four of six populations. In contrast, environmental conditions in the breeding grounds were not related to population size. 4. Our findings suggest negative density-dependent regulation of red-backed shrike breeding populations and are consistent with the long-standing hypothesis that conditions in the African staging and wintering areas influence population numbers of species

  17. Characterizing intra-annual density fluctuations using fine-spatial resolution blue intensity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babst, Flurin; Wright, William; Szejner, Paul; Wells, Leon; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Monson, Russell

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly rising evaporative demand threatens forests in semi-arid areas around the world, but the timing of stem growth response to drought is often coarsely known. This is partly due to a shortage of sub-annual growth records, particularly outside the Mediterranean region where most intra-annual density fluctuation (IADF) chronologies are based. We anticipate that an automated, cost-effective, and easily implementable method to characterize IADFs could foster more widespread development of sub-annual chronologies. Here, we applied a peak detection algorithm to fine-spatial resolution blue intensity (BI) profiles of Ponderosa pine tree rings from two sites located in neighboring mountain ranges in southern Arizona (~300 m elevation difference). This automated procedure proved reliable to isolate and characterize IADFs, thus offering an efficient and objective alternative to visual identification. Out of seven investigated BI parameters, peak height, width, and area showed satisfactory chronology statistics. We assessed the response of these BI and radial growth parameters to six monthly-resolved climate variables and to the onset date of the North American summer monsoon (NAM). The NAM is an atmospheric mode that provides a clear time marker for the termination of a pre-summer drought period (May-June) causing regular IADFs in trees growing near the dry margin of their distribution range. We observed divergent water limitation at the two sites, despite comparable site characteristics. Radial growth at the lower-elevation site depended mainly on winter precipitation, whereas the higher site relied on spring and monsoon precipitation. The pre-summer drought period indeed promoted IADFs in early ring portions at both sites. Yet, IADFs at the higher site were only formed, if spring was sufficiently humid to assume enough radial growth. Late-position IADFs were caused by a weak monsoon and additionally promoted by favorable conditions towards the end of the growing

  18. Density fluctuations and rotational isomerization in phospholipid bilayers as studied by ultrasonic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaatze, U; Brai, M

    1993-04-01

    Broadband ultrasonic absorption spectra are discussed for some aqueous solutions of single-walled phospholipid bilayer vesicles. It is shown that the excess absorption found with all samples can be represented by a sum of a Debye-type relaxation term with discrete relaxation time and a Fixman-Kawasaki term. The former term reflects the kinetics of structural isomerization of the hydrocarbon chains. The values of its relaxation time (0.09-0.56 ns) agree with those for pure n-alkanes of comparable length. The latter terms seems to be due to density fluctuations in the hydrocarbon part of the double layer. Fluctuation correlation lengths between 1 and 30 A result from the analysis of the ultrasonic spectra.

  19. Scaling Laws of Turbulence and Heating of Fast Solar Wind: The Role of Density Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Bruno, R.

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvenic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  20. Scaling laws of turbulence and heating of fast solar wind: the role of density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; Marino, R; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvénic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  1. The statistics of peaks of Gaussian random fields. [cosmological density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardeen, J. M.; Bond, J. R.; Kaiser, N.; Szalay, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    A set of new mathematical results on the theory of Gaussian random fields is presented, and the application of such calculations in cosmology to treat questions of structure formation from small-amplitude initial density fluctuations is addressed. The point process equation is discussed, giving the general formula for the average number density of peaks. The problem of the proper conditional probability constraints appropriate to maxima are examined using a one-dimensional illustration. The average density of maxima of a general three-dimensional Gaussian field is calculated as a function of heights of the maxima, and the average density of 'upcrossing' points on density contour surfaces is computed. The number density of peaks subject to the constraint that the large-scale density field be fixed is determined and used to discuss the segregation of high peaks from the underlying mass distribution. The machinery to calculate n-point peak-peak correlation functions is determined, as are the shapes of the profiles about maxima.

  2. Turbulent small-scale neutral and ion density fluctuations as measured during MAC/Epsilon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebken, F.-J.; Hillert, W.; Vonzahn, U.; Blix, T. A.; Thrane, E. V.

    1989-01-01

    During the MAC/Epsilon campaign (Fall 1987, from Andoya, Northern Norway, 69 N, 16 E) a total of four altitude profiles of neutral gas number densities and six profiles of ion number densities were measured with high spatial resolution in the height range from 60 to 120 km. First results of these rocket-borne experiments are presented with emphasis on small scale turbulent density variations and related turbulent parameter as structure function constants and energy dissipation rates.

  3. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2-215 solar radii and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances of about 20 solar radii the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrum is well modeled by a single power law in the frequency range 0.0001-0.05 Hz. The flattening of the density spectrum within 20 solar radii is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind.

  4. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2-215 solar radii and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances of about 20 solar radii the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrum is well modeled by a single power law in the frequency range 0.0001-0.05 Hz. The flattening of the density spectrum within 20 solar radii is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind.

  5. Theory of small-scale density and electric field fluctuations in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that small-scale (lambda about 0.1-2 km) density irregularities occur during 100-Hz electric field bursts in the nightside ionosphere of Venus. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the lower-hybrid-drift instability as a mechanism to generate the observed irregularities. A fully electromagnetic theory is developed that is relevant to the finite beta plasma in Venus's ionosphere and includes collisional effects (e.g., electron-ion, electron-neutral, and ion-neutral collisions). The key features of the analysis that favor this instability are the following: (1) it is a flute mode and propagates orthogonal to the ambient magnetic field; (2) it is a relatively short wavelength mode and the Doppler-shifted frequency can be greater than about 100 Hz; (3) it can produce both electric field and density fluctuations, as well as magnetic field fluctuations in a finite beta plasma; and (4) it is most unstable in low-beta plasmas so that it is likely to occur in the low-density, high-magnetic-field ionospheric holes. These features are consistent with observational results.

  6. Correlations of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters with density and microarchitectural parameters in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, correlations of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters (speed of sound, normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation, and nonlinear parameter B/A) with bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters were investigated in 28 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in vitro. All three ultrasound parameters exhibited relatively high correlation coefficients with the indexes of bone quantity (bone mineral density and bone volume fraction) and lower correlation coefficients with the remaining microarchitectural parameters. These results suggest that B/A, in addition to speed of sound and attenuation, may have potential as an index for the assessment of bone status and osteoporosis.

  7. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations using electron microscopy: Light-localization properties of biological cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen

    2010-12-13

    We report a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of heterogeneous optical dielectric media, including nanomaterials and biological cells, by quantifying their nanoscale light-localization properties. Transmission electron microscope images of the media are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. Light-localization properties are studied by the statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. We validated IPR analysis using nanomaterials as models of disordered systems fabricated from dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we then applied such analysis to distinguish between cells with different degrees of aggressive malignancy.

  8. Communication: Linking the dielectric Debye process in mono-alcohols to density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecksher, Tina

    2016-04-01

    This work provides the first direct evidence that the puzzling dielectric Debye process observed in mono-alcohols is coupled to density fluctuations. The results open up for an explanation of the Debye process within the framework of conventional liquid-state theory. The spectral shape of the dynamical bulk modulus of the two studied mono-alcohols, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and 4-methyl-3-heptanol, is nearly identical to that of their corresponding shear modulus, and thus the supramolecular structures believed to be responsible for the slow dielectric Debye process are manifested in the bulk modulus in the same way as in the shear modulus.

  9. Parameters of the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model for a slowly fluctuating signal.

    PubMed

    Picchini, Umberto; Ditlevsen, Susanne; De Gaetano, Andrea; Lansky, Petr

    2008-11-01

    Stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuronal models are common theoretical tools for studying properties of real neuronal systems. Experimental data of frequently sampled membrane potential measurements between spikes show that the assumption of constant parameter values is not realistic and that some (random) fluctuations are occurring. In this letter, we extend the stochastic LIF model, allowing a noise source determining slow fluctuations in the signal. This is achieved by adding a random variable to one of the parameters characterizing the neuronal input, considering each interspike interval (ISI) as an independent experimental unit with a different realization of this random variable. In this way, the variation of the neuronal input is split into fast (within-interval) and slow (between-intervals) components. A parameter estimation method is proposed, allowing the parameters to be estimated simultaneously over the entire data set. This increases the statistical power, and the average estimate over all ISIs will be improved in the sense of decreased variance of the estimator compared to previous approaches, where the estimation has been conducted on each individual ISI. The results obtained on real data show good agreement with classical regression methods.

  10. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  11. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  12. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  13. Density fluctuation measurements by far-forward collective scattering in the MST reversed-field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Duff, J. R.; Brower, D. L.; Sarff, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    The multichannel polarimeter-interferometer system on the MST reversed-field pinch can be utilized to measure far-forward collective scattering from electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 11 viewing chords with ˜8 cm spacing. The source is a 432 μm (694 GHz) far infrared laser and the scattered power is measured using a heterodyne detection scheme. Collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wavenumber range: k⊥ < 1.3 cm-1, corresponding k⊥ρs < 1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius), the region of primary interest for turbulent fluctuation-induced transport. The perpendicular wavenumber consists of toroidal, poloidal, and radial contributions, which vary with chord position. Coherent modes associated with tearing instabilities and neutral-beam driven fast particles are observed along with broadband turbulence at frequencies up to 500 kHz. Changes in frequency are consistent with a Doppler shift due to parallel plasma flow.

  14. Characterization of density fluctuations during ELMs in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coda, S.; Porkolab, M.; Burrell, K. H.

    2001-12-01

    Bursts of turbulence associated with ELMs have been studied systematically in DIII-D with a multichannel phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic, which is sensitive to the long poloidal wavelength components of the density fluctuations in the outer edge of the tokamak. A comparison of the temporal dynamics of the turbulence with the signature Dα signal from the divertor has revealed systematic differences between type I and type III ELMs: even though precursor fluctuations are sometimes seen before type I ELMs, the PCI signal level remains high until the peak in the Dα signal; by contrast, in type III ELMs the fluctuation burst precedes the Dα peak by 0.4-0.6 ms. Type I ELMs can generate `echoes', i.e. secondary bursts, in the scrape-off layer. Coherent modes are observed during type III ELMs only. The radial and temporal correlation structures and the spectral properties of the turbulence during the transient ELM phase have been reconstructed by averaging over multiple ELMs, in order to improve the statistical accuracy. ELM turbulence is found to share many properties with L mode turbulence, including the main qualitative features of radial wavenumber and frequency spectra and radial dispersion relations. However, features unique to ELM turbulence are also identified.

  15. Density fluctuation measurements by far-forward collective scattering in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Duff, J. R.; Sarff, J. S.

    2012-10-15

    The multichannel polarimeter-interferometer system on the MST reversed-field pinch can be utilized to measure far-forward collective scattering from electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 11 viewing chords with {approx}8 cm spacing. The source is a 432 {mu}m (694 GHz) far infrared laser and the scattered power is measured using a heterodyne detection scheme. Collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wavenumber range: k{sub Up-Tack} < 1.3 cm{sup -1}, corresponding k{sub Up-Tack }{rho}{sub s} < 1.3 ({rho}{sub s} is the ion-sound Larmor radius), the region of primary interest for turbulent fluctuation-induced transport. The perpendicular wavenumber consists of toroidal, poloidal, and radial contributions, which vary with chord position. Coherent modes associated with tearing instabilities and neutral-beam driven fast particles are observed along with broadband turbulence at frequencies up to 500 kHz. Changes in frequency are consistent with a Doppler shift due to parallel plasma flow.

  16. Initial density fluctuation measurements from the NSTX Beam Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic system*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Thompson, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Stratton, B. C.

    2010-11-01

    Density fluctuation measurements on the ion gyroscale have been obtained on NSTX with a newly commissioned beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system. The BES system measures red-shifted Dα emission near 660 nm from deuterium neutral beams with high throughput optics and high efficiency detectors. The system presently employs 16 detection channels arranged in radial and poloidal arrays, and an expansion to 32 channels is planned. Radial arrays can measure fluctuations from r/a 0.1 to beyond the last closed flux surface and resolve fluctuations with kρi<=1.5. Initial BES measurements reveal broadband turbulence and coherent modes below 300 kHz for r/a>=0.4. The broadband turbulence appears in high gradient regions and increases at H-L transitions. The frequency characteristics of the coherent modes correlate with Alfvén/energetic particle modes in Mirnov probe measurements, but some coherent modes appear in BES measurements only. *Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Nos. DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-SC0001288.

  17. Optical observation of spin-density-wave fluctuations in Ba122 iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Dai, Y. M.; Xiao, H.; Shen, B.; Ye, Z. R.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Feng, D. L.; Wen, H. H.; Qiu, X. G.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.

    2016-08-01

    In iron-based superconductors, a spin-density-wave (SDW) magnetic order is suppressed with doping, and unconventional superconductivity appears in close proximity to the SDW instability. The optical response of the SDW order shows clear gap features: substantial suppression in the low-frequency optical conductivity, alongside a spectral weight transfer from low to high frequencies. Here, we study the detailed temperature dependence of the optical response in three different series of the Ba122 system [Ba1 -xKxFe2As2 , Ba (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 , and BaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 ]. Intriguingly, we find that the suppression of the low-frequency optical conductivity and spectral weight transfer appear at a temperature T* much higher than the SDW transition temperature TSDW. Since this behavior has the same optical feature and energy scale as the SDW order, we attribute it to SDW fluctuations. Furthermore, T* is suppressed with doping, closely following the doping dependence of the nematic fluctuations detected by other techniques. These results suggest that the magnetic and nematic orders have an intimate relationship, in favor of the magnetic-fluctuation-driven nematicity scenario in iron-based superconductors.

  18. Density fluctuation spectrum of solar wind turbulence between ion and electron scales.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Bonnell, J W; Mozer, F S; Bale, S D

    2012-07-20

    We present a measurement of the spectral index of density fluctuations between ion and electron scales in solar wind turbulence using the EFI instrument on the ARTEMIS spacecraft. The mean spectral index at 1 AU was found to be -2.75±0.06, steeper than predictions for pure whistler or kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence but consistent with previous magnetic field measurements. The steep spectra are also consistent with expectations of increased intermittency or damping of some of the turbulent energy over this range of scales. Neither the spectral index nor the flattening of the density spectra before ion scales were found to depend on the proximity to the pressure anisotropy instability thresholds, suggesting that they are features inherent to the turbulent cascade.

  19. Critical density fluctuations in lipid bilayers detected by fluorescence lifetime heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, A; Hudson, B

    1989-01-01

    The heterogeneity of the decay of the fluorescence of transparinaric acid in single-component lipid bilayers at temperatures above their gel/liquid crystalline phase transition is shown to be due to the presence of regions of higher local density and higher acyl chain order than the predominant fluid regions. This conclusion is based on selective excitation behavior and the observation of time-resolved fluorescence anisotropies that increase at long times. The fractional amplitude of the long lifetime component of the fluorescence shows a temperature variation that conforms to conventional descriptions of critical behavior. The critical exponent extracted from this variation is 1.1, close to the value of 1.0 that describes ultrasonic data. We therefore conclude that liquid crystalline lipid bilayers exhibit critical behavior with significant density and order fluctuations. This behavior must be taken into account in the interpretation of fluorescence and other spectroscopic measurements of the properties of bilayers. PMID:2765649

  20. A Fluctuation Equation of State for Prediction of High-Pressure Densities of Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Chorążewski, Mirosław; Postnikov, Eugene B; Jasiok, Bernadeta; Nedyalkov, Yuriy V; Jacquemin, Johan

    2017-07-17

    During this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the volumetric properties of pure ionic liquids could be truly predicted as a function of temperature from 219 K to 473 K and pressure up to 300 MPa. This has been achieved by using only density and isothermal compressibility data at atmospheric pressure through the Fluctuation Theory-based Tait-like Equation of State (FT-EoS). The experimental density data of 80 different ionic liquids, described in the literature by several research groups as a function of temperature and pressure, was then used to provide comparisons. Excellent predictive capability of FT-EoS was observed with an overall relative absolute average deviation close to 0.14% for the 15,298 data points examined during this work.

  1. Measurement of temperature and density fluctuations in turbulence using an ultraviolet laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flow was examined. The approach used fluorescence of oxygen molecules which are selectively excited by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser beam. The strength of the fluorescence signal and its dependence on laser wavelength vary with the density and temperature of the air in the laser beam. Because fluorescence can be detected at 90 degrees from the beam propagation direction, spatial resolution in three dimensions, rather than path-integrated measurements can be achieved. With spatial resolutions of the order of a millimeter and at supersonic air velocities it is necessary to perform each measurement in a time of the order of a microsecond; this is possible by by using laser pulses of ten nanosecond duration. In this method atmospheric O2 is excited by the emission of a tunable ArF excimer laser, and the fluorescence, which spans the 210 to 420 range, is detected by an ultraviolet phototube.

  2. Measurements of core electron temperature and density fluctuations in DIII-D and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; Makowski, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    For the first time, profiles (0.3<{rho}<0.9) of electron temperature and density fluctuations in a tokamak have been measured simultaneously and the results compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Electron temperature and density fluctuations measured in neutral beam-heated, sawtooth-free low confinement mode (L-mode) plasmas in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] are found to be similar in frequency and normalized amplitude, with amplitude increasing with radius. The measured radial profile of two fluctuation fields allows for a new and rigorous comparison with gyrokinetic results. Nonlinear gyrokinetic flux-tube simulations predict that electron temperature and density fluctuations have similar normalized amplitudes in L-mode. At {rho}=0.5, simulation results match experimental heat diffusivities and density fluctuation amplitude, but overestimate electron temperature fluctuation amplitude and particle diffusivity. In contrast, simulations at {rho}=0.75 do not match either the experimentally derived transport properties or the measured fluctuation levels.

  3. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic Used to Measure Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2003-01-01

    A new, molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based flow diagnostic developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of both gas density and radial velocity components in the plumes of high-speed jets. The objective of the work is to develop an unseeded, nonintrusive dynamic measurement technique for studying turbulent flows in NASA test facilities. This technique provides aerothermodynamic data not previously obtainable. It is particularly important for supersonic flows, where hot wire and pitot probes are difficult to use and disturb the flow under study. The effort is part of the nonintrusive instrumentation development program supporting propulsion research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. In particular, this work is measuring fluctuations in flow velocity, density, and temperature for jet noise studies. These data are valuable to researchers studying the correlation of flow fluctuations with far-field noise. One of the main objectives in jet noise research is to identify noise sources in the jet and to determine their contribution to noise generation. The technique is based on analyzing light scattered from molecules within the jet using a Fabry-Perot interferometer operating in a static imaging mode. The PC-based data acquisition system can simultaneously sample velocity and density data at rates to about 100 kHz and can handle up to 10 million data records. We used this system to interrogate three different jet nozzle designs in a Glenn free-jet facility. Each nozzle had a 25.4-mm exit diameter. One was convergent, used for subsonic flow measurements and to produce a screeching underexpanded jet with a fully expanded Mach number of 1.42. The other nozzles (Mach 1.4 and 1.8) were convergent-divergent types. The radial component of velocity and gas density were simultaneously measured in this work.

  4. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g_{2}(r) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  5. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Michael A.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g2(r ) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  6. Scattering from edge density fluctuations on the lower hybrid waves in FTU

    SciTech Connect

    Calabro, Giuseppe; Ridolfini, V. Pericoli

    2007-09-28

    Careful measurements of density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) plasma have been carried out. The analytical model proposed by Andrews and Perkins for the scattering of lower hybrid (LH) waves by density fluctuations will constitute the basis of our discussion. The envelop of the scattering processes occurring on single points sampled along the poloidal profile of the launching antenna at fixed step {delta}{theta} is considered. The trajectories and N{sub parallel} (LH parallel refraction index) evolution of the corresponding ray bundles are followed using the fast ray tracing code (FRTC), coupled to the transport code ASTRA to infer the radial absorption profile on a given target plasma. Interpretative ASTRA simulations are presented to support the correctness of the scattering model assumed. The current drive (CD) efficiency calculated is then compared with that measured for the shot assumed as reference and with the scaling valid for FTU. Comparison of measured pump frequency spectral broadening on FTU and theoretical prediction is also presented.

  7. Pedestal density fluctuation dynamics during the inter-ELM cycle in DIII-D a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.; McKee, G. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Osborne, T. H.; Beurskens, M. N.; Burrell, K. H.

    2011-05-01

    Detailed 2D measurements of long-wavelength density fluctuations in the pedestal region with beam emission spectroscopy during the period between edge localized modes (ELMs) indicate two distinct bands of fluctuations propagating in opposite poloidal directions in the plasma frame: one lower frequency band (50-150 kHz) advects in the ion-diamagnetic drift direction (ion mode) and a higher frequency band (200-400 kHz) advects in the electron diamagnetic drift direction (electron mode). The ion mode amplitude is modulated with the ELM cycle: it increases rapidly after an ELM and then saturates, similar to the evolution of the pedestal electron pressure and density gradients. The electron mode, in contrast, has no significant time evolution between ELMs. The decorrelation time of the ion mode is <5 μs [τc(cs/csa a)≤1], the radial correlation length is of order 10 ρi and has poloidal wave-number kθρi~0.1, and the mode advects at near the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma frame. These spatiotemporal dynamics are qualitatively similar to features predicted for kinetic ballooning modes.

  8. Pedestal density fluctuation dynamics during the inter-ELM cycle in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; McKee, G. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Osborne, T. H.; Burrell, K. H.; Beurskens, M. N.

    2011-05-15

    Detailed 2D measurements of long-wavelength density fluctuations in the pedestal region with beam emission spectroscopy during the period between edge localized modes (ELMs) indicate two distinct bands of fluctuations propagating in opposite poloidal directions in the plasma frame: one lower frequency band (50-150 kHz) advects in the ion-diamagnetic drift direction (ion mode) and a higher frequency band (200-400 kHz) advects in the electron diamagnetic drift direction (electron mode). The ion mode amplitude is modulated with the ELM cycle: it increases rapidly after an ELM and then saturates, similar to the evolution of the pedestal electron pressure and density gradients. The electron mode, in contrast, has no significant time evolution between ELMs. The decorrelation time of the ion mode is <5 {mu}s[{tau}{sub c}(c{sub s}/c{sub s}aa){<=}1], the radial correlation length is of order 10 {rho}{sub i} and has poloidal wave-number k{sub {theta}{rho}i{approx}}0.1, and the mode advects at near the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma frame. These spatiotemporal dynamics are qualitatively similar to features predicted for kinetic ballooning modes.

  9. Reduced density matrix and order parameters of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Li, Yan Chao; Sacramento, P. D.; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2016-12-01

    It has been recently proposed that the reduced density matrix may be used to derive the order parameter of a condensed matter system. Here we propose order parameters for the phases of a topological insulator, specifically a spinless Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model, and consider the effect of short-range interactions. All the derived order parameters and their possible corresponding quantum phases are verified by the entanglement entropy and electronic configuration analysis results. The order parameter appropriate to the topological regions is further proved by calculating the Berry phase under twisted boundary conditions. It is found that the topological nontrivial phase is robust to the introduction of repulsive intersite interactions and can appear in the topological trivial parameter region when appropriate interactions are added.

  10. Density-based mixing parameter for hybrid functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Miguel A. L.; Vidal, Julien; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Reining, Lucia; Botti, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    A very popular ab initio scheme to calculate electronic properties in solids is the use of hybrid functionals in density functional theory (DFT) that mixes a portion of the Fock exchange with DFT functionals. In spite of its success, a major problem still remains, related to the use of one single mixing parameter for all materials. Guided by physical arguments that connect the mixing parameter to the dielectric properties of the solid, and ultimately to its band gap, we propose a method to calculate this parameter from the electronic density alone. This approach is able to cut significantly the error of traditional hybrid functionals for large and small gap materials, while retaining a good description of the structural properties. Moreover, its implementation is simple and leads to a negligible increase of the computational time.

  11. Measuring long wavelength plasma density fluctuations by CO2 laser scattering (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. E.

    1985-05-01

    . Asymmetric profiles are frequently encountered in far forward scattering experiments in plasma, and they are attributed either to (1) the volume effect, that is, the finite width of a plasma wave, or (2) a pair of counter-propagating waves, such as poloidal waves in a torus met twice by a probe beam traversing a minor diameter. The first explanation rests on the difference between the multiple order scattering of a two-dimensional grating (Raman-Nath) and the single-order scattering of a three-dimensional crystal (Bragg). In a regime intermediate between these extremes, both +1 and -1 orders are present, but of unequal intensity, therefore giving rise to asymmetry in the beam profile. The Fourier optics treatment can be extended to describe a wave of arbitrary interaction length L, and a controlling parameter Q=κ2L/k (κ and k being wave numbers of the plasma wave and the probe radiation, respectively) which is ≪1 for Raman-Nath and ≫1 for Bragg, determines the precise regime that prevails.7 Calculations describing the counter-propagating waves model have been performed and verified experimentally, again using transducer-driven waves in air.8 Profiles based on this model are currently providing best fits to data recently recorded from tokamak plasmas in TOSCA. A preliminary inspection of the results of these measurements reveals, from the orientation of the beam profile pattern, predominantly poloidal waves. Their maximum intensity is near 100 kHz and they fall away towards higher frequencies as ν-2.5. Evidence for coherent gross modes at lower frequencies is also seen. Wave numbers are in the range 1 cm-1<κ⊥<30 cm-1, bracketing the neighborhood where κ⊥ρi˜1. The strength of the relative density fluctuation ñe/n¯e of a few per cent is consistent with diffusion coefficients D⊥˜104 cm2 s-1, and there is evidence for inverse correlation between ñe/n¯e and confinement time τE.

  12. On the phase shift between electric potential and plasma density fluctuations in the edge turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shchepetov, S. V. Kholnov, Yu. V.; Vasil'kov, D. G.

    2013-02-15

    In some cases, the phase shift between fluctuations of the electric potential and plasma density helps to identify the instability that governs the turbulent state. In this paper, the basic experimental and theoretical results that denote the possibility (or impossibility) of such identification are briefly discussed. The experimental data based on measurements of the phase shift between the floating potential and ion saturation current fluctuations in the L-2M stellarator-a system with externally imposed magnetic surfaces-are presented (Shchepetov, Kholnov, Fedyanin, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 045001 (2008)). It is shown that the observed phase shift {Omega} varies in a wide range from {pi} to 0, gradually decreasing with deepening inside the plasma. A number of arguments are presented suggesting that {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi} can indicate that the process is nonlocal, i.e., oscillations at a given spatial point are driven and mainly determined by the processes localized outside of the observation point. We note that, within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamic theory, plasma was definitely unstable with respect to resistive interchange modes in all cases under study. It is demonstrated experimentally that the widespread notion that the phase shift {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi}/2 is characteristic of only resistive interchange modes is hardly universal. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of analytical estimates.

  13. Structure and Function of Intra–Annual Density Fluctuations: Mind the Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Campelo, Filipe; Vieira, Joana; Grabner, Michael; De Micco, Veronica; Nabais, Cristina; Cherubini, Paolo; Carrer, Marco; Bräuning, Achim; Čufar, Katarina; Di Filippo, Alfredo; García-González, Ignacio; Koprowski, Marcin; Klisz, Marcin; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Zafirov, Nikolay; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings are natural archives of climate and environmental information with a yearly resolution. Indeed, wood anatomical, chemical, and other properties of tree rings are a synthesis of several intrinsic and external factors, and their interaction during tree growth. In particular, Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs) can be considered as tree-ring anomalies that can be used to better understand tree growth and to reconstruct past climate conditions with intra-annual resolution. However, the ecophysiological processes behind IADF formation, as well as their functional impact, remain unclear. Are IADFs resulting from a prompt adjustment to fluctuations in environmental conditions to avoid stressful conditions and/or to take advantage from favorable conditions? In this paper we discuss: (1) the influence of climatic factors on the formation of IADFs; (2) the occurrence of IADFs in different species and environments; (3) the potential of new approaches to study IADFs and identify their triggering factors. Our final aim is to underscore the advantages offered by network analyses of data and the importance of high-resolution measurements to gain insight into IADFs formation processes and their relations with climatic conditions, including extreme weather events. PMID:27200063

  14. Structure and Function of Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations: Mind the Gaps.

    PubMed

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Campelo, Filipe; Vieira, Joana; Grabner, Michael; De Micco, Veronica; Nabais, Cristina; Cherubini, Paolo; Carrer, Marco; Bräuning, Achim; Čufar, Katarina; Di Filippo, Alfredo; García-González, Ignacio; Koprowski, Marcin; Klisz, Marcin; Kirdyanov, Alexander V; Zafirov, Nikolay; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings are natural archives of climate and environmental information with a yearly resolution. Indeed, wood anatomical, chemical, and other properties of tree rings are a synthesis of several intrinsic and external factors, and their interaction during tree growth. In particular, Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs) can be considered as tree-ring anomalies that can be used to better understand tree growth and to reconstruct past climate conditions with intra-annual resolution. However, the ecophysiological processes behind IADF formation, as well as their functional impact, remain unclear. Are IADFs resulting from a prompt adjustment to fluctuations in environmental conditions to avoid stressful conditions and/or to take advantage from favorable conditions? In this paper we discuss: (1) the influence of climatic factors on the formation of IADFs; (2) the occurrence of IADFs in different species and environments; (3) the potential of new approaches to study IADFs and identify their triggering factors. Our final aim is to underscore the advantages offered by network analyses of data and the importance of high-resolution measurements to gain insight into IADFs formation processes and their relations with climatic conditions, including extreme weather events.

  15. X-ray Fluctuation Power Spectral Density Survey of Six Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, A.

    2002-05-01

    By combining low-density RXTE long- and medium-term monitoring with high-density, short-term monitoring from XMM and Chandra long-looks, we have constructed X-ray fluctuation power spectral densities (PSDs) for six Seyfert 1 galaxies. These PSDs cover unprecedented dynamic ranges, continuously spanning up to or beyond 4 orders of magnitude in temporal frequency. The PSDs of four targets show significant flattening towards lower frequencies and bear remarkable similarity to X-ray Binary PSDs, strengthening the argument that similar emission processes occur in both types of compact accreting systems, spanning a factor of ~106-7 in luminosity and putative black hole mass. Assuming a linear mass-timescale relation, the resulting PSD break frequencies imply black hole masses which generally agree with reverberation-mapped mass estimates. If the geometric origin of the variability is close to the X-ray corona, then the physical timescales associated with thermal and acoustic disk variations may be relevant.

  16. Competing Unconventional Charge-Density-Wave States in Cuprate Superconductors: Spin-Fluctuation-Driven Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kouki; Yamakawa, Youichi; Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    To understand the origin of unconventional charge-density-wave (CDW) states in cuprate superconductors, we establish the self-consistent CDW equation, and analyze the CDW instabilities based on the realistic Hubbard model, without assuming any q-dependence and the form factor. Many higher-order many-body processes, which are called the vertex corrections, are systematically generated by solving the CDW equation. When the spin fluctuations are strong, the uniform q = 0 nematic CDW with d-form factor shows the leading instability. The axial nematic CDW instability at q = Qa = (δ ,0) (δ ≈ π/2) is the second strongest, and its strength increases under the static uniform CDW order. The present theory predicts that uniform CDW transition emerges at a high temperature, and it stabilize the axial q = Qa CDW at T = TCDW. It is confirmed that the higher-order Aslamazov-Larkin processes cause the CDW orders at both q = 0 and Qa.

  17. Mass density fluctuations in quantum and classical descriptions of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galib, Mirza; Duignan, Timothy T.; Misteli, Yannick; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Hutter, Jürg; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2017-06-01

    First principles molecular dynamics simulation protocol is established using revised functional of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (revPBE) in conjunction with Grimme's third generation of dispersion (D3) correction to describe the properties of water at ambient conditions. This study also demonstrates the consistency of the structure of water across both isobaric (NpT) and isothermal (NVT) ensembles. Going beyond the standard structural benchmarks for liquid water, we compute properties that are connected to both local structure and mass density fluctuations that are related to concepts of solvation and hydrophobicity. We directly compare our revPBE results to the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) plus Grimme dispersion corrections (D2) and both the empirical fixed charged model (SPC/E) and many body interaction potential model (MB-pol) to further our understanding of how the computed properties herein depend on the form of the interaction potential.

  18. Density fluctuation dynamics in a dissipative self-gravitating dilute gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, A. R.; García-Perciante, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of the behavior of density fluctuations in a dissipative self gravitating gas in the linear regime is revisited. A factorization for the dispersion relation given by approximate roots is proposed, which is analogous to the one introduced in the case without gravitational field. The threshold for the onset of a gravitational instability, namely Jeans wavenumber, is found to be unaltered by the presence of thermal and viscous dissipation. However, the behavior of damped modes does not correspond to the usual Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum when the gravitational field is taken into account. Additional to the usual central Rayleigh peak and Brillouin doublet, both corrected due to the presence of the field, non-Lorentizan terms are included in the structure factor. These terms are larger in the presence of the gravitational field and may lead in principle to relevant differences in the general properties of the spectrum. The possible mathematical origin of these modifications is briefly discussed.

  19. Density fluctuations and topological structures in collective surface motion of microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tong; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Active matter that consists of self-propelled particles, such as bacterial suspensions and assays of self-driven biofilaments, can exhibit collective motions with large-scale complex flows and topological defect dynamics. Using a Doi-Onsager kinetic theory, we study suspensions of microswimmers confined to an air/liquid interface, and identify correlations between particle density fluctuations, defect structures, nematic order, and surface flows. When considering a free-standing liquid film where the microswimmers are distributed on the air/liquid interfaces, we capture hydrodynamic coupling of the two active surface, characterized by synchronization of motile disclination defects. We estimate the effective ``penetration distance'' between the two coupled surfaces through a linear stability analysis.

  20. Dynamic density and spin responses of a superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Path integral formulation and pair fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi

    2016-10-01

    We present a standard field theoretical derivation of the dynamic density and spin linear response functions of a dilute superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover in both three and two dimensions. The derivation of the response functions is based on the elegant functional path integral approach which allows us to calculate the density-density and spin-spin correlation functions by introducing the external sources for the density and the spin density. Since the generating functional cannot be evaluated exactly, we consider two gapless approximations which ensure a gapless collective mode (Goldstone mode) in the superfluid state: the BCS-Leggett mean-field theory and the Gaussian-pair-fluctuation (GPF) theory. In the mean-field theory, our results of the response functions agree with the known results from the random phase approximation. We further consider the pair fluctuation effects and establish a theoretical framework for the dynamic responses within the GPF theory. We show that the GPF response theory naturally recovers three kinds of famous diagrammatic contributions: the Self-Energy contribution, the Aslamazov-Lakin contribution, and the Maki-Thompson contribution. We also show that unlike the equilibrium state, in evaluating the response functions, the linear (first-order) terms in the external sources as well as the induced order parameter perturbations should be treated carefully. In the superfluid state, there is an additional order parameter contribution which ensures that in the static and long wavelength limit, the density response function recovers the result of the compressibility (compressibility sum rule). We expect that the f-sum rule is manifested by the full number equation which includes the contribution from the Gaussian pair fluctuations. The dynamic density and spin response functions in the normal phase (above the superfluid critical temperature) are also derived within the Nozières-Schmitt-Rink (NSR) theory.

  1. Studies of velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar. I - Azimuthal anisotropy. II - Momentum fluxes and energy densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Smith, S. A.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Fritts, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a six-day campaign to observe velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar (Fukao et al., 1985) in Shigaraki, Japan in March, 1986. Consideration is given to the azimuthal anisotropy, the frequency spectra, the vertical profiles of energy density, and the momentum flux of the motion field. It is found that all of the observed azimuthal variations are probably caused by a gravity wave field whose parameters vary with time. The results show significant differences between the mean zonal and meridional frequency spectra and different profiles of mean energy density with height for different frequency bands and for zonal and meridional components.

  2. Studies of velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar. I - Azimuthal anisotropy. II - Momentum fluxes and energy densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Smith, S. A.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Fritts, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a six-day campaign to observe velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar (Fukao et al., 1985) in Shigaraki, Japan in March, 1986. Consideration is given to the azimuthal anisotropy, the frequency spectra, the vertical profiles of energy density, and the momentum flux of the motion field. It is found that all of the observed azimuthal variations are probably caused by a gravity wave field whose parameters vary with time. The results show significant differences between the mean zonal and meridional frequency spectra and different profiles of mean energy density with height for different frequency bands and for zonal and meridional components.

  3. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  4. Measurements of drift-wave-induced density and velocity fluctuations using high-speed passive impurity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Takashi; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Passive impurity spectroscopy is used to study high frequency ( 100 kHz) electron density and ion velocity fluctuations in the edge of MST reversed field pinch plasmas. When tearing modes are suppressed, stochastic transport is greatly reduced and microturbulence is anticipated to become important. Gyrokinetic simulations predict unstable trapped electron modes (TEM) in the edge region of these improved-confinement MST plasmas. Interferometry measurements reveal electron density fluctuations with wavenumbers, propagation direction, and a density-gradient threshold in good agreement with predictions for TEMs. These density fluctuations are also observed as emission fluctuations using a recently upgraded Ion Dynamics Spectrometer (IDS II) through edge passive C +2 measurements. The particle transport associated with TEMs will be evaluated directly by correlating the IDS-measured ion velocity and density fluctuations. The measurement is localized to the C +2 emission shell in the edge of the plasma, which is determined by a coronal charge-state balance model using ADAS. We used a large-throughput spectrometer originally developed for fast CHERS measurements and PMTs for light detection to achieve high time resolution. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  5. Level density parameters from excitation cross sections of isomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, E. A.; Batij, V. G.

    1992-03-01

    Cross section ratios were measured for the production of the isomeric pairs99m,gRh,101m,gRh,102m,gRh,104m,gRh and108m,gIn in the (p,n)-reaction,107m,gIn and109m,gIn in the ( p, γ)-reaction over the energy range up to 9 MeV, and116m,gSb and118m,gSb in the (α, n)-reaction up to 24 MeV. The experimental results for these nuclei as well as for other isometric pairs excited in the ( p, n)-reaction were analysed in the frame of the statistical model for extracting the level density parameter values in the vicinity of closed nucleon shells. The level density parameter behaviour is discussed in the range of nuclear mass numbers under study.

  6. Probability density functions of instantaneous Stokes parameters on weak scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Korotkova, Olga

    2017-10-01

    The single-point probability density functions (PDF) of the instantaneous Stokes parameters of a polarized plane-wave light field scattered from a three-dimensional, statistically stationary, weak medium with Gaussian statistics and Gaussian correlation function have been studied for the first time. Apart from the scattering geometry the PDF distributions of the scattered light have been related to the illumination's polarization state and the correlation properties of the medium.

  7. The velocity dispersion among galaxies and the density parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Bruno, Ruth

    1988-06-01

    From a sample of 151 E-galaxies the authors have derived the r.m.s. peculiar velocity of galaxies. The three-dimensional velocity dispersion is 230±20 km s-1 consistent with the earlier results by Davis and Peebles (1983). This r.m.s. peculiar velocity implies a density parameter Ω = 0.060±0.015 within the framework of the linear theory.

  8. Capillary density: An important parameter in nailfold capillaroscopy.

    PubMed

    Emrani, Zahra; Karbalaie, Abdolamir; Fatemi, Alimohammad; Etehadtavakol, Mahnaz; Erlandsson, Björn-Erik

    2017-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy is one of the various noninvasive bioengineering methods used to investigate skin microcirculation. It is an effective examination for assessing microvascular changes in the peripheral circulation; hence it has a significant role for the diagnosis of Systemic sclerosis with the classic changes of giant capillaries as well as the decline in capillary density with capillary dropout. The decline in capillary density is one of microangiopathic features existing in connective tissue disease. It is detectable with nailfold capillaroscopy. This parameter is assessed by applying quantitative measurement. In this article, we reviewed a common method for calculating the capillary density and the relation between the number of capillaries as well as the existence of digital ulcers, pulmonary arterial hypertension, autoantibodies, scleroderma patterns and different scoring system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating parasite densities and estimation of parameters in transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, D; Torgerson, P R

    2008-09-01

    Mathematical modelling of parasite transmission systems can provide useful information about host parasite interactions and biology and parasite population dynamics. In addition good predictive models may assist in designing control programmes to reduce the burden of human and animal disease. Model building is only the first part of the process. These models then need to be confronted with data to obtain parameter estimates and the accuracy of these estimates has to be evaluated. Estimation of parasite densities is central to this. Parasite density estimates can include the proportion of hosts infected with parasites (prevalence) or estimates of the parasite biomass within the host population (abundance or intensity estimates). Parasite density estimation is often complicated by highly aggregated distributions of parasites within the hosts. This causes additional challenges when calculating transmission parameters. Using Echinococcus spp. as a model organism, this manuscript gives a brief overview of the types of descriptors of parasite densities, how to estimate them and on the use of these estimates in a transmission model.

  10. Simulation of characteristic variation in 16 nm gate FinFET devices due to intrinsic parameter fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Hwang, Chih-Hong; Han, Ming-Hung

    2010-03-05

    High-kappa/metal-gate and vertical channel transistors are well-known solutions to continue the device scaling. This work extensively explores the physics and mechanism of the intrinsic parameter fluctuations in nanoscale fin-type field-effect transistors by using an experimentally validated three-dimensional quantum-corrected device simulation. The dominance fluctuation sources in threshold voltage, gate capacitance and cutoff frequency have been found. The emerging fluctuation source, workfunction fluctuation, shows significant impacts on DC characteristics; however, its impact is reduced in AC characteristics due to the screening effect of the inversion layer. Additionally, the channel discrete dopant may enhance the electric field and therefore make the averaged cutoff frequency of fluctuated devices larger than the nominal value of cutoff frequency.

  11. Wave-like Fluctuations of The Total Neutral Density of Amplitude Increasing With Altitude In The Upper Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, P.; Illés-Almár, E.; Almár, I.

    The study of the high resolution total neutral density measurements of the San Marco V satellite revealed also wave-like fluctuations of the density of amplitude increas- ing with height above a given height. The height at which the amplitude of these fluctuations begins to increase has been found to occur in the height range 300-500 km. Analysis of this phenomenon indicated that this height displays a diurnal varia- tion lower heights occurring by day. On the basis of this findings it is assumed that fluctuations of amplitude increasing with height found in the total neutral density are due to convective instability related to the quasi isothermal state of this part of the thermosphere. Under these conditions an infinitesimal disturbance is enough for the development of instability.

  12. Modelling The Effects of Density Gradients and Fluctuations on the Apparent Sizes and Positions of Low Frequency Solar Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, Benjamin Thomas; Kontar, Eduard; Jeffrey, Natasha

    2017-08-01

    Recent high spatial and temporal resolution imaging of <250 MHz solar radio emission has enabled us to observe rapid variations in Type-III solar radio burst characteristics, revealing fast growth of the Type-III source and movement of the source centroid. In this work, we use a Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation to model the passage of low frequency (5-240 MHz) radio waves through the solar corona from a point source, considering both isotropic and dipole emission. We model the effects of random density fluctuations and an isotropic density gradient on the transport of the rays, varying the strength of the scattering to observe the effects on images of the source from an observer at 1 AU. Absorption of photons is included, and the effects on the reproduced images and flux curves are observed. The apparent source size and centroid position are tracked through the simulation, and we find a general increase in source size with time, and a variation of centroid position in both directions throughout the simulation. We find that the size of the variation is strongly dependant upon frequency, with lower frequency sources appearing to move further on the disk than higher frequency sources. We also observe the strength of the effects at different viewing angles, finding that the greatest variation occurs closer to the solar limb. Further observational work is required to limit the scattering parameters, in order to allow for comparison with current radio images.

  13. A perfect storm: the combined effects on population fluctuations of autocorrelated environmental noise, age structure, and density dependence.

    PubMed

    Wilmers, Christopher C; Post, Eric; Hastings, Alan

    2007-05-01

    While it is widely appreciated that climate can affect the population dynamics of various species, a mechanistic understanding of how climate interacts with life-history traits to influence population fluctuations requires development. Here we build a general density-dependent age-structured model that accounts for differential responses in life-history traits to increasing population density. We show that as the temporal frequency of favorable environmental conditions increases, population fluctuations also increase provided that unfavorable environmental conditions still occur. As good years accumulate and the number of individuals in a population increases, successive life-history traits become vulnerable to density dependence once a return to unfavorable conditions prevails. The stronger this ratcheting of density dependence in life-history traits by autocorrelated climatic conditions, the larger the population fluctuations become. Highly fecund species, and those in which density dependence occurs in juvenile and adult vital rates at similar densities, are most sensitive to increases in the frequency of favorable conditions. Understanding the influence of global warming on temporal correlation in regional environmental conditions will be important in identifying those species liable to exhibit increased population fluctuations that could lead to their extinction.

  14. Temporal evolution of lower hybrid waves in the presence of ponderomotive density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.

    1980-06-01

    The propagation of lower hybrid waves in the presence of ponderomotive density density fluctuations is considered. The problem is treated in two dimensions and, in order to be able to correctly impose the boundary conditions, the waves are allowed to evolve in time. The fields are described by i upsilon/sub tau/ - ..integral.. upsilon/sub xi/d/sub zeta/ + upsilon/sub zeta zeta/ + upsilon//sup 2/ upsilon = 0 where upsilon is proportional to the electric field, tau to time, and zeta and xi measure distances across and along the lower hybrid ray. The behavior of the waves is investigated numerically. If the amplitude of the waves is large enough, the spectrum of the waves broadens and their parallel wavelength becomes shorter. The assumptions made in the formulation preclude the application of these results to the lower hybrid heating experiment on Alcator-A. Nevertheless, there are indications that the physics embodied in this problem are responsible for some of the results of that experiment.

  15. Density nonlinearities in field theories for a toy model of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics of supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joonhyun

    2009-11-01

    We study a zero-dimensional version of the fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics (FNH) of supercooled liquids originally investigated by Das and Mazenko (DM) [Shankar P. Das and Gene F. Mazenko Phys. Rev. A 34, 2265 (1986)]. The time-dependent density-like and momentum-like variables are introduced with no spatial degrees of freedom in this toy model. The structure of nonlinearities takes the similar form to the original FNH, which allows one to study in a simpler setting the issues raised recently regarding the field theoretical approaches to glass forming liquids. We study the effects of density nonlinearities on the time evolution of correlation and response functions by developing field theoretic formulations in two different ways: first by following the original prescription of DM and then by constructing a dynamical action which possesses a linear time-reversal symmetry as proposed recently. We show explicitly that, at the one-loop order of the perturbation theory, the DM-type field theory does not support a sharp ergodic-nonergodic transition, while the other admits one. The simple nature of the toy model in the DM formulation allows us to develop numerical solutions to a complete set of coupled dynamical equations for the correlation and response functions at the one-loop order.

  16. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, H. Tan, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xie, H. Q.; Gao, Z.

    2016-11-15

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer’s capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  17. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; Tan, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xie, H. Q.; Gao, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer's capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  18. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H; Tan, Y; Liu, Y Q; Xie, H Q; Gao, Z

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer's capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  19. Linear magnetoresistance in n-type silicon due to doping density fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Nicholas A.; Marrows, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    We report the observation of a large linear magnetoresistance in the ohmic regime in commonplace commercial n-type silicon wafer with a P dopant density of (1.4±0.1) ×1015 cm–3, and report measurements of it in the temperature range 30–200 K. It arises from the deformation of current paths, which causes a part of the Hall field to be detected at the voltage probes. In short, wide samples we found linear magnetoresistance as large as 4707% in an 8 tesla field at 35 K. Sample geometry effects like these are commonplace in commercial Hall sensors. However, we found that the effect persisted in long, thin samples where the macroscopic current flow should be uniform between the voltage probes: we observed a magnetoresistance of 445% under the same conditions as above. We interpret this result as arising due to spatial fluctuations in the donor density, in the spirit of the Herring model. PMID:22876340

  20. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  1. Density-Based Penalty Parameter Optimization on C-SVM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Lian, Jie; Bartolacci, Michael R.; Zeng, Qing-An

    2014-01-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) is one of the most widely used approaches for data classification and regression. SVM achieves the largest distance between the positive and negative support vectors, which neglects the remote instances away from the SVM interface. In order to avoid a position change of the SVM interface as the result of an error system outlier, C-SVM was implemented to decrease the influences of the system's outliers. Traditional C-SVM holds a uniform parameter C for both positive and negative instances; however, according to the different number proportions and the data distribution, positive and negative instances should be set with different weights for the penalty parameter of the error terms. Therefore, in this paper, we propose density-based penalty parameter optimization of C-SVM. The experiential results indicated that our proposed algorithm has outstanding performance with respect to both precision and recall. PMID:25114978

  2. Density-based penalty parameter optimization on C-SVM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Lian, Jie; Bartolacci, Michael R; Zeng, Qing-An

    2014-01-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) is one of the most widely used approaches for data classification and regression. SVM achieves the largest distance between the positive and negative support vectors, which neglects the remote instances away from the SVM interface. In order to avoid a position change of the SVM interface as the result of an error system outlier, C-SVM was implemented to decrease the influences of the system's outliers. Traditional C-SVM holds a uniform parameter C for both positive and negative instances; however, according to the different number proportions and the data distribution, positive and negative instances should be set with different weights for the penalty parameter of the error terms. Therefore, in this paper, we propose density-based penalty parameter optimization of C-SVM. The experiential results indicated that our proposed algorithm has outstanding performance with respect to both precision and recall.

  3. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR.

    PubMed

    Kruezi, U; Stoschus, H; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Samm, U

    2012-06-01

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n(0) = 1.5 × 10(18) m(-3) and a low beam divergence of ±1° simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of Δ(poloidal) = 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of Δ(radial) = 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of Δt ≃ 2 μs (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  4. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.

    2012-06-15

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n{sub 0}= 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and a low beam divergence of {+-}1 Degree-Sign simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of {Delta}{sub poloidal}= 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of {Delta}{sub radial}= 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of {Delta}t Asymptotically-Equal-To 2 {mu}s (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  5. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.

    2012-06-01

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n0 = 1.5 × 1018 m-3 and a low beam divergence of ±1° simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of Δpoloidal = 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of Δradial = 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of Δt ≃ 2 μs (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  6. Alfven resonance mode conversion in the Phaedrus-T current drive experiments: Modelling and density fluctuations measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, M.; Harper, M.; Breun, R.; Wukitch, S.

    1995-12-31

    Current drive experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak performed with a low field side two-strap fast wave antenna at frequencies below {omega}{sub cH} show loop volt drops of up to 30% with strap phasing (0, {pi}/2). RF induced density fluctuations in the plasma core have also been observed with a microwave reflectometer. It is believed that they are caused by kinetic Alfven waves generated by mode conversion of fast waves at the Alfven resonance. Correlation of the observed density fluctuations with the magnitude of the {Delta}V{sub loop} suggest that the {Delta}V{sub loop} is attributable to current drive/heating due to mode converted kinetic Alfven waves. The toroidal cold plasma wave code LION is used to model the Alfven resonance mode conversion surfaces in the experiments while the cylindrical hot plasma kinetic wave code ISMENE is used to model the behavior of kinetic Alfven waves at the Alfven resonance location. Initial results obtained from limited density, magnetic field, antenna phase, and impurity scans show good agreement between the RF induced density fluctuations and the predicted behavior of the kinetic Alfven waves. Detailed comparisons between the density fluctuations and the code predictions are presented.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  8. Contrasting effects of large density changes on relative testes size in fluctuating populations of sympatric vole species

    PubMed Central

    Klemme, Ines; Soulsbury, Carl D.; Henttonen, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    Across species, there is usually a positive relationship between sperm competition level and male reproductive effort on ejaculates, typically measured using relative testes size (RTS). Within populations, demographic and ecological processes may drastically alter the level of sperm competition and thus, potentially affect the evolution of testes size. Here, we use longitudinal records (across 38 years) from wild sympatric Fennoscandian populations of five species of voles to investigate whether RTS responds to natural fluctuations in population density, i.e. variation in sperm competition risk. We show that for some species RTS increases with density. However, our results also show that this relationship can be reversed in populations with large-scale between-year differences in density. Multiple mechanisms are suggested to explain the negative RTS–density relationship, including testes size response to density-dependent species interactions, an evolutionary response to sperm competition levels that is lagged when density fluctuations are over a certain threshold, or differing investment in pre- and post-copulatory competition at different densities. The results emphasize that our understanding of sperm competition in fluctuating environments is still very limited. PMID:25122229

  9. Minimum of the order parameter fluctuations of seismicity before major earthquakes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sarlis, Nicholas V; Skordas, Efthimios S; Varotsos, Panayiotis A; Nagao, Toshiyasu; Kamogawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Haruo; Uyeda, Seiya

    2013-08-20

    It has been shown that some dynamic features hidden in the time series of complex systems can be uncovered if we analyze them in a time domain called natural time χ. The order parameter of seismicity introduced in this time domain is the variance of χ weighted for normalized energy of each earthquake. Here, we analyze the Japan seismic catalog in natural time from January 1, 1984 to March 11, 2011, the day of the M9 Tohoku earthquake, by considering a sliding natural time window of fixed length comprised of the number of events that would occur in a few months. We find that the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity exhibit distinct minima a few months before all of the shallow earthquakes of magnitude 7.6 or larger that occurred during this 27-y period in the Japanese area. Among the minima, the minimum before the M9 Tohoku earthquake was the deepest. It appears that there are two kinds of minima, namely precursory and nonprecursory, to large earthquakes.

  10. Minimum of the order parameter fluctuations of seismicity before major earthquakes in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sarlis, Nicholas V.; Skordas, Efthimios S.; Varotsos, Panayiotis A.; Nagao, Toshiyasu; Kamogawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Haruo; Uyeda, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that some dynamic features hidden in the time series of complex systems can be uncovered if we analyze them in a time domain called natural time χ. The order parameter of seismicity introduced in this time domain is the variance of χ weighted for normalized energy of each earthquake. Here, we analyze the Japan seismic catalog in natural time from January 1, 1984 to March 11, 2011, the day of the M9 Tohoku earthquake, by considering a sliding natural time window of fixed length comprised of the number of events that would occur in a few months. We find that the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity exhibit distinct minima a few months before all of the shallow earthquakes of magnitude 7.6 or larger that occurred during this 27-y period in the Japanese area. Among the minima, the minimum before the M9 Tohoku earthquake was the deepest. It appears that there are two kinds of minima, namely precursory and nonprecursory, to large earthquakes. PMID:23918353

  11. Possibility of determination of the asymptotic level-density parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Kudyaev, G.A.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Svirin, M.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1988-02-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the fissility of nuclei to the parameters of the density of excited levels and conclude that the nuclei in the region of Pb are most favorable for an experimental estimate of the asymptotic parameter a-italic-tilde = ..cap alpha..A. The mean value ..cap alpha.. = 0.086 +- 0.009 MeV/sup -1/ is found from analysis of the fission of seven nuclei from /sup 201/Tl to /sup 213/At. This value is in agreement with the phenomenological description of the energy dependence a(U) (..cap alpha.. = 0.093 MeV/sup -1/) and with the theoretical prediction ..cap alpha.. = 0.09 MeV/sup -1/ obtained for a Woods-Saxon potential.

  12. Construct order parameters from the reduced density matrix spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Shi-Jian; Yu, Wing Chi; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we try to establish a connection between a quantum information concept, i.e., the mutual information, and the conventional order parameter in condensed matter physics. We show that non-vanishing mutual information between two subsystems separated by a long distance means the existence of long-range orders in the system. By analyzing the spectra of the reduced density matrices that are used to calculate the mutual information, we show how to derive the local order operators that identify various ordered phases in condensed matter physics. -- Highlights: •Discussed the relation between long-range order and the mutual information (MI). •Pointed out how to check the existence of long-range order from MI. •Proposed a scheme to derive the diagonal and off-diagonal order parameter. •Gave three examples to show the effectiveness of the scheme.

  13. Effects of density fluctuations on nonlinear evolution of low-frequency Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyuki, Y.; Seough, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that low-frequency Alfven waves are unstable to parametric instabilities, in which these waves are nonlinearly coupled with density fluctuations [e.g, Nariyuki+Hada, JGR, 2007 and references therein]. In solar wind plasmas, low-frequency fluctuations with non-zero cross-helicity are frequently observed [e.g., Bruno+Carbone, Living Rev. Solar Phys. (2013) and references therein]. When the absolute values of normalized cross helicities are close to the unity, the fluctuations may be composed of uni-directionally (anti-sunward) propagating Alfven waves. The derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation (DNLS) has been known as the mode of modulational instabilities of unidirectional Alfven waves [Mio et al, JPSJ, 1976; Mjolhus, JPP, 1976]. In the DNLS, the density fluctuations are assumed to be the quasi-static state, which is determined according to the ponderomotive force of envelope-modulated Alfven waves. The DNLS was extended to include the obliquely propagating, compressional component of magnetic field by Mjolhus and Wyller (JPP, 1988). The kinetically modified DNLS (KDNLS) has also been discussed by many authors [Rogister, POF, 1971; Mjolhus and Wyller, Phys. Scr, 1986; JPP, 1988; Spangler, POF B, 1989; 1990; Medvedev+Diamond, POP, 1996; Nariyuki et al, POP, 2013]. On the other hand, ion acoustic modes [Hada, 1993], large scale inhomogeneity of plasmas [Buti et al, APJ, 1999; Nariyuki, POP, 2015] and random density fluctuations [Ruderman, POP, 2002] can also affect nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves. At the present time, combined effects of these effects are not fully understood. In this presentation, we discuss two models: one of them is the model including both ion kinetic effects and ion acoustic mode and another is the model including finite thermal effects and random density fluctuations. In the former case, ion kinetic effects on both longitudinal [Nariyuki+Hada, JPSJ, 2007] and transverse modulational instabilities are discussed, while the

  14. Climatic Signals from Intra-annual Density Fluctuation Frequency in Mediterranean Pines at a Regional Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zalloni, Enrica; de Luis, Martin; Campelo, Filipe; Novak, Klemen; De Micco, Veronica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Vieira, Joana; Nabais, Cristina; Rozas, Vicente; Battipaglia, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs). IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait., and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 10 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution. PMID:27200052

  15. Climatic Signals from Intra-annual Density Fluctuation Frequency in Mediterranean Pines at a Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Zalloni, Enrica; de Luis, Martin; Campelo, Filipe; Novak, Klemen; De Micco, Veronica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Vieira, Joana; Nabais, Cristina; Rozas, Vicente; Battipaglia, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs). IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait., and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 10 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution.

  16. Thermal Density Functional Theory: Time-Dependent Linear Response and Approximate Functionals from the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem

    DOE PAGES

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Grabowski, Paul E.; Burke, Kieron

    2016-06-08

    We present that the van Leeuwen proof of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is generalized to thermal ensembles. This allows generalization to finite temperatures of the Gross-Kohn relation, the exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT, and fluctuation dissipation theorem for DFT. Finally, this produces a natural method for generating new thermal exchange-correlation approximations.

  17. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  18. Thermal Density Functional Theory: Time-Dependent Linear Response and Approximate Functionals from the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Grabowski, Paul E.; Burke, Kieron

    2016-06-01

    The van Leeuwen proof of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is generalized to thermal ensembles. This allows generalization to finite temperatures of the Gross-Kohn relation, the exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT, and fluctuation dissipation theorem for DFT. This produces a natural method for generating new thermal exchange-correlation approximations.

  19. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  20. The THz Spectrum of Density Fluctuations of Water: The Viscoelastic Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Relevant advances in the knowledge of the water dynamics at mesoscopic scales are reviewed, while mainly focusing on the contribution provided by high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). In particular it is discussed how the use of IXS has improved our understanding of viscoelastic properties of water at THz frequencies. This specifically involves some solid-like features such as the onset of shear wave propagation, a sound velocity surprisingly similar to the one of ice, and an anomalously low sound absorption coefficient. All these properties can be explained by assuming the coupling of THz density fluctuations with a structural relaxation process connected to the breaking and forming of hydrogen bonds (HBs). This review also includes more recent IXS results demonstrating that, upon approaching supercritical conditions, relaxation phenomena in water gradually lose their structural character becoming essentially collisional in character. Furthermore, GHz spectroscopy results on supercooled water, suggesting the occurrence of a structural arrest, are discussed. An overview of the new opportunities offered by next generation IXS spectrometers finally concludes this review.

  1. Dynamics of density fluctuations of a glass-forming epoxy resin revealed by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretto, D.; Comez, L.; Socino, G.; Verdini, L.; Corezzi, S.; Rolla, P. A.

    1999-02-01

    Brillouin light scattering is used for studying the spectrum of density fluctuations of the glass-forming epoxy resin diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A. Spectra at different temperatures ranging from the glassy to the liquid phase are obtained from a direct subtraction of depolarized from polarized spectra. In addition to the structural relaxation, evidence is given of a fast secondary relaxation process, which affects Brillouin spectra also at temperatures lower than that of the glass transition Tg. For the elaboration of isotropic spectra, we exploit the possibility of using the same relaxation function gained from dielectric spectra taken from the same sample. The temperature behavior of the relaxation strength shows the existence of an onset for the structural relaxation, located at a temperature about 93 K higher than Tg, consistent with the results of previous dielectric spectroscopy and depolarized light scattering investigations. The role of secondary relaxations of intramolecular nature in the mode-coupling analysis of real glass formers is also discussed.

  2. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Backman, Vadim

    2011-04-01

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  3. COSMOLOGICAL DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS ON 100 Mpc SCALES AND THEIR ISW EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Papai, Peter; Szapudi, Istvan

    2010-12-20

    We measure the matter probability distribution function (PDF) via counts in cells in a volume-limited subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy Catalog on scales from 30 h {sup -1} Mpc to 150 h {sup -1} Mpc and estimate the linear Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect produced by supervoids and superclusters in the tail of the PDF. We characterize the PDF by the variance, S{sub 3}, and S{sub 4}, and study in simulations the systematic effects due to finite volume, survey shape, and redshift distortion. We compare our measurement to the prediction of {Lambda}CDM with linear bias and find a good agreement. We use the moments to approximate the tail of the PDF with analytic functions. A simple Gaussian model for the superstructures appears to be consistent with the claim by Granett et al. that density fluctuations on 100 h {sup -1} Mpc scales produce hot and cold spots with {Delta}T {approx} 10 {mu}K on the cosmic microwave background.

  4. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Paul E.

    2015-03-07

    Kirkwood-Buff or Fluctuation Solution Theory can be used to provide experimental pair fluctuations, and/or integrals over the pair distribution functions, from experimental thermodynamic data on liquid mixtures. Here, this type of approach is used to provide triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and the corresponding integrals over the triplet and quadruplet distribution functions, in a purely thermodynamic manner that avoids the use of structure factors. The approach is then applied to binary mixtures of water + methanol and benzene + methanol over the full composition range under ambient conditions. The observed correlations between the different species vary significantly with composition. The magnitude of the fluctuations and integrals appears to increase as the number of the most polar molecule involved in the fluctuation or integral also increases. A simple physical picture of the fluctuations is provided to help rationalize some of these variations.

  5. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for liquid mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Kirkwood-Buff or Fluctuation Solution Theory can be used to provide experimental pair fluctuations, and/or integrals over the pair distribution functions, from experimental thermodynamic data on liquid mixtures. Here, this type of approach is used to provide triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and the corresponding integrals over the triplet and quadruplet distribution functions, in a purely thermodynamic manner that avoids the use of structure factors. The approach is then applied to binary mixtures of water + methanol and benzene + methanol over the full composition range under ambient conditions. The observed correlations between the different species vary significantly with composition. The magnitude of the fluctuations and integrals appears to increase as the number of the most polar molecule involved in the fluctuation or integral also increases. A simple physical picture of the fluctuations is provided to help rationalize some of these variations. PMID:25747091

  6. An evolutionary maximum principle for density-dependent population dynamics in a fluctuating environment.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell; Engen, Steinar; Saether, Bernt-Erik

    2009-06-12

    The evolution of population dynamics in a stochastic environment is analysed under a general form of density-dependence with genetic variation in r and K, the intrinsic rate of increase and carrying capacity in the average environment, and in sigma(e)(2), the environmental variance of population growth rate. The continuous-time model assumes a large population size and a stationary distribution of environments with no autocorrelation. For a given population density, N, and genotype frequency, p, the expected selection gradient is always towards an increased population growth rate, and the expected fitness of a genotype is its Malthusian fitness in the average environment minus the covariance of its growth rate with that of the population. Long-term evolution maximizes the expected value of the density-dependence function, averaged over the stationary distribution of N. In the theta-logistic model, where density dependence of population growth is a function of N(theta), long-term evolution maximizes E[N(theta)]=[1-sigma(e)(2)/(2r)]K(theta). While sigma(e)(2) is always selected to decrease, r and K are always selected to increase, implying a genetic trade-off among them. By contrast, given the other parameters, theta has an intermediate optimum between 1.781 and 2 corresponding to the limits of high or low stochasticity.

  7. Density profiles of supernova matter and determination of neutrino parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.-H.

    2007-08-15

    The flavor conversion of supernova neutrinos can lead to observable signatures related to the unknown neutrino parameters. As one of the determinants in dictating the efficiency of resonant flavor conversion, the local density profile near the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) resonance in a supernova environment is, however, not so well understood. In this analysis, variable power-law functions are adopted to represent the independent local density profiles near the locations of resonance. It is shown that the uncertain matter density profile in a supernova, the possible neutrino mass hierarchies, and the undetermined 1-3 mixing angle would result in six distinct scenarios in terms of the survival probabilities of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub e}. The feasibility of probing the undetermined neutrino mass hierarchy and the 1-3 mixing angle with the supernova neutrinos is then examined using several proposed experimental observables. Given the incomplete knowledge of the supernova matter profile, the analysis is further expanded to incorporate the Earth matter effect. The possible impact due to the choice of models, which differ in the average energy and in the luminosity of neutrinos, is also addressed in the analysis.

  8. Non-Gaussian density fluctuations from entropically generated curvature perturbations in ekpyrotic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2008-03-15

    We analyze the non-Gaussian density perturbations generated in ekpyrotic/cyclic models based on heterotic M theory. In this picture, two scalar fields produce nearly scale-invariant entropic perturbations during an ekpyrotic phase that are converted into curvature modes after the ekpyrotic phase is complete and just before the big bang. Both intrinsic nonlinearity in the entropy perturbation and the conversion process contribute to non-Gaussianity. The range of the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} depends on how gradual the conversion process is and the steepness of the scalar field potential during the ekpyrotic phase. Although a wider range is possible, in principle, natural values of the ekpyrotic parameters combined with a gradual conversion process lead to values of -50 < or approx. f{sub NL} < or approx. +200, typically much greater than slow-roll inflation but within the current observational bounds.

  9. Propagation of a cloud of hot electrons through a plasma in the presence of Langmuir scattering by ambient density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G. R.; Robinson, P. A.; Sobhanian, S.; Moslehi-Fard, M.; Li, B.; Cairns, I. H.

    2007-01-15

    Gas-dynamic theory is generalized to incorporate the effects of beam-driven Langmuir waves scattering off ambient density fluctuations, and the consequent effects on the propagation of a cloud of hot electrons in an inhomogeneous plasma. Assuming Langmuir scattering as the limit of nonlinear three-wave interactions with fluctuations that are weak, low-frequency, long-wavelength ion-sound waves, the net effect of scattering is equivalent to effective damping of the Langmuir waves. Under the assumption of self-similarity in the evolution of the beam and Langmuir wave distribution functions, gas-dynamic theory shows that the effects of Langmuir scattering on the beam distribution are equivalent to a perturbation in the injection profile of the beam. Analytical expressions are obtained for the height of the plateau of the beam distribution function, wave spectral number density, total wave and particle energy density, and the beam number density. The main results of gas-dynamic theory are then compared with simulation results from numerical solutions of quasilinear equations. The relaxation of the beam in velocity space is retarded in the presence of density fluctuations and the magnitude of the upper velocity boundary is less than that in the absence of fluctuations. There are four different regimes for the height of the plateau, corresponding to different stages of relaxation of the beam in velocity space. Moreover, Langmuir scattering results in transfer of electrons from moderate velocity to low velocity; this effect produces an enhancement in the beam number density at small distances near the injection site and a corresponding decrease at large distances. There are sharp decreases in the profiles of the beam and total wave energy densities, which are related to dissipation of energy at large phase velocities. Due to a slower velocity space diffusion of the beam distribution in the presence of scattering effects, the spatial width of the beam is reduced while its

  10. Density and particle-hole fluctuation effects on the position of Feshbach resonances in atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qijin

    2013-03-01

    Feshbach resonances have been the key to achieve tunable effective pairing interaction strength in atomic Fermi gases. Most important experiments, as well as their theoretical explanations, rely on precise determination of the locations of these resonances. For the extensively studied 6Li and 40K Fermi gases, the positions of the widely used s-wave Feshbach resonances have been regarded as being measured with high precision. In this talk, we show that due to inevitable particle-hole fluctuations, there is a significant density effect on the resonance locations. For a 6Li gas with a realistic TF = 1 μK, the shift in location in terms of magnetic field can be as high as 8G at low temperature T, and this effect does not necessarily go away at high T. This will cause important consequences as to whether and how the scattering length taken from the literature need to be re-calibrated for the concrete parameters specific to a given experiment. Supported by NSF, MOE and MOST of China.

  11. Drought impact on water use efficiency and intra-annual density fluctuations in Erica arborea on Elba (Italy).

    PubMed

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; DE Micco, Veronica; Brand, Willi A; Saurer, Matthias; Aronne, Giovanna; Linke, Petra; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Erica arborea (L) is a widespread Mediterranean species, able to cope with water stress and colonize semiarid environments. The eco-physiological plasticity of this species was evaluated by studying plants growing at two sites with different soil moistures on the island of Elba (Italy), through dendrochronological, wood-anatomical analyses and stable isotopes measurements. Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) were abundant in tree rings, and were identified as the key parameter to understand site-specific plant responses to water stress. Our findings showed that the formation of IADFs is mainly related to the high temperature, precipitation patterns and probably to soil water availability, which differs at the selected study sites. The recorded increase in the (13) C-derived intrinsic water use efficiency at the IADFs level was linked to reduced water loss rather than to increasing C assimilation. The variation in vessel size and the different absolute values of δ(18) O among trees growing at the two study sites underlined possible differences in stomatal control of water loss and possible differences in sources of water uptake. This approach not only helped monitor seasonal environmental differences through tree-ring width, but also added valuable information on E. arborea responses to drought and their ecological implications for Mediterranean vegetation dynamics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Identification of craters on Moon using Crater Density Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    Lunar craters are the most noticeable features on the face of the moon. They take up 40.96% of the lunar surface and, their accumulated area is approximately three times as much as the lunar surface area. There are many myths about the moon. Some says moon is made of cheese. The moon and the sun chase each other across the sky etc. but scientifically the moon are closest and are only natural satellite of earth. The orbit plane of the moon is tilted by 5° and orbit period around the earth is 27-3 days. There are two eclipse i.e. lunar eclipse and solar eclipse which always comes in pair. Moon surface has 3 parts i.e. highland, Maria, and crater. For crater diagnostic crater density parameter is one of the means for measuring distance can be easily identity the density between two craters. Crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) is being computed for lunar surface using TMC and MiniSAR image data and hence, also the age for the selected test sites of mars is also determined. The GIS-based program uses the density and orientation of individual craters within LCCs (as vector points) to identify potential source craters through a series of cluster identification and ejection modeling analyses. JMars software is also recommended and operated only the time when connected with server but work can be done in Arc GIS with the help of Arc Objects and Model Builder. The study plays a vital role to determine the lunar surface based on crater (shape, size and density) and exploring affected craters on the basis of height, weight and velocity. Keywords: Moon; Crater; MiniSAR.

  13. Conduction-electron spin resonance and spin-density fluctuations of CoS2-xSex (x≤0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivadulla, F.

    2011-10-01

    I report the observation of conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) in the paramagnetic phase of weak itinerant ferromagnet (WIFM) CoS2. The observation of a narrow Lorentzian line above TC is interpreted as a signature of long-wavelength exchange-enhanced spin-density fluctuations, whose amplitude increases up to T* ≈ 2 TC. I propose that this temperature marks a characteristic energy scale below which strong exchange interactions between spin fluctuations determine the spin lifetime. This study shows that the characteristic parameters of CESR are very sensitive to electronic correlations and can be very useful in the study of the spin interactions and relaxation in itinerant electron systems in the intermediate coupling regime.

  14. Observation of magnetic fluctuations and rapid density decay of magnetospheric plasma in Ring Trap 1

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Yano, Y.; Mikami, H.; Kasaoka, N.; Sakamoto, W.

    2012-06-15

    The Ring Trap 1 device, a magnetospheric configuration generated by a levitated dipole field magnet, has created high-{beta} (local {beta} {approx} 70%) plasma by using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). When a large population of energetic electrons is generated at low neutral gas pressure operation, high frequency magnetic fluctuations are observed. When the fluctuations are strongly excited, rapid loss of plasma was simultaneously observed especially in a quiet decay phase after the ECH microwave power is turned off. Although the plasma is confined in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole field configuration, the frequency spectra of the fluctuations have sharp frequency peaks, implying spatially localized sources of the fluctuations. The fluctuations are stabilized by decreasing the hot electron component below approximately 40%, realizing stable high-{beta} confinement.

  15. Sound Sources Identified in High-Speed Jets by Correlating Flow Density Fluctuations With Far-Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    Noise sources in high-speed jets were identified by directly correlating flow density fluctuation (cause) to far-field sound pressure fluctuation (effect). The experimental study was performed in a nozzle facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of NASA s initiative to reduce the noise emitted by commercial airplanes. Previous efforts to use this correlation method have failed because the tools for measuring jet turbulence were intrusive. In the present experiment, a molecular Rayleigh-scattering technique was used that depended on laser light scattering by gas molecules in air. The technique allowed accurate measurement of air density fluctuations from different points in the plume. The study was conducted in shock-free, unheated jets of Mach numbers 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8. The turbulent motion, as evident from density fluctuation spectra was remarkably similar in all three jets, whereas the noise sources were significantly different. The correlation study was conducted by keeping a microphone at a fixed location (at the peak noise emission angle of 30 to the jet axis and 50 nozzle diameters away) while moving the laser probe volume from point to point in the flow. The following figure shows maps of the nondimensional coherence value measured at different Strouhal frequencies ([frequency diameter]/jet speed) in the supersonic Mach 1.8 and subsonic Mach 0.95 jets. The higher the coherence, the stronger the source was.

  16. An edge density fluctuation diagnostic for DIII-D using lithium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.

    1991-12-01

    This report covers the research conducted under DOE grant FG03-90ER-081 during the period August 15, 1990 through November 15, 1991. Progress during the period March 15, 1990 through August 15, 1990 was covered in a previous report. Highlights during this period include the development of a compact neutral lithium accelerator capable of producing several mA at up to 30 kV, measurements of intrinsic beam fluctuation levels, and the design and partial completion of the diagnostic installation on the D3-D tokamak. We also had one journal article describing the system published in Reviews of Scientific Instruments, presented a poster on our recent progress at the APS Plasma Physics conference, and submitted an abstract to the 9th Topical Conference on Plasma Diagnostics. The overall objective of this project is to provide detailed information about the behavior of the electron density in the edge region of D3-D, and in particular to examine the local character of the associated degradation in confinement properties. Measurements should provide important data for testing theories of the L-H transition in tokamaks and should help in assessing the role of various instabilities in anomalous transport. The work on this project may be naturally organized according to the following six subareas: Ion source/beam system, neutralizer system, optical system, data acquisition, data analysis, and machine (D3-D) interface. Progress in each of these areas will be discussed briefly. We also briefly discuss our plans for future work on this program.

  17. Fitting of bone mineral density with consideration of anthropometric parameters

    PubMed Central

    Short, D. F.; Zemel, B. S.; Gilsanz, V.; Kalkwarf, H. J.; Lappe, J. M.; Mahboubi, S.; Oberfield, S. E.; Shepherd, J. A.; Winer, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A new model describing normal values of bone mineral density in children has been evaluated, which includes not only the traditional parameters of age, gender, and race, but also weight, height, percent body fat, and sexual maturity. This model may constitute a better comparative norm for a specific child with given anthropometric values. Introduction Previous descriptions of children's bone mineral density (BMD) by age have focused on segmenting diverse populations by race and gender without adjusting for anthropometric variables or have included the effects of anthropometric variables over a relatively homogeneous population. Methods Multivariate semi-metric smoothing (MS2) provides a way to describe a diverse population using a model that includes multiple effects and their interactions while producing a result that can be smoothed with respect to age in order to provide connected percentiles. We applied MS2 to spine BMD data from the Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study to evaluate which of gender, race, age, height, weight, percent body fat, and sexual maturity explain variations in the population's BMD values. By balancing high adjusted R2 values and low mean square errors with clinical needs, a model using age, gender, race, weight, and percent body fat is proposed and examined. Results This model provides narrower distributions and slight shifts of BMD values compared to the traditional model, which includes only age, gender, and race. Thus, the proposed model might constitute a better comparative standard for a specific child with given anthropometric values and should be less dependent on the anthropometric characteristics of the cohort used to devise the model. Conclusions The inclusion of multiple explanatory variables in the model, while creating smooth output curves, makes the MS2 method attractive in modeling practically sized data sets. The clinical use of this model by the bone research community has yet to be fully established. PMID

  18. SNW 2000 Proceedings. Oxide Thickness Variation Induced Threshold Voltage Fluctuations in Decanano MOSFETs: a 3D Density Gradient Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Kaya, S.; Davies, J. H.; Saini, S.

    2000-01-01

    We use the density gradient (DG) simulation approach to study, in 3D, the effect of local oxide thickness fluctuations on the threshold voltage of decanano MOSFETs in a statistical manner. A description of the reconstruction procedure for the random 2D surfaces representing the 'atomistic' Si-SiO2 interface variations is presented. The procedure is based on power spectrum synthesis in the Fourier domain and can include either Gaussian or exponential spectra. The simulations show that threshold voltage variations induced by oxide thickness fluctuation become significant when the gate length of the devices become comparable to the correlation length of the fluctuations. The extent of quantum corrections in the simulations with respect to the classical case and the dependence of threshold variations on the oxide thickness are examined.

  19. Low Mach number two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence - Energy budgets and density fluctuations in a polytropic fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Theory suggests that three distinct types of turbulence can occur in the low Mach number limit of polytropic flow: nearly incompressible flows dominated by vorticity, nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and flows characterized by near statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Distinctions between these kinds of turbulence are investigated here by direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic turbulence. Dynamical scalings of density fluctuations, examination of the ratio of transverse to longitudinal velocity fluctuations, and spectral decomposition of the fluctuations are employed to distinguish the nature of these low Mach number solutions. A strong dependence on the initial data is observed, as well as a tendency for enhanced effects of compressibility at later times and at higher wave numbers, as suggested by theories of nearly incompressible flows.

  20. Observation of the electron density fluctuations by using the O-mode Microwave Imaging Reflectometry in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Kuwahara, Daisuke; LHD Experimental Team

    2016-10-01

    Visualization of local electron density fluctuations will be very useful to study the physics of confinement and instabilities in fusion plasma. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), the O-mode microwave imaging reflectometry (O-MIR) has been intensively developed in order to visualize the electron density fluctuations. The frequency is 26 - 34 GHz. This corresponds to the electron density of 0.8 - 1.5 × 1019 m-3. The plasma is illuminated by the Gaussian beam with four frequencies. The imaging optics make a plasma image onto the newly developed 2D (8 × 8) Horn-antenna Millimeter-wave Imaging Device (HMID). In HMID, the signal wave that is accumulated by the horn antenna is transduced to the micro-strip line by using the finline transducer. The signal wave is mixed by the double balanced mixer with the local wave that is delivered by cables. By using O-MIR, electron density fluctuations are measured at the H-mode edge and the ITB layer in LHD. This work is supported by NIFS/NINS under the project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network, by the NIFS LHD project, by KAKENHI, and by IMS.

  1. The effect of plasma fluctuations on parallel transport parameters in the SOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlíčková, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Wiesen, S.; Horacek, J.; Seidl, J.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of plasma fluctuations due to turbulence at the outboard midplane on parallel transport properties is investigated. Time-dependent fluctuating signals at different radial locations are used to study the effect of signal statistics. Further, a computational analysis of parallel transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) taking into account these fluctuations is presented. Plasma transport in the SOL along the magnetic field between two targets is calculated by a one-dimensional fluid code in order to estimate the response to transient conditions along the SOL and the attention is given to a comparison of steady-state and time-dependent modelling.

  2. Does the Genotype Have a Significant Effect on the Formation of Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations? A Case Study Using Larix decidua from Northern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Klisz, Marcin; Koprowski, Marcin; Ukalska, Joanna; Nabais, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) can imprint environmental conditions within the growing season and most of the research on IADFs has been focused on their climatic signal. However, to our knowledge, the genetic influence on the frequency and type of IADFs has not been evaluated. To understand if the genotype can affect the formation of IADFs we have used a common garden experiment using eight families of Larix decidua established in two neighboring forest stands in northern Poland. Four types of IADFs were identified using X-ray density profiles: latewood-like cells within earlywood (IADF-type E), latewood-like cells in the transition from early- to latewood (IADF type E+), earlywood-like cells within latewood (IADF-type L), and earlywood-like cells in the border zone between the previous and present annual ring (IADF-type L+). The influence of explanatory variables i.e., families, sites, and years on identified density fluctuations was analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). We hypothesized that trees from different families will differ in terms of frequency and type of IADFs because each family will react to precipitation and temperature in a different way, depending on the origin of those trees. The most frequent fluctuation was E+ and L types on both sites. The most important factors in the formation of IADFs were the site and year, the last one reflecting the variable climatic conditions, with no significant effect of the family. However, the relation between the formation of IADFs and selected climate parameters was different between families. Although, our results did not give a significant effect of the genotype on the formation of IADFs, the different sensitivity to climatic parameters among different families indicate that there is a genetic influence. PMID:27242883

  3. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for pure liquids

    PubMed Central

    Karunaweera, Sadish

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory has provided an alternative view of many liquid mixture properties in terms of particle number fluctuations. The particle number fluctuations can also be related to integrals of the corresponding two body distribution functions between molecular pairs in order to provide a more physical picture of solution behavior and molecule affinities. Here, we extend this type of approach to provide expressions for higher order triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and thereby integrals over the corresponding distribution functions, all of which can be obtained from available experimental thermodynamic data. The fluctuations and integrals are then determined using the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam Formulation 1995 (IAPWS-95) equation of state for the liquid phase of pure water. The results indicate small, but significant, deviations from a Gaussian distribution for the molecules in this system. The pressure and temperature dependence of the fluctuations and integrals, as well as the limiting behavior as one approaches both the triple point and the critical point, are also examined. PMID:25637990

  4. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for pure liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Karunaweera, Sadish; Smith, Paul E.

    2015-01-28

    Fluctuation solution theory has provided an alternative view of many liquid mixture properties in terms of particle number fluctuations. The particle number fluctuations can also be related to integrals of the corresponding two body distribution functions between molecular pairs in order to provide a more physical picture of solution behavior and molecule affinities. Here, we extend this type of approach to provide expressions for higher order triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and thereby integrals over the corresponding distribution functions, all of which can be obtained from available experimental thermodynamic data. The fluctuations and integrals are then determined using the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam Formulation 1995 (IAPWS-95) equation of state for the liquid phase of pure water. The results indicate small, but significant, deviations from a Gaussian distribution for the molecules in this system. The pressure and temperature dependence of the fluctuations and integrals, as well as the limiting behavior as one approaches both the triple point and the critical point, are also examined.

  5. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for pure liquids.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A; Karunaweera, Sadish; Smith, Paul E

    2015-01-28

    Fluctuation solution theory has provided an alternative view of many liquid mixture properties in terms of particle number fluctuations. The particle number fluctuations can also be related to integrals of the corresponding two body distribution functions between molecular pairs in order to provide a more physical picture of solution behavior and molecule affinities. Here, we extend this type of approach to provide expressions for higher order triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and thereby integrals over the corresponding distribution functions, all of which can be obtained from available experimental thermodynamic data. The fluctuations and integrals are then determined using the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam Formulation 1995 (IAPWS-95) equation of state for the liquid phase of pure water. The results indicate small, but significant, deviations from a Gaussian distribution for the molecules in this system. The pressure and temperature dependence of the fluctuations and integrals, as well as the limiting behavior as one approaches both the triple point and the critical point, are also examined.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of electron density fluctuations in the Hall thruster plasma: ExB mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Honore, C.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2010-11-15

    Collective scattering measurements have been conducted on the plasma of a Hall thruster, in which the electron density fluctuations are fully characterized by the dynamic form factor. The dynamic form factor amplitude distribution has been measured depending on the k-vector spatial and frequency components at different locations. Fluctuations are seen as propagating waves. The largest amplitude mode propagates nearly along the cross-field direction but at a phase velocity that is much smaller than the ExB drift velocity. Refined directional analysis of this largest amplitude mode shows a thin angular emission diagram with a mean direction that is not strictly along the ExB direction but at small angles near it. The deviation is oriented toward the anode in the (E,ExB) plane and toward the exterior of the thruster channel in the (B,ExB) plane. The density fluctuation rate is on the order of 1%. These experimentally determined directional fluctuation characteristics are discussed with regard to the linear kinetic theory model and particle-in-cell simulation results.

  7. Local density of states and its mesoscopic fluctuations near the transition to a superconducting state in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrov, I. S.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a theory of the local density of states (LDOS) of disordered superconductors, employing the nonlinear sigma-model formalism and the renormalization-group framework. The theory takes into account the interplay of disorder and interaction couplings in all channels, treating the systems with short-range and Coulomb interactions on equal footing. We explore two-dimensional systems that would be Anderson insulators in the absence of interaction and two- or three-dimensional systems that undergo an Anderson transition in the absence of interaction. We evaluate both the average tunneling density of states and its mesoscopic fluctuations which are related to the LDOS multifractality in normal disordered systems. The obtained average LDOS shows a pronounced depletion around the Fermi energy, both in the metallic phase (i.e., above the superconducting critical temperature Tc) and in the insulating phase near the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT). The fluctuations of the LDOS are found to be particularly strong for the case of short-range interactions, especially, in the regime when Tc is enhanced by Anderson localization. On the other hand, the long-range Coulomb repulsion reduces the mesoscopic LDOS fluctuations. However, also in a model with Coulomb interaction, the fluctuations become strong when the systems approach the SIT.

  8. Density Fluctuation measurement with Upgraded FIR System on the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2016-10-01

    Going forward, a primary physics goal for HSX is to study configuration optimization for reducing turbulence which requires measurement of turbulence with kyρs up to 1. For characteristic HSX parameters (Te 200 eV at r/a 0.5 where the density gradient peaks), this condition corresponds to kyup to 7 cm-1. To accommodate this goal, the 9-chord HSX interferometer/far-forward scattering system (k<2 cm-1) will be upgraded to measure density turbulence at higher k. The existing source (4 mW, 288 GHz) employing frequency modulation will be replaced with two high power (30 mW each, 320 GHz), solid-state sources with fixed frequency offset 4 MHz. This will permit true heterodyne detection, thereby realizing faster measurement time response, increased bandwidth and reduced noise. High power sources and high sensitivity planar-diode mixers will allow us to reduce the aperture of the receiver optics to a few mm thereby increasing the maximum wavenumber to k 15 cm-1. Reconfiguring the interferometer system into a finite-angle collective scattering arrangement is also planned as it will increase the measured k-spectrum up to 18 cm-1 with some spatial resolution (core or edge). Supported by USDOE Grants DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  9. Simultaneous observations of density fluctuations, trimethyl aluminum trail diffusion, wind shears and gravity waves in the turbopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmacher, Gerald; Larsen, Miguel; Collins, Richard; Bilen, Sven; Croskey, Charles; Mitchell, John; Luebken, Franz-Josef; Rapp, Markus

    In February 2009, a rocket experiment was launched from Alaska entitled: Where is the tur-bopause? Instabilities, generation and development of turbulence in the 100-km region. The salvo of four rockets obtained in situ wind and temperature profiles, neutral and plasma fluctu-ations, and wave and tidal activity from ground based lidar, radar, and other instrumentation. Among the goals are comparisons of turbulent energy dissipation rates measured by spectral analysis and from chemical trail expansion rates. Based on trimethyl aluminum trail diffusion we identified regions of mixing around 90 km, 95 km, and also above 100 km. The lower re-gion coincided with layers of density fluctuations, while the upper region was characterized by strong wind shear and kilometer-size density structures in the lower thermosphere. Rayleigh and sodium lidar observed a dominant 4-hour wave motion in the upper mesosphere.

  10. Order parameter fluctuation and ordering competition in Ba1 -xKxFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Guo-Zhu; Efremov, Dmitry V.; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    The competition among superconductivity, stripe-type magnetic order, and a new type of C4 symmetric magnetic order in Ba1-xKxFe2As2 is theoretically studied, focusing on its impact on the global phase diagram. By carrying out a renormalization group analysis of an effective field theory, we obtain the energy-scale dependent flows of all the model parameters, and then apply the results to understand the observed phase diagram. On the basis of the renormalization group analysis, we show that the critical line of nematic order has a negative slope in the superconducting dome and superconductivity is suppressed near the magnetic quantum critical point, which are both consistent with recent experiments. Moreover, we find that, although the observed C4 symmetric magnetic state could be a charge-spin density wave or a spin-vortex crystal at high temperatures, charge-spin density wave is the only stable C4 magnetic state in the low-temperature regime. Therefore, ordering competition provides a method to distinguish these two candidate C4 magnetic states.

  11. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  12. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  13. Density fluctuations from the quark-hadron epoch and primordial nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, G.M.; Mathews, G.J.; Alcock, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    We present a simple thermodynamic model of the quark-hadron transition in the early universe and use this model to estimate how the size of isothermal baryon number fluctuations which emerge from this epoch depend on the temperature of the transition and other uncertain quantities of the underlying QCD physics. We calculate primordial nucleosynthesis in the presence of these fluctuations and find that ..cap omega.. = 1 in baryons is possible only if the measured abundances of /sup 7/Li and /sup 2/H reflect substantial destruction during the evolution of the galaxy. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Effects of 2D and Finite Density Fluctuations on O-X Correlation Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kramer; R. Nazikian; E. Valeo

    2001-07-05

    The correlation between O-mode and X-mode reflectometer signals is studied with a 1D and 2D reflectometer model in order to explore its feasibilities as a q-profile diagnostic. It was found that 2D effects and finite fluctuation levels both decrease the O-X correlation. At very low fluctuation levels, which are usually present in the plasma core, there is good possibility to determine the local magnetic field strength and use that as a constraint for the equilibrium reconstruction.

  15. Effects of temporal fluctuations, fluid density effects and heterogeneity on mixing of two fluids for a stable stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, Maria; Dentz, Marco; Post, Vincent E. A.

    2017-04-01

    Mixing and dispersion in coastal aquifers are controlled by density variations, which are influenced by temporal fluctuations on multiple time-scales ranging from days (tides), seasons (pumping and recharge) to glacial cycles (regression and transgressions). Transient forcing effects lead to a complex space and time dependent flow response which induces enhanced spreading and mixing of dissolved substances. We study effective mixing and solute transport in temporally fluctuating flow for a stable stratification of two fluids of different density using detailed numerical simulation as well as accurate column experiments. For the homogeneous case, we quantify the observed transport behaviors and interface evolution by a time-averaged model that is obtained from a two-scale expansion of the full transport problem, and derive explicit expressions for the center of mass and width of the mixing zone between the two fluids (Pool et al., 2016). We find that the magnitude of transient-driven mixing is mainly controlled by the hydraulic diffusivity, the period, and the initial interface location. For the heterogeneous case, transient forcing and density-dependent transport is investigated considering multigaussian random log conductivity fields and more complex heterogeneous fields characterized by connected patterns of high and low conductivity. We find that the mixing potential and 'hot spots' are directly related to the deformation properties and topology of the flow field, specifically its stretching behavior in response to temporal fluctuations. We also find that gravity forces due to density variations cause smoother concentration distribution leading to a decrease in the width of the transition zone. However the mixing potential is similar as the one obtained with constant density. Reference: Pool, M., M. Dentz, and V.E.A. Post (2016), Transient forcing effects on mixing of two fluids for a stable stratification, Water Resour. Res., 52, 7178-7197, doi:10.1002/2016WR

  16. Characterization of density fluctuations during the search for an I-mode regime on the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, A.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Osborne, T. H.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Rhodes, T. L.; Davis, E. M.; Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.

    2015-09-01

    The I-mode regime, routinely observed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, is characterized by an edge energy transport barrier without an accompanying particle barrier and with broadband instabilities, known as weakly coherent modes (WCM), believed to regulate particle transport at the edge. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak exhibit I-mode characteristics in various physical quantities. These DIII-D plasmas evolve over long periods, lasting several energy confinement times, during which the edge electron temperature slowly evolves towards an H-mode-like profile, while maintaining a typical L-mode edge density profile. During these periods, referred to as I-mode phases, the radial electric field at the edge also gradually reaches values typically observed in H-mode. Density fluctuations measured with the phase contrast imaging diagnostic during I-mode phases exhibit three features typically observed in H-mode on DIII-D, although they develop progressively with time and without a sharp transition: the intensity of the fluctuations is reduced; the frequency spectrum is broadened and becomes non-monotonic; two dimensional space-time spectra appear to approach those in H-mode, showing phase velocities of density fluctuations at the edge increasing to about 10 km s-1. However, in DIII-D there is no clear evidence of the WCM. Preliminary linear gyro-kinetic simulations are performed in the pedestal region with the GS2 code and its recently upgraded model collision operator that conserves particles, energy and momentum. The increased bootstrap current and flow shear generated by the temperature pedestal are shown to decrease growth rates, thus possibly generating a feedback mechanism that progressively stabilizes fluctuations.

  17. Parameter optimization in biased decoy-state quantum key distribution with both source errors and statistical fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Wang, Qin

    2017-10-01

    The decoy-state method has been widely used in commercial quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. In view of the practical decoy-state QKD with both source errors and statistical fluctuations, we propose a universal model of full parameter optimization in biased decoy-state QKD with phase-randomized sources. Besides, we adopt this model to carry out simulations of two widely used sources: weak coherent source (WCS) and heralded single-photon source (HSPS). Results show that full parameter optimization can significantly improve not only the secure transmission distance but also the final key generation rate. And when taking source errors and statistical fluctuations into account, the performance of decoy-state QKD using HSPS suffered less than that of decoy-state QKD using WCS.

  18. Current Fluctuations in One Dimensional Diffusive Systems with a Step Initial Density Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Gerschenfeld, Antoine

    2009-12-01

    We show how to apply the macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim to study the current fluctuations of diffusive systems with a step initial condition. We argue that one has to distinguish between two ways of averaging (the annealed and the quenched cases) depending on whether we let the initial condition fluctuate or not. Although the initial condition is not a steady state, the distribution of the current satisfies a symmetry very reminiscent of the fluctuation theorem. We show how the equations of the MFT can be solved in the case of non-interacting particles. The symmetry of these equations can be used to deduce the distribution of the current for several other models, from its knowledge (Derrida and Gerschenfeld in J. Stat. Phys. 136, 1-15, 2009) for the symmetric simple exclusion process. In the range where the integrated current Qt˜sqrt{t} , we show that the non-Gaussian decay exp [- Q {/t 3}/ t] of the distribution of Q t is generic.

  19. Density-Dependent Prevalence of Francisella tularensis in Fluctuating Vole Populations, Northwestern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pastor, Ruth; Escudero, Raquel; Vidal, Dolors; Mougeot, François; Arroyo, Beatriz; Lambin, Xavier; Vila-Coro, Ave Maria; Rodríguez-Moreno, Isabel; Anda, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Tularemia in humans in northwestern Spain is associated with increases in vole populations. Prevalence of infection with Francisella tularensis in common voles increased to 33% during a vole population fluctuation. This finding confirms that voles are spillover agents for zoonotic outbreaks. Ecologic interactions associated with tularemia prevention should be considered. PMID:28726608

  20. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U. Wi, H. M.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovácsik, Ákos

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  1. The I-mode confinement regime at ASDEX Upgrade: global properties and characterization of strongly intermittent density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happel, T.; Manz, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Dunne, M.; Hennequin, P.; Hetzenecker, A.; Stroth, U.; Conway, G. D.; Guimarais, L.; Honoré, C.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    Properties of the I-mode confinement regime on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak are summarized. A weak dependence of the power threshold for the L-I transition on the toroidal magnetic field strength is found. During improved confinement, the edge radial electric field well deepens. Stability calculations show that the I-mode pedestal is peeling-ballooning stable. Turbulence investigations reveal strongly intermittent density fluctuations linked to the weakly coherent mode in the confined plasma, which become stronger as the confinement quality increases. Across all investigated structure sizes ({{k}\\bot}≈ 5 -12 cm-1, with {{k}\\bot} the perpendicular wavenumber of turbulent density fluctuations), the intermittent turbulence bursts are observed. Comparison with bolometry data shows that they move poloidally toward the X-point and finally end up in the divertor. This might be indicative that they play a role in inhibiting the density profile growth, such that no pedestal is formed in the edge density profile.

  2. A real time dynamic data acquisition and processing system for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    The real time Dynamic Data Acquisition and Processing System (DDAPS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAPS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. DDAPS receives input from hot wire anemometers. Amplifiers and filters condition the signals with computer controlled modules. The analog signals are simultaneously digitized and digitally recorded on disk. Automatic acquisition collects necessary calibration and environment data. Hot wire sensitivities are generated and applied to the hot wire data to compute fluctuations. The presentation of the raw and processed data is accomplished on demand. The interface to DDAPS is described along with the internal mechanisms of DDAPS. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAPS is also provided.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of magnetic and density fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering and Doppler backscattering on the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Barada, K.; Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    An upgraded cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the simultaneous measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations B ˜ and density fluctuations ñ is presented. The system has eight radial quadrature channels acquired simultaneously with an eight-channel Doppler backscattering system (measures density fluctuations ñ and flows). 3-D ray tracing calculations based on the GENRAY ray tracing code are used to illustrate the scattering and geometric considerations involved in the CPS implementation on DIII-D. A unique quasi-optical design and IF electronics system allow direct comparison of B ˜ and ñ during dynamic or transient plasma events (e.g., Edge Localized Modes or ELMs, L to H-mode transitions, etc.). The system design allows the interesting possibility of both magnetic-density ( B ˜ -ñ) fluctuation and magnetic-temperature ( B ˜ - T ˜ ) fluctuation cross-phase measurements suitable for detailed tests of turbulence simulations.

  4. Fluctuating defect density probed with noise spectroscopy in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Verleg, P.A.W.E.; Uca, O.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    1997-07-01

    Resistance fluctuations have been studied in hydrogenated amorphous silicon in the temperature range between 300 K and 450 K. The primary noise source has a power spectrum of approximately 1/f and is ascribed to hydrogen motion. Hopping of weakly bound hydrogen is thermally activated at such low temperatures with an average activation energy of 0.85 eV. The attempt rate amounts to 7 {center_dot} 10{sup 12} s{sup {minus}1}.

  5. Constraining cloud parameters using high density gas tracers in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazandjian, M. V.; Pelupessy, I.; Meijerink, R.; Israel, F. P.; Coppola, C. M.; Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Spaans, M.

    2016-11-01

    Far-infrared molecular emission is an important tool used to understand the excitation mechanisms of the gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) of star-forming galaxies. In the present work, we model the emission from rotational transitions with critical densities n ≳ 104 cm-3. We include 4-3 < J ≤ 15-14 transitions of CO and 13CO , in addition to J ≤ 7-6 transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCO+ on galactic scales. We do this by re-sampling high density gas in a hydrodynamic model of a gas-rich disk galaxy, assuming that the density field of the ISM of the model galaxy follows the probability density function (PDF) inferred from the resolved low density scales. We find that in a narrow gas density PDF, with a mean density of 10 cm-3 and a dispersion σ = 2.1 in the log of the density, most of the emission of molecular lines, even of gas with critical densities >104 cm-3, emanates from the 10-1000 cm-3 part of the PDF. We construct synthetic emission maps for the central 2 kpc of the galaxy and fit the line ratios of CO and 13CO up to J = 15-14, as well as HCN, HNC, and HCO+ up to J = 7-6, using one photo-dissociation region (PDR) model. We attribute the goodness of the one component fits for our model galaxy to the fact that the distribution of the luminosity, as a function of density, is peaked at gas densities between 10 and 1000 cm-3, with negligible contribution from denser gas. Specifically, the Mach number, ℳ, of the model galaxy is 10. We explore the impact of different log-normal density PDFs on the distribution of the line-luminosity as a function of density, and we show that it is necessary to have a broad dispersion, corresponding to Mach numbers ≳30 in order to obtain significant (>10%) emission from n> 104 cm-3 gas. Such Mach numbers are expected in star-forming galaxies, luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGS), and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGS). This method provides a way to constrain the global PDF of the ISM of galaxies from observations of

  6. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-12-15

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  7. Putting Water on a Lattice: The Importance of Long Wavelength Density Fluctuations in Theories of Hydrophobic and Interfacial Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    The physics of air-water interfaces plays a central role in modern theories of the hydrophobic effect. Implementing these theories, however, has been hampered by the difficulty of addressing fluctuations in the shape of such soft interfaces. We show that this challenge is a fundamental consequence of mapping long wavelength density variations onto discrete degrees of freedom. Drawing from studies of surface roughness in lattice models, we account for the resulting nonlinearities simply but accurately. Simulations show that this approach captures complex solvation behaviors quantitatively.

  8. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Bardóczi, L; Rhodes, T L; Carter, T A; Bañón Navarro, A; Peebles, W A; Jenko, F; McKee, G

    2016-05-27

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density fluctuations n[over ˜] (via beam emission spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n[over ˜] was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that n[over ˜] could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient instability.

  9. Improving the reconstruction of the velocity potential and primordial density fluctuations by choice of smoothing windows. [for cosmological theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently considerable attention has been focused on improving algorithms for restoring primordial density fluctuations in the universe or investigating large-scale velocity fields by going to higher order approximations relating nonlinear states to their initial conditions. An alternative approach is to investigate the use of alternative smoothing windows within the context of first-order approximations. I present evidence that the universally used Gaussian smoothing window is far from optimal. A sharp truncation P(k) = 0 for k greater than k(c) leads to a much more direct connection to initial conditions for either 'Gaussianization' methods or use of the Zel'dovich approximation, as discussed in the text.

  10. Putting water on a lattice: the importance of long wavelength density fluctuations in theories of hydrophobic and interfacial phenomena.

    PubMed

    Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Geissler, Phillip L

    2014-01-17

    The physics of air-water interfaces plays a central role in modern theories of the hydrophobic effect. Implementing these theories, however, has been hampered by the difficulty of addressing fluctuations in the shape of such soft interfaces. We show that this challenge is a fundamental consequence of mapping long wavelength density variations onto discrete degrees of freedom. Drawing from studies of surface roughness in lattice models, we account for the resulting nonlinearities simply but accurately. Simulations show that this approach captures complex solvation behaviors quantitatively.

  11. Probability density function (Pdf) of daily rainfall depths by means of superstatistics of hydro-climatic fluctuations for African test cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topa, M. E.; De Paola, F.; Giugni, M.; Kombe, W.; Touré, H.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamic of hydro-climatic processes can fluctuate in a wide range of temporal scales. Such fluctuations are often unpredictable for ecosystems and the adaptation to these represent the great challenge for the survival and the stability of the species. An unsolved issue is how much these fluctuations of climatic variables to different temporal scales can influence the frequency and the intensity of the extreme events, and how much these events can modify the ecosystems life. It is by now widespread that an increment of the frequency and the intensity of the extreme events will represent one of the strongest characteristic of the global climatic change, with the greatest social and biotics implications (Porporato et al 2006). Recent field experiments (Gutshick and BassiriRad, 2003) and numerical analysis (Porporato et al 2004) have shown that the extreme events can generate not negligible consequences on organisms of water-limited ecosystems. Adaptation measures and species and ecosystems answers to the hydro-climatic variations, is therefore srongly interconnected to the probabilistic structure of these fluctuations. Generally the not-linear intermittent dynamic of a state variable z (a rainfall depth or the interarrival time between two storms), at short time scales (for example daily) is described by a probability density function (pdf), p (z|υ), where υ is the parameter of the distribution. If the same parameter υ varies so that the external forcing fluctuates at longer temporal scale, z reaches a new "local" equilibrium. When the temporal scale of the variation of υ is larger than the one of z, the probability distribution of z can be obtained as a overlapping of the temporary equlibria ("Superstatistic" approach), i.e.: p(z) = ∫ p(z|υ)·φ(υ)dυ (1) where p(z|υ) is the conditioned probability of z to υ, while φ(υ) is the pdf of υ (Beck, 2001; Benjamin and Cornell, 1970). The present work, carried out within FP7-ENV-2010 CLUVA (CLimate Change

  12. Techniques for correcting velocity and density fluctuations of ion beams in ion inducti on accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, K. M.; Yu, S. S.; Barnard, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    It is well known that the imperfection of pulse power sources that drive the linear induction accelerators can lead to time-varying fluctuation in the accelerating voltages, which in turn leads to longitudinal emittance growth. We show that this source of emittance growth is correctable, even in space-charge dominated beams with significant transients induced by space-charge waves. Two correction methods are proposed, and their efficacy in reducing longitudinal emittance is demonstrated with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Impact of parameter fluctuations on the performance of ethanol precipitation in production of Re Du Ning Injections, based on HPLC fingerprints and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Qiong; Wang, Shu-Yao; Li, Yan-Jing; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Huang, Wen-Zhe; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Bi, Yu-An; Ding, Gang; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the relationships between the performance of ethanol precipitation and seven process parameters in the ethanol precipitation process of Re Du Ning Injections, including concentrate density, concentrate temperature, ethanol content, flow rate and stir rate in the addition of ethanol, precipitation time, and precipitation temperature. Under the experimental and simulated production conditions, a series of precipitated resultants were prepared by changing these variables one by one, and then examined by HPLC fingerprint analyses. Different from the traditional evaluation model based on single or a few constituents, the fingerprint data of every parameter fluctuation test was processed with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to comprehensively assess the performance of ethanol precipitation. Our results showed that concentrate density, ethanol content, and precipitation time were the most important parameters that influence the recovery of active compounds in precipitation resultants. The present study would provide some reference for pharmaceutical scientists engaged in research on pharmaceutical process optimization and help pharmaceutical enterprises adapt a scientific and reasonable cost-effective approach to ensure the batch-to-batch quality consistency of the final products.

  14. Measurements of the cross-phase angle between density and electron temperature fluctuations and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Carter, T. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C. H.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents new measurements of the cross-phase angle, alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}}, between long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) density, n-tilde{sub e}, and electron temperature, T-tilde{sub e}, fluctuations in the core of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] tokamak plasmas. The coherency and cross-phase angle between n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} are measured using coupled reflectometer and correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostics that view the same plasma volume. In addition to the experimental results, two sets of local, nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that are performed with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are described. One set, called the pre-experiment simulations, was performed prior to the experiment in order to predict a change in alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}} given experimentally realizable increases in the electron temperature, T{sub e}. In the experiment the cross-phase angle was measured at three radial locations (rho=0.55, 0.65, and 0.75) in both a 'Base' case and a 'High T{sub e}' case. The measured cross-phase angle is in good qualitative agreement with the pre-experiment simulations, which predicted that n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} would be out of phase. The pre-experiment simulations also predicted a decrease in cross-phase angle as T{sub e} is increased. Experimentally, this trend is observed at the inner two radial locations only. The second set of simulations, the postexperiment simulations, is carried out using local parameters taken from measured experimental profiles as input to GYRO. These postexperiment simulation results are in good quantitative agreement with the measured cross-phase angle, despite disagreements with transport fluxes. Directions for future modeling and experimental work are discussed.

  15. Spinodal amplification of density fluctuations in fluid-dynamical simulations of relativistic nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    Steinheimer, Jan; Randrup, Jørgen

    2012-11-21

    Extending a previously developed two-phase equation of state, we simulate head-on relativistic lead-lead collisions with fluid dynamics, augmented with a finite-range term, and study the effects of the phase structure on the evolution of the baryon density. For collision energies that bring the bulk of the system into the mechanically unstable spinodal region of the phase diagram, the density irregularities are being amplified significantly. The resulting density clumping may be exploited as a signal of the phase transition, possibly through an enhanced production of composite particles.

  16. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-01-01

    A new molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of gas density and radial velocity component in the plumes of high speed jets. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. The PC based data acquisition system is capable of simultaneous sampling of velocity and density at rates to 100 kHz and data record lengths to 10 million. Velocity and density power spectra and velocity-density cross spectra are presented for a subsonic jet, an underexpanded screeching jet, and for Mach 1.4 and Mach 1.8 supersonic jets. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition.

  17. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-04-01

    A new molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of gas density and radial velocity component in the plumes of high speed jets. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. The PC based data acquisition system is capable of simultaneous sampling of velocity and density at rates to 100 kHz and data record lengths to 10 million. Velocity and density power spectra and velocity-density cross spectra are presented for a subsonic jet, an underexpanded screeching jet, and for Mach 1.4 and Mach 1.8 supersonic jets. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition.

  18. Continuously varying critical order-parameter fluctuations in a parity conserving absorbing-state transition with long-range diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laise, T.; Barros, P.; Argolo, C.; Lyra, M. L.

    2016-11-01

    We study the critical order parameter fluctuations of the absorbing-state phase-transition exhibited by branching and annihilating random walkers performing anomalous diffusion in a linear chain. The diffusion process is considered to follow a power-law distribution of jump lengths with a typical decay exponent α. We focus in the case of parity conserving dynamics for which deviations from the usual directed percolation universality class have been previously demonstrated even for the limiting cases of normal diffusion. Anomalous diffusion induces a continuous change of the critical exponents. By performing a finite-size scaling analysis of simulation data, we show that the critical order parameter moment ratio also varies continuously with α. We unveil that the critical order parameter distribution evolves from a nearly Gaussian to an exponential form as the range of the jump distribution is increased up to the limit α =5/2 on which the active state predominates for any finite branching probability.

  19. A phase contrast imaging–interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-11-15

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. This work describes the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI–interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10.6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density fluctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz

  20. Local Density Fluctuations Predict Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Azobenzene-Modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Kingsland, Addie; Samai, Soumyadyuti; Yan, Yunqi; Ginger, David S; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-08-04

    Azobenzene incorporated into DNA has a photoisomerization quantum yield that depends on the DNA sequence near the azobenzene attachment site. We use Molecular Dynamics computer simulations to elucidate which physical properties of the modified DNA determine the quantum yield. We show for a wide range of DNA sequences that the photoisomerization quantum yield is strongly correlated with the variance of the number of atoms in close proximity to the outer phenyl ring of the azobenzene group. We infer that quantum yield is controlled by the availability of fluctuations that enable the conformational change. We demonstrate that these simulations can be used as a qualitative predictive tool by calculating the quantum yield for several novel DNA sequences, and confirming these predictions using UV-vis spectroscopy. Our results will be useful for the development of a wide range of applications of photoresponsive DNA nanotechnology.

  1. Influence of density fluctuations on the O-X mode conversion and on microwave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, A.; Williams, T.; Vann, R.; Holzhauer, E.; Leddy, J.; O'Brien, M.; Ramisch, M.

    2015-03-01

    Full-wave simulations are performed in order to investigate the interaction of plasma density perturbations and microwaves. The perturbations are divided into two cases: A single blob-like structure and a fully turbulent density profile. The resulting scattering of a microwave beam and the effect on the O-X mode conversion are presented for both cases. Quantitative analyses are performed as a function of the average size and position of the perturbations. The usage of spatial coordinates normalized to the vacuum wavelength of the microwave allows to easily adopt the results to a specific problem.

  2. Constraints upon the Cosmological Density Parameter from Tully-Fisher observations of the IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Joshua

    Mapping galaxy peculiar velocities, or departures from the uniform expansion of the universe, on megaparsec scales promises to indicate whether number density fluctuations in galaxy counts trace density fluctuations in the underlying matter (to within some factor beta), and, if so, to constrain the cosmological density parameter Omega, which dictates whether space will expand forever or one day collapse. To sample the peculiar velocity field to distances approaching that of the RydraCentaurus complex (but in all directions) we have extracted an all sky, quasi volume limited sample to 4000 km/sec from the 1.9 Jy 60 micron IRAS redshift survey of Michael Strauss and collaborators. These objects enjoy distance predictions as functions of beta is identically equal to Omega0.6/beta derived from iterative correction of their redshifts for mutual peculiar gravity, which scales with beta. Our volume limited sample most efficiently probes the cosmic flowfield and enjoys objective and uniform selection criteria whose effects upon inferred quantities can be probed with simulations. We have sought to measure relative distances to the 251 objects in this sample judged a priori suitable for use in the Tully-Fisher (luminosity - linewidth) relation. The requisite neutral hydrogen radio spectra and near infrared CCD photometry have been obtained for about one half of these objects. Methods of reducing the radio and CCD (charge coupled device) data are explained in detail. Isophotal I band magnitudes are reproduced by independent observations to approximately 0.05 magnitudes precision. Errors and biases in neutral hydrogen linewidths at low signal to noise ratio are quantified. The I band magnitude and 21 cm linewidth data imply a Tully-Fisher (TF) relation at each value of beta from 0.05 to 2.00 used by Strauss et al., to iterate the IRAS redshift catalog. The beta value producing minimum apparent TF scatter is investigated as a diagnostic with extensive Monte Carlo simulations

  3. Multichannel Microwave Interferometer for Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Density and its Fluctuation on HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peiwan; Shi, Zhongbing; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Boyu; Li, Yonggao; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong

    2016-07-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer system has been developed on the HL-2A tokomak. Its working frequency is well designed to avoid the fringe jump effect. Taking the structure of HL-2A into account, its antennas are installed in the horizontal direction, i.e. one launcher in high field side (HFS) and four receivers in low field side (LFS). The fan-shaped measurement area covers those regions where the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are active. The heterodyne technique contributes to its high temporal resolution (1 μs). It is possible for the multichannel system to realize simultaneous measurements of density and its fluctuation. The quadrature phase detection based on the zero-crossing method is introduced to density measurement. With this system, reliable line-averaged densities and density profiles are obtained. The location of the saturated internal kink mode can be figured out from the mode showing different intensities on four channels, and the result agrees well with that measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI). supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104002, 2013GB107002, 2014GB107001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475058, 11475057, 11261140326, 11405049)

  4. Fluctuation of Density of States for 1d Schrödinger Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Fumihiko

    2017-03-01

    We consider the 1d Schrödinger operator with random decaying potential and compute the 2nd term asymptotics of the density of states, which shows substantial differences between the cases α > 1/2, α < 1/2 and α = 1/2.

  5. Study of minima of the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity using GCMT catalogue in global scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Stavros-Richard G.; Sarlis, Nicholas V.; Skordas, Efthimios S.

    2016-04-01

    It has been recently shown [1,2] that earthquakes of magnitude M greater or equal to 7 are globally correlated. The identification of this correlation became possible when studying the variance κ1 of natural time which has been proposed as an order parameter for seismicity[3,4]. In the present study, we focus on the behaviour of the fluctuations of κ1 before major earthquakes using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalogue for a magnitude threshold Mthres=5.0 as in Ref.[5]. Natural time analysis reveals that distinct minima of the fluctuations κ1of seismicity appear within almost five and a half months on average before all major earthquakes of magnitude larger than M8.4. This phenomenon corroborates the recent finding [6] that similar minima of seismicity order parameter fluctuations had been observed before all major shallow earthquakes in Japan. Finally, we examine the statistical significance of the results by using ROC graphs [7,8] and the proposed prediction method has a p-value to occur by chance well below 0.1%. The hit rate is 100% with a false alarm rate only 6.67%. An attempt to lower the target earthquake magnitude threshold will be also presented. REFERENCES [1] N. V. Sarlis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 022101 (2011). [2] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Chaos 22, 023123 (2012) [3] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, and E. S. Skordas, Practica of Athens Acad. 76, 294 (2001). [4] P. A. Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, and E. S. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011902 (2002). [5] N.V. Sarlis, S.-R. G. Christopoulos, and E. S. Skordas, Chaos 25, 063110 (2015) [6] N. V. Sarlis et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 13734 (2013) [7] T. Fawcett, Pattern Recognit. Lett. 27, 861 (2006). [8] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Comput. Phys. Commun. 185, 1172 (2014).

  6. Model parameter uncertainty reduction of time series models using data-based learning algorithms for simulating groundwater level fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.; Ha, K.; Ko, K.

    2012-12-01

    Estimation of groundwater level (GWL) fluctuation has been an important and challenging topic in hydrology. In this study, time series models for GWL fluctuation were developed using artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). This study defines 'prediction' as the estimation of GWL when the model includes past GWL measurements in input components and 'forecast' when it uses past GWL estimated values. In order to reduce model parameter uncertainty for GWL forecast, the classic model building process was modified introducing weighting factors to the objective function. The developed models were applied to rainfall and GWL time series data of 5 groundwater monitoring stations in National Groundwater Monitoring Network (NGMN) of Korea: HC, MH, YH, PC and CS station, in order to compare the models' performance for prediction and forecast of GWL fluctuation and evaluate the impact of the weighting factors on model stability. Results showed that root mean squared error (RMSE) values ranged from 0.05 m to 0.11 m for the GWL prediction and 0.072 m to 0.159 m for the GWL forecast. Correlation coefficient values were over 0.91 and 0.87 for the prediction and forecast, respectively. The ANN model was more frequently selected than SVM for the prediction, whereas vice versa for the forecast. In the present study, FC-TS value was defined as RMSE values in the forecast to testing stage for examining the model parameter uncertainty. The FC-TS values decreased significantly when the weighting factors were utilized, which implies that use of the weighting factors reduced the uncertainty of the developed time series models.

  7. Thermal effects on the electron density fluctuation spectra in NIF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Tzoufras, M.; Berger, R.; Brunner, S.; Divol, L.; Michel, P.; Williams, E.; Glenzer, S.

    2012-10-01

    The high flux model of ignition-scale hohlraum plasmas includes the strong thermal flux from the region of laser beam overlap at the entrance hole of the hohlraum along the directions of the inner cone beams. We have examined results of this large heat flow at the kinetic level using Fokker-Planck codes, which reproduce the temperature profile and corresponding electron distribution functions on the millimeter scale of NIF plasmas. Using the first harmonic of the electron distribution, we have identified contributions from the energetic, heat carrying electrons and the return current component within the bulk of the distribution function. In hot NIF plasmas, the heat-carrying electrons have energies (20-40 keV) that are close to resonance with Langmuir waves produced by SRS. By calculating the plasma dielectric function using distribution functions extracted from Fokker-Planck simulations, we have found a significant reduction in the linear Landau damping for the Langmuir waves propagating in the direction of heat flow, potentially contributing to the onset of backward SRS. This effect was further examined in Vlasov simulations and by calculations of the electrostatic fluctuation levels.

  8. Evidence for selection maintaining MHC diversity in a rodent species despite strong density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Andrea C; Herde, Antje; Mazzoni, Camila J; Eccard, Jana A; Sommer, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variation in population size often leads to reduced genetic diversity limiting the adaptive potential of individual populations. Key genes of adaptive variation are encoded by the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) playing an essential role in parasite resistance. How MHC variation persists in rodent populations that regularly experience population bottlenecks remains an important topic in evolutionary genetics. We analysed the consequences of strong population fluctuations on MHC class II DRB exon 2 diversity in two distant common vole (Microtus arvalis) populations in three consecutive years using a high-throughput sequencing approach. In 143 individuals, we detected 25 nucleotide alleles translating into 14 unique amino acid MHC alleles belonging to at least three loci. Thus, the overall allelic diversity and amino acid distance among the remaining MHC alleles, used as a surrogate for the range of pathogenic antigens that can be presented to T-cells, are still remarkably high. Both study populations did not show significant population differentiation between years, but significant differences were found between sites. We concluded that selection processes seem to be strong enough to maintain moderate levels of MHC diversity in our study populations outcompeting genetic drift, as the same MHC alleles were conserved between years. Differences in allele frequencies between populations might be the outcome of different local parasite pressures and/or genetic drift. Further understanding of how pathogens vary across space and time will be crucial to further elucidate the mechanisms maintaining MHC diversity in cyclic populations.

  9. Evolution in population parameters: density-dependent selection or density-dependent fitness?

    PubMed

    Travis, Joseph; Leips, Jeff; Rodd, F Helen

    2013-05-01

    Density-dependent selection is one of earliest topics of joint interest to both ecologists and evolutionary biologists and thus occupies an important position in the histories of these disciplines. This joint interest is driven by the fact that density-dependent selection is the simplest form of feedback between an ecological effect of an organism's own making (crowding due to sustained population growth) and the selective response to the resulting conditions. This makes density-dependent selection perhaps the simplest process through which we see the full reciprocity between ecology and evolution. In this article, we begin by tracing the history of studying the reciprocity between ecology and evolution, which we see as combining the questions of evolutionary ecology with the assumptions and approaches of ecological genetics. In particular, density-dependent fitness and density-dependent selection were critical concepts underlying ideas about adaptation to biotic selection pressures and the coadaptation of interacting species. However, theory points to a critical distinction between density-dependent fitness and density-dependent selection in their influences on complex evolutionary and ecological interactions among coexisting species. Although density-dependent fitness is manifestly evident in empirical studies, evidence of density-dependent selection is much less common. This leads to the larger question of how prevalent and important density-dependent selection might really be. Life-history variation in the least killifish Heterandria formosa appears to reflect the action of density-dependent selection, and yet compelling evidence is elusive, even in this well-studied system, which suggests some important challenges for understanding density-driven feedbacks between ecology and evolution.

  10. Dynamics of supercritical methanol of varying density from first principles simulations: hydrogen bond fluctuations, vibrational spectral diffusion, and orientational relaxation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2013-06-14

    A first principles study of the dynamics of supercritical methanol is carried out by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the fluctuation dynamics of hydroxyl stretch frequencies, hydrogen bonds, dangling hydroxyl groups, and orientation of methanol molecules are investigated for three different densities at 523 K. Apart from the dynamical properties, various equilibrium properties of supercritical methanol such as the local density distributions and structural correlations, hydrogen bonding aspects, frequency-structure correlations, and dipole distributions of methanol molecules are also investigated. In addition to the density dependence of various equilibrium and dynamical properties, their dependencies on dispersion interactions are also studied by carrying out additional simulations using a dispersion corrected density functional for all the systems. It is found that the hydrogen bonding between methanol molecules decreases significantly as we move to the supercritical state from the ambient one. The inclusion of dispersion interactions is found to increase the number of hydrogen bonds to some extent. Calculations of the frequency-structure correlation coefficient reveal that a statistical correlation between the hydroxyl stretch frequency and the nearest hydrogen-oxygen distance continues to exist even at supercritical states of methanol, although it is weakened with increase of temperature and decrease of density. In the supercritical state, the frequency time correlation function is found to decay with two time scales: One around or less than 100 fs and the other in the region of 250-700 fs. It is found that, for supercritical methanol, the times scales of vibrational spectral diffusion are determined by an interplay between the dynamics of hydrogen bonds, dangling OD groups, and inertial rotation of methanol molecules and the roles of these various components are found to vary with density of the supercritical solvent. Effects

  11. Improving hot region prediction by parameter optimization of density clustering in PPI.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xiaolong

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposed an optimized algorithm which combines density clustering of parameter selection with feature-based classification for hot region prediction. First, all the residues are classified by SVM to remove non-hot spot residues, then density clustering of parameter selection is used to find hot regions. In the density clustering, this paper studies how to select input parameters. There are two parameters radius and density in density-based incremental clustering. We firstly fix density and enumerate radius to find a pair of parameters which leads to maximum number of clusters, and then we fix radius and enumerate density to find another pair of parameters which leads to maximum number of clusters. Experiment results show that the proposed method using both two pairs of parameters provides better prediction performance than the other method, and compare these two predictive results, the result by fixing radius and enumerating density have slightly higher prediction accuracy than that by fixing density and enumerating radius. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) for visualization of the 2-dimensional structure of density fluctuations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscatello, C. M.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Ren, X.; Spear, A.; Tobias, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    An imaging diagnostic capable of measuring simultaneously the poloidal and radial structure of density fluctuations is being developed for DIII-D. The success of electron-cyclotron emission imaging developed by UC Davis for DIII-D is a testament to the powerful utility of microwave imaging diagnostics for tokamaks. Since its first deployment on TEXTOR, the MIR concept has undergone several improvements in optical and electronics design. For example, the shape of the wavefront of the probing beam and the curvature of the cutoff layer strongly affect the integrity of the reflected signal. This is addressed with transmitting optical elements that are designed to control the shape of the probing beam. Advances in microwave electronics make it possible to transmit and detect multiple frequencies simultaneously, permitting fluctuation measurements at multiple radial locations. Interesting physics occurs over the entire poloidal cross-section of the plasma, on disparate spatial scales. MIR is flexible in this respect, allowing a remote user to rapidly tune the individual probing frequencies for a variety of correlation studies. Synthetic diagnostic simulations and extensive laboratory tests corroborate our confidence in a successful implementation of MIR on DIII-D.

  13. Fluctuation of the charge density wave in TTF-TCNQ under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Keizo; Weng, Yufeng; Seno, Yuki; Rani Tamilselvan, Natarajan; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Arumugam, Sonachalam; Takashima, Yusaku; Yoshino, Harukazu; Kato, Reizo

    2009-03-01

    Temperature dependence of the resistivity of TTF-TCNQ along the b-(1D)- and a-axes was studied under hydrostatic pressure up to 8 GPa. A striking contrast was seen between the b-(1D)- and a-axes in the power-law dependence of resistivity ρ=ρ0Tα in the metallic region as well as the activation energy in the charge density wave (CDW) insulating state. We note that the careful terminal configuration is essentially important to obtain these properties.

  14. Modeling turbulent compressible flows - The mass fluctuating velocity and squared density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taulbee, D.; Vanosdol, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with single-point closure theory for compressible turbulent flow, including the effects of compressibility on the turbulence. In particular, the combination of the pressure dilatation and the dilatation dissipation, terms which appear on the turbulent kinetic energy equation, are modeled. Model parameters in these transport equations are determined by comparing predictions with boundary layer measurements. Finally, predictions with a k-epsilon model, including the new formulations, are presented for the compressible shear layer.

  15. Impact of finite density on spectroscopic parameters of decuplet baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2016-12-01

    The decuplet baryons, Δ , Σ*, Ξ*, and Ω-, are studied in nuclear matter by using the in-medium QCD sum rules. By fixing the three-momentum of the particles under consideration at the rest frame of the medium, the negative energy contributions are removed. It is obtained that the parameters of the Δ baryon are more affected by the medium against the Ω- state, containing three strange quarks, whose mass and residue are not considerably affected by the medium. We also find the vector and scalar self-energies of these baryons in nuclear matter. By the recent progresses at the P ¯ ANDA experiment at the FAIR and NICA facility, it may be possible to study the in-medium properties of such states, even the multistrange Ξ* and Ω- systems, in the near future.

  16. Influence of monovalent ions on density fluctuations in hydrothermal aqueous solutions by small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Da Silva-Cadoux, Cécile; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Testemale, Denis; Proux, Olivier; Rochas, Cyrille

    2012-01-28

    Synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering measurements on water and alkaline bromine aqueous solutions (XBr, with X = Li, Rb, or Cs) were carried out from ambient to supercritical conditions. The temperature was increased from 300 to 750 K along several isobars between 24 and 35 MPa. The correlation length and the structure factor were extracted from the data following the Ornstein-Zernike formalism. We obtained experimental evidence of the shift of the critical point and isochore and their dependence on the ions concentration (0.33 mol/kg and 1.0 mol/kg). We also observed that the size of the density fluctuations and the structure factor increase with the presence of the ions and that this effect is positively correlated with the atomic number of the cation. These behaviors were compared with ZnBr(2) and NaCl systems from the literature.

  17. Reconstruction of probability density function of intensity fluctuations relevant to free-space laser communications through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Arun K.; Luna, Carlos E.; Idell, Paul S.

    2007-09-01

    A new method of reconstructing and predicting an unknown probability density function (PDF) characterizing the statistics of intensity fluctuations of optical beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence is presented in this paper. The method is based on a series expansion of generalized Laguerre polynomials ; the expansion coefficients are expressed in terms of the higher-order intensity moments of intensity statistics. This method generates the PDF from the data moments without any prior knowledge of specific statistics and converges smoothly. The utility of reconstructed PDF relevant to free-space laser communication in terms of calculating the average bit error rate and probability of fading is pointed out. Simulated numerical results are compared with some known non-Gaussian test PDFs: Log-Normal, Rice-Nakagami and Gamma-Gamma distributions and show excellent agreement obtained by the method developed. The accuracy of the reconstructed PDF is also evaluated.

  18. Anisotropic density fluctuations, plasmons, and Friedel oscillations in nodal line semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental efforts on three-dimensional semimetals, we investigate the static and dynamic density response of the nodal line semimetal by computing the polarizability for both undoped and doped cases. The nodal line semimetal in the absence of doping is characterized by a ring-shape zero energy contour in momentum space, which may be considered as a collection of Dirac points. In the doped case, the Fermi surface has a torus shape and two independent processes of the momentum transfer contribute to the singular features of the polarizability even though we only have a single Fermi surface. In the static limit, there exist two independent singularities in the second derivative of the static polarizability. This results in the highly anisotropic Friedel oscillations which show the angle-dependent algebraic power law and the beat phenomena in the oscillatory electron density near a charged impurity. Furthermore, the dynamical polarizability has two singular lines along {\\hslash }ω =γ p and {\\hslash }ω =γ p{sin}η , where η is the angle between the external momentum {p} and the plane where the nodal ring lies. From the dynamical polarizability, we obtain the plasmon modes in the doped case, which show anisotropic dispersions and angle-dependent plasma frequencies. Qualitative differences between the low and high doping regimes are discussed in light of future experiments.

  19. The response of short-scale density fluctuations to the activity of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes during strong tearing modes on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, G. M.; Li, Y. D.; Li, Q.; Sun, P. J.; Wu, G. J.; Hu, L. Q.; the EAST Team

    2015-08-01

    Beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) during strong tearing modes (TMs) have been frequently observed in fast-electron plasmas of EAST tokamak. The dynamics of the short-scale ({k}\\perp {ρ }s~{1.5-4.3}) density fluctuations during the activity of BAEs with strong TMs has been preliminarily investigated by a tangential CO2 laser collective scattering system. The results suggest the active, but different, response of short-scale density fluctuations to the TMs and BAEs. In the low-frequency (0-10 kHz) part of density fluctuations, there are harmonic oscillations totally corresponding to those of TMs. In the medium-high frequency (10-250 kHz) part of density fluctuations, with the appearance of the BAEs, the medium-high frequency density fluctuations begin to be dominated by several quasi-coherent (QC) modes, and the frequencies of the QC modes seem to be related to the changes of both TMs and BAEs. These results would shed some light on the understanding of the multi-scale interaction physics.

  20. Parameter constraints from weak-lensing tomography of galaxy shapes and cosmic microwave background fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Philipp M.; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-08-01

    Recently, it has been shown that cross-correlating cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and three-dimensional (3D) cosmic shear allows to considerably tighten cosmological parameter constraints. We investigate whether similar improvement can be achieved in a conventional tomographic setup. We present Fisher parameter forecasts for a Euclid-like galaxy survey in combination with different ongoing and forthcoming CMB experiments. In contrast to a fully 3D analysis, we find only marginal improvement. Assuming Planck-like CMB data, we show that including the full covariance of the combined CMB and cosmic shear data improves the dark energy figure of merit (FOM) by only 3 per cent. The marginalized error on the sum of neutrino masses is reduced at the same level. For a next generation CMB satellite mission such as Prism, the predicted improvement of the dark energy FOM amounts to approximately 25 per cent. Furthermore, we show that the small improvement is contrasted by an increased bias in the dark energy parameters when the intrinsic alignment of galaxies is not correctly accounted for in the full covariance matrix.

  1. 95Mo nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of molybdenum hexacarbonyl from density functional theory: appraisal of computational and geometrical parameters.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Sykina, Kateryna; Fontaine, Bruno; Le Pollès, Laurent; Pickard, Chris J; Gautier, Régis

    2011-11-21

    Solid-state (95)Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of molybdenum hexacarbonyl have been computed using density functional theory (DFT) based methods. Both quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters were evaluated and compared with parameters of high precision determined using single-crystal (95)Mo NMR experiments. Within a molecular approach, the effects of major computational parameters, i.e. basis set, exchange-correlation functional, treatment of relativity, have been evaluated. Except for the isotropic parameter of both chemical shift and chemical shielding, computed NMR parameters are more sensitive to geometrical variations than computational details. Relativistic effects do not play a crucial part in the calculations of such parameters for the 4d transition metal, in particular isotropic chemical shift. Periodic DFT calculations were tackled to measure the influence of neighbouring molecules on the crystal structure. These effects have to be taken into account to compute accurate solid-state (95)Mo NMR parameters even for such an inorganic molecular compound.

  2. High-frequency propagating density fluctuations in deeply supercooled water: evidence of a single viscous relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, F; Gapiński, J; Pochylski, M; Ponterio, R C; Saija, F; Salvato, G; Vasi, C

    2013-02-01

    We performed a Brillouin scattering experiment on deeply supercooled water and compared the results with similar literature data obtained both at the same and at higher values of the exchanged wave vector. The whole set of available experimental data can be well reproduced with the use of the generalized hydrodynamic model where all the involved thermodynamic parameters are fixed to their literature values. On the contrary, the model based on the memory function approach generates the wrong estimates for measurables when the same values of the thermodynamic parameters are used. This result confirms our recent criticisms against the utilization of models originating from linear response theory [Phys. Rev. E 84, 051202 (2011)]. The inconsistency between models explains apparent discrepancies between the different conclusions on water acoustic behavior which may be found in the literature. We demonstrate that the observed behavior can be explained by assuming only a single relaxation process that is typical of any viscoelastic system. With all thermodynamics quantities fixed, the hydrodynamic description needs only two parameters to model the experimental data, namely, the relaxation time and the high-frequency limit of the sound velocity. The whole body of the experimental data can be well reproduced when the relaxation time behaves in an Arrhenian manner and the difference between the relaxed and not relaxed sound velocities is a constant. The high-frequency sound velocity is never higher than 2200 m/s. We conclude that, at least from experiments performed within the hydrodynamic regime, there is no indication for a fast sound close to the hypersonic velocity observed in ice.

  3. Dual characterization of critical fluctuations: Density functional theory & nonlinear dynamics close to a tangent bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme-Galván, Mauricio; Robledo, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We improve on the description of the relationship that exists between critical clusters in thermal systems and intermittency near the onset of chaos in low-dimensional systems. We make use of the statistical-mechanical language of inhomogeneous systems and of the renormalization group (RG) method in nonlinear dynamics to provide a more accurate, formal, approach to the subject. The description of this remarkable correspondence encompasses, on the one hand, the density functional formalism, where classical and quantum mechanical analogues match the procedure for one-dimensional clusters, and, on the other, the RG fixed-point map of functional compositions that captures the essential dynamical behavior. We provide details of how the above-referred theoretical approaches interrelate and discuss the implications of the correspondence between the high-dimensional (degrees of freedom) phenomenon and low-dimensional dynamics.

  4. Probabilistic Analysis and Density Parameter Estimation Within Nessus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godines, Cody R.; Manteufel, Randall D.; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    , and 99th percentile of the four responses at the 50 percent confidence level and using the same number of response evaluations for each method. In addition, LHS requires fewer calculations than MC in order to be 99.7 percent confident that a single mean, standard deviation, or 99th percentile estimate will be within at most 3 percent of the true value of the each parameter. Again, this is shown for all of the test cases studied. For that reason it can be said that NESSUS is an important reliability tool that has a variety of sound probabilistic methods a user can employ; furthermore, the newest LHS module is a valuable new enhancement of the program.

  5. X-Ray Fluctuation Power Spectral Densities of Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; George, I. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Kaspi, S.; Lawrence, A.; McHandy, I.; Nandra, K.

    2003-01-01

    By combining complementary monitoring observations spanning long, medium and short time scales, we have constructed power spectral densities (PSDs) of six Seyfert 1 galaxies. These PSDs span approx. greater than 4 orders of magnitude in temporal frequency, sampling variations on time scales ranging from tens of minutes to over a year. In at least four cases, the PSD shows a "break," a significant departure from a power law, typically on time scales of order a few days. This is similar to the behavior of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs), lower mass compact systems with breaks on time scales of seconds. NGC 3783 shows tentative evidence for a doubly-broken power law, a feature that until now has only been seen in the (much better-defined) PSDs of low-state XRBs. It is also interesting that (when one previously-observed object is added to make a small sample of seven), an apparently significant correlation is seen between the break time scale T and the putative black hole mass M(sub BH), while none is seen between break time scale and luminosity. The data are consistent with the linear relation T = M(sub BH) /10(exp 6.5) solar mass; extrapolation over 6-7 orders of magnitude is in reasonable agreement with XRBs. All of this strengthens the case for a physical similarity between Seyfert 1s and XRBs.

  6. X-Ray Fluctuation Power Spectral Densities of Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; George, I. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Kaspi, S.; Lawrence, A.; McHandy, I.; Nandra, K.

    2003-01-01

    By combining complementary monitoring observations spanning long, medium and short time scales, we have constructed power spectral densities (PSDs) of six Seyfert 1 galaxies. These PSDs span approx. greater than 4 orders of magnitude in temporal frequency, sampling variations on time scales ranging from tens of minutes to over a year. In at least four cases, the PSD shows a "break," a significant departure from a power law, typically on time scales of order a few days. This is similar to the behavior of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs), lower mass compact systems with breaks on time scales of seconds. NGC 3783 shows tentative evidence for a doubly-broken power law, a feature that until now has only been seen in the (much better-defined) PSDs of low-state XRBs. It is also interesting that (when one previously-observed object is added to make a small sample of seven), an apparently significant correlation is seen between the break time scale T and the putative black hole mass M(sub BH), while none is seen between break time scale and luminosity. The data are consistent with the linear relation T = M(sub BH) /10(exp 6.5) solar mass; extrapolation over 6-7 orders of magnitude is in reasonable agreement with XRBs. All of this strengthens the case for a physical similarity between Seyfert 1s and XRBs.

  7. EoS of finite density QCD with Wilson fermions by multi-parameter reweighting and Taylor expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Keitaro; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2012-04-01

    The equation of state (EoS), quark number density and susceptibility at nonzero quark chemical potential μ are studied in lattice QCD simulations with a clover improved Wilson fermion of 2-flavors and RG-improved gauge action. To access nonzero μ, we employ two methods: a multi-parameter reweighting (MPR) in μ and β and Taylor expansion in μ/T. The use of a reduction formula for the Wilson fermion determinant enables to study the reweighting factor in MPR explicitly and higher-order coefficients in Taylor expansion free from errors of noise method, although calculations are limited to small lattice size. As a consequence, we can study the reliability of the thermodynamical quantities through the consistency of the two methods, each of which has different origin of the application limit. The thermodynamical quantities are obtained from simulations on a 83 × 4 lattice with an intermediate quark mass( m PS /m V = 0 .8). The MPR and Taylor expansion are consistent for the EoS and number density up to μ/T ~ 0 .8 and for the number susceptibility up to μ/T ~ 0 .6. This implies within a given statistics that the overlap problem for the MPR and truncation error for the Taylor expansion method are negligible in these regions. In order to make MPR methods work, the fluctuation of the reweighting factor should be small. We derive the equation of the reweighting line where the fluctuation is small, and show that the equation of the reweighting line is consistent with the fluctuation minimum condition.

  8. Discriminating between Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Physisorbed Adsorbates: Role of Wavelike Charge-Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wang; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating between metallic (M ) and semiconducting (S ) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) remains a fundamental challenge in the field of nanotechnology. We address this issue by studying the adsorption of the isotropic atoms Xe, Kr, and a highly anisotropic molecule n heptane on M - and S -SWNTs with density functional theory that includes many-body dispersion forces. We find that the distinct polarizabilities of M - and S -SWNTs exhibit significantly different physisorption properties, which are also strongly controlled by the SWNT's diameter, adsorption site, adsorbate coverage, and the adsorbate's anisotropy. These findings stem from the wavelike nature of charge-density fluctuations in SWNTs. Particularly, these results allow us to rationalize the unusual √{3 }×√{3 }R 3 00 phase of Kr atoms on small gap M -SWNTs and the double desorption peak temperatures of n heptane on M -SWNTs in experiments, and also propose the n heptane as an effective sensor for experimentally discriminating M - and S -SWNTs.

  9. A phase contrast imaging–interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. Here, we describe the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI-interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10:6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density uctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz < f < 5MHz and 0 cm-1 ≤ k ≤ 20 cm-1), allowing simultaneous measurement of ion- and electron-scale instabilities. Further, correlating our interferometer's measurements with those from DIII-D's pre-existing, toroidally separated interferometer allows core-localized, low-n MHD studies that may otherwise be inaccessiblemore » via external magnetic measurements. In the combined diagnostic's small port requirements and minimal access restrictions make it well-suited to the harsh neutron environments and limited port space expected in next-step devices.« less

  10. A phase contrast imaging–interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-08-15

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. Here, we describe the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI-interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10:6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density uctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz < f < 5MHz and 0 cm-1 ≤ k ≤ 20 cm-1), allowing simultaneous measurement of ion- and electron-scale instabilities. Further, correlating our interferometer's measurements with those from DIII-D's pre-existing, toroidally separated interferometer allows core-localized, low-n MHD studies that may otherwise be inaccessible via external magnetic measurements. In the combined diagnostic's small port requirements and minimal access restrictions make it well-suited to the harsh neutron environments and limited port space expected in next-step devices.

  11. Long-range correlations of density fluctuations in the Kerner-Klenov-Wolf cellular automata three-phase traffic flow model.

    PubMed

    Wu, J J; Sun, H J; Gao, Z Y

    2008-09-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a useful tool to measure the long-range power-law correlations in 1f noise. In this paper, we investigate the power-law dynamics behavior of the density fluctuation time series generated by the famous Kerner-Klenov-Wolf cellular automata model in road traffic. Then the complexities of spatiotemporal, average speed, and the average density have been analyzed in detail. By introducing the DFA method, our main observation is that the free flow and wide moving jam phases correspond to the long-range anticorrelations. On the contrary, at the synchronized flow phase, the long-range correlated property is observed.

  12. Ultrasonic parameters of renal calculi and gall bladder stones as a function of density.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R

    1998-01-01

    In this investigation, ultrasonic parameters of complex renal calculi and gall bladder stones, in vitro are measured using a double-probe contact by pulse-echo technique. Due to the variation in the chemical composition of the stones, a large variation in the value of ultrasonic parameters is found. A correlation between ultrasonic parameters and various renal calculi and gall bladder stone pathologies are also discussed. The ultrasonic parameters are found to vary as a function of density of the specimen used.

  13. The effect of Electron Cyclotron Heating on density fluctuations at ion and electron scales in ITER Baseline Scenario discharges on the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Marinoni, Alessandro; Pinsker, Robert I.; Porkolab, Miklos; ...

    2017-08-01

    Experiments simulating the ITER Baseline Scenario on the DIII-D tokamak show that torque-free pure electron heating, when coupled to plasmas subject to a net co-current beam torque, affects density fluctuations at electron scales on a sub-confinement time scale, whereas fluctuations at ion scales change only after profiles have evolved to a new stationary state. Modifications to the density fluctuations measured by the Phase Contrast Imaging diagnostic (PCI) are assessed by analyzing the time evolution following the switch-off of Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH), thus going from mixed beam/ECH to pure neutral beam heating at fixed β N . Within 20 msmore » after turning off ECH, the intensity of fluctuations is observed to increase at frequencies higher than 200 kHz; in contrast, fluctuations at lower frequency are seen to decrease in intensity on a longer time scale, after other equilibrium quantities have evolved. Non-linear gyro-kinetic modeling at ion and electron scales scales suggest that, while the low frequency response of the diagnostic is consistent with the dominant ITG modes being weakened by the slow-time increase in flow shear, the high frequency response is due to prompt changes to the electron temperature profile that enhance electron modes and generate a larger heat flux and an inward particle pinch. Furthermore, these results suggest that electron heated regimes in ITER will feature multi-scale fluctuations that might affect fusion performance via modifications to profiles.« less

  14. Density functional study of EPR parameters and spin-density distribution of azurin and other blue copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Remenyi, Christian; Reviakine, Roman; Kaupp, Martin

    2007-07-19

    Modern density functional methods have been used to study spin-density distribution, g tensors, as well as Cu and ligand hyperfine tensors for azurin models, for two more blue copper proteins plastocyanin and stellacyanin, and for small model complexes. The aim was to establish a consistent computational protocol that provides a realistic description of the EPR parameters as probes of the spin-density distribution between metal and coordinated ligands in copper proteins. In agreement with earlier conclusions for plastocyanin, hybrid functionals with appreciable exact-exchange admixtures, roughly around 50%, provide the best overall agreement with all parameters. Then the bulk of the spin density is almost equally shared by the copper atom and the sulfur atom of the equatorial cysteine ligand, and the best values are obtained for copper, histidine nitrogen, and cysteine beta-proton hyperfine couplings, as well as for g(parallel). Spin-orbit effects on the EPR parameters may be appreciable and have to be treated carefully to obtain agreement with experiment. Most notably, spin-orbit effects on the (65)Cu hyperfine coupling tensors in blue copper sites are unusually large compared to more regularly coordinated Cu(II) complexes with similar spin density on copper. In addition to the often emphasized high covalency of the Cu-S(Cys) bond, the characteristically small A(parallel) component of blue copper proteins is shown to derive to a large part from a near-cancellation between negative first-order (Fermi contact and dipolar) and unusually large positive second-order (spin-orbital) contributions. The large spin-orbit effects relate to the distorted tetrahedral structures. Square planar dithiolene complexes with similar spin density on copper exhibit much more negative A(parallel) values, as the cancellation between nonrelativistic and spin-orbit contributions is less complete. Calculations on a selenocysteine-substituted variant of azurin have provided further insight

  15. Dynamic structure factor of density fluctuations from direct imaging very near (both above and below) the critical point of SF(6).

    PubMed

    Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel A; Bayley, Brittany; Hegseth, John J; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre-Chabot, Carole; Beysens, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Large density fluctuations were observed by illuminating a cylindrical cell filled with sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), very near its liquid-gas critical point (|T-T(c)|< 300 μK) and recorded using a microscope with 3 μm spatial resolution. Using a dynamic structure factor algorithm, we determined from the recorded images the structure factor (SF), which measures the spatial distribution of fluctuations at different moments, and the correlation time of fluctuations. This method authorizes local measurements in contrast to the classical scattering techniques that average fluctuations over the illuminating beam. We found that during the very early stages of phase separation the SF scales with the wave vector q according to the Lorentzian q(-2), which shows that the liquid and vapor domains are just emerging. The critical wave number, which is related to the characteristic length of fluctuations, steadily decreases over time, supporting a sustained increase in the spatial scale of the fluctuating domains. The scaled evolution of the critical wave number obeys the universal evolution for the interconnected domains at high volume fraction with an apparent power law exponent of -0.35 ± 0.02. We also determined the correlation time of the fluctuations and inferred values for thermal diffusivity coefficient very near the critical point, above and below. The values were used to pinpoint the crossing of T(c) within 13 μK.

  16. Double density dynamics: realizing a joint distribution of a physical system and a parameter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Moritsugu, Kei

    2015-11-01

    To perform a variety of types of molecular dynamics simulations, we created a deterministic method termed ‘double density dynamics’ (DDD), which realizes an arbitrary distribution for both physical variables and their associated parameters simultaneously. Specifically, we constructed an ordinary differential equation that has an invariant density relating to a joint distribution of the physical system and the parameter system. A generalized density function leads to a physical system that develops under nonequilibrium environment-describing superstatistics. The joint distribution density of the physical system and the parameter system appears as the Radon-Nikodym derivative of a distribution that is created by a scaled long-time average, generated from the flow of the differential equation under an ergodic assumption. The general mathematical framework is fully discussed to address the theoretical possibility of our method, and a numerical example representing a 1D harmonic oscillator is provided to validate the method being applied to the temperature parameters.

  17. Increase in the Random Dopant Induced Threshold Fluctuations and Lowering in Sub 100 nm MOSFETs Due to Quantum Effects: A 3-D Density-Gradient Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Slavcheva, G.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.; Saini, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed simulation study of the influence of quantum mechanical effects in the inversion layer on random dopant induced threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering in sub 100 nm MOSFETs. The simulations have been performed using a 3-D implementation of the density gradient (DG) formalism incorporated in our established 3-D atomistic simulation approach. This results in a self-consistent 3-D quantum mechanical picture, which implies not only the vertical inversion layer quantisation but also the lateral confinement effects related to current filamentation in the 'valleys' of the random potential fluctuations. We have shown that the net result of including quantum mechanical effects, while considering statistical dopant fluctuations, is an increase in both threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering. At the same time, the random dopant induced threshold voltage lowering partially compensates for the quantum mechanical threshold voltage shift in aggressively scaled MOSFETs with ultrathin gate oxides.

  18. Doppler backscattering for spherical tokamaks and measurement of high-k density fluctuation wavenumber spectrum in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.; Meyer, H.; Meakins, A.; Field, A. R.; Dunai, D.; Carr, M.; Hawkes, N.; the MAST Team

    2015-07-01

    The high-k (7≲ {{k}\\bot}{ρi}≲ 11 ) wavenumber spectrum of density fluctuations has been measured for the first time in MAST (Lloyd et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 1665). This was accomplished with the first implementation of Doppler backscattering (DBS) for core measurements in a spherical tokamak. DBS has become a well-established and versatile diagnostic technique for the measurement of intermediate- k ({{k}\\bot}{ρi}˜ 1 , and higher) density fluctuations and flows in magnetically confined fusion experiments. Previous implementations of DBS for core measurements have been in standard, large aspect ratio tokamaks. A novel implementation with two-dimensional (2D) steering was necessary to enable DBS measurements in MAST, where the large variation of the magnetic field pitch angle presents a challenge. We report on the scattering considerations and ray tracing calculations used to optimize the design and present data demonstrating measurement capabilities. Initial results confirm the applicability of the design and implementation approaches, showing the strong dependence of scattering alignment on the toroidal launch angle and demonstrating that DBS is sensitive to the local magnetic field pitch angle. We also present comparisons of DBS plasma velocity measurements with charge exchange recombination and beam emission spectroscopy measurements, which show reasonable agreement over most of the minor radius, but imply large poloidal flows approaching the magnetic axis in a discharge with an internal transport barrier. The 2D steering is shown to enable high-k measurements with DBS, at {{k}\\bot}>20 cm-1 ({{k}\\bot}{ρi}>10 ) for launch frequencies less than 75 GHz; this capability is used to measure the wavenumber spectrum of turbulence and we find \\mid n≤ft({{k}\\bot}\\right){{\\mid}2}\\propto k\\bot-4.7+/- 0.2 for {{k}\\bot}{ρi}≈ 7 -11, which is similar to the expectation for the turbulent kinetic cascade of \\mid n≤ft({{k}\\bot}\\right){{\\mid}2}\\propto

  19. Finest light curve details, physical parameters, and period fluctuations of CoRoT RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkő, J. M.; Szabó, R.; Derekas, A.; Sódor, Á.

    2016-12-01

    The CoRoT satellite supplied the scientific community with a huge data base of variable stars. Among them the RR Lyrae stars have intensively been discussed in numerous papers in the last few years, but the latest runs have not been checked to find RR Lyrae stars up to now. Our main goal was to fill this gap and complete the CoRoT RR Lyrae sample. We found nine unstudied RR Lyrae stars. Seven of them are new discoveries. We identified three new Blazhko stars. The Blazhko effect shows non-strictly repetitive nature for all stars. The frequency spectrum of the Blazhko star CoRoT 104948132 contains second overtone frequency with the highest known period ratio. The harmonic amplitude and phase declines with the harmonic order were studied for non-Blazhko stars. We found a period dependent but similar shape amplitude decline for all stars. We discovered significant random period fluctuation for one of the two oversampled target, CM Ori. After a successful transformation of the CoRoT band parameters to the Johnson V values we estimated the basic physical properties such as mass, luminosity, metallicity. The sample can be divided into two subgroups with respect to the metallicity but otherwise the physical parameters are in the canonical range of RR Lyrae stars.

  20. Effects of level density parameter on the superheavy production in cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Alavi, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    By using semiclassical method and considering Woods-Saxon and Coulomb potentials, the level density parameter a was calculated for three superheavy nuclei 270110, 278112 and 290116. Obtained results showed that the value of level density parameter of these nuclei is near to the simple relation a ≈ A/10. In framework of the dinuclear system model, the effects of level density parameter on the probability of the formation of a compound nucleus, the ratio of neutron emission width and fission width, and evaporation residue cross-section of three cold fusion reactions 62Ni+208Pb, 70Zn+208Pb and 82Se+208Pb, leading to superheavy elements were investigated. The findings indicate that the level density parameter play a significant role in calculations of heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions. The obtained results in the case of a = A/12 have larger values in comparison with calculated level density parameter with Woods-Saxon potential (aWS) and a = A/10. The theoretical results of the evaporation residue cross-section are very sensitive to the choice of level density parameter. The calculated values with aWS are in good agreement with experimental values.

  1. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  2. Opening a nodal gap by fluctuating spin-density wave in lightly doped La2 -xSrxCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapon, Itzik; Ellis, David S.; Drachuck, Gil; Bazalitski, Galina; Weschke, Eugen; Schierle, Enrico; Strempfer, Jörg; Niedermayer, Christof; Keren, Amit

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether the spin or charge degrees of freedom are responsible for the nodal gap in underdoped cuprates by performing inelastic neutron scattering and x-ray diffraction measurements on La2 -xSrxCuO4 , which is on the edge of the antiferromagnetic phase. We found that a fluctuating incommensurate spin-density wave (SDW) with a bottom part of an hourglass dispersion exists even in this magnetic sample. The strongest component of these fluctuations diminishes at the same temperature where the nodal gap opens. X-ray scattering measurements on the same crystal show no signature of a charge-density wave (CDW). Therefore, we suggest that the nodal gap in the electronic band of this cuprate opens due to fluctuating SDW with no contribution from CDW.

  3. Transport of Carbon Tetrachloride in a Fractured Vadose Zone due to Atmospheric Pressure Fluctuations, Diffusion, and Vapor Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Downs, W.; Falta, R. W.; Housley, T.

    2005-12-01

    DNAPL sources of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vapors are of interest at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The site is underlain by thick fractured basalt that includes sedimentary interbeds, each are a few meters thick. Daily atmospheric pressure fluctuations serve as driving forces for CT vapor transport in the subsurface. Other important transport processes for vapor movement include gas-phase diffusion and density-driven transport. The objective of this research is to investigate the influence and relative importance of these processes on gaseous transport of CT. Gas pressure and vapor concentration measurements were conducted at various depths in two wells. A numerical multiphase flow model (TOUGH2), calibrated to field pressure data, is used to conduct sensitivity analyses to elucidate the importance of the different transport mechanisms. Results show that the basalt is highly permeable to vertical air flow. The pressure dampening occurs mainly in the sedimentary interbeds. Model-calibrated permeability values for the interbeds are similar to those obtained in a study by the U.S. Geological Survey for shallow sediments, and an order of magnitude higher than column-scale values obtained by previous studies conducted by INEEL scientists. The transport simulations indicate that considering the effect of barometric pressure changes is critical to simulating transport of pollutants in the vadose zone above the DNAPL source. Predicted concentrations can be orders of magnitude smaller than actual concentrations if the effect is not considered. Below the DNAPL vapor source, accounting for density and diffusion alone would yield acceptable results provided that a 20% error in concentrations are acceptable, and that simulating concentrations trends (and not actual concentrations) is the primary goal.

  4. Correlations of Entangled Systems from Fluctuations of the Prequantum Field: the Case of an Arbitrary Density Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-05-01

    Prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT) is a new attempt to consider quantum mechanics (QM) as an emergent phenomenon, cf. with De Broglie's "double solution" approach, Bohmian mechanics, stochastic electrodynamics (SED), Nelson's stochastic QM and its generalization by Davidson, `t Hooft's models and their development by Elze. PCSFT is a comeback to a purely wave viewpoint on QM, cf. with early Schrödinger. There is no quantum particles at all, only waves. In particular, photons are simply wave-pulses of the classical electromagnetic field, cf. SED. Moreover, even massive particles are special "prequantum fields": the electron field, the neutron field and so on. PCSFT claims that (soon or later) people will be able to measure components of these fields: components of the "photonic field" (the classical electromagnetic field of low intensity), electronic field, neutronic field and so on. However, at the moment (in this paper) we restrict our efforts to reproduce "simply" predictions of QM in the classical field framework. We will show that correlations of entangled systems can be obtained from fluctuations of the prequantum field. We consider the most general case: in QM the state is given by the density operator.

  5. A Cutoff in the X-Ray Fluctuation Power Density Spectrum of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Rick; Nandra, Kirpal

    1999-01-01

    During 1997 March-July, RXTE observed the bright, strongly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 once every approx. 12.8 hr for 4.5 months and nearly continuously (with interruptions due to SAA passage but not Earth occultation) for a 4.2 day period in the middle. These were followed by ongoing monitoring once every approx. 4.3 days. These data are used to construct the first well-determined X-ray fluctuation power density spectrum (PDS) of an active galaxy to span more than 4 decades of usable temporal frequency. The PDS shows no signs of any strict or quasi-periodicity, but does show a progressive flattening of the power-low slope from -1.74 at short time scales to -0.73 at longer time scales. This is the clearest observation to date of the long-predicted cutoff in the PDS. The characteristic variability time scale corresponding to this cutoff temporal frequency is approx. 1 month. Although it is unclear how this time scale may be interpreted in terms of a physical size or process, there are several promising candidate models. The PDS appears similar to those seen for Galactic black hole candidates such as Cyg X-1, suggesting that these two classes of objects with very different luminosities and putative black hole masses (differing by more than a factor of 10(exp 5)) may have similar X-ray generation processes and structures.

  6. Influence of additive laser manufacturing parameters on surface using density of partially melted particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Benoit; Brient, Antoine; Samper, Serge; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-01

    Mastering the additive laser manufacturing surface is a real challenge and would allow functional surfaces to be obtained without finishing. Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) surfaces are composed by directional and chaotic textures that are directly linked to the process principles. The aim of this work is to obtain surface topographies by mastering the operating process parameters. Based on experimental investigation, the influence of operating parameters on the surface finish has been modeled. Topography parameters and multi-scale analysis have been used in order to characterize the DMD obtained surfaces. This study also proposes a methodology to characterize DMD chaotic texture through topography filtering and 3D image treatment. In parallel, a new parameter is proposed: density of particles (D p). Finally, this study proposes a regression modeling between process parameters and density of particles parameter.

  7. Accuracy of Determination of the Parameters of Exotic Nuclei Nuclear Density Distributions in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measure interaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on interaction cross section with reaction cross-sections calculated using expressions obtained in the Glauber Model and its optical approximation. These calculations are performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach to calculating the interaction and reaction cross-sections. The dependence of the accuracy of the density parameters of various exotic nuclei on the ``quality'' of the random numbers chains (here, ``quality'' is defined by lag-1 autocorrelation time of a sequence of random numbers) is obtained for the Gaussian density distribution for a core and the Gaussian density distribution for a halo. KY NSF EPSCoR Research Scholars Program.

  8. GPS analysis of human locomotion: further evidence for long-range correlations in stride-to-stride fluctuations of gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Philippe; Turner, Vincent; Schutz, Yves

    2005-02-01

    During free walking, gait is automatically adjusted to provide optimal mechanical output and minimal energy expenditure; gait parameters, such as cadence, fluctuate from one stride to the next around average values. It was described that this fluctuation exhibited long-range correlations and fractal-like patterns. In addition, it was suggested that these long-range correlations disappeared if the participant followed the beep of metronome to regulate his or her pace. Until now, these fractal fluctuations were only observed for stride interval, because no technique existed to adequately analyze an extended time of free walking. The aim of the present study was to measure walking speed (WS), step frequency (SF) and step length (SL) with high accuracy (<1 cm) satellite positioning method (global positioning system or GPS) in order to detect long-range correlations in the stride-to-stride fluctuations. Eight participants walked 30 min under free and constrained (metronome) conditions. Under free walking conditions, DFA (detrended fluctuation analysis) and surrogate data tests showed that the fluctuation of WS, SL and SF exhibited a fractal pattern (i.e., scaling exponent alpha: 0.5 < alpha < 1) in a large majority of participants (7/8). Under constrained conditions (metronome), SF fluctuations became significantly anti-correlated (alpha < 0.5) in all participants. However, the scaling exponent of SL and WS was not modified. We conclude that, when the walking pace is controlled by an auditory signal, the feedback loop between the planned movement (at supraspinal level) and the sensory inputs induces a continual shifting of SF around the mean (persistent anti-correlation), but with no effect on the fluctuation dynamics of the other parameters (SL, WS).

  9. Centrality dependence of chemical freeze-out parameters from net-proton and net-charge fluctuations using a hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Rama Prasad; Das, Supriya; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Ray, Rajarshi; Samanta, Subhasis

    2017-07-01

    We estimate chemical freeze-out parameters in Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) and Excluded Volume HRG (EVHRG) models by fitting the experimental information of net-proton and net-charge fluctuations measured in Au + Au collisions by the STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We observe that chemical freeze-out parameters obtained from lower and higher order fluctuations are almost the same for √{sNN}>27 GeV, but tend to deviate from each other at lower √{sNN}. Moreover, these separations increase with decrease of √{sNN}, and for a fixed √{sNN} increase towards central collisions. Furthermore, we observe an approximate scaling behavior of (μB/T ) /(μB/T)central with (Npart) /(Npart)central for the parameters estimated from lower order fluctuations for 11.5 ≤√{sNN}≤200 GeV. Scaling is violated for the parameters estimated from higher order fluctuations for √{sNN}=11.5 and 19.6 GeV. It is observed that the chemical freeze-out parameter, which can describe σ2/M of net protons very well in all energies and centralities, cannot describe the s σ equally well, and vice versa.

  10. Measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations using far-forward collective scattering and interferometric techniques in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Chapman, Brett; Sarff, John; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Lin, Liang

    2012-10-01

    In standard RFP plasmas, transport is governed by magnetic fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. For improved-confinement plasmas using inductive current profile control (PPCD), smaller-scale fluctuations at higher frequencies might become important for transport, especially drift-wave-like instabilities which may be theoretically unstable for the larger temperature gradients achieved. On the MST-RFP, an 11-chord laser-based diagnostic with ˜8 cm chord spacing is and frequency 694 GHz used to measure electron density fluctuations both interferometrically and by far-forward collective scattering. The existing diagnostic configuration measures the line-integrated fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering a wavenumber range k<1.3 cm-1, corresponding to kρs <1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius). Of particular interest is comparing fluctuations in standard and PPCD plasmas. Relative to standard plasmas, tearing mode and higher frequency broadband fluctuations (up to 600 kHz) are suppressed with PPCD. This suppression in PPCD plasmas corresponds to the improved confinement. A diagnostic upgrade, in progress, will improve sensitivity and cover shorter wavelengths. Work supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  11. Quantiles, parametric-select density estimation, and bi-information parameter estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parzen, E.

    1982-01-01

    A quantile-based approach to statistical analysis and probability modeling of data is presented which formulates statistical inference problems as functional inference problems in which the parameters to be estimated are density functions. Density estimators can be non-parametric (computed independently of model identified) or parametric-select (approximated by finite parametric models that can provide standard models whose fit can be tested). Exponential models and autoregressive models are approximating densities which can be justified as maximum entropy for respectively the entropy of a probability density and the entropy of a quantile density. Applications of these ideas are outlined to the problems of modeling: (1) univariate data; (2) bivariate data and tests for independence; and (3) two samples and likelihood ratios. It is proposed that bi-information estimation of a density function can be developed by analogy to the problem of identification of regression models.

  12. Quantiles, parametric-select density estimation, and bi-information parameter estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parzen, E.

    1982-01-01

    A quantile-based approach to statistical analysis and probability modeling of data is presented which formulates statistical inference problems as functional inference problems in which the parameters to be estimated are density functions. Density estimators can be non-parametric (computed independently of model identified) or parametric-select (approximated by finite parametric models that can provide standard models whose fit can be tested). Exponential models and autoregressive models are approximating densities which can be justified as maximum entropy for respectively the entropy of a probability density and the entropy of a quantile density. Applications of these ideas are outlined to the problems of modeling: (1) univariate data; (2) bivariate data and tests for independence; and (3) two samples and likelihood ratios. It is proposed that bi-information estimation of a density function can be developed by analogy to the problem of identification of regression models.

  13. The origin of the long time correlations of the density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of the Tore Supra Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.

    2005-05-01

    It is shown that intermittent density bursts observed in the scrape-off layer of Tore Supra [J. Jacquinot, Nucl. Fusion 43, 1583 (2003)] are detected in packs on the probe. In such a pack, typically two to three bursts are separated by time intervals smaller than the mean separation time. The long tails above 50μs observed on the autocorrelation function of the density fluctuations are found to be the temporal correlation between the individual bursts within their pack. Packs of density bursts can be detected in two limiting states of the turbulence: when the coupling between density and potential is strong and large density bursts split during their radial propagation or at the opposite when the coupling is weak so that different density bursts can propagate radially along the potential valleys. The lack of spatial resolution of the diagnostic does not allow to discriminate between the two mechanisms.

  14. The origin of the long time correlations of the density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of the Tore Supra Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Devynck, P.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.

    2005-05-15

    It is shown that intermittent density bursts observed in the scrape-off layer of Tore Supra [J. Jacquinot, Nucl. Fusion 43, 1583 (2003)] are detected in packs on the probe. In such a pack, typically two to three bursts are separated by time intervals smaller than the mean separation time. The long tails above 50 {mu}s observed on the autocorrelation function of the density fluctuations are found to be the temporal correlation between the individual bursts within their pack. Packs of density bursts can be detected in two limiting states of the turbulence: when the coupling between density and potential is strong and large density bursts split during their radial propagation or at the opposite when the coupling is weak so that different density bursts can propagate radially along the potential valleys. The lack of spatial resolution of the diagnostic does not allow to discriminate between the two mechanisms.

  15. Using intra annual density fluctuations and d13C to assess the impact of summer drought on Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battipaglia, G.; Brand, W. A.; Linke, P.; Schaefer, I.; Noetzli, M.; Cherubini, P.

    2009-04-01

    Tree- ring growth and wood density have been used extensively as indicators of climate change, and tree-ring has been commonly applied as a proxy estimate for seasonal integration of temperatures and precipitation with annual resolution (Hughes 2002). While these relationships have been well established in temperate ecosystems (Fritts, 1976; Schweingruber, 1988, Briffa et al., 1998, 2004), in Mediterranean region dendrochronological studies are still scarce (Cherubini et al, 2003). In Mediterranean environment, trees may form intra-annual density fluctuations, also called "false rings" or "double rings" (Tingley 1937; Schulman 1938). They are usually induced by sudden drought events, occurring during the vegetative period, and, allowing intra-annual resolution, they may provide detailed information at a seasonal level, as well as species-specific sensitivity to drought. We investigated the variability of tree- ring width and carbon stable isotopes of a Mediterranean species, Arbutus unedo L., sampled on Elba island, (Tuscany, Italy). The samples were taken at two different sites, one characterized by wet and one by dry conditions. d13C was measured using Laser- Ablation- Combustion -GC-IRMS. Here, we present first results showing the impact of drought on tree growth and on false ring formation at the different sites and we underline the importance of using Laser Ablation to infer drought impact at the intra -annual level. Briffa KR, Schweingruber FH, Jones PD, Osborn TJ, Harris IC, Shiyatov SG, Vaganov EA, Grudd H (1998) Trees tell of past climates: but are they speaking less clearly today? Phil Transact Royal Soc London 353:65-73 Briffa KR, Osborn TJ, Schweingruber FH (2004) Large-scale temperature inferences from tree rings: a review. Glob Panet Change 40:11-26 Cherubini, P., B.L. Gartner, R. Tognetti, O.U. Bräker, W. Schoch & J.L. Innes. 2003. Identification, measurement and interpretation of tree rings in woody species from Mediterranean climates. Biol. Rev

  16. Inverse estimation of parameters for multidomain flow models in soil columns with different macropore densities

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    Soil and crop management practices have been found to modify soil structure and alter macropore densities. An ability to accurately determine soil hydraulic parameters and their variation with changes in macropore density is crucial for assessing potential contamination from agricultural chemicals. This study investigates the consequences of using consistent matrix and macropore parameters in simulating preferential flow and bromide transport in soil columns with different macropore densities (no macropore, single macropore, and multiple macropores). As used herein, the term“macropore density” is intended to refer to the number of macropores per unit area. A comparison between continuum-scale models including single-porosity model (SPM), mobile-immobile model (MIM), and dual-permeability model (DPM) that employed these parameters is also conducted. Domain-specific parameters are obtained from inverse modeling of homogeneous (no macropore) and central macropore columns in a deterministic framework and are validated using forward modeling of both low-density (3 macropores) and high-density (19 macropores) multiple-macropore columns. Results indicate that these inversely modeled parameters are successful in describing preferential flow but not tracer transport in both multiple-macropore columns. We believe that lateral exchange between matrix and macropore domains needs better accounting to efficiently simulate preferential transport in the case of dense, closely spaced macropores. Increasing model complexity from SPM to MIM to DPM also improved predictions of preferential flow in the multiple-macropore columns but not in the single-macropore column. This suggests that the use of a more complex model with resolved domain-specific parameters is recommended with an increase in macropore density to generate forecasts with higher accuracy. PMID:24511165

  17. Behavior of Small-Scale Density Fluctuations in Discharges with Off-Axis Electron-Cyclotron Resonance Heating in the T-10 Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Shelukhin, D.A.; Vershkov, V.A.; Razumova, K.A.

    2005-12-15

    In experiments on off-axis electron-cyclotron resonance heating in the T-10 tokamak, a steep gradient of the electron temperature was observed to form for a short time at a relative radius of {rho} {approx_equal} 0.25 after the heating power was switched off. Small-scale fluctuations of the electron density were studied with the help of correlation reflectometry. It was found that, in a narrow region near {rho} {approx_equal} 0.25, the amplitude of the density fluctuations was two times lower than that in the ohmic heating phase. Quasi-coherent fluctuations were suppressed over a period of time during which the steep temperature gradient existed. Measurements of the poloidal rotation velocity of turbulent fluctuations show that there is no velocity shear after the heating is switched off. An analysis of the linear growth rates of instabilities shows that the ion-temperature-gradient mode is unstable at {rho} {approx_equal} 0.25 throughout the entire discharge phase. The effect observed can be explained by an increase in the distance between the rational surfaces near the radius at which the safety factor is q = 1 due to the temporary flattening of the q profile after the off-axis electron-cyclotron resonance heating is switched off.

  18. Volume cross section of auroral radar backscatter and RMS plasma fluctuations inferred from coherent and incoherent scatter data: a response on backscatter volume parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M. V.; Janhunen, P.; Koustov, A. V.; Kauristie, K.

    2011-06-01

    Norway and Finland STARE radar measurements in the eastward auroral electrojet are combined with EISCAT CP-1 measurements of the electron density and electric field vector in the common scattering volume to investigate the variation of the auroral radar volume cross section (VCS) with the flow angle of observations (radar look direction with respect to the E×B electron drift). The data set available consists of ~6000 points for flow angles of 40-85° and electron drifts between 500 and 2000 m s-1. The EISCAT electron density N(h)-profile data are used to estimate the effective electron density, aspect angle and thickness of the backscattering layer. It is shown that the flow angle variation of the VCS is rather weak, only ~5 dB within the range of the considered flow angles. The VCS values themselves respond almost linearly to the square of both the electron drift velocity magnitude and the effective electron density. By adopting the inferred shape of the VCS variation with the flow angle and the VCS dependence upon wavelength, the relative amplitude of electrostatic electron density fluctuations over all scales is estimated. Inferred values of 2-4 percent react nearly linearly to the electron drift velocity in the range of 500-1000 m s-1 but the rate of increase slows down at electron drifts >1000 m s-1 and density fluctuations of ~5.5 percent due to, perhaps, progressively growing nonlinear wave losses.

  19. Estimation of flow parameters of turbulent fluctuations and vortex motions based on randomly sampled velocity data in the near wake of a circular cylinder in a steady flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D.

    1995-12-31

    Turbulent near wake flow is one of the key subjects for solving fluid dynamics-related problems in industrial practice, e.g. numerical simulation of gas explosions on offshore oil/gas production platforms. Flow velocities measured in the near-wake of bluff bodies contain information of mean flow, turbulent fluctuations and vortex motions. Flow parameters like RMS values of velocity fluctuations, Reynolds shear stresses, and auto-/spatial correlation of velocity fluctuations, derived by direct averaging of measured data, will include the total contributions of the periodic vortex motions and the random turbulent fluctuations. In the case of near-wake flows behind a cylinder at sub-critical Reynolds numbers, a vortex-street is formed in the wake and the vortex-shedding frequency is well defined. This offers a possibility for simplifying the decomposition of regular vortex motions and the random turbulent fluctuations. Velocity profiles and cross-stream spatial correlation of streamwise velocity were measured by positioning a TSI`s two-component LDA system in the region 2d to 4d downstream of a circular cylinder at Re = 35,000. The randomly sampled data were first interpolated linearly, and then re-sampled with a pertinent sampling frequency. The optimal FIR filters, designed using the Remez exchange algorithm, were applied to reject the digital signals in a narrow band around the vortex-shedding frequency. Various flow parameters associated with random turbulence were computed. The integration of the auto- and spatial correlation, obtained based on the filtered data gave a physically adequate estimation of the integral time and length scales of the turbulent fluctuations. Errors due to linear interpolation and filtering were discussed.

  20. Sensitivity of the NMR density matrix to pulse sequence parameters: a simplified analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Momot, Konstantin I; Takegoshi, K

    2012-08-01

    We present a formalism for the analysis of sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance pulse sequences to variations of pulse sequence parameters, such as radiofrequency pulses, gradient pulses or evolution delays. The formalism enables the calculation of compact, analytic expressions for the derivatives of the density matrix and the observed signal with respect to the parameters varied. The analysis is based on two constructs computed in the course of modified density-matrix simulations: the error interrogation operators and error commutators. The approach presented is consequently named the Error Commutator Formalism (ECF). It is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the density matrix to parameter variation based on the simulations carried out for the ideal parameters, obviating the need for finite-difference calculations of signal errors. The ECF analysis therefore carries a computational cost comparable to a single density-matrix or product-operator simulation. Its application is illustrated using a number of examples from basic NMR spectroscopy. We show that the strength of the ECF is its ability to provide analytic insights into the propagation of errors through pulse sequences and the behaviour of signal errors under phase cycling. Furthermore, the approach is algorithmic and easily amenable to implementation in the form of a programming code. It is envisaged that it could be incorporated into standard NMR product-operator simulation packages.

  1. Spherical harmonics analysis of surface density fluctuations of spherical ionic SDS and nonionic C12E8 micelles: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Nimura, Yuki; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Okazaki, Susumu

    2017-07-01

    The surface structure and its fluctuation of spherical micelles were investigated using a series of density correlation functions newly defined by spherical harmonics and Legendre polynomials based on the molecular dynamics calculations. To investigate the influence of head-group charges on the micelle surface structure, ionic sodium dodecyl sulfate and nonionic octaethyleneglycol monododecylether (C12E8) micelles were investigated as model systems. Large-scale density fluctuations were observed for both micelles in the calculated surface static structure factor. The area compressibility of the micelle surface evaluated by the surface static structure factor was tens-of-times larger than a typical value of a lipid membrane surface. The structural relaxation time, which was evaluated from the surface intermediate scattering function, indicates that the relaxation mechanism of the long-range surface structure can be well described by the hydrostatic approximation. The density fluctuation on the two-dimensional micelle surface has similar characteristics to that of three-dimensional fluids near the critical point.

  2. An improved empirical formulation of an ionosphere bottomside electron density profile thickness parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazo-Cuartas, K.; Radicella, S. M.

    2017-10-01

    An improved empirical formulation for the characterization of the ;base point; of the bottomside ionospheric electron density profile is proposed. The ;base point; in an ionospheric layer is defined by the electron density profile height where the gradient dN/dh reaches a maximum. The difference between the height of the maximum electron density and the height of the ;base point; is proportional to the ionospheric F2 layer thickness parameter B2. The previous empirical formula links the maximum value of dN/dh to foF2 and M(3000)F2 scaled from the ionograms. The new formulation adds a dependence on the solar zenith angle. The use of the new equation improves substantially the calculation of the B2 thickness parameter used in the NeQuick model.

  3. Critical parameters governing energy density of Li-storage cathode materials unraveled by confirmatory factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Kee-Sun; Han, Su Cheol; Park, Woon Bae; Pyo, Myoungho

    2016-03-01

    Despite extensive effort during the past few decades, a comprehensive understanding of the key variables governing the electrochemical properties of cathode materials in Li-ion batteries is still far from complete. To elucidate the critical parameters affecting energy density (ED) and capacity (Q) retention in layer and spinel cathodes, we data-mine the existing experimental data via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on a structural equation model (SEM), which is a proven, versatile tool in understanding complex problems in the social science. The data sets are composed of 18 and 15 parameters extracted from 38 layer and 33 spinel compounds, respectively. CFA reveals the irrelevance of Q retention to all the parameters we adopt, but it also reveals the sensitive variations of ED with specific parameters. We validate the usefulness of CFA in material science and pinpointed critical parameters for high-ED cathodes, hoping to suggest a new insight in materials design.

  4. Excitation energy dependence of the level density parameter close to the doubly magic 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pandey, R.; Sen, A.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Roy, T.; Dhal, A.; Dey, A.; Meena, J. K.; Saha, A. K.; Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra have been measured from 4He+208Pb and 4He+209Bi reactions by using 4He-ion beams of several bombarding energies. Excitation-energy dependence of the level density parameter has been studied for the two systems in the excitation energy range of ˜18 -50 MeV. For both the reactions an overall reduction of the asymptotic level density parameter with increasing excitation energy (temperature) is observed. The trend of the data was compared with the Thomas-Fermi model predictions and found to be in reasonable agreement. The value of the shell damping parameter has been extracted from the lowest-energy data in the case of Po,211210 and At,212211 nuclei close to the Z =82 and N =126 shell closure, and it was found to be consistent with the recent measurement in the vicinity of doubly magic 208Pb nucleus.

  5. Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li/S Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D

    2014-03-06

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries have high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, their volumetric energy density has been believed to be lower than that of conventional lithium ion batteries employing metal oxide cathodes like LiCoO2. Here, we study the effects of sulfur loading percentage, develop a simple model and calculate the gravimetric and volumetric energy densities based on the total composition of electrodes in a lithium-sulfur cell, and compare those results with a typical graphite/LiCoO2 cell. From the model output, we have identified and established key parameters governing the energy density of rechargeable Li/S batteries. We find that the sulfur loading percentage has a much higher impact on the volumetric energy density than on the gravimetric energy density. A lithium-sulfur cell can exceed a lithium ion cell's volumetric energy density but only at high sulfur loading percentages (ca. 70%). We believe that these findings may attract more attention of lithium-sulfur system studies to high sulfur loading levels.

  6. Two-parameter Fermi function fits to experimental charge and point-proton densities for 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adam B.; Brown, B. Alex

    2014-12-01

    We use the model-independent experimental charge density for 208Pb to determine a model-independent point-proton density. An improved two-parameter Fermi function representation for the this point-proton density provides input for the analysis of experiments for the neutron density interpreted in terms of neutron skin and halo properties of 208Pb.

  7. Measuring the matter energy density and Hubble parameter from large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the method to measure both the present value of the matter energy density contrast and the Hubble parameter directly from the measurement of the linear growth rate which is obtained from the large scale structure of the Universe. From this method, one can obtain the value of the nuisance cosmological parameter Ω{sub m0} (the present value of the matter energy density contrast) within 3% error if the growth rate measurement can be reached z > 3.5. One can also investigate the evolution of the Hubble parameter without any prior on the value of H{sub 0} (the current value of the Hubble parameter). Especially, estimating the Hubble parameter are insensitive to the errors on the measurement of the normalized growth rate fσ{sub 8}. However, this method requires the high z (z > 3.5) measurement of the growth rate in order to get the less than 5% errors on the measurements of H(z) at z ≤ 1.2 with the redshift bin Δz = 0.2. Thus, this will be suitable for the next generation large scale structure galaxy surveys like WFMOS and LSST.

  8. Shell energy and the level-density parameter of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nerlo-Pomorska, Bozena; Pomorski, Krzysztof; Bartel, Johann

    2006-09-15

    Macroscopic-microscopic calculations have been performed with the Yukawa folded mean field for 134 spherical even-even nuclei and 6 deformed ones at temperatures 0{<=}T{<=}5 MeV and elongations ranging from oblate shapes to the scission configuration of fissioning nuclei. The Strutinsky type free-energy shell corrections for this sample of nuclei and their temperature and deformation dependence are found by a folding procedure in particle-number space. The average dependence of the single-particle level-density parameter on mass number A and isospin I is determined and compared with previous estimates obtained using the relativistic mean-field theory, the Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme effective interaction, and the phenomenological Thomas-Fermi approach adjusted to experimental data. The estimates for the level-density parameter obtained for different deformations are fitted by a liquid-drop type expression.

  9. Typical density of states as an order parameter for the Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Ka-Ming; Moore, Conrad; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The typical medium theory and its recently proposed extensions for models with off-diagonal disorder and multiple bands are significant progress towards the study of localization phenomenon in real materials. The fundamental assumption of these methods is that the typical density of states can be treated as an order parameter. However, its justifications in lattice model is largely lacking. This is predominantly due to two factors. First, the lattice sizes amenable for exact diagonalization is rather limited. Second, the small lattice sizes lead to a very sensitive dependence on the broadening factor. In this work, we use the kernel polynomial method to perform simulation for large system sizes. By adapting the method for the study of criticality, we find that the typical density of states has a well defined finite size scaling behavior. In particular, from the kurtosis, Binder ratio, of the distribution of the density of states for different lattice sizes, we find a clear crossing to identify the critical point. This provides further support that the typical density of states can be used as an order parameter for the localization transition.

  10. Statistical analysis of error rate of large-scale single flux quantum logic circuit by considering fluctuation of timing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanashi, Yuki; Masubuchi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the timing margin and the error rate of the large-scale single flux quantum logic circuits is quantitatively investigated to establish a timing design guideline. We observed that the fluctuation in the set-up/hold time of single flux quantum logic gates caused by thermal noises is the most probable origin of the logical error of the large-scale single flux quantum circuit. The appropriate timing margin for stable operation of the large-scale logic circuit is discussed by taking the fluctuation of setup/hold time and the timing jitter in the single flux quantum circuits. As a case study, the dependence of the error rate of the 1-million-bit single flux quantum shift register on the timing margin is statistically analyzed. The result indicates that adjustment of timing margin and the bias voltage is important for stable operation of a large-scale SFQ logic circuit.

  11. Effect of Microstructural Parameters on the Relative Densities of Metal Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Kerr, Jacob A.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed quantitative microstructural analyses of primarily open cell FeCrAlY and 314 stainless steel metal foams with different relative densities and pores per inch (p.p.i.) were undertaken in the present investigation to determine the effect of microstructural parameters on the relative densities of metal foams. Several elements of the microstructure, such as longitudinal and transverse cell sizes, cell areas and perimeters, ligament dimensions, cell shapes and volume fractions of closed and open cells, were measured. The cross-sections of the foam ligaments showed a large number of shrinkage cavities, and their circularity factors and average sizes were determined. The volume fractions of closed cells increased linearly with increasing relative density. In contrast, the volume fractions of the open cells and ligaments decreased with increasing relative density. The relative densities and p.p.i. were not significantly dependent on cell size, cell perimeter and ligament dimensions within the limits of experimental scatter. A phenomenological model is proposed to rationalize the present microstructural observations.

  12. Characterization of the local density-of-states fluctuations near the integer quantum Hall transition in a quantum-dot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jug, Giancarlo; Ziegler, Klaus

    1997-10-01

    We present a calculation for the second moment of the local density of states in a model of a two-dimensional quantum dot array near the quantum Hall transition. The quantum dot array model is a realistic adaptation of the lattice model for the quantum Hall transition in the two-dimensional electron gas in an external magnetic field proposed by Ludwig, Fisher, Shankar, and Grinstein. We make use of a Dirac fermion representation for the Green's functions in the presence of fluctuations for the quantum dot energy levels. A saddle-point approximation yields nonperturbative results for the first and second moments of the local density of states, showing interesting fluctuation behavior near the quantum Hall transition. To our knowledge we discuss here one of the first analytic characterizations of chaotic behavior for a two-dimensional mesoscopic structure. The connection with possible experimental investigations of the local density of states in the quantum dot array structures (by means of NMR Knight-shift or single-electron-tunneling techniques) and our work is also established.

  13. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and T{sub e} fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-15

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  14. Behavior of Parameters of Nighttime Electron Density Enhancements of the Ionospheric F2 Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina

    2017-04-01

    There is known a wide class of disturbances of the F2-layer of the ionosphere, which are superimposed on the regular diurnal variations of the electron density. Different types of disturbances are characterized by different mechanisms of their generation. Traveling ionospheric disturbances appear to be the most characteristic features of the inhomogeneous structure of the ionosphere. Another type of ionospheric disturbances presents the nighttime electron density enhancements in the ionospheric F2- layer maximum (NmF2). This type of irregularities is described in numerous papers. There is a concept that, in spite of the various mechanisms of ionospheric disturbances generation a response of F2-layer parameters exhibits similar features associated with the upward lift and the simultaneous expansion of the layer and then its subsequent downward movement, including layer compression, which results in the formation of the electron density peak in the layer maximum at the moment of greatest compression. The aim of this study is a verification of this concept on the example of disturbances related with the nighttime electron density enhancements, and the definition of precise quantitative relationships between the variations of different F2-layer parameters for such disturbances. By using the data of the ionospheric vertical sounding in Almaty, (76° 55'E, 43°15'N) during 2001-2012, analysis of the behavior the F2-layer parameters during the night electron density enhancements was carried out within framework of a single concept of effects of various types of ionospheric plasma perturbations in variations of height and half-thickness of the F2-layer, accompanied by increasing and decreasing NmF2 at moments of maximum compression and expansion of the layer. For a quantitative analysis of the parameters of nighttime enhancements we have selected 20 nights characterized by low magnetic activity (Dst> - 50 nT) and evident manifestations of the nighttime electron density

  15. Local Neutral Density and Plasma Parameter Measurements in a Hollow Cathode Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Kristina K.; Goebel, Dan M.; MiKellides, Joannis; Watkins, Ron M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to understand the cathode and keeper wear observed during the Extended Life Test (ELT) of the DS1 flight spare NSTAR thruster and provide benchmarking data for a 2D cathode/cathode-plume model, a basic understanding of the plasma and neutral gas parameters in the cathode orifice and keeper region of the cathode plume must be obtained. The JPL cathode facility is instrumented with an array of Langmuir probe diagnostics along with an optical diagnostic to measure line intensity of xenon neutrals. In order to make direct comparisons with the present model, a flat plate anode arrangement was installed for these tests. Neutral density is deduced from the scanning probe data of the plasma parameters and the measured xenon line intensity in the optical regime. The Langmuir probes are scanned both axially, out to 7.0 cm downstream of the keeper, and radially to obtain 2D profile of the plasma parameters. The optical fiber is housed in a collimating stainless steel tube, and is scanned to view across the cathode plume along cuts in front of the keeper with a resolution of 1.5 mm. The radial intensities are unfolded using the Abel inversion technique that produces radial profiles of local neutral density. In this paper, detailed measurements of the plasma parameters and the local neutral densities will be presented in the cathode/keeper plume region for a 1.5 cm diameter NEXIS cathode at 25A of discharge current at several different strengths of applied magnetic field.

  16. Relation between the contrast in time integrated dynamic speckle patterns an the power spectral density of their temporal intensity fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Draijer, Matthijs J; Hondebrink, Erwin; Larsson, Marcus; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2010-10-11

    Scattering fluid flux can be quantified with coherent light, either from the contrast of speckle patterns, or from the moments of the power spectrum of intensity fluctuations. We present a theory connecting these approaches for the general case of mixed static-dynamic patterns of boiling speckles without prior assumptions regarding the particle dynamics. An expression is derived and tested relating the speckle contrast to the intensity power spectrum. Our theory demonstrates that in speckle contrast the concentration of moving particles dominates over the contribution of speed to the particle flux. Our theory provides a basis for comparison of both approaches when used for studying tissue perfusion.

  17. Fluctuation of densities of bacteriophages and Escherichia coli present in natural biofilms and water of a main channel and a small tributary.

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hiroshi; Yu, Ma; Yamada, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuation of bacteriophage and Escherichia coli densities in naturally developed riverbed biofilms were investigated for a 1-year period. E. coli ranged from 1,500 to 15,500 most probable number (MPN)/100 mL and from 580 to 18,500 MPN/cm(2) in the main channel in the river water and biofilms, respectively. However, the fluctuations were much greater in the tributary, ranging from 0.8 to 100 MPN/100 mL and from 0.3 to 185 MPN/cm(2) in water and biofilms, respectively. The fluctuations of coliphages were also greater in the tributary than in the main channel. FRNA phage serotyping results indicated no significant differences in the source type of the fecal contamination in the main channel and tributary sampling stations. Significant correlations between phage groups in biofilms and water were found at both main channel and tributary. It was assumed that natural biofilms developed in the streambed captured and retained somatic phages in the biofilms for a certain period of time in the main channel site. At the location receiving constant and heavy contamination, the usage of phage indicators may provide additional information on the presence of viruses. In the small tributary it may be possible to estimate the virus concentration by monitoring the E. coli indicator.

  18. Haematological, biochemical and bone density parameters in vegetarians and non-vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Sambol, S Z; Stimac, D; Orlić, Z C; Guina, T

    2009-12-01

    The objective is to determine any possible differences between haematological, biochemical and bone mineral density in vegetarians (vegans and lacto-ovovegetarians) and non-vegeterians. The examined group consisted of 100 individuals: 50 non-vegetarians and 50 vegetarians. The vegetarian group was further divided in 2 subgroups: 20 vegans and 30 lacto-ovovegetarians. In all participants, plasma levels of erythrocytes, haemoglobin, haematocrit, iron, low density lipoprotein, (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL) total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose were measured. Quantitative ultrasound parameters of the right calcaneus were determined in all participants. The results showed that lacto-ovovegetarians had statistically significantly higher red blood cell counts and haematocrit values than non-vegetarians. Vegans also had higher haematocrit values than non-vegetarians. Statistically significant differences were found between iron plasma levels in the examined groups. Iron levels were lower in non-vegetarians than in vegans and lacto-ovovegetarians. Non-vegetarians had much higher levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL than the other two groups, but there were no differences found between same values in vegans and lacto-ovovegetarians. A well planned and balanced vegetarian diet, with avoidance of risk factors, does not result in abnormalities in laboratory tests and bone status parameters.

  19. Fluctuations and intermittent poloidal transport in a simple toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Goud, T. S.; Ganesh, R.; Saxena, Y. C.; Raju, D.

    2013-07-15

    In a simple magnetized toroidal plasma, fluctuation induced poloidal flux is found to be significant in magnitude. The probability distribution function of the fluctuation induced poloidal flux is observed to be strongly non-Gaussian in nature; however, in some cases, the distribution shows good agreement with the analytical form [Carreras et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2664 (1996)], assuming a coupling between the near Gaussian density and poloidal velocity fluctuations. The observed non-Gaussian nature of the fluctuation induced poloidal flux and other plasma parameters such as density and fluctuating poloidal velocity in this device is due to intermittent and bursty nature of poloidal transport. In the simple magnetized torus used here, such an intermittent fluctuation induced poloidal flux is found to play a crucial role in generating the poloidal flow.

  20. Methane dissociation on Pt(111): Searching for a specific reaction parameter density functional

    SciTech Connect

    Nattino, Francesco Migliorini, Davide; Kroes, Geert-Jan; Bonfanti, Matteo

    2016-01-28

    The theoretical description of methane dissociating on metal surfaces is a current frontier in the field of gas-surface dynamics. Dynamical models that aim at achieving a highly accurate description of this reaction rely on potential energy surfaces based on density functional theory calculations at the generalized gradient approximation. We focus here on the effect that the exchange-correlation functional has on the reactivity of methane on a metal surface, using CHD{sub 3} + Pt(111) as a test case. We present new ab initio molecular dynamics calculations performed with various density functionals, looking also at functionals that account for the van der Waals (vdW) interaction. While searching for a semi-empirical specific reaction parameter density functional for this system, we find that the use of a weighted average of the PBE and the RPBE exchange functionals together with a vdW-corrected correlation functional leads to an improved agreement with quantum state-resolved experimental data for the sticking probability, compared to previous PBE calculations. With this semi-empirical density functional, we have also investigated the surface temperature dependence of the methane dissociation reaction and the influence of the rotational alignment on the reactivity, and compared our results with experiments.

  1. Distributions and averages of electron density parameters: Explaining the effects of gradient corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Ales; Burke, Kieron; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Perdew, John P.

    1997-06-01

    We analyze the electron densities n(r) of atoms, molecules, solids, and surfaces. The distributions of values of the Seitz radius rs=(3/4πn)1/3 and the reduced density gradient s=|∇n|/(2(3π2)1/3n4/3) in an electron density indicate which ranges of these variables are significant for physical processes. We also define energy-weighted averages of these variables, and , from which local spin density (LSD) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation energies may be estimated. The changes in these averages upon rearrangement of the nuclei (atomization of molecules or solids, stretching of bond lengths or lattice parameters, change of crystal structure, etc.) are used to explain why GGA corrects LSD in the way it does. A thermodynamic-like inequality (essentially d/>d/2) determines whether the gradient corrections drive a process forward. We use this analysis to explain why gradient corrections usually stretch bonds (but not for example H-H bonds), reduce atomization and surface energies, and raise energy barriers to formation at transition states.

  2. SCAN-based hybrid and double-hybrid density functionals from models without fitted parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Kerwin; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-01-01

    By incorporating the nonempirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) semilocal density functional [J. Sun, A. Ruzsinszky, and J. P. Perdew, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 036402 (2015)] in the underlying expression of four existing hybrid and double-hybrid models, we propose one hybrid (SCAN0) and three double-hybrid (SCAN0-DH, SCAN-QIDH, and SCAN0-2) density functionals, which are free from any fitted parameters. The SCAN-based double-hybrid functionals consistently outperform their parent SCAN semilocal functional for self-interaction problems and noncovalent interactions. In particular, SCAN0-2, which includes about 79% of Hartree-Fock exchange and 50% of second-order Møller-Plesset correlation, is shown to be reliably accurate for a very diverse range of applications, such as thermochemistry, kinetics, noncovalent interactions, and self-interaction problems.

  3. Permeability parameter as a function of population density in classical infiltration equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Nor Hafizah; Ahmad, Rohanin; Nordin, Syarifah Zyurina

    2014-12-01

    Rapid development of urban areas has caused many problems especially related to water issues. The increase in urban development also means the increase in impervious surfaces due to expansion of buildings, roads, parking lots to name a few. Impervious surfaces have low water permeability compared to pervious surfaces. Also, infiltration capacity is dependent on the permeability of the area and subsequently permeability is dependent on the surface conditions. In this paper, we study the infiltration capacity with the assumption that permeability parameter can be described in the term of the population density of the area. The modified model is based on the original form of Green-Ampt equation. The new model with population density is able to describe permeability, hence the infiltration capacity of an area.

  4. Spatial localization and temporal analysis of optical property fluctuations by multiplexed near-infrared photon density waves in turbid media: In vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiaci, Mattia Emidio

    2001-12-01

    In recent years the application of near infrared non- invasive methods for medical diagnostics and clinical studies has grown rapidly. The ease of use, low cost and portability of these methods is a clear advantage over other techniques such as MRI. The limitations in detection of optical property inhomogeneities in tissues, such as tumors or hematomas, is due to the diffusive, highly scattering nature of near infrared light propagation. I have studied and developed methods to improve the spatial localization of these inhomogeneities in biological tissues, especially for the application of functional studies of the human brain in vivo. Recently much attention has been given to the study of the processes in the human brain that lead to the changing of the optical parameters that characterize the tissue, measured by our frequency-domain instrumentation. These processes have been divided into two main categories with different time-scales. The slower one is mostly due to the fluctuations in the absorption coefficient caused by oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin changes in the tissue. The temporal analysis of the signal resulting from this process is studied in detail, and I also introduce a time-series data analysis technique that has not been applied to this field before but was introduced in another area very recently. The faster time-scale process has been attributed to the electrochemical excitation of the individual neurons in the brain that have been observed to cause a change in the scattering coefficient of the tissue. This is the other primary parameter that is measured by our frequency domain instrument. However, before this work it has not been clear how to go about to better localize these smaller fluctuations. I present a novel idea for improving spatial localization of macroscopic optical parameter fluctuations, and study the characteristics of this optical probe design using analytical solutions to the diffusion equation and Monte Carlo simulations that more

  5. Landau parameters for energy density functionals generated by local finite-range pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idini, A.; Bennaceur, K.; Dobaczewski, J.

    2017-06-01

    In Landau theory of Fermi liquids, the particle-hole interaction near the Fermi energy in different spin-isospin channels is probed in terms of an expansion over the Legendre polynomials. This provides a useful and efficient way to constrain properties of nuclear energy density functionals in symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei. In this study, we present general expressions for Landau parameters corresponding to a two-body central local regularized pseudopotential. We also show results obtained for two recently adjusted NLO and N2LO parametrizations. Such pseudopotentials will be used to determine mean-field and beyond-mean-field properties of paired nuclei across the entire nuclear chart.

  6. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Burger, A.; Gorgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  7. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; ...

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  8. Effects of stocking density on growth performance, feather growth, intestinal development, and serum parameters of geese.

    PubMed

    Yin, L Y; Wang, Z Y; Yang, H M; Xu, L; Zhang, J; Xing, H

    2017-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of stocking density on the growth performance, feather growth, intestinal development, and serum parameters of geese. In total, 336 healthy, 28-day-old, male Yangzhou goslings were randomly allotted to 30 plastic wire-floor pens according to 5 stocking densities (2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 birds/m2). The results showed that with the stocking density increased from 2 birds/m2 to 6 birds/m2, the body weights of geese at 42 d (P < 0.001) and 70 d (P < 0.001) were reduced by 10.53% and 10.43% respectively, the primary feather lengths of geese at 42 d (P < 0.001) and 70 d (P = 0.021) were reduced by 20.38% and 6.62% respectively, whereas the feed/gain ratios for 28- to 42-d period and 28- to 70-d period increased from 2.50 to 2.90 (P = 0.001), and 3.80 to 4.24 (P < 0.001), respectively. The relative weights of the jejunum, ileum, and small intestine and the lengths of the jejunum, ileum, and small intestine were all adversely affected (P < 0.05) when stocking density was increased to 6 birds/m2. Serum concentrations of alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.013) and triiodothyronine (P < 0.001) decreased as the stocking density increased. The serum thyroxine concentration of geese from the 6 birds/m2 group was lower than that of geese from the other groups (P < 0.05). The reduction in thyroid hormone concentrations was similar to what was observed in growth rate. All the results suggested that high stocking density will adversely influence thyroid function and the developments of the body weight, body size, feathers, and small intestine. Under our experimental conditions, we recommend that the stocking density of geese should be kept to 5 or fewer birds/m2 to avoid the negative effects of high stocking density on geese. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Acceleration of the effect of solute on the entropy-volume cross fluctuation density in aqueous 2-butoxyethanol, 1-propanol, and glycerol: the fourth derivative of Gibbs energy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Koh; Baluja, Shipra; Inaba, Akira; Koga, Yoshikata

    2011-06-07

    Using a differential pressure perturbation calorimetry developed by us recently [K. Yoshida, S. Baluja, A. Inaba, K. Tozaki, and Y. Koga, "Experimental determination of third derivative of G (III): Differential pressure perturbation calorimetry (II)," J. Solution Chem. (in press)], we experimentally determined the partial molar S-V cross fluctuation density of solute B, (SV)δ(B) , in binary aqueous solutions for B = 1-propanol (1P) and glycerol (Gly). This third derivative of G provides information about the effect of solute B on the S-V cross fluctuation density, (SV)δ, in aqueous solution as the concentration of B varies. Having determined (SV)δ(B) by better than 1% uncertainty, we evaluated for the first time the fourth derivative quantity (SV)δ(B-B) = N(∂(SV)δ(B) ∕∂n(B)) for B = 1P and Gly graphically without resorting to any fitting functions within several percent. This model-free quantity gives information about the acceleration of the effect of solute B on (SV)δ. By comparing fourth derivative quantities, (SV)δ(B-B) , among B = 1P, Gly, and 2-butoxyethanol obtained previously, the distinction of the effect of solute on H(2)O becomes clearer than before when only the third derivative quantities were available.

  10. Acceleration of the effect of solute on the entropy-volume cross fluctuation density in aqueous 2-butoxyethanol, 1-propanol, and glycerol: The fourth derivative of Gibbs energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Koh; Baluja, Shipra; Inaba, Akira; Koga, Yoshikata

    2011-06-01

    Using a differential pressure perturbation calorimetry developed by us recently [K. Yoshida, S. Baluja, A. Inaba, K. Tozaki, and Y. Koga, "Experimental determination of third derivative of G (III): Differential pressure perturbation calorimetry (II)," J. Solution Chem. (in press)], we experimentally determined the partial molar S-V cross fluctuation density of solute B, SVδB, in binary aqueous solutions for B = 1-propanol (1P) and glycerol (Gly). This third derivative of G provides information about the effect of solute B on the S-V cross fluctuation density, SVδ, in aqueous solution as the concentration of B varies. Having determined SVδB by better than 1% uncertainty, we evaluated for the first time the fourth derivative quantity SVδB-B = N(∂SVδB /∂nB) for B = 1P and Gly graphically without resorting to any fitting functions within several percent. This model-free quantity gives information about the acceleration of the effect of solute B on SVδ. By comparing fourth derivative quantities, SVδB-B, among B = 1P, Gly, and 2-butoxyethanol obtained previously, the distinction of the effect of solute on H2O becomes clearer than before when only the third derivative quantities were available.

  11. Osteocyte density and histomorphometric parameters in cancellous bone of the proximal femur in five mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Mullender, M G; Huiskes, R; Versleyen, H; Buma, P

    1996-11-01

    The species-specific relationships between trabecular morphology and osteocyte density were investigated in the femoral heads of 30 adult animals of five mammalian species (rat, rabbit, Rhesus monkey, pig, and cow). Our hypothesis is that osteocytes are mechanosensory cells and are involved in the regulation of bone remodeling. According to the predictions from a simulation model, this hypothesis implies that the influencing distance of osteocytes, together with the magnitude of the mechanical loads, determines the thickness of trabeculae and that the number of osteocytes primarily affects the rate of bone remodeling. The number of osteocytes per bone volume ranged from 93,200 mm-3 in rat to 31,900 mm-3 in bovine cancellous bone. Osteocyte density was inversely related to the size of the species. Since basal metabolic output is related to body mass, we speculate that osteocyte density may be related to metabolic rates. Trabecular thickness was larger in the cow than in the other species, but the range of variation between species was relatively small. This agrees with the hypothesis that trabecular thickness is limited by the domain that can be regulated by an osteocyte and that this domain is of similar size regardless of the species. Only in the rat was trabecular thickness considerably smaller than in the other species. This is probably due to the presence of the cartilaginous growth plate in the femoral head of the rat. The relationships with species are different for osteocyte density than for morphometric parameters. Hence, our data support our hypothesis that osteocyte density is not directly associated with the macroscopic trabecular architecture.

  12. Retrieving parameters of the anisotropic refractive index fluctuations spectrum in the stratosphere from balloon-borne observations of stellar scintillation.

    PubMed

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Michau, Vincent; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Robert, Claude; Dalaudier, Francis

    2008-02-01

    Scintillation effects are not negligible in the stratosphere. We present a model based on a 3D model of anisotropic and isotropic refractive index fluctuations spectra that predicts scintillation rates within the so-called small perturbation approximation. Atmospheric observations of stellar scintillation made from the AMON-RA (AMON, Absorption par les Minoritaires Ozone et NO(x); RA, rapid) balloon-borne spectrometer allows us to remotely probe wave-turbulence characteristics in the stratosphere. Data reduction from these observations brings out values of the inner scale of the anisotropic spectrum. We find metric values of the inner scale that are compatible with space-based measurements. We find a major contribution of the anisotropic spectrum relative to the isotropic contribution. When the sight line plunges into the atmosphere, strong scintillation occurs as well as coupled chromatic refraction effects.

  13. Analysis of the Sn chain length fluctuations on Si(100)2 ×1 : An extraction of microscopic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, M.; Kocán, P.; Sobotík, P.; Majer, K.; Ošt'ádal, I.

    2017-07-01

    Tin chains grown on the Si(100)2 ×1 surface were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. Real time measurements were used for recording chain length fluctuations in a temperature range from 310 to 350 K. The recorded data were analyzed by means of a statistical model containing both interfering processes observed at a chain termination—random attachment and detachment of metal atoms. Rates of the both processes were calculated from lifetimes of two different chain terminations (monomer or dimer) by means of derived formulas. The activation energies for the detachment and frequency prefactors were calculated from dependence of the corresponding time constants on temperature in an Arrhenius plot. A similar approach was used for characterization of binding Sn atoms on C -type defects which represent preferential adsorption sites.

  14. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2.3 μm. Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  15. Density-of-states effective mass and scattering parameter measurements by transport phenomena in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.; Kaydanov, V. I.

    2000-02-01

    A novel machine has been developed to measure transport coefficients in the temperature range of 50-350 K of thin films deposited on electrically insulating substrates. The measured coefficients—resistivity, Hall, Seebeck, and Nernst—are applied to solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation to give information about the film's density-of-states effective mass, the Fermi energy level, and an energy-dependent scattering parameter. The machine is designed to eliminate or compensate for simultaneously occurring transport phenomena that would interfere with the desired measured quantity, while allowing for all four coefficients to be measured on the same sample. An average density-of-states effective mass value of 0.29±0.04me was measured on the transparent conductive oxide, cadmium stannate (CTO), over a carrier concentration range of 2-7×1020cm-3. This effective mass value matched previous results obtained by optical and thermoelectric modeling. The measured scattering parameter indicates that neutral impurities or a mixture of scattering mechanisms may inhibit the transport of carriers in CTO.

  16. Galactic rotation curve and spiral density wave parameters from 73 masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Based on kinematic data on masers with known trigonometric parallaxes and measurements of the velocities of HI clouds at tangential points in the inner Galaxy, we have refined the parameters of the Allen-Santillan model Galactic potential and constructed the Galactic rotation curve in a wide range of Galactocentric distances, from 0 to 20 kpc. The circular rotation velocity of the Sun for the adopted Galactocentric distance R 0 = 8 kpc is V 0 = 239 ± 16 km s-1. We have obtained the series of residual tangential, Δ V θ , and radial, V R , velocities for 73 masers. Based on these series, we have determined the parameters of the Galactic spiral density wave satisfying the linear Lin-Shu model using the method of periodogram analysis that we proposed previously. The tangential and radial perturbation amplitudes are f θ = 7.0±1.2 km s-1 and f R = 7.8±0.7 km s-1, respectively, the perturbation wave length is λ = 2.3±0.4 kpc, and the pitch angle of the spiral pattern in a two-armed model is i = -5.2° ±0.7°. The phase of the Sun ζ ⊙ in the spiral density wave is -50° ± 15° and -160° ± 15° from the residual tangential and radial velocities, respectively.

  17. Fast super-resolution imaging with ultra-high labeling density achieved by joint tagging super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-02-10

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods.

  18. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods. PMID:25665878

  19. Parameters Selection for Bivariate Multiscale Entropy Analysis of Postural Fluctuations in Fallers and Non-Fallers Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Ramdani, Sofiane; Bonnet, Vincent; Tallon, Guillaume; Lagarde, Julien; Bernard, Pierre Louis; Blain, Hubert

    2016-08-01

    Entropy measures are often used to quantify the regularity of postural sway time series. Recent methodological developments provided both multivariate and multiscale approaches allowing the extraction of complexity features from physiological signals; see "Dynamical complexity of human responses: A multivariate data-adaptive framework," in Bulletin of Polish Academy of Science and Technology, vol. 60, p. 433, 2012. The resulting entropy measures are good candidates for the analysis of bivariate postural sway signals exhibiting nonstationarity and multiscale properties. These methods are dependant on several input parameters such as embedding parameters. Using two data sets collected from institutionalized frail older adults, we numerically investigate the behavior of a recent multivariate and multiscale entropy estimator; see "Multivariate multiscale entropy: A tool for complexity analysis of multichannel data," Physics Review E, vol. 84, p. 061918, 2011. We propose criteria for the selection of the input parameters. Using these optimal parameters, we statistically compare the multivariate and multiscale entropy values of postural sway data of non-faller subjects to those of fallers. These two groups are discriminated by the resulting measures over multiple time scales. We also demonstrate that the typical parameter settings proposed in the literature lead to entropy measures that do not distinguish the two groups. This last result confirms the importance of the selection of appropriate input parameters.

  20. Tissue composition and density impact on the clinical parameters for (125)I prostate implants dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Susana Maria; Teixeira, Nuno José; Fernandes, Lisete; Teles, Pedro; Vieira, Guy; Vaz, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    The MCNPX code was used to calculate the TG-43U1 recommended parameters in water and prostate tissue in order to quantify the dosimetric impact in 30 patients treated with (125)I prostate implants when replacing the TG-43U1 formalism parameters calculated in water by a prostate-like medium in the planning system (PS) and to evaluate the uncertainties associated with Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. The prostate density was obtained from the CT of 100 patients with prostate cancer. The deviations between our results for water and the TG-43U1 consensus dataset values were -2.6% for prostate V100, -13.0% for V150, and -5.8% for D90; -2.0% for rectum V100, and -5.1% for D0.1; -5.0% for urethra D10, and -5.1% for D30. The same differences between our water and prostate results were all under 0.3%. Uncertainties estimations were up to 2.9% for the gL(r) function, 13.4% for the F(r,θ) function and 7.0% for Λ, mainly due to seed geometry uncertainties. Uncertainties in extracting the TG-43U1 parameters in the MC simulations as well as in the literature comparison are of the same order of magnitude as the differences between dose distributions computed for water and prostate-like medium. The selection of the parameters for the PS should be done carefully, as it may considerably affect the dose distributions. The seeds internal geometry uncertainties are a major limiting factor in the MC parameters deduction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Density of voltage-gated potassium channels is a bifurcation parameter in pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Hugh P. C.; Århem, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Several types of intrinsic dynamics have been identified in brain neurons. Type 1 excitability is characterized by a continuous frequency-stimulus relationship and, thus, an arbitrarily low frequency at threshold current. Conversely, Type 2 excitability is characterized by a discontinuous frequency-stimulus relationship and a nonzero threshold frequency. In previous theoretical work we showed that the density of Kv channels is a bifurcation parameter, such that increasing the Kv channel density in a neuron model transforms Type 1 excitability into Type 2 excitability. Here we test this finding experimentally, using the dynamic clamp technique on Type 1 pyramidal cells in rat cortex. We found that increasing the density of slow Kv channels leads to a shift from Type 1 to Type 2 threshold dynamics, i.e., a distinct onset frequency, subthreshold oscillations, and reduced latency to first spike. In addition, the action potential was resculptured, with a narrower spike width and more pronounced afterhyperpolarization. All changes could be captured with a two-dimensional model. It may seem paradoxical that an increase in slow K channel density can lead to a higher threshold firing frequency; however, this can be explained in terms of bifurcation theory. In contrast to previous work, we argue that an increased outward current leads to a change in dynamics in these neurons without a rectification of the current-voltage curve. These results demonstrate that the behavior of neurons is determined by the global interactions of their dynamical elements and not necessarily simply by individual types of ion channels. PMID:25339708

  2. Body shape changes in the elderly and the influence of density assumptions on segment inertia parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Robert K.; Fletcher, P.; Abraham, C.

    1991-04-01

    The segment mass mass proportions and moments of inertia of a sample of twelve females and seven males with mean ages of 67. 4 and 69. 5 years were estimated using textbook proportions based on cadaver studies. These were then compared with the parameters calculated using a mathematical model the zone method. The methodology of the model was fully evaluated for accuracy and precision and judged to be adequate. The results of the comparisons show that for some segments female parameters are quite different from male parameters and inadequately predicted by the cadaver proportions. The largest discrepancies were for the thigh and the trunk. The cadaver predictions were generally less than satisfactory although the common variance for some segments was moderately high. The use ofnon-linear regression and segment anthropometry was illustrated for the thigh moments of inertia and appears to be appropriate. However the predictions from cadaver data need to be examined fully. These results are dependent on the changes in mass and density distribution which occur with aging and the changes which occur with cadaver samples prior to and following death.

  3. Europium Luminescence: Electronic Densities and Superdelocalizabilities for a Unique Adjustment of Theoretical Intensity Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, José Diogo L.; Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2015-01-01

    We advance the concept that the charge factors of the simple overlap model and the polarizabilities of Judd-Ofelt theory for the luminescence of europium complexes can be effectively and uniquely modeled by perturbation theory on the semiempirical electronic wave function of the complex. With only three adjustable constants, we introduce expressions that relate: (i) the charge factors to electronic densities, and (ii) the polarizabilities to superdelocalizabilities that we derived specifically for this purpose. The three constants are then adjusted iteratively until the calculated intensity parameters, corresponding to the 5D0→7F2 and 5D0→7F4 transitions, converge to the experimentally determined ones. This adjustment yields a single unique set of only three constants per complex and semiempirical model used. From these constants, we then define a binary outcome acceptance attribute for the adjustment, and show that when the adjustment is acceptable, the predicted geometry is, in average, closer to the experimental one. An important consequence is that the terms of the intensity parameters related to dynamic coupling and electric dipole mechanisms will be unique. Hence, the important energy transfer rates will also be unique, leading to a single predicted intensity parameter for the 5D0→7F6 transition. PMID:26329420

  4. Application of MODIS GPP to Forecast Risk of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Based on Fluctuations in Reservoir Population Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehman, R.; Heinsch, F. A.; Mills, J. N.; Wagoner, K.; Running, S.

    2003-12-01

    Recent predictive models for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) have used remotely sensed spectral reflectance data to characterize risk areas with limited success. We present an alternative method using gross primary production (GPP) from the MODIS sensor to estimate the effects of biomass accumulation on population density of Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse), the principal reservoir species for Sin Nombre virus (SNV). The majority of diagnosed HPS cases in North America are attributed to SNV, which is transmitted to humans through inhalation of excretions and secretions from infected rodents. A logistic model framework is used to evaluate MODIS GPP, temperature, and precipitation as predictors of P. maniculatus density at established trapping sites across the western United States. Rodent populations are estimated using monthly minimum number alive (MNA) data for 2000 through 2002. Both local meteorological data from nearby weather stations and 1.25 degree x 1 degree gridded data from the NASA DAO were used in the regression model to determine the spatial sensitivity of the response. MODIS eight-day GPP data (1-km resolution) were acquired and binned to monthly average and monthly sum GPP for 3km x 3km grids surrounding each rodent trapping site. The use of MODIS GPP to forecast HPS risk may result in a marked improvement over past reflectance-based risk area characterizations. The MODIS GPP product provides a vegetation dynamics estimate that is unique to disease models, and targets the fundamental ecological processes responsible for increased rodent density and amplified disease risk.

  5. Quantum lifetime in ultrahigh quality GaAs quantum wells: Relationship to Δ5 /2 and impact of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Q.; Nakamura, J.; Fallahi, S.; Gardner, G. C.; Watson, J. D.; Lüscher, S.; Folk, J. A.; Csáthy, G. A.; Manfra, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the quantum lifetime derived from low-field Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations as a metric of the quality of the two-dimensional electron gas in GaAs quantum wells that expresses large excitation gaps of the ν =5/2 fractional quantum Hall state in the N =1 Landau level. In high quality samples, small density inhomogeneities dramatically impact the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations such that the canonical method [cf. Coleridge, Phys. Rev. B 44, 3793 (1991), 10.1103/PhysRevB.44.3793] for determination of the quantum lifetime substantially underestimates τq unless density inhomogeneity is explicitly considered. We have developed a method that can be used to determine density inhomogeneity and extract the intrinsic τq by analyzing the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. However, even after accounting for inhomogeneity, τq does not correlate well with sample quality as measured by Δ5 /2, the excitation gap of the fractional quantum Hall state at 5/2 filling.

  6. Accuracy of estimated geometric parameters of trees depending on the LIDAR data density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Edyta; Estornell, Javier

    2015-04-01

    The estimation of dendrometric variables has become important for spatial planning and agriculture projects. Because classical field measurements are time consuming and inefficient, airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements are successfully used in this area. Point clouds acquired for relatively large areas allows to determine the structure of forestry and agriculture areas and geometrical parameters of individual trees. In this study two LiDAR datasets with different densities were used: sparse with average density of 0.5pt/m2 and the dense with density of 4pt/m2. 25 olive trees were selected and field measurements of tree height, crown bottom height, length of crown diameters and tree position were performed. To determine the tree geometric parameters from LiDAR data, two independent strategies were developed that utilize the ArcGIS, ENVI and FUSION software. Strategy a) was based on canopy surface model (CSM) slicing at 0.5m height and in strategy b) minimum bounding polygons as tree crown area were created around detected tree centroid. The individual steps were developed to be applied also in automatic processing. To assess the performance of each strategy with both point clouds, the differences between the measured and estimated geometric parameters of trees were analyzed. As expected, the tree height were underestimated for both strategies (RMSE=0.7m for dense dataset and RMSE=1.5m for sparse) and tree crown height were overestimated (RMSE=0.4m and RMSE=0.7m for dense and sparse dataset respectively). For dense dataset, strategy b) allows to determine more accurate crown diameters (RMSE=0.5m) than strategy a) (RMSE=0.8m), and for sparse dataset, only strategy a) occurs to be relevant (RMSE=1.0m). The accuracy of strategies were also examined for their dependency on tree size. For dense dataset, the larger the tree (height or crown longer diameter), the higher was the error of estimated tree height, and for sparse dataset, the larger the tree

  7. Low Density Lipoprotein and Non-Newtonian Oscillating Flow Biomechanical Parameters for Normal Human Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Soulis, Johannes V.; Fytanidis, Dimitrios K.; Lampri, Olga P.; Giannoglou, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The temporal variation of the hemodynamic mechanical parameters during cardiac pulse wave is considered as an important atherogenic factor. Applying non-Newtonian blood molecular viscosity simulation is crucial for hemodynamic analysis. Understanding low density lipoprotein (LDL) distribution in relation to flow parameters will possibly spot the prone to atherosclerosis aorta regions. Methods The biomechanical parameters tested were averaged wall shear stress (AWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT) in relation to the LDL concentration. Four non-Newtonian molecular viscosity models and the Newtonian one were tested for the normal human aorta under oscillating flow. The analysis was performed via computational fluid dynamic. Results Tested viscosity blood flow models for the biomechanical parameters yield a consistent aorta pattern. High OSI and low AWSS develop at the concave aorta regions. This is most noticeable in downstream flow region of the left subclavian artery and at concave ascending aorta. Concave aorta regions exhibit high RRT and elevated LDL. For the concave aorta site, the peak LDL value is 35.0% higher than its entrance value. For the convex site, it is 18.0%. High LDL endothelium regions located at the aorta concave site are well predicted with high RRT. Conclusions We are in favor of using the non-Newtonian power law model for analysis. It satisfactorily approximates the molecular viscosity, WSS, OSI, RRT and LDL distribution. Concave regions are mostly prone to atherosclerosis. The flow biomechanical factor RRT is a relatively useful tool for identifying the localization of the atheromatic plaques of the normal human aorta. PMID:28197271

  8. Establishing a Nonequilibrium Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem Through Simultaneous Measurement of the Power Spectral Density and Transfer Function of Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevelyan, Alexander; Corwin, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We explore the response of a model statistical system to strong, non-linear perturbations to its state variables. Specifically, we work with a tunable model of Johnson-Nyquist noise, designed to permit a driving of both the drift and diffusion terms in the associated White Noise Langevin Equation. We achieve a simultaneous measurement of both sides of the Fluctuation Dissipation Theorem (FDT) by driving the circuit with digitally generated white noise and measuring the output. This allows us to calculate a frequency-dependent effective temperature for the driven system, which for an equilibrium system should be set by the energy scale of the input white noise. Comparison of the two sides of FDT-the circuit's transfer function and the power spectral density of the voltage fluctuations-across frequency-space proves non-trivial, and methods are discussed for achieving the most reliable estimate. After comparing the response for a series of functional signals, we find that FDT, measured in this simultaneous fashion, remains intact even while the system is being actively driven out of equilibrium.

  9. Influence of meteorological parameters and air pollution on hourly fluctuation of birch (Betula L.) and ash (Fraxinus L.) airborne pollen.

    PubMed

    Puc, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Pollen grains are one of the most important groups of atmospheric biological particles that originate allergic processes. Knowledge of intradiurnal variation of the atmospheric pollen may be useful for the treatment and prevention of pollen allergies. Intradiurnal fluctuation of hourly pollen counts in 24 h are related to the daily rhythm of anther opening, and modified by various interacting factors. Flowering and pollen production of individual species are influenced by genetic, phenological, ecological, meteorological and climatic factors. Estimation of the intradiurnal variability in the pollen count permits evaluation of the threat posed by allergens over a given area. Measurements performed in Szczecin over a period of 7 years (2006-2012) permitted analysis of hourly variation of the pollen count of birch (Betula) and ash (Fraxinus) in 24 h, and evaluation of the impact of weather conditions and the concentration of gas air pollutants on the intradiurnal patterns of both taxa. Aerobiological monitoring was conducted using a Hirst volumetric trap (Lanzoni VPPS 2000). Consecutive phases during the day were defined as 1, 5, 25, 50, 75, 95, 99% of annual total pollen. The analysis revealed that 50% of total daily pollen was noted at 14:00 for Betula and Fraxinus. The hourly distribution of birch pollen count skewed to the left and the majority of pollen of this taxon appears in the air in the first 12 hours of the day. However, for ash, the hourly distribution of pollen count skewed to the right. Statistically significant correlation was noted between the Betula and Fraxinus pollen concentration and the mean air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, air pressure, total radiation and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)).

  10. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Bardóczi, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; ...

    2016-05-26

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density uctuations en (via Beam Emission Spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that en could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability.

  11. Probability Density Functions of Floating Potential Fluctuations Due to Local Electron Flux Intermittency in a Linear ECR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Eiki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    An intermittent behavior of local electron flux in a laboratory ECR plasma is statistically analyzed by means of probability density functions (PDFs). The PDF constructed from a time series of the floating potential signal on a Langmuir probe has a fat tail in the negative value side, which reflects the intermittency of the local electron flux. The PDF of the waiting time, which is defined by the time interval between two successive events, is found to exhibit an exponential distribution, suggesting that the phenomenon is characterized by a stationary Poisson process. The underlying Poisson process is also confirmed by the number of events in given time intervals that is Poisson distributed.

  12. Partnering dispersion corrections with modern parameter-free double-hybrid density functionals.

    PubMed

    Sancho-García, J C; Brémond, É; Savarese, M; Pérez-Jiménez, A J; Adamo, C

    2017-03-09

    The PBE-QIDH and SOS1-PBE-QIDH double-hybrid density functionals are merged with a pair of dispersion corrections, namely the pairwise additive D3(BJ) and the non-local correlation functional VV10, leading to the corresponding dispersion-corrected models. The parameters adjusting each of the dispersion corrections to the functionals are obtained by fitting to well-established energy datasets (e.g. S130) used as a benchmark, giving rise to functionals spanning covalent and non-covalent binding forces. The application of the models to challenging systems out of the training set, like those comprising the L7 database of large supramolecular complexes, or the S66x8 dataset of stretched and elongated intermolecular distances, reveals the high accuracy of the coupling.

  13. Gravitational lens modeling with iterative source deconvolution and global optimization of lens density parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing produces multiple distorted images of a background source when it is closely aligned with a mass distribution along the line of sight. The lensed images provide constraints on the parameters of a model of the lens, and the images themselves can be inverted providing a model of the source. Both of these aspects of lensing are extremely valuable, as lensing depends on the total matter distribution, both luminous and dark. Furthermore, lensed sources are commonly located at cosmological distances and are magnified by the lensing effect. This provides a chance to image sources that would be unobservable when viewed with conventional optics. The semilinear method expresses the source modeling step as a least-squares problem for a given set of lens model parameters. The blurring effect due to the point spread function of the instrument used to observe the lensed images is also taken into account. In general, regularization is needed to solve the source deconvolution problem. We use Krylov subspace methods to solve for the pixelated sources. These optimization techniques, such as the Conjugate Gradient method, provide natural regularizing effects from simple truncated iteration. Using these routines, we are able to avoid the explicit construction of the lens and blurring matrices and solve the least squares source optimization problem iteratively. We explore several regularization parameter selection methods commonly used in standard image deconvolution problems, which lead to previously derived expressions for the number of source degrees of freedom. The parameters that describe the lens density distribution are found by global optimization methods including genetic algorithms and particle swarm optimizers. In general, global optimizers are useful in non-linear optimization problems such as lens modeling due to their parameter space mapping capabilities. However, these optimization methods require many function evaluations and iterative

  14. Population density, sex ratio, body size and fluctuating asymmetry of Ceroglossus chilensis (Carabidae) in the fragmented Maulino forest and surrounding pine plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, Paula; Donoso, Denise S.; Grez, Audrey A.

    2009-11-01

    Habitat fragmentation results in new environmental conditions that may stress resident populations. Such stress may be reflected in demographical or morphological changes in the individuals inhabiting those landscapes. This study evaluates the effects of fragmentation of the Maulino forest on population density, sex ratio, body size, and fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the endemic carabid Ceroglossus chilensis. Individuals of C. chilensis were collected during 2006 in five locations at Los Queules National Reserve (continuous forest), in five forest fragments and in five areas of surrounding pine plantations (matrix). In each location, once a season, 40 pitfall traps (20 in the centre, 20 in the edge), were opened for 72 h. Population density of C. chilensis was higher in the small fragments than in the pine matrix, with intermediate densities in the continuous forest; sex ratio did not differ significantly from 1:1 in the three habitats. Individuals from the centre of fragments were smaller than those from the centre of continuous forest, and FA did not vary significantly among habitats. These results suggest that small forest fragments maintain dense populations of C. chilensis and therefore they must be considered in conservation strategies. Although the decrease of the body size suggests that small remnants should be connected by managing the structure of the surrounding matrix, facilitating the dispersion of this carabid across the landscape and avoiding possible antagonistic interactions inside small fragments.

  15. Hydration shell parameters of aqueous alcohols: THz excess absorption and packing density.

    PubMed

    Matvejev, V; Zizi, M; Stiens, J

    2012-12-06

    Solvation in water requires minimizing the perturbations in its hydrogen bonded network. Hence solutes distort water molecular motions in a surrounding domain, forming a molecule-specific hydration shell. The properties of those hydration shells impact the structure and function of the solubilized molecules, both at the single molecule and at higher order levels. The size of the hydration shell and the picoseconds time-scale water dynamics retardation are revealed by terahertz (THz) absorption coefficient measurements. Room-temperature absorption coefficient at f = 0.28 [THz] is measured as a function of alcohol concentration in aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1,2-propanol, and 1-butanol solutions. Highly diluted alcohol measurements and enhanced overall measurement accuracy are achieved with a THz absorption measurement technique of nL-volume liquids in a capillary tube. In the absorption analysis, bulk and interfacial molecular domains of water and alcohol are considered. THz ideal and excess absorption coefficients are defined in accordance with thermodynamics mixing formulations. The parameter extraction method is developed based on a THz excess absorption model and hydrated solute molecule packing density representation. First, the hydration shell size is deduced from the hydrated solute packing densities at two specific THz excess absorption nonlinearity points: at infinite alcohol dilution (IAD) and at the THz excess absorption extremum (EAE). Consequently, interfacial water and alcohol molecular domain absorptions are deduced from the THz excess absorption model. The hydration shell sizes obtained at the THz excess absorption extremum are in excellent agreement with other reports. The hydration shells of methanol, ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol consist of 13.97, 22.94, 22.99, and 31.10 water molecules, respectively. The hydration shell water absorption is on average 0.774 ± 0.028 times the bulk water absorption. The hydration shell parameters might shed light on

  16. Density-fluctuation symbolic computation on the (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Kudryashov-Sinelshchikov equation for a bubbly liquid with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Liquids with gas bubbles are commonly seen in medical science, natural science, daily life and engineering. Nonlinear-wave symbolic computation on the (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Kudryashov-Sinelshchikov model for a bubbly liquid is hereby performed. An auto-Bäcklund transformation and with some solitonic solutions are obtained. With respect to the density fluctuation of the bubble-liquid mixture, both the auto-Bäcklund transformation and solitonic solutions depend on the bubble-liquid-viscosity, transverse-perturbation, bubble-liquid-nonlinearity and bubble-liquid-dispersion coefficient functions. We note that some shock waves given by our solutions have been observed by the gas-bubble/liquid-mixture experiments. Effects on a bubbly liquid with respect to the bubble-liquid-viscosity, transverse-perturbation, bubble-liquid-nonlinearity and bubble-liquid-dispersion coefficient functions might be detected by the future gas-bubble/liquid-mixture experiments.

  17. Interspecific and intraspecific competition as causes of direct and delayed density dependence in a fluctuating vole population.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T F; Stenseth, N C; Henttonen, H; Tast, J

    1999-02-02

    A 3- to 5-year cycle of vole abundances is a characteristic phenomenon in the ecology of northern regions, and their explanation stands as a central theoretical challenge in population ecology. Although many species of voles usually coexist and are in severe competition for food and breeding space, the role of interspecific competition in vole cycles has never been evaluated statistically. After studying community effects on the population dynamics of the gray-sided vole (Clethrionomys rufocanus) in the subarctic birch forest at Kilpisjärvi, Finland, we report statistical results showing that both interspecific and intraspecific effects are important in the direct year-to-year density dependence. However, interspecific effects are not detectable in the 2-year delayed density dependence that is crucial for generating the characteristic cycles. Furthermore, we show that most of the competition takes place during the winter. The results are evaluated against two models of community dynamics. One assumes that the delayed effects are caused by an interaction with a specialist predator, and the other assumes that they are caused by overgrazing food plants. These statistical results show that vole cycles may be generated by a species-specific trophic interaction. The results also suggest that the gray-sided vole may be the focal species in the birch-forest community, as field voles may be in the taiga and as lemmings may be on the tundra.

  18. Optically trapped quasi-two-dimensional Bose gases in a random environment: Quantum fluctuations and superfluid density

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Kezhao; Liang Zhaoxin; Zhang Zhidong; Hu Ying

    2010-10-15

    We investigate a dilute Bose gas confined in a tight one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice plus a superimposed random potential at zero temperature. Accordingly, the ground-state energy, quantum depletion, and superfluid density are calculated. The presence of the lattice introduces a crossover to the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) regime, where we analyze asymptotically the 2D behavior of the system, particularly the effects of disorder. We thereby offer an analytical expression for the ground-state energy of a purely 2D Bose gas in a random potential. The obtained disorder-induced normal fluid density n{sub n} and quantum depletion n{sub d} both exhibit a characteristic 1/ln(1/n{sub 2D}a{sub 2D}{sup 2}) dependence. Their ratio n{sub n}/n{sub d} increases to 2 compared to the familiar 4/3 in lattice-free three-dimensional (3D) geometry, signifying a more pronounced contrast between superfluidity and Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensions. The conditions for possible experimental realization of our scenario are also proposed.

  19. Effect of housing density on reproductive parameters and corticosterone levels in nursing mice.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, James; Dambrosia, James M; Davis, Judith A

    2008-03-01

    The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Guide) recommends minimum floor space per mouse based on weight, with no other factors considered. We conducted a randomized experiment to evaluate the effect of housing density on reproductive indices and corticosterone levels in lactating mice. Female mice matched for age, strain, and date-of-pregnancy were housed individually. At parturition the dams were randomly allocated to have litters culled or remain intact. The experimental group had litters culled to meet the Guide's space density requirement. Litters of the second group were maintained as the numbers born to each dam. Fecal corticosterone levels (first-generation mice only), growth, and weaning weights were measured for mice in all cages; in addition, the reproductive behavior of progeny generated under both housing conditions was assessed to determine whether a space x litter size interaction affected subsequent reproduction. The growth rates for pups from culled litters were significantly greater than those from intact litters. The first-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in fecal corticosterone or reproductive parameters. The second-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in growth rates. The results of the study suggest that a strict interpretation of space requirements as listed in Table 2.1 of the Guide is not warranted for lactating dams with litters.

  20. Effect of Housing Density on Reproductive Parameters and Corticosterone Levels in Nursing Mice

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, James; Dambrosia, James M; Davis, Judith A

    2008-01-01

    The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Guide) recommends minimum floor space per mouse based on weight, with no other factors considered. We conducted a randomized experiment to evaluate the effect of housing density on reproductive indices and corticosterone levels in lactating mice. Female mice matched for age, strain, and date-of-pregnancy were housed individually. At parturition the dams were randomly allocated to have litters culled or remain intact. The experimental group had litters culled to meet the Guide’s space density requirement. Litters of the second group were maintained as the numbers born to each dam. Fecal corticosterone levels (first-generation mice only), growth, and weaning weights were measured for mice in all cages; in addition, the reproductive behavior of progeny generated under both housing conditions was assessed to determine whether a space × litter size interaction affected subsequent reproduction. The growth rates for pups from culled litters were significantly greater than those from intact litters. The first-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in fecal corticosterone or reproductive parameters. The second-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in growth rates. The results of the study suggest that a strict interpretation of space requirements as listed in Table 2.1 of the Guide is not warranted for lactating dams with litters. PMID:18351716

  1. Calculation of effective electromagnetic parameters of multi-needle zinc oxide whisker based on equivalent spherical particle and strong fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Chen; Liu, Jiang-Fan; Song, Zhong-Guo; Xi, Xiao-Li

    2014-12-01

    Multi-needle zinc oxide whisker (M-ZnOw) includes tetrapod-needle ZnOw (T-ZnOw), flower-shaped ZnOw, and other similar ZnOw architectures. The unique three-dimensional (3D) and multi-needle-shaped structures give the special performance of M-ZnOw, but make it difficult to calculate the effective electromagnetic parameters of M-ZnOw composites. In this paper, based on the equivalent spherical particle and the strong fluctuation theory, three different closed-form expressions are presented to calculate the effective electromagnetic parameters of M-ZnOw composites. To start with, because of the macroscopic isotropic nature of M-ZnOw composites and lossy properties of M-ZnOw itself, an equivalent spherical particle is introduced in the scheme to simplify the unique microscopic structures of M-ZnOw, and the possible limitations of the presented equivalent spherical particle are discussed qualitatively. In addition, different closed-form expressions to calculate the effective electromagnetic parameter are obtained by means of representing the physical situations of conductive network as different correlation functions in the strong fluctuation theory. Finally, the effective permeability of a T-ZnOw/Fe - paraffin composite is calculated by these three expressions in 2-18 GHz frequency range. Very good agreement between the calculated and experimental results on one hand verifies the rationality of presented expressions, and on the other hand indicates that the correlation function plays an important role in improving the performance of the presented expression.

  2. Bone mineral density, quantitative ultrasound parameters and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women with depression.

    PubMed

    Atteritano, Marco; Lasco, Antonino; Mazzaferro, Susanna; Macrì, Ida; Catalano, Antonino; Santangelo, Antonino; Bagnato, Gianluca; Bagnato, Gianfilippo; Frisina, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Low bone mineral density, which increases the risk of stress fragility fractures, is a frequent, often persistent finding in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The clinical association between major depressive disorder and osteopenia is still unclear, although several factors are associated with a loss of bone mass. The aim of our study, therefore, was to evaluate bone mineral density and bone metabolism in patients with MDD. Bone mineral density was evaluated in fifty postmenopausal women with MDD, and in 50 matched postmenopausal control women by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and femur, and by ultrasonography of the calcaneus and phalanges. Serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D, parathyroid hormone, Osteoprotegerin/Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κB Ligand ratio, bone turnover markers, serum and urinary cortisol were examined. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMD: 0.72 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.09 g/cm(2), p < 0.001), femoral neck (BMD: 0.58 ± 0.04 vs. 0.71 ± 0.07 g/cm(2), p < 0.001) and total femur (BMD 0.66 ± 0.09 vs. 0.54 ± 0.06 g/cm(2), p < 0.001); and ultrasound parameters at calcaneus (SI: 81.30 ± 6.10 vs. 93.80 ± 7.10, p < 0.001) and phalanges (AD-SOS: 1915.00 ± 37.70 vs. 2020.88 ± 39.46, p < 0.001; BTT : 1.30 ± 0.8 vs. 1.45 ± 0.9, p < 0.001) are significantly lower in patients with MDD compared with controls. Moreover bone turnover markers, parathyroid hormone levels and Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κB Ligand are significantly higher in MDD patients compared with controls, while serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D and osteoprotegerin are significantly lower. There are no differences in urinary excretion and serum cortisol between groups. Postmenopausal women with depressive disorder have an elevated risk for osteoporosis. Our data suggest that a high level of parathyroid hormone may play a role in the pathogenetic process underlying osteopenia in these patients.

  3. Origin of structure: statistical characterization of the primordial density fluctuations and the collapse of the wave function

    SciTech Connect

    León, Gabriel; Sudarsky, Daniel E-mail: sudarsky@nucleares.unam.mx

    2015-06-01

    The statistical properties of the primordial density perturbations has been considered in the past decade as a powerful probe of the physical processes taking place in the early universe. Within the inflationary paradigm, the properties of the bispectrum are one of the keys that serves to discriminate among competing scenarios concerning the details of the origin of cosmological perturbations. However, all of the scenarios, based on the conventional approach to the so-called ''quantum-to-classical transition'' during inflation, lack the ability to point out the precise physical mechanism responsible for generating the inhomogeneity and anisotropy of our universe starting from and exactly homogeneous and isotropic vacuum state associated with the early inflationary regime. In past works, we have shown that the proposals involving a spontaneous dynamical reduction of the quantum state provide plausible explanations for the birth of said primordial inhomogeneities and anisotropies. In the present manuscript we show that, when considering within the context of such proposals, the characterization of the spectrum and bispectrum turn out to be quite different from those found in the traditional approach, and in particular, some of the statistical features, must be treated in a different way leading to some rather different conclusions.

  4. Universal fluctuations of the AEX index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Rui; Ferreira, Helena; Stollenwerk, Nico; Pinto, Alberto Adrego

    2010-11-01

    We compute the analytic expression of the probability distributions F and F of the normalized positive and negative AEX (Netherlands) index daily returns r(t). Furthermore, we define the α re-scaled AEX daily index positive returns r( and negative returns (, which we call, after normalization, the α positive fluctuations and α negative fluctuations. We use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test as a method to find the values of α that optimize the data collapse of the histogram of the α fluctuations with the Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton (BHP) probability density function. The optimal parameters that we found are α+=0.46 and α-=0.43. Since the BHP probability density function appears in several other dissimilar phenomena, our result reveals a universal feature of stock exchange markets.

  5. High-precision refractive index measurements revealing order parameter fluctuations in KMnF3 and NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, F. J.; Kleemann, W.

    1985-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the refractive index n of cubic crystals undergoing phase transitions (PT) is measured with an accuracy of the order δn=10-6 at temperatures between 3.5 and 1000 K with a computer-controlled Jamin-Lebedeff interferometer. Microscopic monitoring for in situ sample orientation and single domain work is provided. Results are presented for KMnF3 (antiferrodistortive PT) and NiO (antiferromagnetic PT) and discussed within the framework of a generalized phenomenological indicatrix perturbation theory. It predicts the proportionality between the order parameter autocorrelation function <δη2> and the refractive index anomaly preceding the PT. Comparison with recent theoretical predictions is performed.

  6. Parameters of Density Distribution of Exotic Nuclei Extracted from a Data on Reaction Cross-section in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Ivan; Rueter, Keiti

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of density distribution of exotic nuclei with halo structure were extracted from the experimental data on the interaction cross-section using exact expressions obtained in the Glauber theory. Generally, to do so measured interaction cross-section is compared with a reaction cross-section calculated in optical approximation or using exact expressions of the Glauber theory. It was shown before that the parameters of nuclear density distribution depends on chosen density model (Gaussian, harmonic oscillator or Woods-Saxon) and on the used approximation of the Glauber theory (i.e. optical or rigid target). In the presented paper, we discuss the difference between reaction and interaction cross-sections calculated in various approximations, and how this difference affects the accuracy of the nuclear density parameters determination. As an example, we provide results of the analyzes of experimental data on interaction cross-section of 11Li, 16C and 31Ne nuclei on 12C target.

  7. Correlation between CT Perfusion Parameters and Microvessel Density and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xifu; Bai, Renju; Li, Yajun; Zhao, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the correlation between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and markers of angiogenesis in adrenal adenomas and non-adenomas to determine if perfusion CT can be used to distinguish between them. Thirty-four patients with pathologically-confirmed adrenal tumors (17 adenomas, 17 non-adenomas) received CT perfusion imaging before surgery. CT perfusion parameters (blood flow [BF], blood volume [BV], mean transit time [MTT], and permeability surface area product [PS]) were calculated. Tumor tissue sections were examined with immunohistochemical methods for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and microvessel density (MVD). The mean age of the 34 patients was 43 years. The median BV was significantly higher in adenomas than in non-adenomas [12.3 ml/100 g, inter-quartile range (IQR): 10.4 to 16.5 ml/100 g vs. 8.8 ml/100 g, IQR: 3.3 to 9.4 ml/100 g, p = 0.001]. Differences in BF, MTT, and PS parameter values between adenomas and non-adenomas were not significant (p>0.05). The mean MVD was significantly higher in adenomas compared to non-adenomas (98.5±28.5 vs. 53.5±27.0, p<0.0001). Adenomas also expressed significantly higher median VEGF than non-adenomas (65%, IQR: 50 to 79% vs. 45%, IQR: 35 to 67%, p = 0.02). A moderately strong correlation between BF and VEGF (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and between BV and MVD among adenomas (r = 0.57, p = 0.02) exist. Morphology, MVD, and VEGF expression in adenomas differ significantly from non-adenomas. Of the CT perfusion parameters examined, both BF and BV correlate with MVD, but only BF correlates with VEGF, and only in adenomas. The significant difference in BV suggests that BV may be used to differentiate adenomas from non-adenomas. However, the small difference in BV shows that it may only be possible to use BV to identify adenomas vs. non-adenomas at extreme BV values. PMID:24260316

  8. Longitudinal fluctuations in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubczyk, Pawel; Metzner, Walter

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the interplay of longitudinal and transverse thermal fluctuations in a U(1 ) symmetric two-dimensional ϕ4 theory. Toward this end, we derive coupled renormalization-group equations for both types of fluctuations obtained from a linear (Cartesian) decomposition of the order-parameter field. Discarding the longitudinal fluctuations, the expected Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase characterized by a finite stiffness and an algebraic decay of order-parameter correlations is recovered. Renormalized by transverse fluctuations, the longitudinal mass scales to zero so that longitudinal fluctuations become increasingly important for small momenta. Within our expansion of the effective action, they generate a logarithmic decrease of the stiffness, in agreement with previous functional renormalization-group calculations. The logarithmic terms imply a deviation from the vanishing β function for the stiffness in the nonlinear σ model describing the phase fluctuations at three-loop order. To gain further insight, we also compute the flow of the parameters characterizing longitudinal and transverse fluctuations from a density-phase representation of the order-parameter field, with a cutoff on phase fluctuations. The power-law flow of the longitudinal mass and other quantities is thereby confirmed, but the stiffness remains finite in this approach. We conclude that the marginal flow of the stiffness obtained in the Cartesian representation is an artifact of the truncated expansion of momentum dependences.

  9. On Predicting Mössbauer Parameters of Iron-Containing Molecules with Density-Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The performance of six frequently used density functional theory (DFT) methods (RPBE, OLYP, TPSS, B3LYP, B3LYP*, and TPSSh) in the prediction of Mössbauer isomer shifts(δ) and quadrupole splittings (ΔEQ) is studied for an extended and diverse set of Fe complexes. In addition to the influence of the applied density functional and the type of the basis set, the effect of the environment of the molecule, approximated with the conducting-like screening solvation model (COSMO) on the computed Mössbauer parameters, is also investigated. For the isomer shifts the COSMO-B3LYP method is found to provide accurate δ values for all 66 investigated complexes, with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.05 mm s–1 and a maximum deviation of 0.12 mm s–1. Obtaining accurate ΔEQ values presents a bigger challenge; however, with the selection of an appropriate DFT method, a reasonable agreement can be achieved between experiment and theory. Identifying the various chemical classes of compounds that need different treatment allowed us to construct a recipe for ΔEQ calculations; the application of this approach yields a MAE of 0.12 mm s–1 (7% error) and a maximum deviation of 0.55 mm s–1 (17% error). This accuracy should be sufficient for most chemical problems that concern Fe complexes. Furthermore, the reliability of the DFT approach is verified by extending the investigation to chemically relevant case studies which include geometric isomerism, phase transitions induced by variations of the electronic structure (e.g., spin crossover and inversion of the orbital ground state), and the description of electronically degenerate triplet and quintet states. Finally, the immense and often unexploited potential of utilizing the sign of the ΔEQ in characterizing distortions or in identifying the appropriate electronic state at the assignment of the spectral lines is also shown. PMID:25821417

  10. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the

  11. Seasonal fluctuations and temperature dependence of leaf gas exchange parameters of co-occurring evergreen and deciduous trees in a temperate broad-leaved forest.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Yoshiko; Matsuo, Naoko

    2006-09-01

    Seasonal fluctuations in leaf gas exchange parameters were investigated in three evergreen (Quercus glauca Thunb., Cinnamomum camphora Sieb. and Castanopsis cuspidata Schottky) and one deciduous (Quercus serrata Thunb.) co-occurring, dominant tree species in a temperate broad-leaved forest. Dark respiration rate (Rn), maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and stomatal coefficient (m), the ratio of stomatal conductance to net assimilation rate after adjustment to the vapor pressure deficit and internal carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, were derived inversely from instantaneous field gas exchange data (one-point method). The normalized values of Rn and Vcmax at the reference temperature of 25 degrees C (Rn25, Vcmax25) and their temperature dependencies (Delta Ha(Rn), Delta Ha(Vcmax)) were analyzed. Parameter Vcmax25 ranged from 24.0-40.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and Delta Ha(Vcmax) ranged from 29.1- 67.0 kJ mol(-1). Parameter Rn25 ranged from 0.6-1.4 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and Delta Ha(Rn) ranged from 47.4-95.4 kJ mol(-1). The stomatal coefficient ranged from 7.2-8.2. For the three evergreen trees, a single set of Vcmax25 and Rn25 parameters and temperature dependence curves produced satisfactory estimates of carbon uptake throughout the year, except during the period of simultaneous leaf fall and leaf expansion, which occurs in April and May. In the deciduous oak, declines in Vcmax25 were observed after summer, along with changes in Vcmax25 and Rn25 during the leaf expansion period. In all species, variation in m during periods of leaf expansion and drought should be considered in modeling studies. We conclude that the changes in normalized gas exchange parameters during periods of leaf expansion and drought need to be considered when modeling carbon uptake of evergreen broad-leaved species.

  12. Plasma Impedance Spectrum Analyzer (PISA): an advanced impedance probe for measuring plasma density and other parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Uribe, P.; Burchill, J.

    2006-12-01

    High-accuracy, high-cadence measurements of ionospheric electron density between 100 and a few x 106 / cc and electron temperature from 200 K to a few thousand K are of critical importance for understanding conductivity, Joule heating rates, and instability growth rates. We present results from the development of an impedance probe at NASA GSFC and show its strengths relative to other measurement techniques. Complementary measurement techniques such as Langmuir Probes, while providing extremely high measurement cadence, suffer from uncertainties in calibration, surface contamination effects, and wake/sheath effects. Impedance Probes function by measuring the phase shift between the voltage on a long antenna and the current flowing from the antenna into the plasma as a function of frequency. At frequencies for which the phase shift is zero, a plasma resonance is assumed to exist. These resonances depend on a variety of plasma parameters, including the electron density, electron temperature, and magnetic field strength, as well as the antenna geometry, angle between the antenna and the magnetic field, and sheath / Debye length effects, but do not depend on the surface properties of the antenna. Previous impedance probe designs which "lock" onto the upper hybrid resonance are susceptible to losing lock in low-density environments. Information about other resonances, including the series resonance (which strongly depends on temperature) and other resonances which may occur near the upper hybrid, confounding its identification, are typically not transmitted. The novel features of the GSFC Impedance Probe (PISA) include: 1) A white noise generator that stimulates a wide range of frequencies simultaneously, allowing the instrument to send down the entire impedance frequency spectrum every few milliseconds. This allows identification of all resonance frequencies, including the series resonance which depends on temperature. 2) DC bias voltage stepping to bring the antenna

  13. Derangements in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density in south Indian subjects on antiepileptic medications

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, George; Varghese, Ron Thomas; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesargatta Shyamsunder; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Alexander, Mathew; Thomas, Maya; Aaron, Sanjith; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there are reports describing the association of alternations of bone and mineral metabolism in epileptic patients with long-term anticonvulsant therapy, there are only limited Indian studies which have looked at this aspect. Objectives: This study was done to compare the prevalence of changes in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) in ambulant individuals on long-term anticonvulsant therapy with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: There were 55 men (on medications for more than 6 months) and age- and BMI-matched 53 controls. Drug history, dietary calcium intake (DCI), and duration of sunlight exposure were recorded. Bone mineral parameters and BMD were measured. Results: The control group had a significantly higher daily DCI with mean ± SD of 396 ± 91 mg versus 326 ± 101 mg (P = 0.007) and more sunlight exposure of 234 ± 81 vs 167 ± 69 min (P = 0.05). BMD at the femoral neck was significantly lower in cases (0.783 ± 0.105 g/cm2) when compared to controls (0.819 ± 0.114 g/cm2). Majority of the patients (61%) had low femoral neck BMD (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) between cases (n = 32) and controls (n = 37) (P = 0.234). Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was seen in both the groups in equal proportions, highlighting the existence of a high prevalence of this problem in India. Low femoral neck BMD found in cases may stress the need for supplementing calcium and treating vitamin D deficiency in this specific group. However, the benefit of such intervention has to be studied in a larger proportion of epileptic patients. PMID:25221394

  14. Relationships between lumbar bone mineral density and biochemical parameters in phenylketonuria patients.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Martijn J; Hoeksma, Marieke; van Rijn, Margreet; Slart, Riemer H J A; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2012-04-01

    The etiology of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in phenylketonuria (PKU) is unknown. Reduced BMD may be inherent to PKU and/or secondary to its dietary treatment. Lumbar BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 53 early and continuously treated PKU patients (median age 16, range 2-35 years). First, Z-scores of BMD were correlated to age group, clinical severity of PKU, mean phenylalanine (Phe) concentration and Phe variation in the year prior to DXA scanning, as well as to blood vitamin, mineral, and alkaline phosphatase concentrations. Second, parameters were compared between subjects with reduced BMD (Z-score<-2 SD) and subjects with normal BMD. BMD was significantly reduced in our cohort (p=0.000). Z-scores of BMD were neither significantly correlated to age group, nor clinical severity of PKU. Both mean Phe concentration and Phe variation in the year prior to DXA scanning did not significantly correlate with Z-scores of BMD. Higher blood calcium concentrations were significantly associated with lower BMD (r(2)=-0.485, p=0.004). Other biochemical parameters, including vitamin B12 availability markers, did not show significant correlations with Z-score of BMD. Subjects with reduced BMD had significantly higher blood phosphorus concentrations than subjects with normal BMD (p=0.009). No other significant differences were found between both BMD groups. Reduced BMD in PKU is present from early age onward and does not progress with age. Therefore, BMD deserves attention from early age onward in PKU patients. Our findings are consistent with increased bone turnover in PKU. It remains unclear whether reduced BMD is inherent to PKU and/or secondary to its dietary treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluctuation Measurements in MRX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, T.; Hsu, S.; Zaharia, S.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Kulsrud, R.; Mazzucato, E.

    1998-11-01

    Recently, data(H. Ji, et al), Phys. Rev. Lett., 80, 3256 (1998) from the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) have shown agreement with an MHD (Sweet-Parker) scaling modified to include, among other effects, an experimentally measured resistivity in collisionless current sheets for which η > η_Spitzer. Consistent with the observation of enhanced resistivity in these experiments was the measurement of current sheet widths on the order of ρ_i. Current sheet width scaling with ρi implies a drift parameter (v_d,i-v_d,e)/v_th,i which is constant with density. A potential explanation for these three observations is the existence of a current-driven instability in the current sheet of MRX which limits the relative drift speed, enhances the resistivity and widens the reconnection layer. Studies of fluctuations in the current sheet of MRX have begun, and preliminary fluctuation measurements using floating Langmuir and magnetic pick-up probes reveal frequency spectra with strong features near 30 MHz (≈ ω_LH). Theoretical studies of instabilities in the MRX current sheet and detailed measurements of frequency spectra using these diagnostics will be presented along with preliminary measurements using a new 35.6 cm-1 microwave scattering system.

  16. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data.

  17. Vibrational and electronic investigations, thermodynamic parameters, HOMO and LUMO analysis on Lornoxicam by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of Lornoxicam were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameters, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the Vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and Lornoxicam is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like Entropy, Enthalpy, Specific heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations.

  18. Parameter scaling toward high-energy density in a quasi-steady flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Sheared axial flows are utilized by the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment to stabilize MHD instabilities. The pinches formed are 50 cm long with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 cm. The plasma is generated in a coaxial acceleration region, similar to a Marshall gun, which provides a steady supply of plasma for approximately 100 us. The power to the plasma is partially decoupled between the acceleration and pinch assembly regions through the use of separate power supplies. Adiabatic scaling of the Bennett relation gives targets for future devices to reach high-energy density conditions or fusion reactors. The applicability of an adiabatic assumption is explored and work is done experimentally to clarify the plasma compression process, which may be more generally polytropic. The device is capable of a much larger parameter space than previous machine iterations, allowing flexibility in the initial conditions of the compression process to preserve stability. This work is supported by DoE FES and NNSA.

  19. The MOSDEF Survey: Electron Density and Ionization Parameter at z ~ 2.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Reddy, Naveen A.; Freeman, William R.; Coil, Alison L.; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Shivaei, Irene; Price, Sedona H.; de Groot, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Using observations from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey, we investigate the physical conditions of star-forming regions in z ˜ 2.3 galaxies, specifically the electron density and ionization state. From measurements of the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 and [S ii]λλ6716,6731 doublets, we find a median electron density of ˜250 cm-3 at z ˜ 2.3, an increase of an order of magnitude compared to measurements of galaxies at z ˜ 0. While z ˜ 2.3 galaxies are offset toward significantly higher O32 values relative to local galaxies at fixed stellar mass, we find that the high-redshift sample follows a similar distribution to the low-metallicity tail of the local distribution in the O32 versus R23 and O3N2 diagrams. Based on these results, we propose that z ˜ 2.3 star-forming galaxies have the same ionization parameter as local galaxies at fixed metallicity. In combination with simple photoionization models, the position of local and z ˜ 2.3 galaxies in excitation diagrams suggests that there is no significant change in the hardness of the ionizing spectrum at fixed metallicity from z ˜ 0 to z ˜ 2.3. We find that z ˜ 2.3 galaxies show no offset compared to low-metallicity local galaxies in emission line ratio diagrams involving only lines of hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, but show a systematic offset in diagrams involving [N ii]λ6584. We conclude that the offset of z ˜ 2.3 galaxies from the local star-forming sequence in the [N ii] BPT diagram is primarily driven by elevated N/O at fixed O/H compared to local galaxies. These results suggest that the local gas-phase and stellar metallicity sets the ionization state of star-forming regions at z ˜ 0 and z ˜ 2. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  20. THE MOSDEF SURVEY: ELECTRON DENSITY AND IONIZATION PARAMETER AT z ∼ 2.3

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Price, Sedona H.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Freeman, William R.; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Shivaei, Irene; Groot, Laura de; Coil, Alison L.

    2016-01-01

    Using observations from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey, we investigate the physical conditions of star-forming regions in z ∼ 2.3 galaxies, specifically the electron density and ionization state. From measurements of the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 and [S ii]λλ6716,6731 doublets, we find a median electron density of ∼250 cm{sup −3} at z ∼ 2.3, an increase of an order of magnitude compared to measurements of galaxies at z ∼ 0. While z ∼ 2.3 galaxies are offset toward significantly higher O{sub 32} values relative to local galaxies at fixed stellar mass, we find that the high-redshift sample follows a similar distribution to the low-metallicity tail of the local distribution in the O{sub 32} versus R{sub 23} and O3N2 diagrams. Based on these results, we propose that z ∼ 2.3 star-forming galaxies have the same ionization parameter as local galaxies at fixed metallicity. In combination with simple photoionization models, the position of local and z ∼ 2.3 galaxies in excitation diagrams suggests that there is no significant change in the hardness of the ionizing spectrum at fixed metallicity from z ∼ 0 to z ∼ 2.3. We find that z ∼ 2.3 galaxies show no offset compared to low-metallicity local galaxies in emission line ratio diagrams involving only lines of hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, but show a systematic offset in diagrams involving [N ii]λ6584. We conclude that the offset of z ∼ 2.3 galaxies from the local star-forming sequence in the [N ii] BPT diagram is primarily driven by elevated N/O at fixed O/H compared to local galaxies. These results suggest that the local gas-phase and stellar metallicity sets the ionization state of star-forming regions at z ∼ 0 and z ∼ 2.