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Sample records for density lipoprotein binding

  1. Effects of human low and high density lipoproteins on the binding of rat intermediate density lipoproteins to rat liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, L.; Nol, S.P.

    1986-05-25

    Upon incubation with rat liver membranes, radioiodinated rat intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) interacted with at least two binding sites having a low and a high affinity as demonstrated by the curvilinear Scatchard plots obtained from the specific binding data. The purpose of our work was to identify the nature of these binding sites. Human low density lipoproteins (LDL), contain apolipoprotein B only, and human high density lipoproteins (HDL3), containing neither apolipoprotein B nor E, were both capable of decreasing the specific binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. The Scatchard analysis clearly revealed that only the low affinity component was affected by the addition of these human lipoproteins. In fact, the low affinity binding component gradually decreased as the amount of human LDL or HDL3 increased in the binding assay. At a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, the low affinity binding was totally masked, and the Scatchard plot of the specific /sup 125/I-IDL binding became linear. Only the high affinity binding component was left, enabling a precise measurement of its binding parameters. In a series of competitive displacement experiments in which the binding assay contained a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, only unlabeled rat IDL effectively displaced the binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. We conclude that the low affinity binding of rat IDL to rat liver membranes is due to weak interactions with unspecified lipoprotein binding sites. The camouflage of these sites by human lipoproteins makes possible the study of IDL binding to the high affinity component which likely represents the combined effect of IDL binding to both the remnant and the LDL receptors.

  2. Lipoprotein receptors in copper-deficient rats: high density lipoprotein binding to liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hassel, C.A.; Lei, K.Y.; Marchello, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    In copper-deficient rats, the observed hyperlipoproteinemia was mainly due to the elevation in high density lipoproteins (HDL). This study was designed to determine whether an impairment in the binding of HDL to liver membrane is responsible for the hyperlipoproteinemia. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 treatments, namely copper (Cu) deficient and adequate (less than 1 and 8 mg Cu/kg of diet). After 8 weeks, plasma, heart and liver tissues were obtained. Reduction in liver Cu content and elevation in heart to body weight ratio and plasma cholesterol confirmed that rats fed the test diet were Cu-deficient. Plasma HDL isolated from both Cu-deficient and control rats were iodinated and bound to liver membranes prepared from rats of each treatment. Binding of /sup 125/I-HDL was competitively inhibited by unlabelled rat HDL from both treatments, but not by human LDL. Scatchard analysis of specific binding data showed that maximal /sup 125/I-HDL binding (per mg membrane protein) to membranes prepared from Cu-deficient rats was not lower than controls. Furthermore, the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from deficient rats specifically bound to liver membranes prepared from either treatment was not less than the amount of /sup 125/I-HDL from control rats bound to the same membranes. The data suggest that the hyperlipoproteinemia in Cu-deficient rats may not have resulted from a decrease in the number of hepatic HDL binding sites.

  3. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, H; Takahashi, K; Hamilton, R L; Havel, R J

    1989-01-01

    The high affinity of 45Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellular distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. Weaker ligand-blotting properties and an extraordinary susceptibility to proteolysis most likely contribute to the difficulty of detecting LRP in conventional assays for lipoprotein receptors. Our data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism. Images PMID:2594771

  4. CD36 binds oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) in a mechanism dependent upon fatty acid binding.

    PubMed

    Jay, Anthony G; Chen, Alexander N; Paz, Miguel A; Hung, Justin P; Hamilton, James A

    2015-02-20

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  5. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    PubMed

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  6. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  7. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  8. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouse(TM) platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  9. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  10. Characterization of binding sites for acetylated low density lipoprotein in the rat liver in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Dresel, H A; Friedrich, E; Via, D P; Schettler, G; Sinn, H

    1985-01-01

    Acetylated low density lipoprotein (acetyl-LDL) binding to hepatic membrane proteins of rats was analysed in vitro by ligand blotting. Specific binding could be demonstrated to two hepatic proteins with an apparent mol. wt. of 250 kd and 220 kd. Polyanionic competitors and maleylated bovine serum albumin inhibited the binding of acetyl-LDL effectively. To determine the sites of the catabolism of acetyl-LDL, [131I]-acetyl-LDL was injected intravenously into control rats and rats pre-treated with the known competitors of the acetyl-LDL binding. Distribution of the radiolabelled acetyl-LDL was followed by a scintillation camera. Six minutes after injection, the radioactivity was concentrated in the liver. The competitors and unlabelled acetyl-LDL but not native LDL reduced the hepatic uptake of [131I]acetyl-LDL dramatically. Thus, the sensitivity of the 220- and 250-kd membrane binding sites to the competitors for the acetyl-LDL binding resembled that of the hepatic compartment in vivo. Finally, an application of scintigraphy with radiolabelled low density lipoproteins for diagnostic evaluation of tumor compartments is presented. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4006910

  11. Evidence for Two Distinct Binding Sites for Lipoprotein Lipase on Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Reimund, Mart; Larsson, Mikael; Kovrov, Oleg; Kasvandik, Sergo; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2015-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is an endothelial membrane protein that transports lipoprotein lipase (LPL) from the subendothelial space to the luminal side of the capillary endothelium. Here, we provide evidence that two regions of GPIHBP1, the acidic N-terminal domain and the central Ly6 domain, interact with LPL as two distinct binding sites. This conclusion is based on comparative binding studies performed with a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the Ly6 domain of GPIHBP1, wild type GPIHBP1, and the Ly6 domain mutant GPIHBP1 Q114P. Although LPL and the N-terminal domain formed a tight but short lived complex, characterized by fast on- and off-rates, the complex between LPL and the Ly6 domain formed more slowly and persisted for a longer time. Unlike the interaction of LPL with the Ly6 domain, the interaction of LPL with the N-terminal domain was significantly weakened by salt. The Q114P mutant bound LPL similarly to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1. Heparin dissociated LPL from the N-terminal domain, and partially from wild type GPIHBP1, but was unable to elute the enzyme from the Ly6 domain. When LPL was in complex with the acidic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the enzyme retained its affinity for the Ly6 domain. Furthermore, LPL that was bound to the N-terminal domain interacted with lipoproteins, whereas LPL bound to the Ly6 domain did not. In summary, our data suggest that the two domains of GPIHBP1 interact independently with LPL and that the functionality of LPL depends on its localization on GPIHBP1. PMID:25873395

  12. Evidence for Two Distinct Binding Sites for Lipoprotein Lipase on Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1).

    PubMed

    Reimund, Mart; Larsson, Mikael; Kovrov, Oleg; Kasvandik, Sergo; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2015-05-29

    GPIHBP1 is an endothelial membrane protein that transports lipoprotein lipase (LPL) from the subendothelial space to the luminal side of the capillary endothelium. Here, we provide evidence that two regions of GPIHBP1, the acidic N-terminal domain and the central Ly6 domain, interact with LPL as two distinct binding sites. This conclusion is based on comparative binding studies performed with a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the Ly6 domain of GPIHBP1, wild type GPIHBP1, and the Ly6 domain mutant GPIHBP1 Q114P. Although LPL and the N-terminal domain formed a tight but short lived complex, characterized by fast on- and off-rates, the complex between LPL and the Ly6 domain formed more slowly and persisted for a longer time. Unlike the interaction of LPL with the Ly6 domain, the interaction of LPL with the N-terminal domain was significantly weakened by salt. The Q114P mutant bound LPL similarly to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1. Heparin dissociated LPL from the N-terminal domain, and partially from wild type GPIHBP1, but was unable to elute the enzyme from the Ly6 domain. When LPL was in complex with the acidic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the enzyme retained its affinity for the Ly6 domain. Furthermore, LPL that was bound to the N-terminal domain interacted with lipoproteins, whereas LPL bound to the Ly6 domain did not. In summary, our data suggest that the two domains of GPIHBP1 interact independently with LPL and that the functionality of LPL depends on its localization on GPIHBP1. PMID:25873395

  13. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J.; Mootoosamy, Roy C.; Ford, Melanie J.; Warley, Alice; Liu, Qiang; Bu, Guojun; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Moestrup, Søren; McGuinness, Lindsay; Emptage, Nigel; Morris, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrPSc) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrPC) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrPC is the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor clusters 2 and 4, PrPC and PrPSc fibrils bind only to receptor cluster 4. PrPSc fibrils out-compete PrPC for internalization. When endocytosed, PrPSc fibrils are routed to lysosomes, rather than recycled to the cell surface with PrPC. Thus, although LRP1 binds both forms of PrP, it traffics them to separate fates within sensory neurons. The binding of both to ligand cluster 4 should enable genetic modification of PrP binding without disrupting other roles of LRP1 essential to neuronal viability and function, thereby enabling in vivo analysis of the role of this interaction in controlling both prion and LRP1 biology. PMID:20048341

  14. Effects of retinoids on differentiation, lipid metabolism, epidermal growth factor, and low-density lipoprotein binding in squamous carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ponec, M.; Weerheim, A. ); Havekes, L. ); Boonstra, J. )

    1987-08-01

    The relationship among keratinocyte differentiation capacity, lipid synthesis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding has been studied in SCC-12F2 cells. The differentiation capacity of the cells, i.e., ionophore-induced cornified envelope formation, was inhibited by various retinoids and stimulated by hydrocortisone. Retinoids that caused a significant reduction of cornified envelope formation, i.e., retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid, caused only minor changes in lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Arotinoid ethylsulfone, having a minor effect on cornified envelope formation, caused a drastic inhibition of cholesterol synthesis resulting in changes in the plasma membrane composition. Hydrocortisone stimulated cornified envelope formation but had only minor effects on lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Of all retinoids tested, only arotinoid ethylsulfone caused a drastic increase in EGF binding, while hydrocortisone had no effect. These results clearly demonstrate that the plasma membrane composition is not related to keratinocyte differentiation capacity, but most likely does determine EGF binding. Furthermore, EGF binding does not determine keratinocyte differentiation capacity.

  15. Specific binding of human low-density lipoprotein to the surface of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni and ingestion by the parasite.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. W.; Caulfield, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) may be important in human schistosomiasis because LDL bound to the surface of the parasite inhibits the binding of anti-schistosomal antibodies. Low-density lipoproteins also may serve as a source of lipids for the parasite membrane synthesis. Here LDL fluorescently labeled with carbocyanine dye (DiI-LDL) was used to measure the specificity of binding of LDL to the surface of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni and to examine the distribution of the LDL particles over time. DiI-LDL binding was saturable and specific, with strong inhibition by unlabeled LDL and apoB but not by apoA1, bovine serum albumin, or IgG, and only weak inhibition by high-density lipoproteins. Half of the bound DiI-LDL was displaced by unlabeled LDL. DiI-LDL remained bound on the surface of schistosomula for up to 36 hours in culture. However parasites also ingested both DiI-LDL and a second fluorescent LDL, Bodipy-LDL. Over time, both fluorophores appeared throughout the worm tissues, suggesting the LDL particles were breaking down and that the fluorophores and lipids originally contained within the LDL particle were partitioning throughout the worm. Thus human LDL appears to bind to the surface of schistosomula specifically. Ingested LDL appears to be broken down and may serve as a source of host lipids for the parasite. Images Figure 1 Figure 9 PMID:2024706

  16. Inhibition of triacylglycerol and apoprotein B secretion and of low density lipoprotein binding in Hep G2 cells by eicosapentaenoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.H.; Nestel, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    The consumption of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of fish oils leads to profound lowering of plasma triacylglyercol (TAG) but not of plasma cholesterol. Reasons for this were investigated with the human hepatoma cell line, the Hep G2 cell. Incubations with oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid (LA) and the characteristic marine fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) enriched cellular TAG mass, though least with EPA. However, secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TAG and apoprotein B (apo B), measured from (/sup 3/H)-glycerol and (/sup 3/H)-leucine was markedly inhibited by EPA. Preincubation with LA reduced VLDL-TAG but not apo B secretion in comparison with OA which stimulated both. A possible effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) removal was studied by measuring (/sup 125/I)-LDL binding. Preincubation with either EPA or LA inhibited the saturable binding of LDL, observed with OA and control incubations. The binding of lipoproteins containing chylomicron remnants was not affected by any of the fatty acids.

  17. Baculovirus-mediated expression of human apolipoprotein E in Manduca sexta larvae generates particles that bind to the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gretch, D G; Sturley, S L; Friesen, P D; Beckage, N E; Attie, A D

    1991-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and mediates the catabolism of several classes of lipoprotein particles. Binding of apoE to the LDL receptor requires association of apoE with lipid in a vesicle or a lipoprotein particle. Because of this requirement, purified apoE or apoE derived directly from bacterial expression systems does not bind to the LDL receptor. To overcome this problem and to facilitate analysis of apoE structure, recombinant baculoviruses containing the human apoE cDNA fused to the polyhedrin promoter of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus were constructed. The recombinant viruses were used to infect larvae of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta in vivo. High levels of lipoprotein particles containing human apoE were present in the hemolymph of infected larvae. In contrast to apoE produced by recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells in vitro, these particles were excellent ligands for the LDL receptor. Images PMID:1924311

  18. Identification of high density lipoprotein-binding proteins, including a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane dipeptidase, in rat lung and type II pneumocytes.

    PubMed

    Witt, W; Kolleck, I; Rüstow, B

    2000-06-01

    Numerous communications have indicated that specific binding proteins for high density lipoprotein (HDL) exist in addition to the well characterized candidate HDL receptor SR-BI, but structural information was presented only in a few cases, and most of the work was aimed at the liver and steroidogenic glands. In this study, we purified two HDL-binding proteins by standard procedures from rat lung tissue. One of these membrane glycoproteins was identified by N-terminal sequencing and with specific antibodies as HB2, a previously described HDL-binding protein, whereas the other one was identified as a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane dipeptidase (MDP). The apparent dissociation constant of the HDL binding was determined by solid phase assay to be 2.1 microg/ml (HB2) and 25 microg/ml (MDP). MDP also exerts affinity to low density lipoprotein (LDL) on ligand blots, and competition between HDL and LDL was observed, but analysis by solid phase assay showed that very high concentrations of LDL are required. The physiologic relevance of this effect is therefore questionable. The level in type II pneumocyte membranes of both binding proteins, MDP and HB2, increased when the plasma lipoprotein concentration was reduced by treatment of rats with 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine, consistent with a function to facilitate lipid uptake in vivo. The binding proteins were also dramatically upregulated by feeding rats a vitamin E-depleted diet. Vitamin E uptake requires interaction between HDL and type II cells, suggesting a role of HB2 and MDP also in this process.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ligand-binding domain of human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Tomoko; Ohki, Izuru; Oyama, Takuji; Machida, Sachiko; Morikawa, Kousuke; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2005-05-01

    Two different fragments of the ligand-binding domain of LOX-1, the major receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on endothelial cells, have been crystallized in different forms. Two different fragments of the ligand-binding domain of LOX-1, the major receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on endothelial cells, have been crystallized in different forms. One crystal form contains the disulfide-linked dimer, which is the form of the molecule present on the cell surface; the other contains a monomeric form of the receptor that lacks the cysteine residue necessary to form disulfide-linked homodimers. The crystal of the monomeric ligand-binding domain belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.79, b = 67.57, c = 79.02 Å. The crystal of the dimeric form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.86, b = 49.56, c = 76.73 Å, β = 98.59°. Data for the dimeric form of the LOX-1 ligand-binding domain have been collected to 2.4 Å. For the monomeric form of the ligand-binding domain, native, heavy-atom derivative and SeMet-derivative crystals have been obtained; their diffraction data have been measured to 3.0, 2.4 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively.

  20. Role of low-density lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Ziajka, Paul

    2005-08-22

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis has been shown to reduce plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a). In addition to these lipoprotein changes, LDL apheresis induces atherosclerosis regression, improves myocardial perfusion and endothelial function, and may reduce cardiovascular event rates. PMID:16098847

  1. Effects of hyperinsulinemia on lipoprotein lipase, angiopoietin-like protein 4, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1 in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Toralph; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia; Makoveichuk, Elena; Lundgren, Magdalena; Svensson, Maria K; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Eriksson, Jan W

    2012-05-01

    Our aims were to compare the systemic effects of insulin on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in tissues from subjects with different degrees of insulin sensitivity. The effects of insulin on LPL during a 4-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp were studied in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and postheparin plasma from young healthy subjects (YS), older subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DS), and older control subjects (CS). In addition, we studied the effects of insulin on the expression of 2 recently recognized candidate genes for control of LPL activity: angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1. As an effect of insulin, LPL activity decreased by 20% to 25% in postheparin plasma and increased by 20% to 30% in adipose tissue in all groups. In YS, the levels of ANGPTL4 messenger RNA in adipose tissue decreased 3-fold during the clamp. In contrast, there was no significant change in DS or CS. Regression analysis showed that the ability of insulin to reduce the expression of ANGPTL4 was positively correlated with M-values and inversely correlated with factors linked to the metabolic syndrome. Expression of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1 tended to be higher in YS than in DS or CS, but the expression was not affected by insulin in any of the groups. Our data imply that the insulin-mediated regulation of LPL is not directly linked to the control of glucose turnover by insulin or to ANGPTL4 expression in adipose tissue or plasma. Interestingly, the response of ANGPTL4 expression in adipose tissue to insulin was severely blunted in both DS and CS. PMID:22078753

  2. Visualization of the binding, endocytosis, and transcytosis of low- density lipoprotein in the arterial endothelium in situ

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We investigated the interaction and transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) through the arterial endothelium in rat aorta and coronary artery, by perfusing in situ native, untagged human, and rat LDL. The latter was rendered electron-opaque after it interacted with the endothelial cell and was subsequently fixed within tissue. We achieved LDL electron-opacity by an improved fixation procedure using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine, and mordanting with tannic acid. The unequivocal identification of LDL was implemented by reacting immunocytochemically the perfused LDL with anti LDL-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Results indicate that LDL is taken up and internalized through two parallel compartmented routes. (a) A relatively small amount of LDL is taken up by endocytosis via: (i) a receptor-mediated process (adsorptive endocytosis) that involved coated pits/vesicles, and endosomes, and, probably, (ii) a receptor-independent process (fluid endocytosis) carried out by a fraction of plasmalemmal vesicles. Both mechanisms bringing LDL to lysosomes supply cholesterol to the endothelial cell itself. (b) Most circulating LDL is transported across the endothelial cell by transcytosis via plasmalemmal vesicles which deliver LDL to the other cells of the vessel wall. Endocytosis is not enhanced by increasing LDL concentration, but the receptor-mediated internalization decreases at low temperature. Transcytosis is less modified by low temperature but is remarkably augmented at high concentration of LDL. While the endocytosis of homologous (rat) LDL is markedly more pronounced than that of heterologous (human) LDL, both types of LDL are similarly transported by transcytosis. These results indicate that the arterial endothelium possesses a dual mechanism for handling circulating LDL: by a high affinity process, endocytosis secures the endothelial cells' need for cholesterol; by a low-affinity nonsaturable uptake process, transcytosis supplies cholesterol to the other cells of the

  3. Apolipoprotein E LDL receptor-binding domain-containing high-density lipoprotein: a nanovehicle to transport curcumin, an antioxidant and anti-amyloid bioflavonoid.

    PubMed

    Khumsupan, Panupon; Ramirez, Ricardo; Khumsupan, Darin; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioflavonoid that has been recently identified as an anti-amyloid agent as well. To make it more available in its potent form as a potential amyloid disaggregation agent, we employed high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are lipid-protein complexes that transport plasma cholesterol, to transport curcumin. The objective of this study was to employ reconstituted HDL containing human apoE3 N-terminal (NT) domain, as a vehicle to transport curcumin. The NT domain serves as a ligand to mediate binding and uptake of lipoprotein complexes via the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) family of proteins located at the cell surface. Reconstituted HDL was prepared with phospholipids and recombinant apoE3-NT domain in the absence or presence of curcumin. Non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the molecular mass and Stokes' diameter of HDL bearing curcumin were ~670kDa and ~17nm, respectively, while electron microscopy revealed the presence of discoidal particles. Fluorescence emission spectra of HDL bearing (the intrinsically fluorescent) curcumin indicated that the wavelength of maximal fluorescence emission (λ(max)) of curcumin was ~495nm, which is highly blue-shifted compared to λ(max) of curcumin in solvents of varying polarity (λ(max) ranging from 515-575nm) or in aqueous buffers. In addition, an enormous enhancement in fluorescence emission intensity was noted in curcumin-containing HDL compared to curcumin in aqueous buffers. Curcumin fluorescence emission was quenched to a significant extent by lipid-based quenchers but not by aqueous quenchers. These observations indicate that curcumin has partitioned efficiently into the hydrophobic milieu of the phospholipid bilayer of HDL. Functional assays indicated that the LDLr-binding ability of curcumin-containing HDL with apoE3-NT is similar to that of HDL without curcumin. Taken together, we report that apoE-containing HDL has a tremendous

  4. Development and application of a nonradioactive binding assay of oxidized low-density lipoprotein to macrophage scavenger receptors

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Erica N.; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Binder, Christoph J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis in part through excessive uptake of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) via scavenger receptors. Binding of OxLDL to macrophages has traditionally been assessed using radiolabeled OxLDL. To allow more efficient and convenient measurements, we developed a nonradioactive binding assay in which biotinylated OxLDL (Bt-OxLDL) is added to macrophages in 96-well microtiter culture plates under various conditions and the extent of binding is determined using solid phase chemiluminescent immunoassay techniques. As examples, we show that Bt-OxLDL displayed high and saturable binding to macrophages in contrast to Bt-LDL, which showed very low binding. In competition assays, unlabeled OxLDL and the anti-OxLDL monoclonal antibody E06 inhibited Bt-OxLDL binding to macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Specific binding of Bt-OxLDL to ApoE/SR-A/CD36 triple knockout macrophages was reduced by 80% as compared with binding to macrophages from ApoE knockout mice. Binding of Bt-OxLDL to CD36 transfected COS-7 cells showed enhanced saturable binding compared with mock-transfected cells. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and uses small amounts of materials. It can be used to study binding of OxLDL to macrophages and factors that influence this binding. The techniques described should be readily adaptable to study of other ligands, receptors, and cell types. PMID:23997238

  5. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter-2 (ABCA2) Regulates Cholesterol Homeostasis and Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Metabolism in N2a Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter-2 (ABCA2) has been identified as a possible regulator of lipid metabolism. ABCA2 is most highly expressed in the brain but its effects on cholesterol homeostasis in neuronal-type cells have not been characterized. It is important to study the role of ABCA2 in regulating cholesterol homeostasis in neuronal-type cells because ABCA2 has been identified as a possible genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, the effects of ABCA2 expression on cholesterol homeostasis were examined in mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells. ABCA2 reduced total, free- and esterified cholesterol levels as well as membrane cholesterol but did not perturb cholesterol distribution in organelle or lipid raft compartments. ABCA2 did not modulate de novo cholesterol biosynthesis from acetate. Cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane was not affected by ABCA2 but efflux to the physiological acceptor ApoE3 and mobilization of plasma membrane cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum for esterification were reduced by ABCA2. ABCA2 reduced esterification of serum and low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol but not 25-hydroxycholesterol. ABCA2 decreased low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA and protein levels and increased its turnover rate. The surface expression of LDLR as well as the uptake of fluroresecent DiI-LDL was also reduced by ABCA2. Reduction of endogenous ABCA2 expression by RNAi treatment of N2a cells and rat primary cortical neurons produced the opposite effects of over-expression of ABCA2, increasing LDLR protein levels. This report identifies ABCA2 as a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis and LDLR metabolism in neuronal cells. PMID:21810484

  6. Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 reduces cardiac fibroblast proliferation by suppressing GATA Binding Protein 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Ning-Ning; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Shuang-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Zhi; Li, Ai-Qun; Liu, Shi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and GATA Binding Protein 4 (GATA4) are important for the growth of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). When deregulated, LOX-1 and GATA4 can cause cardiac remodeling. In the present study, we found novel evidence that GATA4 was required for the LOX-1 regulation of CF proliferation. The inhibition of LOX-1 by RNA interference LOX-1 lentivirus resulted in the loss of PI3K/Akt activation and GATA4 protein expression. The overexpression of LOX-1 by lentivirus rescued CF proliferation, PI3K/Akt activation, and GATA4 protein expression. Moreover, GATA4 overexpression enhanced CF proliferation with LOX-1 inhibition. We also found that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and protein level of GATA4. In summary, GATA4 may play an important role in the LOX-1 and PI3K/Akt regulation of CF proliferation. PMID:27216460

  7. A1M/α1-microglobulin is proteolytically activated by myeloperoxidase, binds its heme group and inhibits low density lipoprotein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Cederlund, Martin; Deronic, Adnan; Pallon, Jan; Sørensen, Ole E.; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    α1-microglobulin (A1M) is a 26 kDa plasma and tissue protein with reductase activity and radical- and heme-binding anti-oxidative functions. In addition, exposure of A1M to hemoglobin has been shown to induce proteolytic elimination of a C-terminal tetrapeptide yielding a heme-degrading form, truncated A1M (t-A1M). Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme-containing enzyme that catalyzes the production of free radicals and hypochlorite, is released by neutrophils during the inflammatory response to bacterial infections. MPO-induced low density lipoprotein (LDL)-oxidation in blood has been suggested as a causative factor in atherosclerosis. In this study we have hypothesized that A1M interacts with MPO in a similar mode as with hemoglobin, and is a regulator of its activity. The results show that A1M is proteolytically cleaved, with formation of t-A1M, after exposure to MPO, and that t-A1M contains iron and heme-degradation products. The reaction is dependent of pH, time and concentration of substrates and a pH-value around 7 is shown to be optimal for cleavage. Furthermore, A1M inhibits MPO- and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation of LDL. The results suggest that A1M may have a role as an inhibitor of the damaging effects of the neutrophil respiratory burst on bystander tissue components. PMID:25698971

  8. Identification of a Small Peptide That Inhibits PCSK9 Protein Binding to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingnan; Eigenbrot, Charles; Zhou, Lijuan; Shia, Steven; Li, Wei; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Moran, Paul; Di Lello, Paola; Skelton, Nicholas J.; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Peterson, Andrew; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a negative regulator of the hepatic LDL receptor, and clinical studies with PCSK9-inhibiting antibodies have demonstrated strong LDL-c-lowering effects. Here we screened phage-displayed peptide libraries and identified the 13-amino acid linear peptide Pep2-8 as the smallest PCSK9 inhibitor with a clearly defined mechanism of inhibition that has been described. Pep2-8 bound to PCSK9 with a KD of 0.7 μm but did not bind to other proprotein convertases. It fully restored LDL receptor surface levels and LDL particle uptake in PCSK9-treated HepG2 cells. The crystal structure of Pep2-8 bound to C-terminally truncated PCSK9 at 1.85 Å resolution showed that the peptide adopted a strand-turn-helix conformation, which is remarkably similar to its solution structure determined by NMR. Consistent with the functional binding site identified by an Ala scan of PCSK9, the structural Pep2-8 contact region of about 400 Å2 largely overlapped with that contacted by the EGF(A) domain of the LDL receptor, suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism. Consistent with this, Pep2-8 inhibited LDL receptor and EGF(A) domain binding to PCSK9 with IC50 values of 0.8 and 0.4 μm, respectively. Remarkably, Pep2-8 mimicked secondary structural elements of the EGF(A) domain that interact with PCSK9, notably the β-strand and a discontinuous short α-helix, and it engaged in the same β-sheet hydrogen bonds as EGF(A) does. Although Pep2-8 itself may not be amenable to therapeutic applications, this study demonstrates the feasibility of developing peptidic inhibitors to functionally relevant sites on PCSK9. PMID:24225950

  9. Onion peel extract increases hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 messenger RNA expressions in Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Moon, Jiyoung; Do, Hyun Ju; Chung, Ji Hyung; Lee, Kyung-Hea; Cha, Yong-Jun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that onion peel extract (OPE) alters hepatic gene expression to improve blood cholesterol profiles. To investigate the effect of OPE to test our hypothesis, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum for 8 weeks with the control, high-fat diet (HFD) or the high-fat diet with 0.2% OPE supplementations (HFD + OPE). Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of genes in cholesterol metabolism and fatty acid metabolism were examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The OPE in HFD reverted high fat-induced reduction in mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase genes in the liver comparable with the levels of the control group. Onion peel extract slightly increased stearoyl-coA desaturase 1 (SCD-1) expression compared with high-fat feeding. However, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and fatty acid synthase were not affected by high-fat or OPE feeding. Onion peel extract also enhanced expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 and scavenger receptor class B type I genes when compared with high-fat feeding. However, OPE did not influence high fat-triggered changes in apolipoprotein A1 mRNA levels and liver X receptor α were not affected by either high-fat or OPE feeding. Our results suggest that OPE changes the expression of genes associated with cholesterol metabolism in favor of lowering blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and enhancing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through increasing mRNA abundance of low-density lipoprotein receptor and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 genes. PMID:22464808

  10. Apolipoprotein AI tertiary structures determine stability and phospholipid-binding activity of discoidal high-density lipoprotein particles of different sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Ren, Xuefeng; Neville, Tracey; Jerome, W. Gray; Hoyt, David W.; Sparks, Daniel L.; Ren, Gang; Wang, Jianjun

    2009-05-18

    Human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a key role in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway that delivers excess cholesterol back to the liver for clearance. In vivo, HDL particles vary in size, shape and biological function. The discoidal HDL is a 140-240 kDa, disk-shaped intermediate of mature HDL. During mature spherical HDL formation, discoidal HDLs play a key role in loading cholesterol ester onto the HDL particles by activating the enzyme, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). One of the major problems for high-resolution structural studies of discoidal HDL is the difficulty in obtaining pure and, foremost, homogenous sample. We demonstrate here that the commonly used cholate dialysis method for discoidal HDL preparation usually contains 5-10% lipid-poor apoAI that significantly interferes with the high-resolution structural analysis of discoidal HDL using biophysical methods. Using an ultracentrifugation method, we quickly removed lipid-poor apoAI. We also purified discoidal reconstituted HDL (rHDL) into two pure discoidal HDL species of different sizes that are amendable for high-resolution structural studies. A small rHDL has a diameter of 7.6 nm, and a large rHDL has a diameter of 9.8 nm. We show that these two different sizes of discoidal HDL particles display different stability and phospholipid-binding activity. Interestingly, these property/functional differences are independent from the apoAI -helical secondary structure, but are determined by the tertiary structural difference of apoAI on different discoidal rHDL particles, as evidenced by two-dimensional NMR and negative stain electron microscopy data. Our result further provides the first high-resolution NMR data, demonstrating a promise of structural determination of discoidal HDL at atomic resolution using a combination of NMR and other biophysical techniques.

  11. The antigenic similarity of human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    LEVINE, L; KAUFFMAN, D L; BROWN, R K

    1955-08-01

    THE FOLLOWING HUMAN LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS WERE PREPARED: beta-lipoproteins of densities greater than 1.040 (A, B,C) a beta-lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 5 (D), a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 19 (E), and a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 70 (F). Data are presented which show the immunochemical homogeneity of the D lipoprotein rabbit-anti-D lipoprotein system. Cross-reactions between antibody to A and D lipoproteins and the above lipoproteins have been demonstrated by quantitative precipitation, quanitative complement fixation, and single and double diffusion in agar. The antigenic similarities appear to be associated with the protein portions of the molecule. The antisera produced did not differentiate the low density lipoprotein classes. PMID:13242737

  12. Common polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette transporter A1, including a functional promoter polymorphism, associated with plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Turks.

    PubMed

    Hodoğlugil, Uğur; Williamson, David W; Huang, Yadong; Mahley, Robert W

    2005-12-01

    The role of high levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in protection against development of atherosclerosis is generally attributed to its role in reverse cholesterol transport, and the ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a key element of this process. We examined polymorphisms in ABCA1 in Turks, a population characterized by very low HDL-C levels. We discovered 36 variations in ABCA1 and genotyped informative polymorphisms in over 2,300 subjects. The rare alleles of C-14T and V771M polymorphisms were associated with higher HDL-C levels in men and, in combination with the rare alleles of R219K and I883M, respectively, with higher HDL-C in both sexes. Rare alleles of the C-14T and V771M polymorphisms were more frequent in the high HDL-C (>OR=40mg/dl) than in the low HDL-C group (

  13. Dot-blot assay for the low density lipoprotein receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Catapano, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a new method for detecting the interaction of low density lipoprotein with its receptor using unmodified nitrocellulose as support for membrane protein. The method is specific and sensitive down to 3 micrograms of membrane protein. Unlabeled LDL, but not HDL, competes with /sup 125/I-labeled LDL for binding, and binding is abolished by pretreatment of the membranes with pronase and is dependent upon the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, modification of arginine or lysine residues on LDL abolishes the lipoprotein interaction with the receptor protein supported on the nitrocellulose. When the membranes are solubilized with octyl glucoside, purification steps of the receptor can be directly followed with no interference of the detergent, therefore eliminating the need for its removal. The increased expression of LDL receptors on liver membranes from estradiol-treated rats was also demonstrated. We suggest, therefore, that this method can be used to detect the presence of LDL receptors on minute amounts of membrane protein.

  14. Dense low density lipoproteins and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1995-02-23

    A common, genetically influenced lipoprotein subclass profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with relative increases in plasma triglyceride and apolipoprotein (apo) B-100, and reduced levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and apoAI. Recently, this phenotype has also been associated with the insulin resistance syndrome and familial combined hyperlipidemia. Case-control studies of patients with myocardial infarction and angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated that 40-50% of patients have the small, dense LDL phenotype and that this is associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in disease risk. However, because of strong statistical correlations among the multiple features of the phenotype, it has been difficult to determine whether > or = 1 of its metabolic alterations are primarily responsible for increased CAD susceptibility. More direct evidence for enhanced atherogenicity of lipoproteins in this trait derives from a recent report that LDL-cholesterol lowering by diet and drug treatment resulted in reduced coronary angiographic progression in CAD subjects with predominantly dense LDL, but that an equivalent lowering of LDL cholesterol in subjects with more buoyant LDL was not associated with angiographic benefit. Further, in vitro findings have indicated increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidative modification and relatively greater binding of these particles to arterial wall proteoglycans. Thus, the small, dense LDL trait may underlie familial predisposition to CAD in a large proportion of the population, and its presence may indicate the potential for benefit from specific therapeutic interventions.

  15. Abnormal high density lipoproteins in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.; Salen, G.; Cheng, F.W.; Forte, T.; Shefer, S.; Tint, G.S.

    1981-11-01

    The plasma lipoprotein profiles and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were characterized in patients with the genetic disease cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). The mean HDL-cholesterol concentration in the CTX plasmas was 14.5 +/- 3.2 mg/dl, about one-third the normal value. The low HDL-cholesterol reflects a low concentration and an abnormal lipid composition of the plasma HDL. Relative to normal HDL, the cholesteryl esters are low, free cholesterol and phospholipids essentially normal, and triglycerides increased. The ratio of apoprotein (apo) to total cholesterol in the HDL of CTX was two to three times greater than normal. In the CTX HDL, the ratio of apoAI to apoAII was high, the proportion of apoC low, and a normally minor form of apoAI increased relative to other forms. The HDL in electron micrographs appeared normal morphologically and in particle size. The adnormalities in lipoprotein distribution profiles and composition of the plasma HDL result from metabolic defects that are not understood but may be linked to the genetic defect in bile acid synthesis in CTX. As a consequence, it is probable that the normal functions of the HDL, possibly including modulation of LDL-cholesterol uptake and the removal of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues, are perturbed significantly in this disease.

  16. Double Superhelix Model of High Density Lipoprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiping; Gogonea, Valentin; Lee, Xavier; Wagner, Matthew A.; Li, Xin-Min; Huang, Ying; Undurti, Arundhati; May, Roland P.; Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Gutsche, Irina; Zaccai, Giuseppe; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL), the carrier of so-called “good” cholesterol, serves as the major athero-protective lipoprotein and has emerged as a key therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease. We applied small angle neutron scattering (SANS) with contrast variation and selective isotopic deuteration to the study of nascent HDL to obtain the low resolution structure in solution of the overall time-averaged conformation of apolipoprotein AI (apoA-I) versus the lipid (acyl chain) core of the particle. Remarkably, apoA-I is observed to possess an open helical shape that wraps around a central ellipsoidal lipid phase. Using the low resolution SANS shapes of the protein and lipid core as scaffolding, an all-atom computational model for the protein and lipid components of nascent HDL was developed by integrating complementary structural data from hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and previously published constraints from multiple biophysical techniques. Both SANS data and the new computational model, the double superhelix model, suggest an unexpected structural arrangement of protein and lipids of nascent HDL, an anti-parallel double superhelix wrapped around an ellipsoidal lipid phase. The protein and lipid organization in nascent HDL envisages a potential generalized mechanism for lipoprotein biogenesis and remodeling, biological processes critical to sterol and lipid transport, organismal energy metabolism, and innate immunity. PMID:19812036

  17. Intrinsic enzymes of high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Le, Ngoc-Anh; Walter, Mary F

    2007-03-01

    Several lines of evidence are available to support the protective effects of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) on atherosclerosis. The exact mechanisms by which HDL protects against atherosclerotic disease development are not understood. In addition to its role in the reverse transport of cholesterol from the peripheral sites to the liver for excretion, HDL also carries a number of enzymes that contribute to the remodeling of plasma lipoproteins and to the protection of other lipoproteins against oxidative modification. Many of these enzymes can play a role in determining the composition of circulating HDL, while others appear to affect specific biologic activities associated with HDL. It is not clear whether the concentrations of HDL particles or the activities associated with this class of particles are more important. One of the problems is that HDL constitutes a heterogeneous population of particles, and analytical tools to characterize the various subpopulations are not widely available. In this article, we will review the enzymes that are associated with plasma HDL and possible mechanisms as to how these may contribute to the protective properties of HDL in humans. PMID:21291665

  18. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  19. Why are low-density lipoproteins atherogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Young, S G; Parthasarathy, S

    1994-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) carry most of the cholesterol in human plasma, and high levels of LDL cholesterol clearly cause heart disease. In recent years, many scientists have focused on elucidating the pathophysiologic steps that lie between elevated levels of LDL in the plasma and atherosclerotic plaques in the arterial wall. A large number of scientific studies indicate that oxidation of LDL within the arterial wall may be an important early step in atherogenesis. The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a likely explanation for the formation of macrophage foam cells in early atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, oxidized LDL has many other potentially proatherogenic properties. Images PMID:8160466

  20. Human Serum Amyloid A3 (SAA3) Protein, Expressed as a Fusion Protein with SAA2, Binds the Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Takeshi; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Serum amyloid A3 (SAA3) possesses characteristics distinct from the other serum amyloid A isoforms, SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4. High density lipoprotein contains the latter three isoforms, but not SAA3. The expression of mouse SAA3 (mSAA3) is known to be up-regulated extrahepatically in inflammatory responses, and acts as an endogenous ligand for the toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. We previously reported that mSAA3 plays an important role in facilitating tumor metastasis by attracting circulating tumor cells and enhancing hyperpermeability in the lungs. On the other hand, human SAA3 (hSAA3) has long been regarded as a pseudogene, which is in contrast to the abundant expression levels of the other isoforms. Although the nucleotide sequence of hSAA3 is very similar to that of the other SAAs, a single oligonucleotide insertion in exon 2 causes a frame-shift to generate a unique amino acid sequence. In the present study, we identified that hSAA3 was transcribed in the hSAA2-SAA3 fusion transcripts of several human cell lines. In the fusion transcript, hSAA2 exon 3 was connected to hSAA3 exon 1 or hSAA3 exon 2, located approximately 130kb downstream from hSAA2 exon 3 in the genome, which suggested that it is produced by alternative splicing. Furthermore, we succeeded in detecting and isolating hSAA3 protein for the first time by an immunoprecipitation-enzyme linked immune assay system using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that recognize the hSAA3 unique amino acid sequence. We also demonstrated that hSAA3 bound oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor (oxLDL receptor, LOX-1) and elevated the phosphorylation of ERK, the intracellular MAP-kinase signaling protein. PMID:25738827

  1. Membrane receptors for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, P.I.; Beck, G.; Zucker, S.

    1981-06-01

    Physiologic concentrations of human plasma very low density lipoproteins inhibit the DNA synthesis of lymphocytes stimulated by allogeneic cells or lectins. In this report reachers have compared the effects of isolated lipoproteins (very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL)) and lipoprotein-depleted plasma (LDP) on DNA synthesis by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. The relative potency for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was VLDL greater than LDL greater than HDL greater than LDP. Fifty percent inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed at a VLDL protein concentration of 1.5--2.0 microgram/ml. Researchers have further demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for VLDL on human lymphocytes. Native VLDL was more effective than LDL in competing for 125I-VLDL binding sites. Subsequent to binding to lymphocytes, 125I-VLDL was internalized and degraded to acid-soluble products. Based on a Scatchard analysis of VLDL binding at 4 degrees C, the number of VLDL receptors per lymphocyte was estimated at 28,000 +/- 1300. Based on an estimated mean binding affinity for the VLDL receptor complex at half saturation of approximately 8.8 X 10(7) liter/mole, it is estimated that 91% of lymphocyte VLDL receptors are occupied at physiologic VLDL concentrations in blood. Although the immune regulatory role of plasma lipoproteins is uncertain, researchers suggest tha VLDL and LDL-In may maintain circulating blood lymphocytes in a nonproliferative state via their respective cell receptor mechanisms.

  2. Metabolic abnormalities: triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-06-01

    Increased plasma triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are key features of the metabolic syndrome. Although elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not an integral characteristic of this syndrome, there is commonly an increase in the proportion of small, dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Together, these abnormalities constitute the atherogenic dyslipidemia of the metabolic syndrome. This article reviews the pathophysiology of altered triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome, outlines the relationship of these lipoprotein abnormalities to increased risk of coronary heart disease,and highlights the application of this information to clinical practice. The role of reduced high-density lipoprotein in the metabolic syndrome is discussed elsewhere in this issue.

  3. [Atherogenic modification of low-density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Sukhorukov, V N; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2016-05-01

    One of the first manifestations of atherosclerosis is accumulation of extra- and intracellular cholesterol esters in the arterial intima. Formation of foam cells is considered as a trigger in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) circulating in human blood is the source of lipids accumulated in the arterial walls. This review considered features and role in atherogenesis different modified forms of LDL: oxidized, small dense, electronegative and especially desialylated LDL. Desialylated LDL of human blood plasma is capable to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells and it is atherogenic. LDL possesses numerous alterations of protein, carbohydrate and lipid moieties and therefore can be termed multiple-modified LDL. Multiple modification of LDL occurs in human blood plasma and represents a cascade of successive changes in the lipoprotein particle: desialylation, loss of lipids, reduction in the particle size, increase of surface electronegative charge, etc. In addition to intracellular lipid accumulation, stimulatory effects of naturally occurring multiple-modified LDL on other processes involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, namely cell proliferation and fibrosis, were shown. PMID:27562992

  4. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association.

  5. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  6. Charge properties of low density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    La Belle, M; Blanche, P J; Krauss, R M

    1997-04-01

    Measurements of electrophoretic mobility and particle size of low density lipoproteins (LDL) allowed use of standard electrokinetic theory to quantitate LDL charge characteristics from subjects with predominance of large LDL (pattern A, n = 9) or small LDL (pattern B, n = 8). Pattern A LDL was found to have significantly lower (P < or = 0.001) mobility (-0.22 +/- 0.01 micron s-1 cm V-1), surface potential (-4.2 +/- 0.3 mV) and charge density (-500 +/- 34 esu/cm2) than pattern B LDL (-0.25 +/- 0.01 micron s-1 cm V-1, -4.9 +/- 0.3 mV, and -580 +/- 30 esu/cm2), but no significant difference in particle valence (-22.0 +/- 1.4 for pattern A vs. -21.8 +/- 1.9 for pattern B). Thus, the greater mobility of pattern B LDL is due to similar net charge residing on a smaller particle. Comparison of subfractions in pattern B relative to pattern A LDL revealed greater surface potential in all pattern B subfractions and greater charge density in fractions of d > or = 1.032 g/ml. In a subset of subjects incubation with neuraminidase produced significant reductions in all LDL charge parameters for all subfractions, but did not abolish the differences between pattern A and B. Thus increased surface potential and charge density of unfractionated pattern B LDL is due both to charge properties of particles across the size and density spectrum as well as enrichment of pattern B LDL with smaller, denser particles that have higher surface charge density.

  7. Drug binding in sera deficient in lipoproteins, albumin or orosomucoid.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, E; Kierulf, P; Skuterud, B; Bredesen, J E; Lunde, P K

    1983-01-01

    The relative role of lipoproteins, albumin and orosomucoid in the serum binding variation of various drugs was examined by separate removal of these proteins. Lipoproteins were removed from serum by ultracentrifugation, albumin by affinity chromatography and orosomucoid by immunoprecipitation. Removal of the lipoproteins did not affect the serum binding of the acidic (phenytoin) and neutral (digitoxin) drugs tested, nor the basic drugs disopyramide, quinidine or propranolol. A reduction in binding of amitryptyline, nortriptyline, doxepin and desmethyldoxepin was observed. Removal of albumin did, with some exception for nortriptyline, not affect the serum binding of the basic drugs tested. A pronounced reduction in the binding of phenytoin and digitoxin was observed. Removal of orosomucoid did not affect the binding of the acidic and neutral drugs tested. A reduction in the binding of all the basic drugs tested was observed, especially for disopyramide whose binding almost disappeared. Quinidine, propranolol, phenytoin and digitoxin all bound to isolated lipoproteins, but the removal of lipoproteins had no effect on the total serum binding for these drugs. Hence, the use of deficient sera provides valuable information as to the quantitative role of the various proteins in drug binding, whereas studies using purified proteins are often necessary to examine the mechanisms of the drug protein interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6626414

  8. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  9. Particulate Matter Promotes In Vitro Receptor-Recognizable Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Dysfunction of Lipid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-León, Natalia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Sevilla-Tapia, Laura; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Serrano, Jesús; O’Neill, Marie S.; García-Cuellar, Claudia M.; Quintana, Raúl; Vázquez-López, Inés

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter may promote cardiovascular disease, possibly as a consequence of its oxidative potential. Studies using susceptible animals indicate that particulate matter aggravates atherosclerosis by increasing lipid/macrophage content in plaques. Macrophage lipid uptake requires oxidized low-density lipoprotein and scavenger receptors; same receptors are involved in particulate matter uptake. We studied in vitro particulate matter potential to oxidize low-density lipoproteins and subsequent cell uptake through scavenger receptors. Particulate matter-induced low-density lipoproteins oxidation was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid assay. Binding/internalization was tested in wild type and scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, and in RAW264.7 cells using fluorescently labeled low-density lipoproteins. Dose-dependent binding/internalization only occurred in scavenger receptor–transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells and RAW264.7 cells. Competition binding/internalization using particles showed that particulate matter induced decreased binding (~50%) and internalization (~70%) of particle-oxidized low-density lipoproteins and native low-density lipoproteins. Results indicate that particulate matter was capable of oxidizing low-density lipoproteins, favoring macrophage internalization, and also altered scavenger and low-density lipoproteins receptor function. PMID:23297186

  10. Nanobiotechnology applications of reconstituted high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a fundamental role in the Reverse Cholesterol Transport pathway. Prior to maturation, nascent HDL exist as disk-shaped phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is stabilized by amphipathic apolipoproteins. Methods have been developed to generate reconstituted (rHDL) in vitro and these particles have been used in a variety of novel ways. To differentiate between physiological HDL particles and non-natural rHDL that have been engineered to possess additional components/functions, the term nanodisk (ND) is used. In this review, various applications of ND technology are described, such as their use as miniature membranes for solubilization and characterization of integral membrane proteins in a native like conformation. In other work, ND harboring hydrophobic biomolecules/drugs have been generated and used as transport/delivery vehicles. In vitro and in vivo studies show that drug loaded ND are stable and possess potent biological activity. A third application of ND is their use as a platform for incorporation of amphiphilic chelators of contrast agents, such as gadolinium, used in magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, it is demonstrated that the basic building block of plasma HDL can be repurposed for alternate functions. PMID:21122135

  11. High-Density Lipoproteins: Nature's Multifunctional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Rui; Li, Dan; Chen, Y Eugene; Moon, James J; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-03-22

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are endogenous nanoparticles involved in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides. HDL is well-known as the "good" cholesterol because it not only removes excess cholesterol from atherosclerotic plaques but also has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties, which protect the cardiovascular system. Circulating HDL also transports endogenous proteins, vitamins, hormones, and microRNA to various organs. Compared with other synthetic nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, and inorganic and polymeric nanoparticles, HDL has unique features that allow them to deliver cargo to specific targets more efficiently. These attributes include their ultrasmall size (8-12 nm in diameter), high tolerability in humans (up to 8 g of protein per infusion), long circulating half-life (12-24 h), and intrinsic targeting properties to different recipient cells. Various recombinant ApoA proteins and ApoA mimetic peptides have been recently developed for the preparation of reconstituted HDL that exhibits properties similar to those of endogenous HDL and has a potential for industrial scale-up. In this review, we will summarize (a) clinical pharmacokinetics and safety of reconstituted HDL products, (b) comparison of HDL with inorganic and other organic nanoparticles, PMID:26889958

  12. Nanobiotechnology applications of reconstituted high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a fundamental role in the Reverse Cholesterol Transport pathway. Prior to maturation, nascent HDL exist as disk-shaped phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is stabilized by amphipathic apolipoproteins. Methods have been developed to generate reconstituted (rHDL) in vitro and these particles have been used in a variety of novel ways. To differentiate between physiological HDL particles and non-natural rHDL that have been engineered to possess additional components/functions, the term nanodisk (ND) is used. In this review, various applications of ND technology are described, such as their use as miniature membranes for solubilization and characterization of integral membrane proteins in a native like conformation. In other work, ND harboring hydrophobic biomolecules/drugs have been generated and used as transport/delivery vehicles. In vitro and in vivo studies show that drug loaded ND are stable and possess potent biological activity. A third application of ND is their use as a platform for incorporation of amphiphilic chelators of contrast agents, such as gadolinium, used in magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, it is demonstrated that the basic building block of plasma HDL can be repurposed for alternate functions.

  13. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes

    PubMed Central

    Aberare, Ogbevire L.; Okuonghae, Patrick; Mukoro, Nathaniel; Dirisu, John O.; Osazuwa, Favour; Odigie, Elvis; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes) were used for this study between the 4th of August and 7th of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group), group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Result: Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (P<0.05). The mean triglyceride and total body weight were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the exposed group when compared with the unexposed. The plasma level of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. Conclusion: These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes may be highly

  14. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  15. Mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 binds human protein HER2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Lijuan; Fang, Cheng; Nie, Rong; Wang, Jiamou; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-11-01

    Mycoplasmas are a group of microbes that can cause human diseases. The mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 promotes cancer metastasis, at least in part, by interacting with EGFR. In this study, we show that the p37 lipoprotein binds another member of the EGFR family, HER2, through the HER2 extracellular domain. The binding of p37-HER2 promotes phosphorylation of HER2 and activates the downstream signaling molecule Erk1/2. Because the HER2 signaling pathway contributes to breast tumor metastasis, our results imply that the mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 may also be involved in breast cancer metastasis. This study contributes to our understanding of mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 function and its potential involvement in tumorigenesis. PMID:27664744

  16. The terminal six amino-acids of the carboxy cytoplasmic tail of CD36 contain a functional domain implicated in the binding and capture of oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Malaud, Eric; Hourton, Delphine; Giroux, Louise Marie; Ninio, Ewa; Buckland, Robin; McGregor, John L

    2002-01-01

    CD36, a major adhesion molecule expressed by monocytes/macrophages, plays a key role in the binding and internalization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). This adhesion molecule, a member of an important scavenger receptor family, contains a very short C-terminal cytoplasmic tail that is known to induce intracellular signalling events. However, the domains on the cytoplasmic tail involved in such signal transduction are unknown. In this study, we have investigated the functional components of the cytoplasmic tail by site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional OxLDL and monoclonal antibody (mAb) binding studies. Seven truncated or punctual CD36 constructs, localized in the cytoplasmic tail, were produced by site-directed mutagenesis. Each construct was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. We used a quantitative and a qualitative method, labelling OxLDL with either iodine or rhodamine, to determine the functional importance of the cytoplasmic domains in OxLDL internalization. Results indicate that: (1) a deletion of the last amino-acid (construct K472STOP) significantly reduces, compared with wild-type, the binding, internalization and degradation of OxLDL; (2) truncation of the last six amino-acids (construct R467STOP) significantly reduces OxLDL binding; (3) the above two constructs (K472STOP and R467STOP) showed a reduced rate of OxLDL internalization compared with wild-type; (4) the binding and rate of internalization of an anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody (10/5) was not affected by the above mentioned mutants (K472STOP and R467STOP), compared with wild-type. This study shows, for the first time, a specific site on the CD36 cytoplasmic tail that is critical for the binding, endocytosis and targeting of OxLDL. PMID:12023894

  17. Purification of a sarcoplasmic reticulum protein that binds Ca2+ and plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Brown, M.S.; Lee, E.; Pathak, R.K.; Anderson, R.G.; Goldstein, J.L. )

    1989-05-15

    A protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit skeletal and cardiac muscle was identified because of its ability to bind 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) with high affinity after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This protein, referred to as the 165-kDa protein, is restricted to striated muscle. It was not detected in 14 other tissues, including several that contain smooth muscle, but it appears in rat L6 myoblasts when they differentiate into myocytes. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopic studies revealed that the protein is present throughout the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the terminal cisternae. It binds 45Ca2+ on nitrocellulose blots and stains metachromatically with Stains-all, a cationic dye that stains Ca2+-binding proteins. It does not appear to be a glycoprotein, and it appears slightly larger than the 160-kDa glycoprotein previously described in sarcoplasmic reticulum. The 165-kDa protein binds LDL, beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein, and a cholesterol-induced high density lipoprotein particle that contains apoprotein E as its sole apoprotein with much higher affinity than it binds high density lipoprotein. The protein is stable to boiling and to treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate, but it becomes sensitive to these treatments when its cystine residues are reduced and alkylated. The protein was purified 1300-fold to apparent homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes. It differs from the cell surface LDL receptor in that (1) its apparent molecular weight is not changed by reduction and alkylation; (2) it is present in Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, which lack functional LDL receptors; (3) binding of lipoproteins is not inhibited by EDTA; and (4) it is located within the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum where it has no access to plasma lipoproteins.

  18. Pistachio intake increases high density lipoprotein levels and inhibits low-density lipoprotein oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Nur; Aksoy, Mehmet; Bagci, Cahit; Gergerlioglu, H Serdar; Celik, Hakim; Herken, Emine; Yaman, Abdullah; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet; Soydinc, Serdar; Sari, Ibrahim; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2007-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that nuts have protective effects against coronary artery disease by improving lipid profile and inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, data about pistachio nuts are limited, and to our knowledge, there is no study investigating the effects of pistachio intake on lipid oxidation and serum antioxidant levels. This study, therefore, sought to determine the effects of pistachio intake on serum lipids and determine whether consumption of pistachio would alter serum antioxidant levels. Rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=12 for each): control group fed basic diet for 10 weeks and treated groups fed basic diet plus pistachio which constituted 20% and 40% of daily caloric intake, respectively. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and decreased total cholesterol (TC)/HDL ratio, compared with those not taking pistachio. However, TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by pistachio consumption. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased serum paraoxonase activity by 35% and arylesterase activity by 60%, which are known to inhibit LDL cholesterol oxidation, compared with the control group. However, increased antioxidant activity was blunted when pistachio intake was increased to 40% of daily caloric intake. In conclusion, the present results show that consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake leads to significant improvement in HDL and TC/HDL ratio and inhibits LDL cholesterol oxidation. These results suggest that pistachio may be beneficial for both prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease.

  19. Biologically active low density lipoprotein in human peripheral lymph.

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, D; Myant, N B; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1978-01-01

    We have compared the ability of human serum and peripheral lymph to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), to activate cholesteryl ester synthesis, and to compete with 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) for binding to LDL receptors in cultured human fibroblasts. Whole lymph was active in all three tests and the activity per unit volume in lymph was approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. All three biologic activities in lymph were confined to the d less than 1.063 g/ml fraction. Whole lymph had no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity in fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, whose cells lack LDL receptors. The LDL-like biologic activity per unit mass of immunologically active apoprotein B was approximately the same in lymph as in serum. The current data indicate that functionally active LDL is present in lymph and that the concentration of this lipoprotein is approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. PMID:201669

  20. Hemodynamics alter arterial low-density lipoprotein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Warty, V.S.; Calvo, W.J.; Berceli, S.A.; Pham, S.M.; Durham, S.J.; Tanksale, S.K.; Klein, E.C.; Herman, I.M.; Borovetz, H.S. )

    1989-10-01

    We have investigated the role of hemodynamic factors on low-density lipoprotein transport and metabolism in the intact arterial wall. Freshly excised canine carotid blood vessels were exposed to well-defined pulsatile flow in vitro for continuous periods up to 20 hours. We chose to impose the following hemodynamic conditions on our test carotid arteries: normotension, hypertension (at physiologic flow conditions), and hypertension coupled with elevated flow of canine serum perfusate. In several experiments the effect of endothelial denudation was examined in carotid arteries exposed to normotensive pulsatile flow. A trapped ligand method was used for quantitating low-density lipoprotein uptake and metabolism in the arterial wall. The distribution of both intact and degraded low-density lipoprotein fractions was determined from measurements of radiolabelled low-density lipoprotein activity within thin radial sections of perfused arteries. Our results suggest that both hypertensive hemodynamic simulations exacerbate the uptake of low-density lipoprotein within the arterial wall (by a factor of three to nine). The percentage of low-density lipoprotein that undergoes irreversible degradation falls from 41% under normotensive conditions to below 30% when hypertensive conditions are imposed, indicating that degradative processes are not proportionally elevated with the accelerated influx. A similar pattern is observed for deendothelialized vessels.

  1. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 gene transcription is downregulated by activator protein 2alpha. Doxazosin inhibits activator protein 2alpha and increases high-density lipoprotein biogenesis independent of alpha1-adrenoceptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Ayaori, Makoto; Tanaka, Nobukiyo; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2007-07-20

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a rate-limiting factor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis. The ABCA1 gene expression is known to be upregulated by various transcriptional factors. However, negative regulation factors would be better targets for pharmacological modulation of HDL biogenesis. Doxazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor blocker, increased ABCA1 mRNA, its protein, and apolipoprotein A-I-mediated HDL biogenesis in THP-1 macrophages and CHO-K1 cells, independent of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor blockade. Analysis of the human ABCA1 promoter indicated that the region between the positions -368 and -147 that contains an activator protein (AP)2-binding site responsible for the effects of doxazosin. Overexpression of AP2alpha inhibited ABCA1 transcription in a dose-dependent fashion. Mutation in the AP2-binding site caused increase of the basal promoter activity and cancelling both the transactivation by doxazosin and the trans-repression by AP2alpha. Doxazosin had no effect on ABCA1 mRNA level in HepG2 cells, which lack endogenous AP2alpha, and it reversed the inhibitory effect of AP2alpha expression in this type of cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel shift assays revealed that doxazosin reduced specific binding of AP2alpha to the ABCA1 promoter, as it suppressed phosphorylation of AP2alpha. Finally, doxazosin increased ABCA1 expression and plasma HDL in mice. We thus concluded that AP2alpha negatively regulates the ABCA1 gene transcription. Doxazosin inhibits AP2alpha activity independent of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor blockade and increases the ABCA1 expression and HDL biogenesis. AP2alpha is a potent pharmacological target for the increase of HDL.

  2. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob; Samson, Abraham O

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25-4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels. PMID:27516832

  3. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25–4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels. PMID:27516832

  4. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  5. Metabolism of a Lipid Nanoemulsion Resembling Low-Density Lipoprotein in Patients with Grade III Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Simone Alves; Ficker, Elisabeth Salvatori; Vinagre, Carmen G. C.; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Maranhão, Raul Cavalcante; Mady, Charles

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity increases triglyceride levels and decreases high-density lipoprotein concentrations in plasma. Artificial emulsions resembling lipidic plasma lipoprotein structures have been used to evaluate low-density lipoprotein metabolism. In grade III obesity, low density lipoprotein metabolism is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the kinetics with which a cholesterol-rich emulsion (called a low-density emulsion) binds to low-density lipoprotein receptors in a group of patients with grade III obesity by the fractional clearance rate. METHODS: A low-density emulsion was labeled with [14C]-cholesterol ester and [3H]-triglycerides and injected intravenously into ten normolipidemic non-diabetic patients with grade III obesity [body mass index higher than 40 kg/m2] and into ten non-obese healthy controls. Blood samples were collected over 24 hours to determine the plasma decay curve and to calculate the fractional clearance rate. RESULTS: There was no difference regarding plasma levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between the two groups. The fractional clearance rate of triglycerides was 0.086 ± 0.044 in the obese group and 0.122 ± 0.026 in the controls (p = 0.040), and the fractional clearance rate of cholesterol ester (h−1) was 0.052 ± 0.021 in the obese subjects and 0.058 ± 0.015 (p = 0.971) in the controls. CONCLUSION: Grade III obese subjects exhibited normal low-density lipoprotein removal from plasma as tested by the nanoemulsion method, but triglyceride removal was slower. PMID:20126342

  6. Quantitative dissection of the binding contributions of ligand lysines of the receptor-associated protein (RAP) to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1).

    PubMed

    Dolmer, Klavs; Campos, Andres; Gettins, Peter G W

    2013-08-16

    Although lysines are known to be critical for ligand binding to LDL receptor family receptors, relatively small reductions in affinity have been found when such lysines have been mutated. To resolve this paradox, we have examined the specific binding contributions of four lysines, Lys-253, Lys-256, Lys-270, and Lys-289, in the third domain (D3) of receptor-associated protein (RAP), by eliminating all other lysine residues. Using D3 variants containing lysine subsets, we examined binding to the high affinity fragment CR56 from LRP1. With this simplification, we found that elimination of the lysine pairs Lys-253/Lys-256 and Lys-270/Lys-289 resulted in increases in Kd of 1240- and 100,000-fold, respectively. Each pair contributed additively to overall affinity, with 61% from Lys-270/Lys-289 and 39% from Lys-253/Lys-256. Furthermore, the Lys-270/Lys-289 pair alone could bind different single CR domains with similar affinity. Within the pairs, binding contributions of Lys-270 ≫ Lys-256 > Lys-253 ∼ Lys-289 were deduced. Importantly, however, Lys-289 could significantly compensate for the loss of Lys-270, thus explaining how previous studies have underestimated the importance of Lys-270. Calorimetry showed that favorable enthalpy, from Lys-256 and Lys-270, overwhelmingly drives binding, offset by unfavorable entropy. Our findings support a mode of ligand binding in which a proximal pair of lysines engages the negatively charged pocket of a CR domain, with two such pairs of interactions (requiring two CR domains), appropriately separated, being alone sufficient to provide the low nanomolar affinity found for most protein ligands of LDL receptor family members.

  7. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  8. Subendothelial retention of lipoprotein (a). Evidence that reduced heparan sulfate promotes lipoprotein binding to subendothelial matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Pillarisetti, S; Paka, L; Obunike, J C; Berglund, L; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    Vessel wall subendothelial extracellular matrix, a dense mesh formed of collagens, fibronectin, laminin, and proteoglycans, has important roles in lipid and lipoprotein retention and cell adhesion. In atherosclerosis, vessel wall heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) are decreased and we therefore tested whether selective loss of HSPG affects lipoprotein retention. A matrix synthesized by aortic endothelial cells and a commercially available matrix (Matrigel; , Rutherford, NJ) were used. Treatment of matrix with heparinase/heparitinase (1 U/ml each) increased LDL binding by approximately 1.5-fold. Binding of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] to both subendothelial matrix and Matrigel(R) increased 2-10-fold when the HSPG were removed by heparinase treatment. Incubation of endothelial cells with oxidized LDL (OxLDL) or lysolecithin resulted in decreased matrix proteoglycans and increased Lp(a) retention by matrix. The effect of OxLDL or lysolecithin on endothelial PG was abolished in the presence of HDL. The decrease in matrix HSPG was associated with production of a heparanase-like activity by OxLDL-stimulated endothelial cells. To test whether removal of HSPG exposes fibronectin, a candidate Lp(a) binding protein in the matrix, antifibronectin antibodies were used. The increased Lp(a) binding after HSPG removal was inhibited 60% by antifibronectin antibodies. Similarly, the increased Lp(a) binding to matrix from OxLDL-treated endothelial cells was inhibited by antifibronectin antibodies. We hypothesize that atherogenic lipoproteins stimulate endothelial cell production of heparanase. This enzyme reduces HSPG which in turn promotes Lp(a) retention. PMID:9259586

  9. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  10. HIV Infection and High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Honor; Hoy, Jennifer; Woolley, Ian; Tchoua, Urbain; Bukrinsky, Michael; Dart, Anthony; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment are associated with dyslipidemia, including hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Parameters of HDL metabolism in HIV-positive patients were investigated in a cross-sectional study. The following groups of subjects were selected: i) 25 treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients or HIV-infected patients on long therapy break, ii) 28 HIV-infected patients currently treated with protease inhibitors, and iii) 33 HIV-negative subjects. Compared to the HIV-negative group, all groups of HIV-infected patients were characterized by significantly elevated triglyceride and apolipoprotein B levels, mass and activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (p<0.01). Total and LDL cholesterol was lower in treatment-naïve HIV-infected group only. HDL cholesterol and preβ1-HDL were significantly lower in all HIV-infected groups (p<0.05), while mean levels of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and ability of plasma to promote cholesterol efflux were similar in all groups. We found a positive correlation between apoA-I and levels of CD4+ cells (r2 = 0.3, p<0.001). Plasma level of phospholipid transfer protein was reduced in the group on antiretroviral therapy. Taken together these results suggest that HIV infection is associated with modified HDL metabolism re-directing cholesterol to the apoB-containing lipoproteins and likely reducing the functionality of reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:18054941

  11. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.; Bao, Clare; Swaim, AnneMarie F.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC). Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26680360

  12. Low levels of high density lipoproteins in Turks, a population with elevated hepatic lipase. High density lipoprotein characterization and gender-specific effects of apolipoprotein e genotype.

    PubMed

    Mahley, R W; Pépin, J; Palaoğlu, K E; Malloy, M J; Kane, J P; Bersot, T P

    2000-08-01

    Turks have strikingly low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (10-15 mg/dL lower than those of Americans or Western Europeans) associated with elevated hepatic lipase mass and activity. Here we report that Turks have low levels of high density lipoprotein subclass 2 (HDL(2)), apoA-I-containing lipoproteins (LpA-I), and pre-beta-1 HDL and increased levels of HDL(3) and LpA-I/A-II particles (potentially an atherogenic lipid profile). The frequency distributions of HDL-C and LpA-I levels were skewed toward bimodality in Turkish women but were unimodal in Turkish men. The apoE genotype affected HDL-C and LpA-I levels in women only. In women, but not men, the varepsilon2 allele was strikingly more prevalent in those with the highest levels of HDL-C and LpA-I than in those with the lowest levels. The higher prevalence of the epsilon2 allele in these subgroups of women was not explained by plasma triglyceride levels, total cholesterol levels, age, or body mass index. The modulating effects of apoE isoforms on lipolytic hydrolysis of HDL by hepatic lipase (apoE2 preventing efficient hydrolysis) or on lipoprotein receptor binding (apoE2 interacting poorly with the low density lipoprotein receptors) may account for differences in HDL-C levels in Turkish women (the epsilon2 allele being associated with higher HDL levels). In Turkish men, who have substantially higher levels of hepatic lipase activity than women, the modulating effect of apoE may be overwhelmed. The gender-specific impact of the apoE genotype on HDL-C and LpA-I levels in association with elevated levels of hepatic lipase provides new insights into the metabolism of HDL.

  13. Low density lipoprotein uptake by an endothelial-smooth muscle cell bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1991-03-01

    To study the interaction of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and the means by which such interaction may affect lipid permeability of the arterial wall, cell bilayers were established by use of a transwell culture system. After confluent growth of both cell types had been achieved, iodine 125 bound to low-density lipoprotein (10 ng protein/ml) was added to the media of the upper well. After a 3-hour incubation period, the iodine 125-bound low-density lipoprotein content of the upper and lower media demonstrated an impedance to lipoprotein movement across the endothelial cell monolayer as compared to the bare porous polycarbonate filter of the transwell (p less than 10(-6)). The presence of smooth muscle cells in the bottom well significantly enhanced the permeability of the endothelial cell layer (p less than 10(-60)). This effect remained unchanged over a 9-day time course. Membrane binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells was not altered by smooth muscle cells, indicating that this change in permeability could not be easily attributed to changes in receptor-mediated transport or transcytosis. Membrane binding (p less than 0.02) and cellular uptake (p less than 10(-6)) of low-density lipoprotein by smooth muscle cells in the bilayer, when adjusted for counts available in the smooth muscle cell media, were both reduced in the early incubation period as compared to isolated smooth muscle cells. The disproportionate reduction in uptake as compared to binding would suggest that this was not entirely a receptor-dependent process.

  14. Lipoproteins binding malachite green to slow the decolorization of malachite green in Pseudomonas sp. JT-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Li, Liguan; Du, Hongwei; Jiang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiong; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Lin; Yang, Liuyan

    2011-01-01

    Lipoproteins of a malachite green (MG)-decolorizing bacterium Pseudomonas sp. JT-1 could bind MG to form green MG-Lipoproteins complexes, which prevented the decolorization of MG by triphenylmethane reductase.

  15. Lipid composition of circulating multiple-modified low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zakiev, E R; Sukhorukov, V N; Melnichenko, A A; Sobenin, I A; Ivanova, E A; Orekhov, A N

    2016-01-01

    Atherogenic modified low- density lipoprotein (LDL) induces pronounced accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in the arterial wall, while native LDL seems to lack such capability. Therefore, modified LDL appears to be a major causative agent in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Possible modifications of LDL particles include changes in size and density, desialylation, oxidation and acquisition of negative charge. Total LDL isolated from pooled plasma of patients with coronary atherosclerosis, as well as from healthy subjects contains two distinct subfractions: normally sialylated LDL and desialylated LDL, which can be isolated by binding to a lectin affinity column. We called the desialylated LDL subfraction circulating modified LDL (cmLDL). In this study, we focused on lipid composition of LDL particles, analysing the total LDL preparation and two LDL subfractions: cmLDL and native LDL. The composition of LDL was studied using thin-layer chromatography. We found that cmLDL subfraction had decreased levels of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids (except for lysophosphatidylcholine) and sphingomyelin in comparison to native LDL. On the other hand, levels of mono-, and diglycerides, lysophosphatidylcholine and free fatty acids were higher in cmLDL than in native LDL. Our study demonstrated that lipid composition of cmLDL from atherosclerotic patients was altered in comparison to healthy subjects. In particular, phospholipid content was decreased, and free fatty acids levels were increased in cmLDL. This strengthens the hypothesis of multiple modification of LDL particles in the bloodstream and underscores the clinical importance of desialylated LDL as a possible marker of atherosclerosis progression. PMID:27558696

  16. The tissue distribution of lipoprotein lipase determines where chylomicrons bind.

    PubMed

    Savonen, Roger; Hiden, Michaela; Hultin, Magnus; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Olivecrona, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    To determine the role of LPL for binding of lipoproteins to the vascular endothelium, and for the distribution of lipids from lipoproteins, four lines of induced mutant mice were used. Rat chylomicrons labeled in vivo with [(14)C]oleic acid (primarily in TGs, providing a tracer for lipolysis) and [(3)H]retinol (primarily in ester form, providing a tracer for the core lipids) were injected. TG label was cleared more rapidly than core label. There were no differences between the mouse lines in the rate at which core label was cleared. Two minutes after injection, about 5% of the core label, and hence chylomicron particles, were in the heart of WT mice. In mice that expressed LPL only in skeletal muscle, and had much reduced levels of LPL in the heart, binding of chylomicrons was reduced to 1%, whereas in mice that expressed LPL only in the heart, the binding was increased to over 10%. The same patterns of distribution were evident at 20 min when most of the label had been cleared. Thus, the amount of LPL expressed in muscle and heart governed both the binding of chylomicron particles and the assimilation of chylomicron lipids in the tissue. PMID:25589507

  17. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH VERY LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was utilized to examine the binding of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with drugs, using R/S-propranolol as a model. These studies indicated that two mechanisms existed for the binding of R- and S-propranolol with VLDL. The first mechanism involved non-saturable partitioning of these drugs with VLDL, which probably occurred with the lipoprotein's non-polar core. This partitioning was described by overall affinity constants of 1.2 (± 0.3) × 106 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.4 (± 0.6) × 106 M-1 for S-propranolol at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. The second mechanism occurred through saturable binding by these drugs at fixed sites on VLDL, such as represented by apolipoproteins on the surface of the lipoprotein. The association equilibrium constants for this saturable binding at 37 °C were 7.0 (± 2.3) × 104 M-1 for R-propranolol and 9.6 (± 2.2) × 104 M-1 for S-propranolol. Comparable results were obtained at 20 °C and 27 °C for the propranolol enantiomers. This work provided fundamental information on the processes involved in the binding of R- and S-propranolol to VLDL, while also illustrating how HPAC can be used to evaluate relatively complex interactions between agents such as VLDL and drugs or other solutes. PMID:25103529

  18. Management of non-high-density lipoprotein abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S

    2009-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports the use of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB), and low-density lipoprotein particles as markers of atherogenic risk. Treatment guidelines also identify these as additional targets of lipid-modifying intervention in patients with elevated triglycerides (TG). Even when TG are only moderately elevated, many patients on statin monotherapy who have achieved targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) fail to reach non-HDL-C treatment goals, and even fewer reach apoB goals. Combination lipid-modifying therapy is therefore indicated for comprehensive lipid management, particularly in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in whom LDL-C levels are often considered 'optimal'. Of the available options, adding either a niacin, fibrate or omega-3 fatty acids provides greater opportunity to achieve non-HDL-C and apoB targets, given complementary profiles of lipid-modifying activity and supported by evidence from clinical studies. Improvement in lipid control and reduction in atherogenic risk could be anticipated to translate to benefits in clinical outcomes. PMID:19545870

  19. Modifying plasma low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: what combinations are available in the future?

    PubMed

    Kastelein, John J P

    2005-11-01

    Despite a growing body of research on the benefit of combination drug therapy for dyslipidemia in the metabolic syndrome or diabetes mellitus, there are insufficient outcome data on the use of combination therapy as well as inadequate data to compare certain combination regimens. The focus of the therapeutic approach in treating the metabolic syndrome has been almost exclusively on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol for approximately the past 10 years, and specifically on statin therapy. Although results of epidemiologic studies as well as clinical trials using angiographic and clinical end points confirm the association of LDL cholesterol and risk of coronary artery disease, data are lacking regarding the effects of combination therapy in the management of coronary artery disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome focusing on the modification of plasma LDL as well as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is reviewed. Future management strategies with the use of novel combination therapy is also discussed. PMID:16291010

  20. MCP-1 binds to oxidized LDL and is carried by lipoprotein(a) in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Philipp; Tafelmeier, Maria; Chittka, Dominik; Choi, Soo-Ho; Zhang, Li; Byun, Young Sup; Almazan, Felicidad; Yang, Xiaohong; Iqbal, Navaid; Chowdhury, Punam; Maisel, Alan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein oxidation plays an important role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) induces profound inflammatory responses in vascular cells, such as production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2], a key chemokine in the initiation and progression of vascular inflammation. Here we demonstrate that OxLDL also binds MCP-1 and that the OxLDL-bound MCP-1 retains its ability to recruit monocytes. A human MCP-1 mutant in which basic amino acids Arg-18 and Lys-19 were replaced with Ala did not bind to OxLDL. The MCP-1 binding to OxLDL was inhibited by the monoclonal antibody E06, which binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in OxLDL. Because OxPLs are carried by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in human plasma, we tested to determine whether Lp(a) binds MCP-1. Recombinant wild-type but not mutant MCP-1 added to human plasma bound to Lp(a), and its binding was inhibited by E06. Lp(a) captured from human plasma contained MCP-1 and the Lp(a)-associated endogenous MCP-1 induced monocyte migration. These results demonstrate that OxLDL and Lp(a) bind MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo and that OxPLs are major determinants of the MCP-1 binding. The association of MCP-1 with OxLDL and Lp(a) may play a role in modulating monocyte trafficking during atherogenesis. PMID:23667177

  1. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  2. Esterification of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Human Fibroblasts and Its Absence in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Brown, Michael S.

    1974-01-01

    A new mechanism is described for the cellular esterification of cholesterol derived from extra-cellular lipoproteins. Incubation of monolayers of cultured fibroblasts from normal human subjects with low density lipoproteins led to a 30- to 40-fold increase in the rate of incorporation of either [14C]acetate or [14C]oleate into the fatty acid fraction of cholesteryl [14C]esters. This stimulation of cholesteryl ester formation by low density lipoproteins occurred despite the fact that endogenous synthesis of free cholesterol was completely suppressed by the lipoprotein. Thus, exogenous cholesterol contained in low density lipoproteins, rather than endogenously synthesized sterol, appeared to provide the cholesterol substrate for this cellular esterfication process. High density lipoproteins and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of serum neither stimulated cholesteryl ester formation nor inhibited cholesterol synthesis. Both the low density lipoprotein-dependent increase in cholesterol esterification and decrease in free cholesterol synthesis required the interaction of the lipoprotein with its recently described cell surface receptor. Cells from homozygotes with familial hypercholesterolemia, which lack specific low density lipoprotein receptors, showed neither lipoprotein-dependent cholesterol esterification nor suppression of cholesterol synthesis. The reciprocal changes in free cholesterol synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation produced by low density lipoprotein-receptor interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the cholesterol content of mammalian cells. PMID:4373706

  3. Esterification of low density lipoprotein cholesterol in human fibroblasts and its absence in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J L; Dana, S E; Brown, M S

    1974-11-01

    A new mechanism is described for the cellular esterification of cholesterol derived from extra-cellular lipoproteins. Incubation of monolayers of cultured fibroblasts from normal human subjects with low density lipoproteins led to a 30- to 40-fold increase in the rate of incorporation of either [(14)C]acetate or [(14)C]oleate into the fatty acid fraction of cholesteryl [(14)C]esters. This stimulation of cholesteryl ester formation by low density lipoproteins occurred despite the fact that endogenous synthesis of free cholesterol was completely suppressed by the lipoprotein. Thus, exogenous cholesterol contained in low density lipoproteins, rather than endogenously synthesized sterol, appeared to provide the cholesterol substrate for this cellular esterfication process. High density lipoproteins and the lipoprotein-deficient fraction of serum neither stimulated cholesteryl ester formation nor inhibited cholesterol synthesis. Both the low density lipoprotein-dependent increase in cholesterol esterification and decrease in free cholesterol synthesis required the interaction of the lipoprotein with its recently described cell surface receptor. Cells from homozygotes with familial hypercholesterolemia, which lack specific low density lipoprotein receptors, showed neither lipoprotein-dependent cholesterol esterification nor suppression of cholesterol synthesis. The reciprocal changes in free cholesterol synthesis and cholesteryl ester formation produced by low density lipoprotein-receptor interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the cholesterol content of mammalian cells.

  4. Multimerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and familial chylomicronemia from a serine-to-cysteine substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain.

    PubMed

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P

    2014-07-11

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24847059

  5. Multimerization of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and Familial Chylomicronemia from a Serine-to-Cysteine Substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G.; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S.; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G.; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2014-01-01

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24847059

  6. Multimerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and familial chylomicronemia from a serine-to-cysteine substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain.

    PubMed

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P

    2014-07-11

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  7. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  8. Biomimetic high density lipoprotein nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kaylin M; Mutharasan, R Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K; Luthi, Andrea J; Helfand, Brian T; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C Shad

    2011-03-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy that combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy, and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery.

  9. Thermal stability of human plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein: A paradoxical behavior of low-density lipoprotein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rull, Anna; Jayaraman, Shobini; Gantz, Donald L; Rivas-Urbina, Andrea; Pérez-Cuellar, Montserrat; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Gursky, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) aggregation is central in triggering atherogenesis. A minor fraction of electronegative plasma LDL, termed LDL(-), plays a special role in atherogenesis. To better understand this role, we analyzed the kinetics of aggregation, fusion and disintegration of human LDL and its fractions, LDL(+) and LDL(-). Thermal denaturation of LDL was monitored by spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Initially, LDL(-) aggregated and fused faster than LDL(+), but later the order reversed. Most LDL(+) disintegrated and precipitated upon prolonged heating. In contrast, LDL(-) partially retained lipoprotein morphology and formed soluble aggregates. Biochemical analysis of all fractions showed no significant degradation of major lipids, mild phospholipid oxidation, and an increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) upon thermal denaturation. The main baseline difference between LDL subfractions was higher content of NEFA in LDL(-). Since NEFA promote lipoprotein fusion, increased NEFA content can explain rapid initial aggregation and fusion of LDL(-) but not its resistance to extensive disintegration. Partial hydrolysis of apoB upon heating was similar in LDL subfractions, suggesting that minor proteins importantly modulate LDL disintegration. Unlike LDL(+), LDL(-) contains small amounts of apoA-I and apoJ. Addition of exogenous apoA-I to LDL(+) hampered lipoprotein aggregation, fusion and precipitation, while depletion of endogenous apoJ had an opposite effect. Therefore, the initial rapid aggregation of LDL(-) is apparently counterbalanced by the stabilizing effects of minor proteins such as apoA-I and apoJ. These results help identify key determinants for LDL aggregation, fusion and coalescence into lipid droplets in vivo. PMID:27233433

  10. High density lipoprotein metabolism in a rabbit model of hyperalphalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Quig, D W; Zilversmit, D B

    1989-03-01

    The potential utility of an animal model of hyperalphalipoproteinemia for examining the role of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in atherogenesis prompted the current studies. Preliminary data indicated that in rabbits high-coconut oil feeding for 30 days doubled plasma HDL-cholesterol levels, but did not affect lower density lipoproteins (LDL) (d less than 1.063 g/ml). Experiments were performed to examine the composition of these HDL and to determine the mechanism for the diet-induced increase in plasma HDL. Rabbits were fed commercial chow or chow plus 14% (w/w) coconut oil and blood samples were collected 18 h after feeding. Compared to chow-fed rabbits, peak levels of HDL-cholesterol were attained within 2 weeks, and coconut oil feeding doubled the plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol, phospholipids and protein for up to 4 months without affecting HDL lipid and apoprotein composition. After 3 months the diet also increased VLDL- (107%) and LDL-cholesterol (40%) levels, but the absolute increases in each of these lipoprotein fractions was less than half of that of HDL. Isotope kinetic studies of 125I-HDL protein indicated a doubled rate of production of HDL and no change in the efficiency of removal of HDL from plasma. These studies demonstrate that in the rabbit high-coconut oil feeding doubles the rate of production and turnover of apparently normal HDL particles. It is proposed that such an animal model could be utilized to examine directly the role of HDL in atherogenesis. PMID:2920068

  11. High-density lipoprotein functionality in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, Constantine E; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Cheng, Jeh-wei; Vittorio, Timothy J; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cardiovascular atheroprotection is well established. Epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL levels and the risk for coronary artery disease, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein levels. However, more recent data provide evidence that high HDL levels are not always protective and that under certain conditions may even confer an increased risk. Thus, a new concept has arisen, which stresses the importance of HDL functionality, rather than HDL concentration per se, in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. HDL functionality is genetically defined but can also be modified by several environmental and lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking or certain pharmacologic interventions. Furthermore, HDL is consisted of a heterogeneous group of particles with major differences in their structural, biological and functional properties. Recently, the cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages was proven to be an excellent metric of HDL functionality, because it was shown to have a strong inverse relationship with the risk of angiographically documented coronary artery disease, independent of the HDL and apolipoprotein A-1 levels, although it may not actually predict the prospective risk for cardiovascular events. Thus, improving the quality of HDL may represent a better therapeutic target than simply raising the HDL level, and assessment of HDL function may prove informative in refining our understanding of HDL-mediated atheroprotection.

  12. Protein carbamylation renders high-density lipoprotein dysfunctional

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Carbamylation of proteins through reactive cyanate has been demonstrated to predict an increased cardiovascular risk. Cyanate is formed in vivo by break-down of urea and at sites of inflammation by the phagocyte protein myeloperoxidase. Since myeloperoxidase (MPO) associates with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in human atherosclerotic intima, we examined in the present study whether cyanate specifically targets HDL. Results Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that protein carbamylation is a major post-translational modification of HDL. The carbamyllysine content of lesion derived HDL was more than 20-fold higher in comparison to 3-chlorotyrosine levels, a specific oxidation product of MPO. Notable, the carbamyllysine content of lesion-derived HDL was 5 to 8-fold higher when compared to lesion derived low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or total lesion protein and increased with lesion severity. Importantly, the carbamyllysine content of HDL, but not of LDL, correlated with levels of 3-chlorotyrosine, suggesting MPO mediated carbamylation in the vessel wall. Remarkably, one carbamyllysine residue per HDL associated apolipoprotein A-I was sufficient to induce cholesterol accumulation and lipid droplet formation in macrophages through a pathway requiring the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B, type I. Conclusion The present results raise the possibility that HDL carbamylation contributes to foam cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:21235354

  13. The farnesoid X receptor induces very low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Claudel, Thierry; Martin, Geneviève; Brozek, John; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-05-21

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor activated by bile acids (BAs). In response to ligand-binding, FXR regulates many genes involved in BA, lipid, and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify new FXR target genes, microarray technology was used to profile total RNA extracted from HepG2 cells treated with the natural FXR agonist chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Interestingly, a significant increase of transcript level of the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) was observed. Our data, resulting from selective FXR activation, FXR RNA silencing and FXR-deficient mice, clearly demonstrate that BAs up-regulate VLDLR transcript levels via a FXR-dependent mechanism in vitro in human and in vivo in mouse liver cells.

  14. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  15. Associations of hepatic and lipoprotein lipase activities with changes in dietary composition and low density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Campos, H; Dreon, D M; Krauss, R M

    1995-03-01

    To test whether lipoprotein lipase or hepatic lipase activities are associated with lipoprotein subclasses, and to assess the effects of dietary manipulations on these associations, enzyme activities were measured in postheparin plasma (75 U heparin/kg) from 43 healthy men who were randomly allocated to a low-fat (24% fat, 60% carbohydrate) and a high-fat (46% fat, 38% carbohydrate) diet for 6 weeks each in a cross-over design. The high-fat diet significantly increased both lipoprotein lipase (+20%, P = 0.02) and hepatic lipase (+8%, P = 0.007) activities. On both diets, hepatic lipase activity was significantly positively correlated (P < 0.01) with plasma apolipoprotein (apo)B concentrations, and with levels of small dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) III, measured by analytic ultracentrifugation as mass of lipoproteins of flotation rate (Sof) 3-5, while lipoprotein lipase activity was inversely associated with levels of LDL III (P < 0.05). Despite the cross-sectional correlations, increased hepatic lipase activity was not significantly correlated with the reduction in LDL III mass observed on the high-fat diet. Rather, changes in hepatic lipase were correlated inversely with changes in small very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sof 20-40, and small intermediate density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sof 10-16. Moreover, changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were not significantly correlated with changes in small LDL, but were positively associated with changes in small IDL of Sof 10-14, and large LDL I of Sof 7-10. Thus, while increased levels of small dense LDL are associated with a metabolic state characterized by relatively increased hepatic lipase and decreased lipoprotein lipase activity, changes in these enzymes do not appear to be primary determinants of diet-induced changes in levels of this LDL subfraction. On the other hand, increased lipoprotein lipase activity induced by high-fat feeding may contribute to the accumulation in plasma of both large LDL I

  16. Reliability of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B measurement.

    PubMed

    Contois, John H; Warnick, G Russell; Sniderman, Allan D

    2011-01-01

    There is little understanding of the reliability of laboratory measurements among clinicians. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) measurement is the cornerstone of cardiovascular risk assessment and prevention, but it is fraught with error. Therefore, we have reviewed issues related to accuracy and precision for the measurement of LDL-C and the related markers non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B. Despite the widespread belief that LDL-C is standardized and reproducible, available data suggest that results can vary significantly as the result of methods from different manufacturers. Similar problems with direct HDL-C assays raise concerns about the reliability of non-HDL-C measurement. The root cause of method-specific bias relates to the ambiguity in the definition of both LDL and HDL, and the heterogeneity of LDL and HDL particle size and composition. Apolipoprotein B appears to provide a more reliable alternative, but assays for it have not been as rigorously tested as direct LDL-C and HDL-C assays.

  17. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  18. Low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns and risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Austin, M A; Breslow, J L; Hennekens, C H; Buring, J E; Willett, W C; Krauss, R M

    1988-10-01

    The association of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclass patterns with coronary heart disease was investigated in a case-control study of nonfatal myocardial infarction. Subclasses of LDL were analyzed by gradient gel electrophoresis of plasma samples from 109 cases and 121 controls. The LDL subclass pattern characterized by a preponderance of small, dense LDL particles was significantly associated with a threefold increased risk of myocardial infarction, independent of age, sex, and relative weight. Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased, and levels of triglyceride, very low-density lipoproteins, and intermediate-density lipoproteins were increased in subjects with this LDL subclass pattern. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels contributed to the risk associated with the small, dense LDL subclass pattern. Thus, the metabolic trait responsible for this LDL subclass pattern results in a set of interrelated lipoprotein changes that lead to increased risk of coronary heart disease.

  19. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  20. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  1. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density...

  3. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sike; Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Columns containing immobilized lipoproteins were prepared for the analysis of drug interactions with these particles by high-performance affinity chromatography. This approach was evaluated by using it to examine the binding of high density lipoprotein (HDL) to the drugs propranolol or verapamil. HDL was immobilized by the Schiff base method onto silica and gave HPLC columns with reproducible binding to propranolol over four to five days of continuous operation at pH 7.4. Frontal analysis experiments indicated that two types of interactions were occurring between R/S-propranolol and HDL at 37°C: saturable binding with an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 1.1–1.9 × 105 M−1, and non-saturable binding with an overall affinity constant (n Ka) of 3.7–4.1 × 104 M−1. Similar results were found at 4 and 27°C. Verapamil also gave similar behavior, with a Ka of 6.0 × 104 M−1 at 37°C for the saturable sites and a n Ka value for the non-saturable sites of 2.5 × 104 M−1. These measured affinities gave good agreement with solution-phase values. The results indicated HPAC can be used to study drug interactions with HDL, providing information that should be valuable in obtaining a better description of how drugs are transported within the body. PMID:19833090

  4. Anionic phospholipids inhibit apolipoprotein E--low-density lipoprotein receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Ryan, Robert O

    2007-03-16

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Lipid-free apoE is not recognized by LDLR, yet interaction with lipid confers receptor recognition properties. Although lipid interaction is known to induce a conformational change in apoE, it is not known if the lipid composition of the resulting complex influences binding. Using reconstituted lipoprotein particles of apoE3 N-terminal (NT) domain and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), maximal LDLR binding was observed at DMPC:apoE3-NT ratios >2.5:1 (w/w). ApoE3-NT lipid particles prepared with egg sphingomyelin were functional as LDLR ligands while complexes formed with the anionic phospholipids dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol or dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) were not. In the case of apoE3-NT, lipid particles comprised of a mixture of DMPC and DMPS, a DMPS concentration dependent inhibition of LDLR binding activity was observed. Thus, in addition to affecting apoE conformational status, the lipid composition of ligand particles can modulate LDLR binding activity.

  5. Low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns and lipoprotein response to a reduced-fat diet in men.

    PubMed

    Dreon, D M; Fernstrom, H A; Miller, B; Krauss, R M

    1994-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclass pattern B is a common genetically influenced lipoprotein profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles, and associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, reductions in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and increased risk of coronary artery disease compared to individuals with a predominance of larger LDL (pattern A). We sought to determine whether LDL subclass patterns are associated with response of plasma lipoprotein levels to changes in dietary fat and carbohydrate content. In a randomized cross-over study, 105 men consumed, for six weeks each, high-fat (46%) and low-fat (24%) solid food diets, with replacement of fat by carbohydrate. Diet-induced changes in subjects who exhibited pattern B (n = 18) following the high-fat diet differed significantly from those in subjects with pattern A (n = 87): in pattern B subjects LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) reductions were two-fold greater and plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B levels decreased significantly. These differences remained significant after adjustment for levels of plasma LDL-C, apo B, HDL-C, and body mass index. Thus, LDL subclass pattern is a factor that contributes significantly to interindividual variation of plasma lipoprotein response to a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

  6. Hydrophobic surface patches on LolA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are essential for lipoprotein binding.

    PubMed

    Remans, Kim; Pauwels, Kris; van Ulsen, Peter; Buts, Lieven; Cornelis, Pierre; Tommassen, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Decanniere, Klaas; Van Gelder, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Many lipoproteins reside in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their biogenesis is dependent on the Lol (localization of lipoproteins) system. The periplasmic chaperone LolA accepts OM-destined lipoproteins that are released from the inner membrane by the LolCDE complex and transfers them to the OM receptor LolB. The exact nature of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is still unknown. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli LolA features an open beta-barrel covered by alpha helices that together constitute a hydrophobic cavity, which would allow the binding of one acyl chain. However, OM lipoproteins contain three acyl chains, and the stoichiometry of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is 1:1. Here we present the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LolA that projects clear hydrophobic surface patches. Since these patches are large enough to accommodate acyl chains, their role in lipoprotein binding was investigated. Several LolA mutant proteins were created, and their functionality was assessed by studying their capacity to release lipoproteins produced in sphaeroplasts. Interruption of the largest hydrophobic patch completely destroyed the lipoprotein-releasing capacity of LolA, while interruption of smaller patches apparently reduced efficiency. Thus, the results show a new lipoprotein transport model that places (some of) the acyl chains on the hydrophobic surface patches. PMID:20620146

  7. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  8. Molecular studies of pH-dependent ligand interactions with the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; Guigard, Emmanuel; Kay, Cyril M; Ryan, Robert O

    2008-11-01

    The release of ligand from the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has been postulated to involve a "histidine switch"-induced intramolecular rearrangement that discharges bound ligand. A recombinant soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor (sLDLR) was employed in ligand binding experiments with a fluorescently tagged variant apolipoprotein E N-terminal domain (apoE-NT). Binding was monitored as a function of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from excited Trp residues in sLDLR to an extrinsic fluorophore covalently attached to Trp-null apoE3-NT. In binding experiments with wild-type (WT) sLDLR, FRET-dependent AEDANS fluorescence decreased as the pH was lowered. To investigate the role of His190, His562, and His586 in sLDLR in pH-dependent ligand binding and discharge, site-directed mutagenesis studies were performed. Compared to WT sLDLR, triple His --> Ala mutant sLDLR displayed attenuated pH-dependent ligand binding and a decreased level of ligand release as a function of low pH. When these His residues were substituted for Lys, the positively charged side chain of which does not ionize over this pH range, ligand binding was nearly abolished at all pH values. When sequential His to Lys mutants were examined, the evidence suggested that His562 and His586 function cooperatively. Whereas the sedimentation coefficient for WT sLDLR increased when the pH was reduced from 7 to 5, no such change occurred in the case of the triple Lys mutant receptor or a His562Lys/His586Lys double mutant receptor. The data support the existence of a cryptic, histidine side chain ionization-dependent alternative ligand that modulates ligand discharge via conformational reorganization.

  9. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  10. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  11. Associations of lipoproteins and apolipoproteins with gradient gel electrophoresis estimates of high density lipoprotein subfractions in men and women.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Krauss, R M; Vranizan, K M; Stefanick, M L; Wood, P D; Lindgren, F T

    1992-03-01

    We examined the relations of gender and lipoproteins to subclasses of high density lipoproteins (HDLs) in a cross-sectional sample of moderately overweight men (n = 116) and women (n = 78). The absorbance of protein-stained polyacrylamide gradient gels was used as an index of mass concentrations of HDL at intervals of 0.01 nm across the entire HDL particle size range (7.2-12 nm). At least five HDL subclasses have been identified by their particle sizes: HDL3c (7.2-7.8 nm), HDL3b (7.8-8.2 nm), HDL3a (8.2-8.8 nm), HDL2a (8.8-9.7 nm), and HDL2b (9.7-12 nm). Men had significantly higher HDL3b and significantly lower HDL2a and HDL2b than did women. Correlations of HDL subclasses with concentrations of other lipoprotein variables were generally as strong for gradient gel electrophoresis as for analytical ultracentrifugation measurements of HDL particle distributions. In both sexes, high levels of HDL3b were associated with coronary heart disease risk factors, including high concentrations of triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, small low density lipoproteins, intermediate density lipoproteins, and very low density lipoproteins and low concentrations of HDL2 cholesterol and HDL2 mass. Plasma concentrations of HDL3 cholesterol were unrelated to protein-stained HDL3b levels. HDL3 cholesterol concentrations also did not exhibit the sex difference or the relations with lipoprotein concentrations that characterized HDL3b. Thus, low HDL3b levels may contribute in part to the low heart disease risk in men and women who have high HDL cholesterol. Measurements of HDL3 cholesterol may not identify clinically important relations involving HDL3b.

  12. Distribution of High-Density Lipoprotein Subfractions and Hypertensive Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Gao, Ying; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The exact mechanisms of hypertension contributing to atherosclerosis have not been fully elucidated. Although multiple studies have clarified the association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions, uncertainty remains about its relationship with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively determine the relationship between distribution of HDL subfractions and hypertensive status. A total of 953 consecutive subjects without previous lipid-lowering drug treatment were enrolled and were categorized based on hypertension history (with hypertension [n = 550] or without hypertension [n = 403]). Baseline clinical and laboratory data were collected. HDL separation was performed using the Lipoprint System. Plasma large HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and large HDL percentage were dramatically lower whereas the small HDL-C and small HDL percentage were higher in patients with hypertension (all P < 0.05). The antihypertensive drug therapy was not associated with large or small HDL subfractions (on treatment vs not on treatment, P > 0.05; combination vs single drug therapy, P > 0.05). However, the blood pressure well-controlled patients have significantly lower small HDL subfraction (P < 0.05). Moreover, large HDL-C and percentage were inversely whereas small HDL percentage was positively associated with incident hypertension after adjusting potential confounders (all P < 0.05). In the multivariate model conducted in patients with and without hypertension separately, the cardio-protective value of large HDL-C was disappeared in patients with hypertension (OR 95%CI: 1.011 [0.974–1.049]). The distribution of HDL subfractions is closely associated with hypertensive status and hypertension may potentially impact the cardio-protective value of large HDL subfraction. PMID:26512616

  13. 99mTc-low density lipoprotein: intracellularly trapped radiotracer for noninvasive imaging of low density lipoprotein metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, S; Goldsmith, S J

    1990-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is the major transport protein for endogenous cholesterol in human plasma. LDL can be radiolabeled with 99mTc using sodium dithionite as a reducing agent. Biodistribution studies of 99mTc-LDL in normal rabbits confirm that 99mTc-LDL acts as an intracellularly "trapped ligand" similar to radioiodinated tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand). In addition, studies performed in hypercholesterolemic rabbit models demonstrated the feasibility of imaging hepatic LDL-receptor concentration noninvasively. 99mTc-LDL imaging studies in a number of hypercholesterolemic and hypocholesterolemic patients have proven useful in understanding the abnormal uptake and metabolism of LDL. In patients with hypercholesterolemia (HC), 99mTc-LDL appears to be taken up well by the actively evolving atherosclerotic lesions and xanthomata that contained foam cells and macrophages. In patients with myeloproliferative disease and chronic hypocholesterolemia, 99mTc-LDL images showed intense accumulation of radioactivity in the spleen and bone marrow; this demonstrated extensive proliferation of the macrophage population suggesting that hypocholesterolemia in these patients may be due to increased uptake of LDL uptake by the macrophages. 99mTc-LDL is a powerful tool for the noninvasive exploration of a variety of disorders of lipoprotein metabolism in patients.

  14. Radiotracers for low density lipoprotein biodistribution studies in vivo: technetium-99m low density lipoprotein versus radioiodinated low density lipoprotein preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Paidi, M.; Badimon, J.J.; Le, N.A.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.; Ginsberg, H.N.

    1988-07-01

    In an attempt to characterize the in vivo behavior of (99mTc) low density lipoprotein (LDL), biodistribution studies were performed in normal and hypercholesterolemic (HC) rabbits. In normal rabbits, 24 hr after the injection of (99mTc)LDL, 99mTc activity accumulated mainly in adrenal glands, spleen, liver, and kidney. In HC rabbits, however, there was a marked reduction of 99mTc activity in these organs. In both normal and HC rabbits, less than 17% of 99mTc activity appeared in the 24-hr urine following injection of (99mTc)LDL, suggesting that in vivo, (99mTc)LDL is trapped and accumulated within the tissues. Direct comparison of (99mTc)LDL, 125I-native-LDL and (131I)tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand) in normal rabbits, demonstrated that the biodistribution of (99mTc)LDL was similar to that of (131I)tyramine cellobiose-LDL. The adrenal glands, liver, and spleen accumulated significantly greater quantities of 99mTc and 131I activity per gram of tissue than 125I (from native-LDL). In addition, imaging studies in monkeys, showed that the hepatic uptake and retention of (99mTc) LDL was similar to that of (131I)tyramine cellobiose LDL. In contrast, radioiodine from native-LDL was deiodinated in liver with subsequent excretion into the intestine. These results suggest that (99mTc)LDL acts as a trapped ligand in vivo and should therefore, be a good tracer for noninvasive quantitative biodistribution studies of LDL.

  15. Radiotracers for low density lipoprotein biodistribution studies in vivo: technetium-99m low density lipoprotein versus radioiodinated low density lipoprotein preparations.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, S; Paidi, M; Badimon, J J; Le, N A; Goldsmith, S J; Fuster, V; Ginsberg, H N

    1988-07-01

    In an attempt to characterize the in vivo behavior of [99mTc] low density lipoprotein (LDL), biodistribution studies were performed in normal and hypercholesterolemic (HC) rabbits. In normal rabbits, 24 hr after the injection of [99mTc]LDL, 99mTc activity accumulated mainly in adrenal glands, spleen, liver, and kidney. In HC rabbits, however, there was a marked reduction of 99mTc activity in these organs. In both normal and HC rabbits, less than 17% of 99mTc activity appeared in the 24-hr urine following injection of [99mTc]LDL, suggesting that in vivo, [99mTc]LDL is trapped and accumulated within the tissues. Direct comparison of [99mTc]LDL, 125I-native-LDL and [131I]tyramine cellobiose-LDL (the previously validated trapped radioligand) in normal rabbits, demonstrated that the biodistribution of [99mTc]LDL was similar to that of [131I]tyramine cellobiose-LDL. The adrenal glands, liver, and spleen accumulated significantly greater quantities of 99mTc and 131I activity per gram of tissue than 125I (from native-LDL). In addition, imaging studies in monkeys, showed that the hepatic uptake and retention of [99mTc] LDL was similar to that of [131I]tyramine cellobiose LDL. In contrast, radioiodine from native-LDL was deiodinated in liver with subsequent excretion into the intestine. These results suggest that [99mTc]LDL acts as a trapped ligand in vivo and should therefore, be a good tracer for noninvasive quantitative biodistribution studies of LDL.

  16. Fitness, Heart Disease, and High-Density Lipoproteins: A Look at the Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCunney, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The role of fitness in preventing coronary heart disease is explored. Research on high-density lipoprotein, which has been found to be one of the most critical determinants of risk, is reviewed. The relationship between fitness, high-density lipoprotein, and coronary heart disease is assessed, and clinical implications are spelled out. (MT)

  17. Proprotein convertases in high-density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seungbum; Korstanje, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexins (PCSKs) are a serine endopeptidase family. PCSK members cleave amino acid residues and modulate the activity of precursor proteins. Evidence from patients and animal models carrying genetic alterations in PCSK members show that PCSK members are involved in various metabolic processes. These studies further revealed the molecular mechanism by which genetic alteration of some PCSK members impairs normal molecular and physiological functions, which in turn lead to cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is anti-atherogenic as it removes excessive amount of cholesterol from blood and peripheral tissues. Several PCSK members are involved in HDL metabolism. PCSK3, PCSK5, and PCSK6 process two triglyceride lipase family members, endothelial lipase and lipoprotein lipase, which are important for HDL remodeling. Recent studies in our lab found evidence that PCSK1 and PCSK9 are also involved in HDL metabolism. A mouse model carrying an amino acid substitution in PCSK1 showed an increase in serum apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) level. Another mouse model lacking PCSK9 showed a decrease in APOE-containing HDL. In this review, we summarize the role of the five PCSK members in lipid, glucose, and bile acid (BA) metabolism, each of which can influence HDL metabolism. We propose an integrative model in which PCSK members regulate HDL metabolism through various molecular mechanisms and metabolic processes and genetic variation in some PCSK members may affect the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport. PCSK members are considered as attractive therapeutic targets. A greater understanding of the molecular and physiological functions of PCSK members will improve therapeutic strategies and drug efficacy for cardiovascular disease where PCSK members play critical role, with fewer adverse effects. PMID:24252756

  18. Alcohol alters low density lipoprotein composition and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hoinacki, J.; Brown, J.; Dawson, M.; Deschenes, R.; Mulligan, J. )

    1991-03-11

    Two separate studies were conducted to examine the effect of ethanol (EtOH) dose on atherogenic low density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions and LDL metabolism in vivo. In the first study, male, atherosclerosis-susceptible squirrel monkeys were divided in three treatments: controls fed liquid diet, and low and high alcohol groups given liquid diet with vodka substituted for carbohydrate at 12% and 24% of calories, respectively. After 6 months, LDL subclasses (LDL{sub 1a}, LDL{sub 1b} and LDL{sub 2}) were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, and their lipid and protein composition was determined. Low dose EtOH had no effect on LDL subfraction distribution while 24% EtOH resulted in an increase in the larger (LDL{sub 1a} and LDL{sub 1b}), buoyant subspecies without affecting the level of the more atherogenic, smaller, denser LDL{sub 2} particles. In the second study, {sup 125}I-LDL apolipoprotein B (apo B) was injected intravenously into Control and High EtOH monkeys and kinetic analyses were performed. Although the absolute catabolic rate (LDL production) was not altered, High EtOH primates showed a reduction in the fractional catabolic rate and a longer LDL apoB residence time.

  19. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  20. The specific amino acid sequence between helices 7 and 8 influences the binding specificity of human apolipoprotein A-I for high density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses: a potential for HDL preferential generation.

    PubMed

    Carnemolla, Ronald; Ren, Xuefeng; Biswas, Tapan K; Meredith, Stephen C; Reardon, Catherine A; Wang, Jianjun; Getz, Godfrey S

    2008-06-01

    Humans have two major high density lipoprotein (HDL) sub-fractions, HDL(2) and HDL(3), whereas mice have a monodisperse HDL profile. Epidemiological evidence has suggested that HDL(2) is more atheroprotective; however, currently there is no direct experimental evidence to support this postulate. The amino acid sequence of apoA-I is a primary determinant of HDL subclass formation. The majority of the alpha-helical repeats in human apoA-I are proline-punctuated. A notable exception is the boundary between helices 7 and 8, which is located in the transitional segment between the stable N-terminal domain and the C-terminal hydrophobic domain. In this study we ask whether the substitution of a proline-containing sequence (PCS) separating other helices in human apoA-I for the non-proline-containing sequence (NPCS) between helices 7 and 8 (residues 184-190) influences HDL subclass association. The human apoA-I mutant with PCS2 replacing NPCS preferentially bound to HDL(2). In contrast, the mutant where PCS3 replaced NPCS preferentially associated with HDL(3). Thus, the specific amino acid sequence between helices 7 and 8 influences HDL subclass association. The wild-type and mutant proteins exhibited similar physicochemical properties except that the two mutants displayed greater lipid-associated stability versus wild-type human apoA-I. These results focus new attention on the influence of the boundary between helices 7 and 8 on the properties of apoA-I. The expression of these mutants in mice may result in the preferential generation of HDL(2) or HDL(3) and allow us to examine experimentally the anti-atherogenicity of the HDL subclasses.

  1. Statins do not decrease small, dense low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Ung; Seo, Hong Seog; Lee, Eun Mi; Shin, Seung Yong; Choi, Un-Jung; Na, Jin Oh; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Oh, Dong Joo

    2010-01-01

    In an observational study, we examined the effect of statins on low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions.Using density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we measured small, dense LDL density in 612 patients (mean age, 61.7 ± 12.6 yr), some with and some without coronary artery disease, who were placed in a statin-treated group (n=172) or a control group (n=440) and subdivided on the basis of coronary artery disease status.Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and the LDL cholesterol/apolipoprotein B ratio were significantly lower in the statin group. However, the proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in the statin group (42.9% ± 9.5% vs 41.3% ± 8.5%; P=0.046) and the proportion of large, buoyant LDL was lower (23.6% ± 7.5% vs 25.4% ± 7.9%; P=0.011). In the statin group, persons without coronary artery disease had higher proportions of small, dense LDL, and persons with coronary artery disease tended to have higher proportions of small, dense LDL.Our study suggests that statin therapy--whether or not recipients have coronary artery disease--does not decrease the proportion of small, dense LDL among total LDL particles, but in fact increases it, while predictably reducing total LDL cholesterol, absolute amounts of small, dense LDL, and absolute amounts of large, buoyant LDL. If and when our observation proves to be reproducible in subsequent large-scale studies, it should provide new insights into small, dense LDL and its actual role in atherogenesis or the progression of atherosclerosis.

  2. Effects of diet on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W

    2011-12-01

    Multiple dietary factors have been shown to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations, and HDL-C has been inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Replacement of dietary carbohydrate with polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and saturated fat has been associated with progressively greater increases in HDL-C (7-12%) in addition to other lipid changes. Added sugars, but not high glycemic carbohydrates, have been associated with decreased HDL-C. Alcohol consumption has been associated with increased HDL-C (9.2%) independent of changes in other measured lipids. Modest effects on HDL-C (~4-5%) among other lipid and non-lipid CHD risk factors have also been observed with weight loss by dieting, omega-3 fatty acids, and a Mediterranean diet pattern. The CHD benefit of increasing HDL-C is unclear given the inconsistent evidence from HDL-raising pharmacologic trials. Furthermore, pleiotropic effects of diet preclude attribution of CHD benefit specifically to HDL-C. Investigation into functional or other properties of HDL may lend further insight. PMID:21901431

  3. Dietary and genetic effects on low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    2001-01-01

    We have tested whether differences in distribution and dietary responsiveness of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses contribute to the variability in the magnitude of LDL-cholesterol reduction induced by diets low in total and saturated fat and high in carbohydrate. Our studies have focused on a common, genetically influenced metabolic profile, characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles (subclass pattern B), that is associated with a two- to threefold increase in risk for coronary artery disease. We have found that healthy normolipidemic individuals with this trait show a greater reduction in LDL cholesterol and particle number in response to low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets than do unaffected individuals (subclass pattern A). Moreover, such diets result in reduced LDL particle size, with induction of pattern B in a substantial proportion of pattern A men. Recent studies have indicated that this response is under genetic influence. Future identification of the specific genes involved may lead to improved targeting of dietary therapies aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease risk.

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters endothelial progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Liu, Lingjuan; Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Jia; Xie, Xiaoyun; Hao, Hong; Liu, Jason Z; He, Guanglong; Cowan, Peter J; Cui, Lianqun; Zhu, Hua; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is critical to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia. Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are important to preventing atherosclerosis, and significantly decreased in hyperlipidemia. This study was to demonstrate ox-LDL and hyperlipidemia could exhibit similar effect on EPC population and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production in BM and blood was significantly increased in male C57BL/6 mice with intravenous ox-LDL treatment, and in hyperlipidemic LDL receptor knockout mice with 4-month high-fat diet. ROS formation was effectively blocked with overexpression of antioxidant enzymes or N-acetylcysteine treatment. In hyperlipidemic and ox-LDL-treated mice, c-Kit(+)/CD31(+) cell number in BM and blood, and Sca-1(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number in blood, not in BM, were significantly decreased, which were not affected by inhibiting ROS production, while blood CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number was significantly increased that was prevented with reduced ROS formation. However, blood CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell number increased in ox-LDL-treated mice, while decreased in hyperlipidemic mice. These data suggested that ox-LDL produced significant changes in BM and blood EPC populations similar (but not identical) to chronic hyperlipidemia with predominantly ROS-independent mechanism(s).

  5. Novel Therapies for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Reduction.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-09-15

    Although many clinical trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated that lower serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are associated with proportionately greater reductions in the risk of cardiovascular disease events, not all patients with hypercholesterolemia are able to attain risk-stratified LDL-C goals with statin monotherapy. Elucidation of the pathophysiology of genetic disorders of lipid metabolism (e.g., familial hypercholesterolemia) has led to the development of several novel lipid-lowering strategies, including blocking the degradation of hepatic LDL-C receptors that are important in LDL-C clearance, or the inhibition of apoprotein synthesis and lipidation. Mipomersen and lomitapide are highly efficacious new agents available for the treatment of patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. The recent introduction of PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and evolocumab) have made it possible for many patients to achieve very low LDL-C concentrations (e.g., <40 mg/dl) that are usually not attainable with statin monotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are examining the impact of very low LDL-C levels on cardiovascular disease event rates and the long-term safety of this approach. PMID:27620356

  6. Tiliroside and gnaphaliin inhibit human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Schinella, Guillermo R; Tournier, Horacio A; Máñez, Salvador; de Buschiazzo, Perla M; Del Carmen Recio, María; Ríos, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    Two flavonoids, gnaphaliin and tiliroside, isolated from Helichrysum italicum, were studied in vitro for their capacity to inhibit Cu(2+)-induced human low density lipoprotein (LDL) and diluted plasma oxidation. LDL oxidation was monitored by conjugated diene, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) formation and electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel. Gnaphaliin and tiliroside increased the lag-phase for diene conjugate production in a dose-dependent manner. The reduction of TBARS production confirmed the antioxidant activity of gnaphaliin and tiliroside with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 8.0+/-3.9 microM and 7.0+/-2.6 microM respectively. Furthermore, the flavonoids negated the Cu(2+)-induced increase in electrophoretic mobility of LDL. Antioxidant activity of gnaphaliin and tiliroside was significantly different when diluted plasma was oxidised by adding 1 mM CuSO(4). Although both flavonoids again reduced the TBARS production, tiliroside showed higher activity than gnaphaliin (IC(50)=10.6+/-2.5 microM vs. IC(50)>50 microM). In conclusion, tiliroside and gnaphaliin are antioxidants against in vitro Cu(2+)-induced LDL oxidation in the same order of magnitude compared to that of the reference drug, probucol.

  7. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  8. Targeting high-density lipoproteins: update on a promising therapy.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Céline; Martinez, Laurent O; Ferrières, Jean; Elbaz, Meyer; Genoux, Annelise; Perret, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated the atheroprotective roles of high density lipoproteins (HDL), so that HDL is established as an independent negative risk factor. The protective effect of HDL against atherosclerosis is mainly attributed to their capacity to bring peripheral excess cholesterol back to the liver for further elimination into the bile. In addition, HDL can exert other protective functions on the vascular wall, through their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antithrombotic and cytoprotective properties. HDL-targeted therapy is thus an innovative approach against cardiovascular risk and atherosclerosis. These pleiotropic atheroprotective properties of HDL have led experts to believe that "HDL-related therapies" represent the most promising next step in fighting against atherosclerosis. However, because of the heterogeneity of HDL functions, targeting HDL is not a simple task and HDL therapies that lower cardiovascular risk are NOT yet available. In this paper, an overview is presented about the therapeutic strategies currently under consideration to raise HDL levels and/or functions. Recently, clinical trials of drugs targeting HDL-C levels have disappointingly failed, suggesting that HDL functions through specific mechanisms should be targeted rather than increasing per se HDL levels. PMID:24074699

  9. Ethanol enhances de novo synthesis of high density lipoprotein cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cluette, J.E.; Mulligan, J.J.; Noring, R.; Doyle, K.; Hojnacki, J.

    1984-05-01

    Male squirrel monkeys fed ethanol at variable doses were used to assess whether alcohol enhances de novo synthesis of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in vivo. Monkeys were divided into three groups: 1) controls fed isocaloric liquid diet; 2) low ethanol monkeys fed liquid diet with vodka substituted isocalorically for carbohydrate at 12% of calories; and 3) High Ethanol animals fed diet plus vodka at 24% of calories. High Ethanol primates had significantly higher levels of HDL nonesterified cholesterol than Control and Low Ethanol animals while serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase was similar for the three treatments. There were no significant differences between the groups in HDL cholesteryl ester mass or specific activity following intravenous injection of labeled mevalonolactone. By contrast, High Ethanol monkeys had significantly greater HDL nonesterified cholesterol specific activity with approximately 60% of the radioactivity distributed in the HDL/sub 3/ subfraction. This report provides the first experimental evidence that ethanol at 24% of calories induces elevations in HDL cholesterol in primates through enhanced de novo synthesis without adverse effects on liver function.

  10. Binding to plasma lipoproteins of chlorophenoxyisobutyric, tibric and nicotinic acids and their esters: its significance for the mechanism of lipid lowering by clofibrate and related drugs.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, J L; Dachet, C

    1976-01-01

    The binding of chlorophenoxyisobutyric (CPIB), tibric (TA) and nicotinic (NA) acids and CPIB ethyl ester (Clofibrate), TA and NA isopropyl esters (TAPE and NAPE) to human lipoproteins of low density of different classes (LDL2, LDL1 and VLDL) and high density (HDL) were studied by equilibrium dialysis and Sephadex gel filtration. Clofibrate and TAPE bound strongly to lipoproteins, but their acids, CPIB and TA and also NA and NAPE, did not bind. In the same experimental conditions, Clofibrate and TAPE bound only weakly to human serum albumin (HSA) and CPIB bound to HSA with a Ka of 3.3 X 10(5) M(-1) for 1 site of high affinity. The Clofibrate and TAPE bound to lipoproteins did not dissociate either during dialysis or during filtration on Sephadex G 25. The binding percentage remained constant for all drug concentrations studied, and the molar ratio of bound drug rose linearly with increasing concentrations. This suggests that the interaction may be irreversible, and there is some evidence that binding may induce irreversible changes in the lipoprotein molecules. These results, and those already found in experiments made with three other drugs related to Clofibrate, lead to the proposal that in their interaction with lipoproteins, the phenyl groups are necessary and the esterification is contributory. The possible role of this interaction in the lipid-lowering effect of the drugs is discussed with special reference to their possible implication in lipoprotein synthesis within the intestinal and hepatic cells.

  11. Triolein and trilinolein ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Deng, Ze-yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Rao, Huan; Fan, Ya-wei

    2014-05-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells is a critical step for the initiation of atherosclerosis. Triacylglycerol uptake in these cells is understood to be a part of the process. The present investigation, comparison among the effects of simple acylglycerol, including tristearin, triolein, and trilinolein, upon oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced oxidative stress was undertaken. Results indicated that trilinolein (78 % ± 0.02) and triolein (90 % ± 0.01) increased cell viability of endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, whereas tristearin decreased the cell viability (55 % ± 0.03) (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein treatment significantly increased apoptosis (23 %), compared to cells simultaneously exposed to trilinolein (19 %) or triolein (16 %), where apoptosis was reduced (P < 0.05). On the other hand, exposure to tristearin further increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced cell apoptosis (34 %). Treatment with trilinolein or triolein on oxidized low-density lipoprotein -stimulated endothelial cells inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA. Moreover, both trilinolein and triolein demonstrated a strong antioxidant response to oxidative stress caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Taken together, the results indicate trilinolein and triolein possess anti-inflammatory properties, which are mediated via the antioxidant defense system.

  12. Identifying the predominant peak diameter of high-density and low-density lipoproteins by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Krauss, R M; Nichols, A V; Vranizan, K M; Wood, P D

    1990-06-01

    Particle size distributions of high-density (HDL) and low-density (LDL) lipoproteins, obtained by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, exhibit apparent predominant and minor peaks within characteristic subpopulation migration intervals. In the present report, we show that identification of such peaks as predominant or minor depends on whether the particle size distribution is analyzed according to migration distance or particle size. The predominant HDL peak on the migration distance scale is frequently not the predominant HDL peak when the distribution is transformed to the particle size scale. The potential physiologic importance of correct identification of the predominant HDL peak within a gradient gel electrophoresis profile is suggested by our cross-sectional study of 97 men, in which diameters associated with the predominant peak, determined using migration distance and particle size scales, were correlated with plasma lipoprotein and lipid parameters. Plasma concentrations of HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins A-I and B correlated more strongly with the predominant peak obtained using the particle size scale than the migration distance scale. The mathematical transformation from migration distance to particle diameter scale had less effect on the LDL distribution. The additional computational effort required to transform the HDL-distribution into the particle size scale appears warranted given the substantial changes it produces in the gradient gel electrophoresis profile and the strengthening of correlations with parameters relevant to lipoprotein metabolism.

  13. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol on a roller coaster: where will the ride end?

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Bowe et al. report an association between low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and various incident chronic kidney disease end points in a cohort of almost 2 million US veterans followed for 9 years. These impressive data should be a starting point for further investigations including genetic epidemiologic investigations as well as post hoc analyses of interventional trials that target high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, finally, studies that focus on the functionality of high-density lipoprotein particles. PMID:26994572

  14. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael; Ginsberg, Henry N; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) include atherogenic TG-rich lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester-enriched remnants of TG-rich lipoproteins, and lipoprotein(a). Recent observational and intervention studies suggest that the predictive value of non-HDL-C for cardiovascular risk and mortality is better than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and that non-HDL-C correlates highly with plasma apolipoprotein B levels. Currently, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines identify non-HDL-C as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TG elevation (> or =200 mg/dl) after the attainment of LDL-C target goals. In patients with coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease risk equivalents, an optional non-HDL-C goal is <100 mg/dl. To achieve the non-HDL-C goal, statin therapy may be intensified or combined with ezetimibe, niacin, a fibrate, or omega-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, non-HDL-C remains an important target of therapy for patients with elevated TGs, although its widespread adoption has yet to gain a foothold among health care professionals treating patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:18359322

  15. Human very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons can protect against endotoxin-induced death in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Rapp, J H

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia stimulates many physiologic responses including disturbances in lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that this lipemia may be part of a defensive mechanism by which the body combats the toxic effects of circulating endotoxin. We tested the effects of mixtures of endotoxin, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma and determined the ability of varying concentrations of human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, as well as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), and of the synthetic lipid emulsion SOYACAL to prevent endotoxin-induced death in mice. This study demonstrates that the triglyceride-rich VLDL and chylomicrons, as well as cholesterol-rich LDL and HDL, and cholesterol-free SOYACAL can protect against endotoxin-induced death. Protection required small amounts of lipoprotein-free plasma, and depended on the incubation time and the concentration of lipoprotein lipid. Despite stringent techniques to prevent exogenous endotoxin contamination eight of ten duplicate VLDL preparations contained endotoxin (5,755 +/- 3,514 ng endotoxin/mg triglyceride, mean +/- SEM) making the isolation of endotoxin-free VLDL difficult. In contrast, simultaneous preparations of LDL and HDL were relatively free of endotoxin contamination (3 +/- 3 and 320 +/- 319 ng/mg total cholesterol, respectively), suggesting that the contamination of VLDL occurs in vivo and not during the isolation procedure. These observations suggest a possible role for increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the host's defense against endotoxemia and infection. Images PMID:2394827

  16. Biomimetic High-Density Lipoproteins from a Gold Nanoparticle Template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthi, Andrea Jane

    For hundreds of years the field of chemistry has looked to nature for inspiration and insight to develop novel solutions for the treatment of human diseases. The ability of chemists to identify, mimic, and modifiy small molecules found in nature has led to the discovery and development of many important therapeutics. Chemistry on the nanoscale has made it possible to mimic natural, macromolecular structures that may also be useful for understanding and treating diseases. One example of such a structure is high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The goal of this work is to use a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) as a template to synthesize functional mimics of HDL and characterize their structure and function. Chapter 1 details the structure and function of natural HDL and how chemistry on the nanoscale provides new strategies for mimicking HDL. This Chapter also describes the first examples of using nanoparticles to mimic HDL. Chapter 2 reports the synthesis and characterization of biomimetic HDL using different sizes of Au NPs and different surface chemistries and how these variables can be used to tailor the properties of biomimetic HDL. From these studies the optimal strategy for synthesizing biomimetic HDL was determined. In Chapter 3, the optimization of the synthesis of biomimetic HDL is discussed as well as a full characterization of its structure. In addition, the work in this chapter shows that biomimetic HDL can be synthesized on a large scale without alterations to its structure or function. Chapter 4 focuses on understanding the pathways by which biomimetic HDL accepts cholesterol from macrophage cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that biomimetic HDL is able to accept cholesterol by both active and passive pathways of cholesterol efflux. In Chapter 5 the preliminary results of in vivo studies to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biomimetic HDL are presented. These studies suggest that biomimetic HDL traffics through tissues prone to

  17. High-density lipoprotein, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell survival mechanisms.

    PubMed

    White, C Roger; Giordano, Samantha; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic injury is associated with acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and open heart surgery. The timely re-establishment of blood flow is critical in order to minimize cardiac complications. Reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic period, however, can induce severe cardiomyocyte dysfunction with mitochondria serving as a major target of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. An increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces damage to mitochondrial respiratory complexes leading to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial membrane perturbations also contribute to calcium overload, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and the release of apoptotic mediators into the cytoplasm. Clinical and experimental studies show that ischemic preconditioning (ICPRE) and postconditioning (ICPOST) attenuate mitochondrial injury and improve cardiac function in the context of I/R injury. This is achieved by the activation of two principal cell survival cascades: 1) the Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway; and 2) the Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Recent data suggest that high density lipoprotein (HDL) mimics the effects of conditioning protocols and attenuates myocardial I/R injury via activation of the RISK and SAFE signaling cascades. In this review, we discuss the roles of apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I), the major protein constituent of HDL, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysosphingolipid associated with small, dense HDL particles as mediators of cardiomyocyte survival. Both apoA-I and S1P exert an infarct-sparing effect by preventing ROS-dependent injury and inhibiting the opening of the mPTP. PMID:27150975

  18. Itinerary of high density lipoproteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Perisa, Damir; Rohrer, Lucia; Kaech, Andres; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-02-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) and its main protein component apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) have multiple anti-atherogenic functions. Some of them are exerted within the vessel wall, so that HDL needs to pass the endothelial barrier. To elucidate their itinerary through endothelial cells (ECs), we labelled ApoA-I and HDL either fluorescently or with 1.4 nm nanogold and investigated their cellular localization by using immunofluorescent microscopy (IFM) and electron microscopy (EM). HDL as well as ApoA-I is taken up by ECs into the same route of intracellular trafficking. Time kinetics and pulse chase experiments revealed that HDL is trafficked through different vesicles. HDL partially co-localized with LDL, albumin, and transferrin. HDL did not co-localize with clathrin and caveolin-1. Fluorescent HDL was recovered at small proportions in early endosomes and endosome to trans-golgi network vesicles but not at all in recycling endosomes, in late endosomes or lysosomes. EM identified HDL mainly in large filled vesicles which however upon IFM did not colocalize with markers of multivesicular bodies or autophagosomes. The uptake or cellular distribution of HDL was altered upon pharmacological interference with cytochalasine D, colchicine and dynasore. Blockage of fluid phase uptake with Amiloride or EIPA did not reduce the uptake of HDL. Neither did we observe any co-localization of HDL with dextran as the marker of fluid phase uptake. In conclusion, HDL and ApoA-I are internalized and trafficked by endothelial cells through a non-classical endocytic route. PMID:26577406

  19. Interaction of high-density and low-density lipoproteins to solid surfaces coated with cholesterol as determined by an optical fiber-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bal R.; Poirier, Michelle A.

    1993-05-01

    In recent years, the use of fiber optics has become an important tool in biomedicine and biotechnology. We are involved in developing and employing a new system which, through the use of fiber optics, may be capable of measuring the content of cholesterol and lipoproteins in blood samples in real time. In the optical fiber-based biosensor, a laser beam having a wavelength of 512 nm (green light) is launched into an optical fiber, which transmits the light to its distal end. An evanescent wave (travelling just outside the fiber core) is used to excite rhodamine-labelled HDL or LDL which become bound to the fiber or to fiber-bound molecules. The fluorescence (red light) is coupled back into the fiber and detected with a photodiode. Preliminary work has involved testing of high density lipoprotein (HDL) binding to a cholesterol-coated fiber and to a bare fiber and low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding to a cholesterol-coated fiber. A significant difference was observed in the binding rate of HDL (5 (mu) g/mL and lower) to a bare fiber as opposed to a cholesterol-coated fiber. The binding rate of HDL (5 (mu) g/mL) to a bare fiber was 7.5 (mu) V/sec and to a cholesterol-coated fiber was 3.5 (mu) V/sec. We have calculated the binding affinity of LDL to a cholesterol- coated fiber as 1.4 (mu) M-1. These preliminary results suggest that the optical fiber-based biosensor can provide a unique and promising approach to the analysis of lipoprotein interaction with solid surfaces and with cholesterol. More importantly, the results suggest that this technique may be used to assess the binding of blood proteins to artificial organs/tissues, and to measure the amount of cholesterol, HDL and LDL in less than a minute.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay of Binding Properties of Antisense Oligonucleotides to Serum Albumins and Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Reina; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Sekiguchi, Mitsuaki; Kugimiya, Akira; Kinouchi, Hiroki; Nihashi, Yoichiro; Kamimori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we developed an assay to evaluate the kinetic binding properties of the unconjugated antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) and lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands conjugated ASOs to mouse and human serum albumin, and lipoproteins using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The lipophilic ligands conjugated ASOs showed clear affinity to the albumins and lipoproteins, while the unconjugated and hydrophilic ligand conjugated ASOs showed no interaction. The SPR method showed reproducible immobilization of albumins and lipoproteins as ligands on the sensor chip, and reproducible affinity kinetic parameters of interaction of ASOs conjugated with the ligands could be obtained. The kinetic binding data of these ASOs to albumin and lipoproteins by SPR were related with the distributions in the whole liver in mice after administration of these conjugated ASOs. The results demonstrated that our SPR method could be a valuable tool for predicting the mechanism of the properties of delivery of conjugated ASOs to the organs.

  1. Hypercholesterolemia, low density lipoprotein receptor and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hong-mei; Zhang, Da-wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. Plasma levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are positively correlated with the risk of atherosclerosis. High plasma LDL concentrations in patients with hypercholesterolemia lead to build-up of LDL in the inner walls of the arteries, which becomes oxidized and promotes the formation of foam cells, consequently initiating atherosclerosis. Plasma LDL is mainly cleared through the LDL receptor (LDLR) pathway. Mutations in the LDLR cause familiar hypercholesterolemia and increase the risk of premature coronary heart disease. The expression of LDLR is regulated at the transcriptional level via the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and at the posttranslational levels mainly through proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9 (PCSK9) and inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the studies of PCSK9. PMID:26445568

  2. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Lila M.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions. PMID:26949399

  3. Assembly and secretion of hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, G F

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to water-soluble fuels such as glucose or ketone bodies, the use of lipids as an energy source for tissues has required the development of complex structures for their transport through the aqueous plasma. In the case of endogenously synthesized triacylglycerol this is achieved by the assembly and secretion of hepatic VLDL which provides the necessary stability in an aqueous medium. An essential component of this assembly process is apo B. Dietary changes which require an increase in hepatic VLDL secretion appear to be accompanied by increases in the availability of functional apo B. Interesting questions relate to: (a) the intracellular site(s) of triacylglycerol association with apo B, and (b) the mechanism(s) by which the availability of functional apo B at this site responds to metabolic and hormonal signals which reflect dietary status and, thus, the need to secrete triacylglycerol. As regards the latter, although in some cases changes in apo B synthesis occur in response to VLDL secretion hepatic apo B mRNA levels appear to be quite stable in vitro. Intracellular switching of apo B between the secretory and degradative pathways may be important in controlling VLDL assembly and post-translational modifications of the apoprotein may also play a role by influencing its ability to bind to triacylglycerol. Transport is not the only problem associated with the utilization of a concentrated energy source such as triacylglycerol and the complex problems of waste product disposal and recycling have to be dealt with. In the case of triacylglycerol, potentially toxic waste products include atherogenic remnants and LDL. The overall problem, then, in the long-term, involves the development of a 'safe' means of utilizing triacylglycerol and this requirement accounts for much of the complexity of plasma lipoprotein metabolism. In this area, the rat could teach the human a few tricks. One of these appears to be the utilization of hepatic apo B48 rather than apo B

  4. Modification of High Density Lipoprotein by Myeloperoxidase Generates a Pro-inflammatory Particle*

    PubMed Central

    Undurti, Arundhati; Huang, Ying; Lupica, Joseph A.; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is the major atheroprotective particle in plasma. Recent studies demonstrate that myeloperoxidase (MPO) binds to HDL in vivo, selectively targeting apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) of HDL for oxidative modification and concurrent loss in cholesterol efflux and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase activating activities, generating a “dysfunctional HDL” particle. We now show that (patho)physiologically relevant levels of MPO-catalyzed oxidation result in loss of non-cholesterol efflux activities of HDL including anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory functions. One mechanism responsible is shown to involve the loss of modified HDL binding to the HDL receptor, scavenger receptor B1, and concurrent acquisition of saturable and specific binding to a novel unknown receptor independent of scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A1. HDL modification by MPO is further shown to confer pro-inflammatory gain of function activities as monitored by NF-κB activation and surface vascular cell adhesion molecule levels on aortic endothelial cells exposed to MPO-oxidized HDL. The loss of non-cholesterol efflux activities and the gain of pro-inflammatory functions requires modification of the entire particle and can be recapitulated by oxidation of reconstituted HDL particles comprised of apoA1 and nonoxidizable phosphatidylcholine species. Multiple site-directed mutagenesis studies of apoA1 suggest that the pro-inflammatory activity of MPO-modified HDL does not involve methionine, tyrosine, or tryptophan, oxidant-sensitive residues previously mapped as sites of apoA1 oxidation within human atheroma. Thus, MPO-catalyzed oxidation of HDL results not only in the loss of classic atheroprotective reverse cholesterol transport activities of the lipoprotein but also both the loss of non-cholesterol efflux related activities and the gain of pro-inflammatory functions. PMID:19726691

  5. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in assessment and management of cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Remaley, A T

    2014-07-01

    The deposition of cholesterol in the arterial wall by the infiltration of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) is a key step in the development of atherosclerosis. In this Commentary, we discuss recent recommendations for clinical laboratory measurement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and its utility both for assessing cardiovascular disease risk and as a tool in the management of patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy.

  6. Reliability of Calculated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Snozek, Christine L; Baumann, Nikola A; Jaffe, Allan S; Saenger, Amy K

    2015-08-15

    Aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering strategies are recommended for prevention of cardiovascular events in high-risk populations. Guidelines recommend a 30% to 50% reduction in at-risk patients even when LDL-C concentrations are between 70 and 130 mg/dl (1.8 to 3.4 mmol/L). However, calculation of LDL-C by the Friedewald equation is the primary laboratory method for routine LDL-C measurement. We compared the accuracy and reproducibility of calculated LDL-C <130 mg/dl (3.4 mmol/L) to LDL-C measured by β quantification (considered the gold standard method) in 15,917 patients with fasting triglyceride concentrations <400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L). Both variation and bias of calculated LDL-C increased at lower values of measured LDL-C. The 95% confidence intervals for a calculated LDL-C of 70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L) and 30 mg/dl (0.8 mmol/L) were 60 to 86 mg/dl (1.6 to 2.2 mmol/L) and 24 to 60 mg/dl (0.6 to 1.6 mmol/L), respectively. Previous recommendations have emphasized the requirement for a fasting sample with triglycerides <400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L) to calculate LDL-C by the Friedewald equation. However, no recommendations have addressed the appropriate lower reportable limit for calculated LDL-C. In conclusion, calculated LDL-C <30 mg/dl (0.8 mmol/L) should not be reported because of significant deviation from the gold standard measured LDL-C results, and caution is advised when using calculated LDL-CF values <70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L) to make treatment decisions.

  7. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Srisen, Kaemisa; Röhrl, Clemens; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Ranftler, Carmen; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit; Neumüller, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL), and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate), cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal intraellular

  8. Focus on lipids: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its associated lipoproteins in cardiac and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun Joon; McCullough, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) contains dozens of apoproteins that participate in normal cholesterol metabolism with a reliance on renal catabolism for clearance from the body. The plasma pool of HDL-C has been an excellent inverse predictor of cardiovascular events. However, when HDL-C concentrations have been manipulated with the use of niacin, fibric acid derivatives, and cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitors, there has been no improvement in outcomes in patients where the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol has been well treated with statins. Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) is one of the minor apoproteins of HDL-C, newly discovered in 1997. Circulating APOL1 is a 43-kDa protein mainly found in the HDL3 subfraction. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), mutant forms of APOL1 have been associated with rapidly progressive CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Because mutant forms of APOL1 are more prevalent in African Americans compared to Caucasians, it may explain some of the racial disparities seen in the pool of patients with ESRD in the United States. Thus, HDL-C is an important lipoprotein carrying apoproteins that play roles in vascular and kidney disease. PMID:25343842

  9. Iron-ascorbate-phospholipid mediated modification of low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, P; Yu, H; Gutman, R L; Mao, F; Ryu, B H; Lou, P

    1996-06-11

    LDL can be oxidized by a variety of agents to form a modified lipoprotein which is capable of being avidly metabolized by macrophages. While previous in vitro studies have focused exclusively on the oxidation of LDL, other lipids found in the atheroma are also subject to oxidation and its lipoperoxide byproducts may contribute to the process of LDL modification. To examine the relationship between the oxidation of phospholipids and the subsequent modification of LDL, we incubated 250 microM phosphatidylcholine with 10 microM ferrous sulfate and 50 microM ascorbic acid in 10 mM Tris (pH 7.0). After 18 h at 37 degrees C, significant amounts of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were formed. The inclusion of LDL (100 micrograms protein/ml) elevated the TBARS and increased the electrophoretic mobility of the lipoprotein. LDL treated with iron and ascorbate in the absence of phosphatidylcholine did not result in the modification of this lipoprotein. LDL that was incubated with phosphatidylcholine, iron and ascorbate was found to be metabolized by macrophages to a far greater extent than native LDL or LDL treated with phosphatidylcholine alone. Probucol (10 microM) inhibited the LDL modification process. These results demonstrate that while iron and ascorbate cannot oxidize LDL directly, the addition of phosphatidylcholine to these initiators of lipid peroxidation can mediate and lead to the modification of LDL. PMID:8664335

  10. Studies on epitopes on low-density lipoprotein modified by 4-hydroxynonenal. Biochemical characterization and determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q; Esterbauer, H; Jürgens, G

    1992-01-01

    Oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was found to be accompanied by the generation of various reactive aldehydes. One of them, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), was shown to modify LDL to a form which represents a good model of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). In order to investigate the epitopes newly formed on HNE-modified LDL, a polyvalent antiserum to HNE-LDL [anti-(HNE-LDL)] was raised in rabbits and the non-specific components were removed with native LDL coupled to CNBr-Sepharose 4B. Competitive fluorescence immunoassay analysis showed that anti-(HNE-LDL) recognized HNE-LDL, copper-oxidized LDL, HNE-albumin and to a lower extent HNE-modified high-density lipoprotein 3 (HNE-HDL3) and ox-HDL3 but not native LDL. A certain degree of cross-reactivity of the antibody with LDLs modified by either hexanal or 2,4-heptadienal was found. No reaction was obtained with LDL labelled with malondialdehyde. From the abilities of HNE-modified poly(L-amino acids) to compete with HNE-LDL for binding to anti-(HNE-LDL), it is postulated that lysine, tyrosine, arginine and histidine are involved in the formation of HNE-derived epitopes on apolipoprotein B (apo B). Using a double-sandwich fluorescence immunoassay [capture antibody: anti-(apo B); detection antibody: anti-(HNE-LDL)] we found that the HNE-derived epitopes were expressed at a far higher degree in ox-LDL and HNE-LDL than in native LDL. PMID:1280111

  11. Rhesus positivity and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: a new link?

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Yildirir, Aylin; Ulus, Taner; Bilgi, Muhammet; Kucuk, Alparslan; Muderrisoglu, Haldun

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of ABO and Rh blood groups with lipid profile in patients with established multivessel coronary artery disease in a population with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The records of 978 patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, in whom coronary bypass surgery was performed, were investigated. Coronary risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and obesity were noted for each patient. Serum lipid profiles: total cholesterol, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 59.3 +/- 9.7 years (range, 25-84 years) and 80% were male. The risk factors and lipid profiles of ABO blood types were similar. Rh-negative patients had higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (46.9 +/- 9.9 vs. 41.6 +/- 10.4 mg.dL(-1), p = 0.001) and a lower total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (4.8 +/- 1.3 vs. 5.2 +/- 1.6, p = 0.029) compared to Rh-positive patients. The other lipid levels and risk factors had no association with Rh typing. These results indicate a significant association between rhesus positivity and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease.

  12. Increased expression of apolipoprotein E in transgenic rabbits results in reduced levels of very low density lipoproteins and an accumulation of low density lipoproteins in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, J; Ji, Z S; Huang, Y; de Silva, H; Sanan, D; Mahley, R W; Innerarity, T L; Taylor, J M

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic rabbits expressing human apo E3 were generated to investigate mechanisms by which apo E modulates plasma lipoprotein metabolism. Compared with nontransgenic littermates expressing approximately 3 mg/dl of endogenous rabbit apo E, male transgenic rabbits expressing approximately 13 mg/dl of human apo E had a 35% decrease in total plasma triglycerides that was due to a reduction in VLDL levels and an absence of large VLDL. With its greater content of apo E, transgenic VLDL had an increased binding affinity for the LDL receptor in vitro, and injected chylomicrons were cleared more rapidly by the liver in transgenic rabbits. In contrast to triglyceride changes, transgenic rabbits had a 70% increase in plasma cholesterol levels due to an accumulation of LDL and apo E-rich HDL. Transgenic and control LDL had the same binding affinity for the LDL receptor. Both transgenic and control rabbits had similar LDL receptor levels, but intravenously injected human LDL were cleared more slowly in transgenic rabbits than in controls. Changes in lipoprotein lipolysis did not contribute to the accumulation of LDL or the reduction in VLDL levels. These observations suggest that the increased content of apo E3 on triglyceride-rich remnant lipoproteins in transgenic rabbits confers a greater affinity for cell surface receptors, thereby increasing remnant clearance from plasma. The apo E-rich large remnants appear to compete more effectively than LDL for receptor-mediated binding and clearance, resulting in delayed clearance and the accumulation of LDL in plasma. PMID:9593771

  13. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein. PMID:22481012

  14. Proteome of human plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein exhibits a link with coagulation and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dashty, M; Motazacker, M M; Levels, J; de Vries, M; Mahmoudi, M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Rezaee, F

    2014-03-01

    Apart from transporting lipids through the body, the human plasma lipoproteins very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are also thought to serve as a modality for intra-organismal protein transfer, shipping proteins with important roles in inflammation and thrombosis from the site of synthesis to effector locations. To better understand the role of VLDL and LDL in the transport of proteins, we applied a combination of LTQ ORBITRAP-XL (nLC-MS/MS) with both in-SDS-PAGE gel and in-solution tryptic digestion of pure and defined VLDL and LDL fractions. We identified the presence of 95 VLDL- and 51 LDL-associated proteins including all known apolipoproteins and lipid transport proteins, and intriguingly a set of coagulation proteins, complement system and anti- microbial proteins. Prothrombin, protein S, fibrinogen γ, PLTP, CETP, CD14 and LBP were present on VLDL but not on LDL. Prenylcysteine oxidase 1, dermcidin, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, TFPI-1 and fibrinogen α chain were associated with both VLDL and LDL. Apo A-V is only present on VLDL and not on LDL. Collectively, this study provides a wealth of knowledge on the protein constituents of the human plasma lipoprotein system and strongly supports the notion that protein shuttling through this system is involved in the regulation of biological processes. Human diseases related to proteins carried by VLDL and LDL can be divided in three major categories: 1 - dyslipidaemia, 2 - atherosclerosis and vascular disease, and 3 - coagulation disorders. PMID:24500811

  15. Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 and high-density lipoprotein metabolism: experimental animal models and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Corsini, Alberto; Macchi, Chiara; Magni, Paolo; Ruscica, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) belongs to the proprotein convertase family. Several studies have demonstrated its involvement in the regulation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels by inducing the degradation of the LDL receptor (LDLR). However, experimental, epidemiologic, and pharmacologic data provide important evidence on the role of PCSK9 also on high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). In mice, PCSK9 regulates the HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels by the degradation of hepatic LDLR, thus inhibiting the uptake of apolipoprotein (Apo)E-containing HDLs. Several epidemiologic and genetic studies reported positive relationship between PCSK9 and HDL-C levels, likely by reducing the uptake of the ApoE-containing HDL particles. PCSK9 enhances also the degradation of LDLR's closest family members, ApoE receptor 2, very low-density lipoprotein receptor, and LDLR-related protein 1. This feature provides a molecular mechanism by which PCSK9 may affect HDL metabolism. Experimental studies demonstrated that PCSK9 directly interacts with HDL by modulating PCSK9 self-assembly and its binding to the LDLR. Finally, the inhibition of PCSK9 by means of monoclonal antibodies directed to PCSK9 (ie, evolocumab and alirocumab) determines an increase of HDL-C fraction by 7% and 4.2%, respectively. Thus, the understanding of the role of PCSK9 on HDL metabolism needs to be elucidated with a particular focus on the effect of PCSK9 on HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:26548330

  16. The myeloperoxidase product hypochlorous acid generates irreversible high-density lipoprotein receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Veronika; Ljubojevic, Senka; Haybaeck, Johannes; Holzer, Michael; El-Gamal, Dalia; Schicho, Rudolf; Pieske, Burkert; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been described in several chronic inflammatory diseases, like chronic renal insufficiency, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Recent findings revealed that AOPPs are inhibitors of the major high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, scavenger receptor class B, type 1 (SR-BI). Here we investigated what oxidation induced structural alterations convert plasma albumin into an HDL-receptor inhibitor. Approach and Results Exposure of albumin to the physiological oxidant, hypochlorous acid, generated high affinity SR-BI ligands. Protection of albumin lysine-residues prior exposure to hypochlorous acid as well as regeneration of N-chloramines after oxidation of albumin completely prevented binding of oxidized albumin to SR-BI, indicating that modification of albumin lysine-residues is required to generate SR-BI ligands. Of particular interest, N-chloramines within oxidized albumin promoted irreversible binding to SR-BI, resulting in permanent receptor blockade. We observed that the SR-BI inhibitory activity of albumin isolated from chronic kidney disease patients correlated with the content of the myeloperoxidase-specific oxidation product 3-chlorotyrosine and was associated with alterations in the composition of HDL. Conclusion Given that several potential atheroprotective activities of HDL are mediated by SR-BI, the present results raise the possibility that oxidized plasma albumin, through permanent SR-BI blockade, contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23493288

  17. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation: CRITICAL ROLES OF LYSINES 60 AND 191.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Young, Patricia A; Strickland, Dudley K

    2016-08-26

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  18. Recombinant hepatitis C virus-envelope protein 2 interactions with low-density lipoprotein/CD81 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Tansini, Aline; Cappelini, Luciana Teresa Dias; Malagó, Wilson; da Silva, Flávio Henrique; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; da Costa, Paulo Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein 2 (E2) is involved in viral binding to host cells. The aim of this work was to produce recombinant E2B and E2Y HCV proteins in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris, respectively, and to study their interactions with low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and CD81 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the ECV304 bladder carcinoma cell line. To investigate the effects of human LDL and differences in protein structure (glycosylated or not) on binding efficiency, the recombinant proteins were either associated or not associated with lipoproteins before being assayed. The immunoreactivity of the recombinant proteins was analysed using pooled serum samples that were either positive or negative for hepatitis C. The cells were immunophenotyped by LDLr and CD81 using flow cytometry. Binding and binding inhibition assays were performed in the presence of LDL, foetal bovine serum (FCS) and specific antibodies. The results revealed that binding was reduced in the absence of FCS, but that the addition of human LDL rescued and increased binding capacity. In HUVEC cells, the use of antibodies to block LDLr led to a significant reduction in the binding of E2B and E2Y. CD81 antibodies did not affect E2B and E2Y binding. In ECV304 cells, blocking LDLr and CD81 produced similar effects, but they were not as marked as those that were observed in HUVEC cells. In conclusion, recombinant HCV E2 is dependent on LDL for its ability to bind to LDLr in HUVEC and ECV304 cells. These findings are relevant because E2 acts to anchor HCV to host cells; therefore, high blood levels of LDL could enhance viral infectivity in chronic hepatitis C patients. PMID:26018451

  19. Cholesterol-Dependent Anaplasma phagocytophilum Exploits the Low-Density Lipoprotein Uptake Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qingming; Lin, Mingqun; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, intracellular cholesterol homeostasis and trafficking are tightly regulated. Certain bacteria, such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum, also require cholesterol; it is unknown, however, how this cholesterol-dependent obligatory intracellular bacterium of granulocytes interacts with the host cell cholesterol regulatory pathway to acquire cholesterol. Here, we report that total host cell cholesterol increased >2-fold during A. phagocytophilum infection in a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. Cellular free cholesterol was enriched in A. phagocytophilum inclusions as detected by filipin staining. We determined that A. phagocytophilum requires cholesterol derived from low-density lipoprotein (LDL), because its replication was significantly inhibited by depleting the growth medium of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, by blocking LDL uptake with a monoclonal antibody against LDL receptor (LDLR), or by treating the host cells with inhibitors that block LDL-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes or lysosomes. However, de novo cholesterol biosynthesis is not required, since inhibition of the biosynthesis pathway did not inhibit A. phagocytophilum infection. The uptake of fluorescence-labeled LDL was enhanced in infected cells, and LDLR expression was up-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. A. phagocytophilum infection stabilized LDLR mRNA through the 3′ UTR region, but not through activation of the sterol regulatory element binding proteins. Extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) was up-regulated by A. phagocytophilum infection, and inhibition of its upstream kinase, MEK, by a specific inhibitor or siRNA knockdown, reduced A. phagocytophilum infection. Up-regulation of LDLR mRNA by A. phagocytophilum was also inhibited by the MEK inhibitor; however, it was unclear whether ERK activation is required for LDLR mRNA up-regulation by A. phagocytophilum. These data reveal that A. phagocytophilum exploits the host LDL uptake pathway and

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles1

    PubMed Central

    Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Lanzardo, Stefania; Alberti, Diego; Belfiore, Simona; Ciampa, Anna; Giovenzana, Giovanni B; Lovazzano, Clara; Pagliarin, Roberto; Aime, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, Gd-AAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T1 measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs) has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR) visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety. PMID:18084612

  1. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  2. High-density lipoprotein acts as an opsonin to enhance phagocytosis of group A streptococcus by U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Zhou, Lulei; Li, Yuxin; Bai, Wencheng; Liu, Na; Li, Wenlong; Gao, Yumin; Liu, Zhi; Han, Runlin

    2015-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) can specifically bind to streptococcal collagen-like protein 1 (Scl1) of M41-type group A Streptococcus (GAS). However, the pathological or physiological significance of Scl1-HDL interaction is unknown. Here, the hypothesis that HDL acts as an opsonin to enhance phagocytosis of HDL-bound GAS by monocytes given that some scavenger receptors can mediate the endocytosis of HDL was tested by using FITC-labeled bacteria, human U937 monocytes and HDL for phagocytic assays. HDL (10 µg/mL) was found to significantly enhance internalization of M41-type (ATCC 12373) GAS by U937 cells after 60 min incubation, compared with an HDL-free group. The internalized GAS were dead after 60 min incubation with U937 cells regardless of presence and absence of HDL. Although very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) could specifically bind to ATCC 12373 strain, it did not promote phagocytosis of GAS. Additionally, LDL, HDL and VLDL did not enhance phagocytosis of CMCC 32198 strain because this strain did not bind to these lipoproteins. A physiological concentration of HDL (1000 µg/mL) had a similar effect. Anti-CD36 antibody completely abolished opsonic phagocytosis whereas anti-CD4 antibody did not, indicating that CD36 is the major scavenger receptor mediating the uptake of HDL-opsonized GAS by U937 cells. Furthermore, because rScl1 competitively blocked the interaction of ATCC 12373 strain with HDL recombinant Scl1 (rScl1) derived from M41-type GAS, it significantly decreased opsonophagocytosis of ATCC 12373 strain but not of CMCC 32198 strain. Therefore, our findings suggest that HDL may be an opsonin that enhances CD36-dependent opsonophagocytosis of GAS by U937 cells.

  3. Photodynamic targeting of human retinoblastoma cells using covalent low-density lipoprotein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Erfurth, U.; Diddens, H.; Birngruber, R.; Hasan, T.

    1997-01-01

    Combination of photosensitizers with carrier molecules has been shown to enhance the efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Owing to an increased expression of their receptors on some malignant and proliferating cells, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) are potential endogenous carriers. A photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (Ce6), was covalently bound to LDL via carbodiimide activation. The Ce6-LDL conjugate was evaluated on a fibroblast cell line with defined LDL receptor expression and a retinoblastoma cell line (Y79). Uptake of free Ce6 and Ce6 either covalently bound to or complexed with LDL was measured by spectrofluorimetry. Phototoxicity after irradiation at 660 nm was determined by a mitochondrial activity assay (MTT). Covalent binding to LDL significantly increased the uptake of Ce6 for both cell lines by a factor of 4-5. A Ce6: LDL binding ratio of 50:1 was optimal. A receptor-mediated uptake was demonstrated by saturability and competitive inhibition by free LDL. Binding also occurred at 2 degrees C and was attributed to non-specific associations. Irradiation with 10 J cm-2 of 660 nm light after treatment of cells with Ce6-LDL conjugate reduced the MTT activity by 80%, while free or mixed Ce6 induced a maximum of 10% reduction in the MTT activity following identical treatment conditions. These data suggest that targeting of LDL receptor-bearing cells using covalently bound carriers, such as LDL, might increase the efficiency and selectivity of PDT. Intraocular tumours such as retinoblastomas could be appropriate targets for such an approach owing to the ease of access of light sources and the need for non-invasive approaches in sensitive ocular sites. PMID:9000598

  4. Regulation of Rac1 activation by the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong; Thomas, Keena S; Webb, Donna J; Moravec, Radim; Salicioni, Ana Maria; Mars, Wendy M; Gonias, Steven L

    2002-12-23

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1) binds and mediates the endocytosis of multiple ligands, transports the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and other membrane proteins into endosomes, and binds intracellular adaptor proteins involved in cell signaling. In this paper, we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and L929 cells, LRP-1 functions as a major regulator of Rac1 activation, and that this activity depends on uPAR. LRP-1-deficient MEFs demonstrated increased Rac1 activation compared with LRP-1-expressing MEFs, and this property was reversed by expressing the VLDL receptor, a member of the same gene family as LRP-1, with overlapping ligand-binding specificity. Neutralizing the activity of LRP-1 with receptor-associated protein (RAP) increased Rac1 activation and cell migration in MEFs and L929 cells. The same parameters were unaffected by RAP in uPAR-/- MEFs, prepared from uPAR gene knockout embryos, and in uPAR-deficient LM-TK- cells. Untreated uPAR+/+ MEFs demonstrated substantially increased Rac1 activation compared with uPAR-/- MEFs. In addition to Rac1, LRP-1 suppressed activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in MEFs; however, it was Rac1 (and not ERK) that was responsible for the effects of LRP-1 on MEF migration. Thus, LRP-1 regulates two signaling proteins in the same cell (Rac1 and ERK), both of which may impact on cell migration. In uPAR-negative cells, LRP-1 neutralization does not affect Rac1 activation, and other mechanisms by which LRP-1 may regulate cell migration are not unmasked.

  5. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  6. 'Trig-onometry': non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol as a therapeutic target in dyslipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, T A

    2011-01-01

    Targeting elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) remains the cornerstone of cardiovascular prevention. However, this fraction does not adequately capture elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs; e.g. intermediate-density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein) in certain patients with metabolic syndrome or diabetic dyslipidaemia. Many such individuals have residual cardiovascular risk that might be lipid/lipoprotein related despite therapy with first-line agents (statins). Epidemiological evidence encompassing > 100,000 persons supports the contention that non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) is a superior risk factor vs. LDL-C for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in certain patient populations. In studies with clinical end-points evaluated in the current article, a 1:1 to 1:3 relationship was observed between reductions in non-HDL-C and in the relative risk of CHD after long-term treatment with statins, niacin (nicotinic acid) and fibric-acid derivatives (fibrates); this relationship increased to 1:5 to 1:10 in smaller subgroups of patients with elevated triglycerides and low HDL-C levels. Treatment with statin-, niacin-, fibrate-, ezetimibe-, and omega 3 fatty acid-containing regimens reduced non-HDL-C by approximately 9-65%. In a range of clinical trials, long-term treatment with these agents also significantly decreased the incidence of clinical/angiographic/imaging efficacy outcome variables. For patients with dyslipidaemia, consensus guidelines have established non-HDL-C treatment targets 30 mg/dl higher than LDL-C goals. Ongoing prospective randomised controlled trials should help to resolve controversies concerning (i) the clinical utility of targeting non-HDL-C in patients with dyslipidaemia; (ii) the most efficacious and well-tolerated therapies to reduce non-HDL-C (e.g. combination regimens); and (iii) associations between such reductions and clinical, angiographic, and/or imaging end-points. PMID:21105969

  7. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  8. Isolation and partial characterization of high-density lipoprotein HDL1 from rat plasma by gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, L T; Walker, L F; DuBien, L H; Getz, G S

    1979-01-01

    The lipoproteins isolated from rat plasma by flotation in the density range 1.019-1.063 g/ml were further characterized. Using rate zonal ultracentrifugation, we isolated two lipoproteins in almost equal proportions from this density range. Similar isolations may be accomplished with density gradients in a swinging-bucket rotor. On isopycnic-density-gradient ultracentrifugation one component banded at rho = 1.031 g/ml and the other at rho = 1.054 g/ml. More that 98% of the apoprotein of the lighter component was B protein, and hence this particle is LD (low-density) lipoprotein. Of the apoproteins of the rho = 1.054 g/ml particles, designated lipoprotein HDL1, over 60% was arginine-rich peptide, and the remainder was A-I, A-IV and C peptides. The molecular weight of these lipoproteins determined by agarose column chromatography was 2.36 x 10(6) for LD lipoprotein and 1.30 x 10(6) for lipoprotein HDL1. On electron microscopy the radius of LD lipoprotein was 14.0 nm and that of lipoprotein HDL1 was 10.0 nm, in contrast with molecular radii of 10.4 nm and 8.4 nm respectively determined from the gel-permeation-chromatography data. The lipid and phospholipid composition of both particles was determined. Lipoprotein HDL1 was notable for both the concentration of its esterified cholesterol, which was similar to that of LD lipoprotein, and the low triacylglycerol content, resembling that of HD lipoprotein. The possible origin of lipoprotein HDL1 is discussed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:230819

  9. In vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into high and low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Terpstra, A.H.; Nicolosi, R.J.; Herbert, P.N. )

    1989-11-01

    We have developed and validated a method for in vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into low density (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Radiolabeled cholesteryl esters dissolved in absolute ethanol were mixed with LDL or HDL in the presence of lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) as a source of core lipid transfer activity. The efficiency of incorporation was dependent on: (a) the core lipid transfer activity and quantity of LPDS, (b) the mass of added radiolabeled cholesteryl esters, (c) the length of incubation, and (d) the amount of acceptor lipoprotein cholesterol. The tracer incorporation was documented by repeat density gradient ultracentrifugation, agarose gel electrophoresis, and precipitation with heparin-MnCl2. The radiolabeling conditions did not affect the following properties of the lipoproteins: (1) chemical composition, (2) electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels, (3) hydrated density, (4) distribution of apoproteins on SDS gels, (5) plasma clearance rates, and (6) immunoprecipitability of HDL apoproteins A-I and A-II. Rat HDL containing radiolabeled cholesteryl esters incorporated in vitro had plasma disappearance rates identical to HDL radiolabeled in vivo.

  10. Variations in high-density lipoprotein subclasses during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Austin, M A; Krauss, R M

    1994-11-01

    In a study of 41 healthy premenopausal women, plasma high-density lipoprotein-2a (HDL2a) levels (ie, HDL of diameter 8.8 to 9.7 nm) were significantly higher during the luteal phase than during the follicular phase of the cycle. There was no significant variation in HDL2b or any of the HDL3 subclasses.

  11. Glycated albumin and direct low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  12. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. 866.5600 Section 866.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. 866.5600 Section 866.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  15. Direct Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Glycated Albumin Levels in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) have been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. The aim in this st...

  16. Total and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Kelly, Luke E.

    1990-01-01

    The study evaluated the total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol of 40 adults (mean age 37.5 years) with mental retardation residing at an intermediate care facility. Results indicated that 59 percent of the males and 68 percent of the females were at moderate to high risk for coronary heart disease. (DB)

  17. Spin-labeling study of the oxidative damage to low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Singh, R J; Feix, J B; Mchaourab, H S; Hogg, N; Kalyanaraman, B

    1995-06-20

    In this study, we have spin-labeled the lysine and cysteine residues of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using N-4-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl-4-yl) maleimide (MAL-6) and succinimidyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrroline-1-oxyl-3-carboxylate (SSL), respectively. The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of SSL bound to LDL indicated that the nitroxide moiety was relatively mobile. In contrast, the ESR spectrum of MAL-6 bound to LDL showed that the nitroxide moiety was rotationally restricted. Using the continuous-wave power saturation technique in the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic paramagnetic relaxing agents, we have determined that (i) approximately 60-70% of lysine-bound SSL is exposed to the aqueous phase, (ii) approximately 30-40% of SSL-LDL is buried in a hydrophobic region, and (iii) MAL-6 bound to LDL is localized predominantly in the hydrophobic region. During Cu(2+)-initiated oxidation of spin-labeled LDL, nitroxide labels located in a hydrophobic environment were predominantly degraded. Nitroxide destruction was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, indicating the role of lipid peroxidation in this process. ESR data also showed that Cu2+ binding to lysine is essential for LDL oxidation. The spin label methodology may be useful for the investigation of site-specific radical reactions in LDL.

  18. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential. PMID:26578342

  19. Aggregation and fusion of low-density lipoproteins in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs, also known as ‘bad cholesterol’) are the major carriers of circulating cholesterol and the main causative risk factor of atherosclerosis. Plasma LDLs are 20- to 25-nm nanoparticles containing a core of cholesterol esters surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and a single copy of apolipoprotein B (550 kDa). An early sign of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of LDL-derived lipid droplets in the arterial wall. According to the widely accepted ‘response-to-retention hypothesis’, LDL binding to the extracellular matrix proteoglycans in the arterial intima induces hydrolytic and oxidative modifications that promote LDL aggregation and fusion. This enhances LDL uptake by the arterial macrophages and triggers a cascade of pathogenic responses that culminate in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Hence, LDL aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation are important early steps in atherogenesis. In vitro, a variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of LDL can induce these reactions and thereby provide useful models for their detailed analysis. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the in vivo and in vitro modifications of LDLs leading to their aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation; outline the techniques used to study these reactions; and propose a molecular mechanism that underlies these pro-atherogenic processes. Such knowledge is essential in identifying endogenous and exogenous factors that can promote or prevent LDL aggregation and fusion in vivo and to help establish new potential therapeutic targets to decelerate or even block these pathogenic reactions. PMID:25197325

  20. Rspo2 suppresses CD36-mediated apoptosis in oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Zewei; Zan, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Pan, Yanyun; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis of macrophages contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. R‑spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of the cysteine‑rich secreted proteins, has been shown to be involved in the oncogenesis of several types of cancer. It has also been found to be abundantly expressed among the four R‑spondin members in macrophages. The present study was performed to determine whether Rspo2 is involved in the ox‑LDL‑induced apoptosis of macrophages. It was identified that Rspo2 inhibited oxLDL‑induced apoptosis in the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activator using flow cytometry. In addition, Rspo2 was observed to suppress oxLDL‑induced ER stress and reactive oxygen species production as demonstrated by western blotting. Furthermore, analysis of the role of Rspo2 in macrophage lipid uptake identified that Rspo2 negatively regulated the Dil‑oxLDL uptake by inhibiting the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)36, through the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)‑γ. The manipulation of Rspo2 had a direct effect on PPAR‑γ nuclear translocation. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rspo2 manipulation led to regulation of the direct binding between PPAR‑γ and CD36. In conclusion, Rspo2 was found to have a negative regulatory effect during oxLDL‑induced macrophage apoptosis by regulating lipid uptake. PMID:27571704

  1. High-Density Lipoprotein-Mediated Transcellular Cholesterol Transport in Mouse Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miao, LiXia; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Cao, ZhiJan; Yang, Hong; Motley-Johnson, Evangeline; Guo, Zhongmao

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unesterified cholesterol-rich lipid vesicles in the subendothelial space contributes to atherogenesis. Transport of cholesterol from the subendothelial intima back to the circulating blood inhibits atherosclerosis development; however, the mechanism for this process has not been fully defined. Using cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), we observed that unesterified cholesterol can be transported across the endothelial cell monolayer from the basolateral to the apical compartment. Administration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) to the apical compartment enhanced transendothelial cholesterol transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) or scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1), or inhibition of SR-B1 diminished HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport; while knockdown of ABCA1 reduced apoAI-mediated cholesterol transport. HDL enhanced phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in MAECs. However, inhibition PI3K or Akt did not reduce HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport. These results suggest that HDL enhances transendothelial cholesterol transport by activation of a mechanism involving ABCA1, ABCA1 and SR-B1 but not involving PI3K and Akt. PMID:26255968

  2. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-11-18

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  3. Novel fluorescently labeled peptide compounds for detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein at high specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Oe, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    The probes for specific detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in plasma and in atherosclerotic plaques are expected to be useful for the identification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for atherosclerosis. In this study, to develop a fluorescent peptide probe for specific detection of ox-LDL, we investigated the interaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled peptides with ox-LDL using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two heptapeptides (KWYKDGD and KP6) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the N-terminus to FITC in the presence/absence of 6-amino-n-caproic acid (AC) linker to FITC--(FITC-AC)KP6 and (FITC)KP6--both bound with high specificity to ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, a tetrapeptide (YKDG) labeled with FITC at the N-terminus and a pentapeptide (YKDGK) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the C-terminus to FITC did not bind selectively to ox-LDL. Furthermore, (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 bound with high specificity to the protein in mouse plasma (probably ox-LDL fraction). These findings strongly suggest that (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 may be effective novel fluorescent probes for specific detection of ox-LDL.

  4. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  5. Macrophage uptake of low-density lipoprotein modified by 4-hydroxynonenal. An ultrastructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, H.F.; Cole, T.B. )

    1991-02-01

    We have documented the ultrastructural characteristics of the uptake and processing by mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an intermediate of lipid peroxidation. This was performed as part of a larger biochemical study assessing the role of LDL oxidation in lipid loading of macrophages during atherogenesis. Gold-labeled LDL that was modified with HNE leading to particle aggregation represented the morphologic probe used. When incubated with MPM, the probe became associated with short segments of cell membrane, probably derived from blebs or from lysed cells. At 37 degrees C there was a time-dependent increase in uptake by MPM, and at 4 hours the increase paralleled the degradation by MPM of 125I-labeled HNE-LDL-cAu. Clathrin-coated pits on the cell surface were consistently associated with probe. Uptake of probe appeared to occur via phagocytosis, because pseudopods frequently surrounded probe, and cytochalasin D quantitatively prevented probe uptake. A time-dependent increase was found in the number of gold particles per unit area within vacuoles, some of which were secondary lysosomes, based on acid phosphatase-positive staining. Thus, HNE-induced aggregation of LDL during oxidation, binding of aggregates to clathrin-coated pits on MPM, and subsequent phagocytosis may represent one of the ways lipid-laden foam cells are formed in vivo.

  6. Involvement of second messengers in regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Auwerx, J.H. . ECHEM Labs.); Chait, A.; Wolfbauer, G.; Deeb, S.S. . Dept. of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    Transcription of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in the human monocytic leukemic cell line THP-1 and in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep-G2 is regulated by second messengers of the diacylglycerol-protein kinase C (DAG-PKC), inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-Ca/sup 2+/, and cyclic AMP pathways. Exogeneous phospholipase C (which releases DAG and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate), PKC activators (phorbol esters and DAG), Ca/sup 2+/ ionophores, and a cyclic AMP analog all transiently induced accumulation of LDL-R mRNA. The effects of these three signal-transducing pathways were to a large extend additive. Furthermore, PKC stimulation effected an increase in LDL binding, which suggested that the increase in LDL-R mRNA resulted in an increase in functional cell surface receptor activity. These results suggest that uptake of cholesterol by these cells is under control of both intracellular cholesterol levels and external signals.

  7. Rspo2 suppresses CD36-mediated apoptosis in oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Zewei; Zan, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Pan, Yanyun; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Mingjie; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis of macrophages contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of the cysteine-rich secreted proteins, has been shown to be involved in the oncogenesis of several types of cancer. It has also been found to be abundantly expressed among the four R-spondin members in macrophages. The present study was performed to determine whether Rspo2 is involved in the ox-LDL-induced apoptosis of macrophages. It was identified that Rspo2 inhibited oxLDL-induced apoptosis in the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activator using flow cytometry. In addition, Rspo2 was observed to suppress oxLDL-induced ER stress and reactive oxygen species production as demonstrated by western blotting. Furthermore, analysis of the role of Rspo2 in macrophage lipid uptake identified that Rspo2 negatively regulated the Dil-oxLDL uptake by inhibiting the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)36, through the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. The manipulation of Rspo2 had a direct effect on PPAR-γ nuclear translocation. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rspo2 manipulation led to regulation of the direct binding between PPAR-γ and CD36. In conclusion, Rspo2 was found to have a negative regulatory effect during oxLDL-induced macrophage apoptosis by regulating lipid uptake. PMID:27571704

  8. Low density lipoprotein fraction assay for cardiac disease risk

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, R.M.; Blanche, P.J.; Orr, J.

    1999-07-20

    A variable rate density gradient electrophoric gel is described which separates LDL subfractions with the precision of ultracentrifugation techniques. Also, an innovative bottom inlet mixing chamber particularly useful for producing these gels is described. 8 figs.

  9. Low density lipoprotein fraction assay for cardiac disease risk

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Orr, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A variable rate density gradient electrophoric gel is described which separate LDL subfractions with the precision of ultracentrifugation techniques. Also, an innovative bottom inlet mixing chamber particularly useful for producing these gels is described.

  10. IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS OF STEREOSELECTIVE DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Columns containing immobilized low density lipoprotein (LDL) were prepared for the analysis of drug interactions with this agent by high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). R/S-Propranolol was used as a model drug for this study. The LDL columns gave reproducible binding to propranolol over 60 h of continuous use in the presence of pH 7.4, 0.067 M potassium phosphate buffer. Experiments conducted with this type of column through frontal analysis indicated that two types of interactions were occurring between R-propranolol and LDL, while only a single type of interaction was observed between S-propranolol and LDL. The first type of interaction, which was seen for both enantiomers, involved non-saturable binding; this interaction had an overall affinity (nKa) of 1.9 (± 0.1) × 105 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.7 (± 0.2) × 105 M-1 for S-propranolol at 37 °C. The second type of interaction was observed only for R-propranolol and involved saturable binding that had an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 5.2 (± 2.3) × 105 M-1 at 37 °C. Similar differences in binding behavior were found for the two enantiomers at 20 °C and 27 °C. This is the first known example of stereoselective binding of drugs by LDL or other lipoproteins. This work also illustrates the ability of HPAC to be used as a tool for characterizing mixed-mode interactions that involve LDL and related binding agents. PMID:22354572

  11. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  12. Linkage analysis of the genetic determinants of high density lipoprotein concentrations and composition: evidence for involvement of the apolipoprotein A-II and cholesteryl ester transfer protein loci.

    PubMed

    Bu, X; Warden, C H; Xia, Y R; De Meester, C; Puppione, D L; Teruya, S; Lokensgard, B; Daneshmand, S; Brown, J; Gray, R J

    1994-06-01

    We have tested for evidence of linkage between the genetic loci determining concentrations and composition of plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) with the genes for the major apolipoproteins and enzymes participating in lipoprotein metabolism. These genes include those encoding various apolipoproteins (apo), including apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoB, apoC-I, apoC-II, apoC-III, apoE, and apo(a), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), HDL-binding protein, lipoprotein lipase, and the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. Polymorphisms of these genes, and nearby highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers, were examined by quantitative sib-pair linkage analysis in 30 coronary artery disease families consisting of a total of 366 individuals. Evidence for linkage was observed between a marker locus D16S313 linked to the CETP locus and a locus determining plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration (P = 0.002), and the genetic locus for apoA-II and a locus determining the levels of the major apolipoproteins of HDL, apoA-I and apoA-II (P = 0.009 and 0.02, respectively). HDL level was also influenced by the variation at the apo(a) locus on chromosome 6 (P = 0.02). Thus, these data indicate the simultaneous involvement of at least two different genetic loci in the determination of the levels of HDL and its associated lipoproteins.

  13. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  14. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  15. Apolipoprotein E on Hepatitis C Virion Facilitates Infection through Interaction with Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David M.; Huang, Hua; Ye, Jin; Gale, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. HCV associates with host apolipoproteins and enters hepatocytes through complex processes involving some combination of CD81, claudin-I, occludin, and scavenger receptor BI. Here we show that infectious HCV resembles very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and that entry involves co-receptor function of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R). Blocking experiments demonstrate that β-VLDL itself or anti-apolipoprotein E (apoE) antibody can block HCV entry. Knockdown of the LDL-R by treatment with 25-hydroxycholesterol or siRNA ablated ligand uptake and reduced HCV infection of cells, whereas infection was rescued upon cell ectopic LDL-R expression. Analyses of gradient-fractionated HCV demonstrate that apoE is associated with HCV virions exhibiting peak infectivity and dependence upon the LDL-R for cell entry. Our results define the LDL-R as a cooperative HCV co-receptor that supports viral entry and infectivity through interaction with apoE ligand present in an infectious HCV/lipoprotein complex comprising the virion. Disruption of HCV/LDL-R interactions by altering lipoprotein metabolism may therefore represent a focus for future therapy. PMID:19751943

  16. Low-density-lipoprotein subclasses and response to a low-fat diet in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M; Dreon, D M

    1995-08-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein responses to reduced dietary fat intake were investigated in relation to differences in distribution of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses among 105 healthy men consuming high-fat (46% fat) and low-fat (24% fat) diets in random order for 6 wk each. With high-fat diets, 87 subjects had predominantly large, buoyant LDL (pattern A), whereas the remainder had primarily smaller, denser LDL (pattern B). With low-fat diets, 36 men changed from pattern A to B. Compared with the 51 men with pattern A with both diets (stable A group), men in the stable B group (n = 18) had significantly greater reductions in plasma LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and mass of mid-sized (LDL II) and small (LDL III) LDL subfractions. In both the stable A and change groups, there was a shift in LDL particle mass from larger, lipid-enriched (LDL I and II) to smaller, lipid-depleted (LDL III and IV) subfractions, suggestive of change in LDL composition with minimal change in particle number, and consistent with the observation of reduced plasma LDL cholesterol without reduced apolipoprotein B. Stable B subjects had significantly greater increases in the largest very-low-density-lipoprotein subfraction with the low-fat diet than the stable A group, and also had greater decreases in the high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subclass HDL3 but smaller reductions in HDL2. Genetic and environmental factors influencing LDL subclass distributions thus may also contribute substantially to interindividual variation in plasma lipoprotein response to a low-fat diet.

  17. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Show Altered Lipoprotein Profiles with Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoproteins that Can Exacerbate Inflammatory and Atherogenic Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Jin Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to identify putative biomarkers in lipoprotein, we compared lipid and lipoprotein properties between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and control with similar age. Methods We analyzed four classes of lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, HDL2, HDL3) from both male (n = 8, 69±4 year-old) and female (n = 25, 53±7 year-old) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as controls with similar age (n = 13). Results Although RA group showed normal levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and glucose, however, the RA group showed significantly reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C level and ratio of HDL-C/TC. The RA group showed significantly elevated levels of blood triglyceride (TG), uric acid, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The RA group also showed elevated levels of advanced glycated end (AGE) products in all lipoproteins and severe aggregation of apoA-I in HDL. As CETP activity and TG contents were 2-fold increased in HDL from RA group, paraoxonase activity was reduced upto 20%. Electron microscopy revealed that RA group showed much less HDL2 particle number than control. LDL from the RA group was severely oxidized and glycated with greater fragmentation of apo-B, especially in female group, it was more atherogenic via phagocytosis. Conclusion Lipoproteins from the RA patients showed severely altered structure with impaired functionality, which is very similar to that observed in coronary heart patients. These dysfunctional properties in lipoproteins from the RA patients might be associated with high incidence of cardiovascular events in RA patients. PMID:27736980

  18. Initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is unaffected but endocytosis is delayed in mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herz, J; Qiu, S Q; Oesterle, A; DeSilva, H V; Shafi, S; Havel, R J

    1995-01-01

    Two endocytic receptors, the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein (LRP), are thought to act in concert in the hepatic uptake of partially metabolized dietary lipoproteins, the chylomicron remnants. We have evaluated the role of these two receptors in the hepatic metabolism of chylomicron remnants in normal mice and in LDLR-deficient [LDLR (-/-)] mice. The rate of chylomicron remnant removal by the liver was normal up to 30 min after intravenous injection of chylomicrons into LDLR (-/-) mice and was unaffected by receptor-associated protein (RAP), a potent inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP. In contrast, endocytosis of the remnants by the hepatocytes, measured by their accumulation in the endosomal fraction and by the rate of hydrolysis of component cholesteryl esters, was dramatically reduced in the absence of the LDLR. Coadministration of RAP prevented the continuing hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants in LDL (-/-) mice after 30 min, consistent with blockade of the slow endocytosis by a RAP-sensitive process. Taken together with previous studies, our results are consistent with a model in which the initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is primarily mediated by mechanisms that do not include LDLR or LRP, possibly involving glycosaminoglycan-bound hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein E. After the remnants bind to these alternative sites on the hepatocyte surface, endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the LDLR and also by a slower and less efficient backup process that is RAP sensitive and therefore most likely involves LRP. PMID:7753850

  19. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol as an independent risk factor in cardiovascular disease: assessing the data from Framingham to the Veterans Affairs High--Density Lipoprotein Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Boden, W E

    2000-12-21

    The Framingham Heart Study found that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was the most potent lipid predictor of coronary artery disease risk in men and women >49 years of age. The Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention Study (AFCAPS/TexCAPS), in which subjects were randomized to treatment with lovastatin or placebo, also reported a striking benefit of treatment, particularly in patients with HDL-C < or =35 mg/dL at baseline. Treatment with lovastatin was associated with a remarkable 45% reduction in events for this group. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial (VA-HIT) randomized subjects to gemfibrozil or placebo. A high proportion of enrolled subjects with low HDL-C also had characteristics of the dysmetabolic syndrome. HDL-C likewise increased by 6% on treatment, total cholesterol was reduced by 4% and triglycerides by 31%. There was no change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. These changes in lipid were associated with a cumulative 22% reduction in the trial primary endpoint of all-cause mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). Additionally, significant reductions in secondary endpoints including death from coronary artery disease, nonfatal MI, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and carotid endarterectomy were associated with the increase in HDL-C. In VA-HIT, for every 1% increase in HDL-C, there was a 3% reduction in death or MI, a therapeutic benefit that eclipses the benefit associated with LDL-C reduction. PMID:11374850

  20. Nigerian propolis improves blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, very low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels in rat models of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oladayo, Mustafa Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: According to our previous studies, propolis of Nigerian origin showed some evidence of hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities in addition to its ability to ameliorate oxidative-stress-induced organ dysfunction. This study was carried out to determine whether an ethanolic extract of Nigerian propolis (EENP) improves glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations in rats that have alloxan diabetes. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced with alloxan (110 mg/kg). Animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 5); Group 1 was non-diabetic receiving normal saline and Group 2 was diabetic but also received only normal saline. Groups 3, 4, and 5 were diabetic receiving 200 mg/kg propolis, 300 mg/kg propolis, and 150 mg/kg metformin, respectively, for 42 days. Results: Hyperglycemia, elevated serum level of VLDL, elevated plasma level of HbA1c, and decreased levels of HDL were observed in the diabetic untreated animals. Nigerian propolis decreased blood glucose level and serum level of VLDL but elevated HDL level. These changes were significant (P < 0.05). The levels of plasma HbA1c were also reduced in the propolis-treated groups, and the reduction was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Nigerian propolis contains compounds exhibiting hypoglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and HbA1c reducing activities. PMID:27366348

  1. Baseline lipoprotein lipids and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to prescription omega-3 acid ethyl ester added to Simvastatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Dicklin, Mary R; Davidson, Michael H; Doyle, Ralph T; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2010-05-15

    The present post hoc analysis of data from the COMBination of prescription Omega-3 with Simvastatin (COMBOS) study investigated the predictors of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol response to prescription omega-3 acid ethyl ester (P-OM3) therapy in men and women with high (200 to 499 mg/dl) triglycerides during diet plus simvastatin therapy. Subjects (n = 256 randomized) received double-blind P-OM3 4 g/day or placebo for 8 weeks combined with diet and open-label simvastatin 40 mg/day. The percentage of changes from baseline (with diet plus simvastatin) in lipids was evaluated by tertiles of baseline LDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. The baseline LDL cholesterol tertile was a significant predictor of the LDL cholesterol response (p = 0.022 for the treatment by baseline tertile interaction). The median LDL cholesterol response in the P-OM3 group was +9.5% (first tertile, <80.4 mg/dl), -0.9% (second tertile), and -6.4% (third tertile, > or =99.0 mg/dl). Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride responses did not vary significantly by baseline LDL cholesterol tertile. The reductions in very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were greater than the increases in LDL cholesterol, where present, resulting in a net decrease in the concentration of cholesterol carried by atherogenic particles (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in all baseline LDL cholesterol tertiles. In conclusion, these results suggest that the increase in LDL cholesterol that occurred with the addition of P-OM3 to simvastatin therapy in subjects with mixed dyslipidemia was confined predominantly to those with low LDL cholesterol levels while receiving simvastatin monotherapy. PMID:20451686

  2. Heparin-binding defective lipoprotein lipase is unstable and causes abnormalities in lipid delivery to tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, E. Peer; Merkel, Martin; Kako, Yuko; Melford, Kristan; Radner, Herbert; Breslow, Jan L.; Bensadoun, André; Goldberg, Ira J.

    2001-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) is hypothesized to stabilize the enzyme, localize LpL in specific capillary beds, and route lipoprotein lipids to the underlying tissues. To test these hypotheses in vivo, we created mice expressing a human LpL minigene (hLpLHBM) carrying a mutated heparin-binding site. Three basic amino acids in the carboxyl terminal region of LpL were mutated, yielding an active enzyme with reduced heparin binding. Mice expressing hLpLHBM accumulated inactive human LpL (hLpL) protein in preheparin blood. hLpLHBM rapidly lost activity during a 37°C incubation, confirming a requirement for heparin binding to stabilize LpL. Nevertheless, expression of hLpLHBM prevented the neonatal demise of LpL knockout mice. On the LpL-deficient background hLpLHBM expression led to defective targeting of lipids to tissues. Compared with mice expressing native hLpL in the muscle, hLpLHBM transgenic mice had increased postprandial FFAs, decreased lipid uptake in muscle tissue, and increased lipid uptake in kidneys. Thus, heparin association is required for LpL stability and normal physiologic functions. These experiments confirm in vivo that association with HSPGs can provide a means to maintain proteins in their stable conformations and to anchor them at sites where their activity is required. PMID:11342582

  3. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  4. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves suppressed oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro and in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Miu; Tani, Mariko; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Iizuka, Maki; Saita, Emi; Toyozaki, Miku; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Kondo, Kazuo

    2011-05-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves are consumed as vegetables around the world, especially in Southeast Asia. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of sweet potato leaves on low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro and in human subjects. We compared the antioxidant activity of 8 kinds of sweet potato leaves. Every sweet potato leaf had high radical scavenging activity and prolonged a lag time for starting low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro. We found that sweet potato leaves contained abundant polyphenol compounds and the radical scavenging activity and prolongation rate of lag time were highly correlated with total polyphenol content. We also confirmed that thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production was increased in endothelial cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein oxidation, which was decreased by treatment with sweet potato leaves. We further measured the low-density lipoprotein oxidizability in 13 healthy volunteers after their intake of 18 g of "Suioh", raw sweet potato leaves. "Suioh" prolonged a lag time for starting low-density lipoprotein oxidation and decreased low-density lipoprotein mobility. These results suggest that sweet potato leaves have antioxidant activity leading to the suppression of low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

  5. Immunoregulation by low density lipoproteins in man. Inhibition of mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation by interference with transferrin metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A; Lipsky, P E

    1984-01-01

    Human low density lipoprotein (LDL, d = 1.020-1.050 g/ml) inhibits mitogen-stimulated T lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Because both LDL and transferrin bind to specific cell surface receptors and enter cells by the similar means of receptor-mediated endocytosis, and because transferrin is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis, we investigated the possibility that LDL may inhibit mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL inhibited mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in a concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition was most marked in serum-free cultures, but was also observed in serum-containing cultures. The addition of transferrin not only augmented mitogen-induced lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in serum-free medium but also completely reversed the inhibitory effect of LDL in both serum-free and serum-containing media. Similar results were obtained when lymphocyte proliferation was assayed by counting the number of cells in culture. Transferrin also reversed the inhibition of lymphocyte responses caused by very low density lipoproteins and by cholesterol. The ability of transferrin to reverse the inhibitory effect of lipoproteins was specific, in that native but not denatured transferrin was effective whereas a variety of other proteins were ineffective. These results indicate that LDL inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL only inhibited lymphocyte responses after a 48-h incubation if present from the initiation of the culture. By contrast, transferrin reversed inhibition when added after 24 h of the 48-h incubation. LDL did not inhibit lymphocyte responses by nonspecifically associating with transferrin. In addition, the acquisition of specific lymphocyte transferrin receptors was not blocked by LDL. Moreover, transferrin did not prevent the binding and uptake of fluorescent-labeled LDL by activated lymphocytes

  6. Structural investigation of reconstituted high density lipoproteins by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culot, C.; Durant, F.; Lazarescu, S.; Thiry, P. A.; Vanloo, B.; Rosseneu, M. Y.; Lins, L.; Brasseur, R.

    2004-05-01

    Being able to participate in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), high density lipoproteins (HDL) are known to be anti-atherogenic. In order to understand such a process, it is thus essential to have a detailed knowledge of the structure and molecular organisation of HDL. Reconstituted nascent high density lipoproteins (r-HDL), consisting of synthetic phospholipids together with different apolipoproteins (apo A-I, A-IV and E), were thus analysed by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Both shape and dimensions of the discoidal HDL particles measured by this technique were found in good agreement with the data available from the literature. The accuracy of the STM pictures presented in this paper enables for the first time the visualisation of the molecular organisation of such macromolecules. The arrangement of the protein as antiparallel helical segments, is consistent with the general mode of organisation of apolipoprotein/phospholipid discoidal particles previously reported.

  7. Drugs targeting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary artery disease management.

    PubMed

    Katz, Pamela M; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    Many patients remain at high risk for future cardiovascular events despite levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at, or below, target while taking statin therapy. Much effort is therefore being focused on strategies to reduce this residual risk. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a strong, independent, inverse predictor of coronary heart disease risk and is therefore an attractive therapeutic target. Currently available agents that raise HDL-C have only modest effects and there is limited evidence of additional cardiovascular risk reduction on top of background statin therapy associated with their use. It was hoped that the use of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors would provide additional benefit, but the results of clinical outcome studies to date have been disappointing. The results of ongoing trials with other CETP inhibitors that raise HDL-C to a greater degree and also lower LDL-C, as well as with other emerging therapies are awaited.

  8. High-density lipoproteins induce a rapid and transient release of Ca2+ in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Akerman, K E; Slotte, J P

    1991-10-01

    Several different cell types showed increased rates of proliferation and cholesterol mobilization in response to treatment with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). This would suggest that one main function of HDL is the activation of signal pathways in cells. In the current study we have used the fluorescent indicator fura-2 to monitor the level of cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in human skin fibroblasts. Exposure of subconfluent as well as confluent fibroblasts to HDL3 (20-60 micrograms/ml) resulted in a rapid and transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Sequential additions of HDL3 resulted in diminished rises in [Ca2+]i. The transient rise in [Ca2+]i was observed with HDL prepared from plasma either by conventional ultracentrifugation or by precipitation with dextran sulphate. Chelation of the extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA prior to the addition of HDL3 did not prevent the HDL3-induced rise in [Ca2+]i, suggesting that the mobilized Ca2+ was derived mainly from intracellular stores. Covalent modification of the apoproteins of HDL3 with dimethyl suberimidate or tetranitromethane did not inhibit the HDL3-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. This indicates that the binding of HDL3 to cell surface receptors may not be necessary for the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Moreover, the Ca(2+)-releasing effect of HDL3 was not inhibited by the presence of albumin (1%, w/v) in the extracellular medium, suggesting that non-esterified fatty acids were not the cause of the increased [Ca2+]i. The exposure of fibroblasts to lysophosphatidic acid, a potent mitogen and Ca(2+)-releasing agent, before addition of HDL3 completely inhibited the HDL3-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate blocked the HDL3-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. The results of this study imply that exposure of cells to HDL generates an intracellular signal which is induced by a component of the lipid fraction.

  9. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 governs Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic cartilage destruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wnt ligands bind to low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) 5 or 6, triggering a cascade of downstream events that include β-catenin signaling. Here we explored the roles of LRP5 in interleukin 1β (IL-1β)- or Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage destruction in mice. Methods The expression levels of LRP5, type II collagen, and catabolic factors were determined in mouse articular chondrocytes, human OA cartilage, and mouse experimental OA cartilage. Experimental OA in wild-type, Lrp5 total knockout (Lrp5-/-) and chondrocyte-specific knockout (Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre) mice was caused by aging, destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), or intra-articular injection of collagenase. The role of LRP5 was confirmed in vitro by small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of Lrp5 or in Lrp5-/- cells treated with IL-1β or Wnt proteins. Results IL-1β treatment increased the expression of LRP5 (but not LRP6) via JNK and NF-κB signaling. LRP5 was upregulated in human and mouse OA cartilage, and Lrp5 deficiency in mice inhibited cartilage destruction. Treatment with IL-1β or Wnt decreased the level of Col2a1 and increased those of Mmp3 or Mmp13, whereas Lrp5 knockdown ameliorated these effects. In addition, we found that the functions of LRP5 in arthritic cartilage were subject to transcriptional activation by β-catenin. Moreover, Lrp5-/- and Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre mice exhibited decreased cartilage destruction (and related changes in gene expression) in response to experimental OA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that LRP5 (but not LRP6) plays an essential role in Wnt/β-catenin-signaling-mediated OA cartilage destruction in part by regulating the expression levels of type II collagen, MMP3, and MMP13. PMID:24479426

  10. Alpha slow-moving high-density-lipoprotein subfraction in serum of a patient with radiation enteritis and peritoneal carcinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Peynet, J.; Legrand, A.; Messing, B.; Thuillier, F.; Rousselet, F.

    1989-04-01

    An alpha slow-moving high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction was seen in a patient presenting with radiation enteritis and peritoneal carcinosis, who was given long-term cyclic parenteral nutrition. This subfraction, observed in addition to normal HDL, was precipitated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) by sodium phosphotungstate-magnesium chloride. The patient's serum lipoproteins were analyzed after fractionation by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The alpha slow-moving HDL floated in the ultracentrifugation subfractions with densities ranging from 1.028 to 1.084 kg/L, and their main apolipoproteins included apolipoprotein E in addition to apolipoprotein A-I. These HDL were larger than HDL2. The pathogenesis of this unusual HDL subfraction is hypothesized.

  11. Switching to black rice diets modulates low-density lipoprotein oxidation and lipid measurements in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moemin, Aly R

    2011-04-01

    The effect of white and black rice consumption on lipid profile, hydroperoxides, thiobarbituric reactive substances and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induced by hypercholesterolemia was investigated in 24 male rabbits; a purified normal diet (NC, n = 6), a high fat/cholesterol (1.0 g/100 g) diet (PC group, n = 6), a high fat/cholesterol diet with 25 g/100 g white ground rice (PCWR group, n = 6), 25 g/100 g black ground rice (PCBR group, n = 6) for 10 weeks. Blood samples were collected for lipid measurements. Results indicate that serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was higher (P < 0.05) in the PCBR compared with the PC and PCWR groups. Hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric reactive substances were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the PCBR compared with PCWR and PC groups. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3-Glu) and peonidin-3-glucoside have been tested in vitro against copper-mediated low-density lipoprotein. Cy-3-Glu was excelled peonidin-3-glucoside by increasing the lag time of NC from 80 to 500 minutes in the presence of 2.0 μM of Cy-3-Glu. Hierarchically, black rice rabbits group was given the best results compared with other groups. The results may be indicating to a suggested mechanism (anthocyanins protection; Cy-3-Glu) of the cardioprotective effect of black rice. PMID:21289511

  12. Practical technique to quantify small, dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trirongjitmoah, Suchin; Iinaga, Kazuya; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Chiba, Hitoshi; Sriyudthsak, Mana; Shimizu, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of small, dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) cholesterol is clinically significant. We propose a practical technique to estimate the amount of sdLDL cholesterol using dynamic light scattering (DLS). An analytical solution in a closed form has newly been obtained to estimate the weight fraction of one species of scatterers in the DLS measurement of two species of scatterers. Using this solution, we can quantify the sdLDL cholesterol amount from the amounts of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which are commonly obtained through clinical tests. The accuracy of the proposed technique was confirmed experimentally using latex spheres with known size distributions. The applicability of the proposed technique was examined using samples of human blood serum. The possibility of estimating the sdLDL amount using the HDL data was demonstrated. These results suggest that the quantitative estimation of sdLDL amounts using DLS is feasible for point-of-care testing in clinical practice.

  13. Amphiphilic polyvinyl alcohol adsorbent for the removal of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao Ting; Zhu, Huijun; Wang, Shenqi

    2015-04-01

    Spacer can effectively reduce the steric hindrance and synergistic effect of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands immobilized in adsorbents can improve the specific adsorption for low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In this paper, in order to improve the adsorption capacity for the Low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), specifically, amphiphilic adsorbent based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) containing cholesterol ligand and sulfonic dextran ligands was synthesized. All kinds of factors affecting the synthesis yield and adsorption properties were studied in detail. Results showed that the amphiphilic PVA adsorbent has higher adsorption capacity for total cholesterol (TC), (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), and lower adsorption capacity, and percentage for high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), while the ligand ratio of cholesterol to sulfonic ligands is 1.57:1, the adsorption percentage and adsorption capacity for TC, LDL-C, TG, and HDL-C were 54.4%, 67.6%, 42.5%, 10.4% and 4.02, 3.612, 2.154, 0.168 mg/g, respectively.

  14. Catalytic stimulation by restrained active-site floppiness--the case of high density lipoprotein-bound serum paraoxonase-1.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Moshe; Sussman, Joel L; Maxwell, Christopher I; Szeler, Klaudia; Kamerlin, Shina C L; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-03-27

    Despite the abundance of membrane-associated enzymes, the mechanism by which membrane binding stabilizes these enzymes and stimulates their catalysis remains largely unknown. Serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a lipophilic lactonase whose stability and enzymatic activity are dramatically stimulated when associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Our mutational and structural analyses, combined with empirical valence bond simulations, reveal a network of hydrogen bonds that connect HDL binding residues with Asn168--a key catalytic residue residing >15Å from the HDL contacting interface. This network ensures precise alignment of N168, which, in turn, ligates PON1's catalytic calcium and aligns the lactone substrate for catalysis. HDL binding restrains the overall motion of the active site and particularly of N168, thus reducing the catalytic activation energy barrier. We demonstrate herein that disturbance of this network, even at its most far-reaching periphery, undermines PON1's activity. Membrane binding thus immobilizes long-range interactions via second- and third-shell residues that reduce the active site's floppiness and pre-organize the catalytic residues. Although this network is critical for efficient catalysis, as demonstrated here, unraveling these long-rage interaction networks is challenging, let alone their implementation in artificial enzyme design.

  15. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Bishnu H; Joshi, Parag H; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Michos, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics. PMID:24748800

  16. Unique Features of High-Density Lipoproteins in the Japanese: In Population and in Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Despite its gradual increase in the past several decades, the prevalence of atherosclerotic vascular disease is low in Japan. This is largely attributed to difference in lifestyle, especially food and dietary habits, and it may be reflected in certain clinical parameters. Plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, a strong counter risk for atherosclerosis, are indeed high among the Japanese. Accordingly, lower HDL seems to contribute more to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) than an increase in non-HDL lipoproteins at a population level in Japan. Interestingly, average HDL levels in Japan have increased further in the past two decades, and are markedly higher than in Western populations. The reasons and consequences for public health of this increase are still unknown. Simulation for the efficacy of raising HDL cholesterol predicts a decrease in CHD of 70% in Japan, greater than the extent by reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol predicted by simulation or achieved in a statin trial. On the other hand, a substantial portion of hyperalphalipoproteinemic population in Japan is accounted for by genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which is also commonly unique in East Asian populations. It is still controversial whether CETP mutations are antiatherogenic. Hepatic Schistosomiasis is proposed as a potential screening factor for historic accumulation of CETP deficiency in East Asia. PMID:25849946

  17. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Bishnu H; Joshi, Parag H; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Michos, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics.

  18. Single Step Reconstitution of Multifunctional High-Density Lipoprotein-Derived Nanomaterials Using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YongTae; Fay, Francois; Cormode, David P.; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Tang, Jun; Hennessy, Elizabeth J.; Ma, Mingming; Moore, Kathryn; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Fisher, Edward Allen; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that transports peripheral cholesterol to the liver. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) exhibits antiatherothrombotic properties and is being considered as a natural treatment for cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, HDL nanoparticle platforms have been created for targeted delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. The current methods for HDL reconstitution involve lengthy procedures that are challenging to scale up. A central need in the synthesis of rHDL, and multifunctional nanomaterials in general, is to establish large-scale production of reproducible and homogeneous batches in a simple and efficient fashion. Here, we present a large-scale microfluidics-based manufacturing method for single-step synthesis of HDL-mimicking nanomaterials (µHDL). µHDL is shown to have the same properties (e.g., size, morphology, bioactivity) as conventionally reconstituted HDL and native HDL. In addition, we were able to incorporate simvastatin (a hydrophobic drug) into µHDL, as well as gold, iron oxide, quantum dot nanocrystals or fluorophores to enable its detection by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Our approach may contribute to effective development and optimization of lipoprotein-based nanomaterials for medical imaging and drug delivery. PMID:24079940

  19. Effects of dietary fat on high-density-lipoprotein subclasses are influenced by both apolipoprotein E isoforms and low-density-lipoprotein subclass patterns.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Dreon, D M; Krauss, R M

    1995-06-01

    We examined the effects of replacing dietary fat with carbohydrates on high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses as measured by nondenaturing polyacrylamide-gradient-gel electrophoresis. One hundred five men received a 6-wk low-fat diet (24% of total energy) and a 6-wk high-fat diet (46% of energy) in a crossover design. Absorbency of protein stain was measured within five HDL subclasses: HDL3c (7.2-7.8 nm), HDL3b (7.8-8.2 nm), HDL3a (8.2-8.8 nm), HDL2a (8.8-9.7 nm), and HDL2b (9.7-12 nm). The low-density-lipoprotein-(LDL) subclass pattern was determined by gradient-gel electrophoresis, with pattern B men defined as having an LDL-predominant peak diameter < or = 25.5 nm and an LDL distribution skewed toward larger size particles. On the high-fat diet, 18 men exhibited LDL-subclass pattern B and 87 men exhibited the alternative LDL pattern A. Twelve men had the apolipoprotein (apo) epsilon 2 allele. Replacing dietary fat with carbohydrates 1) significantly decreased HDL3a, HDL2a, and HDL2b; 2) reduced HDL2b significantly more in pattern A than in pattern B men; and 3) increased plasma HDL3b concentrations significantly more in those men with the epsilon 2 allele. Our results suggest that unfavorable HDL changes were significantly more likely to occur in men who had LDL-subclass pattern A or the apo epsilon allele than in men who had pattern B or lacked the epsilon 2 allele.

  20. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  1. Suppression by diets rich in fish oil of very low density lipoprotein production in man.

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, P J; Connor, W E; Reardon, M F; Connor, S; Wong, S; Boston, R

    1984-01-01

    The highly polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils lower the plasma triglyceride concentration. We have studied the effect of a diet rich in fish oil on the rate of production of the triglyceride-transporting very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Seven subjects, five normal and two with hypertriglyceridemia received up to 30% of daily energy needs from a fish oil preparation that was rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids with five and six double bonds, respectively. Compared with a diet similarly enriched with safflower oil (in which the predominant fatty acid is the omega-6 linoleic acid, with two double bonds), the fish oil diet lowered VLDL lipids and B apoprotein concentrations profoundly. High density lipoprotein lipids and A1 apoprotein were also lowered, but the effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration was inconsistent. The daily production or flux of VLDL apoprotein B, calculated from reinjected autologous 125I-labeled lipoprotein, was substantially less in six subjects studied after 3 wk of fish oil, compared with after safflower oil. This effect on flux was more consistent than that on the irreversible fractional removal rate, which was increased in the four normolipidemic but inconsistent in the hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This suggests that fish oil reduced primarily the production of VLDL. The daily production of VLDL triglyceride, calculated from the kinetics of the triglyceride specific radioactivity-time curves after [3H]glycerol was injected, also showed very substantial reductions in five subjects studied. The marked suppression in VLDL apoprotein B and VLDL triglyceride formation was found not to be due to diminished plasma total free fatty acid or plasma eicosapentaenoic flux, calculated during constant infusions of [14C]eicosapentaenoic acid and [3H]oleic acid in four subjects. In two subjects there was presumptive evidence for substantial independent influx of LDL during the fish oil diet

  2. Suppression by diets rich in fish oil of very low density lipoprotein production in man.

    PubMed

    Nestel, P J; Connor, W E; Reardon, M F; Connor, S; Wong, S; Boston, R

    1984-07-01

    The highly polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils lower the plasma triglyceride concentration. We have studied the effect of a diet rich in fish oil on the rate of production of the triglyceride-transporting very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Seven subjects, five normal and two with hypertriglyceridemia received up to 30% of daily energy needs from a fish oil preparation that was rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids with five and six double bonds, respectively. Compared with a diet similarly enriched with safflower oil (in which the predominant fatty acid is the omega-6 linoleic acid, with two double bonds), the fish oil diet lowered VLDL lipids and B apoprotein concentrations profoundly. High density lipoprotein lipids and A1 apoprotein were also lowered, but the effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration was inconsistent. The daily production or flux of VLDL apoprotein B, calculated from reinjected autologous 125I-labeled lipoprotein, was substantially less in six subjects studied after 3 wk of fish oil, compared with after safflower oil. This effect on flux was more consistent than that on the irreversible fractional removal rate, which was increased in the four normolipidemic but inconsistent in the hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This suggests that fish oil reduced primarily the production of VLDL. The daily production of VLDL triglyceride, calculated from the kinetics of the triglyceride specific radioactivity-time curves after [3H]glycerol was injected, also showed very substantial reductions in five subjects studied. The marked suppression in VLDL apoprotein B and VLDL triglyceride formation was found not to be due to diminished plasma total free fatty acid or plasma eicosapentaenoic flux, calculated during constant infusions of [14C]eicosapentaenoic acid and [3H]oleic acid in four subjects. In two subjects there was presumptive evidence for substantial independent influx of LDL during the fish oil diet

  3. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  4. Alimentary lipemia: plasma high-density lipoproteins and apolipoproteins CII and CIII in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, M L; Barnhart, R L; Srivastava, L S; Perisutti, G; Allen, C; Hogg, E; Glueck, C J; Jackson, R L

    1983-02-01

    Three healthy male and three female inpatient volunteers consumed isocaloric diets for 4 wk. At weekly intervals, a fatty meal (100 g fat) was consumed by each fasting subject and blood drawn at 2 h intervals for 12 h. Of the four oral fat loads, two contained saturated fat (polyunsaturated/saturated fat ratio = 0.34) and two contained unsaturated fat (polyunsaturated/saturated fat = 2.21). The magnitude of alimentary lipemia, expressed as area under the plasma triglyceride curve, was 3- to 4-fold higher in males than females. Alimentary lipemia was inversely related to the subjects' fasting plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, HDL apolipoprotein (apo) CIII and directly related to plasma triglycerides. The P/S ratios of the daily diet or the fat meal did not significantly influence the plasma triglyceride curve. After fat intake, mean (+/- SEM) plasma total apoCII and CIII fell to 54 +/- 20% and 73 +/- 5% of base-line, respectively, at 12 h in five of six subjects. After oral fat, an initial fall and a subsequent rise in apoCII and CIII in HDL was associated with reciprocal changes in apoC concentrations in very low-density lipoproteins. We speculate from the data that 1) plasma HDL and their apoC concentrations are important determinants of chylomicron clearance and 2) transfer of apoCs from HDL to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the early phase of fat absorption does not result in the total recycling of apoCs from these lipoproteins to HDL during the late phase of alimentary lipemia.

  5. New function for high density lipoproteins. Their participation in intravascular reactions of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Ulevitch, R J; Johnston, A R; Weinstein, D B

    1979-01-01

    The addition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 or Salmonella minnesota R595 to plasma (or serum) resulted in a marked reduction of the hydrated buoyant density of the parent LPS (0111:B4 [d = 1.44 g/cm3] and R595 [d = 1.38 g/cm3]), to d less than 1.2 g/cm3. This reduction in buoyant density to less than 1.2 g/cm3 of the LPS required plasma (or serum) lipid. Delipidation of plasma (or serum) by extraction with n-butanol/diisopropyl ether (40/60, vol:vol) prevented the conversion of the parent LPS to a form with d less than 1.2 g/cm3. Reversal of the effect of delipidation was accomplished by the addition of physiologic concentrations of high density lipoprotein (HDL). In contrast, as much as two times normal serum concentration of low density or very low density lipoprotein were ineffective. The ability of normal plasma (or serum) to inhibit the pyrogenic activity of LPS, lost after delipidation, was also restored after the addition of HDL. Preliminary results suggested that prior modifications of the LPS, probably disaggregation, may be required before interaction with HDL. PMID:227936

  6. Increased low density lipoprotein degradation in aorta of irradiated mice is inhibited by preenrichment of low density lipoprotein with alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Tribble, D L; Krauss, R M; Chu, B M; Gong, E L; Kullgren, B R; Nagy, J O; La Belle, M

    2000-10-01

    We previously reported that upper thoracic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) accelerates fatty streak formation in C57BL/6 mice and that such effects are inhibited by overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD). Notably, IR-accelerated lesion formation is strictly dependent on a high fat diet (i.e., atherogenic lipoproteins) but does not involve alterations in circulating lipid or lipoprotein levels. We thus proposed that IR promotes changes in the artery wall that enhance the deposition of lipoprotein lipids. To address this hypothesis, we examined the effects of IR on aortic accumulation and degradation of low density lipoproteins (LDL). Ten-week-old C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single (8-Gy) dose of (60)Co radiation to the upper thoracic area or were sham irradiated (controls) and were then placed on the high fat diet. Five days postexposure, the mice received either (125)I-labeled LDL ((125)I-LDL) (which was used to measure intact LDL) or (125)I-labeled tyramine cellobiose ((125)I-TC)-LDL (which was used to measure both intact and cell-degraded LDL) via tail vein injection. On the basis of trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable counts in retroorbital blood samples, > or =95% of donor LDL was cleared within 24 h and there were no differences in time-averaged plasma concentrations of the two forms of LDL among irradiated and control mice. Aortic values increased markedly within the first hour and thereafter exhibited a slow increase up to 24 h. There were no differences between irradiated and control mice at 1 h, when values primarily reflected LDL entry, but a divergence was observed thereafter. At 24 h, (125)I-TC-associated counts were 1.8-fold higher in irradiated mice (P = 0.10). In contrast, (125)I-LDL-associated counts were 30% lower in irradiated mice (P< 0.05), suggesting that most of the retained (125)I-TC was associated with LDL degradation products. Consistent with the proposed involvement of oxidative or redox

  7. Modulation of infant formula fat profile alters the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and plasma fatty acid distribution relative to those with breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Pronczuk, A; Wood, R A; Guy, D G

    1992-04-01

    The effect of breast-feeding was compared with that of two fat-modified milk formulas in 45 infants (15 per group) studied by assessing body weight gain for 4 months and plasma lipids, lipoprotein profiles, fatty acid profiles of plasma and red blood cells, and plasma tocopherol status 3 months after birth. A saturated fat formula with coconut oil/soybean oil (COCO/SOY) had a fatty acid content and polyunsaturated/saturated ratio (P/S, 0.55) comparable with that of human milk fat (P/S, 0.39) and had the same fat energy content (50% kcal). The second formula, with corn oil/soybean oil (CORN/SOY), was highly unsaturated (P/S, 4.6), with only 35% kcal from fat. Energy intake and body weight gain were similar for all groups. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels were significantly lower (greater than 20% on average) in infants fed the CORN/SOY formula than in infants fed either the COCO/SOY formula or human milk. Infants fed the CORN/SOY formula also had lower (25% to 35%) plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratios. Plasma, red blood cell, and cholesteryl ester fatty acids from infants fed COCO/SOY contained less 18:1 and more 18:2; cholesterol esters in plasma from breast-fed infants had the highest 20:4n-6 levels. Plasma tocopherol levels were higher in infants consuming formulas. The presence of cholesterol in human milk appeared to expand the low-density lipoprotein pool and exert an "unfavorable" increase in the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio. Thus modulation of infant lipoproteins by changing dietary fat and cholesterol is feasible and in keeping with the known response in adults. PMID:1560323

  8. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods.

  9. Effect of Oxidation on the Structure of Human Low- and High-Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Santos, Priscila R.; Monteiro, Andrea M.; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a controlled study of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) structural changes due to in vitro oxidation with copper ions. The changes were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques in the case of LDL and by SAXS, DLS, and Z-scan (ZS) techniques in the case of HDL. SAXS data were analyzed with a to our knowledge new deconvolution method. This method provides the electron density profile of the samples directly from the intensity scattering of the monomers. Results show that LDL particles oxidized for 18 h show significant structural changes when compared to nonoxidized particles. Changes were observed in the electrical density profile, in size polydispersity, and in the degree of flexibility of the APO-B protein on the particle. HDL optical results obtained with the ZS technique showed a decrease of the amplitude of the nonlinear optical signal as a function of oxidation time. In contrast to LDL results reported in the literature, the HDL ZS signal does not lead to a complete loss of nonlinear optical signal after 18 h of copper oxidation. Also, the SAXS results did not indicate significant structural changes due to oxidation of HDL particles, and DLS results showed that a small number of oligomers formed in the sample oxidized for 18 h. All experimental results for the HDL samples indicate that this lipoprotein is more resistant to the oxidation process than are LDL particles. PMID:24940777

  10. The biological properties of iron oxide core high-density lipoprotein in experimental atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Skajaa, Torjus; Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; Delshad, Amanda; Blachford, Courtney; Barazza, Alessandra; Fisher, Edward A.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoproteins are a family of plasma nanoparticles responsible for the transportation of lipids throughout the body. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), the smallest of the lipoprotein family, measures 7–13 nm in diameter and consists of a cholesteryl ester and triglyceride core that is covered with a monolayer of phospholipids and apolipoproteins. We have developed an iron oxide core HDL nanoparticle (FeO-HDL), which has a lipid based fluorophore incorporated in the phospholipid layer. This nanoparticle provides contrast for optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Consequently, FeO-HDL can be visualized on the anatomical, cellular and sub-cellular level. In the current study we show that the biophysical features of FeO-HDL closely resemble those of native HDL and that FeO-HDL possess the ability to mimic HDL characteristics both in vitro as well as in vivo. We demonstrate that FeO-HDL can be applied to image HDL interactions and to investigate disease settings where HDL plays a key function. More generally, we have demonstrated a multimodal approach to study the behavior of biomaterials in vitro as well as in vivo. The approach allowed us to study nanoparticle dynamics in circulation, as well as nanoparticle targeting and uptake by tissues and cells of interest. Moreover, we were able to qualitatively assess nanoparticle excretion, critical for translating nanotechnologies to the clinic. PMID:20926130

  11. Low-Density Lipoprotein Modified by Myeloperoxidase in Inflammatory Pathways and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, Luc; Roumeguère, Thierry; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has a key role in atherogenesis. Among the different models of oxidation that have been studied, the one using myeloperoxidase (MPO) is thought to be more physiopathologically relevant. Apolipoprotein B-100 is the unique protein of LDL and is the major target of MPO. Furthermore, MPO rapidly adsorbs at the surface of LDL, promoting oxidation of amino acid residues and formation of oxidized lipoproteins that are commonly named Mox-LDL. The latter is not recognized by the LDL receptor and is accumulated by macrophages. In the context of atherogenesis, Mox-LDL accumulates in macrophages leading to foam cell formation. Furthermore, Mox-LDL seems to have specific effects and triggers inflammation. Indeed, those oxidized lipoproteins activate endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages and induce proinflammatory molecules such as TNFα and IL-8. Mox-LDL may also inhibit fibrinolysis mediated via endothelial cells and consecutively increase the risk of thrombus formation. Finally, Mox-LDL has been involved in the physiopathology of several diseases linked to atherosclerosis such as kidney failure and consequent hemodialysis therapy, erectile dysfunction, and sleep restriction. All these issues show that the investigations of MPO-dependent LDL oxidation are of importance to better understand the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis. PMID:23983406

  12. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-01-01

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL. PMID:27087061

  13. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection

    PubMed Central

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-01-01

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL. PMID:27087061

  14. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-04-18

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL.

  15. Characterization of a receptor for oxidized low-density lipoproteins on rat Kupffer cells: similarity to macrosialin.

    PubMed Central

    Van Velzen, A G; Da Silva, R P; Gordon, S; Van Berkel, T J

    1997-01-01

    Rat liver Kupffer cell membranes contain a protein that recognizes specifically oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Visualization after blotting under reducing conditions indicates that the receptor is a monomeric protein, with an estimated molecular mass of 115-120 kDa. N-Glycosidase F and endoglycosidase F treatment resulted in a fall in estimated molecular mass of 24 and 11 kDa respectively, whereas O-glycosidase was ineffective. No effect on the extent of interaction with oxLDL was noticed, suggesting that glycans are not essential for ligand recognition. Using a polyclonal antibody to mouse macrosialin, we visualized macrosialin on blot, and compared this glycoprotein with the oxLDL-binding protein. It appears that the two glycoproteins have a similar molecular mass and are comparably affected by treatment with the different glycosidases. Incubation with trypsin resulted in a reduction in the estimated molecular mass of about 25 kDa for both the oxLDL-binding protein and macrosialin. These results indicate that the oxLDL-binding protein and macrosialin are identical, suggesting a role for macrosialin in modified LDL catabolism. PMID:9065757

  16. Interaction of lipoprotein lipase with heparin–Sepharose. Evaluation of conditions for affinity binding

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Gunilla; Olivecrona, Thomas

    1977-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipases from a variety of sources have been shown previously to bind to heparin and some related polysaccharides. For the present studies lipoprotein lipase purified from bovine milk was used. 1. In batch experiments binding of the enzyme activity to heparin–Sepharose occurred relatively slowly, so that 30min was required for the system to come to near-equilibrium. In contrast, release of the enzyme activity from heparin–Sepharose by addition of salt to the liquid phase occurred rapidly. 2. Some binding was observed also with unsubstituted Sepharose, but this binding had a low capacity compared with that observed with heparin–Sepharose. High salt concentrations, heparin or deoxycholate decreased the binding to unsubstituted Sepharose. These factors also increase the solubility of the enzyme, which is low. 3. Addition of heparin to the liquid phase caused a concentration-dependent release of enzyme activity from the gel. These results suggested that the binding of the enzyme to heparin–Sepharose was mainly through interaction with heparin. 4. The enzyme activity was also quantitatively displaced to the liquid phase at increased concentrations of salt. Among the positive ions tested the following order of effectiveness was noted: Cs+≃K+>Na+>Li+; and among the negative the following: SCN−>I−> NO3−>Br−≃Cl−. The differences were quite large. Thus addition of 0.16m-KSCN (in addition to the 0.32m-NaCl originally present) displaced one-half of the enzyme activity to the supernatant, whereas 0.8m-LiCl only displaced one-quarter. 5. The distribution of heparin in the gel also profoundly influenced the binding. Two series of gels were studied. One series was made by mixing heparin–Sepharose with unsubstituted Sepharose. Results obtained with these gels were those expected from a series of decreasing volumes of heparin–Sepharose. In contrast, a series of heparin–Sepharoses made with different degrees of substitution gave quite different

  17. Impaired protection against diabetes and coronary heart disease by high-density lipoproteins in Turks.

    PubMed

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Ayhan, Erkan; Kaya, Zekeriya; Hergenç, Gülay

    2009-10-01

    The issue of whether or not incident type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease (CHD) can be predicted by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in both sexes needs investigation. A representative sample of 3035 middle-aged Turkish adults free of CHD at baseline was studied with this purpose prospectively over a mean of 7.8 years. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were found to be correlated in women positively with plasma fibrinogen and weakly with waist girth and C-reactive protein, and to be not correlated with fasting insulin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol protected men against future CHD risk (for a 12-mg/dL increment: relative risk = 0.80 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.95]) after multivariable adjustment in logistic regression analyses for age, smoking status, physical activity grade, hypertension, abdominal obesity, diabetes, and lipid-lowering drugs. However, men were not protected against risk of diabetes. In women, HDL cholesterol was not associated with risk for CHD, whereas intermediate (40-60 mg/dL) compared with lower HDL cholesterol levels proved protective against risk of diabetes (relative risk = 0.57 [95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.90]) after adjustments that included apolipoprotein A-I tertiles. Yet higher serum concentrations failed to yield protection against diabetes. It was concluded that HDL particles confer partially lacking protection against cardiometabolic risk among Turks, and this impairment is modulated by sex. This highly important observation may result from a setting of prevailing chronic subclinical inflammation.

  18. High-Density Lipoprotein Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Downregulation of Liver LOX-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dan; Li, Ling-Fang; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a specific cell-surface receptor for oxidized-low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated alteration of the LOX-1 level in hepatocytes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact on LOX-1 expression by tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress and to determine the effect of HDL on TM-affected LOX-1 expression in hepatic L02 cells. Overexpression or silencing of related cellular genes was conducted in TM-treated cells. mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Lipid uptake was examined by DiI-ox-LDL, followed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that TM induced the upregulation of ER chaperone GRP78, downregulation of LOX-1 expression, and lipid uptake. Knock down of IRE1 or XBP-1 effectively restored LOX-1 expression and improved lipid uptake in TM-treated cells. HDL treatment prevented the negative impact on LOX-1 expression and lipid uptake induced by TM. Additionally, 1–10 μg/mL HDL significantly reduced the GRP78, IRE1, and XBP-1 expression levels in TM-treated cells. Our findings reveal that HDL could prevent the TM-induced reduction of LOX-1 expression via inhibiting the IRE1/XBP-1 pathway, suggesting a new mechanism for beneficial roles of HDL in improving lipid metabolism. PMID:25923692

  19. High-Density Lipoprotein Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Downregulation of Liver LOX-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dan; Li, Ling-Fang; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a specific cell-surface receptor for oxidized-low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated alteration of the LOX-1 level in hepatocytes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact on LOX-1 expression by tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress and to determine the effect of HDL on TM-affected LOX-1 expression in hepatic L02 cells. Overexpression or silencing of related cellular genes was conducted in TM-treated cells. mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Lipid uptake was examined by DiI-ox-LDL, followed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that TM induced the upregulation of ER chaperone GRP78, downregulation of LOX-1 expression, and lipid uptake. Knock down of IRE1 or XBP-1 effectively restored LOX-1 expression and improved lipid uptake in TM-treated cells. HDL treatment prevented the negative impact on LOX-1 expression and lipid uptake induced by TM. Additionally, 1-10 μg/mL HDL significantly reduced the GRP78, IRE1, and XBP-1 expression levels in TM-treated cells. Our findings reveal that HDL could prevent the TM-induced reduction of LOX-1 expression via inhibiting the IRE1/XBP-1 pathway, suggesting a new mechanism for beneficial roles of HDL in improving lipid metabolism. PMID:25923692

  20. Selective uptake of boronated low-density lipoprotein in melanoma xenografts achieved by diet supplementation.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Y; Moore, D E; Allen, B J

    1996-12-01

    The lipid core of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was extracted using hexane and the LDL reconstituted with the addition of n-octyl-carborane. Biodistribution studies of the boronated LDL were performed in BALB/c mice bearing subcutaneous Harding-Passey melanoma xenografts. When diet supplementation with coconut oil and cholesterol for 21 days and regular dosing with hydrocortisone for 7 days before the studies was used to down-regulate the liver LDL receptors and the adrenal receptors, respectively, the tumour-blood boron concentration ratio of 5:1 was achieved.

  1. Receptor-mediated delivery of photoprotective agents by low-density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, S.T.; Yang, Y.L.; Falck, J.R.; Anderson, R.G.W.

    1984-12-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been used to deliver toxic molecules to cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In these studies, the cholesteryl ester core of LDL was replaced with a lipophilic, toxic molecule. The authors report that photoprotective azo dyes can be stably incorporated into LDL, and that this reconstituted LDL protects cells from the photosensitizing action of pyrene methanol (PM) in a receptor-dependent process. The photoprotective action of the azo dye is due to its ability to scavenge singlet oxygen that is produced by the photosensitive agent in response to UV light.

  2. Synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Foit, Linda; Giles, Francis J.; Gordon, Leo I.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    Summary High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a diverse group of natural nanoparticles that are most well-known for their role in cholesterol transport. However, HDLs have diverse functions that provide significant opportunities for cancer therapy. Presented is a focused review of the ways that synthetic versions of HDL have been used as targeted therapies for cancer, and as vehicles for the delivery of diverse therapeutic cargo to cancer cells. As such, synthetic HDLs are likely to play a central role in the development of next generation cancer therapies. PMID:25487833

  3. Oxidation of cholesterol does not alter significantly its uptake into high-density lipoprotein particles.

    PubMed

    Karilainen, Topi; Timr, Štěpán; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Using replica exchange umbrella sampling we calculated free energy profiles for uptake of cholesterol and one of its oxysterols (7-ketocholesterol) from an aqueous solution into a high-density lipoprotein particle. These atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that both sterols are readily taken up from the aqueous solution with comparable free energy minima at the surface of the particle of -17 kcal/mol for cholesterol and -14 kcal/mol for 7-ketocholesterol. Moreover, given its preferred position at the particle surface, 7-ketocholesterol is expected to be able to participate directly in biological signaling processes.

  4. Health benefits of high-density lipoproteins in preventing cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Momo, Claudia N; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2012-01-01

    Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) are strongly and inversely correlated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, it is becoming clear that a functional HDL is a more desirable target than simply increasing HDL-cholesterol levels. The best known antiatherogenic function of HDL particles relates to their ability to promote reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral cells. However, HDL also possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. This review focuses on the state of knowledge regarding assays of HDL heterogeneity and function and their relationship to cardiovascular diseases.

  5. [Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via CD36.].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-Tong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Na-Na; Kang, Li; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Song, Guo-Hua; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2010-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and the underlying mechanisms in ox-LDL-induced macrophage foam-forming process. RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum, and then treated with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L), anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody+ox-LDL and tunicamycin (TM), respectively. After incubation for 24 h, the cells were collected. The cellular lipid accumulation was showed by oil red O staining and the content of cellular total cholesterol was quantified by enzymatic colorimetry. The expression of glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), a molecular marker of ERS, was determined by immunocytochemistry assay. The levels of GRP94 protein, phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in RAW264.7 cells were detected by Western blotting. The results indicated that after incubation with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L) for 24 h, a large amount of lipid droplets were found in the cytoplasm, and the contents of cellular total cholesterol were increased by 2.1, 2.8 and 3.1 folds compared with the control, respectively. Anti-CD36 antibody decreased markedly the cellular lipid accumulation induced by ox-LDL at 100 mg/L. Both ox-LDL and TM, a specific ERS inducer, could up-regulate the protein expression of GRP94 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, p-IRE1 and XBP1, two key components of the unfolded protein response, were also significantly induced by the treatment with ox-LDL. The up-regulations of the three proteins induced by ox-LDL were inhibited significantly when the macrophages were pre-incubated with anti-CD36 antibody. These results suggest that ox-LDL may induce ERS in a dose-dependent way and subsequently activate the unfolded protein response signaling pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages, which is potentially mediated by scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:20945046

  6. High-Density Lipoprotein Biogenesis: Defining the Domains Involved in Human Apolipoprotein A-I Lipidation.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Ricquita D; Fulp, Brian; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Thomas, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    The first step in removing cholesterol from a cell is the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1)-driven transfer of cholesterol to lipid-free or lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), which yields cholesterol-rich nascent high-density lipoprotein (nHDL) that then matures in plasma to spherical, cholesteryl ester-rich HDL. However, lipid-free apoA-I has a three-dimensional (3D) conformation that is significantly different from that of lipidated apoA-I on nHDL. By comparing the lipid-free apoA-I 3D conformation of apoA-I to that of 9-14 nm diameter nHDL, we formulated the hypothetical helical domain transitions that might drive particle formation. To test the hypothesis, ten apoA-I mutants were prepared that contained two strategically placed cysteines several of which could form intramolecular disulfide bonds and others that could not form these bonds. Mass spectrometry was used to identify amino acid sequence and intramolecular disulfide bond formation. Recombinant HDL (rHDL) formation was assessed with this group of apoA-I mutants. ABCA1-driven nHDL formation was measured in four mutants and wild-type apoA-I. The mutants contained cysteine substitutions in one of three regions: the N-terminus, amino acids 34 and 55 (E34C to S55C), central domain amino acids 104 and 162 (F104C to H162C), and the C-terminus, amino acids 200 and 233 (L200C to L233C). Mutants were studied in the locked form, with an intramolecular disulfide bond present, or unlocked form, with the cysteine thiol blocked by alkylation. Only small amounts of rHDL or nHDL were formed upon locking the central domain. We conclude that both the N- and C-terminal ends assist in the initial steps in lipid acquisition, but that opening of the central domain was essential for particle formation.

  7. Association of a genetic polymorphism in human apolipoprotein B-100 with intermediate density lipoprotein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M T; Butler, R; Krauss, R M

    1991-09-01

    Immunochemical techniques have been used to identify five antigenic (Ag) sites on apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB), the major protein constituent of very low density (VLDL), intermediate density (IDL), and low density lipoproteins (LDL). Each Ag site results from allelic variation at a specific locus of the apoB gene. In the present study, we assessed whether variations in the five Ag loci were associated with concentrations of plasma lipids or lipoprotein fractions measured by analytical ultracentrifugation in a group of 44 healthy men. Pair-wise analyses of the Ag markers revealed that Ag(a1/d), in association with either Ag(x/y) or Ag(t/z), is significantly related to plasma IDL-mass concentrations. In this cohort we detected no significant associations of the Ag alleles (singly or in combination) with plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, or mass of total VLDL or LDL. These results suggest that genetic variations in the apoB molecule may predispose to variations in concentrations of IDL that could have consequences for atherosclerotic risk.

  8. Preferential enrichment of large-sized very low density lipoprotein populations with transferred cholesteryl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.

    1985-04-01

    The effect of lipid transfer proteins on the exchange and transfer of cholesteryl esters from rat plasma HDL2 to human very low (VLDL) and low density (LDL) lipoprotein populations was studied. The use of a combination of radiochemical and chemical methods allowed separate assessment of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl ester exchange and of cholesteryl ester transfer. VLDL-I was the preferred acceptor for transferred cholesteryl esters, followed by VLDL-II and VLDL-III. LDL did not acquire cholesteryl esters. The contribution of exchange of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl esters to total transfer was highest for LDL and decreased in reverse order along the VLDL density range. Inactivation of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and heating the HDL2 for 60 min at 56 degrees C accelerated transfer and exchange of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl esters. Addition of lipid transfer proteins increased cholesterol esterification in all systems. The data demonstrate that large-sized, triglyceride-rich VLDL particles are preferred acceptors for transferred cholesteryl esters. It is suggested that enrichment of very low density lipoproteins with cholesteryl esters reflects the triglyceride content of the particles.

  9. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, and Apolipoprotein B and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients With Manifest Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, M Johanneke; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Borst, Gert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-09-15

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) only partly represents the atherogenic lipid burden, and a growing body of evidence suggests that non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B (apoB) are more accurate in estimating lipid-related cardiovascular disease risk. Our objective was to compare the relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, triglycerides, and apoB and the occurrence of future vascular events and mortality in patients with manifest arterial disease. This is a prospective cohort study of 7,216 patients with clinically manifest arterial disease in the Secondary Manifestations of Arterial Disease Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to quantify the risk of major cardiovascular events (MACE; i.e., stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. Interaction was tested for type of vascular disease at inclusion. MACE occurred in 1,185 subjects during a median follow-up of 6.5 years (interquartile range 3.4 to 9.9 years). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of MACE per 1 SD higher were for LDL-C (HR 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 1.22), for non-HDL-C (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.23), for log(triglycerides) (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.19), and for apoB HR (1.12, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.28). The relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and cardiovascular events was comparable in patients with cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, or polyvascular disease and absent in those with aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease. In conclusion, in patients with a history of cerebrovascular, coronary artery, or polyvascular disease, but not aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease, higher levels of LDL-C and non-HDL-C are related to increased risk of future MACE and of comparable magnitude.

  10. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, and Apolipoprotein B and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients With Manifest Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, M Johanneke; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Borst, Gert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-09-15

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) only partly represents the atherogenic lipid burden, and a growing body of evidence suggests that non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B (apoB) are more accurate in estimating lipid-related cardiovascular disease risk. Our objective was to compare the relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, triglycerides, and apoB and the occurrence of future vascular events and mortality in patients with manifest arterial disease. This is a prospective cohort study of 7,216 patients with clinically manifest arterial disease in the Secondary Manifestations of Arterial Disease Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to quantify the risk of major cardiovascular events (MACE; i.e., stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. Interaction was tested for type of vascular disease at inclusion. MACE occurred in 1,185 subjects during a median follow-up of 6.5 years (interquartile range 3.4 to 9.9 years). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of MACE per 1 SD higher were for LDL-C (HR 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 1.22), for non-HDL-C (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.23), for log(triglycerides) (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.19), and for apoB HR (1.12, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.28). The relation among LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and cardiovascular events was comparable in patients with cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, or polyvascular disease and absent in those with aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease. In conclusion, in patients with a history of cerebrovascular, coronary artery, or polyvascular disease, but not aneurysm of abdominal aorta or peripheral artery disease, higher levels of LDL-C and non-HDL-C are related to increased risk of future MACE and of comparable magnitude. PMID:27471056

  11. Triglyceride to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and low ankle brachial index in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yiqiang; Yu, Jinming; Ding, Rongjing; Sun, Yihong; Hu, Dayi

    2014-05-01

    Hintergrund: Der Zusammenhang zwischen den Quotienten aus Triglycerid (TG) und High-density-lipoprotein-cholesterin (HDL‑C) sowie Gesamtcholesterin (TC) und HDL‑C und dem Knöchel-Arm-Index (ABI) wurde selten untersucht. Patienten und Methoden: Insgesamt 2.982 Teinehmer, die über 60 Jahre alt waren, wurden für die bevölkerungsbasierte Querschnittstudie rekrutiert. TG, TC, HDL‑C, und low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL-C) wurden bei allen Teilnehmern getestet. Ein niedriger ABI wurde als ABI ≤ 0.9 definiert. Multiple Regressionsmodelle wurden für die Untersuchung der Assoziation zwischen TG/HDL‑C Ratio und TC/HDL‑C Ratio und niedrigem ABI angewendet. Ergebnisse: Die TG/HDL‑C Ratios für ABI > 0.9 und ABI ≤ 0.9 waren 1.28 ± 1.20 und 1.48 ± 1.13 (P < 0.0001), während die TC/HDL‑C Ratios 3.96 ± 1.09 bzw. 4.32 ± 1.15 (P < 0.0001) waren. Nach der Angleichung von Alter, Geschlecht, Body-Mass-Index, Fettleibigkeit, Alkoholkonsum, köperliche Aktivität, Hypertonie, Diabetes, Einnahme von lipidsenkenden Medikamenten, und Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen waren die Odds Ratios (OR) mit 95 % Konfidenzintervall (KI) bei dem niedrigen ABI und TG/HDL‑C Quotient 1,10 (0,96 - 1,26) und 1,34 (1,14 - 1,59) für TC/HDL‑C in der Nichtrauchergruppe. Wenn das TC weiter angeglichen wurde, waren die ORs (95 % CIs) 1.40 (0.79, 2.52) und 1.53 (1.21, 1.93) für die TG/HDL‑C Ratio und TC/HDL‑C Ratio. Nichtlineare Zusammenhänge wurden zwischen der TG/HDL‑C Ratio und TC/HDL‑C Ratio und dem niedrigen ABI in der Raucher- und Nichtrauchergruppe entdeckt. Schlussfolgerungen: Die TC/HDL‑C Ratio war signifikant mit einem niedrigen ABI in der Nichtrauchergruppe verbunden und die Assoziation war unabhängig von TC, TG, HDL‑C und LDL-C. TC/HDL‑C könnte als potentieller Biomarker für die frühe periphere arterielle Verschlusskrankheit beim Screening berücksichtigt werden.

  12. Accelerated decline in renal function after acute myocardial infarction in patients with high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Satoshi; Sakakibara, Masaki; Hayashida, Ryo; Jinno, Yasushi; Tanaka, Akihito; Okada, Koji; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Ishii, Hideki; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2014-01-01

    High low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (L/H) ratio is associated with progressions of coronary arteriosclerosis and chronic kidney disease. On the other hand, renal function markedly declined after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aims of the present study were (1) to identify what type of patients with AMI would have high L/H ratio at follow-up and (2) to evaluate whether decline in renal function after AMI had accelerated or not in patients with high L/H ratio. The 190 eligible AMI patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and received atorvastatin (10 mg) were divided into one of two groups according to the L/H ratio at 6-month follow-up: L/H >2 group (n = 81) or L/H ≤2 group (n = 109). The characteristics on admission in the two groups were examined. Furthermore, changes in serum creatinine (sCr) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) during 1- and 6-month follow-up were compared between the two groups. L/H >2 group were significantly younger and had greater body mass index (BMI) and worse lipid profile on admission compared with L/H ≤2 group. Percentage increase in sCr and percentage decrease in eGFR during 1-month follow-up in L/H >2 group tended to be greater than in L/H ≤2 group, and those during 6-month follow-up were significantly greater (16.5 ± 2.77 vs. 9.79 ± 2.23 %, p = 0.03 and 11.8 ± 1.93 vs. 2.75 ± 3.85 %, p = 0.04, respectively). In AMI patients undergoing primary PCI, those who were young and had large BMI and poor lipid profile on admission were likely to have a high L/H ratio at follow-up despite statin therapy. In addition, the decline in renal function after AMI had significantly accelerated in patients with high L/H ratio.

  13. Alpinetin enhances cholesterol efflux and inhibits lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-loaded human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengming; Sang, Haiqiang; Fu, Xin; Liang, Ying; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Alpinetin is a natural flavonoid abundantly present in the ginger family. Here, we investigated the effect of alpinetin on cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages and human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). After exposing THP-1 macrophages to alpinetin, cholesterol efflux was determined by liquid scintillator. The mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), liver X receptor alpha (LXR-α), ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), and ABCG1 and scavenger receptor class B member 1 were determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. Alpinetin promoted apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density-lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux and elevated PPAR-γ and LXR-α mRNA and protein expression in a dose-dependent fashion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages and HMDMs. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PPAR-γ or LXR-α dose dependently reversed alpinetin-increased cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages, indicating the involvement of PPAR-γ and LXR-α in alpinetin-promoted cholesterol efflux. Alpinetin inhibited ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation and enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA and protein, which was reversed by specific knockdown of PPAR-γ or LXR-α. Taken together, our results reveal that alpinetin exhibits positive effects on cholesterol efflux and inhibits ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation, which might be through PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1/ABCG1 pathway.

  14. Lower Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels Are Associated with Severe Dengue Outcome.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Hope H; Gordon, Aubree; Nuñez, Andrea; Perez, Maria Angeles; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a flavivirus of worldwide importance, with approximately 4 billion people across 128 countries at risk of infection, and up to 390 million infections and 96 million clinically apparent cases estimated annually. Previous in vitro studies have shown that lipids and lipoproteins play a role in modifying virus infectivity. However, the relationship between development of severe dengue and total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, is unclear. We analyzed data from 789 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases and 447 other febrile illnesses (OFI) in a prospective pediatric hospital-based study in Managua, Nicaragua between August 2005 and January 2013, using three different classifications of dengue severity: World Health Organization (WHO) 1997, WHO 2009, and standardized intervention categories. Total serum cholesterol and LDL-C levels decreased over the course of illness and were generally lower with increasing dengue severity, regardless of classification scheme. Greater decreases in LDL-C than HDL-C were observed among dengue-positive patients compared to patients with OFI and among severe dengue compared to mild dengue cases. Furthermore, daily cholesterol levels declined with daily albumin blood levels. To examine the effect of cholesterol at presentation on subsequent risk of development of severe dengue, relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariable modified Poisson models. We found that lower total serum cholesterol and LDL-C levels at presentation were associated with subsequent risk of developing dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome using the WHO 1997 dengue severity classification, and thus that the reduction in LDL-C is likely driving the decreases observed in total serum cholesterol levels among dengue-positive patients. Our results suggest that cholesterol blood levels are important correlates of dengue

  15. Changes in remnant and high-density lipoproteins associated with hormone therapy and progression of coronary artery disease in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of hormone therapy (HT) on the plasma concentration of remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) subpopulations and the contribution of HT-related changes in these lipoproteins to the progression of coronary heart disease (CHD) were examined in 256 postmen...

  16. The biology of PCSK9 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes: new and emerging therapeutics to control low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Steve; Mayer, Gaétan

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) directly binds to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A domain of low-density lipoprotein receptor and induces its degradation, thereby controlling circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 can decrease the incidence of coronary heart disease by up to 88%, owing to lifelong reduction of LDL-C. Moreover, two subjects with PCSK9 loss-of-function mutations on both alleles, resulting in a total absence of functional PCSK9, were found to have extremely low circulating LDL-C levels without other apparent abnormalities. Accordingly, PCSK9 could represent a safe and effective pharmacological target to increase clearance of LDL-C and to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Recent clinical trials using anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies that block the PCSK9:low-density lipoprotein receptor interaction were shown to considerably reduce LDL-C levels by up to 65% when given alone and by up to 72% in patients already receiving statin therapy. In this review, we will discuss how major scientific breakthroughs in PCSK9 cell biology have led to the development of new and forthcoming LDL-C-lowering pharmacological agents. PMID:24115837

  17. Interleukin-10 Deficiency Increases Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Low-density Lipoproteins in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Rudling, Mats; Ollivier, Véronique; Jacob, Marie-Paule; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Hansson, Göran K; Nicoletti, Antonino

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that may play a protective role in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of IL-10 deficiency in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse. Apolipoprotein E deficient (E−/−) and IL-10 deficient (−/−) mice were crossed to generate E−/− × IL-10−/− double knockout mice. By 16 wk, cholesterol and triglycerides were similar in double and single knockouts but the lack of IL-10 led to increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol whereas very-low-density lipoprotein was reduced. In parallel, T-helper 1 responses and lesion size were dramatically increased in double knockout compared with E−/− controls. At 48 wk, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue factor activities were increased in lesions of double-knockout mice. Furthermore, markers of systemic coagulation were increased, and vascular thrombosis in response to i.v. thrombin occurred more frequently in E−/− × IL-10−/− than in E−/− mice. Our findings suggest that IL-10 deficiency plays a deleterious role in atherosclerosis. The early phase of lesion development was increased, and the proteolytic and procoagulant activity was elevated in advanced lesions. These data show that IL-10 may reduce atherogenesis and improve the stability of plaques. PMID:12765335

  18. Thinking beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: strategies to further reduce cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh K; Singh, Vibhuti N; Reddy, Hanumanth K

    2009-01-01

    Several large statin trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some trials have also highlighted the significance of residual cardiovascular risk after treatment of LDL-C to target levels. This reflects the complex nature of residual cardiovascular risk. This residual risk is partially due to low HDL-C and high triglycerides (TG) despite achievement of LDL goals with statin therapy. The NCEP ATP III guidelines reported that low HDL-C is a significant and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and is inversely related to CHD. Epidemiologic studies have also shown a similar inverse relationship of HDL-C with CHD. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) may directly participate in the anti-atherogenic process by promoting efflux of cholesterol of the foam cells of atherogenic lesions. Many studies have demonstrated multiple anti-atherogenic actions of HDL-C and its role in promoting efflux of cholesterol from the foam cells. The residual risk by increased TG with or without low HDL-C can be assessed by calculating non-HDL-C and a reduction in TG results in decreased CHD. PMID:19812691

  19. Linkage analysis of low-density lipoprotein subclass phenotypes and the apolipoprotein B gene.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, M; Austin, M A; Rubin, E; Krauss, R M

    1991-01-01

    A common heritable phenotype has recently been identified which is characterized by a relative abundance of small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and mild elevations of plasma triglycerides and reductions in plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol. This phenotype, designated LDL subclass phenotype B, has been associated with up to a three-fold increase in coronary disease risk. Complex segregation analysis in two large family studies has demonstrated that LDL subclass phenotype B is influenced by an allele at a single genetic locus with a population frequency of 0.25-0.3, and autosomal dominant inheritance, but with full penetrance only in males age 20 and over and in postmenopausal women. Since apolipoprotein B (apoB) is the principal protein component of LDL, linkage analysis was used to investigate possible linkage between the phenotype B phenotype and the apoB gene, using a variable number of tandem repeats site located 0.5 kb from the 3' end of the apoB gene. In 6 informative families including only family members in the penetrant classes, a total LOD score of -7.49 was found at a recombination fraction of 0.001. Thus, under the assumptions of the single gene model, it is unlikely that the apoB locus controls LDL subclass phenotype B.

  20. Linkage between cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and high plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Freeman, D J; Grundy, S M; Levine, D M; Guerra, R; Cohen, J C

    1998-01-01

    Interindividual differences in plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels reflect both environmental variation and genetic polymorphism, but the specific genes involved and their relative contributions to the variance in LDL-C are not known. In this study we investigated the relationship between plasma LDL-C concentrations and three genes with pivotal roles in LDL metabolism: the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB), and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7). Analysis of 150 nuclear families indicated statistically significant linkage between plasma LDL-C concentrations and CYP7, but not LDLR or APOB. Further sibling pair analyses using individuals with high plasma LDL-C concentrations as probands indicated that the CYP7 locus was linked to high plasma LDL-C, but not to low plasma LDL-C concentrations. This finding was replicated in an independent sample. DNA sequencing revealed two linked polymorphisms in the 5' flanking region of CYP7. The allele defined by these polymorphisms was associated with increased plasma LDL-C concentrations, both in sibling pairs and in unrelated individuals. Taken together, these findings indicate that polymorphism in CYP7 contributes to heritable variation in plasma LDL-C concentrations. Common polymorphisms in LDLR and APOB account for little of the heritable variation in plasma LDL-C concentrations in the general population. PMID:9502769

  1. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors.

  2. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors. PMID:27133571

  3. Uptake and processing of remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins by rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.L.; Hradek, G.T.; Hornick, C.; Renaud, G.; Windler, E.E.; Havel, R.J.

    1984-11-01

    In the rat, chylomicron remnants and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants are taken up into the liver by high affinity processes and appear to undergo degradation by lysosomes. The relationship of this catabolic process to the known pathways of uptake and degradation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and the involvement of nonparenchymal cells are addressed in these studies. The authors have utilized both light and electron microscopic radioautography to determine whether the pathway of intracellular transport and catabolism resembles that established for LDL in hepatocytes. Radioiodinated plasma VLDL remnants and lymph chylomicron remnants were injected into femoral veins of rats and the livers were fixed by perfusion 3 to 30 minutes later. Quantitative light microscopic radioautography showed little or no accumulation of grains over Kupffer cells. Electromicroscopic radioautography confirmed these observations and, in addition, demonstrated that very few grains were associated with endothelial cells. The processing of the remnant particles closely resembled that of LDL. Following an initial association of grains with the parenchymal cell plasma membrane, frequently in regions in close proximity to clathrin-coated endocytic pits, the grains were found in endocytic vesicles just beneath the plasma membrane. By 15 minutes the grains were found over multivesicular bodies located in the Golgi-lysosome region of the cell. Thirty minutes after injection, radioautographic grains began to be associated with secondary lysosomes.

  4. Effect of apolipoprotein E-free high density lipoproteins on cholesterol metabolism in cultured pig hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachorik, P.S.; Virgil, D.G.; Kwiterovich, P.O. Jr.

    1987-10-05

    We studied cholesterol synthesis from (/sup 14/C)acetate, cholesterol esterification from (/sup 14/C)oleate, and cellular cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels after incubating cells with apoE-free high density lipoproteins (HDL) or low density lipoproteins (LDL). LDL suppressed synthesis by up to 60%, stimulated esterification by up to 280%, and increased cell cholesteryl ester content about 4-fold. Esterification increased within 2 h, but synthesis was not suppressed until after 6 h. ApoE-free HDL suppressed esterification by about 50% within 2 h. Cholesterol synthesis was changed very little within 6 h, unless esterification was maximally suppressed; synthesis was then stimulated about 4-fold. HDL lowered cellular unesterified cholesterol by 13-20% within 2 h and promoted the removal of newly synthesized cholesterol and cholesteryl esters. These changes were transient; by 24 h, both esterification and cellular unesterified cholesterol returned to control levels, and cholesteryl esters increased 2-3-fold. HDL core lipid was taken up selectively from /sup 125/I-labeled (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl ester- and ether-labeled HDL. LDL core lipid uptake was proportional to LDL apoprotein uptake. The findings suggest that 1) the cells respond initially to HDL or LDL with changes in esterification, and 2) HDL mediates both the removal of free cholesterol from the cell and the delivery of HDL cholesteryl esters to the cell.

  5. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy. PMID:25045281

  6. N-Succinyl-chitosan nanoparticles coupled with low-density lipoprotein for targeted osthole-loaded delivery to low-density lipoprotein receptor-rich tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-ge; Zhu, Qiao-ling; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Ai-jun; Zhang, Xue-nong; Jin, Yong

    2014-01-01

    N-Succinyl-chitosan (NSC) was synthesized and NSC nanoparticles (NPs) with loaded osthole (Ost) (Ost/NSC-NPs) were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion. Subsequently, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-mediated NSC-NPs with loaded Ost (Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs) were obtained by coupling LDL with Ost/NSC-NPs through amide linkage. The average particle size of Ost/NSC-NPs was approximately 145 nm, the entrapment efficiency was 78.28%±2.06%, and the drug-loading amount was 18.09%±0.17%. The release of Ost from Ost/NSC-NPs in vitro showed a more evident sustained effect than the native material. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs was only 16.23% that of the free Ost at 24 hours in HepG2 cells. Ost inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation by arresting cells in the synthesis phase of the cell cycle and by triggering apoptosis. Cellular uptake and subcellular localization in vitro and near-infrared fluorescence real-time imaging in vivo showed that Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs had high targeting efficacy. Therefore, LDL-NSC-NPs are a promising system for targeted Ost delivery to liver tumor. PMID:24966673

  7. Oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 mediates oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-ping; Xun, Ke-li; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Tian-tai; Shi, Jing-shan; Du, Guan-hua

    2007-07-01

    Studies have shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) elicits both necrotic and apoptotic cell death and several mechanisms have been proposed. Ox-LDL induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), a second messenger that might be involved in apoptosis, formation in different types of cells including endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). As lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) was the main receptor for ox-LDL, this study was designed to determine whether the apoptosis induced by ox-LDL was mediated by LOX-1 in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and whether there is an association between LOX-1 mediated apoptosis and the production of ROS. After exposure to ox-LDL (50,100, and 150 microg/ml for 18 h), HUVECs exhibit typical apoptotic characteristics as determined by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis in a dose-dependent pattern. Ox-LDL increases intracellular ROS formation including superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with anti-LOX-1 mAb, Vitamin C, apocynin or catalase significantly reduced ROS production and prevented ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, while indomethacin or allopurinol had no effect. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells and that ROS production and NADPH oxidase might play an important role in ox-LDL-induced apoptosis.

  8. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: a physiological Aβ homeostatic mechanism with multiple therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Sagare, Abhay P.; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) is the main cell surface receptor involved in brain and systemic clearance of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) toxin amyloid-beta (Aβ). In plasma, a soluble form of LRP1 (sLRP1) is the major transport protein for peripheral Aβ. LRP1 in brain endothelium and mural cells mediates Aβ efflux from brain by providing a transport mechanism for A across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). sLRP1 maintains a plasma ‘sink’ activity for Aβ through binding of peripheral Aβ which in turn inhibits re-entry of free plasma Aβ into the brain. LRP1 in the liver mediates systemic clearance of Aβ. In AD, LRP1 expression at the BBB is reduced and Aβ binding to circulating sLRP1 is compromised by oxidation. Cell surface LRP1 and circulating sLRP1 represent druggable targets which can be therapeutically modified to restore the physiological mechanisms of brain Aβ homeostasis. In this review, we discuss how increasing LRP1 expression at the BBB and liver with lifestyle changes, statins, plant-based active principles and/or gene therapy on one hand, and how replacing dysfunctional plasma sLRP1 on the other regulate Aβ clearance from brain ultimately controlling the onset and/or progression of AD. PMID:22820095

  9. Surface glycosylation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) membrane for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lan, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of constructing a glycosylated surface on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] membrane surface for the selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylic acid followed by the chemical binding of carboxyl groups with glucosamine in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxy-succinimide. The chemical structures of the fabricated membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes, respectively. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the LDL adsorption on the plain and modified membrane surfaces. It was found that the surface glycosylation of P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane greatly enhanced the affinity interactions with LDL and the absorbed LDL could be easily desorbed with eluents, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to the surface. Furthermore, the hemocompatibility of glycosylated membrane was improved as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the glycosylated P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane is promising for application in LDL apheresis therapy.

  10. Tartaric Acid-based Amphiphilic Macromolecules with Ether Linkages Exhibit Enhanced Repression of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Dalia; Zhang, Yingue; Lewis, Daniel R.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Welsh, William J.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease initiates with the atherogenic cascade of scavenger receptor- (SR-) mediated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. Resulting foam cell formation leads to lipid-rich lesions within arteries. We designed amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) to inhibit these processes by competitively blocking oxLDL uptake via SRs, potentially arresting atherosclerotic development. In this study, we investigated the impact of replacing ester linkages with ether linkages in the AM hydrophobic domain. We hypothesized that ether linkages would impart flexibility for orientation to improve binding to SR binding pockets, enhancing anti-atherogenic activity. A series of tartaric acid-based AMs with varying hydrophobic chain lengths and conjugation chemistries were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for bioactivity. 3-D conformations of AMs in aqueous conditions may have significant effects on anti-atherogenic potency and were simulated by molecular modeling. Notably, ether-linked AMs exhibited significantly higher levels of inhibition of oxLDL uptake than their corresponding ester analogues, indicating a dominant effect of linkage flexibility on pharmacological activity. The degradation stability was also enhanced for ether-linked AMs. These studies further suggested that alkyl chain length (i.e., relative hydrophobicity), conformation (i.e., orientation), and chemical stability play a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake, and guide the design of innovative cardiovascular therapies. PMID:25890704

  11. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  12. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  13. Low density lipoprotein metabolism by human macrophages activated with low density lipoprotein immune complexes. A possible mechanism of foam cell formation

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Human macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis and are believed to be the progenitors of the cholesteryl ester (CE)-laden foam cells present in early atherosclerotic lesions. Several mechanisms by which macrophages accumulate CE have been recently described. One involves a perturbation in LDL metabolism subsequent to macrophage activation. Thus, we decided to study the effect of macrophage activation by immune complexes on N-LDL metabolism. Initially, LDL-containing immune complexes (LDL-IC) were chosen, since increased plasma levels of these IC have been reported in patients with coronary heart disease. Human macrophages stimulated for 22 h with LDL-IC (250 micrograms/ml) and incubated afterwards for 20 h with 10 micrograms/ml 125I-N-LDL showed a six- and fourfold increase in the accumulation and degradation, respectively, of 125I-N-LDL over the values observed in nonstimulated cells. Scatchard analysis of 125I-N-LDL-specific binding suggests an increase (20-fold) in the number of LDL receptors in macrophages stimulated with LDL-IC. We studied other immune complexes varying in size and antigen composition. Some of the IC were able to stimulate, although to a lesser degree, the uptake of N-LDL by macrophages. Lipoprotein IC are more efficient and have the greatest capacity to increase N-LDL uptake and CE accumulation. We conclude that human macrophage activation by LDL-IC leads to an increase in LDL receptor activity and promotes in vitro foam cell formation. PMID:3171477

  14. Structural Insights into High Density Lipoprotein: Old Models and New Facts

    PubMed Central

    Gogonea, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The physiological link between circulating high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and cardiovascular disease is well-documented, albeit its intricacies are not well-understood. An improved appreciation of HDL function and overall role in vascular health and disease requires at its foundation a better understanding of the lipoprotein's molecular structure, its formation, and its process of maturation through interactions with various plasma enzymes and cell receptors that intervene along the pathway of reverse cholesterol transport. This review focuses on summarizing recent developments in the field of lipid free apoA-I and HDL structure, with emphasis on new insights revealed by newly published nascent and spherical HDL models constructed by combining low resolution structures obtained from small angle neutron scattering (SANS) with contrast variation and geometrical constraints derived from hydrogen–deuterium exchange (HDX), crosslinking mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer, and electron spin resonance. Recently published low resolution structures of nascent and spherical HDL obtained from SANS with contrast variation and isotopic labeling of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) will be critically reviewed and discussed in terms of how they accommodate existing biophysical structural data from alternative approaches. The new low resolution structures revealed and also provided some answers to long standing questions concerning lipid organization and particle maturation of lipoproteins. The review will discuss the merits of newly proposed SANS based all atom models for nascent and spherical HDL, and compare them with accepted models. Finally, naturally occurring and bioengineered mutations in apoA-I, and their impact on HDL phenotype, are reviewed and discuss together with new therapeutics employed for restoring HDL function. PMID:26793109

  15. A Lipoprotein Receptor Cluster IV Mutant Preferentially Binds Amyloid-β and Regulates Its Clearance from the Mouse Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Sagare, Abhay P.; Bell, Robert D.; Srivastava, Alaka; Sengillo, Jesse D.; Singh, Itender; Nishida, Yoichiro; Chow, Nienwen; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (sLRP1) binds ∼70% of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in human plasma. In Alzheimer disease (AD) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment converting to AD, plasma sLRP1 levels are reduced and sLRP1 is oxidized, which results in diminished Aβ peripheral binding and higher levels of free Aβ in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that free circulating Aβ re-enters the brain and that sLRP1 and/or its recombinant wild type cluster IV (WT-LRPIV) prevent Aβ from entering the brain. Treatment of Alzheimer APPsw+/0 mice with WT-LRPIV has been shown to reduce brain Aβ pathology. In addition to Aβ, LRPIV binds multiple ligands. To enhance LRPIV binding for Aβ relative to other LRP1 ligands, we generated a library of LRPIV-derived fragments and full-length LRPIV variants with glycine replacing aspartic acid residues 3394, 3556, and 3674 in the calcium binding sites. Compared with WT-LRPIV, a lead LRPIV-D3674G mutant had 1.6- and 2.7-fold higher binding affinity for Aβ40 and Aβ42 in vitro, respectively, and a lower binding affinity for other LRP1 ligands (e.g. apolipoprotein E2, E3, and E4 (1.3–1.8-fold), tissue plasminogen activator (2.7-fold), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (4.1-fold), and Factor Xa (3.8-fold)). LRPIV-D3674G cleared mouse endogenous brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 25–27% better than WT-LRPIV. A 3-month subcutaneous treatment of APPsw+/0 mice with LRPIV-D3674G (40 μg/kg/day) reduced Aβ40 and Αβ42 levels in the hippocampus, cortex, and cerebrospinal fluid by 60–80% and improved cerebral blood flow responses and hippocampal function at 9 months of age. Thus, LRPIV-D3674G is an efficient new Aβ clearance therapy. PMID:23580652

  16. [Cholesterol bound to high density lipoproteins: critical review of the methods of analysis and personal data].

    PubMed

    Orso Giacone, G

    1982-01-01

    It is widely known that atherosclerosis through its complication, i.e. heart and brain infarction, is at the present the main cause of death. The atherosclerotic process has been shown in correlation with hyperlipemia especially as far as the plasma lipoprotein cholesterol level is concerned. A preminent role in removing cholesterol from tissues and arterial walls then in preventing atherosclerosis is played by a specific class of plasma lipoproteins, the high density lipoproteins (HDL). Since the HDL-colesterol level seems to have an inverse correlation with the atherosclerotic disease it is of primary importance to define a reliable and reproducible technique to measure it. One of the aims of this paper was to examine the different methods now available for such a determination. This analysis has underlined the discrepancy among the reference values reported in the literature. However, all the authors agree that only the simultaneous measurement of total and HDL-colesterol levels is of prognostic value. Personal studies are here reported on the relationship between total and HDL-colesterol levels and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. The two mentioned laboratory analyses have been performed on blood samples from 250 between male and female human subjects of different age. The obtained results show that the highest HDL-colesterol concentrations determined by a lipoprotein precipitation procedure with dextran sulphate, are typical in the first ten years of life both in male and in female, while the lowest levels of plasma HDL-cholesterol have been evintiated during the fifth decade of life, when the total cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular complications rich the highest values. In a following set of investigations, the already examined blood parameters together with the risk factor values have been examined in two groups of subjects, the first one represented by adult healthy persons the second one by patients of similar age from a cardiovascular

  17. [Cholesterol bound to high density lipoproteins: critical review of the methods of analysis and personal data].

    PubMed

    Orso Giacone, G

    1982-01-01

    It is widely known that atherosclerosis through its complication, i.e. heart and brain infarction, is at the present the main cause of death. The atherosclerotic process has been shown in correlation with hyperlipemia especially as far as the plasma lipoprotein cholesterol level is concerned. A preminent role in removing cholesterol from tissues and arterial walls then in preventing atherosclerosis is played by a specific class of plasma lipoproteins, the high density lipoproteins (HDL). Since the HDL-colesterol level seems to have an inverse correlation with the atherosclerotic disease it is of primary importance to define a reliable and reproducible technique to measure it. One of the aims of this paper was to examine the different methods now available for such a determination. This analysis has underlined the discrepancy among the reference values reported in the literature. However, all the authors agree that only the simultaneous measurement of total and HDL-colesterol levels is of prognostic value. Personal studies are here reported on the relationship between total and HDL-colesterol levels and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. The two mentioned laboratory analyses have been performed on blood samples from 250 between male and female human subjects of different age. The obtained results show that the highest HDL-colesterol concentrations determined by a lipoprotein precipitation procedure with dextran sulphate, are typical in the first ten years of life both in male and in female, while the lowest levels of plasma HDL-cholesterol have been evintiated during the fifth decade of life, when the total cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular complications rich the highest values. In a following set of investigations, the already examined blood parameters together with the risk factor values have been examined in two groups of subjects, the first one represented by adult healthy persons the second one by patients of similar age from a cardiovascular

  18. The effects of physical exercise on plasma prebeta-1 high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahtab; Leaf, David Alexander; Macrae, Holden; Kasem, Julie; O'conner, Patricia; Pullinger, Clive; Malloy, Marry; Kane, John P

    2003-04-01

    The impact of physical exercise on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism is recognized as a major mechanism of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk reduction. Prebeta-1 HDL subparticle species play a pivotal role in initiating reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We examined the effect of acute physical exercise on plasma prebeta-1 HDL levels. Nineteen nonsmoking, healthy men (n = 11) and women (n = 8) not receiving lipid-altering medications completed dietary surveys, and had percent body fat determinations, and fasting blood drawn for measurements of plasma lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I), and absolute and percent prebeta-1 HDL. Each subject completed cardiopulmonary exercise stress testing to Vo(2max) followed by a 4-km course of run-jogging. Laboratory measurements were repeated from blood drawn immediately after exercise. Mean +/- SD values were determined for age, percent body fat, dietary calories, dietary cholesterol, dietary fat, and plasma lipids, lipoproteins, Apo A-I, and absolute and percent prebeta-1 HDL using 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). One-way ANOVA comparisons were made for measurements of plasma lipids, lipoproteins, Apo A-I, and absolute and percent prebeta HDL measurements taken before and after exercise for all subjects combined. Entry characteristics showed the following (mean +/-SD): age, 24 +/- 5.8 years; body mass index (BMI), 22.4 +/- 2.6; percent body fat, 13 +/- 5.7; and Vo(2max), 49.1 +/- 7.9 mL O(2)/kg/min. Exercise significantly increased absolute plasma prebeta HDL (0.10 +/- 0.05 to 0.130 +/- 0.07 microg/mL, P =.039) and decreased plasma HDL-triglycerides (23.3 +/- 10.8 to 12.5 +/- 5.6 mg/dL, P =.012). Our findings indicate that prebeta-1 HDL and HDL-triglyceride metabolism are significant components of the effect of acute exercise on RCT. These findings have important relevance for studies pertaining to exercise-related effects on HDL metabolism as pertains to CAD risk reduction. PMID:12701055

  19. High density lipoprotein-based contrast agents for multimodal imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Skajaa, Torjus; Cormode, David P.; Falk, Erling; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Lipoproteins, natural nanoparticles, have a well-recognized biological role and are highly suitable as a platform for delivering imaging agents. The ease with which both the exterior and interior of the particles can be modified permits the creation of multifunctional nanoparticles for imaging as well as the delivery of therapeutics. Importantly, their endogenous nature may make them biocompatible, biodegradable and allows them to avoid the recognition of the reticuloendothelial system. In particular, high density lipoproteins (HDL) are of interest, because of their small size they can easily cross the endothelium and penetrate the underlying tissue. We summarize here the progress in establishing HDL as a vector for delivering a variety of diagnostically active materials to vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in mouse models of atherosclerosis. By loading various types of image-enhancing compounds into either the core or surface of HDL, they can be visualized by different imaging modalities (MRI, CT, optical). By re-routing of HDL away from plaque macrophages, imaging of biological processes in diseases besides atherosclerosis may also be achieved. PMID:19815819

  20. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway. PMID:26559024

  1. Optical Characterization of Europium Tetracycline Complex in the presence of Low Density Lipoprotein and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Silva, Flávia Rodrigues; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Neto, Antônio M. Figueiredo; Gidlund, Magnus A.; Gomes, Laércio; Junior, Nilson Dias Vieira; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2008-04-01

    Development of native Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) biosensors is of great importance in clinical analysis because the LDL concentration, which is the main carrier of cholesterol, in the plasma, is a fundamental parameter for the prevention and diagnosis of a number of clinical disorders such as heart disease, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The optical properties of the Europium-Tetracycline Complex (EuTc) were investigated for the solutions containing LDL in their compositions. In this paper we show an enhancement in the europium luminescence of EuTc complex in the presence of LDL. The time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experimental results of the pure EuTc sample and samples with LDL (EuTc:LDL) reveal an increase in the europium emission lifetime in the lipoprotein-doped samples with respect to the pure EuTc sample. A calibration curve, reasonably well described by a linear function between 0 and 3 mg/mL of LDL, was obtained. The obtained limit of detection was 0.23 mg/mL. Sixteen blood plasma samples all of them contend approximately 90 mg/dL of LDL were studied and the LDL concentrations were calculated with our method. The average LDL concentration obtained was 94 mg/dL. The results show that the EuTc complex can be used as a sensor to determine LDL with fast response, compact design, and reproducible results.

  2. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  3. Translation of two aggregated low-density lipoproteins within blood plasma: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Protopapas, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a disease in which the artery walls get thicker and harder. Atherosclerosis is a specific form of arteriosclerosis which allows less blood to travel through the artery and increases blood pressure. Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) and their ability to aggregate are important in atherosclerosis. In the present study we develop a mathematical model that describes the translation of two aggregated LDSs through blood plasma. We model the two aggregated LDLs as an inverted oblate spheroid and the flow as a creeping steady incompressible axisymmetric one. The mathematical tools that we used are the Kelvin inversion and the semi-separation of variables in the spheroidal coordinate systems. The stream function is given as a series expansion of even order terms of combinations of Gegenbauer functions of angular and radial dependence. The analytical solution is expected to give insight into the study of the various chemical precipitation methods used for the precipitation of lipoproteins, as this is the first step for the measurement of their concentration within blood plasma. PMID:25417024

  4. Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoprotein: An Innovative Target for Proteomics and Lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan; Olivar, Luis Carlos; Ramos, Eduardo; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Rojas, Joselyn; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol (HDL-C) is regarded as an important protective factor against cardiovascular disease, with abundant evidence of an inverse relationship between its serum levels and risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as various antiatherogenic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Nevertheless, observations of hereditary syndromes featuring scant HDL-C concentration in absence of premature atherosclerotic disease suggest HDL-C levels may not be the best predictor of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, the beneficial effects of HDL may not depend solely on their concentration, but also on their quality. Distinct subfractions of this lipoprotein appear to be constituted by specific protein-lipid conglomerates necessary for different physiologic and pathophysiologic functions. However, in a chronic inflammatory microenvironment, diverse components of the HDL proteome and lipid core suffer alterations, which propel a shift towards a dysfunctional state, where HDL-C becomes proatherogenic, prooxidant, and proinflammatory. This heterogeneity highlights the need for further specialized molecular studies in this aspect, in order to achieve a better understanding of this dysfunctional state; with an emphasis on the potential role for proteomics and lipidomics as valuable methods in the search of novel therapeutic approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26634153

  5. High density lipoproteins: Measurement techniques and potential biomarkers of cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Hafiane, Anouar; Genest, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) comprises a heterogeneous family of lipoprotein species, differing in surface charge, size and lipid and protein compositions. While HDL cholesterol (C) mass is a strong, graded and coherent biomarker of cardiovascular risk, genetic and clinical trial data suggest that the simple measurement of HDL-C may not be causal in preventing atherosclerosis nor reflect HDL functionality. Indeed, the measurement of HDL-C may be a biomarker of cardiovascular health. To assess the issue of HDL function as a potential therapeutic target, robust and simple analytical methods are required. The complex pleiotropic effects of HDL make the development of a single measurement challenging. Development of laboratory assays that accurately HDL function must be developed validated and brought to high-throughput for clinical purposes. This review discusses the limitations of current laboratory technologies for methods that separate and quantify HDL and potential application to predict CVD, with an emphasis on emergent approaches as potential biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:26674734

  6. Effect of chronic renal failure on high-density lipoprotein kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Fuh, M.M.; Lee, C.M.; Jeng, C.Y.; Shen, D.C.; Shieh, S.M.; Reaven, G.M.; Chen, Y.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentration and high density lipoprotein (HDL) kinetics were determined in control subjects and patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Results demonstrated that plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in patients with CRF, associated with a significant increase in plasma VLDL-cholesterol (P less than 0.002) and a significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration. The rate of removal of {sup 125}I-apoAI/HDL from plasma was slower (P less than 0.001) in the patients with CRF, resulting in an increase in the residence time of {sup 125}I-apoAI/HDL (P less than 0.001) and a decrease in the fractional catabolic rate (P less than 0.001). Since plasma apoAI concentration was lower in patients with CRF, total apoAI/HDL synthetic rate was also significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased. These data provide support for the view that low plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations in patients with CRF are related to decreases in the synthetic rate of apoAI/HDL.

  7. High density lipoproteins: Measurement techniques and potential biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Hafiane, Anouar; Genest, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) comprises a heterogeneous family of lipoprotein species, differing in surface charge, size and lipid and protein compositions. While HDL cholesterol (C) mass is a strong, graded and coherent biomarker of cardiovascular risk, genetic and clinical trial data suggest that the simple measurement of HDL-C may not be causal in preventing atherosclerosis nor reflect HDL functionality. Indeed, the measurement of HDL-C may be a biomarker of cardiovascular health. To assess the issue of HDL function as a potential therapeutic target, robust and simple analytical methods are required. The complex pleiotropic effects of HDL make the development of a single measurement challenging. Development of laboratory assays that accurately HDL function must be developed validated and brought to high-throughput for clinical purposes. This review discusses the limitations of current laboratory technologies for methods that separate and quantify HDL and potential application to predict CVD, with an emphasis on emergent approaches as potential biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:26674734

  8. Usefulness of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol to Predict Survival in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Carolyn M; McCully, Robert B; Murphy, Joseph G; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Frantz, Robert P; Kane, Garvan C

    2016-07-15

    It has been suggested that lipoprotein abnormalities may contribute to the pulmonary arteriolar dysfunction observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) has vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory, and endothelial protective properties. We hypothesized that a higher serum HDL level may be advantageous for survival in PAH and that the serum HDL level at diagnosis would be an independent predictor of survival in PAH and be additive to previously validated predictors of survival. This study included all patients with PAH seen at the Mayo Clinic Pulmonary Hypertension Clinic from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2009, who had a baseline HDL measurement. Mortality was analyzed over 5 years using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards ratios were calculated to evaluate the relation between baseline HDL level and survival. HDL levels were available for 227 patients. Higher HDL levels were associated with significantly lower mortality. Patients with an HDL >54 mg/dl at diagnosis had a 5-year survival of 59%. By comparison those with an HDL <34 mg/dl had a 5-year survival of 30%. On multivariate analysis, higher HDL was associated with an age-adjusted risk ratio for death of 0.78 (CI 0.67 to 0.91; p <0.01) per 10 mg/dl increase. In conclusion, HDL was an independent predictor of survival in PAH.

  9. [Possibility of New Circulating Atherosclerosis-Related Lipid Markers Measurement in Medical and Complete Medical Checkups: Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Lipase].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentrations correlate more strongly with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other LDL-C and large LDL particle concentrations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein particles and is a useful biomarker in diagnosing Type I, Type IV, and Type V hyperlipidemia. Therefore, the measurement of circulating sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations contributes to the assessment of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers. However, the measurement of these lipids has not been fully adopted in medical and complete medical checkups. Recently, novel automated homogenous assay for measuring sdLDL-C and latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) for measuring LPL have been developed, respectively. Using these new assays, sdLDL-C values showed excellent agreement with those obtained by isolation of the d = 1.044 - 1.063 g/mL plasma fraction by sequential ultracentrifugation, and LPL values measured with and without heparin injection were highly correlated with the values measured by the LPL-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These assays may be superior to the previous assays for the measurement of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations due their simplicity and reproducibility. The measurements of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations may be useful as lipid markers in the assessment of the development and progression of atherosclerosis and the detection of pathological conditions and diseases if these markers are measured in medical and complete medical checkups. We have introduced the possibility of the novel measurement of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers such as sdLDL-C and LPL in medical and complete medical checkups. Further studies are needed to clarify whether sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations are related to the development and progression of

  10. High density lipoprotein as a source of cholesterol for adrenal steroidogenesis: a study in individuals with low plasma HDL-C.

    PubMed

    Bochem, Andrea E; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Romijn, Johannes A; Hoekstra, Menno; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Hovingh, G Kees; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Stroes, Erik S G

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have addressed the delivery of lipoprotein-derived cholesterol to the adrenals for steroid production in humans. While there is evidence against a role for low-density lipoprotein (LDL), it is unresolved whether high density lipoprotein (HDL) contributes to adrenal steroidogenesis. To study this, steroid hormone profiles in urine were assessed in male subjects suffering from functional mutations in ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) (n = 24), lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) (n = 40), as well as in 11 subjects with low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) without ABCA1/LCAT mutations. HDL-C levels were 39% lower in the ABCA1, LCAT, and low HDL-C groups compared with controls (all P < 0.001). In all groups with low HDL-C levels, urinary excretion of 17-ketogenic steroids was reduced by 33%, 27%, and 32% compared with controls (all P < 0.04). In seven carriers of either type of mutation, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation did not reveal differences from normolipidemic controls. In conclusion, this study shows that basal but not stimulated corticosteroid metabolism is attenuated in subjects with low HDL-C, irrespective of its molecular origin. These findings lend support to a role for HDL as a cholesterol donor for basal adrenal steroidogenesis in humans. PMID:23511897

  11. High-Density Lipoprotein - A Hero, a Mirage, or a Witness?

    PubMed

    Sviridov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    Negative relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a firmly established medical fact, but attempts to reproduce protective properties of HDL by pharmacologically elevating HDL levels were mostly unsuccessful. This conundrum presents a fundamental question: were the approaches used to raise HDL flawed or the protective effects of HDL are an epiphenomenon? Recent attempts to elevate plasma HDL were universally based on reducing HDL catabolism by blocking reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Here, we argue that this mode of HDL elevation may be mechanistically different to natural mechanisms and thus be counterproductive. We further argue that independently of whether HDL is a driving force or a surrogate measure of the rate of RCT, approaches aimed at increasing HDL supply, rather than reducing its catabolism, would be most beneficial for speeding up RCT and improving protection against CVD. PMID:26664860

  12. Spanish sparkling wines (Cavas) as inhibitors of in vitro human low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Satué-Gracia, M T; Andrés-Lacueva, C; Lamuela-Raventós, R M; Frankel, E N

    1999-06-01

    Forty-seven dealcoholized sparkling wines (cava) from the Penedès area in Spain were tested for their antioxidant activity in a low-density lipoprotein system. The effect of different quality-related parameters, such as harvest year or grape variety, was investigated. Twenty-two phenolic compounds were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by comparing their retention time and their ultraviolet spectra with those of pure standards. When tested at the same total phenol concentration, the antioxidant activity of these white sparkling wines was found to be similar to that reported for red wines. This activity was positively correlated with the total phenolic content, trans-caffeic acid, coumaric acid, protocatechuic acid, and quercetin 3-glucuronide. The wines made of the classic cava wine coupage had superior antioxidant activity compared to those of other cultivars.

  13. Treating low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Mirella P.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, genetic and interventional studies have failed to consistently support this relationship. There is an increasing body of evidence that the function of HDL, including its antiatherogenic properties and its reverse cholesterol transport activity, has a greater impact on CVD risk compared with levels of HDL alone. Targeting HDL has become a growing interest. Nevertheless, raising HDL pharmacologically has failed to show a considerable, if any, impact on cardiovascular outcome. Efforts should focus on improving HDL quality in addition to raising HDL levels when developing new therapies. Ongoing and future research will help determine the most safe and effective approach to improve cardiovascular outcome and establish the safety, efficacy and impact on atherosclerosis of the emerging HDL-raising therapies. PMID:24696776

  14. High density lipoprotein cholesterol: an evolving target of therapy in the management of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Navin K; Ashen, Dominique; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2008-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of John Gofman in the 1950s, our understanding of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and its relationship to coronary heart disease (CHD) has grown substantially. Numerous clinical trials since the Framingham Study in 1977 have demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL-C and one’s risk of developing CHD. Over the past two decades, preclinical research has gained further insight into the nature of HDL-C metabolism, specifically regarding the ability of HDL-C to promote reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Recent attempts to harness HDL’s ability to enhance RCT have revealed the complexity of HDL-C metabolism. This review provides a detailed update on HDL-C as an evolving therapeutic target in the management of cardiovascular disease. PMID:18629371

  15. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  16. Edaravone attenuates monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijuan; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Liping

    2015-10-30

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plays a vital role in recruitment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which is important during early stages of atherosclerosis development. Edaravone, a potent and novel scavenger of free radicals inhibiting hydroxyl radicals, has been clinically used to reduce the neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In the present study, Edaravone was revealed to markedly reduce oxLDL-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The inhibitory mechanism of Edaravone was associated with suppression of the chemokine MCP-1 and adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression. In addition, luciferase reporter assay results revealed that administration of Edaravone attenuated the increase in NF-κB transcriptional activity induced by oxLDL. Notably, it's also shown that Edaravone treatment blocked oxLDL induced p65 nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Results indicate that Edaravone negatively regulates endothelial inflammation.

  17. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) impacts on erythrocyte viscoelasticity and its molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Yang, Li; Liu, Yao; Gao, Wei; Peng, Weiyan; Sung, K-L Paul; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2009-10-16

    The oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) plays an important role in atherosclerosis, yet it remains unclear if it damages circulating erythrocytes. In this study, erythrocyte deformability and its membrane proteins after Ox-LDL incubations are investigated by micropipette aspiration, thiol radical measurement, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results show that Ox-LDL incubation reduces the erythrocyte deformability, decreases free thiol radical contents in erythrocytes, and induces the cross-linking among membrane proteins. SDS-PAGE analysis reveals a high molecular weight (HMW) complex as well as new bands between spectrins and band 3 and reduced ratios between band 3 and other major membrane skeletal proteins. Analyses indicate that Ox-LDL makes erythrocytes harder to deform through a molecular mechanism by which the oxidation of free thiol radicals forms disulfide bonds among membrane skeletal proteins.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of paraoxonase activity: elucidating the role of high-density lipoprotein in disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel Seung; Marsillach, Judit; Furlong, Clement E; Jarvik, Gail P

    2014-01-01

    PON1 is a key component of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and is at least partially responsible for HDL's antioxidant/atheroprotective properties. PON1 is also associated with numerous human diseases, including cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's disease and cancer. In addition, PON1 metabolizes a broad variety of substrates, including toxic organophosphorous compounds, statin adducts, glucocorticoids, the likely atherogenic l-homocysteine thiolactone and the quorum-sensing factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Numerous cardiovascular and antidiabetic pharmacologic agents, dietary macronutrients, lifestyle factors and antioxidant supplements affect PON1 expression and enzyme activity levels. Owing to the importance of PON1 to HDL function and its individual association with diverse human diseases, pharmacogenomic interactions between PON1 and the various factors that alter its expression and activity may represent an important therapeutic target for future investigation. PMID:24024900

  19. High density lipoprotein: it’s not just about lipid transport anymore

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Scott M.; Hofmann, Susanna; Askew, David S.; Davidson, W. Sean

    2011-01-01

    Plasma levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) have long been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in large populations. However, HDL-C has been significantly less useful for predicting CVD risk in individual patients. This has ignited a new debate on the merits of measuring HDL quantity versus quality in terms of protective potential. In addition, numerous recent studies have begun to uncover HDL functions that vary surprisingly from traditional lipid transport roles. In this paper, we review recent findings that point to important functions for HDL that go well beyond lipid transport. These discoveries suggest that HDL might be a platform that mediates protection from a host of disease states ranging from CVD to diabetes to infectious disease. PMID:21067941

  20. Anticipatory Role of High Density Lipoprotein and Endothelial Dysfunction: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Esin; Yılmaz, Necat; Aydin, Ozgur; Ellidağ, Hamit Y

    2014-01-01

    High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) has been witnessed to possess a range of different functions that contribute to its atheroprotective effects. These functions are: the promotion of macrophage cholesterol efflux, reverse cholesterol transport, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, anti-apoptotic, pro-fibrinolytic and anti-oxidative functions. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an HDL associated enzyme esterase/homocysteinethiolactonase that contributes to the anti-oxidant and anti-atherosclerotic capabilities of HDL. PON1 is directly involved in the etiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis through the modulation of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The aim of this review is to summarize the role of HDL on endothelial homeostasis, and also to describe the recently characterized molecular pathways involved. PMID:25598849

  1. Effects of lifestyle interventions on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Roussell, Michael A; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2007-03-01

    This review summarizes intervention studies that evaluated the effects of lifestyle behaviors on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Current diet and lifestyle recommendations beneficially affect HDL-C. Individual lifestyle interventions that increase HDL-C include: a healthful diet that is low (7-10% of calories) in saturated fat and sufficient in unsaturated fat (15-20% of calories), regular physical activity, attaining a healthy weight, with moderate alcohol consumption, and cessation of cigarette smoking. Combining a healthy diet with weight loss and physical activity can increase HDL-C 10% to 13%. When combined with interventions that beneficially affect other cardiovascular disease risk factors, this increase in HDL-C is expected to contribute to a overall reduction in cardiovascular disease risk.

  2. High-Density Lipoprotein Proteomics: Identifying New Drug Targets and Biomarkers by Understanding Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Scott; Durairaj, Anita; Lu, Jason L.; Davidson, W. Sean

    2010-01-01

    Recent proteomics studies on human plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have discovered up to 50 individual protein constituents. Many of these have known functions that vary surprisingly from the lipid transport roles commonly thought to mediate HDL’s ability to protect from coronary artery disease. Given newly discovered roles in inflammation, protease inhibition, complement regulation, and innate immunity, many have begun to view HDL as a broad collection of distinct particle subfamilies, each distinguished by unique protein compositions and functions. Herein we review recent applications of high-resolution proteomics to HDL and summarize evidence supporting the idea of HDL functional subspeciation. These studies have set the stage for a more complete understanding of the molecular basis of HDL functional heterogeneity and hold promise for the identification of new biomarkers that can predict disease or evaluate the success of clinical interventions. PMID:20625533

  3. Conformational Changes in High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles Induced by High Payloads of Paramagnetic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) nanoparticles doped with gadolinium lipids can be used as magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic agents for atherosclerosis. In this study, HDL nanoparticles with different molar fractions of gadolinium lipids (0 < xGd-lipids < 0.33) were prepared, and the MR relaxivity values (r1 and r2) for all compositions were measured. Both r1 and r2 parameters reached a maximal value at a molar fraction of approximately xGd-lipids = 0.2. Higher payloads of gadolinium did not significantly increase relaxivity values but induced changes in the structure of HDL, increasing the size of the particles from dH = 8.2 ± 1.6 to 51.7 ± 7.3 nm. High payloads of gadolinium lipids trigger conformational changes in HDL, with potential effects on the in vivo behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:27713933

  4. High density lipoprotein and metabolic disease: Potential benefits of restoring its functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Klancic, Teja; Woodward, Lavinia; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High density lipoproteins (HDLs) are thought to be atheroprotective and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Besides their antioxidant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic properties in the vasculature, HDLs also improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Scope of the review Herein, we review the functional role of HDLs to improve metabolic disorders, especially those involving insulin resistance and to induce regression of CVD with a particular focus on current pharmacological treatment options as well as lifestyle interventions, particularly exercise. Major conclusions Functional properties of HDLs continue to be considered important mediators to reverse metabolic dysfunction and to regress atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes are often recommended to reduce the risk of CVD, with exercise being one of the most important of these. Understanding how exercise improves HDL function will likely lead to new approaches to battle the expanding burden of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27110484

  5. Receptor mediated uptake of paclitaxel from a synthetic high density lipoprotein nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Mooberry, Linda K; Nair, Maya; Paranjape, Sulabha; McConathy, Walter J; Lacko, Andras G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism(s) whereby paclitaxel (PTX), is taken up by cancer cells, once encapsulated into synthetic/reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL). The uptake of PTX was found to be facilitated by the scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1) when drug-loaded rHDL particles were incubated with cells that express the SRB1 receptor. Studies with double-labeled, PTX containing rHDL nanoparticles showed that prostate cancer (PC-3) cells incorporated PTX primarily via a selective (SR-B1 type) uptake mechanism. In the presence of a 10-fold excess of plasma HDL, PTX uptake decreased to 30% of the control. These findings suggest that the incorporation of lipophilic drugs by cancer cells from rHDL nanoparticles is facilitated by a receptor mediated (SR-B1) mechanism.

  6. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro by ginger extracts.

    PubMed

    Gunathilake, K D Prasanna P; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Currently, there is a renewed interest in ginger because of its antioxidants and cardioprotective properties. The effects of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane solvent extracts of ginger and pure major ginger constituents on Cu(2+)-induced oxidation of human LDL in vitro were examined. The LDL oxidation inhibition by ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane extracts of ginger was 71%, 76%, 67%, and 67%, respectively, at their optimum extraction conditions. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by water extracts of ginger, which was prepared by ultrasonic-assisted extraction conditions of 52°C for 15 min, was about 43%. Phenolic bioactives of ginger-6-gingerols, 8-gingerols, 10-gingerols, and 6-shogaol-seem to be strong inhibitors of Cu(+2)-induced LDL oxidation. Overall, ginger extracts, including the water extract possess the antioxidant activities to inhibit human LDL oxidation in vitro.

  7. Betanin inhibits the myeloperoxidase/nitrite-induced oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Mario; Tesoriere, Luisa; Livrea, Maria A

    2007-03-01

    Production of nitrogen dioxide by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of nitrite is now considered a key step in the pathophysiology of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. This study shows that betanin, a phytochemical of the betalain class, inhibits the production of lipid hydroperoxides in human LDL submitted to a MPO/nitrite-induced oxidation. Kinetic measurements including time-course of particle oxidation and betanin consumption, either in the presence or in the absence of nitrite, suggest that the antioxidant effect is possibly the result of various actions. Betanin scavenges the initiator radical nitrogen dioxide and can also act as a lipoperoxyl radical-scavenger. In addition, unidentified oxidation product(s) of betanin by MPO/nitrite inhibit(s) the MPO/nitrite-induced LDL oxidation as effectively as the parent compound. In the light of betanin bioavailability and post-absorbtion distribution in humans, present findings may suggest favourable in vivo activity of this phytochemical.

  8. Determinants of binding of oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein (a) and lipoprotein (a).

    PubMed

    Leibundgut, Gregor; Scipione, Corey; Yin, Huiyong; Schneider, Matthias; Boffa, Michael B; Green, Simone; Yang, Xiaohong; Dennis, Edward; Witztum, Joseph L; Koschinsky, Marlys L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2013-10-01

    Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) are present on apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)] and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] but the determinants influencing their binding are not known. The presence of OxPLs on apo(a)/Lp(a) was evaluated in plasma from healthy humans, apes, monkeys, apo(a)/Lp(a) transgenic mice, lysine binding site (LBS) mutant apo(a)/Lp(a) mice with Asp(55/57)→Ala(55/57) substitution of kringle (K)IV10)], and a variety of recombinant apo(a) [r-apo(a)] constructs. Using antibody E06, which binds the phosphocholine (PC) headgroup of OxPLs, Western and ELISA formats revealed that OxPLs were only present in apo(a) with an intact KIV10 LBS. Lipid extracts of purified human Lp(a) contained both E06- and nonE06-detectable OxPLs by tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Trypsin digestion of 17K r-apo(a) showed PC-containing OxPLs covalently bound to apo(a) fragments by LC-MS/MS that could be saponified by ammonium hydroxide. Interestingly, PC-containing OxPLs were also present in 17K r-apo(a) with Asp(57)→Ala(57) substitution in KIV10 that lacked E06 immunoreactivity. In conclusion, E06- and nonE06-detectable OxPLs are present in the lipid phase of Lp(a) and covalently bound to apo(a). E06 immunoreactivity, reflecting pro-inflammatory OxPLs accessible to the immune system, is strongly influenced by KIV10 LBS and is unique to human apo(a), which may explain Lp(a)'s pro-atherogenic potential. PMID:23828779

  9. The Complex Fate in Plasma of Gadolinium Incorporated into High-Density Lipoproteins Used for Magnetic Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Barazza, Alessandra; Blachford, Courtney; Even-Or, Orli; Joaquin, Victor A.; Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported enhancing the imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in mice using reconstituted high density lipoproteins (HDL) as nanocarriers for the MRI contrast agent gadolinium (Gd). This study focuses on the underlying mechanisms of Gd delivery to atherosclerotic plaques. HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles containing Gd chelated to phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DTPA-DMPE) and a lipidic fluorophore were used to demonstrate the transfer of Gd-phospholipids among plasma lipoproteins in vitro and in vivo. To determine the basis of this transfer, the roles of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lipoprotein lipase (LpL) in mediating the migration of Gd-DTPA-DMPE among lipoproteins were investigated. The results indicated that neither was an important factor, suggesting that spontaneous transfer of Gd-DTPA-DMPE was the most probable mechanism. Finally, two independent mouse models were used to quantify the relative contributions of HDL and LDL reconstituted with Gd-DTPA-DMPE to plaque imaging enhancement by MR. Both sets of results suggested that Gd-DTPA-DMPE originally associated with LDL was about twice as effective as that injected in the form of Gd-HDL, and that some of Gd-HDL’s effectiveness in vivo is indirect through transfer of the imaging agent to LDL. In conclusion, the fate of Gd-DTPA-DMPE associated with a particular type of lipoprotein is complex, and includes its transfer to other lipoprotein species that are then cleared from the plasma into tissues. PMID:23617731

  10. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, daily estradiol and progesterone, and mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Flote, Vidar G; Frydenberg, Hanne; Ursin, Giske; Iversen, Anita; Fagerland, Morten W; Ellison, Peter T; Wist, Erik A; Egeland, Thore; Wilsgaard, Tom; McTiernan, Anne; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Thune, Inger

    2015-06-01

    High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) may influence the proliferation of breast tumor cells, but it is unclear whether low HDL-C levels, alone or in combination with cyclic estrogen and progesterone, are associated with mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer development. Fasting morning serum concentrations of HDL-C were assessed in 202 premenopausal women, 25 to 35 years of age, participating in the Norwegian Energy Balance and Breast Cancer Aspects (EBBA) I study. Estrogen and progesterone were measured both in serum, and daily in saliva, throughout an entire menstrual cycle. Absolute and percent mammographic density was assessed by a computer-assisted method (Madena), from digitized mammograms (days 7-12). Multivariable models were used to study the associations between HDL-C, estrogen and progesterone, and mammographic density phenotypes. We observed a positive association between HDL-C and percent mammographic density after adjustments (P = 0.030). When combining HDL-C, estradiol, and progesterone, we observed among women with low HDL-C (<1.39 mmol/L), a linear association between salivary 17β-estradiol, progesterone, and percent and absolute mammographic density. Furthermore, in women with low HDL-C, each one SD increase of salivary mid-menstrual 17β-estradiol was associated with an OR of 4.12 (95% confidence intervals; CI, 1.30-13.0) of having above-median percent (28.5%), and an OR of 2.5 (95% CI, 1.13-5.50) of having above-median absolute mammographic density (32.4 cm(2)). On the basis of plausible biologic mechanisms linking HDL-C to breast cancer development, our findings suggest a role of HDL-C, alone or in combination with estrogen, in breast cancer development. However, our small hypothesis generating study requires confirmation in larger studies.

  11. High-density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration and Subclinical Atherosclerosis of the Carotid Arteries in Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Maryam; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Abbott, Robert D.; Okamura, Tomonori; Takashima, Naoyuki; Torii, Sayuki; Saito, Yoshino; Hisamatsu, Takashi; Miyagawa, Naoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kadota, Aya; Sekikawa, Akira; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Mitsunami, Kenichi; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of high-density lipoprotein particle (HDL-P) with atherosclerosis may be stronger than that of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Whether associations persist in populations at low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear. This study examines the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaque counts among Japanese men, who characteristically have higher HDL-C levels and a lower CHD burden than those in men of Western populations. Methods We cross-sectionally examined a community-based sample of 870 Japanese men aged 40-79 years, free of known clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) and not on lipid-lowering medication. Participants were randomly selected among Japanese living in Kusatsu City in Shiga, Japan. Results Both HDL-P and HDL-C were inversely and independently associated with cIMT in models adjusted for conventional CHD risk factors, including low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and diabetes. HDL-P maintained an association with cIMT after further adjustment for HDL-C (P<0.01), whereas the association of HDL-C with cIMT was noticeably absent after inclusion of HDL-P in the model. In plaque counts of the carotid arteries, HDL-P was significantly associated with a reduction in plaque count, whereas HDL-C was not. Conclusion HDL-P, in comparison to HDL-C, is more strongly associated with measures of carotid atherosclerosis in a cross-sectional study of Japanese men. Findings demonstrate that, HDL-P is a strong correlate of subclinical atherosclerosis even in a population at low risk for CHD. PMID:25687270

  12. Paradoxical Elevation of High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Association with Lacunar-Type Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Gui-Lin; Tan, Yan; Fang, Min; Yang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Zhao, Yan-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) levels and the risk of lacunar infarction (LI) in a retrospective cohort study in China. Material/Methods We recruited 229 patients with obsolete brain infarctions single side (SOBI), 218 with obsolete brain infarctions bilateral sides (BOBI), 193 with both acute stroke and obsolete lacunar infarctions single side (AI&SOBI), 113 with both acute stroke and obsolete lacunar infarctions bilateral sides (AI&BOBI), and 203 without any infarctions (Control). Results 1) The plasma levels of HDLC in group BOBI, AI&SOBI, and AI&BOBI were higher than in the control group, and lower in group SOBI than in the control group (p<0.01). 2) The plasma levels of HDLC in group AI&SOBI were significantly higher than in group SOBI (p<0.01). 3) The plasma levels of HLDL were similar between group AI&SOBI and AI&BOBI. 4) There were significant relationships between HDLC and acute lacunar stroke, even after adjusting for these factors such as age, sex, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and history of diabetes (p=0.001). 4) Compared with the controls, the calculation of odds ratios indicated relative risk estimates of higher HDLC for acute lacunar stroke with obsolete lacunar infarction. Conclusions Elevated HDLC may be an independent predictor of recurrent stroke with obsolete lacunar infarctions single side in Chinese people, justifying clinical trials for secondary prevention of stroke by generally increasing HLDL level. According to the difference between single and bilateral side multiple silent lacunar infarcts, it is inferred that HDLC may increase the risk of atherothrombotic infarction but reduce the risk of cardioembolic infarction in the general Chinese population. PMID:26120926

  13. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis.

  14. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin–low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin®, a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. Patients and methods This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I–II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin® or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. Results There were no differences between the Theracurmin® and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects.

  15. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin–low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin®, a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. Patients and methods This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I–II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin® or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. Results There were no differences between the Theracurmin® and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects. PMID:27616885

  16. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26771151

  17. Residual Cardiovascular Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of High-density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Valentina; Yang, Haichun; Fazio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Although reducing low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels with lipid-lowering agents (statins) decreases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, a substantial residual risk (up to 70% of baseline) remains after treatment in most patient populations. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a potential contributor to residual risk, and low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established risk factor for CVD. However, in contrast to conventional lipid-lowering therapies, recent studies show that pharmacologic increases in HDL-C levels do not bring about clinical benefits. These observations have given rise to the concept of dysfunctional HDL where increases in serum HDL-C may not be beneficial because HDL loss of function is not corrected by or even intensified by the therapy. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) increases CVD risk, and patients whose CKD progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis are at the highest CVD risk of any patient type studied. The ESRD population is also unique in its lack of significant benefit from standard lipid-lowering interventions. Recent studies indicate that HDL-C levels do not predict CVD in the CKD population. Moreover, CKD profoundly alters metabolism and composition of HDL particles and impairs their protective effects on functions such as cellular cholesterol efflux, endothelial protection, and control of inflammation and oxidation. Thus, CKD-induced perturbations in HDL may contribute to the excess CVD in CKD patients. Understanding the mechanisms of vascular protection in renal disease can present new therapeutic targets for intervention in this population. PMID:26009251

  18. Effects of serum amyloid A on the structure and antioxidant ability of high-density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Megumi; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ichimura, Naoya; Nishimori, Madoka; Okubo, Shigeo; Yatomi, Yutaka; Tozuka, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) levels increase during acute and chronic inflammation and are mainly associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). In the present study, we investigated the effect of SAA on the composition, surface charge, particle size and antioxidant ability of HDL using recombinant human SAA (rhSAA) and HDL samples from patients with inflammation. We confirmed that rhSAA bound to HDL3 and released apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) from HDL without an apparent change in particle size. Forty-one patients were stratified into three groups based on serum SAA concentrations: Low (SAA ≤ 8 μg/ml), Middle (8 < SAA ≤ 100 μg/ml) and High (SAA > 100 μg/ml). The ratios of apoA-I to total protein mass, relative cholesterol content and negative charge of HDL samples obtained from patients with high SAA levels were lower than that for samples from patients with low SAA levels. Various particle sizes of HDL were observed in three groups regardless of serum SAA levels. Antioxidant ability of rhSAA, evaluated as the effect on the formation of conjugated diene in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induced by oxidation using copper sulfate, was higher than that of apoA-I. Consistent with this result, reconstituted SAA-containing HDL (SAA-HDL) indicated higher antioxidant ability compared with normal HDL. Furthermore, HDL samples obtained from High SAA group patients also showed the highest antioxidant ability among the three groups. Consequently, SAA affects the composition and surface charge of HDL by displacement of apoA-I and enhances its antioxidant ability. PMID:27422844

  19. Reduced uptake of oxidized low density lipoproteins in monocyte-derived macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, S; Kashiwagi, H; Yamashita, S; Nakagawa, T; Kostner, B; Tomiyama, Y; Nakata, A; Ishigami, M; Miyagawa, J; Kameda-Takemura, K

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the physiological roles of CD36 as an oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) receptor, we analyzed the monocyte-derived macrophages from normal and two CD36-deficient subjects, since we identified the molecular abnormalities (Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, Y. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, R. H. Lipsky, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa 1994. Blood. 83:3545-3552; and Kashiwagi, H., Y. Tomiyama, S. Honda, S. Kosugi, M. Shiraga, N. Nagao, S. Sekiguchi, Y. Kanayama, Y. Kurata, and Y. Matsuzawa. 1995. J. Clin. Invest. 95:1040-1046). Scatchard analysis of 125I-OxLDL binding showed a linear plot and the maximum binding was lower by approximately 40% in the macrophages from subjects with CD36 deficiency than those from normal controls. Competition studies showed that the uptake of 125I-OxLDL was suppressed by OKM5, an antibody against CD36, by 53% in normal control macrophages, but not in the CD36-deficient macrophages. After incubation with OxLDL for 24 h, cholesteryl ester mass accumulation was reduced by approximately 40% in the macrophages from CD36-deficient subjects than those from normal controls. These results suggest that CD36 is one of the physiological receptors for OxLDL. Since specific binding of OxLDL was only reduced by approximately 40% in spite of the complete deficiency of CD36, several other receptors also may have some role in OxLDL uptake. Further studies will be needed to assess the quantitative role of CD36 in foam cell formation in vivo. Images PMID:7560077

  20. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  1. High density lipoproteins and prevention of experimental atherosclerosis with special reference to tree shrews.

    PubMed

    She, M P; Xia, R Y; Ran, B F; Wong, Z L

    1990-01-01

    According to data obtained from epidemiological and experimental survey, serum HDL level is known to be correlated conversely with the incidence of atherosclerosis. Experimental data collected in this article explained part of its mechanism, which is described in four parts as follows: 1. The result of 3 successive experiments on experimental atherosclerosis in tree shrews (total of 96 animals available including 40 as the controls) showed that the serum HDL level had been kept persistantly to 69-88% of the total serum lipoproteins even after a high cholesterol intake for 32 weeks. The incidence of atheromatous lesions developed was only 0-9%, but the incidence of gall stone was very high, 48-84% by gross examination by the end of these experiments. 2. HDL are also capable of (1) promotion of monocyte migration activity; (2) enhancement of cholesterol clearance rate of aortic smooth muscle cells originally isolated from either rabbits or tree shrews; (3) inhibition of 20% of LDL degradation but with no inhibitory effect obtained on Ac-LDL degradation in the endothelial cells; (4) presence of specific binding sites for apo E free HDL on the surface of aortic smooth muscle cells from either rabbits or tree shrews which recognizes apo A1 as a ligand. 3. Data from 2 successive experiments in rabbits showed that HDL lipoproteins (mainly apo A1) possess an inhibitory effect on the development of atheromatous plaques, but not a very strong one. 4. The colesterol clearance effect of smooth muscle cells was markedly enhanced by apo A1/phospholipid liposomes (the apo A1 used was isolated from either rabbit's or tree shrew's serum) in vitro. PMID:2123379

  2. High density lipoproteins and prevention of experimental atherosclerosis with special reference to tree shrews.

    PubMed

    She, M P; Xia, R Y; Ran, B F; Wong, Z L

    1990-01-01

    According to data obtained from epidemiological and experimental survey, serum HDL level is known to be correlated conversely with the incidence of atherosclerosis. Experimental data collected in this article explained part of its mechanism, which is described in four parts as follows: 1. The result of 3 successive experiments on experimental atherosclerosis in tree shrews (total of 96 animals available including 40 as the controls) showed that the serum HDL level had been kept persistantly to 69-88% of the total serum lipoproteins even after a high cholesterol intake for 32 weeks. The incidence of atheromatous lesions developed was only 0-9%, but the incidence of gall stone was very high, 48-84% by gross examination by the end of these experiments. 2. HDL are also capable of (1) promotion of monocyte migration activity; (2) enhancement of cholesterol clearance rate of aortic smooth muscle cells originally isolated from either rabbits or tree shrews; (3) inhibition of 20% of LDL degradation but with no inhibitory effect obtained on Ac-LDL degradation in the endothelial cells; (4) presence of specific binding sites for apo E free HDL on the surface of aortic smooth muscle cells from either rabbits or tree shrews which recognizes apo A1 as a ligand. 3. Data from 2 successive experiments in rabbits showed that HDL lipoproteins (mainly apo A1) possess an inhibitory effect on the development of atheromatous plaques, but not a very strong one. 4. The colesterol clearance effect of smooth muscle cells was markedly enhanced by apo A1/phospholipid liposomes (the apo A1 used was isolated from either rabbit's or tree shrew's serum) in vitro.

  3. ApoAV reduces plasma triglycerides by inhibiting very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) production and stimulating lipoprotein lipase-mediated VLDL-TG hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Frank G; Rensen, Patrick C N; Voshol, Peter J; Vrins, Carlos; van der Vliet, Hendrik N; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Havekes, Louis M; Groen, Albert K; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2004-07-01

    ApoAV has been discovered recently as a novel modifier of triglyceride (TG) metabolism, but the pathways involved are currently unknown. To gain insight into the function of apoAV, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of murine apoa5 to C57Bl/6 mice was employed. The injection of low doses of Ad-apoa5 (1-5 x 10(8) plaqueforming units/mouse) dose-dependently reduced plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG levels. First, we evaluated whether a reduced hepatic VLDL production contributed to the TG-lowering effect. Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently diminished (29-37%) the VLDL-TG production rate without affecting VLDL particle production, suggesting that apoAV impairs the lipidation of apoB. Second, Ad-apoa5 treatment dose-dependently reduced (68-88%) the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia following an intragastric fat load, suggesting that apoAV also stimulates the lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-dependent clearance of TG-rich lipoproteins. Indeed, recombinant apoAV was found to dose-dependently stimulate LPL activity up to 2.3-fold in vitro. Accordingly, intravenously injected VLDL-like TG-rich emulsions were cleared at an accelerated rate concomitant with the increased uptake of emulsion TG-derived fatty acids by skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in Ad-apoa5-treated mice. From these data, we conclude that apoAV is a potent stimulator of LPL activity. Thus, apoAV lowers plasma TG by both reducing the hepatic VLDL-TG production rate and by enhancing the lipolytic conversion of TG-rich lipoproteins.

  4. Increased Small Dense LDL and Intermediate-Density Lipoprotein With Albuminuria in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Shalamar D.; Hokanson, John E.; Steffes, Michael W.; Purnell, Jonathan Q; Marcovina, Santica M.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Brunzell, John D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This population study examines the relationship between LDL density and persistent albuminuria in subjects with type 1 diabetes at the end of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Subjects were classified as persistently normoalbuminuric (albumin excretion rate [AER] <30 mg/d, n = 1,056), microalbuminuric (AER ≥30–299 mg/day, n = 80), and macroalbuminuric (AER = 300 mg/day, n = 24) based on the last two AER measures. RESULTS Triglyceride (P <0.01) and LDL cholesterol (P <0.01) levels were higher in macroalbuminuric subjects compared with normoalbuminuric subjects. Cholesterol distribution by density-gradient ultracentrifugation showed an increase in intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and a shift in peak LDL from buoyant toward more dense particles with progressive albuminuria. In the entire group, there was a significant negative correlation between the peak buoyancy of LDL particles and albuminuria (r = −0.238, P <0.001, n = 1,160). This correlation persisted in the normoalbuminuric DCCT group (r = −0.138, P<0.001, n = 1,056). CONCLUSIONS As albuminuria increases in subjects with type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia occurs with an increase in IDL and dense LDL that may lead to increased cardiovascular disease. PMID:10388983

  5. Innate Immune Proteins C1q and Mannan-Binding Lectin Enhance Clearance of Atherogenic Lipoproteins by Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Deborah A.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of modified lipoproteins in the arterial intima. C1q and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are not only recognition components involved in activation of inflammation via the complement cascade, but they are also able to directly modulate phagocyte activation. Studies in C1q−/− and MBL−/− mice suggest that these molecules play a protective role in the early atherosclerotic lesion in the absence of, or prior to, expression of other complement components. However, in later stages, complement activation becomes an inappropriate inflammatory response, contributing to disease pathology. Therefore, to investigate possible molecular interactions of C1q and MBL in atherosclerotic lesions, we examined the influence of C1q and MBL in the clearance of native and modified lipoproteins by human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Both C1q and MBL are shown to bind and enhance the monocyte/monocyte-derived macrophage clearance of modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), including oxidized LDL and acetylated LDL, but not native LDL. Modified forms of LDL activate the classical complement pathway, but no lectin pathway activation was detected. Interestingly, monocytes that ingested modified LDL in the presence of C1q or MBL upregulated surface CD80 and CD31, as well as CCL2 chemokine gene expression. However, C1q and MBL also significantly reduced levels of free cholesterol accumulation in monocytes and human monocyte-derived macrophages that ingested oxidized LDL, while enhancing high-density lipoprotein–specific cholesterol efflux from these cells. These results suggest a novel pathway in which C1q and MBL influence removal and metabolism of atherogenic forms of LDL in the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:20833838

  6. Studies on the structure of low density lipoproteins isolated from Macaca fascicularis fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Tall, A R; Small, D M; Atkinson, D; Rudel, L L

    1978-12-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys, Macaca fascicularis, fed cholesterol-containing saturated-fat diets develop increased levels of high molecular weight plasma low density lipoproteins (LDL), associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. To study the composition and structure of these abnormal particles, LDL from monkeys, fed atherogenic and control diets, were characterized chemically and examined by differential scanning calorimetry and low-angle X-ray scattering. LDL from animals on the experimental diet showed an increase in molecular weight (4.0 to 7.0 x 10(6), experimental diet compared with 3.0 to 3.7 x 10(6), control diet) associated with a large increase in cholesterol ester content and concomitant smaller increases in protein, phospholipid, and free cholesterol. There was a strong positive correlation between molecular weight and the number of saturated and monounsaturated cholesterol esters in the particle. In contrast, particle content of polyunsaturated cholesterol esters remained constant despite large changes in total particle cholesterol esters.When examined by calorimetry and X-ray scattering, LDL from monkeys on both diets diplayed a reversible transition of cholesterol esters from an ordered smeticlike (layered) structure to a more disordered state. For all animals on the experimental diet, the peak temperature of the cholesterol-ester transition (42-48 degrees C) was above body temperature (39 degrees C), but below body temperature on the control diet (34-38.5 degrees C). In the experimental group, the transition temperature was correlated with the LDL molecular weight. However, after thermal disruption of LDL, liquid-crystalline transitions of LDL cholesterol esters were observed in the same temperature range as in the intact lipoprotein, which shows that changes in particle size had little effect on the cholesterol-ester transition temperature. Rather, the transition temperature was determined by the degree of saturation of the LDL cholesterol ester fatty

  7. Physical inactivity interacts with an endothelial lipase polymorphism to modulate high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is highly heritable but is also modifiable by environmental factors including physical activity. HDL-C response to exercise varies among individuals, and this variability may be associated with genetic polymorphism...

  8. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and amyloid-β clearance in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain trigger the development of progressive neurodegeneration and dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Perturbation in Aβ clearance, rather than Aβ production, is likely the cause of sporadic, late-onset AD, which accounts for the majority of AD cases. Since cellular uptake and subsequent degradation constitute a major Aβ clearance pathway, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of Aβ has been intensely investigated. Among Aβ receptors, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is one of the most studied receptors. LRP1 is a large endocytic receptor for more than 40 ligands, including apolipoprotein E, α2-macroglobulin and Aβ. Emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that LRP1 is critically involved in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 is highly expressed in a variety of cell types in the brain including neurons, vascular cells and glial cells, where LRP1 functions to maintain brain homeostasis and control Aβ metabolism. LRP1-mediated endocytosis regulates cellular Aβ uptake by binding to Aβ either directly or indirectly through its co-receptors or ligands. Furthermore, LRP1 regulates several signaling pathways, which also likely influences Aβ endocytic pathways. In this review, we discuss how LRP1 regulates the brain Aβ clearance and how this unique endocytic receptor participates in AD pathogenesis. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying LRP1-mediated Aβ clearance should enable the rational design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:24904407

  9. Proteomic diversity of high density lipoproteins: our emerging understanding of its importance in lipid transport and beyond1

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy S.; Tan, Lirong; Long, Jason Lu; Davidson, W. Sean

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications of mass spectrometry technology have dramatically increased our understanding of the proteomic diversity of high density lipoproteins (HDL). Depending on the method of HDL isolation, upwards of 85 proteins have been identified, and the list continues to grow. In addition to proteins consistent with traditionally accepted roles in lipid transport, HDL carries surprising constituents, such as members of the complement pathway, protease inhibitors involved in hemostasis, acute-phase response proteins, immune function mediators, and even metal-binding proteins. This compositional diversity fits well with hundreds of studies demonstrating a wide functional pleiotrophy, including roles in lipid transport, oxidation, inflammation, hemostasis, and immunity. This review summarizes the progression of our understanding of HDL proteomic complexity and points out key experimental observations that reinforce the functional diversity of HDL. The possibility of specific HDL subspecies with distinct functions, the evidence supporting this concept, and some of the best examples of experimentally defined HDL subspecies are also discussed. Finally, key challenges facing the field are highlighted, particularly the need to identify and define the function of HDL subspecies to better inform attempts to pharmacologically manipulate HDL for the benefit of cardiovascular disease and possibly other maladies. PMID:23434634

  10. Dysregulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Pathway Is Involved in Lipid Disorder-Mediated Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ma, Kun Ling; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is a negative feedback system that plays important roles in the regulation of plasma and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. To maintain a cholesterol homeostasis, LDLR expression is tightly regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in transcriptional level and by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in posttranscriptional level. The dysregulation of LDLR expression results in abnormal lipid accumulation in cells and tissues, such as vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatic cells, renal mesangial cells, renal tubular cells and podocytes. It has been demonstrated that inflammation, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation, and hyperglycemia induce the disruption of LDLR pathway, which might contribute to lipid disorder-mediated organ injury (atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, kidney fibrosis, etc). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical mediator in the disruption of LDLR pathway caused by pathogenic factors. The mTOR complex1 activation upregulates LDLR expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, consequently resulting in lipid deposition. This paper mainly reviews the mechanisms for the dysregulation of LDLR pathway and its roles in lipid disorder-mediated organ injury under various pathogenic conditions. Understanding these mechanisms leading to the abnormality of LDLR expression contributes to find potential new drug targets in lipid disorder-mediated diseases. PMID:27019638

  11. Blood-Borne Lipopolysaccharide Is Rapidly Eliminated by Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells via High-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhili; Mates, Jessica M; Cheplowitz, Alana M; Hammer, Lindsay P; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Phillips, Gary S; Wewers, Mark D; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Robinson, John M; Anderson, Clark L; Ganesan, Latha P

    2016-09-15

    During Gram-negative bacterial infections, excessive LPS induces inflammation and sepsis via action on immune cells. However, the bulk of LPS can be cleared from circulation by the liver. Liver clearance is thought to be a slow process mediated exclusively by phagocytic resident macrophages, Kupffer cells (KC). However, we discovered that LPS disappears rapidly from the circulation, with a half-life of 2-4 min in mice, and liver eliminates about three quarters of LPS from blood circulation. Using microscopic techniques, we found that ∼75% of fluor-tagged LPS in liver became associated with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and only ∼25% with KC. Notably, the ratio of LSEC-KC-associated LPS remained unchanged 45 min after infusion, indicating that LSEC independently processes the LPS. Most interestingly, results of kinetic analysis of LPS bioactivity, using modified limulus amebocyte lysate assay, suggest that recombinant factor C, an LPS binding protein, competitively inhibits high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated LPS association with LSEC early in the process. Supporting the previous notion, 3 min postinfusion, 75% of infused fluorescently tagged LPS-HDL complex associates with LSEC, suggesting that HDL facilitates LPS clearance. These results lead us to propose a new paradigm of LSEC and HDL in clearing LPS with a potential to avoid inflammation during sepsis. PMID:27534554

  12. Glucuronic acid epimerase is associated with plasma triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Turks.

    PubMed

    Hodoğlugil, Uğur; Williamson, David W; Yu, Yi; Farrer, Lindsay A; Mahley, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    We narrowed chromosome 15q21-23 linkage to plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in Turkish families by fine mapping, then focused on glucuronic acid epimerase (GLCE), a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) biosynthesis enzyme. HSPGs participate in lipid metabolism along with apolipoprotein (apo) E. Of 31 SNPs in the GLCE locus, nine analyzed by haplotype were associated with HDL-C and triglyceride levels (permuted p = 0.006 and 0.013, respectively) in families. Of five tagging GLCE SNPs in two cohorts of unrelated subjects, three (rs16952868, rs11631403, and rs3865014) were associated with triglyceride and HDL-C levels in males (nonpermuted p < 0.05). The association was stronger in APOE 2/3 subjects (apoE2 has reduced binding to HSPGs) and reached multiple-testing significance (p < 0.05) in both males and females (n= 2612). Similar results were obtained in the second cohort (n= 1164). Interestingly, at the GLCE locus, bounded by recombination hotspots, Turks had a minor allele frequency of SNPs resembling Chinese more than European ancestry; adjoining regions resembled the European pattern. Studies of glce(+/-) apoe(-/-) mice fed a chow or high-fat diet supported a role for GLCE in lipid metabolism. Thus, SNPs in GLCE are associated with triglyceride and HDL-C levels in Turks, and mouse studies support a role for glce in lipid metabolism.

  13. Measurement of /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein uptake in selected tissues of the squirrel monkey by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, R.G.; Schnitzer, J.J.; Yarmush, M.L.; Colton, C.K.; Smith, K.A.

    1988-09-01

    A recently developed technique of absolute quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of /sup 125/I-labeled proteins in biologic specimens was used to measure /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein (/sup 125/I-LDL) concentration levels in various tissues of the squirrel monkey after 30 minutes of in vivo LDL circulation. Liver and adrenal cortex exhibited high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations, presumably because of binding to specific cell surface receptors and/or internalization in vascular beds with high permeability to LDL. High tissue concentrations of LDL were associated with the zona fasciculata and reticularis of the adrenal cortex and the interstitial cells of Leydig in the testis; significantly lower levels of /sup 125/I-LDL were observed in the adrenal medulla, the zona glomerulosa, and germinal centers of the testis. Contrary to previous reports, low /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were observed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and in lymph nodes. In addition, multiple arterial intramural focal areas of high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were identified in arteries supplying the adrenal gland, lymph node, small bowel, and liver.

  14. Berberine as a photosensitizing agent for antitumoral photodynamic therapy: Insights into its association to low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Luiza Andreazza, Nathalia; Vevert-Bizet, Christine; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève; Sureau, Franck; José Salvador, Marcos; Bonneau, Stephanie

    2016-08-20

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in Berberine, a phytochemical with multispectrum therapeutic activities, as anti-tumoral agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this context, low density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of the photosensitizer in tumor cells. We correlate the physicochemical parameters of the berberine association to LDL with the influence of LDL-delivery on its accumulation in a glioma cell line and on its photo-induced activity in view of antitumor PDT. Our results evidence an important binding of 400 berberine molecules per LDL. Changes in berberine and apoprotein fluorescence suggest different fixation types, involving various LDL compartments including the vicinity of the apoprotein. The berberine association to LDL does not affect their recognition by the specific B/E receptors, of which over-expression increases the cellular uptake of LDL-preloaded berberine. Fluorescence microscopy evidences the mitochondrial labeling of the glioma model cells, with no significant modification upon LDL-delivery. Moreover, the cellular delivery of berberine by LDL increases its photocytotoxic effects on such cells. So, this research illustrates the potential of berberine as a photosensitizing agent for PDT, in particular due to their behavior towards LDL as plasma vehicles, and gives insights into its mechanisms of cell uptake. PMID:27282536

  15. Relation of Black Race between High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Content, High Density Lipoprotein Particles and Coronary Events (From the Dallas Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J.; Das, Sandeep R.; Khera, Amit; Turer, Aslan T.; Ayers, Colby R.; McGuire, Darren K.; Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Therapies targeting high density lipoprotein cholesterol content (HDL-C) have not improved coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) may better predict CHD. However, the impact of race/ethnicity on the relations between HDL-P and subclinical atherosclerosis/ incident CHD events has not been described. Participants from the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic, probability-based, population cohort of Dallas County adults had the following baseline measurements: HDL-C, HDL-P by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) by electron beam computed tomography. Participants were followed for a median of 9.3 years for incident CHD events (composite of first myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or cardiovascular death). The study comprised 1977 participants free from CHD (51% women, 46% Black). In adjusted models, HDL-C was not associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.13) or incident CHD overall (HR per 1SD: 0.89, 95% CI 0.76–1.05). However, HDL-C was inversely associated with incident CHD among non-Black (adjusted HR per 1SD 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97) but not Black participants (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78–1.13, pinteraction = 0.05). Conversely, HDL-P, adjusted for risk factors and HDL-C, was inversely associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.009) and with incident CHD overall (adjusted HR per 1SD: 0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.86) with no interaction by Black race/ethnicity (pinteraction = 0.57). In conclusion, in contrast to HDL-C, the inverse relationship between HDL-P and incident CHD events is consistent across ethnicities. These findings suggest that HDL-P is superior to HDL-C in predicting both prevalent atherosclerosis as well as incident CHD events across a diverse population and should be considered as a therapeutic target. PMID:25661572

  16. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  17. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  18. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Affects Hyaluronan Synthesis in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N.; Hascall, Vincent C.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20–50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL. PMID:23979132

  19. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor is a receptor for connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Segarini, P R; Nesbitt, J E; Li, D; Hays, L G; Yates, J R; Carmichael, D F

    2001-11-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is regulated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and strong up-regulation occurs during wound healing; in situ hybridization data indicate that there are high levels of CTGF expression in fibrotic lesions. Recently the binding parameters of CTGF to both high and lower affinity cell surface binding components have been characterized. Affinity cross-linking and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated the binding of CTGF to a cell surface protein with a mass of approximately 620 kDa. We report here the purification of this protein by affinity chromatography on CTGF coupled to Sepharose and sequence information obtained by mass spectroscopy. The binding protein was identified as the multiligand receptor, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP). The identification of LRP as a receptor for CTGF was validated by several studies: 1) binding competition with many ligands that bind to LRP, including receptor-associated protein; 2) immunoprecipitation of CTGF-receptor complex with LRP antibodies; and 3) cells that are genetically deficient for LRP were unable to bind CTGF. Last, CTGF is rapidly internalized and degraded and this process is LRP-dependent. In summary, our data indicate that LRP is a receptor for CTGF, and may play an important role in mediating CTGF biology.

  20. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease: evidence and guidance for management.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N; Amarenco, Pierre; Andreotti, Felicita; Borén, Jan; Catapano, Alberico L; Descamps, Olivier S; Fisher, Edward; Kovanen, Petri T; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Lesnik, Philippe; Masana, Luis; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Ray, Kausik K; Reiner, Zeljko; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tokgözoglu, Lale; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Watts, Gerald F

    2011-06-01

    Even at low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal, patients with cardiometabolic abnormalities remain at high risk of cardiovascular events. This paper aims (i) to critically appraise evidence for elevated levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as cardiovascular risk factors, and (ii) to advise on therapeutic strategies for management. Current evidence supports a causal association between elevated TRL and their remnants, low HDL-C, and cardiovascular risk. This interpretation is based on mechanistic and genetic studies for TRL and remnants, together with the epidemiological data suggestive of the association for circulating triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. For HDL, epidemiological, mechanistic, and clinical intervention data are consistent with the view that low HDL-C contributes to elevated cardiovascular risk; genetic evidence is unclear however, potentially reflecting the complexity of HDL metabolism. The Panel believes that therapeutic targeting of elevated triglycerides (≥ 1.7 mmol/L or 150 mg/dL), a marker of TRL and their remnants, and/or low HDL-C (<1.0 mmol/L or 40 mg/dL) may provide further benefit. The first step should be lifestyle interventions together with consideration of compliance with pharmacotherapy and secondary causes of dyslipidaemia. If inadequately corrected, adding niacin or a fibrate, or intensifying LDL-C lowering therapy may be considered. Treatment decisions regarding statin combination therapy should take into account relevant safety concerns, i.e. the risk of elevation of blood glucose, uric acid or liver enzymes with niacin, and myopathy, increased serum creatinine and cholelithiasis with fibrates. These recommendations will facilitate reduction in the substantial cardiovascular risk that persists in patients with cardiometabolic abnormalities at LDL-C goal. PMID:21531743

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  2. Bone and high-density lipoprotein: The beginning of a beautiful friendship

    PubMed Central

    Papachristou, Dionysios J; Blair, Harry C

    2016-01-01

    There is a tight link between bone and lipid metabolic pathways. In this vein, several studies focused on the exploration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the pathobiology of bone diseases, with emphasis to the osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporosis, the most common bone pathologies. Indeed, epidemiological and in vitro data have connected reduced HDL levels or dysfunctional HDL with cartilage destruction and OA development. Recent studies uncovered functional links between HDL and OA fueling the interesting hypothesis that OA could be a chronic element of the metabolic syndrome. Other studies have linked HDL to bone mineral density. Even though at epidemiological levels the results are conflicting, studies in animals as well as in vitro experiments have shown that HDL facilitates osteoblastogensis and bone synthesis and most probably affects osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast bone resorption. Notably, reduced HDL levels result in increased bone marrow adiposity affecting bone cells function. Unveiling the mechanisms that connect HDL and bone/cartilage homeostasis may contribute to the design of novel therapeutic agents for the improvement of bone and cartilage quality and thus for the treatment of related pathological conditions. PMID:26925377

  3. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-03

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  4. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins. PMID:24694979

  5. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Study Makes High-Density Lipoprotein a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Yuh; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lin, Shih-Yi

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipid and protein complex that consists of apolipoproteins and lower level HDL-associated enzymes. HDL dysfunction is a factor in atherosclerosis and decreases patient survival. Mass spectrometry- (MS-) based proteomics provides a high throughput approach for analyzing the composition and modifications of complex HDL proteins in diseases. HDL can be separated according to size, surface charge, electronegativity, or apoprotein composition. MS-based proteomics on subfractionated HDL then allows investigation of lipoprotein roles in diseases. Herein, we review recent developments in MS-based quantitative proteomic techniques, HDL proteomics and lipoprotein modifications in diseases, and HDL subfractionation studies. We also discuss future directions and perspectives in MS-based proteomics on HDL. PMID:26090384

  6. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  7. Red grape seed extract improves lipid profiles and decreases oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with mild hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed-Mostafa; Gholamin, Sharareh; Eskandari, Ali; Mohsenian, Nakta; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Delazar, Abbas; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Argani, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia can lead to atherosclerosis by lipoprotein deposition inside the vessel wall and oxidative stress induction that leads to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein particles (Ox-LDL) have a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The lipid-lowering properties and antioxidants of the grape seed can be beneficial in atherosclerosis prevention. We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. Fifty-two mildly hyperlipidemic individuals were divided into two groups that received either 200 mg/day of the red grape seed extract (RGSE) or placebo for 8 weeks. After an 8-week washout period, the groups were crossed over for another 8 weeks. Lipid profiles and Ox-LDL were measured at the beginning and the end of each phase. RGSE consumption reduced total cholesterol (-10.68±26.76 mg/dL, P=.015), LDL cholesterol (-9.66±23.92 mg/dL, P=.014), and Ox-LDL (-5.47±12.12 mg/dL, P=.008). While triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was increased by RGSE, the changes were not statistically significant. RGSE consumption decreases Ox-LDL and has beneficial effects on lipid profile-consequently decreasing the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders-in mild hyperlipidemic individuals.

  8. Multiple Hepatic Regulatory Variants at the GALNT2 GWAS Locus Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Tamara S.; Marvelle, Amanda F.; Fogarty, Marie P.; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gonzalez, Arlene J.; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Jackson, Anne U.; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Sethupathy, Praveen; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S.; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 150 loci associated with blood lipid and cholesterol levels; however, the functional and molecular mechanisms for many associations are unknown. We examined the functional regulatory effects of candidate variants at the GALNT2 locus associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fine-mapping and conditional analyses in the METSIM study identified a single locus harboring 25 noncoding variants (r2 > 0.7 with the lead GWAS variants) strongly associated with total cholesterol in medium-sized HDL (e.g., rs17315646, p = 3.5 × 10−12). We used luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells to test all 25 variants for allelic differences in regulatory enhancer activity. rs2281721 showed allelic differences in transcriptional activity (75-fold [T] versus 27-fold [C] more than the empty-vector control), as did a separate 780-bp segment containing rs4846913, rs2144300, and rs6143660 (49-fold [AT– haplotype] versus 16-fold [CC+ haplotype] more). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we observed differential CEBPB binding to rs4846913, and we confirmed this binding in a native chromatin context by performing chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines of differing genotypes. Additionally, sequence reads in HepG2 DNase-I-hypersensitivity and CEBPB ChIP-seq signals spanning rs4846913 showed significant allelic imbalance. Allelic-expression-imbalance assays performed with RNA from primary human hepatocyte samples and expression-quantitative-trait-locus (eQTL) data in human subcutaneous adipose tissue samples confirmed that alleles associated with increased HDL-C are associated with a modest increase in GALNT2 expression. Together, these data suggest that at least rs4846913 and rs2281721 play key roles in influencing GALNT2 expression at this HDL-C locus. PMID:26637976

  9. Structure and chromosomal assignment of the human lectin-like oxidized low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, T; Sawamura, T; Furutani, Y; Matsuoka, R; Yoshida, M C; Fujiwara, H; Masaki, T

    1999-01-01

    We have reported the cDNA cloning of a modified low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, designated lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), which is postulated to be involved in endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we determined the organization of the human LOX-1 gene, including the 5'-regulatory region. The 5'-regulatory region contained several potential cis-regulatory elements, such as GATA-2 binding element, c-ets-1 binding element, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-responsive element and shear-stress-responsive elements, which may mediate the endothelium-specific and inducible expression of LOX-1. The major transcription-initiation site was found to be located 29 nucleotides downstream of the TATA box and 61 nucleotides upstream from the translation-initiation codon. The minor initiation site was found to be 5 bp downstream from the major site. Most of the promoter activity of the LOX-1 gene was ascribed to the region (-150 to -90) containing the GC and CAAT boxes. The coding sequence was divided into 6 exons by 5 introns. The first 3 exons corresponded to the different functional domains of the protein (cytoplasmic, transmembrane and neck domains), and the residual 3 exons encoded the carbohydrate-recognition domain similar to the case of other C-type lectin genes. The LOX-1 gene was a single-copy gene and assigned to the p12.3-p13.2 region of chromosome 12. Since the locus for a familial hypertension has been mapped to the overlapping region, LOX-1 might be the gene responsible for the hypertension. PMID:10085242

  10. Multiple Hepatic Regulatory Variants at the GALNT2 GWAS Locus Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tamara S; Marvelle, Amanda F; Fogarty, Marie P; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gonzalez, Arlene J; Buchkovich, Martin L; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fuchsberger, Christian; Jackson, Anne U; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Gaulton, Kyle J; Sethupathy, Praveen; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 150 loci associated with blood lipid and cholesterol levels; however, the functional and molecular mechanisms for many associations are unknown. We examined the functional regulatory effects of candidate variants at the GALNT2 locus associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fine-mapping and conditional analyses in the METSIM study identified a single locus harboring 25 noncoding variants (r(2) > 0.7 with the lead GWAS variants) strongly associated with total cholesterol in medium-sized HDL (e.g., rs17315646, p = 3.5 × 10(-12)). We used luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells to test all 25 variants for allelic differences in regulatory enhancer activity. rs2281721 showed allelic differences in transcriptional activity (75-fold [T] versus 27-fold [C] more than the empty-vector control), as did a separate 780-bp segment containing rs4846913, rs2144300, and rs6143660 (49-fold [AT(-) haplotype] versus 16-fold [CC(+) haplotype] more). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we observed differential CEBPB binding to rs4846913, and we confirmed this binding in a native chromatin context by performing chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines of differing genotypes. Additionally, sequence reads in HepG2 DNase-I-hypersensitivity and CEBPB ChIP-seq signals spanning rs4846913 showed significant allelic imbalance. Allelic-expression-imbalance assays performed with RNA from primary human hepatocyte samples and expression-quantitative-trait-locus (eQTL) data in human subcutaneous adipose tissue samples confirmed that alleles associated with increased HDL-C are associated with a modest increase in GALNT2 expression. Together, these data suggest that at least rs4846913 and rs2281721 play key roles in influencing GALNT2 expression at this HDL-C locus. PMID:26637976

  11. Hepatitis C virus G1b infection decreases the number of small low-density lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Chika; Nagano, Tomohisa; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Tomita, Yoichi; Sugita, Tomonori; Aida, Yuta; Itagaki, Munenori; Satoh, Kenichi; Sutoh, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Akihito; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how hepatitis C virus (HCV) G1b infection influences the particle number of lipoproteins. METHODS: The numbers of lipoprotein particles in fasting sera from 173 Japanese subjects, 82 with active HCV G1b infection (active HCV group) and 91 with cleared HCV infection (SVR group), were examined. Serum lipoprotein was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography into twenty fractions. The cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in each fraction were measured using LipoSEARCH. The number of lipoprotein particles in each fraction was calculated using a newly developed algorithm, and the relationship between chronic HCV G1b infection and the lipoprotein particle number was determined by multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The median number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was significantly lower in the active HCV group [1182 nmol/L, interquartile range (IQR): 444 nmol/L] than in the SVR group (1363 nmol/L, IQR: 472 nmol/L, P < 0.001), as was that of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles (14168 nmol/L vs 15054 nmol/L, IQR: 4114 nmol/L vs 3385 nmol/L, P = 0.042). The number of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles was similar between the two groups. Among the four LDL sub-fractions, the number of large LDL particles was similar between the two groups. However, the numbers of medium (median: 533.0 nmol/L, IQR: 214.7 nmol/L vs median: 633.5 nmol/L, IQR: 229.6 nmol/L, P < 0.001), small (median: 190.9 nmol/L, IQR: 152.4 nmol/L vs median: 263.2 nmol/L, IQR: 159.9 nmol/L; P < 0.001), and very small LDL particles (median: 103.5 nmol/L, IQR: 66.8 nmol/L vs median: 139.3 nmol/L, IQR: 67.3 nmol/L, P < 0.001) were significantly lower in the active HCV group than in the SVR group, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated an association between HCV G1b infection and the decreased numbers of medium, small, and very small LDL particles. However, active HCV infection did not affect the number of large LDL

  12. Elevated High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. Methods The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes); large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247); late AMD (n = 40, 61). Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC), Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG)) were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261), higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54–3.90; P = 0.0002) and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46–3.59; P = 0.0003). Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48–5.17; p = 0.45). No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. Conclusions This study suggests that

  13. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis.

  14. Comparative analyses of lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase, and their binding properties with known inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyun; Li, Shen; Sun, Lidan; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Zhenming

    2013-01-01

    The triglyceride lipase gene subfamily plays a central role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. There are three members of this subfamily: lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase. Although these lipases are implicated in the pathophysiology of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, their structures have not been fully solved. In the current study, we established homology models of these three lipases, and carried out analysis of their activity sites. In addition, we investigated the kinetic characteristics for the catalytic residues using a molecular dynamics simulation strategy. To elucidate the molecular interactions and determine potential key residues involved in the binding to lipase inhibitors, we analyzed the binding pockets and binding poses of known inhibitors of the three lipases. We identified the spatial consensus catalytic triad "Ser-Asp-His", a characteristic motif in all three lipases. Furthermore, we found that the spatial characteristics of the binding pockets of the lipase molecules play a key role in ligand recognition, binding poses, and affinities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that systematically builds homology models of all the triglyceride lipase gene subfamily members. Our data provide novel insights into the molecular structures of lipases and their structure-function relationship, and thus provides groundwork for functional probe design towards lipase-based therapeutic inhibitors for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:23991054

  15. [A history and review of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and their contribution to the understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of high density lipoprotein].

    PubMed

    Corral, Pablo; Schreier, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a magnitude proportional to the intensity of the decrease in cholesterol transport by the low density lipoproteins. Despite this great advance there is still a residual risk of cardiovascular events. For this reason, an increase in the levels of high density lipoprotein is considered in order to boost the main action of this lipoprotein, which is reverse cholesterol transport. Distinct classes of evidence (epidemiological, genetic, and pathophysiological) show that the inhibition and/or modulation of cholesterol ester transfer protein increases plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. The main reason for presenting this review is to look at the physiology of cholesterol ester transfer protein, its interrelationship with high density lipoproteins, and to give an update on the development of different cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitor/modulator molecules. PMID:24094503

  16. [A history and review of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and their contribution to the understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of high density lipoprotein].

    PubMed

    Corral, Pablo; Schreier, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a magnitude proportional to the intensity of the decrease in cholesterol transport by the low density lipoproteins. Despite this great advance there is still a residual risk of cardiovascular events. For this reason, an increase in the levels of high density lipoprotein is considered in order to boost the main action of this lipoprotein, which is reverse cholesterol transport. Distinct classes of evidence (epidemiological, genetic, and pathophysiological) show that the inhibition and/or modulation of cholesterol ester transfer protein increases plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. The main reason for presenting this review is to look at the physiology of cholesterol ester transfer protein, its interrelationship with high density lipoproteins, and to give an update on the development of different cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitor/modulator molecules.

  17. High-Density Lipoproteins Rescue Diabetes-Impaired Angiogenesis via Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joanne T M; Prosser, Hamish C G; Dunn, Louise L; Vanags, Laura Z; Ridiandries, Anisyah; Tsatralis, Tania; Leece, Laura; Clayton, Zoë E; Yuen, Sui Ching G; Robertson, Stacy; Lam, Yuen Ting; Celermajer, David S; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2016-10-01

    Disordered neovascularization and impaired wound healing are important contributors to diabetic vascular complications. We recently showed that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) enhance ischemia-mediated neovascularization, and mounting evidence suggests HDL have antidiabetic properties. We therefore hypothesized that HDL rescue diabetes-impaired neovascularization. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice had reduced blood flow recovery and neovessel formation in a hindlimb ischemia model compared with nondiabetic mice. Reconstituted HDL (rHDL) infusions in diabetic mice restored blood flow recovery and capillary density to nondiabetic levels. Topical rHDL application rescued diabetes-impaired wound closure, wound angiogenesis, and capillary density. In vitro, rHDL increased key mediators involved in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization, including the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway, Siah1, and Siah2, and suppressed the prolyl hydroxylases (PHD) 2 and PHD3. rHDL rescued high glucose-induced impairment of tubulogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A protein production, a finding associated with enhanced phosphorylation of proangiogenic mediators VEGF receptor 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Siah1/2 small interfering RNA knockdown confirmed the importance of HIF-1α stability in mediating rHDL action. Lentiviral short hairpin RNA knockdown of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in vitro and SR-BI(-/-) diabetic mice in vivo attenuated rHDL rescue of diabetes-impaired angiogenesis, indicating a key role for SR-BI. These findings provide a greater understanding of the vascular biological effects of HDL, with potential therapeutic implications for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:27284113

  18. A pyrene based fluorescence approach to study conformation of apolipoprotein E3 in macrophage-generated nascent high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sea H; Kothari, Shweta; Patel, Arti B; Bielicki, John K; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy

    2014-07-18

    Apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) is an anti-atherogenic apolipoprotein with the ability to exist in lipid-free and lipoprotein-associated states. During atherosclerosis, its function in promoting cholesterol efflux from macrophages via the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) takes a prominent role, leading to generation of nascent high density lipoprotein (nHDL) particles. The objective of this study is to understand the conformation adopted by apoE3 in macrophage-generated nHDL using a fluorescence spectroscopic approach involving pyrene. Pyrene-labeled recombinant human apoE3 displayed a robust ability to stimulate ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-loaded J774 macrophages (which do not express apoE), comparable to that elicited by unlabeled apoE3. The nHDL recovered from the conditioned medium revealed the presence of apoE3 by immunoblot analysis. A heterogeneous population of nHDL bearing exogenously added apoE3 was generated with particle size varying from ∼12 to ∼19 nm in diameter, corresponding to molecular mass of ∼450 to ∼700 kDa. The lipid: apoE3 ratio varied from ∼60:1 to 10:1. A significant extent of pyrene excimer emission was noted in nHDL, indicative of spatial proximity between Cys112 on neighboring apoE3 molecules similar to that noted in reconstituted HDL. Cross-linking analysis using Cys-specific cross-linkers revealed the predominant presence of dimers. Taken together the data indicate a double belt arrangement of apoE molecules on nHDL. A similar organization of the C-terminal tail of apoE on nHDL was noted when pyrene-apoEA277C(201-299) was used as the cholesterol acceptor. These studies open up the possibility of using exogenously labeled apoE3 to generate nHDL for structural and conformational analysis.

  19. Insights into Mycoplasma genitalium metabolism revealed by the structure of MG289, an extracytoplasmic thiamine binding lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Katherine H; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Boehlein, Susan K; Sankaran, Banumathi; Quirit, Jeanne G; Govindasamy, Lakshamanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J; McKenna, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is one of the smallest organisms capable of self-replication and its sequence is considered a starting point for understanding the minimal genome required for life. MG289, a putative phosphonate substrate binding protein, is considered to be one of these essential genes. The crystal structure of MG289 has been solved at 1.95 Å resolution. The structurally identified thiamine binding region reveals possible mechanisms for ligand promiscuity. MG289 was determined to be an extracytoplasmic thiamine binding lipoprotein. Computational analysis, size exclusion chromatography, and small angle X-ray scattering indicates that MG289 homodimerizes in a concentration-dependant manner. Comparisons to the thiamine pyrophosphate binding homolog Cypl reveal insights into the metabolic differences between mycoplasmal species including identifying possible kinases for cofactor phosphorylation and describing the mechanism of thiamine transport into the cell. These results provide a baseline to build our understanding of the minimal metabolic requirements of a living organism.

  20. Insights into Mycoplasma genitalium Metabolism Revealed by the Structure of MG289, an Extracytoplasmic Thiamine Binding Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, Katherine H.; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Boehlein, Susan K.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Quirit, Jeanne G.; Govindasamy, Lakshamanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J.; McKenna, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Summary Mycoplasma genitalium is one of the smallest organisms capable of self-replication and its sequence is considered a starting point for understanding the minimal genome required for life. MG289, a putative phosphonate substrate binding protein, is considered to be one of these essential genes. The crystal structure of MG289 has been solved at 1.95 Å resolution. The structurally identified thiamine binding region reveals possible mechanisms for ligand promiscuity. MG289 was determined to be an extracytoplasmic thiamine binding lipoprotein. Computational analysis, size exclusion chromatography, and small angle X-ray scattering indicates that MG289 homodimerizes in a concentration-dependant manner. Comparisons to the thiamine pyrophosphate binding homolog Cypl reveal insights into the metabolic differences between mycoplasmal species including identifying possible kinases for cofactor phosphorylation and describing the mechanism of thiamine transport into the cell. These results provide a baseline to build our understanding of the minimal metabolic requirements of a living organism. PMID:21117240

  1. Characterization of native and drug-loaded human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Westesen, K; Gerke, A; Koch, M H

    1995-02-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), the physiological vehicles for lipids, are potentially useful drug delivery devices for (hydrophobic) drugs. The physicochemical characteristics of LDL loaded with the adriamycin derivative AD 32 or the N-mustard derivative WB 4291 were compared to that of native and reconstituted LDL at different temperatures. X-ray solution scattering indicates that loading with AD 32 has no detectable effect on the particle structure at room temperature, in contrast to WB 4291. According to 19F NMR data, AD 32 molecules are located in two distinct chemical environments with restricted motional freedom of the CF3 groups in samples stored as lyophilisates. 1H NMR signals from AD 32 were not observed, while those from WB 4291 could be distinguished from those of LDL constituents. WB 4291 molecules are in an environment with a higher motional freedom than AD 32 molecules. 1H NMR data suggest a higher fluidity of the core components for the WB-loaded LDLs compared to the other LDL preparations. While the motional freedom of the phospholipid head groups seems to be temperature independent, there is an increase in the mobility of the lipid components in the core region of the LDL particles with temperature. PMID:7738790

  2. Enhanced Sphingomyelinase Activity Contributes to the Apoptotic Capacity of Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lu, Jonathan; Marathe, Gopal K; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Chan, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Ya; Tung, Yi-Ching; McIntyre, Thomas M; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-02-11

    Sphingomyelinase (SMase) catalyzes the degradation of sphingomyelin to ceramide. In patients with metabolic syndrome or diabetes, circulating plasma ceramide levels are significantly higher than in normal individuals. Our data indicate that electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) shows SMase activity, which leads to increased ceramide levels that can produce pro-inflammatory effects and susceptibility to aggregation. According to sequence alignment and protein structure predictions, the putative catalytic site of SMase activity is in the α2 region of apoB-100. To identify specific post-translational modifications of apoB100 near the catalytic region, we performed data-independent, parallel-fragmentation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS(E)), followed by data analysis with ProteinLynx GlobalServer v2.4. Results showed that the serine of apoB100 in electronegative LDL was highly O-glycosylated, including S(1732), S(1959), S(2378), S(2408), and S(2429). These findings may support the changing of the α-helix/β-pleated sheets ratio in protein structure analysis. Further study is necessary to confirm the activation of SMase activity by electronegative LDL. PMID:26766134

  3. Ethnicity and coronary artery disease: the role of high-density lipoprotein - a change in paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Katia; Velarde, Gladys P

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer of men and women across ethnic groups in the USA. Health disparities in CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD), are well documented in the diverse American population. Despite efforts taken toward reducing cardiovascular health disparities, there are still gaps in its diagnosis and management. Current risk assessment guidelines consider high high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels a protective factor against CAD, although its significance across races remains poorly understood. Recent clinical trials focused on increasing HDL levels have been disappointing. In this article, the authors have explored the role of HDL in CAD, have analyzed its significance across gender and ethnic groups and have challenged the broad application of widely used HDL level cutoffs in CAD risk assessment tools across these vulnerable groups. The current evidence suggests a paradigm change from HDL quantity to quality and function in future CVD risk research. This may better explain why some ethnic minority groups with a seemingly more benign lipid profile experience a higher CAD burden.

  4. l-Cystathionine Inhibits the Mitochondria-Mediated Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Chen, Siyao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Yonghong; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the regulatory role of l-cystathionine in human macrophage apoptosis induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells were induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and differentiated into macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with ox-LDL after pretreatment with l-cystathionine. Superoxide anion, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening were examined. Caspase-9 activities and expression of cleaved caspase-3 were measured. The results showed that compared with control group, ox-LDL treatment significantly promoted superoxide anion generation, release of cytochrome c (cytc) from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and cell apoptosis, in addition to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential as well as increased MPTP opening. However, 0.3 and 1.0 mmol/L l-cystathionine significantly reduced superoxide anion generation, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and markedly decreased MPTP opening in ox-LDL + l-cystathionine macrophages. Moreover, compared to ox-LDL treated-cells, release of cytc from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and apoptosis levels in l-cystathionine pretreated cells were profoundly attenuated. Taken together, our results suggested that l-cystathionine could antagonize mitochondria-mediated human macrophage apoptosis induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of cytc release and caspase activation. PMID:25514411

  5. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  6. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of the interactions of a porphyrin with low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Stéphanie; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Morlière, Patrice; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Brault, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of photosensitizers to tumor cells in photodynamic therapy. The interaction of deuteroporphyrin, an amphiphilic porphyrin, with LDL is examined at equilibrium and the kinetics of association/dissociation are determined by stopped-flow. Changes in apoprotein and porphyrin fluorescence suggest two classes of bound porphyrins. The first class, characterized by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, involves four well-defined sites. The affinity constant per site is 8.75 x 10(7) M(-1) (cumulative affinity 3.5 x 10(8) M(-1)). The second class corresponds to the incorporation of up to 50 molecules into the outer lipidic layer of LDL with an affinity constant of 2 x 10(8) M(-1). Stopped-flow experiments involving direct LDL porphyrin mixing or porphyrin transfer from preloaded LDL to albumin provide kinetic characterization of the two classes. The rate constants for dissociation of the first and second classes are 5.8 and 15 s(-1); the association rate constants are 5 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) per site and 3 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Both fluorescence and kinetic analysis indicate that the first class involves regions at the boundary between lipids and the apoprotein. The kinetics of porphyrin-LDL interactions indicates that changes in the distribution of photosensitizers among various carriers could be very sensitive to the specific tumor microenvironment. PMID:12496113

  7. Relative efficacy of antilipemic agents in non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Santee, Jennifer; Lindsey, Cameron; Pace, Heather

    2012-08-01

    The investigators sought to summarize the percentage reduction in non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) achieved with various antilipemic regimens and to determine whether certain antilipemic regimens have been proven more effective in lowering non-HDL-C. A search of MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Iowa Drug Information Service Database from 1970 to May 2011 was performed. Criteria were used to exclude studies not published in English, studies with methodology limitations, and studies with variables that may affect efficacy beyond the antilipemic agent administered. Only randomized, controlled trials comparing medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration were reviewed to determine whether significant differences in percentage reduction in non-HDL-C had been observed between different medication regimens. A total of 51 trials reported data that could be used to determine the range of percentage reduction in non-HDL-C achieved by select antilipemic regimens. Of these 51 trials, 38 provided head-to-head comparisons of antilipemic regimens. Rosuvastatin and atorvastatin are the most potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in lowering non-HDL-C. Adding ezetimibe, fibric acid derivatives, and omega-3 fatty acids to antilipemic monotherapy may result in further reduction in non-HDL-C. Subjects with certain characteristics (eg, nonwhite) were not prevalent in these studies. PMID:22551562

  8. High-density lipoprotein subfractions--what the clinicians need to know.

    PubMed

    Pirillo, Angela; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Catapano, Alberico Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Although the inverse relationship between plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and cardiovascular disease has been largely demonstrated, many observations have suggested that the assessment of HDL functionality might be more informative than a simple measurement of HDL-cholesterol plasma levels. HDLs are a class of structurally and functionally heterogeneous particles; in atherosclerosis-related diseases, changes in HDL subfraction levels and functions are frequently observed. Circulating levels of large HDL particles are decreased in dyslipidaemic conditions, while levels of small dense HDL particles are increased in patients with coronary heart disease. Furthermore, specific genetic defects in proteins involved in HDL metabolism significantly impact the distribution of HDL subpopulations. Finally, many drugs used for dyslipidaemia induce changes in HDL subfractions strictly related to cardiovascular disease. Although several methods exist to evaluate HDL subclass levels, most of them are not easily applicable in clinical practice, due to the costs and high variability. However, the possibility to measure the levels of specific HDL subfractions in patients with atherosclerosis-related diseases might help to better define their cardiovascular risk. PMID:23428644

  9. Inheritance of low-density lipoprotein subclass patterns: results of complex segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Austin, M A; King, M C; Vranizan, K M; Newman, B; Krauss, R M

    1988-12-01

    Heterogeneity in the size of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was used to identify two distinct patterns based on gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. These two phenotypes, LDL subclass pattern A and pattern B, were characterized by a predominance of large, buoyant LDL particles and small, dense LDL particles, respectively. The inheritance of these LDL subclass patterns was investigated in a sample of 61 healthy families including 301 individuals. LDL subclass pattern B was present in 31% of the subjects, with the prevalence varying by gender, age, and (in women) menopausal status. Complex segregation analysis suggested a major locus controlling LDL subclass patterns. The model providing the best fit to the data included a dominant mode of inheritance with a frequency of .25 for the allele determining LDL subclass pattern B and reduced penetrance for men under age 20 and for premenopausal women. Thus, the allele for the LDL subclass pattern characterized by a predominance of small, dense LDL particles appears to be very common in the population, although not usually expressed until adulthood in men and until after menopause in women. The presence of a major gene controlling LDL subclass could explain much of the familial aggregation of lipid and apolipoprotein levels and may be involved in increased risk of coronary heart disease.

  10. Antioxidant effects of 14 Chinese traditional medicinal herbs against human low-density lipoprotein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Charles, Albert Linton; Hsieh, Chang-Wei; Lee, Ya-Chi; Ciou, Jhih-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant activities and inhibitory effect of 14 Chinese medicinal herbs against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) formation was evaluated. Prolongation of the lag phase of LDL oxidation depended on the concentration of the herbs. The concentration of each herb that was able to prolong the lag time by about two-fold was calculated and expressed as doubling-time concentration. The lower the doubling-time concentration, the stronger the inhibitory effect exhibited toward LDL oxidation. Among them, Chrysanthemi Flos (Chrysanthemum morifolium ramat; 甘菊花 gān jú huā), Crataegi Fructus (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge. var. major N.E.Br.; 山楂 shān zhā), and Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn.; 洛神 luò shén) showed significant inhibitory effects. Correlation coefficients between doubling-time concentration and radical-scavenging activities were high; the total phenolic content was also high. In conclusion, phenolic compounds contributed not only to antioxidant activities, but also to the inhibitory effect against LDL oxidation. Chrysanthemi Flos, Crataegi Fructus, and H. sabdariffa, with lower doubling-time concentrations, could be potent phytochemical agents to reduce LDL oxidation and prevent the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26151009

  11. Low-density Lipoprotein Improves Motility and Plasma Membrane Integrity of Cryopreserved Canine Epididymal Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Prapaiwan, N; Tharasanit, T; Punjachaipornpol, S; Yamtang, D; Roongsitthichai, A; Moonarmart, W; Kaeoket, K; Manee-In, S

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreservation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa is an effective technique to conserve genetic potentials of superior dogs when it is not possible to collect ejaculated spermatozoa. Although hen egg yolk is commonly supplemented into the semen extender, active substances within the egg yolk which protect sperm against cryoinjury remain to be discovered. Among its compositions, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been reported to have a cryoprotective property for sperm cryopreservation. However, the effects of LDL on dog epididymal spermatozoa during cryopreservation have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LDL on epididymal spermatozoa quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration of 12 dogs, caudal epididymides from individuals were separated from the testes and cut into a few pieces in a Tris-buffer. Spermatozoa recovered from each sample were examined at once for sperm quality and divided into six groups of extender: no LDL, 20% egg yolk, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 24% LDL, before cryopreservation. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, morphology, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that 4% LDL and 20% egg yolk yielded significantly higher sperm motility (57.69% and 52.69%, respectively, p<0.05) than other LDLs. In addition, 4% LDL yielded the significantly highest plasma membrane integrity (70.54%, p<0.05). In conclusion, the supplementation of 4% LDL in Tris-glucose extender could be applied for cryopreservation of canine epididymal spermatozoa. PMID:26954170

  12. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity.

  13. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases acetylcholinesterase activity correlating with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yamchuen, Panit; Aimjongjun, Sathid; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their oxidized forms, and oxidative stress are suspected to be a key combination in the onset of AD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a part in this pathology. The present study aimed to link these parameters using differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in culture. Both mildly and fully oxidized human LDL (mox- and fox-LDL), but not native (non-oxidized) LDL were cytotoxic in dose- and time-dependent patterns and this was accompanied by an increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidized LDL (10-200 μg/mL) augmented AChE activity after 4 and 24h treatments, respectively while the native LDL was without effect. The increased AChE with oxidized LDLs was accompanied by a proportionate increase in intracellular ROS formation (R=0.904). These findings support the notion that oxidized LDLs are cytotoxic and that their action on AChE may reduce central cholinergic transmission in AD and affirm AChE as a continued rational for anticholinesterase therapy but in conjunction with antioxidant/antihyperlipidemic cotreatments.

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Oxidized LDL) and the risk of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, C; Phung, T T T; Vadachkoria, S; Muy-Rivera, M; Sanchez, S E; Williams, M A

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. In a case-control study of 99 women with preeclampsia and 99 controls, we assessed maternal plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxidized LDL) in relation to preeclampsia risk. Logistic regression procedures were used to derive odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Plasma oxidized LDL was determined using enzyme immunoassay. Maternal plasma oxidized LDL was significantly positively correlated with lipids in both cases and controls. After adjusting for nulliparity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, physical inactivity, family history of chronic hypertension and plasma vitamin C concentrations, women who had elevated oxidized LDL concentrations ( > or = 50 U/l) experienced a 2.9-fold increased risk of preeclampsia when compared with women having lower oxidized LDL concentrations (95 % CI 1.4-5.9). The risk of preeclampsia was markedly increased in women who had both elevated oxidized LDL and elevated triglyceride concentrations (OR=8.9, 95 % CI 3.1-26.2). Women with both elevated oxidized LDL and low vitamin C concentrations experienced a 9.8-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (95 % CI 3.0-32.2). Our results confirm the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Prospective studies are needed to determine if elevated oxidized LDL concentrations can predict the occurrence of preeclampsia.

  15. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Marj P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  16. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost-benefit ratio.

  17. High Density Lipoprotein: A Novel Target for Anti-Restenosis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Restenosis is an integral pathological process central to the recurrent vessel narrowing after interventional procedures. Although the mechanisms for restenosis are diverse in different pathological conditions, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and myofibroblasts transition have been thought to play crucial role in the development of restenosis. Indeed, there is an inverse relationship between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, relatively studies on the direct assessment of HDL effect on restenosis are limited. In addition to involvement in the cholesterol reverse transport (RCT), many vascular protective effects of HDL, including protection of endothelium, anti-inflammation, anti-thrombus actions, inhibition of SMC proliferation, and regulation by adventitial effects may contribute to the inhibition of restenosis, though the exact relationships between HDL and restenosis remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes the vascular protective effects of HDL, emphasizing the potential role of HDL in intimal hyperplasia and vascular remodeling, which may provide novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for anti-restenosis. PMID:25043950

  18. Effect of ethyl esterification of phenolic acids on low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chalas, J; Claise, C; Edeas, M; Messaoudi, C; Vergnes, L; Abella, A; Lindenbaum, A

    2001-02-01

    Inhibition of copper-induced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by phenolic acids and their ethyl esters was investigated. LDL oxidation was evaluated by the hydroperoxide concentration and the chromatographic pattern of apoprotein fractions after fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Antiradical properties against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH) were also investigated, and lipophilicity determined by thin-layer chromatography. Caffeic acid at 5 microM and sinapic acid at 10 microM protected LDL against oxidation, inhibiting both hydroperoxide formation and the increase of apoprotein negative charge. Ferulic, gallic and p-hydroxy cinnamic acids were ineffective. Ethyl esterification increased the lipophilicity of the five acids, and enhanced the antioxidant properties of caffeic, sinapic and ferulic acids. Ethyl caffeate was protective at 1 microM. In contrast, gallic and p-hydroxy cinnamic ethyl esters were ineffective. Our results indicate that ethyl esterification of phenolic acids increases lipophilicity of their ethyl esters and may enable a better incorporation into the lipid layer of the LDL particle and the exertion of their antioxidant effect in the true site of lipoperoxidation. However, increasing lipophilicity is not the only mechanism able to potentiate preexisting antioxidant properties of molecules, and probably other mechanisms are implicated.

  19. Anti-psoriatic treatment extends beyond the skin: Recovering of high-density lipoprotein function

    PubMed Central

    Marsche, Gunther; Holzer, Michael; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a consistent association of psoriasis with systemic metabolic disorders including an increased prevalence of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Psoriasis is accompanied by systemic inflammation and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Recent studies provided clear evidence that psoriasis affects HDL composition and function. HDL isolated from psoriatic patients showed a significantly impaired capability to mobilize cholesterol from macrophages, a crucial step in reverse cholesterol transport and markedly lower paraoxonase activity, a protein that co-transports with HDL in serum with well-known anti-atherogenic properties. Of particular interest, successful anti-psoriatic therapy significantly improved HDL composition and function independently of serum HDL-cholesterol levels. These novel findings suggest that the conventional approaches of evaluating cardiovascular risk in psoriasis may be in need of refinement. As these data argue for a loss of beneficial activities of HDL in psoriatic patients, altered HDL functionality should be considered when evaluating the lipid status of patients. PMID:24980461

  20. Intercorrelations among plasma high density lipoprotein, obesity and triglycerides in a normal population

    SciTech Connect

    Albrink, M.J.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; von der Groeben, J.; Pan, S.; Wood, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    The interrelationships among fatness measures, plasma triglycerides and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were examined in 131 normal adult subjects: 38 men aged 27 to 46, 50 men aged 47 to 66, 29 women aged 27 to 46 and 24 women aged 47 to 66. None of the women were taking estrogens or oral contraceptive medication. The HDL concentration was subdivided into HDL/sub 2b/, HDL/sub 2a/ and HDL by a computerized fitting of the total schileren pattern to reference schlieren patterns. Anthropometric measures employed included skinfolds at 3 sites, 2 weight/height indices and 2 girth measurements. A high correlation was found among the various fatness measures. These measures were negatively correlated with total HDL, reflecting the negative correlation between fatness measures and HDL/sub 2/ (as the sum of HDL/sub 2a/ and /sub 2b/). Fatness measures showed no relationship to HDL/sub 3/. There was also an inverse correlation between triglyceride concentration and HDL/sub 2/. No particular fatness measure was better than any other for demonstrating the inverse correlation with HDL but multiple correlations using all of the measures of obesity improved the correlations. Partial correlations controlling for fatness did not reduce any of the significnt correlations between triglycerides and HDL/sub 2/ to insignificance. The weak correlation between fatness and triglycerides was reduced to insigifnicance when controlled for HDL/sub 2/.

  1. Accumulation of 99mTc-low-density lipoprotein in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Leppälä, J.; Kallio, M.; Nikula, T.; Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Savolainen, S.; Gylling, H.; Hiltunen, J.; Callaway, J.

    1995-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake in gliomas was studied to find out if LDL has potential as a drug carrier of boron, especially for boron neutron capture therapy. Single photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed 2 h and 20 h after intravenous injection of autologous 99mTc-labelled LDL in four patients with untreated and five patients with recurrent glioma. 99mTc-LDL uptake was compared with the uptake of 99mTc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA), an established blood pool marker. The intra- and peritumoral distributions of radioactivity in the SPET images were not identical for radiolabelled LDL and HSA. The mean LDL tumour to brain ratio, determined from transversal SPET slices at 20 h post injection, was 1.5 in untreated and 2.2 in recurrent gliomas; the corresponding ratios for HSA were 1.6 and 3.4. The brain to blood ratio remained constant at 2 h and 20 h in both types of tumours. These data are not consistent with highly selective, homogeneous uptake of LDL in gliomas. However, the different tumoral distribution and rate of uptake of 99mTc-LDL, as compared with 99mTc-HSA, indicate that the uptake of LDL is different from that of HSA and that further studies on the mechanism of LDL uptake in glioma are warranted. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7841057

  2. Prostaglandin E1 decreases the low-density-lipoprotein entry into rabbit arterial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Lupattelli, G.; Molinari, E.; Gerakakis, A.; Angelberger, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. In 72 male rabbits fed a 1% cholesterol supplemented diet the effect of a 4 weeks daily infusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 20 micrograms kg-1 min-1 over 2 h) on [125I]-low density lipoprotein (LDL) accumulation (10 microCi; 0.5 mg protein ml-1) was examined versus sham-treatment after removal of the endothelium of the abdominal aorta by a Fogarthy catheter. 2. The uptake of [125I]-LDL was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher in endothelium-free aortic segments (showing the highest peak maximum at around 12 h after 125I-injection) as compared to aortic segments with endothelium intact (showing the lowest uptake of [125I]-LDL with the peak maximum at 48 h, last control time). Segments with the endothelium restored showed a similar LDL-retention curve to segments with endothelium however, being again significantly (P less than 0.01) higher. 3. PGE1-treatment caused reduction in LDL-accumulation, being significantly (P less than 0.001) pronounced in segments without endothelium and in segments with endothelium restored. 4. The findings indicate a beneficial effect of PGE1 in lipid metabolism by decreasing the LDL-influx into the arterial wall in-vivo. PMID:1933127

  3. Chitosan-modified carbon nanotubes-based platform for low-density lipoprotein detection.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Azahar; Singh, Nawab; Srivastava, Saurabh; Agrawal, Ved V; John, Renu; Onoda, M; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2014-10-01

    We have fabricated an immunosensor based on carbon nanotubes and chitosan (CNT-CH) composite for detection of low density lipoprotein (LDL) molecules via electrochemical impedance technique. The CNT-CH composite deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass electrode has been used to covalently interact with anti-apolipoprotein B (antibody: AAB) via a co-entrapment method. The biofunctionalization of AAB on carboxylated CNT-CH surface has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic and electron microscopic studies. The covalent functionalization of antibody on transducer surface reveals higher stability and reproducibility of the fabricated immunosensor. Electrochemical properties of the AAB/CNT-CH/ITO electrode have been investigated using cyclic voltammetric and impedimetric techniques. The impedimetric response of the AAB/CNT-CH/ITO immunoelectrode shows a high sensitivity of 0.953 Ω/(mg/dL)/cm(2) in a detection range of 0-120 mg/dL and low detection limit of 12.5 mg/dL with a regression coefficient of 0.996. The observed low value of association constant (0.34 M(-1)s(-1)) indicates high affinity of AAB/CNT-CH/ITO immunoelectrode towards LDL molecules. This fabricated immunosensor allows quantitative estimation of LDL concentration with distinguishable variation in the impedance signal.

  4. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and diet in a healthy elderly population.

    PubMed

    Hooper, P L; Garry, P J; Goodwin, J S; Hooper, E M; Leonard, A G

    1982-01-01

    This study examined how high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) correlated with a 3-day food record of fat, protein, carbohydrate, and alcohol consumption in a group of 270 healthy subjects over age 60. HDL-C concentrations correlated with alcohol consumption (expressed as grams/day) (r = + .25, P less than .001), and inversely with total carbohydrate (r = - .18, P less than .01) and refined carbohydrate (r = - .17, P less than .01) ingestion (expressed as a percent of total caloric intake). Subjects consuming diets low in either total carbohydrate or refined carbohydrate had 10 to 20% higher HDL-C levels than did those consuming diets high in these food substances. The relationships between HDL-C levels and alcohol and carbohydrate ingestion were independent of other variables which correlated with HDL-C levels. Dietary fat (total fat, saturated fat, unsaturated fat, and cholesterol) did not correlate with HDL-C. LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not correlate with any dietary variable measured.

  5. Sphingomyelin in High-Density Lipoproteins: Structural Role and Biological Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Lou-Bonafonte, Jose M.; Martínez-Gracia, María V.; Osada, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels are an inverse risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and sphingomyelin (SM) is the second most abundant phospholipid component and the major sphingolipid in HDL. Considering the marked presence of SM, the present review has focused on the current knowledge about this phospholipid by addressing its variable distribution among HDL lipoparticles, how they acquire this phospholipid, and the important role that SM plays in regulating their fluidity and cholesterol efflux from different cells. In addition, plasma enzymes involved in HDL metabolism such as lecithin–cholesterol acyltransferase or phospholipid transfer protein are inhibited by HDL SM content. Likewise, HDL SM levels are influenced by dietary maneuvers (source of protein or fat), drugs (statins or diuretics) and modified in diseases such as diabetes, renal failure or Niemann–Pick disease. Furthermore, increased levels of HDL SM have been shown to be an inverse risk factor for coronary heart disease. The complexity of SM species, described using new lipidomic methodologies, and their distribution in different HDL particles under many experimental conditions are promising avenues for further research in the future. PMID:23571495

  6. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanoparticles as Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Foit, Linda; Angeloni, Nicholas L.; Giles, Francis J.; Gordon, Leo I.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are diverse natural nanoparticles that carry cholesterol and are best known for the role that they play in cardiovascular disease. However, due to their unique targeting capabilities, diverse molecular cargo, and natural functions beyond cholesterol transport, it is becoming increasingly appreciated that HDLs are critical to cancer development and progression. Accordingly, this chapter highlights ongoing research focused on the connections between HDL and cancer in order to design new drugs and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Research is focused on synthesizing biomimetic HDL-like nanoparticles (NP) that can be loaded with diverse therapeutic cargo (e.g. chemotherapies, nucleic acids, proteins) and specifically targeted to cancer cells. Beyond drug delivery, new data is emerging that HDL-like NPs may be therapeutically active in certain tumor types, for example B cell lymphoma. Overall, HDL-like NPs are becoming increasingly appreciated as targeted, biocompatible, and efficient therapies for cancer, and may soon become indispensable agents in the cancer therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25895867

  7. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Marj P

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  8. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by monoclonal antibody inhibition of PCSK9.

    PubMed

    Stein, Evan A; Raal, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Published phase I and II trials with two fully human monoclonal antibodies to PCSK9 have provided comprehensive evidence that inhibiting PCSK9 is a very effective method to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In all populations studied so far, whether on statins or LDL-C-reducing diet alone, with or without a genetic defect in the LDL receptor, and in subjects intolerant to statins, the LDL-C reductions have been large and consistent. Even the most efficacious statin, rosuvastatin, at its highest dose has not achieved such reductions. The clinical trials have established that monoclonal antibody therapy targeted to PCSK9 may be administered subcutaneously every two or four weeks. Current data suggest these drugs will provide an effective therapeutic option for LDL-C reduction and that, if proven safe in phase III trials, they will be as important to LDL-C control, and likely to cardiovascular disease risk reduction, as statins have been over the past three decades. PMID:24422577

  9. The effects of ascorbate and dehydroascorbate on the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Stait, S E; Leake, D S

    1996-01-01

    Ascorbate at concentrations of 60-100 microM inhibits the modification of freshly prepared low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by macrophages. With 'moderately oxidized' LDL (produced by prolonged storage in a refrigerator), however, ascorbate does not inhibit LDL modification by macrophages and actually modifies the LDL itself in the absence of macrophages [Stait and Leake (1994) FEBS Lett. 341, 263-267]. We have now shown that dehydroascorbate can modify both 'fresh' LDL and moderately oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent manner to increase its uptake by macrophages. The modification of moderately oxidized LDL by ascorbate and dehydroascorbate or of 'fresh' LDL by dehydroascorbate is dependent on the presence of iron or copper. In 'fresh' LDL, ascorbate inhibited conjugated-diene formation by copper. In moderately oxidized LDL, the number of conjugated dienes present was decreased rapidly in the presence of copper and ascorbate. Dehydroascorbate decreased the lag phase and increased the rate of copper-induced conjugated-diene formation in 'fresh' LDL (although in some experiments it inhibited the formation of conjugated dienes). The ascorbate-modified moderately oxidized LDL was taken up by macrophages by their scavenger receptors, as the uptake was inhibited by polyinosinic acid or fucoidan. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbate therefore have the potential to increase LDL oxidation under certain conditions, but whether or not they do so in vivo is unknown. PMID:8973543

  10. Whole-Cell Analysis of Low-Density Lipoprotein Uptake by Macrophages Using STEM Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jerome, W. Gray; Kübel, Christian; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles of heavy materials such as gold can be used as markers in quantitative electron microscopic studies of protein distributions in cells with nanometer spatial resolution. Studying nanoparticles within the context of cells is also relevant for nanotoxicological research. Here, we report a method to quantify the locations and the number of nanoparticles, and of clusters of nanoparticles inside whole eukaryotic cells in three dimensions using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Whole-mount fixed cellular samples were prepared, avoiding sectioning or slicing. The level of membrane staining was kept much lower than is common practice in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), such that the nanoparticles could be detected throughout the entire cellular thickness. Tilt-series were recorded with a limited tilt-range of 80° thereby preventing excessive beam broadening occurring at higher tilt angles. The 3D locations of the nanoparticles were nevertheless determined with high precision using computation. The obtained information differed from that obtained with conventional TEM tomography data since the nanoparticles were highlighted while only faint contrast was obtained on the cellular material. Similar as in fluorescence microscopy, a particular set of labels can be studied. This method was applied to study the fate of sequentially up-taken low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conjugated to gold nanoparticles in macrophages. Analysis of a 3D reconstruction revealed that newly up-taken LDL-gold was delivered to lysosomes containing previously up-taken LDL-gold thereby forming onion-like clusters. PMID:23383042

  11. A Systems Genetic Analysis of High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism and Network Preservation across Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Langfelder, Peter; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Paul, Eric; Davis, Richard; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Horvath, Steve; Mehrabian, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    We report a systems genetics analysis of high density lipoproteins (HDL) levels in an F2 intercross between inbred strains CAST/EiJ and C57BL/6J. We previously showed that there are dramatic differences in HDL metabolism in a cross between these strains, and we now report co-expression network analysis of HDL that integrates global expression data from liver and adipose with relevant metabolic traits. Using data from a total of 293 F2 intercross mice, we constructed weighted gene co-expression networks and identified modules (subnetworks) associated with HDL and clinical traits. These were examined for genes implicated in HDL levels based on large human genome-wide associations studies (GWAS) and examined with respect to conservation between tissue and sexes in a total of 9 data sets. We identify genes that are consistently ranked high by association with HDL across the 9 data sets. We focus in particular on two genes, Wfdc2 and Hdac3, that are located in close proximity to HDL QTL peaks where causal testing indicates that they may affect HDL. Our results provide a rich resource for studies of complex metabolic interactions involving HDL. PMID:21807117

  12. Functional Differences of Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Splice Variants in Regulating Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Takahashi, Yusuke; Oka, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) negatively regulates Wnt signaling. VLDLR has two major alternative splice variants, VLDLRI and VLDLRII, but their biological significance and distinction are unknown. Here we found that most tissues expressed both VLDLRI and VLDLRII, while the retina expressed only VLDLRII. The shed soluble VLDLR extracellular domain (sVLDLR-N) was detected in the conditioned medium of retinal pigment epithelial cells, interphotoreceptor matrix, and mouse plasma, indicating that ectodomain shedding of VLDLR occurs endogenously. VLDLRII displayed a higher ectodomain shedding rate and a more potent inhibitory effect on Wnt signaling than VLDLRI in vitro and in vivo. O-glycosylation, which is present in VLDLRI but not VLDLRII, determined the differential ectodomain shedding rates. Moreover, the release of sVLDLR-N was inhibited by a metalloproteinase inhibitor, TAPI-1, while it was promoted by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In addition, sVLDLR-N shedding was suppressed under hypoxia. Further, plasma levels of sVLDLR-N were reduced in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic mouse models. We concluded that VLDLRI and VLDLRII had differential roles in regulating Wnt signaling and that decreased plasma levels of sVLDLR-N may contribute to Wnt signaling activation in diabetic complications. Our study reveals a novel mechanism for intercellular regulation of Wnt signaling through VLDLR ectodomain shedding. PMID:27528615

  13. Ordering and stability in lipid droplets with applications to low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jarrett L; Antonijevic, Todor; Starobin, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we present a framework for investigating the order-disorder transition in lipid droplets using the standard Ising model. While a single lipid droplet is itself a complex system whose constituent cholesteryl esters each possesses many degrees of freedom, we present justification for using this effective approach to isolate the underlying physics. It is argued that the behavior of the esters confined within lipid droplets is significantly different from that of a bulk system of similar esters, which is adequately described by continuum mean-field theory in the thermodynamic limit. When the droplet's shell is modeled as an elastic membrane, a simple picture emerges for a transition between two ordered phases within the core which is tuned by the strength of interactions between the esters. Triglyceride concentration is proposed as a variable which strongly influences the strength of interactions between cholesteryl esters within droplets. The possible relevance of this mechanism to the well known atherogenic nature of small low-density lipoprotein particles is discussed in detail.

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  15. Cell-density-dependent expression of Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Indest, K J; Ramamoorthy, R; Solé, M; Gilmore, R D; Johnson, B J; Philipp, M T

    1997-01-01

    Previously, we had identified non-OspA-OspB surface proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi that are targeted by the antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing mechanism. Here we demonstrate by Western blotting that one of these proteins, P35, is upregulated at the onset of stationary phase in vitro. Northern analysis revealed that the upregulation of P35 is at the level of transcription. In addition, the expression of an open reading frame (ORF) located downstream of the p35 gene was found to be regulated in the same fashion as that of P35. This ORF encodes a 7.5-kDa lipoprotein. The transcriptional start sites for both of these genes were determined, to aid in the identification of the putative promoter regions. Additional sequencing of the 5' flanking region of the p35 gene revealed a region of dyad symmetry 52 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Southern analysis demonstrated that the expression of these genes was not due to a cell-density-dependent rearrangement in the genome of B. burgdorferi. These findings provide an in vitro model for studying mechanisms of gene regulation in B. burgdorferi. PMID:9119447

  16. Acceleration of atherogenesis by COX-1-dependent prostanoid formation in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Tillmann, C; Zhang, Z B; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2001-03-13

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) product, prostacyclin (PGI(2)), inhibits platelet activation and vascular smooth-muscle cell migration and proliferation. Biochemically selective inhibition of COX-2 reduces PGI(2) biosynthesis substantially in humans. Because deletion of the PGI(2) receptor accelerates atherogenesis in the fat-fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse, we wished to determine whether selective inhibition of COX-2 would accelerate atherogenesis in this model. To address this hypothesis, we used dosing with nimesulide, which inhibited COX-2 ex vivo, depressed urinary 2,3 dinor 6-keto PGF(1alpha) by approximately 60% but had no effect on thromboxane formation by platelets, which only express COX-1. By contrast, the isoform nonspecific inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed platelet function and thromboxane formation ex vivo and in vivo, coincident with effects on PGI(2) biosynthesis indistinguishable from nimesulide. Indomethacin reduced the extent of atherosclerosis by 55 +/- 4%, whereas nimesulide failed to increase the rate of atherogenesis. Despite their divergent effects on atherogenesis, both drugs depressed two indices of systemic inflammation, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to a similar but incomplete degree. Neither drug altered serum lipids and the marked increase in vascular expression of COX-2 during atherogenesis. Accelerated progression of atherosclerosis is unlikely during chronic intake of specific COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, evidence that COX-1-derived prostanoids contribute to atherogenesis suggests that controlled evaluation of the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or aspirin on plaque progression in humans is timely.

  17. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  18. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles12

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mian MK; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Han, Hee Dong; Lu, Chunhua; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Nishimura, Masato; Mora, Edna M; Lee, Jeong-Won; Stone, Rebecca L; Pecot, Chad V; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Roh, Ju-Won; Gaur, Puja; Nair, Maya P; Park, Yun-Yong; Sabnis, Nirupama; Deavers, Michael T; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ellis, Lee M; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; McConathy, Walter J; Prokai, Laszlo; Lacko, Andras G; Sood, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1). In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL) nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase) in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches. PMID:21472135

  19. High-density lipoprotein and atherosclerosis regression: evidence from preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Hewing, Bernd; Smith, Jonathan D; Hazen, Stanley L; Fisher, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles transport (among other molecules) cholesterol (HDL-C). In epidemiological studies, plasma HDL-C levels have an inverse relationship to the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It has been assumed that this reflects the protective functions of HDL, which include their ability to promote cholesterol efflux. Yet, several recent pharmacological and genetic studies have failed to demonstrate that increased plasma levels of HDL-C resulted in decreased cardiovascular disease risk, giving rise to a controversy regarding whether plasma levels of HDL-C reflect HDL function, or that HDL is even as protective as assumed. The evidence from preclinical and (limited) clinical studies shows that HDL can promote the regression of atherosclerosis when the levels of functional particles are increased from endogenous or exogenous sources. The data show that regression results from a combination of reduced plaque lipid and macrophage contents, as well as from a reduction in its inflammatory state. Although more research will be needed regarding basic mechanisms and to establish that these changes translate clinically to reduced cardiovascular disease events, that HDL can regress plaques suggests that the recent trial failures do not eliminate HDL from consideration as an atheroprotective agent but rather emphasizes the important distinction between HDL function and plasma levels of HDL-C.

  20. The advantages of combining low-density lipoproteins with glutamine for cryopreservation of canine semen.

    PubMed

    Bencharif, D; Amirat, L; Pascal, O; Anton, M; Schmitt, E; Desherces, S; Delhomme, G; Langlois, M-L; Barrière, P; Larrat, M; Tainturier, D

    2010-04-01

    Twenty sperm samples from five dogs were frozen in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C in 16 different media, two control media containing 20% egg yolk and 6% low-density lipoproteins (LDL); 10 test media containing 6% LDL (the active cryoprotective ingredient of chicken egg yolk) combined with 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 mmol of glutamine respectively at 4%, 5%, 7%, and 8% LDL. Following thawing, sperm mobility was assessed using an image analyser, HAMILTON THORN CERROS 12. The percentage of mobile spermatozoa was 62.05% in the 6% LDL + 20 mmol glutamine medium compared with 48.90% in the egg yolk-based medium (p < 0.05) or 57.55% for the 6% LDL medium (p < 0.05). Furthermore, in most cases, the motility parameters (average path velocity, curvilinear velocity, straight line velocity) in the 6% LDL + 20 mmol glutamine medium, were superior, to a statistically significant extent, to those in the control media. Finally, the 6% LDL + 20 mmol glutamine combination provides spermatozoa with better protection during freezing than egg yolk or the 6% LDL medium alone in terms of acrosome integrity (fluorescein isothiocyanate--Pisum sativum agglutinin test: p < 0.05), the flagellar plasma membrane (hypo-osmotic test: p < 0.05 for 6% LDL), the DNA (acridine orange test; no significant difference) and the integrity of the acrosome (Spermac test: no significant difference).

  1. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  2. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  3. Drinking deep seawater decreases serum total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhao-Yang; Yang, Feili Lo; Hsu, Hsin-Wen; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2012-06-01

    Drinking deep seawater (DSW) with high levels of magnesium (Mg) decreased serum lipids in animal studies. Therefore the effects of drinking DSW on blood lipids and its antioxidant capacity in hypercholesterolemic subjects were investigated. DSW was first prepared by a process of filtration and reverse osmosis, and then the concentrated DSW with high levels of Mg was diluted as drinking DSW. Forty-two hypercholesterolemic volunteers were randomly divided into three groups: reverse osmotic (RO) water, DSW (Mg: 395 mg/L, hardness 1410 ppm), and magnesium-chloride fortified (MCF) water (Mg: 386 mg/L, hardness 1430 ppm). The subjects drank 1050 mL of water daily for 6 weeks, and blood samples were collected and analyzed on weeks 0, 3, and 6. Drinking DSW caused a decrease in blood total cholesterol levels and this effect was progressively enhanced with time. Serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) was also decreased by DSW. Further, total cholesterol levels of subjects in the DSW group were significantly lower than those in the MCF water or RO water groups. Compared with week 0, the DSW group had higher blood Mg level on weeks 3 and 6, but the Mg levels were within the normal range in all three groups. DSW consumption also lowered thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values in serum. In conclusion, DSW was apparently effective in reducing blood total cholesterol and LDL-C, and also in decreasing lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

  4. Cellular uptake of a dexamethasone palmitate-low density lipoprotein complex by macrophages and foam cells.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a dexamethasone palmitate (DP)-low density lipoprotein (LDL) complex to transport drug into foam cells, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by macrophages and foam cells was examined. The DP-LDL complex was prepared by incubation with DP and LDL, and the DP-LDL complex and murine macrophages were incubated. No cellular uptake of the DP-LDL complex by macrophages was found until 6 h after the start of incubation, but this gradually increased from 12 to 48 h. On the other hand, the cellular uptake of the oxidized DP-LDL complex was already apparent at 3 h after the start incubation, and then markedly increased until 48 h incubation along with that of the lipid emulsion (LE) containing DP (DP-LE). The cellular uptake of DP-LE by foam cells was significantly lower than that by macrophages. However, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by foam cells was similar to that by macrophages. These findings suggest that the DP-LDL complex is oxidatively modified, and then incorporated into macrophages and foam cells through the scavenger receptor pathway. Since selective delivery of drugs into foam cells in the early stage of atherosclerosis is a useful protocol for antiatherosclerosis treatment, the DP-LDL complex appears to be a potentially useful drug-carrier complex for future antiatherosclerotic therapy.

  5. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Russell; Gibson, Emily; Razzaghi, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL), referred to as the ``good cholesterol'', carries free cholesterol to the liver to be filtered from the bloodstream and is important to our understanding of atherosclerosis. HDL is metabolized in part by the enzyme Endothelial Lipase (EL). With this project we will use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the metabolism of HDL by EL comparing wild type with different genetic mutations. FCS is an advanced microscopy technique in which we record fluctuations in the fluorescence of dye-labeled molecules (in this case, HDL labeled with Nile Red) as they freely diffuse through a small focal volume. This data can be analyzed mathematically using the cross-correlation function, from which we can ultimately ascertain much information. In our case, we are interested in the diffusion coefficient which, via the Stokes-Einstein relation for a sphere, we can determine the size of HDL as it undergoes the process of metabolism. Preliminary results seem to indicate that the metabolic process occurs very quickly, that the final size of HDL depends primarily on the concentration of EL, and that the wild and mutant variants of EL have a similar effectiveness. In following experiments, we hope to investigate these relationships further.

  6. High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) – Nature’s Multi-Functional Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Rui; Li, Dan; Chen, Y. Eugene; Moon, James J.; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are endogenous nanoparticles involved in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides. HDL is well known as the ―good‖ cholesterol because it not only removes excess cholesterol from atherosclerotic plaques but also has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, which protect the cardiovascular system. Circulating HDL also transports endogenous proteins, vitamins, hormones, and microRNA to various organs. Compared with other synthetic nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, inorganic and polymeric nanoparticles, HDL has unique features that allow them to deliver cargo to specific targets more efficiently. These attributes include their ultra-small size (8-12 nm in diameter), high tolerability in humans (up to 8 g of protein per infusion), long circulating half-life (12-24 hours), and intrinsic targeting properties to different recipient cells. Various recombinant ApoA proteins and ApoA mimetic peptides have been recently developed for the preparation of reconstituted HDL that exhibits properties similar to endogenous HDL and has a potential for industrial scale-up. In this review, we will summarize: a) clinical pharmacokinetics and safety of reconstituted HDL products, b) comparison of HDL with inorganic and other organic nanoparticles, c) the rationale for using HDL as drug delivery vehicles for important therapeutic indications, d) the current state-of-the-art in HDL production, and e) HDL-based drug delivery strategies for small molecules, peptides/proteins, nucleic acids, and imaging agents targeted to various organs. PMID:26889958

  7. Analysis of non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein accumulation in an artery.

    PubMed

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-06-14

    In this work, non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) transport across an artery are analyzed with a multi-layer model. Four rheological models (Carreau, Carreau-Yasuda, power-law and Newtonian) are used for the blood flow through the lumen. For the non-Newtonian cases, the arterial wall is modeled with a generalized momentum equation. Convection-diffusion equation is used for the LDL transport through the lumen, while Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky, combined with porous media equations, are used for the LDL transport through the wall. Results are presented in terms of filtration velocity, Wall Shear Stresses (WSS) and concentration profiles. It is shown that non-Newtonian effects on mass transport are negligible for a healthy intramural pressure value. Non-Newtonian effects increase slightly with intramural pressure, but Newtonian assumption can still be considered reliable. Effects of arterial size are also analyzed, showing that Newtonian assumption can be considered valid for both medium and large arteries, in predicting LDL deposition. Finally, non-Newtonian effects are also analyzed for an aorta-common iliac bifurcation, showing that Newtonian assumption is valid for mass transport at low Reynolds numbers. At a high Reynolds number, it has been shown that a non-Newtonian fluid model can have more impact due to the presence of flow recirculation. PMID:27055766

  8. Tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

    2015-04-01

    Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  9. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost–benefit ratio. PMID:27143910

  10. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost-benefit ratio. PMID:27143910

  11. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  12. Evalution of in vitro effect of flavonoids on human low-density lipoprotein carbamylation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Shanaki, Mehrnoosh

    2010-01-01

    The non-enzymatic carbamylation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a naturally occurring chemical modification of apolipoprotein B as a result of condensation between lysine residues and cyanate derived from urea. Carbamylated LDL is poorly recognized by LDL receptors and initiates different processes that can be considered proatherogenic. Thus, LDL carbamylation may contribute to the increased risk of atherosclerosis in patients with kidney failure. The objective of this study was to investigate in vitro effects of flavonoids on LDL carbamylation. LDL was isolated from plasma using ultracentrifuge technique with a single step discontinuous gradient. Then, cyanate was added to LDL and LDL carbamylation level was estimated in absence and presence of flavonoids by a colorimetric method at 530 nm. The results of this study showed that a number of flavonoids including rutin, catechin, morin, myricetin, kaempferol, taxifolin, luteolin, naringin and quercetin decreased LDL carbamylation in a dose dependent manner. Also, it was demonstrated that these nutrients decreased electrophoretic mobility of carbamylated LDL. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is suggested that flavonoids are able to inhibit LDL carbamylation (probably by scavenging cyanate ions) and thus, may have a role in ameliorating atherosclerotic risk of patients with kidney failure.

  13. Revising the high-density lipoprotein targeting strategies - insights from human and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Nesan, Dinushan; Ng, Dominic S

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis has been challenged. Several completed randomized clinical trials continue to fall short in demonstrating HDL, or at least HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, as being a consistent target in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, population studies and findings in lipid modifying trials continue to strongly support HDL-C as a superb risk predictor. It is increasingly evident that the complexity of HDL metabolism confounds the use of HDL-C concentration as a unified target. However, important insights continue to emerge from the post hoc analyses of recently completed (i) fibrate-based FIELD and ACCORD trials, including the unexpected beneficial effect of fibrates in microvascular diseases, (ii) the niacin-based AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE studies, (iii) recombinant HDL-based as well as (iv) the completed CETP inhibitor-based trials. These together with on-going mechanistic studies on novel pathways, which include the unique roles of microRNAs, post-translational remodeling of HDL and novel pathways related to HDL modulators will provide valuable insights to guide how best to refocus and redesign the conceptual framework for selecting HDL-based targets. PMID:25115413

  14. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk. PMID:27106140

  15. Proteome analysis of human monocytic THP-1 cells primed with oxidized low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Kim, Hyun Tae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won Ha; Huh, Tae-Lin; Park, Yong Bok; Moon, Byung Jo; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2006-02-01

    Native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) possess a wide variety of biological properties, and play a central role in atherogenesis. In this study, we used a proteomic analysis of human monocyte THP-1 cells induced with oxLDL or with LDL, to identify proteins potentially involved in atherosclerotic processes. Of the 2500 proteins detected, 93 were differentially expressed as a result of priming with LDL or oxLDL. The proteins were unambiguously identified by comparing the masses of their tryptic peptides with those of all known proteins using MALDI-TOF MS and the NCBI database. The largest differences in expression were observed for vimentin (94-fold increase), meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (48-fold increase), serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (40-fold increase), and beta-1,3-galactosyltransferase (15-fold increase). In contrast, the abundance of an unnamed protein product and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased 30-fold and 25-fold, respectively. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot and RT-PCR analyses. The proteins identified in this study are attractive candidates for further biomarker research. This description of the altered protein profiles induced by oxLDL in human monocytes will support functional studies of the macrophage-derived foam cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:16402358

  16. Alpinia zerumbet potentially elevates high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Yun; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Jing; Yeh, Wan-Ting; Wang, Hui-Er; Yu, Tung-Hsi; Peng, Robert Y

    2008-06-25

    In folkloric plant medicines, Alpinia zerumbet (AZ) has been popularly recognized as an exellent hepatoprotector. To search for a good high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) elevating herbal preparation, we examined AZ for its antioxidant and hypolipidaemic bioactivities, especially its HDL-C elevating activity. AZ seeds contain 0.51% essential oils (SO), which are comprised of monoterpenoids, oxygenated monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, oxygenated sesquiterpenoids, aldehydes, acid, and esters. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis indicated that most of the monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were recoverable in pentane eluent, whilst the oxygenated monoterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids remained in ether eluent. The high contents of rutin, quercetin, and polyphenolics in ethanolic extract of AZ seeds exhibit moderate antilipoperoxidative but potent DPPH free radical scavenging bioactivities. Conclusively, both seed powder (SP) and SO are effective hypolipidaemics with amazingly potent HDL-C elevating capabilities. On the basis of hepatoprotectivity, SP is a more feasible hypolipidemic agent as well as a promising HDL-C elevating plant medicine.

  17. Adrenal imaging with technetium-99m-labelled low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacsohn, J.L.; Lees, A.M.; Lees, R.S.; Strauss, H.W.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Moore, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    Evaluation of adrenal cortical function by external imaging is currently accomplished by injection of radiolabelled analogs of cholesterol. Although the adrenals do utilized exogenous cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis, the cholesterol is delivered to the glands not as free cholesterol but through the uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDL), which are subsequently degraded within the adrenal cortical cells to provide cholesterol. Thus, we sought to assess the use of /sup 99m/Tc-labelled LDL injected into rabbits to obtain external images of the adrenal glands. Adrenal images of all nine rabbits tested were obtained within 18 to 21 hours after injection of /sup 99m/Tc-LDL. Seven of the rabbits were subjected to adrenal cortical suppression with dexamethasone and then all nine rabbits were imaged a second time. In the untreated animals, visualization of the adrenal glands was accompanied by normal serum cortisol concentrations and accumulation of radiolabel in the adrenals, whereas in the dexamethasone-treated animals, lack of visualization of the adrenal glands was correlated with low serum cortisols, and greatly decreased accumulation of the radionuclide in the adrenals. These findings demonstrate for the first time that LDL, when labelled with /sup 99m/Tc, can be used to evaluate adrenal cortical function by external imaging.

  18. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  19. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  20. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins induced inflammatory process during atherogenesis with aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, Anis; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Douziech, Nadine; Guérard, Karl-Philippe; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2005-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease developing through decades with two life-threatening complications: myocardial infarction and stroke. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) produced by oxidative modifications of LDL in the subendothelial space have been demonstrated to be critically involved in atherogenesis through their intensive pro-inflammatory activity. Recently, it was shown that oxLDL have an apoptosis-inducing effect in T cells depending on time and degree of oxidation. The goal of the current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoptotic-inducing effects of oxLDL on T lymphocytes. T cells of young and elderly subjects were incubated for various periods of time with LDL oxidized to various degrees. The proliferation, the apoptosis, the MAPK ERK1/2 activation and the expression of the Bcl-2 protein family members were measured upon different LDL treatments. Thus, more the LDL are oxidized more they induce apoptosis and this effect is highly accentuated with aging. The oxLDL decrease the activation of the surviving molecule ERK1/2 and modulate the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 towards a pro-apoptotic profile, which is also accentuated with aging. These results partly explain why atherosclerosis is increasing with aging concomitantly to its complications.

  1. High Density Lipoproteins for the Systemic Delivery of short interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful mechanism for gene silencing with the potential to greatly impact the development of new therapies for many human diseases. Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may be the ideal molecules for therapeutic RNAi. However, therapeutic siRNAs face significant challenges that must be overcome prior to widespread clinical use. Many efforts have been made to overcome the hurdles associated with systemic administration of siRNA; however, current approaches are still limited. As such, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies for siRNA delivery that have the potential to impact a broad spectrum of systemic diseases. Areas covered This review focuses on the promise of siRNA therapies and highlights current siRNA delivery methods. With an eye toward new strategies, this review first introduces high density lipoproteins (HDL) and their natural functions, and then transitions into how HDLs may provide significant opportunities as next generation siRNA delivery vehicles. Importantly, this review describes how synthetic HDLs leverage the natural ability of HDL to stabilize and deliver siRNAs. Expert Opinion HDLs are natural nanoparticles that are critical to understanding the systemic delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids, like siRNA. Methods to synthesize biomimetic HDLs are being explored and data demonstrate that this type of delivery vehicle may be highly beneficial for targeted and efficacious systemic delivery of siRNAs. PMID:24313310

  2. Very-low-density lipoprotein triglyceride kinetics in acute and chronic carbohydrate-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, T.; Mamo, J.; Poapst, M.; Steiner, G.

    1988-09-01

    Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) kinetics were examined in rats maintained on either chow and water (control) or chow and a 10% carbohydrate drinking solution (fructose or glucose). The hexose solutions were available for an acute (16 h) or chronic (14 day) period. The acute fructose (AF), acute glucose (AG), and chronic fructose (CF) groups were hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) compared with control. Plasma TG concentration in chronic glucose (CG)-fed rats was similar to control. VLDL-TG was endogenously radiolabeled in donor rats with (2-3H)-glycerol. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) was then determined by monitoring the clearance of plasma (3H)VLDL-TG in recipient animals. Donors and recipients were treated in an identical manner. AF and CF groups had an FCR significantly lower than rats given glucose for comparable periods. Both fructose groups and the AG group also had a lower FCR than control. In contrast, FCR in the CG group was significantly higher than controls. TG production rate (TGPR) in both AF and CF fed rats did not significantly differ from controls, suggesting that the HTG observed in these animals was solely from a catabolic defect. AG- and CG-treated glucose animals both had TGPR significantly higher than controls. Therefore, overproduction of VLDL-TG contributed to the HTG associated with this carbohydrate.

  3. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk.

  4. Polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene and fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Gang; Gu, Mingyong; Zhou, Zhenyu; Cao, Xuecheng

    2014-01-01

    Several molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the association between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP5) Ala1330Val polymorphism and fracture; however, the conclusions remained controversial. We therefore performed an extensive meta-analysis on 10 published studies with 184479 subjects. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, Elsevier Science Direct and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.14; I(2) = 29%). We also found that this polymorphism increased fracture risk in Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis according to gender, women was significantly associated with risk of fracture. In the subgroup analysis by type of fracture, LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism showed increased osteoporotic fracture risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that an increased risk of fracture was associated with the LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism.

  5. Long term stability of paraoxonase-1 and high-density lipoprotein in human serum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is an enzyme with numerous functions and receives an increasing interest in clinical and epidemiological studies. Sometimes samples are stored for longer periods at a certain temperature. Therefore the stability of PON1 activity must be checked and retained upon storage for longer periods. Results In this study the stability of PON1 activity has been tested in human serum samples during storage up to 12 months at 3 commonly used temperatures, -20°C, -70°C and −196°C. It was found that the stability of the PON1 activity is constant during 12 months of storage at −70°C and −196°C. Storage at −20°C resulted in a small but statistically significant decrease after 6 months to about 94% of its original value. Nonetheless, the rank order between the samples at T = 0 and 12 months remained the same. The same temperature dependence was found for the associated high-density lipoprotein. Conclusions It can be concluded that −70°C is the right temperature for storage to maintain the PON1 activity for at least one year. Storage at a lower temperature in liquid nitrogen (−196°C) is not necessary. PMID:22584062

  6. Effect of Albizia julibrissin water extracts on low-density lipoprotein oxidization.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Katherine; McClain, Colt; Carrier, Danielle Julie; Wallace, Sunny; King, Jerry; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Clausen, Edgar

    2007-06-13

    High-value phytochemicals could be extracted from biomass prior to the current cellulosic pretreatment technologies (i.e., lime, ammonia, dilute acid, or pressurized hot water treatments) provided that the extraction is performed with a solvent that is compatible with the pretreatment. This work reports on the extraction of flavonoids from Albizia julibrissin biomass. While extracting A. julibrissin foliage with 50 degrees C water, 2.227 mg/g of hyperoside and 8.134 mg/g quercitrin were obtained, which is in the realm of what was obtained with 60% methanol. A. julibrissin foliage, flower, and whole plant extracts were tested in terms of their potential to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidization. The highest inhibition was obtained with foliage water extracts, which were standardized at 2.5 microM of flavonoids. Also, the 2.5 microM foliage water extract resulted in a reduction from 43% to only 1% of the observed monocyte adherence. To have commercial application, A. julibrissin water extracts should be devoid of toxicity. The A. julibrissin foliage, flower, and whole plant water extracts were not toxic to Vero 76 cells. In summary, A. julibrissin biomass can be extracted with 50 degrees C water to yield an antioxidant stream, showing that it may be possible to couple extraction of valuable phytochemicals to the cellulosic pretreatment step. PMID:17497875

  7. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  8. Multiple, diverse senile plaque-associated proteins are ligands of an apolipoprotein E receptor, the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Rebeck, G W; Harr, S D; Strickland, D K; Hyman, B T

    1995-02-01

    Both apolipoprotein E and its receptor, the low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), are associated with senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. We examined the relationship of other LRP-related molecules to senile plaques. LRP is a multifunctional receptor that binds and rapidly internalizes at least seven ligands: apolipoprotein E, activated alpha 2-macroglobulin, tissue and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, lipoprotein lipase, and lactoferrin. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that all of these ligands, representing a diverse group of otherwise apparently unrelated proteins, accumulate on senile plaques. We also studied expression of the receptor-associated protein, a physiological inhibitor of LRP, in the hippocampal formation from normal subjects and Alzheimer's disease patients. Receptor-associated protein colocalizes with LRP on neuronal soma, but not on neuronal processes or reactive astrocytes. It is not present on senile plaques. These results suggest that senile plaque-associated LRP can bind its ligands, but clearance of these compounds may be impaired in the vicinity of senile plaques.

  9. High-Density Lipoprotein Function in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pertl, Laura; Kern, Sabine; Weger, Martin; Hausberger, Silke; Trieb, Markus; Gasser-Steiner, Vanessa; Haas, Anton; Scharnagl, Hubert; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-density lipoproteins (HDL) have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported with regard to the associations of AMD with HDL-cholesterol levels. The present study is the first to assess HDL composition and metrics of HDL function in patients with exudative AMD and control patients. Methods Blood samples were collected from 29 patients with exudative AMD and 26 age-matched control patients. Major HDL associated apolipoproteins were determined in apoB-depleted serum by immunoturbidimetry or ELISA, HDL-associated lipids were quantified enzymatically. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function, including cholesterol efflux capacity, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities using apoB-depleted serum from study participants. Results In our study, we observed that the HDL associated acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA) was significantly increased in AMD patients (p<0.01), whereas all other assessed apolipoproteins including ApoA-I, apoA-II, apoC-II, apoC-III and apoE as well as major HDL associated lipids were not altered. HDL efflux capacity, anti-oxidative capacity and arylesterase activity were not different in AMD patients when compared with the control group. The ability of apoB-depleted serum to inhibit monocyte NF-κB expression was significantly improved in AMD patients (mean difference (MD) -5.6, p<0.01). Moreover, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity, a marker of vascular inflammation, was decreased in AMD subjects (MD -24.1, p<0.01). Conclusions The investigated metrics of HDL composition and HDL function were not associated with exudative AMD in this study, despite an increased content of HDL associated SAA in AMD patients. Unexpectedly, anti-inflammatory activity of apoB-depleted serum was even increased in our study. Our data suggest that the investigated parameters of serum HDL

  10. Comparison of two low-density lipoprotein apheresis systems in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Drouin-Chartier, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, André J; Bergeron, Jean; Pelletier, Maude; Laflamme, Nathalie; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis (LA) is a reliable method to decrease LDL-C concentrations and remains the gold standard therapy in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of two LA systems [heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) vs. dextran sulfate adsorption (DS) on the reduction of lipids, inflammatory markers, and adhesion molecules in a sample of genetically defined HoFH subjects (n = 9)]. Fasting blood samples were collected before and after LA. All subjects served as their own control and were first treated with the HELP system then with DS in this single sequence study. Compared with HELP, DS led to significantly greater reductions in total cholesterol (-63.3% vs. -59.9%; P = 0.05), LDL-C (-70.5% vs. -63.0%; P = 0.02), CRP (-75.3% vs. -48.8%; P < 0.0001), and TNF-α (-23.7% vs. +14.7%; P = 0.003). Reductions in the plasma levels of PCSK9 (-45.3% vs. -63.4%; P = 0.31), lipoprotein (a) (-70.6% vs. -65.0%; P = 0.30), E-selectin (-16.6% vs. -18.3%; P = 0.65), ICAM-1 (-4.0 vs. 5.6%; P = 0.56), and VCAM-1 (8.3% vs. -1.8%; P = 0.08) were not different between the two systems. For the same volume of filtered plasma (3,000 mL), however, HELP led to greater reductions in plasma apoB (-63.1% vs. -58.3%; P = 0.04), HDL-C (-20.6% vs. -6.5%; P = 0.003), and PCSK9 (-63.4% vs. -28.5%; P = 0.02) levels. These results suggest that both LA systems are effective in reducing plasma lipids and inflammatory markers in HoFH. Compared with HELP, greater reductions in lipid levels and inflammatory markers were achieved with DS, most likely because this method allows for a larger plasma volume to be filtered. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:359-367, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011648

  11. Candidate genetic analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and severity of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suet Nee; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Todd, Josh; Lombardi, Raffaella; Willerson, James T; Gotto, Antonio M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Marian, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), a heritable trait, is an important determinant of susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Non-synonymous and regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in HDL-C synthesis and metabolism are likely to influence plasma HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) levels and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods We genotyped 784 unrelated Caucasian individuals from two sets of populations (Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study- LCAS, N = 333 and TexGen, N = 451) for 94 SNPs in 42 candidate genes by 5' nuclease assays. We tested the distribution of the phenotypes by the Shapiro-Wilk normality test. We used Box-Cox regression to analyze associations of the non-normally distributed phenotypes (plasma HDL-C and apo A-I levels) with the genotypes. We included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cigarette smoking as covariates. We calculated the q values as indicators of the false positive discovery rate (FDR). Results Plasma HDL-C levels were associated with sex (higher in females), BMI (inversely), smoking (lower in smokers), DM (lower in those with DM) and SNPs in APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL and LIPC (each q ≤0.01). Likewise, plasma apo A-I levels, available in the LCAS subset, were associated with SNPs in CETP, APOA5, and APOC2 as well as with BMI, sex and age (all q values ≤0.03). The APOA5 variant S19W was also associated with minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, a quantitative index of severity of coronary atherosclerosis (q = 0.018); mean number of coronary artery occlusions (p = 0.034) at the baseline and progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as indicated by the loss of MLD. Conclusion Putatively functional variants of APOA2, APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL, LIPC and SOAT2 are independent genetic determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. The non-synonymous S19W SNP in APOA5 is also an independent determinant of plasma

  12. Distribution and Kinetics of Lipoprotein-Bound Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Levels, J. H. M.; Abraham, P. R.; van den Ende, A.; van Deventer, S. J. H.

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major glycolipid component of gram-negative bacterial outer membranes, is a potent endotoxin responsible for pathophysiological symptoms characteristic of infection. The observation that the majority of LPS is found in association with plasma lipoproteins has prompted the suggestion that sequestering of LPS by lipid particles may form an integral part of a humoral detoxification mechanism. Previous studies on the biological properties of isolated lipoproteins used differential ultracentrifugation to separate the major subclasses. To preserve the integrity of the lipoproteins, we have analyzed the LPS distribution, specificity, binding capacity, and kinetics of binding to lipoproteins in human whole blood or plasma by using high-performance gel permeation chromatography and fluorescent LPS of three different chemotypes. The average distribution of O111:B4, J5, or Re595 LPS in whole blood from 10 human volunteers was 60% (±8%) high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 25% (±7%) low-density lipoprotein, and 12% (±5%) very low density lipoprotein. The saturation capacity of lipoproteins for all three LPS chemotypes was in excess of 200 μg/ml. Kinetic analysis however, revealed a strict chemotype dependence. The binding of Re595 or J5 LPS was essentially complete within 10 min, and subsequent redistribution among the lipoprotein subclasses occurred to attain similar distributions as O111:B4 LPS at 40 min. We conclude that under simulated physiological conditions, the binding of LPS to lipoproteins is highly specific, HDL has the highest binding capacity for LPS, the saturation capacity of lipoproteins for endotoxin far exceeds the LPS concentrations measured in clinical situations, and the kinetics of LPS association with lipoproteins display chemotype-dependent differences. PMID:11292694

  13. Carbohydrate composition of circulating multiple-modified low-density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zakiev, Emile R; Sobenin, Igor A; Sukhorukov, Vasily N; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Atherogenic modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, as modified LDL, but not native LDL, induces pronounced accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in the arterial wall. It is likely that LDL particles undergo multiple modifications in human plasma: desialylation, changes in size and density, acquisition of negative electric charge, oxidation, and complex formation. In a total LDL preparation isolated from pooled plasma of patients with coronary atherosclerosis and from healthy subjects, two subfractions of LDL could be identified: desialylated LDL bound by a lectin affinity column and normally sialylated (native) LDL that passed through the column. The desialylated LDL subfraction therefore represents circulating modified LDL. In this work, we performed a careful analysis of LDL particles to reveal changes in the composition of glycoconjugates associated with proteins and lipids. Protein fraction of LDL from atherosclerotic patients contained similar amounts of glucosamine, galactose, and mannose, but a 1.6-fold lower level of sialic acid as compared to healthy donors. Lipid-bound glycoconjugates of total LDL from patients with coronary atherosclerosis contained 1.5–2-fold less neutral monosaccharides than total LDL from healthy donors. Patient-derived LDL also contained significantly less sialic acid. Our results demonstrate that carbohydrate composition of LDL from atherosclerotic patients was altered in comparison to healthy controls. In particular, prominent decrease in the sialic acid content was observed. This strengthens the hypothesis of multiple modification of LDL particles in the bloodstream and underscores the clinical importance of desialylated LDL as a possible marker of atherosclerosis progression. PMID:27789955

  14. In vitro studies of PBT Nonwoven Fabrics adsorbent for the removal of low density lipoprotein from hyperlipemia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chao; Zhong, Rui; Lei, Yu; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin

    2011-06-01

    Polyanion ligands such as acrylic acid (AA) and heparin were grafted on PBT Nonwoven Fabrics (PBTNF) to study their effect on the adsorption of low density lipoprotein (LDL). These modified PBTNFs were characterized by Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy. The blood compatibilities of the modified PBTNFs were examined using in vitro hemolysis rate (HR), platelet adhesion, total protein (TP) and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results showed that direct immobilized heparin could improve PBTNF-PAA's blood compatibility and decrease the adsorption capability of useful high density lipoprotein, but would possess so low bioactivity that could not further improve the absorption of LDL and TC. Since the PBTNF-PAA55-Heparin adsorbent had quite good adsorption selectivity for these proteins, it can be an excellent candidate for depletion of LDL with good blood compatibility.

  15. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein and Lipoprotein-Containing Circulating Immune Complexes as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis and Type 1 Diabetes Macrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Melnichenko, Alexandra A.; Chistiakov, Dimitry A.

    2014-01-01

    In atherosclerosis; blood low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are subjected to multiple enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications that increase their atherogenicity and induce immunogenicity. Modified LDL are capable of inducing vascular inflammation through activation of innate immunity; thus, contributing to the progression of atherogenesis. The immunogenicity of modified LDL results in induction of self-antibodies specific to a certain type of modified LDL. The antibodies react with modified LDL forming circulating immune complexes. Circulating immune complexes exhibit prominent immunomodulatory properties that influence atherosclerotic inflammation. Compared to freely circulating modified LDL; modified LDL associated with the immune complexes have a more robust atherogenic and proinflammatory potential. Various lipid components of the immune complexes may serve not only as diagnostic but also as essential predictive markers of cardiovascular events in atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that LDL-containing immune complexes can also serve as biomarker for macrovascular disease in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25050779

  16. Expression of the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r), an apolipoprotein-E receptor, in the central nervous system and in Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, R.H.; Chung, Haeyong; Rebeck, G.W.; Hyman, B.T.

    1996-04-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r) is a cell-surface molecule specialized for the internalization of multiple diverse ligands, including apolipoprotein E (apoE)-containing lipoprotein particles, via clathrin-coated pits. Its structure is similar to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-r), although the two have substantially different systemic distributions and regulatory pathways. The present work examines the distribution of VLDL-r in the central nervous system (CNS) and in relation to senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD). VLDL-r is present on resting and activated microglia, particularly those associated with senile plaques (SPs). VLDL-r immunoreactivity is also found in cortical neurons. Two exons of VLDL-r mRNA are differentially spliced in the mature receptor mRNA. One set of splice forms gives rise to receptors containing (or lacking) an extracellular O-linked glycosylation domain near the transmembrane portion of the molecule. The other set of splice forms appears to be brain-specific, and is responsible for the presence or absence of one of the cysteine-rich repeat regions in the binding region of the molecule. Ratios of the receptor variants generated from these splice forms do not differ substantially across different cortical areas or in AD. We hypothesize that VLDL-r might contribute to metabolism of apoE and apoE/A{beta} complexes in the brain. Further characterization of apoE receptors in Alzheimer brain may help lay the groundwork for understanding the role of apoE in the CNS and in the pathophysiology of AD. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Role of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in predicting cerebrovascular events in patients following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Nitin; Ference, Brian A; Arora, Natasha; Madhavan, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Pratik; Sudhakar, Rajeev; Sagar, Amit; Wang, Yun; Sacks, Frank; Afonso, Luis

    2012-06-15

    Although there appears to be a role for statins in reducing cerebrovascular events, the exact role of different lipid fractions in the etiopathogenesis of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is not well understood. A secondary analysis of data collected for the placebo arm (n = 2,078) of the Cholesterol and Recurrent Events (CARE) trial was performed. The CARE trial was a placebo-controlled trial aimed at testing the effect of pravastatin on patients after myocardial infarction. Patients with histories of CVD were excluded from the study. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the association between plausible risk factors (including lipid fractions) and risk for first incident CVD in patients after myocardial infarction. At the end of 5 years, 123 patients (6%) had incident CVD after myocardial infarction (76 with stroke and 47 with transient ischemic attack). Baseline non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level emerged as the only significant lipid risk factor that predicted CVD; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and HDL cholesterol were not significant. The adjusted hazard ratios (adjusted for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking) for CVD were 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 1.53) for non-HDL cholesterol, 1.14 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.37) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and 0.90 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.09) for HDL cholesterol (per unit SD change of lipid fractions). This relation held true regardless of the level of triglycerides. After adjustment for age and gender, the hazard ratio for the highest natural quartile of non-HDL was 1.76 (95% CI 1.05 to 2.54), compared to 1.36 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.90) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In conclusion, non-HDL cholesterol is the strongest predictor among the lipid risk factors of incident CVD in patients with established coronary heart disease.

  18. Biodistribution of AAV8 Vectors Expressing Human Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor in a Mouse Model of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Jen; Sanmiguel, Julio; Lock, Martin; McMenamin, Deirdre; Draper, Christine; Limberis, Maria P.; Kassim, Sadik H.; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Bell, Peter; Johnston, Julie C.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors based on serotype 8 (AAV8) transduce liver with superior tropism following intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies conducted by our lab demonstrated that AAV8-mediated transfer of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene driven by a strong liver-specific promoter (thyroxin-binding globulin [TBG]) leads to high level and persistent gene expression in the liver. The approach proved efficacious in reducing plasma cholesterol levels and resulted in the regression of atherosclerotic lesions in a murine model of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hoFH). Prior to advancing this vector, called AAV8.TBG.hLDLR, to the clinic, we set out to investigate vector biodistribution in an hoFH mouse model following IV vector administration to assess the safety profile of this investigational agent. Although AAV genomes were present in all organs at all time points tested (up to 180 days), vector genomes were sequestered mainly in the liver, which contained levels of vector 3 logs higher than that found in other organs. In both sexes, the level of AAV genomes gradually declined and appeared to stabilize 90 days post vector administration in most organs although vector genomes remained high in liver. Vector loads in the circulating blood were high and close to those in liver at the early time point (day 3) but rapidly decreased to a level close to the limit of quantification of the assay. The results of this vector biodistribution study further support a proposed clinical trial to evaluate AAV8 gene therapy for hoFH patients. PMID:24070336

  19. Biodistribution of AAV8 vectors expressing human low-density lipoprotein receptor in a mouse model of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Jen; Sanmiguel, Julio; Lock, Martin; McMenamin, Deirdre; Draper, Christine; Limberis, Maria P; Kassim, Sadik H; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Bell, Peter; Johnston, Julie C; Rader, Daniel J; Wilson, James M

    2013-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors based on serotype 8 (AAV8) transduce liver with superior tropism following intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies conducted by our lab demonstrated that AAV8-mediated transfer of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene driven by a strong liver-specific promoter (thyroxin-binding globulin [TBG]) leads to high level and persistent gene expression in the liver. The approach proved efficacious in reducing plasma cholesterol levels and resulted in the regression of atherosclerotic lesions in a murine model of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hoFH). Prior to advancing this vector, called AAV8.TBG.hLDLR, to the clinic, we set out to investigate vector biodistribution in an hoFH mouse model following IV vector administration to assess the safety profile of this investigational agent. Although AAV genomes were present in all organs at all time points tested (up to 180 days), vector genomes were sequestered mainly in the liver, which contained levels of vector 3 logs higher than that found in other organs. In both sexes, the level of AAV genomes gradually declined and appeared to stabilize 90 days post vector administration in most organs although vector genomes remained high in liver. Vector loads in the circulating blood were high and close to those in liver at the early time point (day 3) but rapidly decreased to a level close to the limit of quantification of the assay. The results of this vector biodistribution study further support a proposed clinical trial to evaluate AAV8 gene therapy for hoFH patients. PMID:24070336

  20. Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shutong; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Sang, Hui; Tian, Hua; Miao, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun

    2012-07-01

    Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein (mm-LDL) induces intimal foam cell formation, which is promoted by endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a cross-point to link cellular processes with multiple risk factors that exist in all stages of atherosclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether mm-LDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages involves ERS and its underlying mechanisms. We showed that mm-LDL induced the accumulation of lipid droplets in RAW264.7 macrophages with increased free cholesterol in the endoplasmic reticulum, which was markedly attenuated by pretreatment with an antibody against toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Additionally, mm-LDL stimulated the transport of Cy3-labeled activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), a key sensor to the unfolded protein response (UPR), from cytoplasm into nucleus. The expression of phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1), another sensor to the UPR, and its two downstream molecules, X box binding protein 1 and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), were significantly upregulated by mm-LDL. The alterations induced by mm-LDL were all significantly inhibited by antibodies against TLR4 or CD36. In addition, the upregulation of p-IRE1 and GRP78 and the nuclear translocation of ATF6 induced by mm-LDL were significantly attenuated by TLR4 siRNA. These results suggest that mm-LDL may induce free cholesterol accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequently stimulate ERS and activate the UPR signaling pathway mediated by ATF6 and IRE1 in macrophages, a process that is potentially mediated by TLR4. PMID:22480542

  1. Interaction between SCO-spondin and low density lipoproteins from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid modulates their roles in early neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vera, América; Recabal, Antonia; Saldivia, Natalia; Stanic, Karen; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    During early stages of development, encephalic vesicles are composed by a layer of neuroepithelial cells surrounding a central cavity filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF). This fluid contains several morphogens that regulate proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial cells. One of these neurogenic factors is SCO-spondin, a giant protein secreted to the eCSF from early stages of development. Inhibition of this protein in vivo or in vitro drastically decreases the neurodifferentiation process. Other important neurogenic factors of the eCSF are low density lipoproteins (LDL), the depletion of which generates a 60% decrease in mesencephalic explant neurodifferentiation. The presence of several LDL receptor class A (LDLrA) domains (responsible for LDL binding in other proteins) in the SCO-spondin sequence suggests a possible interaction between both molecules. This possibility was analyzed using three different experimental approaches: (1) Bioinformatics analyses of the SCO-spondin region, that contains eight LDLrA domains in tandem, and of comparisons with the LDL receptor consensus sequence; (2) Analysis of the physical interactions of both molecules through immunohistochemical colocalization in embryonic chick brains and through the immunoprecipitation of LDL with anti-SCO-spondin antibodies; and (3) Analysis of functional interactions during the neurodifferentiation process when these molecules were added to a culture medium of mesencephalic explants. The results revealed that LDL and SCO-spondin interact to form a complex that diminishes the neurogenic capacities that both molecules have separately. Our work suggests that the eCSF is an active signaling center with a complex regulation system that allows for correct brain development. PMID:26074785

  2. Conservation of apolipoprotein A-I's central domain structural elements upon lipid association on different high-density lipoprotein subclasses.

    PubMed

    Oda, Michael N; Budamagunta, Madhu S; Geier, Ethan G; Chandradas, Sajiv H; Shao, Baohai; Heinecke, Jay W; Voss, John C; Cavigiolio, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    The antiatherogenic properties of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) are derived, in part, from lipidation-state-dependent structural elements that manifest at different stages of apoA-I's progression from lipid-free protein to spherical high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Previously, we reported the structure of apoA-I's N-terminus on reconstituted HDLs (rHDLs) of different sizes. We have now investigated at the single-residue level the conformational adaptations of three regions in the central domain of apoA-I (residues 119-124, 139-144, and 164-170) upon apoA-I lipid binding and HDL formation. An important function associated with these residues of apoA-I is the activation of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), the enzyme responsible for catalyzing HDL maturation. Structural examination was performed by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence and spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies for both the lipid-free protein and rHDL particles 7.8, 8.4, and 9.6 nm in diameter. The two methods provide complementary information about residue side chain mobility and molecular accessibility, as well as the polarity of the local environment at the targeted positions. The modulation of these biophysical parameters yielded new insight into the importance of structural elements in the central domain of apoA-I. In particular, we determined that the loosely lipid-associated structure of residues 134-145 is conserved in all rHDL particles. Truncation of this region completely abolished LCAT activation but did not significantly affect rHDL size, reaffirming the important role of this structural element in HDL function. PMID:23984834

  3. Distinct Roles of Apolipoproteins A1 and E in the Modulation of High-Density Lipoprotein Composition and Function.

    PubMed

    Filou, Serafoula; Lhomme, Marie; Karavia, Eleni A; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Theodoropoulos, Vassilis; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Sakellaropoulos, George C; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Constantinou, Caterina; Kontush, Anatol; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2016-07-12

    In addition to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, HDL quality also appears to be very important for atheroprotection. Analysis of various clinical paradigms suggests that the lipid and apolipoprotein composition of HDL defines its size, shape, and functions and may determine its beneficial effects on human health. Previously, we reported that like apolipoprotein A-I (Apoa1), apolipoprotein E (Apoe) is also capable of promoting the de novo biogenesis of HDL with the participation of ATP binding cassette A lipid transporter member 1 (Abca1) and plasma enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (Lcat), in a manner independent of a functional Apoa1. Here, we performed a comparative analysis of the functions of these HDL subpopulations. Specifically, Apoe and Apoa1 double-deficient (Apoe(-/-) × Apoa1(-/-)) mice were infected with APOA1- or APOE3-expressing adenoviruses, and APOA1-containing HDL (APOA1-HDL) and APOE3-containing HDL (APOE3-HDL), respectively, were isolated and analyzed by biochemical and physicochemical methods. Western blot and lipidomic analyses indicated significant differences in the apolipoprotein and lipid composition of the two HDL species. Moreover APOE3-HDL presented a markedly reduced antioxidant potential and Abcg1-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity. Surprisingly, APOE3-HDL but not APOA1-HDL attenuated LPS-induced production of TNFα in RAW264.7 cells, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of APOA1 are dependent on APOE expression. Taken together, our data indicate that APOA1 and APOE3 recruit different apolipoproteins and lipids on the HDL particle, leading to structurally and functionally distinct HDL subpopulations. The distinct role of these two apolipoproteins in the modulation of HDL functionality may pave the way toward the development of novel pharmaceuticals that aim to improve HDL functionality. PMID:27332083

  4. Influence of Apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I Structure on Nascent High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Particle Size Distribution*

    PubMed Central

    Vedhachalam, Charulatha; Chetty, Palaniappan Sevugan; Nickel, Margaret; Dhanasekaran, Padmaja; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Rothblat, George H.; Phillips, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The principal protein of high density lipoprotein (HDL), apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, in the lipid-free state contains two tertiary structure domains comprising an N-terminal helix bundle and a less organized C-terminal domain. It is not known how the properties of these domains modulate the formation and size distribution of apoA-I-containing nascent HDL particles created by ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-mediated efflux of cellular phospholipid and cholesterol. To address this issue, proteins corresponding to the two domains of human apoA-I (residues 1–189 and 190–243) and mouse apoA-I (residues 1–186 and 187–240) together with some human/mouse domain hybrids were examined for their abilities to form HDL particles when incubated with either ABCA1-expressing cells or phospholipid multilamellar vesicles. Incubation of human apoA-I with cells gave rise to two sizes of HDL particles (hydrodynamic diameter, 8 and 10 nm), and removal or disruption of the C-terminal domain eliminated the formation of the smaller particle. Variations in apoA-I domain structure and physical properties exerted similar effects on the rates of formation and sizes of HDL particles created by either spontaneous solubilization of phospholipid multilamellar vesicles or the ABCA1-mediated efflux of cellular lipids. It follows that the sizes of nascent HDL particles are determined at the point at which cellular phospholipid and cholesterol are solubilized by apoA-I; apparently, this is the rate-determining step in the overall ABCA1-mediated cellular lipid efflux process. The stability of the apoA-I N-terminal helix bundle domain and the hydrophobicity of the C-terminal domain are important determinants of both nascent HDL particle size and their rate of formation. PMID:20679346

  5. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  6. Plasma Nitration of High-Density and Low-Density Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Receiving Kidney Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Bakillah, Ahmed; Tedla, Fasika; Ayoub, Isabelle; John, Devon; Norin, Allen J.; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Brown, Clinton

    2015-01-01

    Background. Functional abnormalities of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) could contribute to cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. We measured a validated marker of HDL dysfunction, nitrated apolipoprotein A-I, in kidney transplant recipients to test the hypothesis that a functioning kidney transplant reduces serum nitrated apoA-I concentrations. Methods. Concentrations of nitrated apoA-I and apoB were measured using indirect sandwich ELISA assays on sera collected from each transplant subject before transplantation and at 1, 3, and 12 months after transplantation. Patients were excluded if they have history of diabetes, treatment with lipid-lowering medications or HIV protease inhibitors, prednisone dose > 15 mg/day, nephrotic range proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, or active inflammatory disease. Sera from 18 transplanted patients were analyzed. Four subjects were excluded due to insufficient data. Twelve and eight patients had creatinine < 1.5 mg/dL at 3 and 12 months after transplantation, respectively. Results. Nitrated apoA-I was significantly reduced at 12 months after transplantation (p = 0.039). The decrease in apoA-I nitration was associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (p = 0.047). In contrast to apoA-I, nitrated apoB was not affected after kidney transplantation. Conclusions. Patients with well-functioning grafts had significant reduction in nitrated apoA-I 12 months after kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed in a large cohort to determine if nitrated apoA-I can be used as a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk stratification in chronic kidney disease. PMID:26648662

  7. Impaired High-Density Lipoprotein Anti-Oxidant Function Predicts Poor Outcome in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schrutka, Lore; Goliasch, Georg; Meyer, Brigitte; Wurm, Raphael; Koller, Lorenz; Kriechbaumer, Lukas; Heinz, Gottfried; Pacher, Richard; Lang, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress affects clinical outcome in critically ill patients. Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles generally possess anti-oxidant capacities, deleterious properties of HDL have been described in acutely ill patients. The impact of anti-oxidant HDL capacities on clinical outcome in critically ill patients is unknown. We therefore analyzed the predictive value of anti-oxidant HDL function on mortality in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients. Method We prospectively enrolled 270 consecutive patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit (ICU) and determined anti-oxidant HDL function using the HDL oxidant index (HOI). Based on their HOI, the study population was stratified into patients with impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and the residual study population. Results During a median follow-up time of 9.8 years (IQR: 9.2 to 10.0), 69% of patients died. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association between impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and short-term mortality with an adjusted HR of 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.24; p = 0.001) as well as 10-year mortality with an adj. HR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.02–1.40; p = 0.032) when compared to the residual study population. Anti-oxidant HDL function correlated with the amount of oxidative stress as determined by Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (r = 0.38; p<0.001). Conclusion Impaired anti-oxidant HDL function represents a strong and independent predictor of 30-day mortality as well as long-term mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26978526

  8. Increased uptake of alpha-hydroxy aldehyde-modified low density lipoprotein by macrophage scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Heinecke, J W; Chait, A

    2000-07-01

    Reactive aldehydes can be formed during the oxidation of lipids, glucose, and amino acids and during the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with malondialdehyde are taken up by scavenger receptors on macrophages. In the current studies we determined whether alpha-hydroxy aldehydes also modify LDL to a form recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors. LDL modified by incubation with glycolaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, erythrose, arabinose, or glucose (alpha-hydroxy aldehydes that possess two, three, four, five, and six carbon atoms, respectively) exhibited decreased free amino groups and increased mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. The lower the molecular weight of the aldehyde used for LDL modification, the more rapid and extensive was the derivatization of free amino groups. Approximately 50-75% of free lysine groups in LDL were modified after incubation with glyceraldehyde, glycolaldehyde, or erythrose for 24-48 h. Less extensive reductions in free amino groups were observed when LDL was incubated with arabinose or glucose, even at high concentration for up to 5 days. LDL modified with glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde labeled with (125)I was degraded more extensively by human monocyte-derived macrophages than was (125)I-labeled native LDL. Conversely, LDL modified with (125)I-labeled erythrose, arabinose, or glucose was degraded less rapidly than (125)I-labeled native LDL. Competition for the degradation of LDL modified with (125)I-labeled glyceraldehyde was nearly complete with acetyl-, glycolaldehyde-, and glyceraldehyde-modified LDL, fucoidin, and advanced glycation end product-modified bovine serum albumin, and absent with unlabeled native LDL. These results suggest that short-chain alpha-hydroxy aldehydes react with amino groups on LDL to yield moieties that are important determinants of recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors.

  9. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptotic dendritic cells as a novel therapy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Wierts, Laura; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-03-01

    Modulation of immune responses may form a powerful approach to treat atherosclerosis. It was shown that clearance of apoptotic cells results in tolerance induction to cleared Ags by dendritic cells (DCs); however, this seems impaired in atherosclerosis because Ag-specific tolerance is lacking. This could result, in part, from decreased emigration of DCs from atherosclerotic lesions because of the high-cholesterol environment. Nonetheless, local induction of anti-inflammatory responses by apoptotic cell clearance seems to dampen atherosclerosis, because inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance worsens atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed whether i.v. administration of oxLDL-induced apoptotic DCs (apop(ox)-DCs) and, as a control, unpulsed apoptotic DCs could modulate atherosclerosis by inducing tolerance. Adoptive transfer of apop(ox)-DCs into low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice either before or during feeding of a Western-type diet resulted in increased numbers of CD103(+) tolerogenic splenic DCs, with a concomitant increase in regulatory T cells. Interestingly, both types of apoptotic DCs induced an immediate 40% decrease in Ly-6C(hi) monocyte numbers and a 50% decrease in circulating CCL2 levels, but only apop(ox)-DC treatment resulted in long-term effects on monocytes and CCL2 levels. Although initial lesion development was reduced by 40% in both treatment groups, only apop(ox)-DC treatment prevented lesion progression by 28%. Moreover, progressed lesions of apop(ox)-DC-treated mice showed a robust 45% increase in collagen content, indicating an enhanced stability of lesions. Our findings clearly show that apoptotic DC treatment significantly decreases lesion development, but only apop(ox)-DCs can positively modulate lesion progression and stability. These findings may translate into a safe treatment for patients with established cardiovascular diseases using patient-derived apop(ox)-DCs.

  10. High-Density Lipoprotein Function Measurement in Human Studies: Focus on Cholesterol Efflux Capacity.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    A low plasma level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). However, several observations have highlighted the shortcomings of using cholesterol content as the sole reflection of HDL metabolism. In particular, several large randomized controlled trials of extended release niacin and cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors on background statin therapy have failed to show improvement in ASCVD outcomes despite significant increases in HDL-C. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the principal HDL function that impacts macrophage foam cell formation and other functions such as endothelial activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, monocyte adhesion, and platelet aggregation. Cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma/serum reflects the first critical step of RCT and is considered a key anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL. Whether this function is operative in humans remains to be seen, but recent studies assessing cholesterol efflux in humans suggest that the cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of human plasma or serum is a potent marker of ASCVD risk. This review describes the methodology of measuring CEC ex vivo from human samples and the findings to date linking CEC to human disease. Studies to date confirm that CEC can be reliably measured using stored human blood samples as cholesterol acceptors and suggest that CEC may be a promising new biomarker for atherosclerotic and metabolic diseases. Further studies are needed to standardize measurements and clarify the role CEC may play in predicting risk of developing disease and response to therapies. PMID:25968932

  11. Roles of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheol Hyun; Woo, Jong Shin; Park, Chang Bum; Cho, Jin Man; Ahn, Young Keun; Kim, Chong Jin; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Weon

    2016-05-01

    Many observational studies showed hogh-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a strong inverse predictor of cardiovascular (CV) outcome. However, recent large clinical trials evaluating therapies to raise HDL-C level in those already on statin therapy have been discouraging. This complexity is not well-known.A total of 28,357 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR), which was a prospective, multicenter, nationwide, web-based database of AMI in Korea. From this registry, we evaluated 3574 patients with AMI who have follow-up HDL-C level to investigate its association with clinical outcomes. The primary endpoint was the relationship between follow-up change in HDL-C and a 12-month composite of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs).Patients with initial HDL-C ≥ 40 mg/dL showed significantly lower rates of 12-month MACEs, especially cardiac and all-cause mortalities (P < 0.001). When patients were stratified into 4 groups according to the change of HDL-C, patients with decreasing HDL-C showed significantly higher rates of 12-month MACEs as comparable with patients with increasing HLD-C. A multivariate analysis indicated that HDL-C level was a significant predictor of CV events (hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.71) after correcting for confounding variables.The follow-up change in HDL-C level was significantly related with CV outcomes in patients with AMI. PMID:27149442

  12. High density lipoprotein cholesterol as a determinant factor in coronary heart disease in Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Adebonojo, S. A.; Ogunnaike, H. O.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the lipid profile of 200 normal Nigerian subjects (Group A) shows a steady increase in the total cholesterol and triglyceride values with increasing age in both sexes, while the high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and percent HDL cholesterol values show a steady decrease with increasing age in both sexes. A similar study of 160 patients with high-risk factors (Group B), ie, patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smokers, and obese patients, shows significantly higher values of mean triglyceride than in the normal subjects (P less than 0.001). The HDL cholesterol and percent HDL cholesterol values are significantly lower in the high risk patients than in the normal subjects (P less than 0.001). A study of the lipid profile of 15 Nigerian patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) (Group C) shows significantly lower in the high-risk patients than in the percent HDL cholesterol than normal subjects (P less than 0.001). These values were also found to be significantly lower in Group C patients than in Group B patients (P less than 0.01). A comparison of the lipid profile of normal Nigerian subjects with those of black Americans shows that the total cholesterol values of normal black Americans are significantly higher than those of normal Nigerians of comparable age and sex (P less than 0.001). Although there is no significant difference in the HDL cholesterol values of both black American and Nigerian males and females, the values of the percent HDL cholesterol of black Americans are significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those of Nigerians of comparable age and sex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2746678

  13. Assessment of the Validity of the Double Superhelix Model for Reconstituted High Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Martin K.; Zhang, Lei; Catte, Andrea; Li, Ling; Oda, Michael N.; Ren, Gang; Segrest, Jere P.

    2010-01-01

    For several decades, the standard model for high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles reconstituted from apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and phospholipid (apoA-I/HDL) has been a discoidal particle ∼100 Å in diameter and the thickness of a phospholipid bilayer. Recently, Wu et al. (Wu, Z., Gogonea, V., Lee, X., Wagner, M. A., Li, X. M., Huang, Y., Undurti, A., May, R. P., Haertlein, M., Moulin, M., Gutsche, I., Zaccai, G., Didonato, J. A., and Hazen, S. L. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 36605–36619) used small angle neutron scattering to develop a new model they termed double superhelix (DSH) apoA-I that is dramatically different from the standard model. Their model possesses an open helical shape that wraps around a prolate ellipsoidal type I hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase. Here, we used three independent approaches, molecular dynamics, EM tomography, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (FRET) to assess the validity of the DSH model. (i) By using molecular dynamics, two different approaches, all-atom simulated annealing and coarse-grained simulation, show that initial ellipsoidal DSH particles rapidly collapse to discoidal bilayer structures. These results suggest that, compatible with current knowledge of lipid phase diagrams, apoA-I cannot stabilize hexagonal I phase particles of phospholipid. (ii) By using EM, two different approaches, negative stain and cryo-EM tomography, show that reconstituted apoA-I/HDL particles are discoidal in shape. (iii) By using FRET, reconstituted apoA-I/HDL particles show a 28–34-Å intermolecular separation between terminal domain residues 40 and 240, a distance that is incompatible with the dimensions of the DSH model. Therefore, we suggest that, although novel, the DSH model is energetically unfavorable and not likely to be correct. Rather, we conclude that all evidence supports the likelihood that reconstituted apoA-I/HDL particles, in general, are discoidal in shape. PMID:20974855

  14. Electronegative Low-density Lipoprotein Increases Coronary Artery Disease Risk in Uremia Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, Guei-Jane; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Lee, An-Sean; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Stancel, Nicole; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the general population, but its role in the development of CAD in uremia patients is unknown. L5 is the most electronegative subfraction of LDL isolated from human plasma. In this study, we examined the distribution of L5 (L5%) and its association with CAD risk in uremia patients. The LDL of 39 uremia patients on maintenance hemodialysis and 21 healthy controls was separated into 5 subfractions, L1–L5, with increasing electronegativity. We compared the distribution and composition of plasma L5 between uremia patients and controls, examined the association between plasma L5% and CAD risk in uremia patients, and studied the effects of L5 from uremia patients on endothelial function. Compared to controls, uremia patients had significantly increased L5% (P < 0.001) and L5 that was rich in apolipoprotein C3 and triglycerides. L5% was significantly higher in uremia patients with CAD (n = 10) than in those without CAD (n = 29) (P < 0.05). Independent of other major CAD risk factors, the adjusted odds ratio for CAD was 1.88 per percent increase in plasma L5% (95% CI, 1.01–3.53), with a near-linear dose–response relationship. Compared with controls, uremia patients had decreased flow-mediated vascular dilatation. In ex vivo studies with preconstricted rat thoracic aortic rings, L5 from uremia patients inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation. In cultured human endothelial cells, L5 inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and induced endothelial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that elevated plasma L5% may induce endothelial dysfunction and play an important role in the increased risk of CAD in uremia patients. PMID:26765403

  15. Proton pump inhibitors and statins: a possible interaction that favors low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Barkas, F; Elisaf, M; Rizos, CV; Klouras, E; Kostapanos, MS; Liberopoulos, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might influence the metabolism of cholesterol and statins in the liver. Aim: The impact of PPIs on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in statin-treated patients. Methods: Retrospective observational study including consecutive statin-treated individuals followed for ≥3 years in a university hospital lipid clinic. Demographic characteristics as well as clinical and laboratory data were recorded at baseline and the most recent visit. High, moderate and low-intensity statin therapy was defined according to the expected LDL-C reduction (≥50%, 30-50%, and <30%, respectively). We compared the LDL-C reduction in subjects receiving statin + PPI with those on statin alone and assessed the overall effect of PPI administration on LDL-C lowering. Results: Of 648 statin-treated subjects, 7% were also taking a PPI. There was no difference between PPI vs. non-PPI group regarding baseline characteristics and intensity of lipid-lowering therapy. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that PPI use was significantly associated with LDL-C reduction (b =0.104, p =0.005) along with baseline LDL-C levels (b =0.482, p <0.001), treatment with ezetimibe (b =0.198, p <0.001), presence of diabetes (b =0.168, p <0.001), compliance with treatment (b =0.205, p <0.001), intensity of statin treatment (b =0.101, p =0.005) and cardiovascular risk (b =0.082, p =0.049). Subjects receiving statin + PPI had a higher LDL-C reduction by 6.4% compared with those taking a statin alone (fully adjusted p =0.005). Conclusions: PPIs may modestly boost the statin-mediated LDL-C reduction. This effect should be confirmed by prospective clinical studies. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 332-337.

  16. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fangning; Qin, Xiaojian; Zhang, Guiming; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Hailiang; Dai, Bo; Shi, Guohai; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

  17. Vitamin D Supplementation and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol: A Study in Healthy School Children

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Fatemeh; Namakin, Kokab; Zardast, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level has been shown to have a significant role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis. Low vitamin D levels have been shown to be correlated with dyslipidemia, but limited data exist on indigenous children. Objectives We aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on HDL-C levels in school-aged Iranian children. Methods In this prospective controlled clinical trial, 47 healthy children (23 boys) aged 10 - 14 years, students of Birjand (Iran) elementary schools, were selected and randomly divided into two groups. The study group received a vitamin D supplement (1000 mg capsule) daily for one month, and placebo tablets were prescribed to the controls. Before and after the treatment course, the serum HDL-C and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels of both groups were measured. The data were analyzed by SPSS, ver. 16, and Chi-square tests, Fisher’s exact test, paired-sample t-tests, and Pearson’s correlation were used, wherever appropriate. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results Forty children completed the study; their mean age was 11.5 ± 1.175 years. The mean serum levels of both HDL-C and vitamin D showed a significant rise following the treatment in the study group (P = 0.007 and P < 0.001, respectively), whereas both variables decreased slightly in the control group (P = 0.27). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean serum levels of HDL-C and vitamin D between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.11 and P = 0.20, respectively). Conclusions Vitamin D supplements seem to have a positive impact on serum HDL-C levels and may be effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases in the long term. PMID:27713805

  18. Biomarkers associated with high-density lipoproteins in atherosclerotic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2014-04-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) originate as discoidal particles that are rapidly converted by lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) into the spherical particles that predominate in normal human plasma. Spherical HDL consist of multiple populations of particles that vary widely in size, composition and function. Human population studies have established that high plasma HDL cholesterol levels are associated with a reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanistic basis of this relationship is not well understood, but most likely involves a number of the cardioprotective functions of HDL. These include the ability of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main apolipoprotein constituent of HDL, to remove cholesterol from macrophages in the artery wall. HDL also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that are potentially cardioprotective. Evidence that some of these beneficial properties are compromised in people with diabetes and renal disease is emerging. Persistently elevated plasma glucose levels i