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Sample records for dental arch study

  1. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  2. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  3. Dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition: a study of Brazilian children from 9 to 12 years of age

    PubMed Central

    LOULY, Fabiane; NOUER, Paulo Roberto Aranha; JANSON, Guilherme; PINZAN, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated dental arch dimensional changes of Brazilian children. Material and methods Dental casts were taken from 66 children (29 males; 37 females) with normal occlusion selected among 1,687 students from public and private schools aged 9, 10, 11 and 12 years, according to the following criteria: Class I canine and molar relationships; well-aligned upper and lower dental arches; mixed dentition; good facial symmetry; no previous orthodontic treatment. Dental arch dimensions were taken by one examiner using the Korkhaus’ compass and a digital pachymeter. ANOVA test was applied to compare the arch dimensions at the different ages and the t-test was used to compare the arch dimensions of male and female subjects. Arch forms were compared by means of chi-square tests. Results Only the maxillary anterior segment length showed a statistically significant increase from 10 to 12 years of age. Males had a significantly larger maxillary depth than females at the age range evaluated. The predominant dental arch form found was elliptical. Conclusion In the studied age range, anterior maxillary length increased from 10 to 12 years of age, males had larger maxillary depth than females and the predominant arch form was elliptical. PMID:21552719

  4. Maxillary dental arch form related to voice classification: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marunick, M T; Menaldi, C J

    2000-03-01

    This pilot study evaluated maxillary dental arch form dimensions and volume to determine if these parameters could be predictors for or related to voice classification. Nine white female professional singers ranging in age from 26 years to 53 years were studied. A maxillary dental impression and stone dental casts were made using standard dental procedures. Measurements were made from 10 points on each cast to determine the depth of the palate measured from first molar (depth A) and from first bicuspid (depth B), the width measured from cuspid-to-cuspid (width A) and from second molar to second molar (width B), and the length of the palate. An impression of the palatal arch of each cast was made to determine the volume of the palate using fluid displacement methods. Audio recordings were made for each subject, and based on speaking fundamental frequency, spectral analysis, voice profile, and tessitura confirmation, the actual voice classification of each subject in soprano, mezzo, and alto was achieved. Correlation and discriminant analysis tests were performed on the data. The discriminant analysis revealed that no single measurement is a predictor for voice classification. However, the discriminant analysis applied to the predictors depth A, depth B, and volume gives optimal results, ie, each subject was classified in her true group.

  5. Comparison of maxillary and mandibular dental arch forms by studying Fourier series developed from mathematically estimated dentitions.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Hiroko; Nakatsuka, Michiko; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2010-11-01

    We conducted a Fourier analysis on data obtained using correlation and principal component analyses of parallel-standardized dental study models; both maxillary and mandibular dental arches were predominantly round square in shape. The present study compared and determined the contribution ratio and reproducible coefficients of amplitudes (factors affecting dental arch forms), and demonstrated that the 1st to 4th and the 1st to 6th Fourier harmonics reproduced maxillary and mandibular dental arch forms, respectively. The correlation analyses of the constant term and amplitudes demonstrated that significant differences in the 2nd harmonic amplitude was strongly correlated with the curvature of anterior teeth and the length-to-width ratio in maxillary dentitions. By comparison of the constant term and amplitudes between different arch types, we did not observe significant differences in the constant term and the 1st amplitude of maxillary dentitions and in constant term and all amplitudes of mandibular dentitions. Nevertheless, the study revealed high contribution ratios of the 1st (in mandibular dentitions) and the 2nd (in maxillary dentitions) amplitudes essentially affecting the reproducibility of arch forms. The 1st amplitudes demonstrated a bow-like arrangement of all arch types, while the 2nd amplitudes adjusted the anterior-teeth curvature and in particular demonstrated the length-to-width ratio of maxillary dentitions. The 3rd and the 4th amplitudes were also determinants of the anterior-teeth curvature of maxillary dentitions. The 6th amplitude was necessary for reproduction, but showed no difference between varying mandibular dental arch types. Collectively, we conclude that the establishment of a Fourier series significantly reproduced maxillary but not mandibular dental arch forms.

  6. Experience from Classroom Teaching to Clinical Practice Regarding Shortened Dental Arch (SDA) Concept Among Dentists – A Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    Malhi, Ravneet; Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Janakiram, Chandrasheker; Pandita, Venisha; Prasad, Monika; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease and dental caries are the common oral conditions which cause loss of teeth, mostly molars. This further leads to Shortening of Dental Arch and Shortened Dental Arch (SDA) concept provides the overall requirements of functional dentition at reduced cost without compromising the health. Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) towards SDA concept among dentists of Ghaziabad city (Uttar Pradesh, India). Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 514 dentists working as academicians or clinicians or both. KAP questionnaire consisting of questions related to SDA concept was distributed to them. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 18.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and descriptive and analytical tests, including mean, standard deviation, and Chi square test were used. Results Of the 514 dentists, only 493 dentists responded to the questionnaire, generating the response rate of 95.5%. Only 113 (22.9%) had knowledge about this concept. Clinicians were found to have more knowledge regarding the SDA concept (p<0.05). Also years of experience and level of knowledge among dentists regarding SDA was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion The study showed lack of knowledge regarding SDA concept among dentists and also only few dentists practice the SDA concept on their patients. If used judiciously the SDA concept can serve as a cost effective and functionally oriented approach in clinical management of patients. PMID:28208999

  7. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%) - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed. PMID:25715725

  8. Influence of posterior dental arch length on brain activity during chewing in patients with mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Shoi, K; Fueki, K; Usui, N; Taira, M; Wakabayashi, N

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that shortened dental arch decreases masticatory function. However, its potential to change brain activity during mastication is unknown. The present study investigates the effect of a shortened posterior dental arch with mandibular removable partial dentures (RPDs) on brain activity during gum chewing. Eleven subjects with missing mandibular molars (mean age, 66.1 years) on both sides received experimental RPDs with interchangeable artificial molars in a crossover trial design. Brain activity during gum chewing with RPDs containing (full dental arch) and lacking artificial molars (shortened dental arch) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, masticatory function was evaluated for each dental arch type. Food comminuting and mixing ability and the perceived chewing ability were significantly lower in subjects with a shortened dental arch than those with a full dental arch (P < 0.05). Brain activation during gum chewing with the full dental arch occurred in the middle frontal gyrus, primary sensorimotor cortex extending to the pre-central gyrus, supplementary motor area, putamen, insula and cerebellum. However, middle frontal gyrus activation was not observed during gum chewing with the shortened dental arch. These results suggest that shortened dental arch affects human brain activity in the middle frontal gyrus during gum chewing, and the decreased middle frontal gyrus activation may be associated with decreased masticatory function.

  9. Mathematical definition of the shape of dental arches in human permanent healthy dentitions.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1994-08-01

    Dental arch shape was studied in 50 men and 45 women aged 20-27 years with sound dentitions. Maxillary and mandibular arches were reconstructed by a fourth-order polynomial and a 'mixed' elliptical (anterior teeth), plus parabolic (post-canine teeth) interpolation of buccal cusp tips (central incisor to second molar). The maxillary arch resulted wider than the mandibular arch regardless of gender. Gender differences were found especially in the maxillary arch, where they reflect more a size discrepancy than a shape difference. The polynomial interpolation allowed the evaluation of arch asymmetry, which resulted negligible in all the subjects. The elliptical plus parabolic interpolation gave mean plots which were well superimposable to the ones obtained by the polynomial interpolation. These curves are geometrically simple and can be used for the mathematical description of dental arch shape in non-patient subjects. Moreover, they allow separate analysis of teeth with a different functional meaning.

  10. Dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition: a study of Italian children born in the 1950s and the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Defraia, Efisio; Baroni, Giulia; Marinelli, Andrea

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition in two modern samples living in the same geographic area and separated by almost 35 years. A group of 83 subjects (39 boys and 44 girls) born between 1953 and 1959 (mean age: eight years and three months +/-15 months for the boys and seven years and 11 months +/-12 months for the girls) were compared with a group of 84 subjects (38 boys and 46 girls) born between 1990 and 1998 (mean age: eight years and eight months +/-12 months for the boys and eight years and four months +/-11 months for the girls). Measurements were taken on dental casts for posterior and anterior arch segments, intermolar and intercanine width, and mesiodistal size of incisors. The available anterior space in both arches and the posterior and anterior transverse dimensions were calculated. Groups were compared using a nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) for independent samples (P < .05). Results show that both boys and girls of 1990s showed significantly smaller maxillary intermolar width when compared with 1950s. Posterior transverse interarch discrepancy was significantly minor in girls of 1990s. The present population has a greater probability of developing a malocclusion as a consequence of the secular trend toward the reduction of the width of the upper arch.

  11. Evaluation of dental arch width and form changes after orthodontic treatment and retention with a new computerized method.

    PubMed

    Taner, Tülin Ugur; Ciger, Semra; El, Hakan; Germeç, Derya; Es, Alphan

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinal arch width and form changes and to define arch form types with a new computerized method. Maxillary and mandibular models of 21 Class II Division 1 patients were examined before treatment (T(0)), after treatment (T(1)), and an average of 3 years after retention (T(2)). Arch width measurements were made directly on scanned images of maxillary and mandibular models. Arch form changes at T(0)-T(1) and T(1)-T(2) were evaluated by superimposing the computer-generated Bezier arch curves with a computer program. Types of dental arch forms were defined by superimposing them with the pentamorphic arch system, which included 5 different types of arch forms: normal, ovoid, tapered, narrow ovoid, and narrow tapered. Maxillary arch widths were increased during orthodontic treatment. Mandibular posterior arch widths were also increased. The expansion of the mandibular arch forms was less than in the maxillary arch forms. Arch width changes were generally stable, except for reduction in maxillary and mandibular interlateral, inter-first premolar, and mandibular intercanine widths. Pretreatment maxillary arch forms were mostly tapered; mandibular arch forms were tapered and narrow tapered. In maxillary arch forms, 76% of the treatment changes were maintained. Mandibular arch form was maintained in 67% of the sample, both during treatment and after retention. In mandibular arches, 71% of orthodontically induced arch form changes were maintained.

  12. Correlation between maxillary central incisor crown morphology and mandibular dental arch form in normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Lima, Carolina Souto; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Torres, Fernando Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the morphology of the mandibular dental arch and the maxillary central incisor crown. Cast models from 51 Caucasian individuals, older than 15 years, with optimal occlusion, no previous orthodontic treatment, featuring 4 of the 6 keys to normal occlusion by Andrews (the first being mandatory) were observed. The models were digitalized using a 3D scanner, and images of the maxillary central incisor and mandibular dental arch were obtained. These were printed and placed in an album below pre-set models of arches and dental crowns, and distributed to 12 dental surgeons, who were asked to choose which shape was most in accordance with the models and crown presented. The Kappa test was performed to evaluate the concordance among evaluators while the chi-square test was used to verify the association between the dental arch and central incisor morphology, at a 5% significance level. The Kappa test showed moderate agreement among evaluators for both variables of this study, and the chi-square test showed no significant association between tooth shape and mandibular dental arch morphology. It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central incisor is not appropriate. Further research is necessary to assess tooth shape using a stricter scientific basis.

  13. Evaluation of the fit of preformed nickel titanium arch wires on normal occlusion dental arches

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barakati, Rakhn G.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.; AlMadi, Abdulaziz; Albarakati, Sahar F.; ALKofide, Eman A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the fits of preformed nickel titanium (NiTi) archwires on dental arches with normal occlusion. Methods Forty sets of upper and lower plaster models were obtained from men and women with Class I occlusions. Preformed 0.016″ × 0.022″ NiTi archwires from Rocky Mountain Orthodontics (RMO), 3 M Unitek, Ormco, and Dentaurum were evaluated in terms of their fits on dental arches from male, female, and combined cases. Data were analyzed by using fourth- and sixth-order polynomial equations, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Duncan post hoc test. Results In the upper arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with RMO Ovoid and Ormco Orthos Large archwires for male cases, but with 3 M Orthoform LA archwires for female and combined cases. In the lower arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with Ormco Orthos Large for male cases, with 3 M Orthoform LA and RMO Normal for female cases, and with 3 M Orthoform LA, RMO Normal, Ormco Orthos Large, and Ormco Orthos Small for combined cases. When both dental arches were matched, Ormco Orthos Large was the best wire for male cases. 3 M Orthoform LA was the best wire for female and combined cases. Conclusions Using an archwire form with the best fit to the dental arch should produce minimal changes in the dental arch form when NiTi wires are used and require less customization when stainless-steel wires are used. PMID:26792965

  14. Predictors of poor dental arch relationship in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Liao, Yu-Fang; Shetty, Akshai

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional outcome study using retrospective data capture of treatment histories was to examine the characteristics of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate who had poor dental arch relationship (i.e., Goslon 5). The study sample comprised 120 children born with nonsyndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate between 1995 and 2003, and were aged between 5.0 and 7.0 years (mean age, 5.1 years) at the time of data collection. The dental arch relationship was assessed using the Goslon yardstick from intraoral dental photographs. An independent investigator recorded treatment histories from the clinical notes. The inter- and intraexaminer agreements evaluated by weighted kappa statistics were high. There was no association between dental arch relationship and the type of presurgical orthopedics or pharyngeal flap. Dental arch relationship was associated with the initial cleft size (odds ratio, OR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.1-1.5, p < 0.01), surgeon grade for palate repair (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.2-19.9, p < 0.05), and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-8.1, p = 0.05). These data suggest that intraoral dental photographs provide a reliable method for rating dental arch relationship. Wide initial cleft, high-volume surgeon, and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty are predictors of poor dental arch relationship outcome in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. These findings may improve treatment outcome by modifying the treatment protocol for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  15. Individual tooth macrowear pattern guides the reconstruction of Sts 52 (Australopithecus africanus) dental arches.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schulz, Dieter; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Weber, Gerhard W

    2013-02-01

    The functional restoration of the occlusal relationship between maxillary and mandibular tooth rows is a major challenge in modern dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Similar technical challenges are present in paleoanthropology when considering fragmented and deformed mandibular and maxillary fossils. Sts 52, an Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4, represents a typical case where the original shape of the dental arches is no longer preserved. It includes a partial lower face (Sts 52a) and a fragmented mandible (Sts 52b), both incomplete and damaged to such an extent to thwart attempts at matching upper and lower dentitions. We show how the preserved macro wear pattern of the tooth crowns can be used to functionally reconstruct Sts 52's dental arches. High-resolution dental stone casts of Sts 52 maxillary and mandibular dentition were mounted and repositioned in a dental articulator. The occlusal relationship between antagonists was restored based on the analysis of the occlusal wear pattern of each preserved tooth, considering all dental contact movements represented in the occlusal compass. The reconstructed dental arches were three-dimensional surface scanned and their occlusal kinematics tested in a simulation. The outcome of this contribution is the first functional restoration of A. africanus dental arches providing new morphometric data for specimen Sts 52. It is noteworthy that the method described in this case study might be applied to several other fossil specimens.

  16. Correlation Between Dental Arch Width and Sagittal Dento-Skeletal Morphology in Untreated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Etezadi, Tahura

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dental arch form is one of the most important characteristics of dentition. However, this dimension usually receives less attention in diagnosis or treatment planning and orthodontic patients are traditionally classified with regard to their sagittal characteristics. The objectives of this study were to investigate if a relationship exists between the dental arch width (transverse dimension) and sagittal skeletal and dental parameters in orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: Dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 108 consecutive untreated Iranian patients (47 males and 61 females) between 16 and 31 years of age were evaluated. Arch width (AW) parameters including upper and lower inter-molar width (UIMW and LIMW) and upper and lower inter-canine width (UICW and LICW) were measured by a digital caliper. Sagittal parameters included SNA and SNB angle and Wits’ appraisal obtained from lateral cephalograms in addition to upper and lower arch length (UAL and LAL) obtained from dental casts. The correlation between the aforementioned parameters was evaluated applying Pearson correlation coefficients. Molar and canine relationship according to Angle’s classification was also recorded and the means of all parameters were compared between three occlusal relationship classes and two gender groups by means of two-way ANOVA. Results: According to statistical analysis a significant positive correlation between sagittal parameters and arch width measures exists between SNA and UICW and between LICW and LAL. Upper and lower ICW were significantly correlated, the relationship between upper and lower IMW and between UAL and LAL were significant. Among sagittal measures, both UAL and LAL were correlated with the ANB angle. The means of arch width parameters in three occlusal classes were not significantly different. Conclusion: The only significant correlation between arch width and sagittal parameters existed between UICW and SNA angle and between LICW and

  17. Dental arch diameters and relationships to oral habits.

    PubMed

    Aznar, T; Galán, A F; Marín, I; Domínguez, A

    2006-05-01

    The objective was to analyze variations in dental arch width in relation to oral habits. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine and intermolar distance were determined in relation to certain oral habits in 1297 children (ages 3 to 6 years). After an oral examination, the parents of each child completed a questionnaire about oral habits, including the use of a dummy or a bottle (or both), finger sucking, mouth breathing, breast- or bottle-feeding, and duration of these habits. Data were subjected to statistical analysis by the chi-square test for qualitative variables and analysis of variance for quantitative variables with homogeneous variances. Statistical significance was P < .05. In general, the maxillary arch was larger than the mandibular arch with regard to both the intercanine and the intermolar distances and more significantly so in boys. In relation to age, a significant increase was found only for the mandibular intercanine distance (P = .001). When arch width was analyzed in relation to various oral habits, the maxillary intercanine distance was less in children who used a dummy, especially one of a round design (P = .003). The maxillary intercanine distance was also less in children who breathed through their mouth (P = .002). In most cases, dummy use and mouth breathing were associated with a reduction in the intercanine distance in the maxillary arch. A dummy habit leads to a reduction in maxillary arch width, and mouth breathing causes a reduction in the size of both arches.

  18. Dental arch asymmetry in young healthy human subjects evaluated by Euclidean distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G

    1993-03-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. A recently proposed method (Euclidean distance matrix analysis; EDMA) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. Here it has been applied to study the asymmetry of mandibular and maxillary arches in 50 men and 45 women with sound dentitions. The centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar) were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. The form of the right and left maxillary and mandibular hemi-arches was separately assessed by calculating all the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth within arch and side. Side differences were tested by EDMA. In men, the maxillary and the mandibular arches were both symmetrical (i.e. there were no significant differences in size or shape between the left and right hemi-arches). In women, the mandibular arch was symmetrical, but in the maxillary arch the two antimeres had a significantly different shape. No size differences were found between the left and right female hemi-arches.

  19. [Dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling in children: orthodontic diagnosis and treatments based on individual child arch development].

    PubMed

    Xiaobing, Li

    2016-12-01

    The etiology of malocclusions basically involves both congenital and environmental factors. Malocclusion is the result of the abnormal development of the orofacial complex (including tooth, dental alveolar bone, upper and lower jaws). Early orthodontic interceptive treatments involve the elimination of all congenital and environmental factors that contribute to the malformation of the orofacial complex, as well as interrupt the deviated development of the orofacial complex and the occlusion. Early orthodontic interceptive treatments mainly aim to use children's growth potential to correct abnormal developments of occlusions and orthodontically treat malocclusions more efficiently. The early orthodontic interceptive treatments include correcting the child's bad oral habits, training the abnormal functioned para-oral muscles, maintaining the normal eruptions of succeeding permanent teeth, applying interceptive treatments to the mal-developed teeth, and employing functional orthopedic treatments for abnormal growths of the upper and lower jaws. In orthodontics, correcting mal-positioned teeth is called orthodontic treatment, while rectifying the abnormal relationships of the upper and lower jaws is called functional orthopedic treatment. However, no clear definition is available as regards to the early orthodontic interceptive treatment of malocclusions caused by the deviated development of the dental alveolar bone. This new theory of "early dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling technique" was proposed by Professor Li Xiaobing of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics in West China Hospital of Stomatology through his clinical analyses and investigation of his early orthodontic interceptive treatments. He defined the early orthodontic corrections of abnormal growth of dental alveolar bone as "remodel". The "early dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling theory and technique" is proved useful in

  20. Effects of early treatment on maxillary arch development in BCLP. A study on dental casts between 0 and 4 years of age.

    PubMed

    Heidbuchel, K L; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Van't Hof, M A; Kramer, G J; Prahl-Andersen, B

    1998-06-01

    The present investigation analyses longitudinally the effects of early orthopaedic and/or surgical treatment on maxillary alveolar arch development in 30 children with a complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP). Palatal arch dimensions were measured on dental casts and their growth velocities during different treatment periods were calculated. Differences in growth velocities between consecutive treatment periods were examined and tested statistically. Furthermore, growth velocities were compared with those of 80 non-cleft children. Before lip closure, growth of the intercanine width of children with a BCLP and non-cleft children was comparable. Only for arch length significantly was less growth observed in BCLP patients in comparison with the control group. After lip closure, intercanine width, arch length and segmental angle diminished. During the intersurgical period, arch form seemed to adapt to a new muscular balance. Immediately after soft palate surgery, growth of the intercanine width and intertuberosity width was restricted. This negative growth was compensated in the postsurgical period, where a catch-up growth of intertuberosity width was even observed.

  1. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  2. Dental arch dimensional changes after adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy in children with airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanfei; Li, Jiaying; Tang, Yanmei; Wang, Xiaoling; Xue, Xiaochen; Sun, Huijun; Nie, Ping; Qu, Xinhua; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Children with severe airway obstruction tend to have a vertical direction of growth, class II malocclusion, and narrow arches. Adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy were recommended for the promotion of balanced dentition growth in these children. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy on the growth of dental morphology in children with airway obstruction. Methods: A comprehensive search of the Medline, Embase, Web of science, and OVID databases for studies published through to January 17, 2016 was conducted. Prospective, comparative, clinical studies assessing the efficacy of adenoidectomy, or tonsillectomy in children with airway obstruction were included. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for continuous variables. Forest plots were drawn to demonstrate effects in the meta-analyses. Results: Eight papers were included in our study. We found that adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy led to a significant change in nasal-breathing in children with airway obstruction. Children with airway obstruction had a significantly narrower posterior maxillary dental arch than children without airway obstruction (WMD = −0.94, 95% CI [−1.13, −0.76]; P < 0.001). After surgery, these children still had a significantly narrower dental arch than the nasal-breathing children (WMD = −0.60, 95% CI [−0.79, −0.42]; P < 0.001). In terms of dental arch width, malocclusion, palatal height, overjet, overbite, dental arch perimeter, and arch length, a tendency toward normalization was evident following adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy, with no significant differences evident between the surgical group and the normal group. The small number of studies and lack of randomized controlled trials were the main limitations of this meta-analysis. Conclusions: Following adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy, the malocclusion and narrow arch width of children with airway obstruction could not

  3. Comparison between dental and basal arch forms in normal occlusion and Class III malocclusions utilizing cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Kyung Eun; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Nam, Young-Ok; Sameshima, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mandibular dental and basal arch forms in subjects with normal occlusion and compare them with those of Class III malocclusion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods CBCT images of 32 normal occlusion (19 males, 13 females; 24.3 years) and 33 Class III malocclusion subjects (20 males, 13 females, 22.2 years) were selected. Facial axis and root center points were identified from the left to right mandibular first molars. Distances between the facial axis and root center points for each tooth were calculated, and 4 linear and 2 ratio variables were measured and calculated for each arch form. The variables were compared between groups by independent t-test. Pearson correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationships between dental and basal variables within each group. Results The mandibular dental and basal intercanine widths were significantly greater in the Class III group than in normal occlusion subjects (p < 0.05). The dental and basal intercanine widths as well as the dental and basal intermolar widths were strongly correlated in normal occlusion and moderately correlated in Class III malocclusion. Conclusions The dental arch form demon strated a strong positive correlation with the basal arch form in the normal occlusion group and moderate correlation in the Class III malocclusion group. These results might be helpful for clinicians to have a better understanding of the importance of basal arch form in the alveolar bone. PMID:23504406

  4. Duration of nutritive and nonnutritive sucking behaviors and their effects on the dental arches in the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Warren, John J; Bishara, Samir E

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the duration of nutritive and nonnutritive sucking behaviors and various occlusal characteristics in the primary dentition. Sucking behavior data were collected on 372 children followed longitudinally from birth by using periodic questionnaires completed by parents. Study models were obtained from the children at 4 to 5 years of age and assessed for posterior crossbite, anterior open bite, and overjet. Dental arch parameters including arch widths, arch lengths, and arch depths were measured directly from the models. The subjects were grouped according to type of habit (pacifier or digit) and duration of nonnutritive sucking behaviors (less than 12, 12 to 24, 24 to 36, 36 to 48, and more than 48 months). Children with nonnutritive sucking of less than 12 months were further grouped according to the duration of breast-feeding. The dental arch and the occlusal characteristics were then compared among these groups. The results indicated no relationship between duration of breast-feeding during the first year of life and any dental arch or occlusal parameters. The study found that prolonged pacifier habits resulted in changes to the dental arches and the occlusal parameters that were different from the effects of digit sucking. In addition, some changes in the dental arch parameters and occlusal characteristics (eg, prevalence of posterior crossbite and increased amount of overjet) persisted well beyond the cessation of the pacifier or digit habit. Although further study is needed to determine the effects of nonnutritive sucking behavior in the mixed dentition, the results suggest that current recommendations for discontinuing these habits may not be optimal in preventing habit-related malocclusions.

  5. Transverse effect of Haas and Hyrax appliances on the upper dental arch in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Façanha, Anna Júlia de Oliveira; Lara, Tulio Silva; Garib, Daniela Gamba; da Silva Filho, Omar Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the transverse effect of rapid maxillary expansion in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate while comparing the Haas and Hyrax appliances. Methods The sample consisted of 48 patients divided into two groups: Group I - 25 patients treated with modified Haas appliance (mean age: 10 years 8 months); and Group II - 23 patients treated with Hyrax appliance (mean age: 10 years 6 months). Casts were taken during pre-expansion and after removal of the appliance at the end of the retention period. The models were scanned with the aid of the 3 Shape R700 3D scanner. Initial and final transverse distances were measured at cusp tips and cervical-palatal points of maxillary teeth by using the Ortho AnalyzerTM 3D software. Results The mean expansion obtained between cusp tips and cervical-palatal points for inter-canine width was 4.80 mm and 4.35 mm with the Haas appliance and 5.91 mm and 5.91 mm with the Hyrax appliance. As for first premolars or first deciduous molars, the values obtained were 6.46 mm and 5.90 mm in the Haas group and 7.11 mm and 6.65 mm in the Hyrax group. With regard to first molars, values were 6.11 mm and 5.24 mm in the Haas group and 7.55 mm and 6.31 mm in the Hyrax group. Conclusion Rapid maxillary expansion significantly increased the transverse dimensions of the upper dental arch in patients with cleft palate, with no significant differences between the Hass and Hyrax expanders. PMID:24945513

  6. Three-dimensional dental arch curvature in human adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Serrao, G; Colombo, A

    1999-04-01

    The three-dimensional arrangement of dental cusps and incisal edges in human dentitions has been reported to fit the surface of a sphere (the curve of Monson), with a radius of about 4 inches in adults. The objective of the current study was to compare the three-dimensional curvature of the mandibular dental arch in healthy permanent dentitions of young adults and adolescents. The mandibular casts of 50 adults (aged 19 to 22 years) and 20 adolescents (aged 12 to 14 years) with highly selected sound dentitions that were free from temporomandibular joint problems were obtained. The three coordinates of cusp tips excluding the third molars were digitized with a three-dimensional digitizer, and used to derive a spherical model of the curvature of the occlusal surfaces. From the best interpolating sphere, the radii of the left and right curves of Spee (quasi-sagittal plane) and of molar curve of Wilson (frontal plane) were computed. Mandibular arch size (interdental distances) was also calculated. The occlusal curvature of the mandibular arch was not significantly influenced by sex, although a significant effect of age was found (Student t, P <.005). The radii of the overall sphere, right and left curves of Spee, and curve of Wilson in the molar area were about 101 mm in adults, and about 80 mm in adolescents. Arch size was not influenced by either sex or age. The different curvatures of the occlusal plane in adolescents and adults may be explained by a progressive rotation of the major axis of the teeth moving the occlusal plane toward a more buccal position. These dental movements should be performed in a frontal plane on an anteroposterior axis located next to the dental crown.

  7. Reliability of antagonistic arch impression in dental prostheses: clinical evaluation of different preimpression preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Scotti, R; Lugli, M; D'Elia, A

    1995-08-01

    This study compared the influence of different methods of preimpression preparation on the quality of occlusal reproduction in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. A total of 30 impressions of the lower dental arch of a patient were made with five different preimpression preparation procedures. Stone casts were made and analyzed. Critical comparison showed that the preimpression preparation influenced the quality of the occlusal surface of the cast. Fingerpainting the occlusal surface with fluid hydrocolloid before positioning the loaded impression tray, associated with use of a saliva ejector, reduced the incidence of macroscopic defects on the occlusal surface of the impressions.

  8. Impact of shortened dental arches on oral health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Antunes, J L F; Tan, H; Peres, K G; Peres, M A

    2016-03-01

    This study described the prevalence of adults with shortened dental arches (SDA) in Brazil, specifically assessing the differences of oral health-related quality of life [the prevalence and severity of oral impacts on daily performance (OIDP)] by dentition status. We analysed data from the 2010 National Survey of Oral Health in Brazil, including home interviews and oral examinations. The assessment of SDA used two alternative definitions: having 3-5 natural occlusal units (OUs) in posterior teeth or having 4 OUs in posterior teeth. Both definitions included having intact anterior region and no dental prosthesis. The analysis was weighted, and a complex sampling design was used. Negative binomial regression models assessed associations as adjusted for socio-demographic conditions and dental outcomes. A total of 9779 adults (35-44 years old) participated in the study. A non-negligible proportion had SDA: 9·9% and 3·8% for the first and second definition, respectively. Individuals with SDA (first definition) ranked higher in OIDP prevalence [count ratio (CR) 1·22; 1·09-1·36, 95% confidence interval (CI)] and severity (CR = 1·43; 1·19-1·72, 95% CI) than those with more natural teeth. This difference was not statistically significant when adjusted for socio-demographic and dental covariates: OIDP prevalence (CR = 1·04; 0·92-1·17, 95% CI) and severity (CR = 1·09; 0·91-1·30, 95% CI). Analogous results were obtained when the second definition of SDA was adopted. These findings suggest that a considerable contingent of adults may function well without dental prostheses, despite having several missing teeth. This conclusion challenges the traditional approach of replacing any missing tooth and instructs the allocation of more dental resources to preventive, diagnostic and restorative services.

  9. Three-dimensional digital evaluation of dental arches in infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Viviane Mendes; Jorge, Paula Karine; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Gomide, Márcia Ribeiro; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and compare the dimensions of the dental arches on three-dimensional digital study models in children with and without cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery. The sample consisted of 223 digital models of children aged 3-9 months, divided into 5 groups: without craniofacial deformities, unilateral and bilateral incomplete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral and bilateral complete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Dental casts of the maxillary dental arches of the children were used. The dental casts underwent a process of scanning through 3D scanner and the measurements used for the correlation among groups were made on the scanned images. Statistical analysis was performed by t test and ANOVA followed by Tukey test. The results showed that the intercanine distance and anterior cleft width was wider in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. The intertuberosity distances and posterior cleft width was wider in children with bilateral cleft lip and palate among the groups. Children with cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery had wider maxillary arch dimensions than the children without cleft lip and palate.

  10. Reporting of dental status from full-arch radiographs: Descriptive analysis and methodological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Huettig, Fabian; Axmann, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To identify standards, how entities of dental status are assessed and reported from full-arch radiographs of adults. METHODS: A PubMed (Medline) search was performed in November 2011. Literature had to report at least one out of four defined entities using radiographs: number of teeth or implants; caries, fillings or restorations; root-canal fillings and apical health; alveolar bone level. Cohorts included to the study had to be of adult age. Methods of radiographic assessment were noted and checked for the later mode of report in text, tables or diagrams. For comparability, the encountered mode of report was operationalized to a logical expression. RESULTS: Thirty-seven out of 199 articles were evaluated via full-text review. Only one article reported all four entities. Eight articles reported at the maximum 3 comparable entities. However, comparability is impeded because of the usage of absolute or relative frequency, mean or median values as well as grouping. Furthermore the methods of assessment were different or not described sufficiently. Consequently, established sum scores turned out to be highly questionable, too. The amount of missing data within all studies remained unclear. It is even so remissed to mention supernumerary and aplased teeth as well as the count of third molars. CONCLUSION: Data about dental findings from radiographs is, if at all possible, only comparable with serious limitations. A standardization of both, assessing and reporting entities of dental status from radiographs is missing and has to be established within a report guideline. PMID:25325067

  11. Investigation of complete dental arches of 23 patients aged at least 75 years

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Beniamino; Di Carlo, Stefano; Shahinas, Jorida; Mencio, Francesca; Fusco, Raimondo; Pompa, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Numerous factors help to conserve the dentition of elderly patients, such as healthy food habits, a strong physical constitution, and a good quality of life. The aim of this study was to define a model that takes into account the integration of both the structural and functional aspects of a healthy dentition. Twenty-three patients aged at least 75 years were recruited. The patients were required to possess all of their dentition and have no prosthetic rehabilitations and be asymptomatic for temporomandibular joint disorders. Occlusal characteristics were measured and recorded using the criteria adopted by the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: presence or absence of rotation of the upper arches, trend of the occlusal table, and distribution of occlusal contacts during movements. We believe that the following parameters are predictive of a condition of the dental arches’ equilibrium: crowding and disalignment of the teeth, derotated position of the upper arches, absence of the curve of Spee, an occlusal plane trend contrary to spherical theory, and presence of group function on the working side and malocclusion on the nonworking side. We consider that these factors are merely the consequence of correct functioning within the framework of favorable environmental factors. PMID:22545185

  12. Three-dimensional visualisation and analysis of post-operative changes in the size and shape of the dental arch and palate.

    PubMed

    Trefný, P; Tauferová, E; Bálková, S

    2005-01-01

    In craniofacial surgery and orthodontics, three-dimensional computer models of the dental arch and palate have recently entered usage in diagnosis assessment, treatment planning, case presentations and evaluation of treatment progress and outcome. In this contribution, we show how effective visualisation and evaluation of changes in the size and shape of the dental arch and palate in a given patient can be performed using superimposition of two or more 3D computer models that record the condition before and after treatment. We also present a method of three-dimensional measurement of the dental arch and palate suitable for evaluation of treatment results within retrospective and prospective studies in larger samples of subjects.

  13. Human dental arch shape evaluated by euclidean-distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1993-04-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. When landmark data are available, a recently proposed method (euclidean-distance matrix analysis) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. This method also localizes those areas which differ most between the two structures. We have applied it to analyze the sexual dimorphism in dental arch form in a sample of 50 men and 45 women. Subjects ranged in age between 20 and 27 years, and had sound dentitions. Fourteen landmarks, corresponding to the centers of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar), were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. All the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth were computed, thus creating four mean form matrices (one for each arch within sex). Gender differences were tested by using euclidean-distance matrix analysis. No significant differences were demonstrated in the shape of arches, while male arches proved to be slightly bigger than female arches.

  14. [Treatment using the Lehman apparatus in patients with malocclusion in light of teleradiologic tests and dental arch measurements].

    PubMed

    Bielawska, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of Lehman's appliance for the management of distocclusion and to establish indications and contraindications to its use. The mean duration of treatment was also determined and compared to such in similar form of malocclusion treated with other types of functional appliances. Linear measurements were performed on dental plaster casts before and after treatment. Cephalometric analysis served to establish the mechanism of Class II correction (skeletal or dentoalveolar) and to reveal any increase in mandibular length caused by Lehman's appliance. The material consisted of thirty-three Class II patients (18 girls and 15 boys), aged 9 to 15 years, treated successfully with Lehman's appliance for distocclusion. Dental plaster casts and lateral cephalograms were obtained at the beginning and end of treatment. Improvement in occlusal relationship in the molar, canine and incisor segments was the result of dental and skeletal changes. Metric analysis of dental casts before and after treatment showed that active treatment was associated with an increase in transversal dimensions of the upper arch ranging from 1.8 to 2.4 mm. Overbite and overjet decreased considerably. Anterior length of upper arch was reduced significantly in boys only and was accompanied by distraction and transition from a V-shaped to U-shaped type of arch. These changes helped to harmonize transversal dental relationship of both arches and improved conditions for functional skeletal base adaptation. Treatment with Lehman's appliance improved the intermaxillary relationship and led to a decrease in the ANB angle attributable to a change in the SNA angle in girls and the SNB angle in boys. The mandibular reaction in girls with Class II/2 was interesting: the SNB angle increased considerably, indicating "unblocking" of the mandible. Changes in the vertical skeletal relationship were limited to a minor reduction in the index. Maxillary incisors moved little

  15. Relationship of Inter-Condylar Distance With Inter-Dental Distance Of Maxillary Arch and Occlusal Vertical Dimension: A Clinical Anthropometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Renu; Meenakshi, A; Kumar, Sandeep; Hota, Sadananda; Rawat, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To find out the anthropometric relationship of Inter-condylar distance to Inter-canine and Inter-molar distance of maxillary arch and occlusal vertical dimension in dentate individuals of South Indian population. Materials and Methods: A total number of 120 dentate individuals were randomly equally divided into Group A and Group B. According to the face form, each Group was again subdivided into four subgroups. Subgroup A1 and B1 contained Square face form, Subgroup A2 and B2 Tapered, Subgroup A3 and B3 Square tapered and Subgroup A4 and B4 Ovoid face form. The ratio of ICD to U3, U6 and OVD of Group A individuals were applied to the Group B individuals with similar face forms and the clinical significance of the ratios were evaluated. Results: No significant difference (p-value=0.841) was observed in the ratio of U6 to ICD (U6/ICD) in all the face forms. A significant difference (p-value = 0.010) in the mean value was observed when the ratio of OVD to ICD (OVD/ICD) was compared between the squared tapered face form of Group A (0.60 ± 0.01) and Group B (0.06±0.03). A significant difference (p value = 0.007) was observed between the measured (62.47 ±2.77) and calculated (64.99±2.61) values of OVD in square taper face form. Conclusion: In south Indian population, ICD can be used as a reliable guide line to determine the bucco-palatal position of maxillary first molar irrespective of the face forms. PMID:25654029

  16. Dental arch relationship in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate following one-stage and three-stage surgical protocols.

    PubMed

    Fudalej, Piotr; Katsaros, Christos; Bongaarts, Catharina; Dudkiewicz, Zofia; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to compare dental arch relationship following one-stage and three-stage surgical protocols of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Dental casts of 61 children (mean age, 11.2 years; SD, 1.7), consecutively treated in one center with one-stage closure of the complete cleft at 9.2 months (SD, 2.0), were compared with a sample of 97 patients (mean age, 8.7 years; SD, 0.9), consecutively treated with a three-stage protocol including delayed hard palate closure in another center. The dental casts were assigned random numbers to blind their origin. Four raters graded dental arch relationship and palatal morphology using the EUROCRAN index. The strength of agreement of rating was assessed with kappa statistics. Independent t tests were run to compare the EUROCRAN scores between one-stage and three-stage samples, and Fisher's exact tests were performed to evaluate differences of distribution of the EUROCRAN grades. The intra- and inter-rater agreement was moderate to very good. Dental arch relationship in the one-stage sample was less favorable than in three-stage group (mean scores, 2.58 and 1.97 for one-stage and three-stage samples, respectively; p < 0.000). Palatal morphology in the one-stage sample was more favorable than in the three-stage group (mean scores, 1.79 and 1.96 for one-stage and three-stage samples, respectively; p = 0.047). The dental arch relationship following one-stage repair was less favorable than the outcome of three-stage repair. The palatal morphology following one-stage repair, however, was more favorable than the outcome of three-stage repair.

  17. Correlation between interdental occlusal plane and plantar arches. An EMG study.

    PubMed

    Valentino, B; Melito, F; Aldi, B; Valentino, T

    2002-01-01

    The Authors carried out an experimental study on a homogeneous group of young people to provide evidence of functional correlation among masticatory muscles and, indirectly, between changes to the interdental occlusal plane and modifications of the plantar arches due to talipes valgus and flat foot. In the two analysed conditions, the masticatory muscles undergo different functional alterations. This is due to the fact that the mechanoreceptors in the tendons of the muscles governing the plantar arch configuration are stimulated in different ways during the activation of long osteoarthromuscular chains. Dental specialists will have to take these correlation into account when diagnosing TMJ disorders.

  18. Evaluation of facial morphology and sagittal relationship between dental arches in primary and mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Traldi, Aline; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; de Souza, Luciane Zanin; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess facial morphology (Pattern) and sagittal relationship between dental arches (Class), and establish a potential association between them and the variables sex, age and ethnicity, among schoolchildren aged between 4 and 9 years old (mean age of 6.7 years) in primary and mixed dentitions. METHODS: The sample comprised 875 children (457 males and 418 females) attending schools in Descalvado, São Paulo, Brazil. An attempt was made with a view to establish a potential association between children's morphological features with sex, age and ethnicity. RESULTS: Descriptive analysis revealed a predominance of facial Pattern I (69.9 %) and Class I (67.4 %). Statistical tests (p < 0.001) showed that Class I was more frequent among Pattern I children, whereas Class II prevailed among Pattern II, and Class III was frequent among Pattern I and III children. Ethnicity was the only variable associated with facial pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that facial pattern and sagittal relationship between dental arches tend to be correlated. Ethnicity was associated with facial pattern, with Pattern I being the most recurrent among Caucasians and facial Pattern II being recurrent among Afro-descendant subjects. PMID:26352847

  19. Evaluation of continuous arch and segmented arch leveling techniques in adult patients--a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Weiland, F J; Bantleon, H P; Droschl, H

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of overbite correction achieved by a conventional continuous arch wire technique and the segmented arch technique as recommended by Burstone. The sample comprised 50 adult patients (age 18 to 40 years) with deep bites. Twenty-five patients were treated with a continuous arch wire technique (CAW); in the second half of the sample, the segmented arch technique (Burstone) was used for correction of the vertical malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms and plaster cast models taken before and immediately after treatment were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed on the collected data. The results showed that both techniques produced a highly significant overbite reduction (CAW: -3.17 mm, p < 0.001; Burstone: -3.56 mm, p < 0.001). The CAW group showed an extrusion in the molar area with subsequent posterior rotation of the mandible (6occl-ML: +1.30 mm; 6occl-NSL: +1.63 mm; ML/NSL: +1.94 degrees, all p < 0.001). The Burstone group, however, showed overbite reduction by incisor intrusion without any substantial extrusion of posterior teeth (upper 1-NSL: -1.50 mm; lower 1-ML: -1.72 mm; both p < 0.001). As a consequence, no significant posterior rotation of the mandible took place (ML/NSL: +0.52 degrees, n.s.). It is concluded that in adult patients the segmented arch technique (Burstone) can be considered as being superior to a conventional continuous arch wire technique if arch leveling by incisor intrusion is indicated.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  1. The esthetic rehabilitation of misplaced dental arch after fracture of anterior maxillae: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Turna, Çagri

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In cases where the patient experiences trauma, the teeth may be fractured or a bone segment could be fractured causing misplaced teeth. Ceramic veneer restorations may be a solution for re-establishing the ideal position. The treatment of misplaced dental arch segment is presented and treatment options are discussed. Case presentation A 30-years-old female Turkish patient had a history of a dentoalveolar trauma and a surgical operation. Her main complaints were about the unpleasant appearance of her anterior teeth. The maxillary anterior teeth were positioned labially and had irregularities in vertical position inharmonious with each other and the horizontal plane. The misplaced sector treated with minimally invasive dentin bonded porcelain laminate veneers. Conclusion Ceramic veneers can be a solution for patients with malpositioned anterior teeth even the situation is severe and excessive tooth reduction is needed. PMID:19918401

  2. Effect of implant-supported prosthesis on the bite force and masticatory efficiency in subjects with shortened dental arches.

    PubMed

    Meena, A; Jain, V; Singh, N; Arora, N; Jha, R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess changes in bite force and masticatory efficiency in shortened dental arch (SDA) subjects rehabilitated with implant-supported restoration for 1st molar. Ten SDA subjects with bilaterally missing mandibular molars (experimental group) were recruited. In each subject, one tapered threaded implant was placed bilaterally in 1st mandibular molar region and restored. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated objectively by measuring the released dye from chewed raw carrots, with a 'spectrophotometer' at 530 nm preoperatively and at 3 months after restoration. Bite force was evaluated using 'bite force measuring appliance' preoperatively, at 6 weeks and at 3 months after restoration. Ten completely dentate-matched subjects (in terms of age, sex, height and weight) acted as control. The results revealed that as compared with the control group, the experimental group showed significantly less (P < 0.05) mean maximum bite force at pre-restoration and at 6 weeks after restoration. Although at 3 months the mean maximum bite force value was less than the control group but the mean difference was statistically insignificant. The mean difference of masticatory efficiency between control and experimental group was statistically significant (P < 0.05) before restoration, but was statistically insignificant at 3 months after restoration. Thus it was concluded that after the restoration of mandibular arch with implant-supported prosthesis, both bite force and masticatory efficiency of all SDA subjects increased and were comparable to that of matched completely dentate subjects after 3 months.

  3. Intra-arch dimensional measurement validity of laser-scanned digital dental models compared with the original plaster models: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    De Luca Canto, G; Pachêco-Pereira, C; Lagravere, M O; Flores-Mir, C; Major, P W

    2015-05-01

    A systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the validity of intra-arch dimensional measurements made from laser-scanned digital dental models in comparison with measurements directly obtained from the original plaster casts (gold standard). Finally included articles were only those reporting studies that compared measurements from digital models produced from laser scanning against their plaster models. Measurements from the original plaster models should have been made using a manual or digital caliper (gold standard). Articles that used scans from impressions or digital photographs were discarded. Detailed individual search strategies for Cochrane, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed, and LILACS were developed. The references cited in the selected articles were also checked for any references that could have been missed in the electronic database searches. A partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar. The methodology of selected studies was evaluated using the 14-item quality assessment tool for diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Only 16 studies were finally included for the qualitative/quantitative synthesis. The selected studies consistently agree that the validity of measurements obtained after using a laser scanner from plaster models is similar to direct measurements. Any stated differences would be unlikely clinically relevant. There is consistent scientific evidence to support the validity of measurements from digital dental models in comparison with intra-arch dimensional measurements directly obtained from them.

  4. A structural equation model to investigate the impact of missing occlusal units on objective masticatory function in patients with shortened dental arches.

    PubMed

    Fueki, K; Yoshida, E; Igarashi, Y

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of missing occlusal units (MOUs) on objective masticatory function with respect to food comminuting and mixing ability. Sixty partially dentate patients (mean age, 64·1 years) with shortened dental arches participated in the study. Food comminuting ability was assessed using a masticatory performance test with peanuts as a test food. Food mixing ability was assessed using a mixing ability test with a two-coloured wax cube. Maximum bite force (MBF) was measured using a pressure-sensitive film as a mediator for food comminuting and mixing ability. A structural equation model was constructed based on a hypothesis that MOUs would be associated with reduced MBF and impairment of food comminuting and mixing ability. Structural equation modelling analysis found significant direct effects of MOU on median particle size and mixing ability index (MAI) (P < 0·001). In addition, MOU had significant indirect effects on median particle size and MAI with MBF as a mediator (P < 0·05). These results suggest that decrease in occlusal platform area and reduced MBF because of MOUs are associated with the impairment of food comminution and mixing in patients with shortened dental arches.

  5. Influence of scanning and reconstruction parameters on quality of three-dimensional surface models of the dental arches from cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Couto Souza, Paulo; Jacobs, Reinhilde; de Azambuja Berti, Soraya; van der Stelt, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The study aim is to investigate the influence of scan field, mouth opening, voxel size, and segmentation threshold selections on the quality of the three-dimensional (3D) surface models of the dental arches from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). 3D models of 25 patients scanned with one image intensifier CBCT system (NewTom 3G, QR SLR, Verona, Italy) using three field sizes in open- and closed-mouth positions were created at different voxel size resolutions. Two observers assessed the quality of the models independently on a five-point scale using specified criteria. The results indicate that large-field selection reduced the visibility of the teeth and the interproximal space. Also, large voxel size reduced the visibility of the occlusal surfaces and bone in the anterior region in both maxilla and mandible. Segmentation threshold was more variable in the maxilla than in the mandible. Closed-mouth scan complicated separating the jaws and reduced teeth surfaces visibility. The preliminary results from this image-intensifier system indicate that the use of medium or small scan fields in an open-mouth position with a small voxel is recommended to optimize quality of the 3D surface model reconstructions of the dental arches from CBCT. More research is needed to validate the results with other flat-panel detector-based CBCT systems. PMID:19506922

  6. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. Results The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. Conclusions The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models. PMID:24696823

  7. Posterior arch C-1 screw technique: a cadaveric comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Fisahn, Christian; Tkachenko, Lara; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Reintjes, Stephen; Grunert, Peter; Norvell, Daniel C; Tubbs, R Shane; Page, Jeni; Newell, David W; Nora, Peter; Oskouian, Rod J; Chapman, Jens

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Posterior atlantoaxial stabilization and fusion using C-1 lateral mass screw fixation has become commonly used in the treatment of instability and for reconstructive indications since its introduction by Goel and Laheri in 1994 and modification by Harms in 2001. Placement of such lateral mass screws can be challenging because of the proximity to the spinal cord, vertebral artery, an extensive venous plexus, and the C-2 nerve root, which overlies the designated starting point on the posterior center of the lateral mass. An alternative posterior access point starting on the posterior arch of C-1 could provide a C-2 nerve root-sparing starting point for screw placement, with the potential benefit of greater directional control and simpler trajectory. The authors present a cadaveric study comparing an alternative strategy (i.e., a C-1 screw with a posterior arch starting point) to the conventional strategy (i.e., using the lower lateral mass entry site), specifically assessing the safety of screw placement to preserve the C-2 nerve root. METHODS Five US-trained spine fellows instrumented 17 fresh human cadaveric heads using the Goel/Harms C-1 lateral mass (GHLM) technique on the left and the posterior arch lateral mass (PALM) technique on the right, under fluoroscopic guidance. After screw placement, a CT scan was obtained on each specimen to assess for radiographic screw placement accuracy. Four faculty spine surgeons, blinded to the surgeon who instrumented the cadaver, independently graded the quality of screw placement using a modified Upendra classification. RESULTS Of the 17 specimens, the C-2 nerve root was anatomically impinged in 13 (76.5%) of the specimens. The GHLM technique was graded Type 1 or 2, which is considered "acceptable," in 12 specimens (70.6%), and graded Type 3 or 4 ("unacceptable") in 5 specimens (29.4%). In contrast, the PALM technique had 17 (100%) of 17 graded Type 1 or 2 (p = 0.015). There were no vertebral artery injuries found

  8. Validity and reliability of a three-dimensional dental cast simulator for arch dimension measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Asefi, Sohrab; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Aminian, Amin; Shamsa, Mohammad; Massudi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The accuracy and reproducibility of measurements in a locally made three dimensional (3D) simulator was assessed and compared with manual caliper measurements. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 casts were scanned by our laser scanner. Software capabilities included dimensional measurements, transformation and rotation of the cast as a whole, separation and rotation of each tooth and clip far. Two orthodontists measured the intercanine width, intermolar width and canine, molar and arch depth on the casts and in 3D simulator. For calculating the reliability coefficient and comparing random and systematic errors between the two methods, intra-class correlation coefficient of reliability (ICC), Dahlberg and paired t-test were used, respectively. The ICC and Dahlberg's formula were also applied to assess intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability of measurements on the casts and in the simulator (P < 0.05). Results: Canine and molar depth measurements had low reliability on the casts. Reliability between methods for the remaining three variables was 0.87, 0.98 and 0.98 in the maxilla and 0.92, 0.77 and 0.94 in the mandible, respectively. The method error was between 0.31 and 0.48 mm. The mean intra-observer difference were 0.086 and 0.23 mm in the 3D method and caliper. The inter-observer differences were 0.21 and 0.42 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The maximum average absolute difference between the two methods was <0.5 mm, indicating that the new system is indeed clinically acceptable. The examiner reliability was higher in 3D measurements. PMID:25540660

  9. Prevalence of snoring and facial profile type, malocclusion class and dental arch morphology among snorer and nonsnorer university population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Madani, Gassan H.; Banabilh, Saeed M.; El-Sakhawy, Medhat M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of snoring in an adult male university population, and to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in facial profile shape, malocclusion type, or palatal morphology among snorer and nonsnorer. Materials and Methods: Berlin questionnaire was given to 840 students and employees aged 18–45 years (24 ± 40). Both snorers and nonsnorers were assessed for the facial profile type, malocclusion type, and palatal morphology. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used to compare the difference between the two groups. Results: The prevalence of snoring was 16.28%. The most frequent findings among snorer were straight profiles (52.0%), Class I malocclusion (74.7%), and V palatal shape (16.0%), respectively. The Chi-square test revealed a significant difference in terms of V-shaped palatal morphology (P < 0.05); higher neck circumference (NC) (P < 0.007); upper arch length was significantly shorter (P < 0.038); and the inter- first upper premolar distance was significantly narrower (P < 0.013). Conclusion: The null hypothesis is rejected. Snoring in our university population is associated with V-shape palatal morphology, increased NC and decrease in the upper arch length, and inter- first upper premolar distance. PMID:26955628

  10. Ketoprofen Dental Pain Study.

    PubMed

    Levin, L M; Cooper, S A; Betts, N J; Wedell, D; Hermann, D G; Lamp, C; Secreto, S A; Hersh, E V

    1997-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, recently approved as an over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic at a 12.5 mg dosage strength. This is the first published study which explores the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketoprofen 12.5 mg in patients experiencing pain following the removal of impacted third molars. This study was single-dose, double-blind and randomized utilizing a 6-hour in-patient evaluation period. Patients ingested a single dose of ketoprofen 12.5 mg (n = 30), ketoprofen 37.5 mg (n = 32) or placebo (n = 15) when their post-surgical pain reached at least a moderate intensity on a 5-point categorical (CAT) scale and greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measures of pain intensity and relief were gathered every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours, and then hourly from hours 3 through 6. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded as they occurred. Both dosages of ketoprofen were significantly more efficacious than placebo (two way ANOVAs, p < 0.05). For pain intensity difference (PID) and pain relief, the 12.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from hours 1 through 3, while the 37.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from 40 minutes through 4 hours. Ketoprofen 37.5 mg was significantly more efficacious than the 12.5 mg dose only at 40 minutes for PID(VAS) and relief, and at 60 minutes for PID(VAS). Both ketoprofen dosages displayed significantly greater 3-hr, 4-hr and 6-hr summary analgesic measures (SPID(VAS), SPID(CAT), TOTPAR) than placebo, with the exception of the 6-hr SPID(CAT) measure for ketoprofen 12.5 mg. No serious side effects were observed in this study. We conclude that ketoprofen in a dose range of 12.5 mg to 37.5 mg is a safe and effective analgesic for the relief of post-operative dental pain.

  11. Double arch mirror study. Part 2: Engineering analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraninejad, B.; Vukobratovich, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, class mirror for infrared, astronomical telescopes was developed. A 50 cm, fused silica mirror was modified for use in a new mount configuration. The flexures and the finite element analysis of the mirror stresses are reported.

  12. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  13. Comparative analysis of 3D data accuracy of single tooth and full dental arch captured by different intraoral and laboratory digital impression systems.

    PubMed

    Ryakhovsky, A N; Kostyukova, V V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of digital impressions taken by different intraoral and laboratory scanners. For this purpose a synthetic jaw model with prepared tooth was scanned using intraoral scanning systems: 3D Progress (MHT S.P.A., IT - MHT Optic Research AG, CH); True Definition (3M ESPE, USA); Trios (3Shape A/S, DNK); CEREC AC Bluecam, CEREC Omnicam (Sirona Dental System GmbH, DE); Planscan (Planmeca, FIN); and laboratory scanning systems: s600 ARTI (Zirkonzahn GmbH, IT); Imetric Iscan D104, CH); D900 (3Shape A/S, DNK); Zfx Evolution (Zfx GmbH, DE) (each n=10). Reference-scanning was done by ATOS Core (GOM mbH, DE). The resulting digital impressions were superimposed with the master-scan. The measured deviations by points (trueness) for intraoral scanners were: True Definition - 15.0±2.85 μm (single tooth) and 45.0±19.11 µm (full arch); Trios - 17.1±1.44 and 58.8±27.36 µm; CEREC AC Bluecam - 22.3±5.58 and 20.3±4.13 µm; CEREC Omnicam - 25.0±1.06 and 78.5±27.03 µm; 3D Progress - 26.4±5.75 and 213.5±47.44 µm; Planscan - 54.6±11.58 and 205.2±21.73 µm. For laboratory scanners: Imetric Iscan D104 - 10.2±0.87 μm (stamp) and 65.3±5.36 µm (full arch); Zfx Evolution - 12.8±0.83 and 66.4±2.80 µm; Zirkonzahn s600 ARTI - 15.1±1.36 and 65.9±1.33 µm; 3Shape D900 - 19.9±0.53 and 63.6±0.83 µm. Precision was: True Definition - 19.9±2.77 μm (single tooth) and 40.1±11.04 µm (full arch); Trios - 25.8±2.49 and 69.9±18.95 µm; CEREC AC Bluecam - 36.4±2.78 and 46.6±3.44 µm; CEREC Omnicam - 37.6±3.29 and 76.2±13.36 µm; 3D Progress - 76.9±11.04 and 102.2±8.06 µm; Planscan - 74.3±6.58 and 93.9±15.32 µm. For laboratory scanners: Imetric Iscan D104 - 11.7±4.39 μm (stamp) and 31.2±5.58 µm (full arch); Zfx Evolution - 8.4±0.49 and 24.8±3.98 µm; Zirkonzahn s600 ARTI - 13.4±6.74 and 20.7±4.34 µm; 3Shape D900 - 10.4±0.93 and 17.8±0.62 µm. Whole deviation of the dental arch was: 3D Progress - 98.0±5.70 µm

  14. In vivo Study of the Accuracy of Dual-arch Impressions

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luciana Martinelli Santayana; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Junior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated in vivo the accuracy of metal (Smart®) and plastic (Triple Tray®) dual-arch trays used with vinyl polysiloxane (Flexitime®), in the putty/wash viscosity, as well as polyether (Impregum Soft®) in the regular viscosity. Materials and Methods: In one patient, an implant-level transfer was screwed on an implant in the mandibular right first molar, serving as a pattern. Ten impressions were made with each tray and impression material. The impressions were poured with Type IV gypsum. The width and height of the pattern and casts were measured in a profile projector (Nikon). The results were submitted to Student’s t-test for one sample (α = 0.05). Results: For the width distance, the plastic dual-arch trays with vinyl polysiloxane (4.513 mm) and with polyether (4.531 mm) were statistically wider than the pattern (4.489 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane (4.504 mm) and with polyether (4.500 mm) did not differ statistically from the pattern. For the height distance, only the metal dual-arch tray with polyether (2.253 mm) differed statistically from the pattern (2.310 mm). Conclusion: The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane, in the putty/wash viscosities, reproduced casts with less distortion in comparison with the same technique with the plastic dual-arch tray. The plastic or metal dual-arch trays with polyether reproduced cast with greater distortion. How to cite the article: Santayana de Lima LM, Borges GA, Burnett LH Jr, Spohr AM. In vivo study of the accuracy of dual-arch impressions. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):50-5. PMID:25083032

  15. Transversal dental arch dimensions in 9-year-old children born in the 1960s and the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Lindsten, R; Ogaard, B; Larsson, E

    2001-12-01

    The transversal arch dimension has been studied in 2 different cohorts of 9-year-old children, a group of 119 (56 girls and 63 boys) from Norway and a group of 133 (72 girls and 61 boys) from Sweden. Half of the children in each group were born in the 1960s and half in the 1980s. The maxillary and mandibular transversal dimensions did not differ between the 1960s groups and the 1980s groups when the maxilla and the mandible were studied separately. When the intermaxillary relationship was assessed, a significant reduction in the intermaxillary difference was found in the boys born in the 1980s compared with the boys born in the 1960s. This was confirmed with different measurement points. In the girls, the mesial drift of the first permanent molars, because of a greater prevalence of caries in the 1960s groups, masked this effect. When the mesial drift of the first permanent molars in the girls born in the 1960s was considered, the transversal intermaxillary difference showed the same secular pattern as in the boys. When the mesial drift of the first permanent molars was considered, the intermaxillary difference in the 1960s groups resembled that found in an American sample of northwest European ancestry born in the 1940s to a greater extent compared with the children born in the 1980s.

  16. A laboratory study of arched magnetic flux rope eruptions*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2010-12-01

    Arched magnetic flux ropes (AMFRs) are arch-shaped twisted magnetic-structures that confine plasma and carry electrical current. Coronal loops and solar prominences are the main examples of AMFRs in the solar atmosphere. Solar AMFRs appear stable for long duration (several Alfven transit times) and then suddenly erupt due to occurrence of instabilities (e.g., kink instability). Solar AMFR eruptions have been frequently observed to evolve into more energetic events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections. A laboratory plasma experiment has been constructed to simulate such eruptions in an ambient magnetized plasma. The laboratory AMFR (n ~ 1019 m-3 , Te ~ 10 eV, B ~ 1 kG, L ~ 0.5 m) is produced using an annular LaB6 cathode and an annular anode mounted on two movable shafts in a vacuum chamber (1.0 m diameter, 4.5 m long). Each AMFR electrode has an electromagnet to produce a vacuum magnetic field along the curved axis of the AMFR. The vacuum chamber has an additional plasma source and electromagnets to produce the ambient magnetized plasma (n ~ 1018 m-3, Te ~ 4 eV, B ~ 25 G). Two laser beams (1064 nm, ~0.5 J/pulse) strike movable carbon targets placed behind the orifices of the electrodes to generate controlled plasma flows from the AMFR footpoints that drives the eruption. The experiment operates with a 0.5 Hz repetition rate and is highly reproducible. Thus, time evolution of the AMFR is recorded in three-dimensions with high spatio-temporal resolutions using movable diagnostic probes. Initial results on the dramatic eruption of an arched magnetic flux rope will be presented that demonstrate outward expansion of the AMFR, release of the AMFR plasma to the background, and excitation of magnetosonic waves in the ambient plasma. Reference: S. K. P. Tripathi and W. Gekelman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 075005 *Work supported by US DOE and NSF Fast camera image of a laboratory AMFR. Laser generated flows can be seen emanating from the both footpoints of the AMFR.

  17. Double arch mirror study. Part 1: Preliminary engineering report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    In the proposed design, the NASA AMES 20-in double arch mirror is supported by three clamp and flexure assemblies. The mirror clamp consists of a T-shaped Invar-36 member that goes into a similarly shaped socket in the back of the mirror. The mirror socket is made oversize and contacts the clamp only along the conical surface. The clamp is preloaded by a spring washer and pulls the mirror into contact with the flexure. The clamp is then inserted into the mirror socket through a cutout, is rotated 90 deg, and is then pinned in place. Loading conditions considered in socket design are discussed as well as stress in the socket and clamp. Flexure geometry and stress are examined as well as the effects of flexure error and of mirror cell error.

  18. Intraoral gothic arch tracing.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barry; Hill, Edward E

    2011-01-01

    In order to create optimum esthetics, function and phonetics in complete denture fabrication, it is necessary to record accurate maxillo-mandibular determinants of occlusion. This requires clinical skill to establish an accurate, verifiable and reproducible vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) and centric relation (CR). Correct vertical relation depends upon a consideration of several factors, including muscle tone, inter-dental arch space and parallelism of the ridges. Any errors made while taking maxillo-mandibular jaw relation records will result in dentures that are uncomfortable and, possibly, unwearable. The application of a tracing mechanism such as the Gothic arch tracer (a central bearing device) is a demonstrable method of determining centric relation. Intraoral Gothic arch tracers provide the advantage of capturing VDO and CR in an easy-to-use technique for practitioners. Intraoral tracing (Gothic arch tracing) is a preferred method of obtaining consistent positions of the mandible in motion (retrusive, protrusive and lateral) at a comfortable VDO.

  19. Anatomical Variations in the Branching Pattern of Human Aortic Arch: A Cadaveric Study from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Virendra; Rastogi, Rakhi; Jain, Vaishali; Bankwar, Vishal; Raghuwanshi, Shiv

    2013-01-01

    Variations of the branches of aortic arch are due to alteration in the development of certain branchial arch arteries during embryonic period. Knowledge of these variations is important during aortic instrumentation, thoracic, and neck surgeries. In the present study we observed these variations in fifty-two cadavers from Indian populations. In thirty-three (63.5%) cadavers, the aortic arch showed classical branching pattern which includes brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, and left subclavian artery. In nineteen (36.5%) cadavers it showed variations in the branching pattern, which include the two branches, namely, left subclavian artery and a common trunk in 19.2% cases, four branches, namely, brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 15.3% cases, and the three branches, namely, common trunk, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 1.9% cases. PMID:25938106

  20. Safety and Efficacy of an Aortic Arch Stent Graft with Window-Shaped Fenestration for Supra-Aortic Arch Vessels: an Experimental Study in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Ha; Choe, Jeong Cheon; Kim, Sang-Pil; Park, Tae Sik; Ahn, Jinhee; Park, Jin Sup; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thoracic endovascular aortic repair exhibits limitations in cases where the aortic pathology involves the aortic arch. We had already developed a fenestrated aortic stent graft (FASG) with a preloaded catheter for aortic pathology involving the aortic arch. FASG was suitable for elective cases. Materials and Methods An aortic arch stent graft with a window-shaped fenestration (FASG-W) for supra-aortic arch vessels is suitable for emergent cases. This study aims to test a FASG-W for supra-aortic arch vessels and to perform a preclinical study in swine to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this device. Six FASG-Ws with 1 preloaded catheter were advanced through the iliac artery in 6 swine. The presence of endoleak and the patency and deformity of the grafts were examined with computed tomography (CT) at 4 weeks postoperatively. A postmortem examination was performed at 8 weeks. The mean procedure time for FASG-W was 27.15±4.02 minutes. The mean time for the selection of the right carotid artery was 5.72±0.72 minutes. Results Major adverse events were not observed in any of the 6 pigs who survived for 8 weeks. For the FASG-W, no endoleaks, no disconnection, and no occlusion of the stent grafts were observed in the CT findings or the postmortem gross findings. Conclusion The procedure with the FASG-W was able to be performed safely in a relatively short procedure time and involved an easy technique. The FASG-W was found to be safe and convenient for use in this preclinical study of swine. PMID:28382077

  1. Periodontal and dental effects of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, assessed by using digital study models

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Danilo Furquim; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Goldenberg, Dov Charles; Fernandes, Mariana dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study assessed the maxillary dental arch changes produced by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME). METHODS: Dental casts from 18 patients (mean age of 23.3 years) were obtained at treatment onset (T1), three months after SARME (T2) and 6 months after expansion (T3). The casts were scanned in a 3D scanner (D-250, 3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark). Maxillary dental arch width, dental crown tipping and height were measured and assessed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS: Increased transversal widths from T1 and T2 and the maintenance of these values from T2 and T3 were observed. Buccal teeth tipping also showed statistically significant differences, with an increase in all teeth from T1 to T2 and a decrease from T2 to T3. No statistically significant difference was found for dental crown height, except for left first and second molars, although clinically irrelevant. CONCLUSION: SARME proved to be an effective and stable procedure, with minimum periodontal hazards. PMID:26154457

  2. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases. PMID:20345858

  3. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-05-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases.

  4. Haemodynamical stress in mouse aortic arch with atherosclerotic plaques: Preliminary study of plaque progression

    PubMed Central

    Assemat, P.; Siu, K.K.; Armitage, J.A.; Hokke, S.N.; Dart, A.; Chin-Dusting, J.; Hourigan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques develop at particular sites in the arterial tree, and this regional localisation depends largely on haemodynamic parameters (such as wall shear stress; WSS) as described in the literature. Plaque rupture can result in heart attack or stroke and hence understanding the development and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques is critically important. The purpose of this study is to characterise the haemodynamics of blood flow in the mouse aortic arch using numerical modelling. The geometries are digitalised from synchrotron imaging and realistic pulsatile blood flow is considered under rigid wall assumptions. Two cases are considered; arteries with and without plaque. Mice that are fed under fat diet present plaques in the aortic arch whose size is dependent on the number of weeks under the diet. The plaque distribution in the region is however relatively constant through the different samples. This result underlines the influence of the geometry and consequently of the wall shear stresses for plaque formation with plaques growing in region of relative low shear stresses. A discussion of the flow field in real geometry in the presence and absence of plaques is conducted. The presence of plaques was shown to alter the blood flow and hence WSS distribution, with regions of localised high WSS, mainly on the wall of the brachiocephalic artery where luminal narrowing is most pronounced. In addition, arch plaques are shown to induce recirculation in the blood flow, a phenomenon with potential influence on the progression of the plaques. The oscillatory shear index and the relative residence time have been calculated on the geometry with plaques to show the presence of this recirculation in the arch, an approach that may be useful for future studies on plaque progression. PMID:25349678

  5. A digital approach to photographing and measuring cleft lip and palate dental study casts.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Nicky

    2007-06-01

    This paper discusses whether a digital photographic technique can be used to produce a measurably accurate image of a dental cast arch, in order to assist the outcome assessments of cleft lip and palate surgery. It describes the measurement techniques, and discusses the factors affecting reproducibility. The results indicate that measurements which were taken from a digital image, using an on-screen measuring tool, correlated significantly with measurements taken manually from a plaster dental cast arch.

  6. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition can make it difficult to fit into shoes. People who have high arches most often need ... Symptoms include: Shortened foot length Difficulty fitting shoes Foot pain with walking, standing, and running (not everyone has this symptom)

  7. Reversal of dental fluorosis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Dhaval N.; Shah, Jigna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical reversal of dental fluorosis with various combinations of calcium, vitamin D3, and ascorbic acid, along with changes in levels of certain biochemical parameters concerned with dental fluorosis. The role of fluoride level of drinking water in the etiology of dental fluorosis and the prevalence of dental fluorosis in both dentitions and teeth were also assessed. Materials and Methods: A total number of 50 patients with clinical features of dental fluorosis without trauma and any adverse habits were selected. Of these, in 30 co-operative patients, estimation of water fluoride level and pretreatment and post-treatment serum and urine fluoride levels were done with ion selective electrode method. The selected 30 patients were divided into three groups, that is, group A, group B, and group C, and were given various combinations of medications like calcium with vitamin D3 supplements, ascorbic acid with vitamin D3 supplements, and chlorhexidine mouthwash (placebo) for three months, respectively. These 30 patients were assessed for any change in the clinical grading of dental fluorosis. Results: No change in clinical grading of dental fluorosis was noted. Considerable reduction in serum and urine fluoride levels was noted in both group A and group B patients. Dental fluorosis was noted in permanent teeth more commonly than deciduous teeth, and permanent maxillary central incisors had the highest prevalence rate. Conclusion: This study comprises only 30 patients with three months of follow-up. So, this sample of patients and duration of follow-up period are conclusive to observe changes in biochemical parameters but not sufficient to observe changes in clinical grading. PMID:23633850

  8. Comparison of arch forms between Turkish and North American

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ahmet A.; Keklik, Hakan; Tan, Enes; Ucar, Faruk I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological differences in the mandibular arches of Turkish and North American white subjects. Methods: The sample included 132 Turkish (34 Class I, 58 Class II, and 40 Class III) and 160 North American (60 Class I, 50 Class II, and 50 Class III) subjects. The most facial portion of 13 proximal contact areas was digitized from photocopied images of patients' mandibular dental arches. Clinical bracket points were calculated for each tooth based on mandibular tooth thickness data. Four linear and two proportional measurements were taken. The subjects were grouped according to arch form types (tapered, ovoid and square) in order to have frequency distribution compared between ethnic groups in each Angle classification. Results: The Turkish group showed significantly lower molar depth and more significant molar width-depth (W/D) ratio in all three Angle classifications. On the other hand, the Turkish group also showed a significantly larger intercanine width in Class III malocclusion and intermolar width in Class II malocclusion. The most frequent arch forms seen were the ovoid arch form in the Turkish group and the tapered form in the white group. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that when treating Turkish patients, one should expect to use preformed ovoid arch form orthodontic wires in a significant percentage of patients. PMID:27275615

  9. ArchE - An Architecture Design Assistant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    X, Module X 3 Author / Presenter, Date if Needed What is ArchE? ArchE is a software architecture design assistant, which: • Takes quality and...functional requirements as input • Elicits key quality attribute information to refine quality requirements • Elicits key architectural information...Derives candidate architectures • Evaluates whether quality requirements are satisfied • Identifies tradeoffs • Suggests alternative architectures ArchE is

  10. Educational material of dental anatomy applied to study the morphology of permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Siéssere, Selma; Vitti, Mathias; de Sousa, Luiz Gustavo; Semprini, Marisa; Regalo, Simone Cecílio Hallak

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present educational material that would allow the dental student to learn to easily identify the morphologic characteristics of permanent teeth, and how they fit together (occlusion). In order to do this, macro models of permanent teeth with no attrition were carved in wax and later molded with alginate. These molds were filled with plaster, dental stone and/or cold-cured acrylic resin. The large individual dental stone tooth models were mounted on a wax base, thus obtaining maxillary and mandibular arches which were occluded. These dental arches were molded with plaster or dental stone. The authors suggest that these types of macro models allow an excellent visualization of the morphologic characteristics of permanent teeth and occlusion. Dental students are able to carve the permanent dentition in wax with great facility when they can observe macro models.

  11. A Comparative Study of Bio Degradation of Various Orthodontic Arch Wires: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gopikrishnan, S; Melath, Anil; Ajith, V V; Mathews, N Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Orthodontic wires are the corner stones of the science and art of orthodontics and they remain in the patient’s mouth for a prolonged period of 18-24 months. It is but natural to expect that they will undergo some biodegradation when in the oral environment during that period. This study aims to compare the biodegradation characteristics of four different orthodontic wires, stainless steel, nickel titanium (NiTi), titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA), and copper NiTi and to assess whether these biodegradation products, are within acceptable limits. Materials and Methods: This study involved the incubation of four different wires in artificial saliva and analyzing the amount of metal released from them at the end of a 28 days study period. The metals analyzed for where nickel, chromium, copper, cobalt, manganese, iron, molybdenum, and titanium. The artificial saliva was changed on days 7, 14, and 21 to prevent the saturation of metals in the artificial saliva. At the end of 28 days, these four samples of artificial saliva of each wire were mixed together and analyzed for the eight metals using an inductively coupled plasma spectroscope. Results: The results showed only the release of nickel, chromium, and iron from stainless steel wire, nickel from NiTi wire, nickel, and chromium from copper NiTi and none from TMA wire. Conclusion: The metals released from arch wires are of such minute quantities to be of any biologic hazard. The amount of metals released is well within acceptable biocompatible limits. Though this study has analyzed the biodegradation of various orthodontic wires, orthodontic wires are never used alone in mechanotherapy. Orthodontic wires along with multiband appliance system with which it is always used and in combination with accessories like face bows may release more metals. PMID:25709360

  12. Atresia of the Aortic Arch in 4-Year-Old Child: A Clinical Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Nigro Stimato, Vittoria; Didier, Dominique; Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Atresia of the aortic arch is a rare congenital heart defect with a high mortality when associated with other intracardiac defects. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) provides the exact anatomy of the aortic arch and collateral circulation and is useful to diagnose-associated aortic arch anomalies. This report describes the case of a 4-year-old child with atresia of the aortic arch, referred to our institution with the diagnosis of aortic coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve. On clinical exam, the femoral pulses were not palpable and there was a significant differential blood pressure between the upper and lower limbs. The echocardiography showed a severely stenotic bicuspid aortic valve but was limited for the exact description of the aortic arch. CMR showed absence of lumen continuity between the ascending and descending aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, extending over 5 mm, with the presence of a bend in the arch and diverticulum on either side of the zone of discontinuity, suggesting the diagnosis atresia of the aortic arch rather than coarctation or interruption. The patient benefited from a successful surgical commissurotomy of the aortic valve and reconstruction of the aortic arch with a homograft. The post-operative CMR confirmed the good surgical result. This case emphasizes the utility of CMR to provide good anatomical information to establish the exact diagnosis and the operative strategy. PMID:25853109

  13. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  14. Dental wear: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia; Raspanti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  15. Calculus detection calibration among dental hygiene faculty members utilizing dental endoscopy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Partido, Brian B; Jones, Archie A; English, Dana L; Nguyen, Carol A; Jacks, Mary E

    2015-02-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty members often do not provide consistent instruction in the clinical environment, especially in tasks requiring clinical judgment. From previous efforts to calibrate faculty members in calculus detection using typodonts, researchers have suggested using human subjects and emerging technology to improve consistency in clinical instruction. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if a dental endoscopy-assisted training program would improve intra- and interrater reliability of dental hygiene faculty members in calculus detection. Training included an ODU 11/12 explorer, typodonts, and dental endoscopy. A convenience sample of six participants was recruited from the dental hygiene faculty at a California community college, and a two-group randomized experimental design was utilized. Intra- and interrater reliability was measured before and after calibration training. Pretest and posttest Kappa averages of all participants were compared using repeated measures (split-plot) ANOVA to determine the effectiveness of the calibration training on intra- and interrater reliability. The results showed that both kinds of reliability significantly improved for all participants and the training group improved significantly in interrater reliability from pretest to posttest. Calibration training was beneficial to these dental hygiene faculty members, especially those beginning with less than full agreement. This study suggests that calculus detection calibration training utilizing dental endoscopy can effectively improve interrater reliability of dental and dental hygiene clinical educators. Future studies should include human subjects, involve more participants at multiple locations, and determine whether improved rater reliability can be sustained over time.

  16. Tilted Implants for Full-Arch Rehabilitations in Completely Edentulous Maxilla: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Nicolò; Barbaro, Bruno; Spasari, Davide; Azzola, Francesco; Ciatti, Alberto; Francetti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aims of this study were to assess the treatment outcome of immediately loaded full-arch fixed bridges anchored to both tilted and axially placed implants in the edentulous maxilla and to evaluate the incidence of biological and prosthetic complications. Materials and Methods. Thirty-four patients (18 women and 16 men) were included in the study. Each patient received a maxillary full-arch fixed bridge supported by two axial implants and two distal tilted implants. A total of 136 implants were inserted. Loading was applied within 48 hours of surgery and definitive restorations were placed 4 to 6 months later. Patients were scheduled for followup at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months and annually up to 5 years. At each followup plaque level and bleeding scores were assessed and every complication was recorded. Results. The overall follow-up range was 12 to 73 months (mean 38.8 months). No implant failures were recorded to date, leading to a cumulative implant survival rate of 100%. Biological complications were recorded such as alveolar mucositis (11.8% patients), peri-implantitis (5.9% patients), and temporomandibular joint pain (5.9% patients). The most common prosthetic complications were the fracture or detachment of one or multiple acrylic teeth in both the temporary (20.6% patients) and definitive (17.7% patients) prosthesis and the minor acrylic fractures in the temporary (14.7% patients) and definitive (2.9% patients) prosthesis. Hygienic complications occurred in 38.2% patients. No patients' dissatisfactions were recorded. Conclusions. The high cumulative implant survival rate indicates that this technique could be considered a viable treatment option. An effective recall program is important to early intercept and correct prosthetic and biologic complications in order to avoid implant and prosthetic failures. PMID:23133453

  17. A Study to Determine the Dental Needs in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    The objective of this study includes a determination of the need for additional dental service and an examination of the dental service delivery system in the state of Ohio. Recognizing that the question of dental manpower and the service it delivers is but one facet of the area of oral health maintenance, and that manpower needs are affected by…

  18. Dentoalveolar mandibular changes with self-ligating versus conventional bracket systems: A CBCT and dental cast study

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Futagami, Cristina; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to compare dentoalveolar changes in mandibular arch, regarding transversal measures and buccal bone thickness, in patients undergoing the initial phase of orthodontic treatment with self-ligating or conventional bracket systems. METHODS: A sample of 25 patients requiring orthodontic treatment was assessed based on the bracket type. Group 1 comprised 13 patients bonded with 0.022-in self-ligating brackets (SLB). Group 2 included 12 patients bonded with 0.022-in conventional brackets (CLB). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and a 3D program (Dolphin) assessed changes in transversal width of buccal bone (TWBB) and buccal bone thickness (BBT) before (T1) and 7 months after treatment onset (T2). Measurements on dental casts were performed using a digital caliper. Differences between and within groups were analyzed by Student's t-test; Pearson correlation coefficient was also calculated. RESULTS: Significant mandibular expansion was observed for both groups; however, no significant differences were found between groups. There was significant decrease in mandibular buccal bone thickness and transversal width of buccal bone in both groups. There was no significant correlation between buccal bone thickness and dental arch expansion. CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant differences between self-ligating brackets and conventional brackets systems regarding mandibular arch expansion and changes in buccal bone thickness or transversal width of buccal bone. PMID:26154456

  19. Wellness Among Dental Students: An Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter L; Shaddox, Luciana M; Garvan, Cynthia W; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2016-09-01

    The high prevalence of distress among health professionals during their education has fostered increased interest in the study of student well-being. The aim of this study was to assess the self-perceived wellness of dental students and determine the relationship between factors affecting wellness and demographic variables. An online questionnaire was distributed to 334 first-through fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school. The questionnaire consisted of modified versions of the Perceived Wellness Survey, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, and Mental Health Inventory and also collected demographic information. The response rate was 78% (N=261). More than 80% of the respondents reported that they were happy all, most, or a good bit of the time. These students exhibited a strong sense of self-worth, were positive about their friendships, and perceived they had good social support. Less than 20% of respondents did not view their physical health as excellent and identified a lack of self-perceived wellness. First-year and single students reported statistically less social support. Students who were parents perceived their wellness less favorably. Hispanic and Asian students were less happy regarding their mental health than white and African American students. These findings suggest that students, especially Hispanic and Asian students, may benefit from programs that promote student well-being. Academic programs that encourage students to work together and promote peer-to-peer involvement may be beneficial, especially for first-year and single students.

  20. Study on Optimal Grouting Timing for Controlling Uplift Deformation of a Super High Arch Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Li, Qingbin; Liu, Hongyuan; Yu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    A grouting model is developed for use during the grouting of the complex foundation of a super high arch dam. The purpose as to determine the optimal grouting timing and appropriate grouting pressure involved in controlling the uplift deformation of the dam. The model determines the optimal grouting time as the height of the arch dam increases with the concrete pouring, by checking the tensile stresses in the dam against standard specifications. The appropriate grouting pressures are given on the basis of the actual grouting pressures monitored during the upstream riverbed foundation grouting. An engineering procedure, applying the model, was then proposed and used during foundation grouting under the toe block of the Xiluodu super high-arch dam in south-western China. The quality of the foundation grouting was evaluated against the results from pressurized water permeability tests, acoustic wave velocity tests, elastic modulus tests and panoramic photographing of the rockmass on completion of the foundation grouting. The results indicated that the proposed grouting model can be applied to effectively reduce the uplift deformation and associated cracking risk for super high arch dams, and it can be concluded that the proposed engineering grouting procedure is a valuable tool for improving foundation grouting under the toe blocks of a super high arch dam.

  1. Palatal positioned implants in severely atrophic maxillae versus conventional implants to support fixed full-arch prostheses: Controlled retrospective study with 5 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Candel-Marti, Eugenia; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate soft tissue conditions and bone loss around palatal positioned implants supporting fixed full-arch prostheses to rehabilitate edentulous maxillae with horizontal atrophy and compare them with conventional well-centered implants placed in non-atrophic maxillae after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Material and Methods A clinical retrospective study was performed of patients that were rehabilitated with full-arch fixed implant-supported maxillary prostheses and had a minimum follow-up of 5 years after implant loading. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with class IV maxilla according to Cawood and Howell and treated with palatal positioned implants (test) and with class III maxilla and treated with implants well-centered in the alveolar ridge and completely surrounded by bone (control). The following variables were assessed: age, sex, frequency of tooth brushing, smoking, type of prosthesis, type of implant, implant success, amount of buccal keratinized mucosa, buccal retraction, probing depth, plaque index, modified bleeding index, presence of mucositis or peri-implantitis and peri-implant bone loss. Statistical analysis was performed applying Chi2 Test and Student’s t-test using alpha set at 0.05. Results A total of 57 patients were included: 32 patients with 161 palatal positioned implants (test) and 25 patients with 132 well centered implants (control). No statistically significant differences were found regarding age, sex and smoking, but test group patients reported a significantly higher frequency of daily tooth brushing. Implant success rates were 96.9% for test group implants and 96.0% for control group implants. Peri-implant mucosa retraction was significantly higher in the control group than in the test group (p=0,017). No significant differences were observed either for all the other assessed clinical parameters or for peri-implant bone loss. Conclusions Despite its limitations the outcomes of the present study suggest

  2. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  3. Gender identification and morphologic classification of tooth, arch and palatal forms in Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Aljanakh; Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine various tooth form, arch form, and palatal form with gender identification between males and females of the Saudi population. Materials and Methods: Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions were made of the maxillary teeth of 100 dentate male and female subjects to obtain study casts. A standardized procedure was adopted to photograph the maxillary dental arches and the maxillary central incisors on the study casts taken from each subject. The outline form of tooth, arch, and palatal form were determined using a standardized method. The average of six prosthodontist's evaluation was considered who classified the outline tracings visually. The statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Square and results tabulated. Results: The predominant tooth is combination form in males and ovoid form in females, the predominant arch is ovoid form in males and square form in females and the predominant palatal form are both U and V shaped in males and U-shaped in females. Conclusion: Except for the tooth form there was a significant difference with arch and palatal form among males and females of the population group studied. The determined tooth, arch and palatal forms are useful in selection and arrangement of artificial teeth among Saudi edentulous population group. Generalizing from the study is questionable as the sample size is small. Further studies should be conducted in a larger sample to confirm the study results PMID:26538903

  4. Function of the triceps surae muscle group in low and high arched feet: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Branthwaite, Helen; Pandyan, Anand; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2012-06-01

    The Achilles tendon has been shown to be comprised of segmental components of tendon arising from the tricpes surae muscle group. Motion of the foot joints in low and high arched feet may induce a change in behaviour of the triceps surae muscle group due to altered strain on the tendon. Surface electromyogram of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle from 12 subjects (with 6 low arched and 6 high arched feet) (1:1) was recorded whilst walking at a self selected speed along a 10m walkway. The results showed a high variability in muscle activity between groups with patterns emerging within groups. Soleus was more active in 50% of the low arch feet at forefoot loading and there was a crescendo of activity towards heel lift in 58% of all subjects. This observed variability between groups and foot types emphasises the need for further work on individual anatomical variation and foot function to help in the understanding and management of Achilles tendon pathologies and triceps surae dysfunction.

  5. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  6. An Infrared Study of the Dust Properties and Geometry of the Arched Filaments H ii Region with SOFIA/FORCAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, M. J.; Lau, R. M.; Morris, M. R.; Herter, T. L.

    2017-03-01

    Massive stellar clusters provide radiation (∼ {10}7{--}{10}8 {L}ȯ ) and winds (∼1000 km s‑1) that act to heat dust and shape their surrounding environment. In this paper, the Arched Filaments in the Galactic center were studied to better understand the influence of the Arches cluster on its nearby interstellar medium (ISM). The Arched Filaments were observed with the Faint Object InfraRed CAMera for the SOFIA Telescope at 19.7, 25.2, 31.5, and 37.1 μm. Color–temperature maps of the region created with the 25.2 and 37.1 μm data reveal relatively uniform dust temperatures (70–100 K) over the extent of the filaments (∼25 pc). Distances between the cluster and the filaments were calculated assuming equilibrium heating of standard-size ISM dust grains (∼0.1 μm). The distances inferred by this method are in conflict with the projected distance between the filaments and the cluster, although this inconsistency can be explained if the characteristic grain size in the filaments is smaller (∼0.01 μm) than typical values. DustEM models of selected locations within the filaments show evidence of depleted abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by factors of ∼1.6–10 by mass compared to the diffuse ISM. The evidence for both PAH depletion and a smaller characteristic grain size points to processing of the ISM within the filaments. We argue that the eroding of dust grains within the filaments is not likely attributable to the radiation or winds from the Arches cluster, but may be related to the physical conditions in the Galactic center.

  7. Do dental students use optimal study strategies?

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Maureen; Kamboj, Rajit S; Pierre, Gaëlle C

    2015-01-01

    Research on human learning has shown that repeated retrieval practice or self-testing maximizes learning. However, recent studies have found undergraduate students to be largely unaware of the benefits of self-testing. The aim of this study was to examine dental students' study strategies and utilization of retrieval techniques for learning. All second-year dental students at New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate. Of the total 360 students, 66 completed the two-question survey, for a response rate of 18.3%. The first question asked students to choose from a list of twelve study strategies the ones they used and to rank their top five in order of personal preference. Repeated reading was the most frequently used strategy with 83.3% of students reporting that they used it and 43.9% naming it as their top strategy. Of these students, 45.5% indicated that they self-tested while studying, but none indicated it was their number one strategy. The second question asked students how they would study after reading a textbook chapter for the first time. They were asked to choose one option from three possibilities: going back and restudying, self-testing (with the possibility of restudying afterward), or some other strategy. On this question, 25.8% chose restudying, 45.5% chose self-testing, and 28.8% indicated they would use another study strategy. Thus, 54.6% of the students reported they would not test themselves after reading a textbook chapter. Of those who chose self-testing, only seven students indicated they would do so to improve learning. The results of this study suggest that the students lacked sufficient awareness of the superiority of self-testing for learning.

  8. Follow-Up Study of 1994 Dental Hygiene Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of its dental hygiene program, William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), in Illinois, conducted a follow-up study of program graduates from 1994. Surveys were mailed to all 30 1994 dental hygiene associate degree graduates, receiving responses from 77% (n=23). Study findings included the following: (1) all…

  9. Challenges to dental access - England as a case study.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Raman

    2006-06-01

    Access to dental services because of an insufficient workforce is a historic challenge faced by many developing countries. In recent years, however, it has become a major issue for many industrialized countries. The growing demand for cosmetic dentistry, an increase in patients' willingness to pay for dental treatment, and growing numbers of older dentate patients have all put pressure on dental systems. Ways of meeting these challenges and ensuring reasonable dental access will vary from country to country, but the solutions often lie in how the dental workforce is regulated. This case study of the dental reforms currently being implemented in England highlights progress at a particular point in time (Summer 2005). It is clear that it will take a number of years to find a new national dental payment system (the National Health Service) to replace the system which has changed little since 1948. However, the political pressure to address poor access to state-funded dental services calls for more immediate actions. The initial approach was to increase the dental workforce via international recruitment, and in the medium term to increase the number of dental students in training and to expand the numbers of other members of the dental team. An additional stratagem is to retain those already providing dental care under the National Health Service by the introduction of a new method of remuneration. England is trying to improve both access to care and the oral health of the population by creating a workforce more suitable to public demands and changing oral health needs.

  10. Choosing indicators of natural resource condition: A case study in Arches National Park, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    1998-01-01

    Heavy visitor use in many areas of the world have necessitated development of ways to assess visitation impacts. Arches National Park recently completed a Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP) plan. Integral to this plan was developing a method to identify biological indicators that would both measure visitor impacts and response to management actions. The process used in Arches for indicator selection is outlined here as a model applicable to many areas facing similar challenges. The steps were: (1) Vegetation types most used by visitors were identified. Impacted and unimpacted areas in these types were sampled, comparing vegetation and soil factors. (2) Variables found to differ significantly between compared sites were used as potential indicators. (3) Site-specific criteria for indicators were developed, and potential indicators evaluated using these criteria. (4) Chosen indicators were further researched for ecological relevancy. (5) Final indicators were chosen, field tested, and monitoring sites designated. In Arches, indicators were chosen for monitoring annually (soil crust index, soil compaction, number of used social trails and soil aggregate stability) and every five years (vegetation cover and frequency; ground cover; soil chemistry; and plant tissue chemistry).

  11. Quantitative effects of a nickel-titanium palatal expander on skeletal and dental structures in the primary and mixed dentition: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Garattini, Giovanna; Colombo, Anna; Filippi, Vittorio; Pozzoli, Silvio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2003-08-01

    The present study analysed the six-month effects of a nickel-titanium (NiTi) palatal expander on the dental and palatal structures of four primary (mean age 5.8 years) and nine mixed dentition children (mean age 8.7 years), with a posterior unilateral crossbite. Standardized dental and palatal landmarks were digitized using a three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic instrument. Collected data were analysed with geometric-mathematical models. During a six-month interval, the natural growth and development of the dental arches and hard tissue palate was negligible, as assessed in seven control children (two in the primary dentition, mean age 4.4 years; five in the mixed dentition, mean age 7.7 years). In all children the crossbite was completely corrected. Indeed, dental expansion was always more than or corresponded to the palatal expansion. A smoothing of the size-independent (shape) palatal curvature in the transverse plane was observed. No differences in maximum palatal height were noted. Symmetrical derotation of the anchorage teeth in a distal direction occurred in almost all children. The inclination of the facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) in the anatomical transverse plane of those teeth with differences between dental and palatal expansion always showed significant modifications (vestibular inclination up to 16.7 degrees). The clinical crown height of anchorage teeth remained nearly the same in all patients. No significant modifications in mandibular arch size were observed. The increase in maxillary arch width, especially in younger children, was probably due to a combination of different effects: opening of the midpalatal suture, tipping of the alveolar process, and molar tipping.

  12. Cross-cultural adaptability of Texas dental hygienists and dental hygiene students: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Tavoc, Tabitha; Newsom, Ron; DeWald, Janice P

    2009-05-01

    This study sought to determine if statistically significant differences existed among and between licensed dental hygienists and first- and second-year dental hygiene students in Texas on a cross-cultural adaptability measure. The cross-cultural adaptability of licensed dental hygienists and of first- and second-year dental hygiene students attending five randomly selected dental hygiene schools in Texas was investigated. A sample of 289 individuals completed the fifty-item Cross-Cultural Adaptability Inventory (CCAI) and a brief demographic survey, resulting in 278 usable responses. The CCAI yields a total score and four individual subscale scores that describe a person's readiness to interact with people of different cultures. The results revealed no statistically significant differences among the licensed hygienists and students in the first and second years of study and CCAI scores. A statistically significant relationship (r=.148) was found between age and one of the four CCAI subscale scores: flexibility/openness. No other statistically significant relationships were found. The number of years to earn a degree, level of practice, ethnicity, and years employed may not play a significant role in enhancing cross-cultural adaptability. Further research needs to be conducted to determine differences and relationships between and among various dental hygiene groups and their cross-cultural adaptability performance.

  13. Animal analogues for the study of dental and oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Levy, B M

    1980-01-01

    The usual laboratory animals, such as rats and hamsters, may not fit the criteria for an analogue of human periodontal disease, although they may be useful in the study of dental caries. Rats, hamsters, mice, guinea pigs and rabbits have been the animals of choice in studies relating nutritional deficiencies and excesses to the dental and oral tissues. Gerbils, dogs, cats, horses, cows and fowl are useful in the study of mineralized tissues of teeth and bones. Recently, primate analogues have been developed for the study of periodontal diseaes and dental caries, the two most important dental diseases afflicting man. The use of a wide variety of laboratory animals in basic dental research makes it timely to review some of the guidelines for the selection of specific animals for particular diseases.

  14. Axial relationship between dental implants and teeth/implants: a radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Machtei, Eli E; Oettinger-Barak, Orit; Horwitz, Jacob

    2014-08-01

    The relationship of dental implants with neighboring teeth will affect both occlusal relationship and distribution of forces; thus, the purpose of this study was to examine implants' axial relationship with adjacent and opposing teeth/implants. Data of dental implants patients was retrieved. Panoramic X rays were digitized. Computer-based software was used to measure the angular relationship between the implants and adjacent/opposing teeth and implants. Data was further sorted by the mode of placement and implants position. 50 patients (219 implants) were included. Mean angle to adjacent tooth/implant was 178.71° ± 9.18° (range 129.7°-206°). Implants were more parallel to adjacent teeth (180.99° ± 1.06°) than to adjacent implants (176.32° ± 0.54°; P = .0001). Mean angular relationship to opposite tooth was 167.88° ± 8.92° (range 137.7°-179.8°). Implants that were placed freehand or with positional guide had similar intra-arch relationship (178.22° and 178.81°, respectively) and similar inter-arch angulations (164.46° and 167.74°). Molars had greater deviation of the angular relationship (175.54°) compared to premolars (181.62°) and incisors (180.55°, P = .0001). Implants placed in the maxilla had smaller axial deviation compared to implants in the mandible (180.41° ± 0.64 vs 177.14° ± 1.02; P = .0081). Good axial relationship may be obtained in most implants placed by an experienced clinician, even when placed freehand. The mandibular posterior region is more prone to axial deviation and as such requires special attention.

  15. Possibility of reconstruction of dental plaster cast from 3D digital study models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare traditional plaster casts, digital models and 3D printed copies of dental plaster casts based on various criteria. To determine whether 3D printed copies obtained using open source system RepRap can replace traditional plaster casts in dental practice. To compare and contrast the qualities of two possible 3D printing options – open source system RepRap and commercially available 3D printing. Design and settings A method comparison study on 10 dental plaster casts from the Orthodontic department, Department of Stomatology, 2nd medical Faulty, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. Material and methods Each of 10 plaster casts were scanned by inEos Blue scanner and the printed on 3D printer RepRap [10 models] and ProJet HD3000 3D printer [1 model]. Linear measurements between selected points on the dental arches of upper and lower jaws on plaster casts and its 3D copy were recorded and statistically analyzed. Results 3D printed copies have many advantages over traditional plaster casts. The precision and accuracy of the RepRap 3D printed copies of plaster casts were confirmed based on the statistical analysis. Although the commercially available 3D printing enables to print more details than the RepRap system, it is expensive and for the purpose of clinical use can be replaced by the cheaper prints obtained from RepRap printed copies. Conclusions Scanning of the traditional plaster casts to obtain a digital model offers a pragmatic approach. The scans can subsequently be used as a template to print the plaster casts as required. Using 3D printers can replace traditional plaster casts primarily due to their accuracy and price. PMID:23721330

  16. Laboratory study of low-β forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; ...

    2016-11-04

    Here, the loss-of-equilibrium is a solar eruption mechanism whereby a sudden breakdown of the magnetohydrodynamic force balance in the Sun's corona ejects a massive burst of particles and energy into the heliosphere. Predicting a loss-of-equilibrium, which has more recently been formulated as the torus instability, relies on a detailed understanding of the various forces that hold the pre-eruption magnetic flux rope in equilibrium. Traditionally, idealized analytical force expressions are used to derive simplified eruption criteria that can be compared to solar observations and modeling. What is missing, however, is a validation that these idealized analytical force expressions can be appliedmore » to the line-tied, low-aspect-ratio conditions of the corona. In this paper, we address this shortcoming by using a laboratory experiment to study the forces that act on long-lived, arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Three key force terms are evaluated over a wide range of experimental conditions: (1) the upward hoop force; (2) the downward strapping force; and (3) the downward toroidal field tension force. First, the laboratory force measurements show that, on average, the three aforementioned force terms cancel to produce a balanced line-tied equilibrium. This finding validates the laboratory force measurement techniques developed here, which were recently used to identify a dynamic toroidal field tension force that can prevent flux rope eruption. The verification of magnetic force balance also confirms the low-beta assumption that the plasma thermal pressure is negligible in these experiments. Next, the measured force terms are directly compared to corresponding analytical expressions. While the measured and analytical forces are found to be well correlated, the low-aspect-ratio, line-tied conditions in the experiment are found to both reduce the measured hoop force and increase the measured tension force with respect to analytical expectations. These two co

  17. Laboratory study of low-β forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2016-11-01

    The loss-of-equilibrium is a solar eruption mechanism whereby a sudden breakdown of the magnetohydrodynamic force balance in the Sun's corona ejects a massive burst of particles and energy into the heliosphere. Predicting a loss-of-equilibrium, which has more recently been formulated as the torus instability, relies on a detailed understanding of the various forces that hold the pre-eruption magnetic flux rope in equilibrium. Traditionally, idealized analytical force expressions are used to derive simplified eruption criteria that can be compared to solar observations and modeling. What is missing, however, is a validation that these idealized analytical force expressions can be applied to the line-tied, low-aspect-ratio conditions of the corona. In this paper, we address this shortcoming by using a laboratory experiment to study the forces that act on long-lived, arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Three key force terms are evaluated over a wide range of experimental conditions: (1) the upward hoop force; (2) the downward strapping force; and (3) the downward toroidal field tension force. First, the laboratory force measurements show that, on average, the three aforementioned force terms cancel to produce a balanced line-tied equilibrium. This finding validates the laboratory force measurement techniques developed here, which were recently used to identify a dynamic toroidal field tension force that can prevent flux rope eruptions [Myers et al., Nature 528, 526 (2015)]. The verification of magnetic force balance also confirms the low-β assumption that the plasma thermal pressure is negligible in these experiments. Next, the measured force terms are directly compared to corresponding analytical expressions. While the measured and analytical forces are found to be well correlated, the low-aspect-ratio, line-tied conditions in the experiment are found to both reduce the measured hoop force and increase the measured tension force with respect to analytical

  18. The ARCHES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies (ARCHES) project is a FP7-Space funded programme started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz- Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (Spain). ARCHES will provide the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large samples of objects extracted from the 3XMM X-ray catalogue of serendipitous sources. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues and a multi-wavelength finder for clusters of galaxies. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are tested in the framework of several science cases. More information may be found at http://www.arches-fp7.eu/

  19. Computational Study of Non-Physiological Hemodynamics in the Cephalic Arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, Kevin; Boghosian, Michael; Mahmoudzadeh, S. M. Javid; Hammes, Mary

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are performed for the flow in a two-dimensional geometry created from radiological images and Doppler flow measurements of the cephalic arch in dialysis patients with a brachiocephalic fistula (surgically placed direct arterial-venous connection). The simulations are performed before insertion of the fistula and at subsequent time intervals as the cephalic vein arterializes over a period of three to six months. A mature fistula, with increased diameter and flow rate, can exhibit Reynolds numbers that are more than one order of magnitude larger than that of the pre-fistula vein. We evaluate the effect of this increased (physiologically abnormal) Reynolds number on flow structures and wall shear stresses through the curved cephalic arch, which is a site prone to stenosis in fistula patients. The long-term goal is to investigate if the development of initimal hyperplasia and stenoses correlates with wall shear stresses or other hemodynamic variables obtained using computational hemodynamics. Research supported by the National Institute of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01DK090769.

  20. Assessment of gingival thickness with regards to age, gender and arch location

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Mahajan, Aaditi

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a considerable intra and inter-individual variation in both width and thickness of the facial gingiva. As the attached gingiva is an important anatomic and functional landmark in the periodontium, the identification of gingival biotype is important in clinical practice since differences in gingival and osseous architecture have been shown to exhibit a significant impact on the outcome of restorative therapy. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the variation in width and thickness of facial gingiva in the anterior segment with respect to age, gender and dental arch location. Materials and Methods: 120 subjects were divided into three age groups: The younger age group (16-24 years), the middle age group (25-39 years) and the older age group (>40 years) with 20 males and 20 females in each group. The width of the gingiva was assessed by William's graduated probe and the thickness was determined using transgingival probing in the maxillary and mandibular anterior segment. Results: It was observed that the younger age group had significantly thicker gingiva but less width than that of the older age group. The gingiva was found to be thinner and with less width in females than males. The mandibular arch had thicker gingiva with less width compared to the maxillary arch. Conclusion: In the present study, we concluded that gingival thickness and width varies with age, gender and dental arch location. PMID:25210263

  1. A study among dental students regarding the factors influenced dental students to choose dentistry as career

    PubMed Central

    AnbuSelvan, Gobichetti Palayam Jagatheeswaran; Gokulnathan, Subramaniam; PrabuRajan, Vilvanathan; RajaRaman, Gangadharan; Kumar, Singaravelu Suresh; Thagavelu, Arthie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Career choice is a complex decision for students since it determines the kind of profession that they intend to pursue in life. As students try to make a career choice while in secondary school, they face the problem of matching their career choices with their abilities and school performance. Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing career choice among dental college students in private dental collages in Tamil Nadu, India. Settings and Design: The study was conducted using descriptive survey design with a population of 989 students. The data for this study was collected using a questionnaire and interview schedules. Materials and Methods: The data for this study was collected using questionnaire previously used by Swati Shah and Rajaraman and interview schedules. The analysis of the study was based on the factors: Outcome expectations, gender, personal interests, and other factors. Results and Conclusion: The most common reason for among the dental students to choose dental science as their career choice was self-interested followed by didn′t get medicine degree, prestige and gives respect. The least common reasons observed in the study population were inspired by dentists. The findings of this study indicate that availability the most influential factors affecting career choices among students. PMID:23946573

  2. A comparative study of centbucridine and lidocaine in dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Vacharajani, G N; Parikh, N; Paul, T; Satoskar, R S

    1983-01-01

    A randomized double-blind study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of centbucridine (0.5%) with those of lidocaine (2%) as an anaesthetic agent was conducted in the dental outpatient department on patients attending for dental extraction. One hundred and twenty patients were studied. The degree of analgesia attained with centbucridine compared well with that obtained with lidocaine. The compound was well tolerated with no significant changes in the cardiovascular parameters and no serious side-effects.

  3. Knowledge of dental health and diseases among dental patients, a multicentre study in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almas, K; Albaker, A; Felembam, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental patients about dental health and diseases. A questionnaire was developed with three sets of questions, 1-general knowledge of dental conditions, 2-use of alternate methods in prevention and treatment of dental diseases, 3-awareness about personal oral health. Six hundred questionnaires were distributed in 6 cities from 4 different regions (i.e. Makkah, Riyadh, Tabuk, Gizan). 367 respondents (61% response rate) constituted 233 (63.5%) male and 134 (36.5%) female with the age range 11-70 years (mean 30 +/- 11.9). The data were analyzed by SPSS version 9.0 and results presented in frequency distributions. 99% male and 96% female considered their teeth for chewing food, 97% male and 96% female knew that increased carbohydrate intake and poor oral hygiene are related to tooth decay, 89% male and 96% female used toothbrush and paste to prevent dental diseases and 75% male and 66% female were regular user of miswak (chewing sticks.) 67% male and 59% female visit dentist, only in pain. 46% used miswak after their meals, only 14% of the subjects used miswak on their lingual and palatal surfaces of teeth, while 38% of the subjects used clove as remedy for toothache, 25.6% used saline and 10% used lemon for bleaching their teeth. 15% considered honey important for their good oral health. Regarding personal oral health, 35% had pain in gums, 36.8% were with bad breath, 28% had tooth hypersensitivity, and almost 50% used toothbrush twice daily while 42% had bleeding gums. It is important to note that knowledge and awareness about dental health and disease conditions are better in male subjects, dietary habits and oral hygiene methods need to be addressed in future investigations. There is a need to provide more health education to female subjects to improve their oral health.

  4. Dental caries among children visiting a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky: a pooled cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases affecting a large portion of children in the United States. The prevalence of childhood dental caries in Kentucky is among the highest in the nation. The purposes of this study are to (1) compare sociodemographic differences between caries and no caries groups and (2) investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries among children who visited a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky. Methods Study subjects were children aged 6 to 15 years who participated in the school-based dental sealant program through the mobile dental clinic operated by the Institute for Rural Health at Western Kentucky University between September 2006 and May 2011 (n = 2,453). Descriptive statistics were calculated for sociodemographic factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and urban versus rural residential location) and caries status. We used chi-square tests to compare sociodemographic differences of children stratified by caries and no caries status as well as three levels of caries severity. We developed a logistic regression model to investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Results The proportion of children having untreated dental caries was 49.7% and the mean number of untreated dental caries was 2.0. The proportion of untreated dental caries was higher in older children, children with no insurance and living in rural residential locations, and caries severity was also higher in these groups. Odds ratio indicated that older ages, not having private insurance (having only public, government-sponsored insurance or no insurance at all) and rural residential location were associated with having untreated dental caries after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics of children. Conclusions Untreated dental caries was more likely to be present in older children living in rural areas without

  5. Mediators between education and dental pain: a cross-sectional study to assess the role of dental services utilization.

    PubMed

    Constante, Helena M; Peres, Marco A; Schroeder, Fernanda C; Bastos, João L

    2016-02-01

    This study tested whether the pattern of dental services utilization and the reason for the last dental visit mediate the association between educational attainment and dental pain. This is a cross-sectional analysis (n = 1099) based on data from a prospective cohort study in adults, southern Brazil. The mediating effects were assessed by including interaction terms in logistic regression models and by the KHB method, which estimated the direct, mediated, and total effects of education on dental pain. The prevalence of dental pain was 17.5%. Individuals with less than 12 yr of study who visited the dentist to solve dental problems had a 20% higher odds of reporting dental pain than those with 12 or more years of study, who sought the dentist for preventive reasons. Dental services should also focus on preventive measures, especially if less-educated individuals visit the dentist only to treat problems; this may help reduce the frequency of negative oral health outcomes, including dental pain.

  6. The ARCHES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2014-07-01

    ARCHES (Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies) is a FP7-Space funded project started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (Madrid, Spain). ARCHES aims at providing the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large sets of objects extracted from the 3XMM catalogue. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are currently tested in the framework of several science cases. An integrated cluster finder is developed at Potsdam, AGN science is studied at Leicester and IFCA while populations of Galactic X-ray sources are investigated at Strasbourg and Madrid.

  7. Different study conditions between dental students in China and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xu; Yi, Zhe; Wang, Xu; Jinno, Yohei; Zhang, Xinwen; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ai, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the study conditions of dental students towards dental education in China and Japan. Methods: 60 students from the Stomatology School of China Medical University and 51 students from the Dental Faculty of Kyushu University, Japan, participated in this study. Information was derived from a self-answered questionnaire consisting of 10 items. Results: More Japanese students (60%) compared to Chinese students (28%) were satisfied with their lives in dental school. For the main reason of discontent, 23.5% of the Japanese students attributed to busy study and lacking of spare time, while 38.3% of the Chinese students indicated small campus lacking of infrastructure. Conclusions: Both students of two countries think they were in big pressure. The main stressor of Japanese students was the examination, but that of Chinese students was anxiety of their future and obtains employment. The main source of tuition and maintenance was family in the both countries, but more Japanese students (25.5%) were dependent on scholarship compared with Chinese students (3.3%). Clinical Implications: The findings from this study enhance our understanding of study conditions among dental students and help to define strategies to improve student management in both Japan and China. PMID:26379955

  8. [Association between malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance: study with Brazilian adolescents].

    PubMed

    Borges, Carolina Marques; Peres, Marco Aurélio; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2010-12-01

    In spite of the high prevalence of malocclusion in adolescents reported worldwide, there are few studies that have investigated the association between normative malocclusion and self-rated dental and gingival appearance among adolescents. The aim of this study was to identify the association between normative malocclusion and dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance among Brazilian adolescents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with adolescents aged 15 to 19 years (n= 16,126) living in 250 towns of all five Brazilian regions. Dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance was the outcome. The main explanatory variable was malocclusion assessed by using the Dental Aesthetic Index - DAI. The other explanatory variables included were per capita family income, schooling delay, study conditions, sex, age, skin color, dental outcomes (untreated dental caries, missing teeth due dental caries, dental calculus, fluorosis, and dental pain) and use of dental services. Simple and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were performed. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance reached 11.4% (95%CI: 10.4-12.5) of the entire sample. All levels of malocclusion were associated with dissatisfaction with dental appearance. Adjusted multivariable analysis showed that dissatisfaction with dental appearance among individuals affected by severe or very severe malocclusion was respectively 40% and 80% higher than among those with normal occlusion. Malocclusion was associated with dissatisfaction with dental and gingival appearance. The results contribute to include self-rated dental appearance criteria in orthodontic treatment decision, mainly within the National Health System - SUS.

  9. Comparative Findings in School Systems with Differing Approaches to Dental Health Education. Special Dental Health Study - Spring 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Sharon E.; Downs, Robert A.

    A study was done to determine what differences, if any, existed in the level of dental health knowledge between pupils at continuous resident (CR) schools (schools which employed a full-time dental hygienist) and pupils at nonresident (NR) schools (schools which provided only classroom instruction by the teacher). Demographic characteristics of…

  10. Effect of therapeutic insoles on the medial longitudinal arch in patients with flatfoot deformity: a three-dimensional loading computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Masamitsu; Ikoma, Kazuya; Hara, Yusuke; Imai, Kan; Maki, Masahiro; Ikeda, Takumi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Inoue, Nozomu; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Insoles are frequently used in orthotic therapy as the standard conservative treatment for symptomatic flatfoot deformity to rebuild the arch and stabilize the foot. However, the effectiveness of therapeutic insoles remains unclear. In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of therapeutic insoles for flatfoot deformity using subject-based three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) models by evaluating the load responses of the bones in the medial longitudinal arch in vivo in 3D. Methods We studied eight individuals (16 feet) with mild flatfoot deformity. CT scans were performed on both feet under non-loaded and full-body-loaded conditions, first with accessory insoles and then with therapeutic insoles under the same conditions. Three-dimensional CT models were constructed for the tibia and the tarsal and metatarsal bones of the medial longitudinal arch (i.e., first metatarsal bone, cuneiforms, navicular, talus, and calcaneus). The rotational angles between the tarsal bones were calculated under loading with accessory insoles or therapeutic insoles and compared. Findings Compared with the accessory insoles, the therapeutic insoles significantly suppressed the eversion of the talocalcaneal joint. Interpretation This is the first study to precisely verify the usefulness of therapeutic insoles (arch support and inner wedges) in vivo. PMID:25457972

  11. Arches and contact forces in a granular pile.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro, C M; Pugnaloni, L A

    2012-06-01

    Assemblies of granular particles mechanically stable under their own weight contain arches. These are structural units identified as sets of mutually stable grains. It is generally assumed that these arches shield the weight above them and should bear most of the stress in the system. We test such hypothesis by studying the stress born by in-arch and out-of-arch grains. We show that, indeed, particles in arches withstand larger stresses. In particular, the isotropic stress tends to be larger for in-arch grains whereas the anisotropic component is marginally distinguishable between the two types of particles. The contact force distributions demonstrate that an exponential tail (compatible with the maximization of entropy under no extra constraints) is followed only by the out-of-arch contacts. In-arch contacts seem to be compatible with a Gaussian distribution consistent with a recently introduced approach that takes into account constraints imposed by the local force balance on grains.

  12. Terahertz pulsed imaging study of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagoz, Burcu; Altan, Hakan; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç

    2015-07-01

    Current diagnostic techniques in dentistry rely predominantly on X-rays to monitor dental caries. Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) has great potential for medical applications since it is a nondestructive imaging method. It does not cause any ionization hazard on biological samples due to low energy of THz radiation. Even though it is strongly absorbed by water which exhibits very unique chemical and physical properties that contribute to strong interaction with THz radiation, teeth can still be investigated in three dimensions. Recent investigations suggest that this method can be used in the early identification of dental diseases and imperfections in the tooth structure without the hazards of using techniques which rely on x-rays. We constructed a continuous wave (CW) and time-domain reflection mode raster scan THz imaging system that enables us to investigate various teeth samples in two or three dimensions. The samples comprised of either slices of individual tooth samples or rows of teeth embedded in wax, and the imaging was done by scanning the sample across the focus of the THz beam. 2D images were generated by acquiring the intensity of the THz radiation at each pixel, while 3D images were generated by collecting the amplitude of the reflected signal at each pixel. After analyzing the measurements in both the spatial and frequency domains, the results suggest that the THz pulse is sensitive to variations in the structure of the samples that suggest that this method can be useful in detecting the presence of caries.

  13. Dental superimposition: a pilot study for standardising the method.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, D; Cattaneo, C; Grandi, M

    2007-11-01

    Dental superimposition is becoming more and more important because of the increasing number of illegal immigrants (at least in Italy), with no clinical history, no personal effects or relatives useful for genetic comparison, whose friends and acquaintances can usually only produce photographs. Very few authors have been involved in devising and using this method. The goal of the present study is to establish whether it is possible, and under which conditions, to identify individuals by dental superimposition of teeth visible in an ante-mortem photograph and dental casts of an unidentified body, and to develop a protocol for the spatial orientation analysis of the dentition and qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of superimpositions. A non-mathematical scoring system has been applied to each superimposition as a first step towards the optimisation of a cheap, quick, semi-quantitative method of identifying individuals when other more used methods are not applicable.

  14. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  15. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction for correction of maxillary hypoplasia and dental crowding in cleft palate patients: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-X; Wang, X; Li, Z-L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Jia, Y-L; Zou, B-S

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) to correct maxillary hypoplasia and severe dental crowding in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients, 7 patients (average age 16.4 years) with maxillary hypoplasia, shortened maxillary dental arch length and severe anterior dental crowding secondary to CLP were selected for this study. After anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy, 3 patients were treated using bilateral internal distraction devices, and 4 patients were treated using rigid external distraction devices. Photographs and radiographs were taken to review the improvement in facial profile and occlusion after distraction. An average 10.25 mm anterior maxillary advancement was obtained in all patients after 10-23 days of distraction and 9-16 weeks of consolidation. The sella-nasion-point A (SNA) angle increased from 69.5 degrees to 79.6 degrees. Midface convexity was greatly improved and velopharyngeal competence was preserved. The maxillary dental arch length was greatly increased by 10.1 mm (P<0.01). Dental crowding and malocclusion were corrected by orthodontic treatment. These results show that AMSD can effectively correct the hypoplastic maxilla and severe dental crowding associated with CLP by increasing the midface convexity and dental arch length while preserving velopharyngeal function, and dental crowding can be corrected without requiring tooth extraction.

  16. Dental Hygienists' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Curry-Chiu, Margaret E; Catley, Delwyn; Voelker, Marsha A; Bray, Kimberly Krust

    2015-08-01

    The effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to change health behaviors is well documented. Previous studies support use of MI to change oral health behaviors in the areas of early childhood caries and periodontal diseases, but research is limited due to the sparse number of oral health care providers with training in MI. The University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) formally integrated MI training into its dental hygiene curriculum five years ago. Summative program evaluation of UMKC's MI training shows that it effectively equips graduates with MI skills. The aim of this qualitative study was to use semi-structured interviews with nine program alumni to provide insight into the experiences of MI-trained dental hygienists in clinical practice. All interviews were captured with a digital voice recorder, were transcribed, and were resubmitted to the interviewees for checking. Five themes emerged from the data analysis: salience, best practices, barriers, facilitators, and lessons learned. These dental hygienists strongly valued and embraced the spirit of MI. They reported feeling strongly that it should be part of all dental hygiene curricula, and they upheld MI as a best practice. The participants approved of their MI instruction as a whole but felt it was difficult and sometimes not viable in practice. They reported that MI training had improved their communication skills and increased treatment acceptance. Time, difficulty, and managing patient resistance were the most often cited barriers, while a supportive climate and creating a routine were the most often cited facilitators.

  17. Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines in dental practices in Hesse, Germany: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Mardjan; Hack, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    The quality of water from dental units is of considerable importance since patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosols generated from the dental unit. This study analyzed the microbial quality of water obtained for periodical monitoring from 56 dental units in different dental practices in Hesse. Contamination by Legionella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and increased total colony counts were detected in 27.8%, 3.5%, and 17% of samples. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 accounted for 28% of Legionella isolates. The Legionella concentration was >100 cfu/100 ml in 84% of contaminated samples. Samples collected from an instrument channel were more frequently contaminated by Legionella than those from cup filler (41.7% vs. 18.6%, p = 0.02). After release of these results, decontamination measures were performed in units that had revealed unsatisfactory results. The outcome of the intervention was followed-up by microbiological analysis. At follow-up, 65.2% and 72.7% of waterlines that had previously been contaminated by Legionella or had shown increased total colony counts were free of contamination. Our results show a high rate of contamination of water from dental units in dental practices in Hesse. They highlight the risk of exposure for patients and personnel and the need for effective strategies to reduce microbial contamination.

  18. Dental pain, oral impacts and perceived need for dental treatment in Tanzanian school students: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mashoto, Kijakazi O; Åstrøm, Anne N; David, Jamil; Masalu, Joyce R

    2009-01-01

    Background Dental caries, dental pain and reported oral problems influence people's oral quality of life and thus their perceived need for dental care. So far there is scant information as to the psychosocial impacts of dental diseases and the perceived treatment need in child populations of sub-Saharan Africa. Objectives Focusing on primary school students in Kilwa, Tanzania, a district deprived of dental services and with low fluoride concentration in drinking water, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of dental pain and oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP), and to describe the distribution of OIDP by socio-demographics, dental caries, dental pain and reported oral problems. The relationship of perceived need estimates with OIDP was also investigated. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008. A total of 1745 students (mean age 13.8 yr, sd = 1.67) completed an extensive personal interview and under-went clinical examination. The impacts on daily performances were assessed using a Kiswahili version of the Child-OIDP instrument and caries experience was recorded using WHO (1997) criteria. Results A total of 36.2% (41.3% urban and 31.4% rural, p < 0.001) reported at least one OIDP. The prevalence of dental caries was 17.4%, dental pain 36.4%, oral problems 54.1% and perceived need for dental treatment 46.8% in urban students. Corresponding estimates in rural students were 20.8%, 24.4%, 43.3% and 43.8%. Adjusted OR for reporting oral impacts if having dental pain ranged from 2.5 (95% CI 1.8–3.6) (problem smiling) to 4.7 (95% CI 3.4–6.5) (problem sleeping),- if having oral problems, from 1.9 (95% CI 1.3–2.6) (problem sleeping) to 3.8 (95% CI 2.7–5.2) (problem eating) and if having dental caries from 1.5 (95% CI 1.1–2.0) (problem eating) to 2.2 (95% CI 1.5–2.9) (problem sleeping). Students who perceived need for dental care were less likely to be females (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.6–0.9) and more likely to have impacts on eating (OR = 1

  19. Maxillary versus mandibular arch form differences in human permanent dentition assessed by Euclidean-distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1994-02-01

    Euclidean-distance matrix analysis (EDMA) was used to analyse the dental arch form in 50 men and 45 women aged 20-27 yr with sound dentitions. Fourteen landmarks, corresponding to the centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar), were identified on the dental casts of subjects. All the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth were computed and maxillary/mandibular arch differences within sex were tested by EDMA. In both sexes, the maxillary arch was larger than the mandibular arch; arch shape was also significantly different. All teeth contributed to the shape difference between arches regardless of gender. EDMA also separated the influence of anterior and posterior teeth in the determination of upper/lower arch characteristics.

  20. A retrospective study of traumatic dental injuries in a Brazilian dental urgency service.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; de Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Estrela, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic aspects of traumatic dental injuries (TDI) were evaluated in the permanent dentition in a sample of 847 patients treated at the Dental Urgency Service of the Dental School of the Federal University of Goiás, Brazil, between May 2000 and May 2008. The statistical treatment analyzed data from frequency distribution and chi-square test. The level of significance was set at 5% for all analyses. The results showed a higher incident among males (610; 72.01%) with mean age of 6-10 year-old. Uncomplicated crown fracture (without pulp exposure) (502; 26.95%), avulsion (341; 18.30%) and complicated crown fracture (with pulp exposure) (330; 17.71%) were the most prevalent TDI. The prevalence of trauma throughout the years showed proportionality, being observed a larger number of cases between July and September (249; 29.39%). The most affected teeth were the maxillary central incisors (65.65%), followed by the maxillary left lateral incisors (19.67%). In 311 participants (18.25%), only one tooth was involved, while in most patients (536; 81.75%), TDI occurred in more than one tooth. Significant proportion (82.27%) of traumatized teeth presented completely formed root apex. The main etiologic factors involved in TDI were falls (51.71%), traffic accidents (22.90%) and violence (5.67%). Based on the obtained data, it may be concluded that accurate policies of TDI prevention must be established, capable of stimulating the exposure of appropriate protocols for management of these lesions. The prevalence of TDI in Goiânia subpopulation is compared to the prevalence reported in epidemiological studies in others populations.

  1. Prospective Study of Dental Intervention for Hematopoietic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, K.; Akashi, M.; Furudoi, S.; Yakushijin, K.; Kawamoto, S.; Okamura, A.; Matsuoka, H.; Komori, T.

    2015-01-01

    Various chemotherapeutic agents used in patients with hematopoietic malignancy cause serious side effects, including myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Immunosuppression makes patients more susceptible to infection, resulting in an increased risk of infectious complications, including the development of severe septicemia that may be life-threatening. It is necessary for dental staff to be familiar with an appropriate protocol in such cases and to share information about the chemotherapy with a hematologist. To verify the effectiveness of our dental intervention protocol, we conducted a prospective study on the incidence of complications for each myelosuppressive grade of chemotherapy in patients with hematopoietic malignancy. We compared the incidence of complications between treatment P (patients who finished all the dental treatments according to the protocol) and treatment Q (patients who did not) per grade (A, B, C, D) and incidence of systemic or oral findings. We also compared the incidence of oral complication related to the residual teeth between first chemo (patients who were undergoing chemotherapy for the first time) and prior chemo (not the first time). There were significant differences in inflammatory complications between treatment P and treatment Q. We found that both systemic and oral inflammatory complications increased with higher-grade myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Additionally, there was a significant difference between the incidence of oral complications related to the residual teeth between first chemo and prior chemo. Complete implementation of the dental intervention protocol was associated with fewer oral and systemic infectious and inflammatory complications in patients with hematopoietic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy. The incidence of oral and systemic complications also increased with grade of chemotherapy. These results support the validity of our dental intervention protocol. We should pay close attention to the oral

  2. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Yarapatineni, Rameshbabu; Vilekar, Abhishek; Kumar, J Phani; Kumar, G Ajay; Aravind, Prasad; Kumar, P Anil

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to compare the retention between sectional border molding using low fusing greenstick compound and single step border molding using condensation silicone (putty) impression material in three stages- A. Immediately following border molding, B. After final impression and C. With the finished permanent denture base. Materials & Methods: In this study evaluation of retentive values of sectional border molding (Group I) (custom impression trays border molded with green stick compound ) and single step border molding (Group II) ( border molding with condensation silicone (putty) impression material ). In both techniques definitive wash impression were made with light body condensation silicone and permanent denture base with heat cure polymerization resin. Results: Group II was significantly higher (mean=8011.43) than Group I (mean=5777.43) in test-A. The t-value (1.5883) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p =0.15). Group I was significantly higher (mean=6718.57) than Group II (mean=5224.29) in test -B. The t-value (1.6909) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p=0.17). Group II was higher (mean=4025.14) than Group I (mean=3835.07) in test -C. The t-value was 0.1239. But it was found to be statistically insignificant (p=0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitation of this clinical study border molding custom tray with low fusing green stick compound provided similar retention as compared to custom impression tray with condensation silicone in permanent denture base. How to cite this article: Yarapatineni R, Vilekar A, Kumar JP, Kumar GA, Aravind P, Kumar PA. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):82-7 . PMID:24453450

  3. The Diversity Dilemma: A National Study of Minorities in Dental Hygiene Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tracye A.

    2012-01-01

    Given the predicted shortages of minority dental healthcare providers in the United States and the expanding diversity of the general population, it is important to recruit and retain an ethnically and culturally diverse allied dental workforce. The objectives of this study were to explore why the profession of dental hygiene exhibits minimal…

  4. Dental Hygienists' Perceptions of Preparedness for Clinical Practice: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Lezlie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify, compile, and describe how community college graduate dental hygienists perceived their initial dental hygiene curriculum preparation and how they subsequently adapted their curriculum preparation in order to perform their responsibilities in their first clinical dental hygiene job.…

  5. Follow-Up Study of 1993 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XXII, Number 17, June 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of its dental hygiene program, William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), in Palatine, Illinois, conducted a follow-up study of its dental hygiene students. The survey instrument was mailed to all 31 1993 dental hygiene associate degree graduates, and a response rate of 97% (n=30) was attained. Results of the…

  6. Italian multicenter study on infection hazards during dental practice: Control of environmental microbial contamination in public dental surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Castiglia, Paolo; Liguori, Giorgio; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Napoli, Christian; Pasquarella, Cesira; Bergomi, Margherita; Fabiani, Leila; Monarca, Silvano; Petti, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Background The present study assessed microbial contamination in Italian dental surgeries. Methods An evaluation of water, air and surface microbial contamination in 102 dental units was carried out in eight Italian cities. Results The findings showed water microbial contamination in all the dental surgeries; the proportion of water samples with microbial levels above those recommended decreased during working. With regard to Legionella spp., the proportion of positive samples was 33.3%. During work activity, the index of microbial air contamination (IMA) increased. The level of microbial accumulation on examined surfaces did not change over time. Conclusion These findings confirm that some Italian dental surgeries show high biocontamination, as in other European Countries, which highlights the risk of occupational exposure and the need to apply effective measures to reduce microbial loads. PMID:18644099

  7. Arch development with trans-force lingual appliances.

    PubMed

    Clark, William J

    2005-01-01

    Trans-Force lingual appliances are designed to correct arch form in patients with contracted dental arches. Interceptive treatment with this new series of pre-activated lingual appliances offers new possibilities for arch development, in combination with fixed appliances. Palatal and lingual appliances insert in horizontal lingual sheaths in molar bands. No activation is required after the appliance is fitted, and this principle is extended to a series of appliances for sagittal and transverse arch development. Both sagittal and transverse appliances have additional components to achieve 3-way expansion where this is indicated. The invisible lingual appliances may be used in correction of all classes of malocclusion at any stage of development, from mixed dentition through permanent dentition, and this approach has wide indications in adult treatment.

  8. Hypnosis and dental anesthesia in children: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Huet, Adeline; Lucas-Polomeni, Marie-Madeleine; Robert, Jean-Claude; Sixou, Jean-Louis; Wodey, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this prospective study initially hypothesized that hypnosis would lower the anxiety and pain associated with dental anesthesia. Thirty children aged 5 to 12 were randomly assigned to 2 groups receiving hypnosis (H) or not (NH) at the time of anesthesia. Anxiety was assessed at inclusion in the study, initial consultation, installation in the dentist's chair, and at the time of anesthesia using the modified Yale preoperative anxiety scale (mYPAS). Following anesthesia, a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a modified objective pain score (mOPS) were used to assess the pain experienced. The median mYPAS and mOPS scores were significantly lower in the H group than in the NH group. Significantly more children in the H group had no or mild pain. This study suggests that hypnosis may be effective in reducing anxiety and pain in children receiving dental anesthesia.

  9. The ARCHES Integrated Cluster Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, A.; Schwope, A.

    2014-07-01

    We are developing a tool to search for galaxy clusters associated with X-ray sources from the 3XMM catalog within the ARCHES project (Astronomical Resource cross-matching for High-Energy Studies). We make use of the new cross-matching tool developed for ARCHES to select galaxies in different catalogs around X-ray positions and then try to find clusters by searching for overdensities in the multi-color space. Colors are related to redshifts using spectroscopic data for passively evolving galaxies from the BOSS and VIPERS catalogs. So far we are making use of SDSS, UKIDSS, WISE, and CFHTLS photometric catalogs, but the method can easily be expanded to other data as well (e.g. Pan-STARRS and DES). We present test results of our tool performed on reference samples from the XMM/SDSS cluster survey (Takey et al 2012) and the NORAS/REFLEX surveys.

  10. Decontamination Methods Used for Dental Burs – A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hugar, Deepa; Hugar, Santosh; Ranjan, Shashi; Kadani, Megha

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Infection control and modes of sterilizations are the key factors to avoid cross transmission of infection in the field of dentistry. Transmission of disease or infection is noted with improper sterilization of reused instruments. Dental burs are the most important tool in any endodontic or conservative procedures of teeth involving tooth contouring, restorative filling procedures and endodontic procedures. Hence, the present study is undertaken to assess the efficacy of different methods of sterilization or decontamination which are routinely used in dental clinics. Materials and Methods: For the present study 96 round diamond burs were selected and divided into 6 groups. These burs were used for the access cavity preparation to get contamination and subjected for bacteriological culture. After getting base line date burs were subjected to manual scrubbing, hot air oven, glass bead sterilizer, ultrasonic cleaner and autoclave to get post decontamination data. Results: The study revealed that mean colony forming units/ml of Streptococcus mutans decreased maximum for autoclave with 80% reduction, for Lactobacilli 76% reduction and for Candida albicans maximum reduction seen for glass bead sterilizer with 74%. Conclusion: Findings of our study revealed that none of the methods used were found to be absolutely efficacious in the decontamination of dental burs. However, among the experimental groups used in the present study, autoclave was found to be the relatively best method. PMID:25121062

  11. The Dental Hygienist: A Study of the Employment Patterns of Registered Dental Hygienists in Southern Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, David F.

    This document reports the results of a survey of all registered dental hygienists reported by the State of Maryland as residents of southern Maryland (n=397), 82% of whom responded. The purpose of the survey was to examine the employment patterns of dental hygienists in the Montgomery College service area in order to determine if hygienists who…

  12. Postural changes in dental hygienists. Four-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Barry, R M; Woodall, W R; Mahan, J M

    1992-01-01

    Numerous surveys identify the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints as a concern in dentistry. However, no longitudinal data exist to indicate whether postural changes occur as a result of practicing dental hygiene. The purpose of this preliminary, four-year longitudinal study was to investigate whether any postural changes developed during the hygienists' clinical education and/or during subsequent dental hygiene practice after one and/or two years. It was anticipated that the awkward positions and intense physical demands placed on hygienists might initiate musculoskeletal problems, but that no postural changes would occur over this short period of time. Nine of 10 dental hygienists in the graduating class of 1987 were surveyed for existing musculoskeletal complaints, and the subjects were photographed for a measurement of postural change. Responses from participants indicated an increase in musculoskeletal-related complaints in each of the six areas investigated. The photographic findings indicated that one of the nine hygienists showed an increase in forward head posture, a postural change.

  13. The Foot's Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Stearne, Sarah M; McDonald, Kirsty A; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Oxnard, Charles E; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-19

    The energy-sparing spring theory of the foot's arch has become central to interpretations of the foot's mechanical function and evolution. Using a novel insole technique that restricted compression of the foot's longitudinal arch, this study provides the first direct evidence that arch compression/recoil during locomotion contributes to lowering energy cost. Restricting arch compression near maximally (~80%) during moderate-speed (2.7 ms(-1)) level running increased metabolic cost by + 6.0% (p < 0.001, d = 0.67; unaffected by foot strike technique). A simple model shows that the metabolic energy saved by the arch is largely explained by the passive-elastic work it supplies that would otherwise be done by active muscle. Both experimental and model data confirm that it is the end-range of arch compression that dictates the energy-saving role of the arch. Restricting arch compression had no effect on the cost of walking or incline running (3°), commensurate with the smaller role of passive-elastic mechanics in these gaits. These findings substantiate the elastic energy-saving role of the longitudinal arch during running, and suggest that arch supports used in some footwear and orthotics may increase the cost of running.

  14. Considerations on Optimal Fluoride Intake using Dental Fluorosis and Dental Caries Outcomes – A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Warren, John J.; Levy, Steven M.; Broffitt, Barbara; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Kanellis, Michael J.; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The “optimal” intake of fluoride has been widely accepted for decades as between 0.05 and 0.07 mg fluoride per kilogram of body weight but is based on limited scientific evidence. The purpose of this paper is to present longitudinal fluoride intake data for children free of dental fluorosis in the early-erupting permanent dentition and free of dental caries in both the primary and early-erupting permanent teeth as an estimate of optimal fluoride intake. Methods Data on fluoride ingestion were obtained from parents of 602 Iowa Fluoride Study children through periodic questionnaires at the ages of 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36 months, and then at 6-month intervals thereafter. Estimates of total fluoride intake at each time point were made by summing amounts from water, dentifrice, and supplements as well as other foods and beverages made with or containing water. Caries data were obtained from examinations of children at ages 5 and 9 years, while fluorosis data were obtained from examinations only at age 9. Results The estimated mean daily fluoride intake for those children with no caries history and no fluorosis at age 9 was at or below 0.05 mgF/kg bw for nearly all time points through the first 48 months of life, and this level declined thereafter. Children with caries had generally slightly less intakes, while those with fluorosis generally had slightly higher intakes. Conclusions Given the overlap among caries/fluorosis groups in mean fluoride intake and extreme variability in individual fluoride intakes firmly recommending an “optimal” fluoride intake is problematic. PMID:19054310

  15. Relationship between performance in dental school and performance on a dental licensure examination: an eight-year study.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Carol M; Bates, Robert E; Smith, Gregory E

    2005-08-01

    This study assessed relationships between academic performance in dental school and "first attempt" performance on a state dental licensure examination for 1996-2003 graduates from the University of Florida College of Dentistry (UFCD). The 524 graduates were ranked into quartiles based on graduating GPA. Using analysis of variance (ANOVA), the students' mean exam score (or exam section score) for each respective quartile (n=131) was compared with mean score for graduates in the combined four quartiles (n=524). ANOVA assessments, by quartile, were performed for the following six measures: 1) overall composite score on the dental licensure exam, 2) clinical periodontics section, 3) clinical amalgam section, 4) combination of clinical periodontics and clinical amalgam, 5) laboratory (manikin exam) with a written prosthodontic exam, and 6) manikin exam without the prosthodontic exam. For the overall exam and all exam sections, a significant (p<0.001) relationship was found between higher mean exam scores and academic ranking in quartile 1. A significant relationship was found between performance (lower mean scores) and ranking in quartile 4 for all exam sections, with the exception of the clinical periodontal section. The results of this study indicate a correlation between performance in dental school and performance on the Florida dental licensure exam for 1996-2003 UFCD graduates.

  16. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics), enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV) and need related factors (oral health status) predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Methods Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH) and University of Science and Technology (UST) during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH) were examined clinically (DMFT) and participated in an interview. Results A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5) were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0) for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6) and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7) were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3) were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8). Conclusion Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to minimize avoidance

  17. The relationship between dental anxiety and dental pain in children aged 18 to 59 months: a study in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Michelle Marie T; Colares, Viviane

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate anxiety and pain related to dental treatment in children under the age of five years. This cross sectional study was carried out with 2,735 children of both sexes. Socioeconomic data, dental anxiety and dental pain experience, as well as the assessment of the child's oral health status, were obtained through a questionnaire answered by the child's parent or guardian. Dental anxiety was measured using the Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ). The prevalence of dental anxiety was 34.7% and that of dental pain was 9.1%. There was an association between these two variables (p < 0.0001). There was also an association between dental pain, age, family income and assessment of oral health status. The poorest rating of the child's oral health and the lowest family income were correlated with the highest percentages of a history of dental pain. Dental anxiety was related to a history of dental pain in children under the age of five years.

  18. Laboratory study of low-β forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2016-11-04

    Here, the loss-of-equilibrium is a solar eruption mechanism whereby a sudden breakdown of the magnetohydrodynamic force balance in the Sun's corona ejects a massive burst of particles and energy into the heliosphere. Predicting a loss-of-equilibrium, which has more recently been formulated as the torus instability, relies on a detailed understanding of the various forces that hold the pre-eruption magnetic flux rope in equilibrium. Traditionally, idealized analytical force expressions are used to derive simplified eruption criteria that can be compared to solar observations and modeling. What is missing, however, is a validation that these idealized analytical force expressions can be applied to the line-tied, low-aspect-ratio conditions of the corona. In this paper, we address this shortcoming by using a laboratory experiment to study the forces that act on long-lived, arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Three key force terms are evaluated over a wide range of experimental conditions: (1) the upward hoop force; (2) the downward strapping force; and (3) the downward toroidal field tension force. First, the laboratory force measurements show that, on average, the three aforementioned force terms cancel to produce a balanced line-tied equilibrium. This finding validates the laboratory force measurement techniques developed here, which were recently used to identify a dynamic toroidal field tension force that can prevent flux rope eruption. The verification of magnetic force balance also confirms the low-beta assumption that the plasma thermal pressure is negligible in these experiments. Next, the measured force terms are directly compared to corresponding analytical expressions. While the measured and analytical forces are found to be well correlated, the low-aspect-ratio, line-tied conditions in the experiment are found to both reduce the measured hoop force and increase the measured tension force with respect to analytical expectations. These two co

  19. Alignment of a buccally displaced maxillary canine in the late mixed dentition with a modified utility arch: a patient report.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Licciardello, Valeria; Greco, Mariagrazia; Rossetti, Bruno; Barbato, Ersilia

    2010-01-01

    Maxillary canines and first molars are the most common ectopic teeth in young people. Ectopic buccal eruption of maxillary canines is strongly associated with lack of space or crowding in the dental arch. This report demonstrates the management of a buccally erupted maxillary canine in an 11-year, 8-month-old boy without sufficient space. The patient had a mostly dental Class II occlusion and was in the late mixed dentition, and the root development of his canines was consistent with his dental age. To correct the distal occlusion and gain space in the maxillary arch for the eruption of both canines, the patient received cervical headgear. To guide the maxillary left canine into occlusion, it was surgically exposed and a modified utility arch inserted. The result of this approach proves that a custom-designed utility arch allows the distal movement of a buccally displaced canine, while at the same time increasing the maxillary arch length.

  20. Key techniques and risk management for the application of the Pile-Beam-Arch (PBA) excavation method: a case study of the Zhongjie subway station.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yong-ping; Zhao, Wen; Li, Shen-gang; Zhang, Guo-bin

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of shallow-buried tunnels in densely populated urban areas involve many challenges. The ground movements induced by tunneling effects pose potential risks to infrastructure such as surface buildings, pipelines, and roads. In this paper, a case study of the Zhongjie subway station located in Shenyang, China, is examined to investigate the key construction techniques and the influence of the Pile-Beam-Arch (PBA) excavation method on the surrounding environment. This case study discusses the primary risk factors affecting the environmental safety and summarizes the corresponding risk mitigation measures and key techniques for subway station construction using the PBA excavation method in a densely populated urban area.

  1. Accuracy of impressions obtained with dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Rehmann, Peter; Balkenhol, Markus

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the accuracy resulting from dual-arch impressions when compared to conventional impressions in complex preparations (ie, inlay and partial crown). One hundred eighty impressions were made using two different dual-arch trays; conventional trays served as the control. The accuracy of the dies obtained (Fuji-Rock EP, GC Europe) was assessed indirectly from the change of 59 transversal dimensions. Statistical analysis (t test, analysis of variance) revealed that less rigid dual-arch trays performed better than rigid ones. Though the inlay preparation was more difficult to reproduce with dual-arch trays, it can be concluded that the accuracy obtainable with nonrigid dual-arch trays is comparable to impressions taken from full-arch trays.

  2. Arch width changes in patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion treated with maxillary first premolar extraction and non-extraction method

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Sajjad; Kachoei, Mojgan; Shahvaghar-Asl, Naiemeh; Shirazi, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine arch width changes during maxillary first premolars extraction and non-extraction treatment in patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion. Material and Methods Dental casts of 91 Class II division 1 patients (36 males and 55 females) were evaluated. The minimum age of the subjects at the beginning of treatment was above 16 years. 48 patients were treated with extraction of the maxillary first premolars and 43 patients were treated without extraction. Pre- and post-treatment maxillary and mandibular inter-canine and inter-molar arch widths were measured. Results At the end of treatment, maxillary and mandibular inter-canine widths of both groups increased significantly. The maxillary inter-molar width decreased in the extraction group and increased in the non-extraction group. The mandibular inter-molar width increased significantly in both groups. No significant differences were observed between males and females. Conclusions The results of this study indicated that there was a tendency for an increase in arch width during both the extraction and non-extraction treatment except maxillary inter-molar width in the extraction cases. Key words:Dental arch, malocclusion, angle Class II, tooth movement, extraction. PMID:27703608

  3. Arched gonadal arteries in the South African negro.

    PubMed Central

    Grine, F E; Kramer, B

    1981-01-01

    The frequency with which the gonadal arteries follow a recurrent course, upwards and arching over the renal veins before descending to the gonads, is recorded for the South African Negro. The gonadal arteries follow such a course on the left side in 17, 2% and on the right side in 22% of cases. This incidence for arched left sided arteries is comparable to that recorded in other studies, but the frequency for arched right sided arteries in the South African Negro appears to be higher. Recognition of arching gonadal arteries is of importance to the vascular surgeon and urologist. PMID:7298490

  4. [Relationship between aortic arch shape and blood pressure response after coarctation repair].

    PubMed

    Ou, P; Mousseaux, E; Auriacombe, L; Pédroni, E; Balleux, F; Sidi, D; Bonnet, D

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of secondary hypertension after repair of coarctation of the aorta are not well understood. Abnormalities of the architecture of the aortic arch and their consequences on blood pressure have not been studied. In order to study the relationship between abnormalities or aortic arch architecture and resting blood pressure ninety-four patients without re-coarctation were followed up prospectively from 1997 to 2004 (mean age 16.9 +/- 8.1 years; mean weight 57.5 +/- 18.3 Kg; interval since surgery 16.3 +/- 5.4 years). All underwent MRI angiography of the thoracic aorta which enabled the abnormalities to be classified in 3 groups: gothic arch, crenellated arch and roman arch. Twenty-four patients (25.5%) were hypertensive and 70 (74.4%) normotensive. There were 40 gothic arches (42.5%). 14 crenellated arches (15%) and 40 roman arches (42.5%). Gothic arches were more commonly observed in the hypertensive patients (18/40, [45%, 95% CI 31-62]) than the crenellated arches (4/14, [28.5%, 95% CI 7-48]) or the roman arches (2/40, [5%, 95% CI 2-12]). Only the gothic arch was independently correlated with hypertension on multivariate analysis. The authors conclude that gothic deformation of the aortic arch is an independent predictive factor of hypertension in patients operated for coarctation with an excellent result on the isthmic region. Patients with a gothic appearance of their aortic arch should be followed up closely.

  5. Immediate loading with fixed full-arch prostheses in the maxilla: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Covani, Ugo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To critically review the evidence-based literature on immediate loading of implants with fixed full-arch prostheses in the maxilla to determine 1) currently recommended performance criteria and 2) the outcomes that can be expected with this procedure. Study Desing: Studies from 2001 to 2011 on immediate loading with fixed full-arch maxillary prostheses were reviewed. Clinical series with at least 5 patients and 12 months of follow-up were included. Case reports, studies with missing data and repeatedly published studies were excluded. In each study the following was assessed: type of study, implant type, number of patients, number of implants, number of implants per patient, use of post-extraction implants, minimum implant length and diameter, type of prosthesis, time until loading, implant survival rate, prosthesis survival rate, marginal bone loss, complications andmean follow-up time. Criteria for patient selection, implant primary stability and bone regeneration were also studied. Results: Thirteen studies were included, reporting a total of 2484 immediately loaded implants in 365 patients. Currently accepted performance criteria regarding patient and implant selection, and surgical and prosthetic procedures were deduced from the reviewed articles. Implant survival rates went from 87.5% to 100%, prosthesis survival rates from 93.8% to 100% and radiographic marginal bone loss from 0.8 mm to 1.6 mm.No intraoperative complications and only minor prosthetic complications were reported. Conclusions: The literature on immediate loading with fixed full-arch prostheses in the maxilla shows that a successful outcome can be expected if adequate criteria are used to evaluate the patient, choose the implant and perform the surgical and prosthetic treatment. Lack of homogeneity within studies limits the relevance of the conclusions that can be drawn, and more controlled randomized studies are necessary to enable comparison between the immediate and the

  6. One-stage hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch: a single-center preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changwei; Guo, Xi; Sun, Lizhong; Huang, Lianjun; Lai, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the initial results of a hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating descending thoracic aortic disease that involves distal aortic arch. It also intends to report our initial experience in performing this procedure. Methods A total of 45 patients (35 males and 10 females) with descending thoracic aortic disease underwent a hybrid procedure, namely, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) combined with supra-arch branch vessel bypass, in our center from April 2009 to August 2014. Right axillary artery to left axillary artery bypass (n=20) or right axillary artery to left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left axillary artery bypass (n=25) were performed. The conditions of all patients were followed up from the 2nd month to the 65th month postoperative (mean, 26.0±17.1). Mortality within 30 days, complications such as endoleak after the hybrid procedure, and stenosis or blockage of the bypass graft during the follow-up period was assessed. Results All the patients underwent a one-stage procedure. One case of death and one case of cerebral infarction were reported within 30 days. One patient died of the sudden drop in blood pressure during the 2nd day of operation. Meanwhile, another patient suffered from cerebral infarction. Two patients underwent open surgery, and one of them had to undergo a second TEVAR during the follow-up period. Moreover, endoleak occurred in two patients and a newly formed intimal tear was observed in one patient. Overall, 93.2% of the patients survived without any complication related to the hybrid procedure. Conclusions Initial results suggest that the one-stage hybrid procedure is a suitable therapeutic option for thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch. However, this procedure is not recommended for type-B aortic dissection, in which a tear is located in the greater curvature or near the left subclavian artery (LSA), because of the high possibility of endoleak occurrence

  7. Biomechanical aspects of segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm for controlled anterior tooth movement: A three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hiroya; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Hamanaka, Ryo; Sumi, Mayumi; Chiang, Pao-Chang; Tanaka, Motohiro; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    The porpose of this study was to determine the optimal length of power arms for achieving controlled anterior tooth movement in segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm. A three-dimensional finite element method was applied for the simulation of en masse anterior tooth retraction in segmented power arm mechanics. The type of tooth movement, namely, the location of center of rotation of the maxillary central incisor in association with power arm length, was calculated after the retraction force was applied. When a 0.017 × 0.022-in archwire was inserted into the 0.018-in slot bracket, bodily movement was obtained at 9.1 mm length of power arm, namely, at the level of 1.8 mm above the center of resistance. In case a 0.018 × 0.025-in full-size archwire was used, bodily movement of the tooth was produced at the power arm length of 7.0 mm, namely, at the level of 0.3 mm below the center of resistance. Segmented arch mechanics required shorter length of power arms for achieving any type of controlled anterior tooth movement as compared to sliding mechanics. Therefore, this space closing mechanics could be widely applied even for the patients whose gingivobuccal fold is shallow. The segmented arch mechanics combined with power arm could provide higher amount of moment-to-force ratio sufficient for controlled anterior tooth movement without generating friction, and vertical forces when applying retraction force parallel to the occlusal plane. It is, therefore, considered that the segmented power arm mechanics has a simple appliance design and allows more efficient and controllable tooth movement.

  8. [The exposure dose of the sella turcica in panoramic dental radiography with an intraoral radiogenic source].

    PubMed

    Pastremoli, A; Cucchi, G; Ciminari, R

    1991-06-01

    Panoramic dental radiography using an intraoral X-ray source exposes critical organs, such as the crystalline and the thyroid, as well as organs of fundamental importance such as the pituitary gland, to X-rays. An experimental study was carried out to assess the exposure dose to the sella turcica during the radiological examination of the upper and lower dental arches using an X-ray source within the oral cavity. The comprehensive exposure dose for the upper and lower dental arches exceeded that found in orthopantomography (110 micro Gy/examination vs 47 micro Gy/examination) with errors which are respectively inferior to 15% and 30%. The authors conclude that the risk of provoking anatomical or functional changes of the pituitary gland is extremely remote using this type of examination.

  9. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  10. Which is a stronger indicator of dental caries: oral hygiene, food, or beverage? A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Poonam; Gary, Julie J

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is a multifactorial disease with various risk factors. Oral hygiene and dietary factors--specifically, the consumption of snacks and beverages with added sugars--have been shown to be risk indicators for this disease. It is critical for dental professionals to understand the relative roles of each of these food categories in the dental caries process. This article presents a cross-sectional study of 76 people living in a Southern Illinois fluoridated community. The amount of sugar-sweetened beverages, snack food consumption, plaque index, and age showed statistically significant relationships with the outcome variable--dental caries (P < 0.05). The results indicated that dietary factors and oral hygiene both contribute equally to dental caries in young adults living in a fluoridated community. Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was a much stronger indicator of dental caries than snack food consumption in our study population.

  11. [Evaluation of the timing of orthodontic arch expansion and graft in cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Wang, Yingnan; Liu, Hongyan

    2016-04-01

    Maxillary transverse growth is inhibited by congenital cleft, early surgical scar strain, and oppression of lipmuscles in patients with cleft lip and palate. Clinical manifestations have shown severely constricted maxilla, insufficientmaxillary width, mismatch of upper and lower dental arches, and crossbite. Alveolar bone graft and arch expansion can effectively correct the deficiency in maxillary width. This paper discusses the timing and success rate of alveolar bone graft, as wellas the relationship between alveolar bone graft and arch expansion. Secondary alveolar bone graft is optimally performed beforepermanent canine eruption, especially when the teeth have formed between half and three quarters of their roots. Rapid maxillaryexpansion prior to alveolar bone graft is beneficial because this process increases the gap of the cleft, expands bone graft, andreduces the difficulty. However, the stability of this process remains controversial. Small-scale studies have reported that rapidmaxillary expansion after alveolar bone graft can open the midpalatal suture without bone graft loss. Slow maxillary expansioncan provide continuous light forces to reconstruct the bone. However, these studies are coordinated with fixed orthodontictreatment. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of maxillary expansion on long-term stability of teeth.

  12. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations

    PubMed Central

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  13. Epidemiologic study of dental emergencies among utilizers in an insured population in Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Ngim, C H; Peterson, D R; Milgrom, P

    1984-10-01

    This is a study of the epidemiology of dental emergencies based on information abstracted from the microfilmed dental claim forms of a large American insurance program in 1981-82. Overall, about 4% of all dental visits were classifiable as emergencies. There were significant seasonal and age variations in dental emergencies. There was no variation with respect to geographic regions in the State of Washington (USA) or sex. Paradoxically, residents in regions having fluoridated water supplies were at equal risk of developing dental emergencies due to dental caries, relative to those residing in non-fluoridated regions. There was also no difference in risk associated with insurance deductibles, although generally deductibles are thought to deter first-contact visits.

  14. A qualitative study of limited access permit dental hygienists in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Battrell, Ann M; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R

    2008-03-01

    Many states have adopted alternative oral health care delivery systems that include expanded roles for dental hygienists. This qualitative study was designed to evaluate the impact of the Limited Access Permit (LAP) legislation in Oregon and to understand the relationship between dental hygienists and dentists within this delivery system. The snowball sampling technique was used to identify LAP dental hygienists and collaborating dentists. The snowball sampling technique begins with the identification of a known expert in the field who serves as the initial "sampling unit." Subsequent individuals are then recommended, or nominated, to the investigator by the initial study participant and are selected based upon the need to fill in or extend information. The final sample consisted of seven LAP dental hygienists and two collaborating dentists. Interviews, field observations, and document analysis were utilized for data collection. Factors that led to the creation of LAP dental hygiene practice, current LAP practice, personal characteristics, relationships between LAP dental hygienists and dentists, and the impact that LAP dental hygienists have had on access to oral health care were explored. Data revealed that the Oregon legislature twice expanded the LAP scope of practice to increase access to oral health care services. LAP dental hygienists practice in community and school-based settings. Common characteristics of LAP dental hygienists include entrepreneurship, lifelong learning, and a commitment to underserved populations. The findings from this study indicate that LAP dental hygienists and collaborating dentists have positive relationships. No evidence of lower quality of care in unsupervised dental hygiene practices was found. However, the impact of the LAP legislation is still unknown due to the limited numbers of LAP dental hygienists and the early nature of the LAP practice.

  15. Association Between Dental Students' Emotional Intelligence and Academic Performance: A Study at Six Dental Colleges in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Puranik, Manjunath P; Sowmya, K R

    2016-05-01

    Since the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in achieving academic excellence requires further research, the aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess EI and its associated factors and to determine any association between EI and academic performance among final-year dental students in Bengaluru, India. In 2015, 208 dental students from six dental colleges in Bengaluru were invited to participate in the study. Their demographic and lifestyle data were collected, and EI was assessed with the 30-item Emotional Quotient Self-Assessment Checklist developed by Sterrett. Academic performance was assessed using grades obtained in the final-year undergraduate examination. The response rate was 96% (N=200). Overall, 54.5% of the participants had high EI scores (≥120), although only 51 (25.5%) had a high EI score in all the domains (≥20). EI was significantly greater in females than males. Gender, sleep, meeting friends, physical exercise, recreational activities, and academic performance were significantly associated with EI and accounted for 42% variance in hierarchical regression analysis. EI was also positively associated with academic performance. Gender and healthy lifestyle habits were positively associated with EI, which in turn influenced these students' academic performance. These findings suggest a possible need for attention to developing dental students' EI.

  16. Catalog of Completed Health Care and Dental Care Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    AD A1 Dentistry Programs: Assessment of Relationship Between Past Dental Experience and Sick 0Ill in the Field (U30 Report No. 81-013) Sep 81 Fiel...Patricia. HSC Public Broadcasting Satellite (Consultation Report No. 83-001) 1983 King, John E. Preventive Dentistry Conference 0. (Consultation Report...1985 Brusch, Walter A. Dental Doctrine Assessment & R !or ol Preventive Dentistry (Dental Consultation Report No. 85-001) 1985 Mangelsdorff, A. David

  17. Finite Element Analysis Generates an Increasing Interest in Dental Research: A Bibliometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Abdoulaziz; Mushegyan, Vagan; Naveau, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to provide a longitudinal overview of published studies that use finite element analysis in dental research, by using the SCI-expanded database of Web of Science® (Thomson Reuters). Material and Methods: Eighty publications from 1999-2000 and 473 from 2009-2010 were retrieved. This literature grew faster than the overall dental literature. The number of publishing countries doubled. The main journals were American or English, and dealt with implantology. For the top 10 journals publishing dental finite element papers, the mean impact factor increased by 75% during the decade. Results: Finite elements generate an increasing interest from dental authors and publishers worldwide. PMID:27006722

  18. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  20. Improved dynamical modelling of the Arches cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joowon; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Clarkson et al. (2012) measured the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster, a young and massive star cluster in the Galactic center. Using the observed velocity dispersion profile and the surface brightness profile of Espinoza et al. (2009), they estimate the cluster's present-day mass to be ˜ 1.5×104 M⊙ by fitting an isothermal King model. In this study, we trace the best-fit initial mass for the Arches cluster using the same observed data set and also the anisotropic Fokker-Planck calculations for the dynamical evolution.

  1. Dental pain and associated factors among pregnant women: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Marta S M; Lang, Celina A; Almeida, Luiza H S; Bello-Corrêa, Fernanda O; Romano, Ana R; Pappen, Fernanda G

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of dental pain during pregnancy and its association with sociodemographic factors and oral health conditions among 315 pregnant women in South Brazil. Participants were interviewed to obtain sociodemographic data, such as age, educational level, employment status, family income, and marital and parity status. Medical and dental histories were also collected, including the occurrence of dental pain and the use of dental services during pregnancy. Clinical examinations were performed to assess the presence of visible plaque and gingival bleeding and to calculate the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. Means and standard deviations of continuous variables and frequencies and percentages of categorical variables were calculated. Independent variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 173 (54.9 %) pregnant women reported dental pain during pregnancy. After adjustment of the analysis, caries activity remained the main determinant of dental pain (odds ratio 3.33, 95 % CI 1.67-6.65). The prevalence of dental pain during pregnancy was high and the presence of caries activity was a determinant of dental pain. Moreover, access to oral health care was low, despite pregnant women's increased need for dental assistance.

  2. A Study of Radiographic Imaging Systems Used for Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karst, Nancy S.

    Thirty-three two-year dental hygiene programs throughout the United States were surveyed to identify the radiographic imaging system most often used and the accompanying rationale for that decision. A literature review identified the three radiographic imaging systems most frequently used and indicated that all dental hygiene programs had the…

  3. A longitudinal study of dental health from the age of 14 to 41.

    PubMed

    Crossner, Claes-Göran; Unell, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    The aim of present study was to longitudinally follow dental health from the age of 14 to 41. Originally an entire age group attending one of the compulsory schools in the city of Orebro, Sweden was selected and 115 children born in 1962 were included in the study. At the last examination 27 years later, 73 (63%) individuals, 35 males and 38 females, could still be located and were willing to participate. The drop out analysis did not show any statistical difference between the drop-outs and this final material. All participants had experienced a comprehensive whole population based preventive dental care, free of charge, during the first 19 years of their lives, and after that the increment of dental diseases had been limited. Only two individuals were diagnosed with chronic periodontitis at 41, and 70% of all DMFS registered at 41 were present already at 19. This positive development during adulthood seemed to be unrelated to socio-economic status. In addition, the dental health at 41 did not seem to be obviously influenced by if the participants, as adults, had paid yearly visits to the dentist or not, and there was no evidence supporting that regularly seeing a dental hygienist or using daily inter-dental cleaning would improve dental health. The most obvious difference in dental health at 41 was due to gender where e.g. the experience of proximal caries and bleeding after probing were twice as frequent in males as in females. Based on the results of the present study it can be concluded that uncritically abandoning whole population preventive strategies might not be in the best interest of public dental health. Furthermore, if already existing dental care resources should be reallocated for a better long-term dental health investment it should be on the expense of the young adults to the benefit of the young teenagers (as population sub-groups) and not the other way around based on individual indications.

  4. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  5. Prevalence and pattern of partial edentulism among dental patients attending College of Dentistry, Aljouf University, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Mostafa I.; Baig, Mohamed N.; Alrawaili, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The current study aimed to determine the prevalence and pattern of partial edentulism among dental patients attending the College of Dentistry, Aljouf University, Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: A total of 142 patients were selected, and the prevalence of partial edentulism among the selected patient was recorded. Patients were grouped into three age groups; Group I: 21–30 years, Group II: 31–40 years, and Group III: 41–50 years. Kennedy's classification was used to determine the pattern of partially edentulous arches. Modification areas were not included in the assessment to avoid complexity. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0 for windows. Results: The results showed that the occurrence of Kennedy Class III partial edentulism was 67.2 % in the maxillary arch and 64.1% in the mandibular arch. Followed by Class II in both maxillary and mandibular arch with an average of 16.3 % in maxillary arch and14.8% in the mandibular arch. Based on these results, class III has the highest prevalence in group II (31- 40 years). Class I and class II have the highest incidence among group III Patients (41–50 years). Conclusions: Among selected patients, Class III dental arch was the most prevalent pattern in maxillary and mandibular arches. Class IV being the least dominant pattern between all classes. There are a rise in Kennedy Class I and Kennedy Class II pattern and a decline in Class III and Class IV with an increase in age. PMID:28217535

  6. The Effects of Patient Contact upon First-Year Dental Students: A Study of Changing Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, Roger G.; And Others

    This study attempted to determine the effects of early patient contact through clinic experience upon the perceptions and attitudes of first year dental students. Questionnaires were administered at the beginning and end of students' first year in an innovative and new dental school where they were introduced to clinic experience within the first…

  7. Follow-Up Study of 1990 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XX, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In a continuing effort to measure the quality of their Dental Hygiene program, explore the need for changes, and substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1990 Dental Hygiene program graduates from William Rainey Harper (WRHC) College in Palatine, Illinois. A survey was mailed to all 30…

  8. Follow-Up Study of 1989 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XIX, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In a continuing effort to measure the quality of their Dental Hygiene program, explore the need for changes, and substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1989 Dental Hygiene program graduates from William Rainey Harper College (WRHC). A survey was mailed to all 29 associate degree…

  9. Follow-Up Study of 1991 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XXI, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In a continuing effort to measure the quality of their Dental Hygiene program, explore the need for changes, and substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1991 Dental Hygiene program graduates from William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) in Palatine, Illinois. Surveys were mailed to all 28…

  10. Follow-Up Study of 1992 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XXII, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In a continuing effort to measure the quality of their Dental Hygiene program, explore the need for changes, and substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1992 Dental Hygiene program graduates from William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) in Palatine, Illinois. Surveys were mailed to all 29…

  11. Follow-Up Study of 1987 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XVII, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Flaherty, Toni

    In 1988, a follow-up study was performed of the 1987 graduates of the Dental Hygiene program of William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), in Illinois, in order to determine the quality of the program and the need for changes, and to substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards. A survey was mailed to all of the 1987 dental hygiene…

  12. Impact of Curriculum on Understanding of Professional Practice: A Longitudinal Study of Students Commencing Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieser, Jules A.; Dall'Alba, Gloria; Livingstone, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines changes in understanding of dental practice among a cohort of students in the early years of a dentistry programme. In their first two professional years, we identified five distinct understandings of dental practice that we have ordered from least to most comprehensive: "relieving pain or generally caring for…

  13. Methodological Study for Determining the Task Content of Dental Auxiliary Education Programs. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, David R.

    The purpose of the study was to develop a methodology of collecting data pertaining to the dental tasks taught and the responsibility levels to which they are taught in the curricula of educational institutions preparing dental assistants, hygienists, and laboratory technicians. The sample group consisted of Faculty and Preceptor respondents from…

  14. Clinical implication of blood glucose monitoring in general dental offices: the Ehime Dental Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Harase, Tadahiro; Nishida, Wataru; Hamakawa, Tomohiro; Hino, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Satoru; Sako, Hirofumi; Ito, Shirou; Murakami, Hajime; Nishida, Kei; Inoue, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Masahito; Yoshizu, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Onuma, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Keita; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki; Osawa, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined whether general dentists can contribute to the detection of patients with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes by monitoring blood glucose in dental clinics. Research design and methods A total of 716 patients who visited clinics for dental treatment were enrolled and classified into 3 groups (mild, moderate, and severe) according to Kornman's criteria for periodontitis. The correlations between the casual blood glucose level, presence or absence of the history of diabetes, and/or severity of periodontitis were evaluated. Results 68 patients (9.5%) had hyperglycemia (blood glucose ≥200 mg/dL). Of these patients, 20 (29.4%) did not have a history of diabetes. Blood glucose tended to be higher with greater periodontitis severity. Of the 3 groups, the severe periodontitis group had the highest proportion of patients with hyperglycemia (p<0.0001). Conclusions Patients with dental problems could be screened for diabetes, especially undiagnosed diabetes. General dentists could function as practitioners to screen for diabetes. Trial registration number UMIN-CTR 000014877. PMID:26629348

  15. Incidence of dental caries in primary dentition and risk factors: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Paixão-Gonçalves, Suzane; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2016-05-20

    The objectives of this prospective, longitudinal, population-based study were to estimate the incidence of dental caries in the primary dentition, identify risk factors and determine the proportion of children receiving dental treatment, through a two-year follow up. The first dental exam was conducted with 381 children aged one to five years, at health centers during immunization campaigns; 184 of them had dental caries and 197 had no caries experience. The second exam was carried out two years later at a nursery or at home with the same individuals who participated in the first exam. The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the dmft criteria. Parents were interviewed regarding socioeconomic indicators. Descriptive, bivariate and adjusted Poisson regression analyses were performed. Among the 381 children, 234 were reexamined after two years (non-exposed: 139; exposed: 95). The overall incidence of dental caries was 46.6%. The greatest incidence of dental caries was found in the group of children with previous caries experience (61.1%). Among the children without dental caries in the first exam, 36.7% exhibited caries in the second exam. The majority of children (72.6%) received no treatment for carious lesions in the two-year interval between examinations. Children with previous dental caries (RR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.12-2.05) had a greater risk of developing new lesions, compared with the children without previous dental caries. The incidence of dental caries was high and most of children's caries were untreated. Previous caries experience is a risk factor for developing new carious lesions in children.

  16. Ambient resonance of Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Thorne, Michael S.

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the resonance characteristics of a prominent natural arch in Canyonlands National Park, Mesa Arch, as measured from ambient seismic data. Evaluating spectral and polarization attributes, we distinguished the first four resonant frequencies of the arch, 2.9, 6.0, 6.9, and 8.5 Hz, as well as basic properties of the associated mode shapes. We then affirmed experimental data using 3-D numerical modal analysis, providing estimates of material properties and clarifying vibrational mode shapes. Monitoring resonant frequencies over time, we searched for shifts associated with changing environmental conditions and long-term progressive damage. We measured ~3% direct daily variation in resonant frequency associated with changing rock temperature, thermal stress, and stiffening of the rock matrix. Independent tilt data showed similar diurnal cycles associated with thermoelastic stresses and deformation of the arch. We observed no permanent resonant frequency shifts related to irreversible damage of Mesa Arch during our study period.

  17. Digital radiological research in forensic dental investigation: case studies.

    PubMed

    Nuzzolese, E; Di Vella, G

    2012-04-01

    The advent of dental digital radiology and new portable X-ray devices allows the execution of periapical X-ray images not only in the dental surgery but also in hitherto difficult locations such as field military hospitals, archaeological excavation sites, morgues and in cases of house arrest. In this work authors evaluated the feasibility of Nomad Examiner (Aribex inc.) handheld X-ray device combined with a digital sensor and a portable pc in forensic odontology applications. Employed for the first time forensically during the 2004 Tsunami victim identification process, the Nomad Examiner has now passed all security and conformity requirements of US and EU regulations. Examples of the practical use and the technical features of this device are seen when employed in odontological assessment of skeletonised and carbonized individuals and the assessment of individuals under house arrest complaining dental lesions. Results from the use this portable device demonstrate the benefits of a dental radiological assessment during an autopsy with the aim of human identification and the importance of a complete dental assessment (clinical and radiological) when evaluating dental traumatic lesions of individuals who cannot visit a dental surgery. In the first example forensic dentist would work alongside a forensic pathologist. On the other hand in the second example an odontologist - dentist could be appointed as an expert witness directly by a Court.

  18. Key Techniques and Risk Management for the Application of the Pile-Beam-Arch (PBA) Excavation Method: A Case Study of the Zhongjie Subway Station

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-ping; Zhao, Wen; Li, Shen-gang; Zhang, Guo-bin

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of shallow-buried tunnels in densely populated urban areas involve many challenges. The ground movements induced by tunneling effects pose potential risks to infrastructure such as surface buildings, pipelines, and roads. In this paper, a case study of the Zhongjie subway station located in Shenyang, China, is examined to investigate the key construction techniques and the influence of the Pile-Beam-Arch (PBA) excavation method on the surrounding environment. This case study discusses the primary risk factors affecting the environmental safety and summarizes the corresponding risk mitigation measures and key techniques for subway station construction using the PBA excavation method in a densely populated urban area. PMID:25221783

  19. Dental solid waste characterization and management in Iran: a case study of Sistan and Baluchestan Province.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Mohammadi, Leili; Mostafapour, Ferdos Kord; Moghaddam, Alireza Ansari

    2014-02-01

    The management of dental solid waste continues to be a major challenge, particularly in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. In Iran, few studies on management of dental solid waste and its composition are available. An effort has been made through this study to evaluate the hazardous and infectious status of dental solid waste, keeping in mind its possible role in cross-infection chain. For this study, 123 private dental centres and 36 public dental centres were selected and the composition and generation rate of dental solid waste produced were measured. Dental solid waste was classified to four main categories: (i) domestic-type; (ii) potentially infectious; (iii) chemical and pharmaceutical; and (iv) toxic, which constituted 11.7, 80.3, 6.3, and 1.7%, respectively, of the total. Also, the results indicated that the dental solid waste per patient per day generation rate for total, domestic-type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic wastes were 169.9, 8.6, 153.3, 11.2, and 3.3 g/patient/d, respectively. Furthermore, the per day generation rates for total, domestic-type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic wastes were 194.5, 22.6, 156.1, 12.3, and 3.4 kg/d, respectively. According to findings of this study, for best management of dental waste it is suggested that source reduction, separation, reuse, and recycling programmes be implemented and each section of dental waste be collected and disposed of separately and in accordance with related criteria.

  20. Occurrence and timing of complications following traumatic dental injuries: A retrospective study in a dental trauma department

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shaul; Pilosof, Nir; Karawani, Munir; Wigler, Ronald; Kaufman, Arieh Y.; Teich, Sorin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study explores the pattern of complications occurrence resulting from traumatic dental injuries, the relation of this pattern to the number of years from the time of the injury to its first diagnosis, and other contributing characteristics such as root development and trauma characteristic. Material and Methods Patients’ data treated following dental trauma from 2002 to 2014 were classified and grouped according to age, gender, tooth type, injury type, diagnosis and the time that elapsed between the traumatic event and the diagnosis of complications (TIC). The distribution function of the quantitative parameters was determined with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Fisher exact test was used to test differences between categorical parameters. Results The review identified 166 patients (114 male and 52 female), with a total of 287 traumatized teeth, and a mean of 1.8 injured teeth per incident. Maxillary teeth were involved significantly more often in traumatic dental injuries. The follow-up period range (TIC) had a mean of 2.99 years. The most frequent complication was pulp necrosis (34.2%). The most frequent complication related to avulsion was ankylotic root resorption (50%) diagnosed after a median TIC of 1.18 years. Open apices at the occurrence of trauma were observed in 52 teeth. Of these, 54.9% experienced pulp necrosis and 9.8% inflammatory root resorption with a median TIC of 1.63 years. Teeth that experienced multiple traumatic events showed significantly more late pulp necrosis compared to teeth that experienced a single traumatic injury (61.9% vs. 25.3%, respectively, p<0.0001). Conclusions Follow-up periods should be based on the type of traumatic dental injury and the severity of the potential complications for the tooth. Current recommendations for follow-up after traumatic dental injury should be revised to reflect the need for more frequent and overall prolonged follow-up. Key words:Dental trauma, avulsion, open apex, pulp necrosis

  1. Dental Occlusion and Ophthalmology: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marchili, Nicola; Ortu, Eleonora; Pietropaoli, Davide; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Monaco, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Stomatognathic system is strictly correlated to other anatomical regions; many studies investigated relationship between temporomandibular joint and posture, several articles describe cranio-facial pain from dental causes, such as trigger points. Until now less interest has been given to connections between dental occlusion and ophthalmology, even if they are important and involving. Clinical experience in dental practice claims that mandibular latero-deviation is connected both to eye dominance and to defects of ocular convergence. The trigeminal nerve is the largest and most complex of the twelve cranial nerves. The trigeminal system represents the connection between somitic structures and those derived from the branchial arches, collecting the proprioception from both somitic structures and oculomotor muscles. The intermedius nucleus of the medulla is a small perihypoglossal brainstem nucleus, which acts to integrate information from the head and neck and relays it on to the nucleus of the solitary tract where autonomic responses are generated. This intriguing neurophysiological web led our research group to investigate anatomical and functional associations between dental occlusion and vision. In conclusion, nervous system and functional pathways strictly connect vision and dental occlusion, and in the future both dentists and oculists should be more and more aware of this correlation for a better diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27733873

  2. Three-dimensional optical high-resolution profiler with a large observation field: foot arch behavior under low static charge studies.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Cornu, Jean Yves

    2002-09-01

    Our aim is to describe a method for detecting small deformations from a three-dimensional (3D) shape of large lateral dimensions. For this purpose the measurement method is based on the simultaneous utilization of several 3D optical systems and the phase-shifting technique. In this way, the following problems appear: optical distortion due to the large field observed, nonlinear phase-to-height conversion, conversion of image coordinates into object coordinates for each 3D optical system, and coordinate unification of all optical systems. The resolution is 50 microm with a field of view of 320 mm x 150 mm. We used this system to study the 3D human foot arch deformation under low loads in vivo. First results indicate the hysteresis behavior of the human foot under a low load (50 to 450 N).

  3. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  4. Cluster Effects in a National Dental PBRN Restorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Litaker, M.S.; Gordan, V.V.; Rindal, D.B.; Fellows, J.L.; Gilbert, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Items in clusters, such as patients of the same clinician or teeth within the same patient, tend to be more similar than items from different groups. This within-group similarity, represented by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), reduces precision, yielding less statistical power and wider confidence intervals, compared with non-clustered samples of the same size. This must be considered in the design of studies including clusters. We present ICC estimates from a study of 7,826 restorations placed in previously unrestored tooth surfaces of 4,672 patients by 222 clinicians in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, as a resource for sample size planning in restorative studies. Our findings suggest that magnitudes of ICCs in practice-based research can be substantial. These can have large effects on precision and the power to detect treatment effects. Generally, we found relatively large ICCs for characteristics that are influenced by clinician choice (e.g., 0.36 for rubber dam use). ICCs for outcomes within individual patients, such as tooth surfaces affected by a caries lesion, tended to be smaller (from 0.03 to 0.15), but were still sufficiently large to substantially affect statistical power. Clustering should be taken into account in the design of oral health studies and derivation of statistical power estimates for these studies (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00847470). PMID:23857643

  5. A Pioneering Study of Dental Fluorosis in the Libyan Population

    PubMed Central

    L, Sunil Tejaswi K; Shetty, Suneeth; M, Annapoorna B; Pujari, Sudarshan C; P, Sarveshwar Reddy; Nandlal, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fluorosis is a condition resulting from excessive ingestion of fluoride during early childhood leading to the formation of defective enamel. The increased fluoride content is thought to result in a metabolic alteration of ameloblasts, which results in defective matrix, and improper calcification of teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 6244 patients between the ages of 6yrs to 60yrs, who presented to our outpatient clinic from October 2009 to December 2010 were included in the study. The study subjects were grouped according to their age into the following groups- 6-14 yrs, 15-25 yrs, 26-40 yrs, and 40-60yrs. Only permanent dentition was taken into consideration in this study. Results: The overall prevalence of fluorosis in this study was 63.34% (3955 of 6244 patients). Men had a slightly higher prevalence of 64.27% compared to 62.28% among women. Conclusion: Prevention of fluorosis would require efforts at raising awareness among the people about the harmful effects of their dietary choices on their teeth. They also need to be educated about adequate and proper oral hygiene, such as brushing their teeth at least two times daily. How to cite this article: Sunil T K L, Shetty S, Annapoorna B M, Pujari S C, Reddy P S, Nandlal B. A Pioneering Study of Dental Fluorosis in the Libyan Population. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):67-72. PMID:24155605

  6. Dental anxiety in relation to neuroticism and pain sensitivity. A twin study.

    PubMed

    Vassend, Olav; Røysamb, Espen; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2011-03-01

    Predisposing personality traits as well as heightened pain sensitivity and fear of pain have been hypothesized as central factors in the development of dental anxiety. The aim of the study was to estimate the heritability of dental anxiety, and to investigate the genetic and environmental sources of covariance between dental anxiety on one hand, and pain sensitivity and the neuroticism trait on the other. A sample comprising 188 twins, aged 23-35 years (53 monozygotic and 39 dizygotic twin pairs, and 4 single twins whose co-twin did not participate), was included in the study. Measures of dental anxiety and personality were obtained using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and the NEO Personality Inventory Revised, respectively. Heat pain and cold pressor pain sensitivity were assessed using standard pain testing procedures. Bivariate Cholesky models were employed to decompose the correlations between phenotypes into genetic and environmental factors. Using models with common additive genetic (A) and individual-specific environmental (E) factors, moderate heritability (i.e., .41) for dental anxiety was demonstrated. Virtually all of the phenotypic correlation between neuroticism and dental anxiety could be accounted for by A. Furthermore, a substantial part of the variance in dental anxiety was due to specific genetic and individual environmental influences unrelated to neuroticism. The phenotypic correlations between dental anxiety and the pain sensitivity indices were close to zero. Thus, while neuroticism and dental anxiety share a sizeable proportion of genetic (but not environmental) risk factors, the results also suggest that these two attributes are distinct entities with overlapping, but not identical, etiologies.

  7. Assessing Critical Thinking Outcomes of Dental Hygiene Students Utilizing Virtual Patient Simulation: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Joanna L

    2015-09-01

    Dental hygiene educators must determine which educational practices best promote critical thinking, a quality necessary to translate knowledge into sound clinical decision making. The aim of this small pilot study was to determine whether virtual patient simulation had an effect on the critical thinking of dental hygiene students. A pretest-posttest design using the Health Science Reasoning Test was used to evaluate the critical thinking skills of senior dental hygiene students at The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston Dental Hygiene Program before and after their experience with computer-based patient simulation cases. Additional survey questions sought to identify the students' perceptions of whether the experience had helped develop their critical thinking skills and improved their ability to provide competent patient care. A convenience sample of 31 senior dental hygiene students completed both the pretest and posttest (81.5% of total students in that class); 30 senior dental hygiene students completed the survey on perceptions of the simulation (78.9% response rate). Although the results did not show a significant increase in mean scores, the students reported feeling that the use of virtual patients was an effective teaching method to promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and confidence in the clinical realm. The results of this pilot study may have implications to support the use of virtual patient simulations in dental hygiene education. Future research could include a larger controlled study to validate findings from this study.

  8. A computational study of the role of the aortic arch in idiopathic unilateral vocal-fold paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Megan J.; Ayylasomayajula, Avinash; Behkam, Reza; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Jacobs, M. Eileen; Edgar, Julia D.; Paniello, Randal C.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral vocal-fold paralysis (UVP) occurs when one of the vocal folds becomes paralyzed due to damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Individuals with UVP experience problems with speaking, swallowing, and breathing. Nearly two-thirds of all cases of UVP is associated with impaired function of the left RLN, which branches from the vagus nerve within the thoracic cavity and loops around the aorta before ascending to the larynx within the neck. We hypothesize that this path predisposes the left RLN to a supraphysiological, biomechanical environment, contributing to onset of UVP. Specifically, this research focuses on the identification of the contribution of the aorta to onset of left-sided UVP. Important to this goal is determining the relative influence of the material properties of the RLN and the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN. Finite element analysis was used to estimate the stress and strain imposed on the left RLN as a function of the material properties and loading conditions. The peak stress and strain in the RLN were quantified as a function of RLN and aortic material properties and aortic blood pressure using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. The material properties of the aortic arch showed the strongest correlation with peak stress [ρ = −0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI), −1.00 to −0.25] and strain (ρ = −0.62, 95% CI, −0.99 to −0.24) in the RLN. Our results suggest an important role for the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN and potentially in the onset of left-sided UVP that is idiopathic. PMID:25477351

  9. The Association Between Body Mass Index and Dental Caries: Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Alswat, Khaled; Mohamed, Waleed S.; Wahab, Moustafa A.; Aboelil, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a growing health-related problem worldwide. Both obesity and dental caries are important health issues with multifactorial aspects. Some studies have shown an association between body mass index (BMI) and caries in childhood/adolescence but limited data about such an association are available in adults. The primary goal of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries and its relationship to BMI. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study at Taif University Outpatient Clinic, for adults who had a visit to the dental clinic. Baseline characteristics were obtained by the participating physician. The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was used to determine the prevalence of dental caries. Information about healthy eating, smoking, exercise, sleep patterns, media consumption, and brushing habits were collected. Results A total of 385 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 28.39 years, 72.8% were male, mean DMFT index score was 6.55, and 85.5% reported brushing their teeth at least once daily. Of the participants, 55.3% were either overweight or obese, and 42.2% demonstrated a high prevalence of dental caries with no significant difference in BMI when compared to the low dental caries group. Conclusions A high prevalence of overweight/obesity and dental caries was observed among the participants. After controlling for potential confounders like smoking and brushing habits, significant positive correlation between BMI and DMFT was observed. PMID:26767084

  10. [Double aortic arch with dominant left arch: case report].

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Paç, Feyza Ayşenur; Paç, Mustafa; Ballı, Sevket

    2012-09-01

    A vascular ring is defined as an anomaly of the great arteries (aortic arch and its branches) that compresses the trachea or esophagus. Double aortic arch is the most common vascular ring. Double aortic arch is very rare and typically becomes symptomatic in infancy or early childhood. We present a 7-year-old girl admitted to our clinic for evaluation of recurrent respiratory infection with dysphagia. Double aortic arch was suspected from echocardiography and diagnosed with cardiac computed tomography. Left aortic arcus was larger than the right at computed tomography and cardiac catheterisation. After surgery the symptoms improved strikingly. We conclude that vascular ring should be considered in the patients presenting with recurrent pulmonary infections and dysphagia. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic, irreversible complications.

  11. Variation in Formation of Superficial Palmar Arches with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Vatsalaswamy, P.; Bahetee, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the variations in the arterial supply of hand has reached a point of practical importance with the advent of microvascular surgery for revascularization, replantation and composite tissue transfers. Arterial supply of hand is derived from two anastomotic arches, formed between two main arteries of forearm i.e. radial, ulnar and their branches, in the palm. Objective: The superficial palmar arch shows variation in formation at the radial side. In the present study we have recorded its data which would help in its clinical and surgical implications. Material and Methods: In the present study we have studied the formation of superficial palmar arches and their variations in 100 cadaveric hands at Dr. D . Y. Patil Medical College, Pune and B.J. Government Medical College, Pune, India. Result and Conclusion: According to Adachi’s classification the most predominant pattern obseved was of Ulnar type arch (66%). According to Coleman and Anson classification 82% showed complete (Group I) superficial palmar arches and a very low incidence (18%) of incomplete arches (Group II). This suggests that collateral circulation is present in majority of cases. This would result in least number of complications considering radial artery harvesting for coronary bypass. Sub-classification of arches according to Coleman and Anson 1961 indicates that the predominant type in the present study was of Group I (Type B) which is formed entirely by Ulnar Artery (56%). Median artery and ulnar artery forming an incomplete superficial arch under Group II (Type C) having an incidence of 4% was recorded. Thus in such cases radial artery harvesting for coronary artery bypass may prove to be less fatal. This study is an effort to provide data about the formation of superficial palmar arches which has been a centre of attraction for most of the surgical procedures and injuries of the hand. PMID:24959427

  12. Study of the potential cytotoxicity of dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Roberta, Tiozzo; Federico, Magagna; Federica, Boraldi; Antonietta, Croce Maria; Sergio, Bortolini; Ugo, Consolo

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity of tow types of impression dental materials: polyethers (Impregum Penta, Permadyne Penta Heavy and Light) and vinyl polysiloxanes (Elite Mono Tray, Medium, Low viscosity and Elite H-D Putty). Their cytotoxic effects were studied by indirect and direct tests. The indirect tests were performed by incubating impression materials in serum free cell culture medium to prepare the soluble extracts. Balb/c 3T3 cells were incubated with extract dilutions (25, 50, 75 and 100%) for 24 h. The extracts of polyether materials caused a decrease of cellular viability, evaluated by light microscopy, by cell counting and by MTT test. The extracts of vinyl polysiloxanes materials induced a slight effect on cellular number and viability. The direct tests were performed by placing the impression materials in the centre of Petri dishes while Balb/c 3T3 were settling. The cellular proliferation was drastically reduced by polyethers and it was unaffected by the presence of vinyl polysiloxanes. These results show that: (a) the polyether materials are more toxic than vinyl polysiloxanes in our experimental conditions, (b) the impression materials are cytotoxic to the same degree in all assay methods.

  13. Computer-Guided Implant Surgery in Fresh Extraction Sockets and Immediate Loading of a Full Arch Restoration: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study of 14 Consecutively Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daas, M.; Assaf, A.; Dada, K.; Makzoumé, J.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Low scientific evidence is identified in the literature for combining implant placement in fresh extraction sockets with immediate function. Moreover, the few studies available on immediate implants in postextraction sites supporting immediate full-arch rehabilitation clearly lack comprehensive protocols. Purpose. The purpose of this study is to report outcomes of a comprehensive protocol using CAD-CAM technology for surgical planning and fabrication of a surgical template and to demonstrate that immediate function can be easily performed with immediate implants in postextraction sites supporting full-arch rehabilitation. Material and Methods. 14 subjects were consecutively rehabilitated (13 maxillae and 1 mandible) with 99 implants supporting full-arch fixed prostheses followed between 6 and 24 months (mean of 16 months). Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant success, biologic and prosthetic complications, pain, oedema evaluation, and radiographic marginal bone levels at surgery and then at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. The overall cumulative implant survival rate at mean follow-up time of 16 months was 97.97%. The average marginal bone loss was 0,9 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, the results validate this treatment modality for full-arch rehabilitations with predictable outcomes and high survival rate after 2 years. PMID:26064119

  14. Dental pain in the medical emergency department: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Currie, C C; Stone, S J; Connolly, J; Durham, J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the number of patients attending a medical emergency department (MED) with dental problems over a three-year period. This cross-sectional study was carried out as part of a service evaluation. Data were collected via a database search of patient attendances at the MED using free text and the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) for oral and dental diagnoses. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, t-test and chi-squared tests. Over the three-year period, there were 2504 visits to the MED for dental-related complaints, accounting for 0·7% of all attendances. The majority of patients were male (53·9%), with a mean age of 29 (s.d. 19·4) years for men, and 32 (s.d. 19·7) years for females. The mean index of multiple deprivation per cent rank was 35·0%. The most common diagnosis was unspecified dental disorder. Ten per cent of dental attendances to MED were repeat attendances by the same patients. In conclusion, patient attendances at MED for dental problems account for 0.7% of all attendances. MED may not be the most appropriate place for these patients to attend, in terms of care pathways, and also for economic reasons. The reasons why patients attend MED for dental problems clearly warrant further research.

  15. Spectrum of Dental Phenotypes in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting

    PubMed Central

    Howe, B.J.; Cooper, M.E.; Vieira, A.R.; Weinberg, S.M.; Resick, J.M.; Nidey, N.L.; Wehby, G.L.; Marazita, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with oral clefts show a wide range of dental anomalies, adding complexity to understanding the phenotypic spectrum of orofacial clefting. The evidence is mixed, however, on whether the prevalence of dental anomalies is elevated in unaffected relatives and is mostly based on small samples. In the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts, their relatives, and controls, this study characterizes the spectrum of cleft-related dental anomalies and evaluates whether families with clefting have a significantly higher risk for such anomalies compared with the general population. A total of 3,811 individuals were included: 660 cases with clefts, 1,922 unaffected relatives, and 1,229 controls. Dental anomalies were identified from in-person dental exams or intraoral photographs, and case-control differences were tested using χ2 statistics. Cases had higher rates of dental anomalies in the maxillary arch than did controls for primary (21% vs. 4%, P = 3 × 10−8) and permanent dentitions (51% vs. 8%, P = 4 × 10−62) but not in the mandible. Dental anomalies were more prevalent in cleft lip with cleft palate than other cleft types. More anomalies were seen in the ipsilateral side of the cleft. Agenesis and tooth displacements were the most common dental anomalies found in case probands for primary and permanent dentitions. Compared with controls, unaffected siblings (10% vs. 2%, P = 0.003) and parents (13% vs. 7%, P = 0.001) showed a trend for increased anomalies of the maxillary permanent dentition. Yet, these differences were nonsignificant after multiple-testing correction, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in some families carrying susceptibility to both overt clefts and dental anomalies. Collectively, the findings suggest that most affected families do not have higher genetic risk for dental anomalies than the general population and that the higher prevalence of anomalies in cases is primarily a physical consequence of the cleft

  16. Views of Dental Providers on Primary Care Coordination at Chairside: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, Mary E.; Birenz, Shirley; Gomes, Danni; Golembeski, Cynthia A.; Greenblatt, Ariel Port; Shelley, Donna; Russell, Stefanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a need for research to facilitate the widespread implementation, dissemination, and sustained utilization of evidence-based primary care screening, monitoring, and care coordination guidelines, thereby increasing the impact of dental hygienists’ actions on patients’ oral and general health. The aims of this formative study are to: (1) explore dental hygienists’ and dentists’ perspectives regarding the integration of primary care activities into routine dental care; and (2) assess the needs of dental hygienists and dentists regarding primary care coordination activities and use of information technology to obtain clinical information at chairside. Methods This qualitative study recruited ten hygienists and six dentists from ten New York City area dental offices with diverse patient mixes and volumes. A New York University faculty hygienist conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews, which were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of multilevel coding based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, resulting in emergent themes with accompanying categories. Results The dental hygienists and dentists interviewed as part of this study fail to use evidence-based guidelines to screen their patients for primary care sensitive conditions. Overwhelmingly, dental providers believe that tobacco use and poor diet contribute to oral disease, and report using electronic devices at chairside to obtain web-based health information. Conclusion Dental hygienists are well positioned to help facilitate greater integration of oral and general health care. Challenges include lack of evidence-based knowledge, coordination between dental hygienists and dentists, and systems-level support, with opportunities for improvement based upon a theory-driven framework. PMID:27340183

  17. Lucy's Flat Feet: The Relationship between the Ankle and Rearfoot Arching in Early Hominins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the Plio-Pleistocene, the hominin foot evolved from a grasping appendage to a stiff, propulsive lever. Central to this transition was the development of the longitudinal arch, a structure that helps store elastic energy and stiffen the foot during bipedal locomotion. Direct evidence for arch evolution, however, has been somewhat elusive given the failure of soft-tissue to fossilize. Paleoanthropologists have relied on footprints and bony correlates of arch development, though little consensus has emerged as to when the arch evolved. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we present evidence from radiographs of modern humans (n = 261) that the set of the distal tibia in the sagittal plane, henceforth referred to as the tibial arch angle, is related to rearfoot arching. Non-human primates have a posteriorly directed tibial arch angle, while most humans have an anteriorly directed tibial arch angle. Those humans with a posteriorly directed tibial arch angle (8%) have significantly lower talocalcaneal and talar declination angles, both measures of an asymptomatic flatfoot. Application of these results to the hominin fossil record reveals that a well developed rearfoot arch had evolved in Australopithecus afarensis. However, as in humans today, Australopithecus populations exhibited individual variation in foot morphology and arch development, and “Lucy” (A.L. 288-1), a 3.18 Myr-old female Australopithecus, likely possessed asymptomatic flat feet. Additional distal tibiae from the Plio-Pleistocene show variation in tibial arch angles, including two early Homo tibiae that also have slightly posteriorly directed tibial arch angles. Conclusions/Significance This study finds that the rearfoot arch was present in the genus Australopithecus. However, the female Australopithecus afarensis “Lucy” has an ankle morphology consistent with non-pathological flat-footedness. This study suggests that, as in humans today, there was variation in arch development

  18. Numerical study of porosity in titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Sahm, P R; Augthun, M; Spiekermann, H; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J

    1999-09-01

    A commercial software package, MAGMASOFT (MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Aachen, Germany), was used to study shrinkage and gas porosity in titanium dental castings. A geometrical model for two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar was created. Both mold filling and solidification of this casting model were numerically simulated. Shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by means of a built-in feeding criterion. The risk of gas pore formation was investigated using the numerical filling and solidification results. The results of the numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which were carried out on a centrifugal casting machine with an investment block mold. The block mold was made of SiO2 based slurry with a 1 mm thick Zr2 face coat to reduce metal-mold reactions. Both melting and casting were carried out under protective argon (40 kPa). The finished castings were sectioned and the shrinkage porosity determined. The experimentally determined shrinkage porosity coincided with the predicted numerical simulation results. No apparent gas porosity was found in these model castings. Several running and gating systems for the above model casting were numerically simulated. An optimized running and gating system design was then experimentally cast, which resulted in porosity-free castings.

  19. Applications of PIXE to studies in dental and mental healths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar Chaudhri, M.; Ainsworth, T.

    1981-03-01

    The elemental composition of healthy and diseased teeth from 25 South Australian children have been determined using thick-target PIXE analysis. Different dental hard tissues, namely enamel, dentine, cementum and the amelodentinal junction, were analysed independently. A number of elements, Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb have been detected, and their concentrations measured. The concentrations of some of the elements were found to vary considerably between: (a) healthy and diseased teeth, (b) teeth of the same type, and (c) different parts of the same tooth. Attempts have been made to correlate the concentrations of the various elements with the health of the teeth. In a pilot study, PIXE has also been applied for Pb analysis in the teeth of a few mentally retarded children. The teeth of all the children, with the exception of one who was suffering from Downe's syndrome, were found to contain appreciable amounts of lead. It is suggested that PIXE would provide a more convenient and accurate form of analysis than destructive chemical methods, for correlating Pb in children's teeth with their mental abilities.

  20. A Study of Nutrition in Entry-Level Dental Hygiene Education Programs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deborah L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to document the extent of nutritional content in U.S. dental hygiene program curricula; identify program directors' opinions, perceptions, and barriers to expanding nutritional content; and evaluate if a proposed nutrition curriculum model would be beneficial. This mixed methods study involved quantitative and qualitative aspects. An invitation letter was sent to all 335 directors of entry-level U.S. dental hygiene programs. In response, 55 directors submitted nutrition course syllabi from their programs (16.4% of the total) for the quantitative analysis. In addition, 14 nutrition instructors and ten program directors were interviewed regarding their perceptions and opinions of nutrition education for dental hygiene students. All aspects of the content analysis results revealed that nutrition content in entry-level dental hygiene programs is diverse. Some programs did not include nutrition content, while others provided oral and systemic nutrition intervention subject matter. Some programs offered multiple clinical nutrition applications and patient contact opportunities while most required none. The interview results disclosed a variety of opinions and perceptions of dental hygienists' role in nutrition. Several interviewees viewed dental hygienists' role in nutrition to be an integral part of patient care, while others indicated no role or providing caries prevention counseling only. Although dental hygienists are expected to provide nutrition assessments and interventions, no standards or standardized competencies exist for nutrition in dental hygiene education. A standardized nutrition model could be beneficial for entry-level programs to ensure dental hygienists possess basic knowledge to perform nutrition assessments and intervention to address Healthy People 2020's intervention initiatives.

  1. Validation of ICMR index for identification of dental fluorosis in epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ashima; Verma, Mahesh; Toteja, G.S.; Gauba, K.; Mohanty, Vikrant; Mohanty, Utkal; Kaur, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) formulated a Task Force on dental fluorosis and recommended the subgroup to develop a simplified index for identification and grading of dental fluorosis to be used by the health workers. This study was conducted to pre-test the ‘ICMR Index for Dental Fluorosis’ in the field to check its reliability and reproducibility. Methods: A total of 600 photographs were taken, 150 in each grade of fluorosis by screening 14-17 yr school children from eight schools of Hisar (Haryana) and South west Delhi. Eighty photographs were finalized (20 in each grade) before calibration to be used for training of field workers. Calibration exercise was conducted involving the five member survey team on 100 diagnosed cases of dental fluorosis. The members again screened 74 children with dental fluorosis in the field to categorize in to different grades of fluorosis for assessment of inter-examiner reliability. Results: The ICMR criteria showed more difference in agreement in very mild and mild categories during calibration. The inter-examiner reliability (κ) ranged from 0.59-1. The criteria was further modified and inter- examiner reliability (κ) found to be 0.83-0.98 which was almost perfect agreement. Interpretation & conclusions: The tool developed by the ICMR to assess dental fluorosis can be used in a field set up by non-dental personnel reliably with high degree of reproducibility. PMID:27834326

  2. Oral and dental health in Huntington‘s disease - an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only a few case reports and case series dealing with oral and dental health care are available in literature until now. The aim of the present pilot study was to determine the status of dental health in comparison to matched controls and to heighten the neurologists’ and dentists’ awareness of the oral aspects of the disease. Methods 42 Huntington’s disease (HD) participants were scored according to the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale. The dental status was assessed by using the well established score for decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) and the dental plaque score (Silness-Loe plaque index). Results Compared to controls HD participants showed significantly more decayed teeth and more plaques in both plaque indices. A higher motor impairment and a lower functional status of the patients lead to a worsening in dental status. Conclusion Possible reasons for our findings are discussed. Apart from local oral complications general complications may also occur. Thus, as a consequence, we would encourage patients, caregivers, neurologists, and the dentists to ensure regular preventive dental examinations and dental treatments of individuals with Huntington’s disease even in the premanifest stage of this disease. PMID:24138900

  3. Study on frequency of dental developmental alterations in a Mexican school-based population

    PubMed Central

    Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Salcido-García, Juan-Francisco; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to know the distribution of dental developmental alterations in the population requesting stomatological attention at the Admission and Diagnosis Clinic of our institution in Mexico City. Material and Methods We reviewed the archives and selected those files with developmental dental alterations. Analyzed data were diagnoses, age, gender, location and number of involved teeth. Results Of the 3.522 patients reviewed, 179 (5.1%) harbored 394 developmental dental alterations. Of them, 45.2% were males and 54.8% were females with a mean age of 16.7 years. The most common were supernumeraries, dental agenesia and dilaceration. Adults were 30.7% of the patients with dental developmental alterations. In them, the most common lesions were agenesia and supernumeraries. Mesiodens was the most frequently found supernumerary teeth (14.7%). Conclusions Our finding that 30.7% of the affected patients were adults is an undescribed and unusually high proportion of patients that have implications on planning and prognosis of their stomatological treatment. Key words:Developmental dental alterations, developmental alterations, supernumerary teeth, dental agenesia, root dilaceration. PMID:26946196

  4. Dental age estimation using Willems method: A digital orthopantomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Krishnamraju, P. V.; Prasanth, P. S.; Sanghvi, Praveen; Lata Reddy, M. Asha; Jyotsna, S.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, age estimation has become increasingly important in living people for a variety of reasons, including identifying criminal and legal responsibility, and for many other social events such as a birth certificate, marriage, beginning a job, joining the army, and retirement. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the developmental stages of left seven mandibular teeth for estimation of dental age (DA) in different age groups and to evaluate the possible correlation between DA and chronological age (CA) in South Indian population using Willems method. Materials and Methods: Digital Orthopantomogram of 332 subjects (166 males, 166 females) who fit the study and the criteria were obtained. Assessment of mandibular teeth (from central incisor to the second molar on left quadrant) development was undertaken and DA was assessed using Willems method. Results and Discussion: The present study showed a significant correlation between DA and CA in both males (r = 0.71 and females (r = 0.88). The overall mean difference between the estimated DA and CA for males was 0.69 ± 2.14 years (P < 0.001) while for females, it was 0.08 ± 1.34 years (P > 0.05). Willems method underestimated the mean age of males by 0.69 years and females by 0.08 years and showed that females mature earlier than males in selected population. The mean difference between DA and CA according to Willems method was 0.39 years and is statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This study showed significant relation between DA and CA. Thus, digital radiographic assessment of mandibular teeth development can be used to generate mean DA using Willems method and also the estimated age range for an individual of unknown CA. PMID:25191076

  5. Italian multicentre study on microbial environmental contamination in dental clinics: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pasquarella, Cesira; Veronesi, Licia; Castiglia, Paolo; Liguori, Giorgio; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Napoli, Christian; Rizzetto, Rolando; Torre, Ida; Masia, Maria Dolores; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Tinteri, Carola; Tanzi, Marialuisa

    2010-09-01

    The dental practice is associated with a high risk of infections, both for patients and healthcare operators, and the environment may play an important role in the transmission of infectious diseases. A microbiological environmental investigation was carried out in six dental clinics as a pilot study for a larger multicentre study that will be performed by the Italian SItI (Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health) working group "Hygiene in Dentistry". Microbial contamination of water, air and surfaces was assessed in each clinic during the five working days of the week, before and during treatments. Air and surfaces were also examined at the end of the daily activity. A wide variation was found in microbial environmental contamination, both within the participating clinics and relative to the different sampling times. Microbial water contamination in Dental Unit Water Systems (DUWS) reached values of up to 26x10(4)cfu/mL (colony forming units per millilitre). P. aeruginosa was found in 33% of the sampled DUWS and Legionella spp. in 50%. A significant decrease in the Total Viable Count (TVC) was recorded during the activity. Microbial air contamination showed the highest levels during dental treatments and tended to decrease at the end of the working activity (p<0.05). Microbial buildup on surfaces increased significantly during the working hours. As these findings point out, research on microbial environmental contamination and the related risk factors in dental clinics should be expanded and should also be based on larger collections of data, in order to provide the essential knowledge aimed at targeted preventive interventions.

  6. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. A comparative study of oral health attitudes and behavior using the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) between dental and civil engineering students in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Jorge A; Jaramillo, Fredy; Kador, Itzjak; Masuoka, David; Tong, Liyue; Ahn, Chul; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Hiroshima University - Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of dental and civil engineering students in Colombia. The HU-DBI's survey consisting of twenty dichotomous responses (agree-disagree) regarding tooth brushing, was completed at University Antonio Narino for the dental students and the University of Cauca for the civil engineering students. The Spanish version of the HU-DBI questionnaire was taken by 182 of 247 dental students and 411 of 762 engineering students. The data was-statistically analyzed by the chi-square test and backward logistic regression. Compared to the engineering students, the dental students were more likely to agree with questions such as "I am bothered by the color of my gums"(OR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.7),"I think I can clean my teeth well without using toothpaste" (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.5-5.9), "I have used a dye to see how clean my teeth are" (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9-4.3), and "I have had my dentist tell me that I brush very well" (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1). The dental education curriculum in a dental school compared to a civil engineering school in Colombia indicated that a three-phase curriculum in didactics and clinics increased oral health attitudes and behavior from entry to graduation.

  8. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of a Dental Handpiece Air Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Neng; Chiang, Hsiao-Wei D.; Chang, Ya-Yi

    2011-06-01

    Dental air turbine handpieces have been widely used in clinical dentistry for over 30 years, however, little work has been reported on their performance. In dental air turbine handpieces, the types of flow channel and turbine blade shape can have very different designs. These different designs can have major influence on the torque, rotating speed, and power performance. This research is focused on the turbine blade and the flow channel designs. Using numerical simulation and experiments, the key design parameters which influence the performance of dental hand pieces can be studied. Three types of dental air turbine designs with different turbine blades, nozzle angles, nozzle flow channels, and shroud clearances were tested and analyzed. Very good agreement was demonstrated between the numerical simulation analyses and the experiments. Using the analytical model, parametric studies were performed to identify key design parameters.

  9. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  10. Use of Screening Blood Studies in Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Glenn T.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 48 United States and 9 Canadian undergraduate dental school clinics investigated the extent of routine use of screening blood tests for patients, test types used, and plans to increase or decrease screening test use. Six responded that they routinely test asymptomatic patients, with 2-20 tests used per patient. (MSE)

  11. Perceived Mistreatment of Graduating Dental Students: A Retrospective Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 38 graduating dental students assessed the types and sources of perceived mistreatment. Students perceived an average of 35 separate incidents. Psychological mistreatment was most common; physical mistreatment was relatively infrequent. Classmates and clinical faculty were the most common sources. Sexual harassment was perceived by…

  12. Motivations for Studying Dentistry Among First-Year Dental Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, R.; Coburn, D.

    1977-01-01

    Reasons for choosing dentistry as a profession were analyzed among first-year dental students at the University of Toronto. An extrinsic motivation, financial reward, was found to be the most widespread, but other widely-chosen motivations were intrinsic, including working with people, stimulating work, and being autonomous. (LBH)

  13. Class III correction using an inter-arch spring-loaded module

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A retrospective study was conducted to determine the cephalometric changes in a group of Class III patients treated with the inter-arch spring-loaded module (CS2000®, Dynaflex, St. Ann, MO, USA). Methods Thirty Caucasian patients (15 males, 15 females) with an average pre-treatment age of 9.6 years were treated consecutively with this appliance and compared with a control group of subjects from the Bolton-Brush Study who were matched in age, gender, and craniofacial morphology to the treatment group. Lateral cephalograms were taken before treatment and after removal of the CS2000® appliance. The treatment effects of the CS2000® appliance were calculated by subtracting the changes due to growth (control group) from the treatment changes. Results All patients were improved to a Class I dental arch relationship with a positive overjet. Significant sagittal, vertical, and angular changes were found between the pre- and post-treatment radiographs. With an average treatment time of 1.3 years, the maxillary base moved forward by 0.8 mm, while the mandibular base moved backward by 2.8 mm together with improvements in the ANB and Wits measurements. The maxillary incisor moved forward by 1.3 mm and the mandibular incisor moved forward by 1.0 mm. The maxillary molar moved forward by 1.0 mm while the mandibular molar moved backward by 0.6 mm. The average overjet correction was 3.9 mm and 92% of the correction was due to skeletal contribution and 8% was due to dental contribution. The average molar correction was 5.2 mm and 69% of the correction was due to skeletal contribution and 31% was due to dental contribution. Conclusions Mild to moderate Class III malocclusion can be corrected using the inter-arch spring-loaded appliance with minimal patient compliance. The overjet correction was contributed by forward movement of the maxilla, backward and downward movement of the mandible, and proclination of the maxillary incisors. The molar relationship was

  14. Dental emergencies in a university-based pediatric dentistry postgraduate outpatient clinic: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Agostini, F G; Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and types of dental emergencies occurring in a university-based, pediatric dentistry postgraduate outpatient clinic. All patients presenting for emergency dental care during scheduled clinic hours over a three year were identified, and their charts were retrieved. Each record was reviewed for demographic information, chief complaint and clinical diagnosis. Only those charts with both chief complaints and clinical diagnoses recorded were included in this study. A total of 816 patients received emergency care, representing 15.3 percent of all patient treated during the study period. The patient population had a slight female predilection (53 percent female, 47 percent male) and a mean age of 5.1 years (range 10 days to 15 years). Ethnicity (39 percent African-American, 36 percent Hispanic, 24 percent Caucasian <1 percent Asian-American) was similar to that for the clinic in general. Reimbursement for dental care was primarily via Medicaid (91 percent) with <10 percent covered by insurance or payment by responsible parents. For one quarter of the children, the emergency visit was their first dental visit. Reasons for seeking emergency included 1) pain or discomfort due to caries [30.1 percent] with 27 percent due to early childhood caries; 2) dental trauma [23 percent];3) eruption difficulties [18 percent] with 27 percent due to early childhood caries; 2) dental trauma [23 percent];3 eruption difficulties [18 percent];4) soft tissue pathoses [16 percent]; 5) problems with orthodontic appliances or space maintainers [10 percent]; and 6) lost restorations [2 percent]. Pain and bleeding were the most common reasons for seeking emergency dental care. Most causes for seeking outpatient emergency dental care are disease processes which may be avoided by infant oral health and preventive dentistry programs and early treatment intervention.

  15. Anthropometric measurements and dental caries in children: a systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive.

  16. Anthropometric Measurements and Dental Caries in Children: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies123

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive. PMID:25593143

  17. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Oral Prevalence in Scotland (HOPSCOTCH): A Feasibility Study in Dental Settings.

    PubMed

    Conway, David I; Robertson, Chris; Gray, Heather; Young, Linda; McDaid, Lisa M; Winter, Andrew J; Campbell, Christine; Pan, Jiafeng; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Kean, Sharon; Bhatia, Ramya; Cubie, Heather; Clarkson, Jan E; Bagg, Jeremy; Pollock, Kevin G; Cuschieri, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of undertaking a full population investigation into the prevalence, incidence, and persistence of oral Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Scotland via dental settings. Male and female patients aged 16-69 years were recruited by Research Nurses in 3 primary care and dental outreach teaching centres and 2 General Dental Practices (GDPs), and by Dental Care Teams in 2 further GDPs. Participants completed a questionnaire (via an online tablet computer or paper) with socioeconomic, lifestyle, and sexual history items; and were followed up at 6-months for further questionnaire through appointment or post/online. Saline oral gargle/rinse samples, collected at baseline and follow-up, were subject to molecular HPV genotyping centrally. 1213 dental patients were approached and 402 individuals consented (participation rate 33.1%). 390 completed the baseline questionnaire and 380 provided a baseline oral specimen. Follow-up rate was 61.6% at 6 months. While recruitment was no different in Research Nurse vs Dental Care Team models the Nurse model ensured more rapid recruitment. There were relatively few missing responses in the questionnaire and high levels of disclosure of risk behaviours (99% answered some of the sexual history questions). Data linkage of participant data to routine health records including HPV vaccination data was successful with 99.1% matching. Oral rinse/gargle sample collection and subsequent HPV testing was feasible. Preliminary analyses found over 95% of samples to be valid for molecular HPV detection prevalence of oral HPV infection of 5.5% (95%CI 3.7, 8.3). It is feasible to recruit and follow-up dental patients largely representative / reflective of the wider population, suggesting it would be possible to undertake a study to investigate the prevalence, incidence, and determinants of oral HPV infection in dental settings.

  18. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Oral Prevalence in Scotland (HOPSCOTCH): A Feasibility Study in Dental Settings

    PubMed Central

    Conway, David I.; Robertson, Chris; Gray, Heather; Young, Linda; McDaid, Lisa M.; Winter, Andrew J.; Campbell, Christine; Pan, Jiafeng; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Kean, Sharon; Bhatia, Ramya; Cubie, Heather; Clarkson, Jan E.; Bagg, Jeremy; Pollock, Kevin G.; Cuschieri, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of undertaking a full population investigation into the prevalence, incidence, and persistence of oral Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Scotland via dental settings. Male and female patients aged 16–69 years were recruited by Research Nurses in 3 primary care and dental outreach teaching centres and 2 General Dental Practices (GDPs), and by Dental Care Teams in 2 further GDPs. Participants completed a questionnaire (via an online tablet computer or paper) with socioeconomic, lifestyle, and sexual history items; and were followed up at 6-months for further questionnaire through appointment or post/online. Saline oral gargle/rinse samples, collected at baseline and follow-up, were subject to molecular HPV genotyping centrally. 1213 dental patients were approached and 402 individuals consented (participation rate 33.1%). 390 completed the baseline questionnaire and 380 provided a baseline oral specimen. Follow-up rate was 61.6% at 6 months. While recruitment was no different in Research Nurse vs Dental Care Team models the Nurse model ensured more rapid recruitment. There were relatively few missing responses in the questionnaire and high levels of disclosure of risk behaviours (99% answered some of the sexual history questions). Data linkage of participant data to routine health records including HPV vaccination data was successful with 99.1% matching. Oral rinse/gargle sample collection and subsequent HPV testing was feasible. Preliminary analyses found over 95% of samples to be valid for molecular HPV detection prevalence of oral HPV infection of 5.5% (95%CI 3.7, 8.3). It is feasible to recruit and follow-up dental patients largely representative / reflective of the wider population, suggesting it would be possible to undertake a study to investigate the prevalence, incidence, and determinants of oral HPV infection in dental settings. PMID:27861508

  19. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  20. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  1. Fixed Full Arches Supported by Tapered Implants with Knife-Edge Thread Design and Nanostructured, Calcium-Incorporated Surface: A Short-Term Prospective Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Soheil; Lukosiunas, Algirdas; Dolcini, Giorgio Andrea; Kubilius, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, and complications affecting fixed full-arch (FFA) restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface. Methods. Between January 2013 and December 2015, all patients referred for implant-supported FFA restorations were considered for enrollment in this study. All patients received implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, South Korea) were restored with FFA restorations and enrolled in a recall program. The final outcomes were implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, biologic/prosthetic complications, and "complication-free" survival of restorations. Results. Twenty-four patients were selected. Overall, 215 implants were inserted (130 maxilla, 85 mandible), 144 in extraction sockets and 71 in healed ridges. Thirty-six FFAs were delivered (21 maxilla, 15 mandible): 27 were immediately loaded and 9 were conventionally loaded. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. Two fixtures failed, yielding an implant survival rate of 95.9% (patient-based). A few complications were registered, for a "complication-free" survival of restorations of 88.9%. Conclusions. FFA restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface are successful in the short term, with high survival and low complication rates; long-term studies are needed to confirm these outcomes.

  2. Fixed Full Arches Supported by Tapered Implants with Knife-Edge Thread Design and Nanostructured, Calcium-Incorporated Surface: A Short-Term Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Soheil; Lukosiunas, Algirdas; Kubilius, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, and complications affecting fixed full-arch (FFA) restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface. Methods. Between January 2013 and December 2015, all patients referred for implant-supported FFA restorations were considered for enrollment in this study. All patients received implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, South Korea) were restored with FFA restorations and enrolled in a recall program. The final outcomes were implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, biologic/prosthetic complications, and “complication-free” survival of restorations. Results. Twenty-four patients were selected. Overall, 215 implants were inserted (130 maxilla, 85 mandible), 144 in extraction sockets and 71 in healed ridges. Thirty-six FFAs were delivered (21 maxilla, 15 mandible): 27 were immediately loaded and 9 were conventionally loaded. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. Two fixtures failed, yielding an implant survival rate of 95.9% (patient-based). A few complications were registered, for a “complication-free” survival of restorations of 88.9%. Conclusions. FFA restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface are successful in the short term, with high survival and low complication rates; long-term studies are needed to confirm these outcomes. PMID:28246595

  3. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia with 2% lignocaine in various minor pediatric dental procedures: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Dhindsa, Abhishek; Pandit, I. K.; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj

    2011-01-01

    One of the most distressing aspects of dentistry for pediatric patients is the fear and anxiety caused by the dental environment, particularly the dental injection. The application and induction of local anesthetics has always been a difficult task, and this demands an alternative method that is convenient and effective. Electronic dental anesthesia, based on the principal of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), promises to be a viable mode of pain control during various pediatric clinical procedures. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS and to compare its efficacy with 2% lignocaine during various minor pediatric dental procedures. Pain, comfort and effectiveness of both the anesthetics were evaluated using various scales and no significant difference was observed between 2% lignocaine and TENS in the various pain scales, while TENS was perceived to be significantly effective in comfort and efficacy as judged by the operator and quite comfortable as judged by the patient himself/herself. PMID:22114450

  4. Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Rahul; Malhotra, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers. Methods Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17–20 years. Results Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the “phobic or extremely anxious” category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures. Conclusion The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene. PMID:25379373

  5. Behavior of Dental/Implant Alloys in Commercial Mouthwash Solution Studied by Electrochemical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Strugaru, Sorin Iacob; Iacoban, Sorin; Bolat, Georgiana; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the electrochemical behavior of the various dental materials: Paliag (Ag-Pd based), Wiron 99 (Ni-Cr based), Cp-Ti (commercial pure titanium), and experimental Ti12Mo5Ta alloy in commercial mouthwash solution with 500 ppm F- (Oral B®) and compares it with the behavior of the same dental materials in artificial saliva. Linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are the electrochemical procedures of investigation. The passivation of all dental samples in artificial saliva and mouthwash solution occurred spontaneously at open circuit potential. The corrosion current density of all tested dental materials in mouthwash solution were low (1-2 μA/cm2). The results suggest a non-predominant fluoride effect on the passive layer formed on all samples at open circuit potential. No passivation could be established with Paliag alloy when polarized in mouthwash solution. The EIS results confirm that all dental sample exhibit passivity in mouthwash solution at open circuit potential (polarization resistance was around 5 × 105 Ω cm2). For Paliag alloy after LPP in mouthwash solution the protectiveness passive layer was no more present. The corrosion resistances of four dental materials in mouthwash solution are in the following order: Ti12Mo5Ta > Cp-Ti > Wiron 99 > Paliag.

  6. Disinfection of Dental Unit Water Line Using Aloe Vera: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Sonia; Nagaraj, Anup; Sharma, Prateek; Walia, Satinder; Naidu, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Context. Dental unit waterlines may be heavily contaminated with microorganisms and are a potential source of infection for both practicing staff and immunocompromised patients particularly. Contamination of dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of disinfectants. The present study investigates the effect of aloe-vera-based disinfectant in reducing the microbial growth in dental unit water lines (DUWLs). Aims. To compare the efficacy of aloe vera, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in controlling microbial contamination of DUWLs. Materials and Methods. After obtaining baseline water samples, the dental unit waterlines were treated with aloe vera, 10% hydrogen peroxide, and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Each of the three disinfectants was used in increasing concentrations and their inhibiting effect was compared. Water samples were analyzed for microbiological quality by the total viable count (TVC) method. Statistical Analysis Used. SPSS 16. Results. There was significant reduction in mean CFU/ml when treated with disinfectants each for a period of one week. Aloe-vera solution was found to be the most effective in reducing the microbial colonies. Conclusions. Improving the water quality from dental unit water lines is of considerable importance; chemical-based disinfectants can be replaced with herbal disinfectants for treating microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines. PMID:24089615

  7. Behavioral Pattern during Dental Pain in Intellectually Disabled Children: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Muthukali; Shivakumar, Vetrivel; Anitha, Vijayarangan; Meenapriya, Bagavathi Perumal; Aishwarya, Srinivasan; Anitha, Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Children with developmental disabilities generally experience more pain than the normal children. Description of pain is generally difficult in children and more so in children with intellectual disabilities. The study aimed at evaluating dental pain in children with intellectual disabilities. Methods. The survey was carried out in an institution caring for intellectually disabled children to determine the oral health status and the treatment needs of the special kids. 236 children were surveyed out of which the test group is comprised of 111 intellectually disabled children and the control group had 125 normal children with age ranging between five to eighteen years. A questionnaire was presented to the caregivers to elaborate about dental pain in their wards using the dental discomfort questionnaire (DDQ+). The children were examined for dental caries and periodontal status based on the WHO indices for oral hygiene status. Result. Results revealed a statistically significant difference between intellectual disability and brushing, chewing, and earache. The frequency of reporting dental pain was lesser in the intellectually disabled group. Conclusion. Children with intellectual disability tended to report dental pain of any nature with lesser frequency than typically developing peers. They also faced greater difficulty in brushing and chewing.

  8. Disinfection of dental unit water line using aloe vera: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Sonia; Nagaraj, Anup; Sharma, Prateek; Atri, Mansi; Walia, Satinder; Naidu, Shravani; Yousuf, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Context. Dental unit waterlines may be heavily contaminated with microorganisms and are a potential source of infection for both practicing staff and immunocompromised patients particularly. Contamination of dental unit water lines could be inhibited with the use of disinfectants. The present study investigates the effect of aloe-vera-based disinfectant in reducing the microbial growth in dental unit water lines (DUWLs). Aims. To compare the efficacy of aloe vera, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in controlling microbial contamination of DUWLs. Materials and Methods. After obtaining baseline water samples, the dental unit waterlines were treated with aloe vera, 10% hydrogen peroxide, and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Each of the three disinfectants was used in increasing concentrations and their inhibiting effect was compared. Water samples were analyzed for microbiological quality by the total viable count (TVC) method. Statistical Analysis Used. SPSS 16. Results. There was significant reduction in mean CFU/ml when treated with disinfectants each for a period of one week. Aloe-vera solution was found to be the most effective in reducing the microbial colonies. Conclusions. Improving the water quality from dental unit water lines is of considerable importance; chemical-based disinfectants can be replaced with herbal disinfectants for treating microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines.

  9. The Dental Needs of Army Family Members, 1986: Pilot Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-10

    contributor to increased average treatment costs for comprehensive care was orthodontics for children and fixed prosthetics for youths and adults. v Reaction t...definitive orthodontic care --16% require space maintenance 3. Dental Fitness Classification reveals that 4-14 year olds have the best overall oral...6-$13 Basic + space maintenance $16-$47 Basic + space maintenance & orthodontics $1.’-$410 --For Youths (age 15-19): Diagnostic & Preventive $33-$88

  10. Analysis of a force system for upper molar distalization using a trans-palatal arch and mini-implant: a finite element analysis study.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Satoshi; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Mayahara, Kotoe; Saito, Yoko; Akiyama, Yuko; Son, Seil; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse distal movements of molars in a force system using a trans-palatal arch (TPA), fixed to the maxillary first molar, and mini-implants placed at the palatal midline, considering the diagnostic standard for placement site in association with variation in upper molar locations, using finite element (FE) analysis. Three-dimensional FE models, divided by the differing direction of traction force, mesiodistal locations of the left and right molars, and the lateral location of the mini-implant were constructed. (1) When a traction force was fixed from the height of alveolar crest to the mini-implant placed at the middle of palate, the molars underwent bodily movement. (2) When the location of the mini-implant was moved to the left of the midline, the amount of distal movement of the left molar increased. When the mesiodistal locations of the left and right molars differed, the amount of distal movement of the molar located mesially was larger than that of the contralateral molar, even when the mini-implant was located on the midline.

  11. Aortic arch dissection: a controversy of classification.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Jeudy, Jean; Kligerman, Seth J; Schultz, Randall; Ninalowo, Hammed A; Gozansky, Elliott K; Griffith, Bartley; White, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Aortic dissections originating in the ascending aorta and descending aorta have been classified as type A and type B dissections, respectively. However, dissections with intimal flap extension into the aortic arch between the innominate and left subclavian arteries are not accounted for adequately in the widely used Stanford classification. This gap has been the subject of controversy in the medical and surgical literature, and there is a tendency among many radiologists to categorize such arch dissections as type A lesions, thus making them an indication for surgery. However, the radiologic perspective is not supported by either standard dissection classification or current clinical management. In this special report, the origin of dissection classification and its evolution into current radiologic interpretation and surgical practice are reviewed. The cause for the widespread misconception about classification and treatment algorithms is identified. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained as part of this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study to assess all aortic dissection studies performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore between 2010 and 2012 to determine the prevalence of arch dissections. Finally, a unified classification system that reconciles imaging interpretation and management implementation is proposed.

  12. A technique to stabilize record bases for Gothic arch tracings in patients with implant-retained complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Raigrodski, A J; Sadan, A; Carruth, P L

    1998-12-01

    Clinicians have long expressed concern about the accuracy of the Gothic arch tracing for recording centric relation in edentulous patients. With the use of dental implants to assist in retaining complete dentures, the problem of inaccurate recordings, made for patients without natural teeth, can be significantly reduced. This article presents a technique that uses healing abutments to stabilize the record bases so that an accurate Gothic arch tracing can be made.

  13. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  14. Asynchronous dentofacial development and dental crowding: a cross-sectional study in a contemporary sample of children in France

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The causes of dental crowding are not fully understood, but it may result from an evolutionary trend towards reduced facial volume, without a proportional reduction in tooth sizes. Most previous studies conducted among modern humans have revealed a very low or non-existent correlation between tooth size and jaw size. Cross-comparison between dental age and facial skeletal age could help to provide better knowledge of the dynamic process of dental crowding. The primary objective of this research was to study the synchronism of dental maturation and skeletal facial growth in a sample of modern children living in France. The secondary objective was to assess the link between dentofacial asynchronism and dental crowding. Results The random sample comprised 28 subjects (16 girls, 12 boys). Mean chronological age was 13.5 years (±2.1; range 9.2–17.6). Mean dental age was 14.2 years (±2.8; range 7.5–17) and mean facial skeletal age was 12.8 years (±2.6, range 7–22). In the estimations of dental age and facial skeletal age, there was no evidence of systematic bias. There were 10 subjects (9 girls, 1 boy) with asynchronous dentofacial development. Finally, there were 13 subjects (8 girls, 5 boys) with dental crowding. A significant association was found between delayed facial skeletal growth/advanced dental maturation and dental crowding (P = 0.01). Conclusions Dental maturation and facial growth are not necessarily synchronous. Further understanding of the interactions between dental maturation and facial growth could have crucial implications in biological anthropology, as well as for the clinical practice of orthodontists. From an anthropological perspective, this study suggests that asynchronous dentofacial development could, at least partially, explain the frequency of dental crowding in modern populations. PMID:24252616

  15. Clarifying the anatomy of the fifth arch artery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The artery allegedly forming in the fifth pharyngeal arch has increasingly been implicated as responsible for various vascular malformations in patients with congenitally malformed hearts. Observations from studies on developing embryos, however, have failed to provide support to substantiate several of these inferences such that the very existence of the fifth arch artery remains debatable. To the best of our knowledge, in only a solitary human embryo has a vascular channel been found that truly resembled the artery of the fifth arch. Despite the meager evidence to support its existence, the fifth arch artery has been invoked to explain the morphogenesis of double-barreled aorta, some unusual forms of aortopulmonary communications, and abnormalities of the brachiocephalic arteries. In most of these instances, the interpretations have proved fallible when examined in the light of existing knowledge of cardiac development. In our opinion, there are more plausible alternative explanations for the majority of these descriptions. Double-barreled aorta is more likely to result from retention of the recently identified dorsal collateral channels while abnormalities of brachiocephalic arteries are better explained on the basis of extensive remodeling of aortic arches during fetal development. Some examples of aortopulmonary communications, nonetheless, may well represent persistence of the developing artery of the fifth pharyngeal arch. We here present one such case — a patient with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia, in whom the fifth arch artery provided a necessary communication between the ascending aorta and the pulmonary arteries. In this light, we discuss the features we consider to be essential before attaching the tag of “fifth arch artery” to a candidate vascular channel. PMID:27011696

  16. The effect of foot arch on plantar pressure distribution during standing.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, R; Anand, Sneh

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how foot type affects plantar pressure distribution during standing. In this study, 32 healthy subjects voluntarily participated and the subject feet were classified as: normal feet (n = 23), flat feet (n = 14) and high arch feet (n = 27) according to arch index (AI) values obtained from foot pressure intensity image analysis. Foot pressure intensity images were acquired by a pedopowergraph system to obtain a foot pressure distribution parameter-power ratio (PR) during standing in eight different regions of the foot. Contact area and mean PR were analysed in hind foot, mid-foot and fore foot regions. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine statistical differences between groups. The contact area and mean PR value beneath the mid-foot was significantly increased in the low arch foot when compared to the normal arch foot and high arch foot (p < 0.001) in both feet. However, subjects with low-arch feet had significantly higher body mass index (BMI) compared to subjects with high-arch feet (p < 0.05) and subjects with normal arch feet (p < 0.05) in both feet. In addition, subjects with low-arch feet had significant differences in arch index (AI) value as compared to subjects with high-arch feet (p < 0.001) and subjects with normal arch feet (p < 0.05) in both feet. Mean mid-foot PR value were positively (r = 0.54) correlated with increased arch index (AI) value. A significant (p < 0.05) change was obtained in PR value beneath the mid-foot of low arch feet when compared with other groups in both feet. The findings suggest that there is an increased mid-foot PR value in the low arch foot as compared to the normal arch foot and high arch foot during standing. Therefore, individuals with low arch feet could be at high risk for mid-foot collapse and Charcot foot problems, indicating that foot type should be assessed when determining an individual's risk for foot injury.

  17. Cultural Competency Education in Academic Dental Institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Sheree L; Hayes, Melanie J; Taylor, Jane A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

  18. A longitudinal study of Greek dental students' perceived sources of stress.

    PubMed

    Polychronopoulou, Argy; Divaris, Kimon

    2010-05-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to examine the variation of dental students' perceived stressors throughout the course of their dental studies and to explore the role of gender on stress. A thirty-item modified version of the Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire (DES) was administered annually between 2003 and 2007 to a cohort of 109 Greek dental students enrolled in a five-year D.D.S. curriculum. Descriptive and multivariate longitudinal methods were utilized to examine variations in perceived stressors by year of study and by gender. Response rates ranged from 61 to 97 percent. Mean scores for the DES factors "workload" and "clinical training" decreased over the study period, while "faculty and administration" increased. Males reported substantially lower perceived stress in the "self-efficacy beliefs" (adjusted DES difference=-0.40; 95 percent CI=-0.63, -0.16), "workload," and "performance pressure" domains. Longitudinal analysis revealed substantial changes for numerous individual stressors. Most concerns for "examinations and grades" were expressed in year three (OR=2.7; 95 percent CI=1.4, 5.0; reference: first year), whereas "lack of self-confidence" items peaked in the second year. Marked gender differences in stress appraisal persisted over time. Longitudinal changes in dental students' stress perceptions corresponded with transitions in the didactic, preclinical, and clinical phases of the curriculum.

  19. Caregiver's education level and child's dental caries in African Americans: a path analytic study.

    PubMed

    Heima, Masahiro; Lee, Wonik; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchita

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of caregiver education level on children's dental caries mediated by both caregiver and child oral health behaviors. Participants were 423 low-income African American kindergarteners and their caregivers who were part of a school-based randomized clinical trial. Path analysis tested the hypothesis that caregiver education level affected untreated dental caries and cumulative overall caries experience (decayed or filled teeth) through the mediating influence of frequency of dental visits, use of routine care, and frequency of toothbrushing for both the caregiver and the child. The results supported the hypothesis: caregivers who completed high school were 1.76 times more likely to visit dentists compared with those who did not complete high school (e(0.56) = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.03-2.99), which in turn was associated with 5.78 times greater odds of dental visits among their children (e(1.76) = 5.78, 95% CI: 3.53-9.48). Children's dental visits, subsequently, were associated with 26% fewer untreated decayed teeth compared with children without dental visits (e(-0.31) = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91). However, this path was not present in the model with overall caries experience. Additionally, caregiver education level was directly associated with 34% less untreated decayed teeth (e(-0.42) = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.54-0.79) and 28% less decayed or filled teeth (e(-0.32) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.88) among the children. This study overcomes important conceptual and analytic limitations in the existing literature. The findings confirm the role of caregiver education in child dental caries and indicate that caregiver's behavioral factors are important mediators of child oral health.

  20. Comparison of temporary anchorage devices and transpalatal arch-mediated anchorage reinforcement during canine retraction

    PubMed Central

    Kecik, Defne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the dental and skeletal effects of canine retraction using conventional anchorage reinforcement systems and comparing them with the usage of TADs. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 50 patients having Class I malocclusions with bimaxillary protrusion indicated for first premolar extraction, and allocated into two groups. The first group consisted of 25 patients with a mean age of 18,7 years (min:14, max:22 years, 16 girls and 9 boys) that TADs were applied as an anchorage mechanic between attached gingiva of upper second premolar and first molar teeth. The second group consisted of 25 patients with a mean age of 19,4 years (min:15, max:23 years, 14 girls and 11 boys) that conventional molar anchorage with Transpalatal arch (TPA) was applied for the anchorage mechanics against canine retraction. Results: The results showed that mean mesial movement and the tipping of the first molars in TAD group between T0 - T1 were insignificant (P > 0,05), however in the TPA group were significant (P<0,01). Vertical movement of the molars were not significant when two groups were compared (P>0,05). Conclusion: Although TPA is a useful appliance, it doesn't provide an effective anchorage control on anteroposterior movement maxillary first molar teeth concerning first premolar extraction treatment. TADs are more convenient to provide absolute anchorage during maxillary canine retraction in contrast to transpalatal arch. PMID:28042267

  1. [Comparative analysis of the results of patient prosthetic treatment by removable arch and elastic constructions in cases of end mandibular defects based on microcirculation study of prosthetic bed tissues].

    PubMed

    Churygin, S N

    2007-01-01

    Study was performed of the microcirculation in gingival tissues of prosthetic bed in patients with end mandibular defects treated by removable arch and elastic constructions in order to increase prosthetic treatment efficacy. It was established that most favourable stimulating effect upon trophics was achieved in patients who had received removable plate constructions made according to the technology of thermoinjection system produced by the company Valplast on nylon base.

  2. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. Results: A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. Conclusion: This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs. PMID:27583219

  3. A typology of dental students according to their experience of stress: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Haissam; Bedos, Christophe

    2010-02-01

    Dental students often report high levels of stress. Even though many studies have been conducted on this issue, we still lack a global understanding of how dental students experience and deal with stress, making it difficult for dental educators to improve this situation. Consequently, our study aimed to understand in a comprehensive manner how dental students experience stress. We conducted a qualitative research study based on in-depth one-on-one interviews with twelve recent graduates from a Canadian dental school. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. We then analyzed the transcripts in a process that included coding, displaying, and interpreting data. We identified three types of students: highly stressed, moderately stressed, and relaxed students. Relaxed students reported very low levels of stress, which they dealt with by using good coping skills. Moderately stressed students were more affected, but they considered stress as acceptable and even helpful as it pushed them to perform better and succeed. Finally, highly stressed students showed alarming levels of stress and described it as "crippling" and "unmanageable." They felt helpless and explained that stress had negative repercussions for their physical and mental health as well as their social life. They related stress to fear of failing, heavy workload, and difficulties in dealing with transitions in the curriculum and sometimes to difficult relationships with the academic staff. They dealt with stress by using poor coping skills. It is crucial to help highly stressed students by both reducing their sources of stress and helping them develop appropriate coping strategies.

  4. The Foot’s Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stearne, Sarah M.; McDonald, Kirsty A.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Oxnard, Charles E.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The energy-sparing spring theory of the foot’s arch has become central to interpretations of the foot’s mechanical function and evolution. Using a novel insole technique that restricted compression of the foot’s longitudinal arch, this study provides the first direct evidence that arch compression/recoil during locomotion contributes to lowering energy cost. Restricting arch compression near maximally (~80%) during moderate-speed (2.7 ms−1) level running increased metabolic cost by + 6.0% (p < 0.001, d = 0.67; unaffected by foot strike technique). A simple model shows that the metabolic energy saved by the arch is largely explained by the passive-elastic work it supplies that would otherwise be done by active muscle. Both experimental and model data confirm that it is the end-range of arch compression that dictates the energy-saving role of the arch. Restricting arch compression had no effect on the cost of walking or incline running (3°), commensurate with the smaller role of passive-elastic mechanics in these gaits. These findings substantiate the elastic energy-saving role of the longitudinal arch during running, and suggest that arch supports used in some footwear and orthotics may increase the cost of running. PMID:26783259

  5. "Without Stones There Is No Arch": A Study of Professional Development of Teacher Educators as a Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Judith; Gidron, Ariela; Turniansky, Bobbie

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the meaning of professional development as a participative process within a community of practice. In this collaborative narrative self-study we look at the development of ourselves as a professional group working together in an intensive program. The study is based on personal career stories, each told by its author, but…

  6. OH⁻ deficiency in dental enamel, crown and root dentine as studied by ¹H CRAMPS.

    PubMed

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Mai, Ronald; Scheler, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR based on combined rotation and multipulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) has been applied to study chemical structures of dental tissues. The samples of human enamel, crown dentine and root dentin studied in this work were used without chemical pre-treatment. The quantitative ¹H NMR spectra permit an assignment to different structures and a quantification of the content of hydroxyl groups. While there is 40% hydroxyl content in the enamel, there is significantly less in the dentin, 14% in the crown and 9% in the root. Thus this study provides the direct evidence of OH⁻ ion deficiency in all dental tissues supporting earlier findings that bone and dental mineral apatite is poorly hydroxylated.

  7. Knowledge regarding prescription of drugs among dental students: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ankita; Gupta, Devanand; Singh, Deepika; Garg, Yogesh; Saxena, Antima; Chaudhary, Himani; Singh, Alpana; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The act of indicating one or more drugs to be taken by the patient, its dosage, and the interval of the treatment is known as prescribing. It is a dynamic and individualized clinical process. Cultural, social, economic and promotional factors can influence the pattern of prescription. Thus the present study was conducted to evaluate the drug prescription knowledge in third year and final year dental students at Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India. Methodology: A questionnaire consisting of 10 open-ended questions was used in a study which was conducted among 170 male and female, third year and final year dental students of Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College and Research Centre. Tables and graphs were used to represent data. Results: Pain was found to be the most important reason for prescribing medication. Diclofenac was found to be the most commonly prescribed NSAID. While amoxicillin was found to be the most widely prescribed antibiotic. Lack of knowledge about drug posology was the basic reason for error done by students. Maximum number of students gets their information for prescribing drugs from their professors. Maximum number of students was unacquainted about the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing. Conclusion: The knowledge of prescribing drugs is of utmost need for good dental practice and hence, it is essential to expand the knowledge related to pharmacological therapy and to know about the proper therapeutic guidelines. With the help of WHO Guide to Good Prescribing, and some educational programs students will develop better prescribing skills. PMID:26792957

  8. [The study of ambulatory demand of the dental clinic of State University of Amazonas].

    PubMed

    Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos; de Souza, Torricelly Barreto

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the demand of the clinic of Dentistry of UEA. One hundred patients who were being treated in the discipline of Semiology answered a questionnaire that collected data on demographic and socio-economic profile. The clinical examination showed the nosologic profile, the blood pressure and dental losses profile. Results showed that 52% of patients were female, aged between 20 and 29 years, 48.3% with the incomplete high school and 60.8% with monthly income greater than five minimum wages. As for dental loss, the teeth most affected were the first molars, while 29% have lost the top first molar and 45% the bottom. The prevalent nosologic profile was 31.3% for treatment in the area of Restorative Dentistry followed by 21% of Periodontics and 19% of Surgery. Only one patient had hypertension. Our conclusion is that most of the population that participated on this study was middle-class women with low average level of education and dental precarious table showing many dental losses and requiring more rehabilitation treatments than preventive. With a greater understanding of the reality of the users of the UEA dental clinic it will be possible to improve the planning of care and actions to improve the promotion of health.

  9. Dental peculiarities in the silvery mole-rat: an original model for studying the evolutionary and biological origins of continuous dental generation in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Šumbera, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Unravelling the evolutionary and developmental mechanisms that have impacted the mammalian dentition, since more than 200 Ma, is an intricate issue. Interestingly, a few mammal species, including the silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus, are able to replace their dentition by the addition of supernumerary molars at the back of jaw migrating then toward the front. The aim here was to demonstrate the potential interest of further studying this rodent in order to better understand the origins of continuous dental replacement in mammals, which could also provide interesting data concerning the evolution of limited dental generation occurring in first mammals. In the present study, we described the main stages of the dental eruptive sequence in the silvery mole-rat and the associated characteristics of horizontal replacement using X-ray microtomography. This was coupled to the investigation of other African mole-rats which have no dental replacement. This method permitted to establish evidence that the initial development of the dentition in Heliophobius is comparable to what it is observed in most of African mole-rats. This rodent first has premolars, but then identical additional molars, a mechanism convergent to manatees and the pygmy rock-wallaby. Evidence of continuous replacement and strong dental dynamics were also illustrated in Heliophobius, and stressed the need to deeply investigate these aspects for evolutionary, functional and developmental purposes. We also noticed that two groups of extinct non-mammalian synapsids convergently acquired this dental mechanism, but in a way differing from extant mammals. The discussion on the diverse evolutionary origins of horizontal dental replacement put emphasis on the necessity of focusing on biological parameters potentially involved in both continuous and limited developments of teeth in mammals. In that context, the silvery mole-rat could appear as the most appropriate candidate to do so. PMID:26401449

  10. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost.

  11. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  12. Analysis of early and long-term outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection according to the new international aortic arch surgery study group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Galuppo, Marco; Comisso, Marina; Toto, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate predictors of early and long-term outcomes of surgical repair of acute Type A aortic dissection. Retrospective single-centre study evaluating patients surgically treated between 1998 and 2013. Clinical follow-up was performed. Complications were classified according to the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group recommendations. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative and operative data. One hundred eighty-five patients were evaluated. The follow-up was complete for 180 patients (97 %). Mean age was 63 years, 82 % had a DeBakey type I aortic dissection, 18 % a type II. Eleven patients (6 %) died intraoperatively, 119 of the remaining (68 %) had postoperative complications. Thirty-day mortality was 21 % (38 patients). Average ICU and hospital stay were 6 and 14 days, respectively. During a mean follow-up time of 6 ± 4 years we observed 44 deaths (31 %). Twenty patients (14 %) needed late thoracic aorta reoperation. Results from the multivariate analysis are as follows. Thirty-day mortality was associated with abdominal pain at presentation (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications was related to older age at intervention (p < 0.01) and longer cross-clamp time (p < 0.01). Mortality at follow-up was significantly increased by older age at intervention (p < 0.01), with a logarithmic growth after 60 years, female sex (p < 0.01), preoperative limb ischemia (p = 0.02) and DHCA (p < 0.01). The surgical results of type A aortic dissection are affected by age at intervention with a logarithmic increase of late mortality in patients older than 60 years.

  13. Arch Reconstruction with Autologous Pulmonary Artery Patch in Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Young

    2014-01-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique. PMID:24782962

  14. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  15. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  16. Fit accuracy of metal partial removable dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by traditional or light curing modeling material technique: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anan, Mohammad Tarek M.; Al-Saadi, Mohannad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the fit accuracies of metal partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) frameworks fabricated by the traditional technique (TT) or the light-curing modeling material technique (LCMT). Materials and methods A metal model of a Kennedy class III modification 1 mandibular dental arch with two edentulous spaces of different spans, short and long, was used for the study. Thirty identical working casts were used to produce 15 PRDP frameworks each by TT and by LCMT. Every framework was transferred to a metal master cast to measure the gap between the metal base of the framework and the crest of the alveolar ridge of the cast. Gaps were measured at three points on each side by a USB digital intraoral camera at ×16.5 magnification. Images were transferred to a graphics editing program. A single examiner performed all measurements. The two-tailed t-test was performed at the 5% significance level. Results The mean gap value was significantly smaller in the LCMT group compared to the TT group. The mean value of the short edentulous span was significantly smaller than that of the long edentulous span in the LCMT group, whereas the opposite result was obtained in the TT group. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the fit of the LCMT-fabricated frameworks was better than the fit of the TT-fabricated frameworks. The framework fit can differ according to the span of the edentate ridge and the fabrication technique for the metal framework. PMID:26236129

  17. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  18. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  19. The Association of Patients’ Oral Health Literacy and Dental School Communication Tools: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A.; Richards, Jessica K.; Holtzman, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients’ ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school’s general dental clinic during 2012–13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects’ oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults’ oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients’ ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy. PMID:25941146

  20. Non-fibrous dust load and smoking in dental technicians: a study using bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, M; Pairon, J C; Morabia, A; Gaudichet, A; Janson, X; Brochard, P

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted with transmission electron microscopy to find whether bronchoalveolar lavage could be used to identify subjects with occupational exposure to mineral particles. Non-fibrous mineral particles in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 46 dental technicians and 41 white collar controls with lung diseases but free from occupational exposure to dusts were analysed. The total particle concentration in BAL fluid was significantly higher in dental technicians than in controls (12.18 x 10(5) particles/ml of BAL fluid, v 2.03 x 10(5) particles/ml, p < 0.001). Dental technicians had significantly more crystalline silica, aluminium, and alloys containing nickel and chromium. There was a non-significant twofold increase of total particle concentration in the lungs of dental technicians who were smokers compared with non-smokers. The results strongly support the use of BAL fluid analysis to assess dust accumulation in workers in heavily exposed occupations such as dental technicians. This is a valid method to evaluate occupational exposure to non-fibrous mineral particles, and may be useful to determine the occupational aetiology of some respiratory diseases. PMID:8124458

  1. Absence of lymphatic vessels in human dental pulp: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Renato; Secciani, Ilaria; Sozio, Francesca; Rossi, Antonella; Weber, Elisabetta; Lorenzini, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Few and controversial data are available in the literature regarding the presence of lymphatic vessels in the human dental pulp. The present study was designed to examine morphologically the existence of a lymph drainage system in human dental pulp. Human dental pulp and skin sections were immunohistochemically stained with specific antibodies for lymphatic endothelium (D2-40, LYVE-1, VEGFR-3 [vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3], and Prox-1), with the pan-endothelial markers CD31 and von Willebrand factor (vWF), and with the blood-specific marker CD34. Several blood vessels were identified in human pulps and skin. Lymphatic vessels were found in all human skin samples but in none of the pulps examined. Western blotting performed on human dermis and on pulps treated with collagenase (to remove odontoblasts) confirmed these results. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that vessels which, by light microscopy, appeared to be initial lymphatic vessels had no anchoring filaments or discontinuous basement membrane, both of which are typical ultrastructural characteristics of lymphatic vessels. These results suggest that under normal conditions human dental pulp does not contain true lymphatic vessels. The various theories about dental pulp interstitial fluid circulation should be revised accordingly.

  2. Quality management in dental care: patients’ perspectives on communication. a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    TIMOFE, MARA PAULA; ALBU, SILVIU

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Dental care usually faces the traditional doctor-patient relationship, according to which the doctor does not seek feedback and patients feel uncomfortable when being involved in the healthcare process. The current study aims at analyzing patients’ attitudes and knowledge about dental care and asses the level of communication between them and their dentists. Methods A series of telephone interviews (N=40) were applied to patients in the city of Cluj-Napoca in order to identify attitudes and knowledge about dental care. The interview guide was applied separately to each respondent and each interview was audio recorded with the verbal consent of the respondent. The data collected was assessed and we performed thematic analysis on the provided answers. Results When asked about the dentist’s attitude during the consultation, the respondents reported only positive attitudes. The majority of the respondents stated that the communication with their dentist was an efficient and professional one, focused on their dental problems. When asked if they understood the verbal and written information received from the dentist, the majority of respondents said they understood the information without any problems. Conclusion Identifying the patients’ health literacy about dental services leads to better communication between dentist and patient, which is essential for establishing a quality management system in dentistry. Effective communication leads to a high level of patient involvement. PMID:27152082

  3. [Pilot study on the presence of Legionella spp in 6 Italian cities' dental units].

    PubMed

    Montagna, M T; Tatò, D; Napoli, C; Castiglia, P; Guidetti, L; Liguori, G; Petti, S; Tanzi, M L

    2006-01-01

    Among the microorganism involved in environmental contamination, Legionella spp is actually considered an important infectious hazard. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of Legionella spp in water samples collected from 138 dental unit selected from public outpatient clinics of 6 Italian cities. The samples were taken from oral rinsing cup, air-water syringe, ultrasonic scaler and the turbine to investigate Legionella spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the total heterotrophic count at 36 degrees and 22 degrees. Legionella spp was present in 33,3% dental unit water; but a significant difference was shown among the enrolled cities. In 43,5% of water sample Legionella concentration was 1.000-10.000 CFU/L and in 30,4% was >10.000 CFU/L. L. pneumophila 1 was found in 23,9% of water samples. The results demonstrate that the concentration of Legionella spp in dental unit water lines could be high and this suggests that the exposure to these micoorganism during the dental practise could be a potential health risk both for dental personnel and for the patients too, especially when immunocompromised.

  4. Antimicrobial effects of Citrus sinensis peel extracts against dental caries bacteria: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sapna B.; Mahin-Syed-Ismail, Prabu; Varghese, Shaji; Thomas-George, Bibin; Kandathil- Thajuraj, Pathinettam; Baby, Deepak; Haleem, Shaista; Sreedhar, Sreeja

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethnomedicine is gaining admiration since years but still there is abundant medicinal flora which is unrevealed through research. The study was conducted to assess the in vitro antimicrobial potential and also determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Citrus sinensis peel extracts with a view of searching a novel extract as a remedy for dental caries pathogens. Material and Methods Aqueous and ethanol (cold and hot) extracts prepared from peel of Citrus sinensis were screened for in vitro antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, using agar well diffusion method. The lowest concentration of every extract considered as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for both test organisms. One way ANOVA with Post Hoc Bonferroni test was applied for statistical analysis. Confidence level and level of significance were set at 95% and 5% respectively. Results Dental caries pathogens were inhibited most by hot ethanolic extract of Citrus sinensispeel followed by cold ethanolic extract. Aqueous extracts were effective at very high concentrations. Minimum inhibitory concentration of hot and cold ethanolic extracts of Citrus sinensis peel ranged between 12-15 mg/ml against both the dental caries pathogens. Conclusions Citrus sinensispeels extract was found to be effective against dental caries pathogens and contain compounds with therapeutic potential. Nevertheless, clinical trials on the effect of these plants are essential before advocating large-scale therapy. Key words:Agar well diffusion, antimicrobial activity, dental caries, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus. PMID:26855710

  5. Oro-dental features of Pallister-Killian syndrome: Evaluation of 21 European probands.

    PubMed

    Bagattoni, Simone; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Sadotti, Agnese; Alkhamis, Nadia; Rocca, Alessandro; Cocchi, Guido; Krantz, Ian David; Piana, Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare sporadic multi-systemic developmental disorder caused by a mosaic tetrasomy of the short arm of chromosome 12. A wide range of clinical characteristics including intellectual disability, seizures, and congenital malformations has previously been described. Individuals with PKS show a characteristic facial phenotype with frontal bossing, alopecia, sparse eyebrows, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, telecanthus, and posteriorly rotated ears. Oro-dental features, such as "Pallister lip," macroglossia, delayed eruption of primary teeth, high arched-palate, prognathism, and cleft palate have been occasionally reported in the medical literature. The aim of the study was to assess the oro-dental phenotype of PKS and to describe the oral health status in a cohort participating in the First European Workshop on PKS. A clinical dental examination was performed in 21 Caucasian probands and data regarding medical and dental history collected. Twelve probands (57%) showed an atypical dental pattern, with multiple missing teeth (primarily the first permanent molars) and 2 (10%) a double teeth. The severity of gingivitis and dental caries increased with age and gingival overgrowth was a common finding. A characteristic occlusive phenotype was found: a high-arched palate with mandibular prognathism associated with an anterior openbite and crossbite and with posterior crossbite (unilateral or bilateral). The prevalence of oral habits (non-nutritive sucking, mouth breathing, bruxism) was high, even in older probands. This study suggests that individuals affected by PKS should be observed closely for oro-dental diseases and a multidisciplinary approach is needed to implement the right preventive measures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  7. Characteristics and Dental Experiences of Autistic Children in Saudi Arabia: Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report base line information about characteristics, and dental experiences of a group of autistic children in three major cities of Saudi Arabia. Most of the children (76.2%) included in the study were diagnosed with autism before the age of 5 years. More than half of the children (53.7%) had no previous dental…

  8. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  9. Prevalence of Dental Caries Among Primary School Children of India – A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Anand; Ankola, Anil V; Hebbal, Mamata; Mohandoss, Suganya; Pastay, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In India, the trend indicates an increase in oral health problems especially dental caries, which has been consistently increasing both in prevalence and in severity. Children of all age groups are affected by dental caries. It becomes imperative to collect the data on prevalence of dental caries and treatment needs to provide preventive care. Aim To assess the prevalence of dental caries and treatment needs of 6-11years old Indian school children. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Sampling frame consisted of 6-11years old primary school children. Study sample consisted of 13,200 children selected from 10 talukas of Belgavi District, Karnataka, India. Clinical examination for dmft and DMFT was carried out in the school premises by five teams, each consisting of one faculty, three postgraduate students and five interns from the KLE VK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belagavi, Karnataka, India. The examiners were trained and calibrated by the principal investigator. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square and t-test. Results The overall caries prevalence was 78.9%, mean dmft was 2.97±2.62 and mean DMFT was 0.17±0.53. The decayed teeth component was the principal component in both dmft and DMFT indices. The mean dmft in boys was higher compared to girls and it was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion This study provided us with the baseline data, using which treatment was provided to all the children screened. The children were provided treatment at the camp site/dental hospital/satellite centers and primary health care centers according to the facilities available. PMID:27891457

  10. Absence of lymphatic vessels in the dog dental pulp: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anna; Gasse, Hagen; Staszyk, Carsten

    2010-11-01

    In spite of numerous investigations it has not been precisely determined whether lymphatic vessels are present in the dental pulp of dogs. Therefore, this study attempted a specific immunohistochemical detection of lymphatic endothelium. The canine teeth of 19 healthy beagle dogs were dissected into three segments (apical, intermediate and occlusal). After decalcification, specimens were embedded in paraffin wax and histologic cross-sections were stained immunohistochemically using a reliable antibody (anti-Prox-1) against the homeobox transcription factor Prox-1, which is located within the nucleus of lymphatic endothelium. Anti-Prox-1 reacted positively with canine control tissues (lymph nodes, gingiva, nasal mucosa), but showed no staining in tissue sections of the dental pulp. The dog dental pulp contained no vascular structures lined with lymphatic endothelium. This suggests that drainage of interstitial fluid makes use of other routes, i.e. extravascular pathways.

  11. Dental pain among 10–15 year old children attending oral health promoting schools: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Saheer, Abdul; Kousalya, Pallavi Swami; Raju, Rekha; Gubbihal, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dental pain is a major public health problem and one of the consequences of oral diseases which requires significant adjustments in life management leading to decreased quality of life. Objective: To assess prevalence of dental pain and its impact on daily life and to explore its relationship with oral health behavior and clinical oral status among 10-15 year old school children attending oral health promoting schools. Method: This cross sectional study was conducted in 6 schools serving low -middle socio economic strata in Bangalore, India. A total of 1237 children were surveyed for history of dental pain during past 3 month. Participants who reported dental pain completed self-reported oral health behaviour and Child dental pain questionnaire. Clinical oral examination included assessment of dental caries, periodontal status. Data was analyzed using t - test, Chi-square test, ANOVA and Regression Analysis. Results: Prevalence of dental pain was 15.6% (n = 194). Among children with pain, 17%, 43% and 40% reported mild, moderate and severe pain. Impact on daily activities was reported by 66%. Mean DMFT and DMFS was 1.80 and 2.11 Mean deft and defs was 2.47 and 3.41. Multiple logistic regression revealed that severity and impact of dental pain was associated with gender, frequency of tooth brushing, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience. Conclusion: Prevalence of Dental pain is associated with brushing behavior, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience, showing need for further attention to these conditions and a need to strengthen preventive and therapeutic dental services. PMID:26942112

  12. Study of dental enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite irradiated by EPR at K-band.

    PubMed

    Santos, A B; Rossi, A M; Baffa, O

    2005-02-01

    In this preliminary work the EPR spectra of a small dental enamel block and a synthetic B-type hydroxyapatite in powder form, both irradiated with gamma rays, were analyzed in K-band. The spectra of the dental enamel block allow the analysis of independent components with different angular orientations, while the study of the dosimetric properties of the synthetic hydroxyapatites showed good performance of this spectrometer. K-band spectra show better resolution when compared to X-band, while using significantly less sample material.

  13. Diatomite as a source of cristobalite for dental investments a differential thermal analysis study.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L; Kuhn, A T

    1982-08-01

    Cristobalite can be obtained from diatomite by heat-treatment at relatively low temperatures and short times without the use of flux. The differential thermal analysis method used to examine the alpha leads to beta inversion was not as satisfactory as it might have been, and to determine the amount and crystallinity of cristobalite formed any such method should be supported by other techniques, in particular, X-ray diffraction. To determine the suitability or otherwise of cristobalite produced from diatomite for use in dental investments, dialatometric studies are indicated since the property of thermal expansion is of fundamental importance to a dental investment.

  14. Drug abuse identification and pain management in dental patients: a case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Fahmida; Frare, Robert W; Py Berrios, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Properly identifying patients with a history of drug abuse is the first step in providing effective dental care. Dental professionals need to be fully aware of the challenges associated with treating this population. In the current study, the authors analyzed the physical and oral manifestations of illicit drug abuse to aid in the identification of patients who abuse drugs and the pain management strategies needed to treat them. The authors also present a clinical case of a patient with unique skin lesions and discuss the typical clinical findings of drug abuse based on a literature review.

  15. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh-Haddad, Aida; Haddad, Denise Sabbagh; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a disorder linked to the chromosome X long arm (Xq27.3), which is identified by a constriction named fragile site. It determines various changes, such as behavioral or emotional problems, learning difficulties, and intellectual disabilities. Craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated and narrow face, prominent forehead, broad nose, large and prominent ear pavilions, strabismus, and myopia are frequent characteristics. Regarding the oral aspects, deep and high-arched palate, mandibular prognathism, and malocclusion are also observed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. Material and Methods: The patients were in the range of 6–17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS), which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. Results: The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (p<0.05). In this group, supernumerary deciduous teeth (2.83%), giroversion of permanent teeth (2.31%), and partial anodontia (1.82%) were the most frequent dental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (p<0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that knowledge of dental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals. PMID:27812623

  16. Dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty: a Canadian participatory case study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Clarice M R; Rodriguez, Charo; Macaulay, Ann C; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    This qualitative case study was conducted in a Canadian dental school using a participatory approach and was based on Paulo Freire's theoretical concept of conscientização, a form of critical consciousness that involves awareness of social reality and fosters action towards social justice. The aim of the study was to understand dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty and dental care provided to people living in poverty. It also examined how these perceptions shape students' plans for their professional careers, as well as their opinions on educational strategies to prepare them to work with poor patients. The sources of data generation were semistructured interviews, participant observations, and document analysis. A deductive-inductive thematic strategy was used to analyze the data. Out of a class of thirty-five senior dental students, the authors interviewed a convenience sample of twelve: five male and seven female. The findings suggest that the students had incipient conscientização about poverty-related themes. They perceived poverty as a distant issue and as the responsibility of the government or of the poor individuals themselves. The students did not have plans to work with patients living in poverty in the future and struggled to envision ways to address these patients' needs other than volunteer work. This research supports the need for academic dental institutions to adopt strategies to increase students' critical consciousness about oral health inequities. Reducing oral health inequities is a matter of social justice, and dental care providers are key actors in this endeavor.

  17. Standardization of Code on Dental Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-13

    Three- Dimensional ). The recording of mandibular movements in three dimensions , the subsequent mounting of casts, and the programming of a fully adjustable...relation, vertical dimension of occlusion, esthetics, and phonetics before final wax up and processing. Credit one for each arch. 0058 3.0 Final Wax...such as dental implants. Credit one per patient examined. 0141 6.2 Postmortem Examination or Bite Mark Analysis for Identification. Postmortem dental

  18. Comparison of Dental Students' Self-Directed, Faculty, and Software-Based Assessments of Dental Anatomy Wax-Ups: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Pauline H; Faraone, Karen L; Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Keaser, Michael L

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about self-directed and self-reflective assessment in preclinical dental curricula. The aim of this study was to evaluate a visual dental anatomy teaching tool to train dental students to self-assess their dental anatomy wax carving practical examinations. The students self-assessed two waxing practical examinations (tooth #8 and tooth #19) using high-quality digital images in an assessment tool incorporated into a digital testing program. Student self-assessments were compared to the faculty evaluations and the results of a software-based evaluation tool (E4D Compare). Out of a total 130 first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school, wax-ups from 57 participants were available for this study. The assessment data were submitted to statistical analyses (p<0.05). For tooth #8, the student self-assessments were significantly different from the faculty and software assessments at a 400 micrometer level of tolerance (p=0.036), whereas the faculty assessment was not significantly different from the software assessment at a 300 micrometer level of tolerance (p=0.69). The evaluation of tooth #19 resulted in no significant differences between faculty members (p=0.94) or students (p=0.21) and the software at a level of tolerance of 400 micrometers. This study indicates that students can learn to self-assess their work using self-reflection in conjunction with faculty guidance and that it may be possible to use software-based evaluation tools to assist in faculty calibration and as objective grading tools.

  19. The State of Veterinary Dental Education in North America, Canada, and the Caribbean: A Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jamie G; Goldstein, Gary; Boudreaux, Karen; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2016-07-14

    Dental disease is important in the population of pets seen by veterinarians. Knowledge and skills related to oral disease and dentistry are critical entry-level skills expected of graduating veterinarians. A descriptive survey on the state of veterinary dental education was sent to respondents from 35 veterinary schools in the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean. Using the online SurveyMonkey application, respondents answered up to 26 questions. Questions were primarily designed to determine the breadth and depth of veterinary dental education from didactic instruction in years 1-3 to the clinical year programs. There was an excellent response to the survey with 86% compliance. Learning opportunities for veterinary students in years 1-3 in both the lecture and laboratory environments were limited, as were the experience in the clinical year 4, which were divided between community-type practices and veterinary dentistry and oral surgery services. The former provided more hands-on clinical experience, including tooth extraction, while the latter focused on dental charting and periodontal debridement. Data on degrees and certifications of faculty revealed only 12 programs with board-certified veterinary dentists. Of these, seven veterinary schools had residency programs in veterinary dentistry at the time of the survey. Data from this study demonstrate the lack of curricular time dedicated to dental content in the veterinary schools participating in the survey, thereby suggesting the need for veterinary schools to address the issue of veterinary dental education. By graduation, new veterinarians should have acquired the needed knowledge and skills to meet both societal demands and professional expectations.

  20. Users' dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Santos-Neto, Pedro Eleutério dos; Carreiro, Danilo Lima; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira e

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users' dissatisfaction with such are. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users' dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable), demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables). Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect) were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms. CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units.

  1. Effects of tongue cleaning on bacterial flora in tongue coating and dental plaque: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of tongue cleaning on reconstruction of bacterial flora in dental plaque and tongue coating itself are obscure. We assessed changes in the amounts of total bacteria as well as Fusobacterium nucleatum in tongue coating and dental plaque specimens obtained with and without tongue cleaning. Methods We conducted a randomized examiner-blind crossover study using 30 volunteers (average 23.7 ± 3.2 years old) without periodontitis. After dividing randomly into 2 groups, 1 group was instructed to clean the tongue, while the other did not. On days 1 (baseline), 3, and 10, tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected after recording tongue coating score (Winkel tongue coating index: WTCI). After a washout period of 3 weeks, the same examinations were performed with the subjects allocated to the alternate group. Genomic DNA was purified from the samples and applied to SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR to quantify the amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum. Results After 3 days, the WTCI score recovered to baseline, though the amount of total bacteria in tongue coating was significantly lower as compared to the baseline. In plaque samples, the bacterial amounts on day 3 and 10 were significantly lower than the baseline with and without tongue cleaning. Principal component analysis showed that variations of bacterial amounts in the tongue coating and dental plaque samples were independent from each other. Furthermore, we found a strong association between amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum in specimens both. Conclusions Tongue cleaning reduced the amount of bacteria in tongue coating. However, the cleaning had no obvious contribution to inhibit dental plaque formation. Furthermore, recovery of the total bacterial amount induced an increase in F. nucleatum in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Thus, it is recommended that tongue cleaning and tooth brushing should both be performed for promoting oral health. PMID:24423407

  2. Users’ dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; dos Santos, Pedro Eleutério; Carreiro, Danilo Lima; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigênia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users’ dissatisfaction with such are. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users’ dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable), demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables). Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect) were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms. CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units. PMID:26270017

  3. A longitudinal study of stress in first-year dental students.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Sarah T; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna

    2010-08-01

    This study examines the association of stress with performance and health in first-year dental students and changes in the amount and sources of stress over one year. Students at four U.S. dental schools completed the Dental Environment Stress (DES) scale, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), stress rating, and demographic questions at the start of their first year of school (baseline), 11.7 weeks, and one year later when first-year GPA, illnesses, health ratings, and symptom frequency were also assessed. Overall, 296 (186 men, 110 women) responded at baseline and after one year; 205 responded all three times. Stress scores were negatively correlated with GPA (DES, p=.006; PSS, p=.04; stress rating, p=.002) and with physical and emotional health ratings (p's< or =.002), but positively associated with illness (p<.05), symptoms (p<.0001), and symptom frequency (p's<.05). Stress was higher after one year (p's<.001) and varied by school (p<.0001). Women (p<.01), younger (p<.003), and single students (p<.03) had higher stress at baseline, but after one year, there were no differences by gender, age, or marital status. Ratings for items on the Dental Environment Stress scale related to schoolwork were high at baseline and increased further by one year (p's< or =.0001); items related to school atmosphere had low ratings initially with large increases over time (p's<.0001). In conclusion, stress increases over time in first-year dental students and is related to detrimental effects on performance and health. Variation between schools may reflect different teaching methods. Changes in sources of stress may reflect the different contributions of anticipatory and situational stress over time. First-year dental students may benefit from stress reduction programs.

  4. Heavy consumption of dental services; a longitudinal cohort study among Finnish adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A reform to Dental Care legislation in 2002 abolished age limits restricting adults’ use of public dental services in Finland. In the Public Dental Service (PDS) unit of Espoo, the proportion of adult patients rose from 36% to 57%. The aim of this study was to investigate heavy use of dental services by adults and its determinants. Methods A longitudinal cohort study was undertaken based on a PDS patient register. Of all adults who attended the PDS in Espoo in 2004, those who had six or more visits (n=3,173) were assigned to the heavy user group and a comparison group of low users (n=22,820) had three or fewer dental visits. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Baseline information (year 2004) on age, sex, number and type of visit, oral health status and treatment provided was collected from treatment records. Each group was followed-up for five years and information on the number and types of visit was recorded for each year from 2005 to 2009. Results Most heavy users (61.6%) became low users and only 11.2% remained chronic heavy users. Most low users (91.0%) remained low users. For heavy users, the mean number of dental visits per year (3.0) during the follow-up period was significantly lower than initially in 2004 (8.3) (p<0.001) but 74.8% of heavy users had had emergency visits compared with 21.6% of the low users (p<0.001). A third (33%) of the visitors in each group had no proper examination and treatment planning during the 5-year follow-up period and two or more examinations were provided to fewer than half of the heavy (46.1%) or low (46.5%) users. The mean number of treating dentists was 5.7 for heavy users and 3.8 for low users (p<0.001). Conclusions Frequent emergency visits were characteristic of heavy users of dental services. Treatment planning was inadequate, probably partly due to the many dentists involved and too many patients requesting care. Better local management and continuous education are needed to

  5. Mesodermal retinoic acid signaling regulates endothelial cell coalescence in caudal pharyngeal arch artery vasculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sucov, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of retinoic acid signaling causes a variety of pharyngeal arch artery and great vessel defects, as well as malformations in many other tissues, including those derived from the pharyngeal endoderm. Previous studies implied that arch artery defects in the context of defective RA signaling occur secondary to pharyngeal pouch segmentation defects, although this model has never been experimentally verified. In this study, we examined arch artery morphogenesis during mouse development, and the role of RA in this process. We show in normal embryos that the arch arteries form by vasculogenic differentiation of pharyngeal mesoderm. Using various genetic backgrounds and tissue-specific mutation approaches, we segregate pharyngeal arch artery and pharyngeal pouch defects in RA receptor mutants, and show that RA signal transduction only in pharyngeal mesoderm is required for arch artery formation. RA does not control pharyngeal mesodermal differentiation to endothelium, but instead promotes the aggregation of endothelial cells into nascent vessels. Expression of VE-cadherin was substantially reduced in RAR mutants, and this deficiency may underlie the arch artery defects. The consequences of disrupted mesodermal and endodermal RA signaling were restricted to the 4th and 6th arch arteries and to the 4th pharyngeal pouch, respectively, suggesting that different regulatory mechanisms control the formation of the more anterior arch arteries and pouches. PMID:22040871

  6. First Hard X-Ray Detection of the Non-Thermal Emission Around the Arches Cluster: Morphology and Spectral Studies With NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, JaeSub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K(alpha) line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario. Key words: cosmic rays - Galaxy: center - ISM: general - X-rays: individual (Arches cluster)

  7. Follow-Up Study of 1988 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XVII, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Flaherty, Toni

    In 1989, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1988 graduates of William Rainey Harper College's (WRHC's) Dental Hygiene program in order to measure the quality of the program, explore the need for changes, and substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards. A survey was mailed to all 27 associate degree graduates, requesting…

  8. A crystallinity study of dental tissues and tartar by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J A; Sánchez, H J; Marcelli, C A; Grenón, M; Guidi, M C; Piccinini, M

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we report a study of an important property of biomineralized phases, crystallinity, on the basis of previous results for synthetic apatite. Crystallinity is not only important for understanding biomineralization, it is also related to the maturation and mechanisms of growth of calcium phosphates in biological surroundings. We studied two kinds of sample, teeth as an example of biomineralized tissues and dental calculi (adhering) as an example of mineralization without participation of biological agents, except possibly bacteria. The investigation focused on study of ν(1)-ν(3) infrared absorption bands of PO(4)(3-) phosphates. We used ATR (attenuated total reflection) analysis to examine human dental tissues and tartar on several samples. The results confirm for the first time previous assumptions about the growth and maturation of dental calculi, i.e., crystallinity progresses from regions of high crystallinity to regions of lower crystallinity, and, in addition, its quantification with spatial resolution in the sample. A gradual pattern was observed in dental calculus. Another result from this study was that cementum and dentine had similar crystallinity, despite their different biological and mechanical functions.

  9. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  10. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  11. Role of Hox PG2 genes in Nile tilapia pharyngeal arch specification: implications for gnathostome pharyngeal arch evolution.

    PubMed

    Le Pabic, Pierre; Scemama, Jean-Luc; Stellwag, Edmund J

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that the ancestral osteichthyan Hox paralog group 2 gene complement was composed of two genes, Hoxa2 and b2, both of which have been retained in tetrapods, but only one of which functions as a selector gene of second pharyngeal arch identity (PA2). Genome duplication at the inception of the teleosts likely generated four Hox PG2 genes, only two of which, hoxa2b and b2a, have been preserved in zebrafish, where they serve as functionally redundant PA2 selector genes. Evidence from our laboratory has shown that other telelosts, specifically striped bass and Nile tilapia, harbor three transcribed Hox PG2 genes, hoxa2a, a2b, and b2a, with unspecified function(s). We have focused on characterizing the function of the three Nile tilapia Hox PG2 genes as a model to examine the effects of postgenome duplication gene loss on the evolution of developmental gene function. We studied Hox PG2 gene function in tilapia by examining the effects of independent morpholino oligonucleotide (MO)-induced knockdowns on pharyngeal arch morphology and Hox gene expression patterns. Morphological defects resulting from independent MO-induced knockdowns of tilapia hoxa2a, a2b, and b2a included the expected PA2 to PA1 homeotic transformations previously observed in tetrapods and zebrafish, as well as concordant and unexpected morphological changes in posterior arch-derived cartilages. Of particular interest, was the observation of a MO-induced supernumerary arch between PA6 and PA7, which occurred concomitantly with other MO-induced pharyngeal arch defects. Beyond these previously unreported morphant-induced transformations, a comparison of Hox PG2 gene expression patterns in tilapia Hox PG2 morphants were indicative of arch-specific auto- and cross-regulatory activities as well as a Hox paralog group 2 interdependent regulatory network for control of pharyngeal arch specification.

  12. A pilot study in the recovery and recognition of non-osseointegrated dental implants following cremation.

    PubMed

    Berketa, J; James, H; Marino, V

    2011-12-01

    Minimal dimensional changes in free standing dental implants when incinerated in a kiln to a temperature of 1125°C have been reported previously. However, in the same study colour changes were observed between commercially pure titanium and titanium alloy type of implants, with speculation that this change may be a useful distinguishing tool in cases requiring forensic identification. The present study was instigated to determine what changes occur following cremation to bone-supported dental implants placed within mandibles of sheep. A selection of dental implants was photographed and radiographed. They were then surgically placed in sheep mandibles and the entire sheep heads cremated in a commercial cremator. There was detachment of the dental implants from the mandible, which could have implications for scene recovery. Following retrieval and re-irradiating of the implants, image subtraction evaluation of the radiographs was recorded using Adobe(®) Photoshop.(®) As with the previous study there was slight oxidation of the implant surfaces leading to minor alteration of the images. There was, however, no gold crust colour change in the commercially pure titanium. Photography within the retrieved implants revealed the batch number within the Straumann™ implant was still visible, which could significantly add weight to the identification of deceased persons.

  13. Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Sandra J.

    Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

  14. Out-of-plane free vibration analysis of a cable-arch structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H. J.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Zhu, H. P.

    2013-02-01

    Cable-arch structure has been widely used in many long-span structures such as cable roofs and cable-stayed arch bridges, but its dynamics is still not well understood. In this paper, the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of a cable-arch structure is investigated. The equations governing the out-of-plane free vibration of the structure are derived using d'Alembert's principle. A transfer matrix method is used to solve the governing equations and determine the frequencies of the out-of-plane vibration. The theories are then used to study two specific cases: free vibration of a model cable-arch and simulation of an arch erection process. The effects of some key parameters of cable and arch, such as tension of cable and radius, open-angle and shape of arch, are examined. The results indicate that in-plane and spatial cables can largely improve the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of arch structures, which are further verified by analyzing the out-of-plane buckling of cable-arch structures. The present work should be valuable and significant not only for the fundamental research but also engineering design of roofs and bridges.

  15. Second Mesiobuccal Canal Treatment in a Predoctoral Dental Clinic: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Parker, Jeffrey M; Tawil, Peter Z

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the location and treatment of second canals in mesiobuccal roots (MB2) of first and second maxillary molars in a predoctoral endodontic clinic by the graduating classes of 2008 to 2015. These results were compared to similar clinical studies. Included in the study were 368 root canal treatments performed by 310 third- and fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school. All cases were done under faculty supervision, and the students were instructed to use dental loupe magnification. Students' evaluation sheets were used to deteremine the total MB2 canals treated in first and second maxillary molars. The results showed that, overall, 72.55% of the teeth had an MB2 canal treated. The frequency was higher in first molars (75.91%) than in second molars (56.92%) (p<0.05). Third-year students were able to detect 39 MB2 canals in 57 maxillary molars (68.42%), while fourth-year students detected 228 MB2 canals in 311 teeth (73.31%) (p>0.05). Under proper supervision by experienced endodontists, these dental students were capable of treating MB2 canals in maxillary molars. The frequency of MB2 canals located and treated by dental students with the assistance of experienced professionals was higher in first than in second molars. No significant difference was found between third- and fourth-year students. The incidence of MB2 canals located and treated in this study was found to be similar to that in other clinical studies.

  16. [Causes of interruption of dental studies and subsequent change in careers].

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, N

    1989-08-01

    During recent years an increasing number of dental students at the University of Oslo used prolonged student time and graduated with mediocre results, or interrupted studies without graduation Jacobsen, Acta Odontol Scand 45:399-408, 1987). The present investigation aimed at clarifying the reasons for interrupted studies and at getting information about subsequent career. Semistructured questionnaires on curricular and socioeconomic causes for drop-out and on subsequent career were mailed to 98 persons who had quit dental studies during a 10-year period. Free comments on circumstances relevant to their drop-out were encouraged. The following findings are based on 68 replies (69 per cent): Sixty-three students (93 per cent) quit dental school for different curricular reasons, a majority of which was "more interest in other subjects". Contributory factors of socioeconomic nature, mostly future unemployment concern, were often mentioned. Forty-five (66 per cent) later graduated with university degrees in medicine, economics, veterinary medicine, science, technology, law etc, and the remainder, except two persons, finished up to 4 years of studies at regional colleges or similar institutions. Free comments focused on curricular, pedagogical, and social shortcomings at the dental faculty. The findings indicated that a large majority of the students who dropped out did so for lack of stimulation by the dental curriculum and not for lack of academic potential. Only a few students quit because, in their own description, they were immature for university studies at the time, or because they had "academic" difficulties with the early science/biology courses or with the preclinical technique courses.

  17. Effect of anti-asthmatic drugs on dental health: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Chellaih, P.; Sivadas, G.; Chintu, S.; Vaishnavi Vedam, V. K.; Arunachalam, Rajeev; Sarsu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Bronchial asthma constitutes important problem worldwide. This chronic lung disease has detrimental effect in the oral cavity like reduction of salivary secretion, change in salivary composition and pH. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to compare the prevalence of dental caries in asthmatic children and healthy children, and also to evaluate the correlation between the Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus and dental caries in both the groups. Results: In this study, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth score of children in the study group was (4.53 ± 3.38) higher than the control group (1.51 ± 1.58) (P < 0.01). The S. mutans count of the study group was (59574.47 ± 28510.67) higher than the control group (19777.78 ± 17899.83) P < 0.01. The Lactobacillus count in study group was (43553.19 ± 58776.96) higher than the control group (8843.84 ± 7982.72) P < 0.01. Subjects using inhaled corticosteroids were more prone to develop dental caries than the control group with odds ratio = 6.26 and 95% confidence interval. Conclusions: The dental caries prevalence increases with the usage of β2 agonist and corticosteroid inhalers for the treatment of asthma. Thus in asthmatic children, increase in caries prevalence might be due to the drug treatment and not due to the disease by itself. It can be concluded that asthmatic children have a higher prevalence of dental caries than healthy children. Hence, special oral health care is needed for asthmatic children. PMID:27829752

  18. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Kuo, Song-Bor; Wu, Chung-De; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yi-Fen; Peng, Ying-Chin

    2015-01-01

    During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7) aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL). As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli.

  19. Dental Student Study Strategies: Are Self-Testing and Scheduling Related to Academic Performance?

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Maureen; Morrow, Christina S; Atiyeh, Lindsey; Pierre, Gaëlle C

    2016-05-01

    Self-testing, a strategy wherein a student actively engages in creating questions and answers from study materials to assist with studying, has been found to be especially advantageous because it enhances future retrieval of information. Studies have found correlations among students' grade point averages (GPAs), self-testing, and rereading study strategies, as well as the spacing of study sessions over time. The aim of this study was to assess relationships among dental students' study strategies, scheduling of study time, and academic achievement. A 16-item survey requesting information on study habits, study schedules, and GPAs was distributed to 358 second-year dental students at New York University College of Dentistry. Additionally, the survey asked students to report the average number of hours per week they devoted to studying for didactic courses and preparing for hands-on preclinical courses. Of the 358 students, 94 (26%) responded to the survey. The vast majority of the respondents reported utilizing self-testing and rereading study strategies. High performers (with higher GPAs) were more likely to use self-testing, especially with flashcards, and to space their studying over multiple sessions. Lower performing students were more likely to highlight or underline their notes and to mass their study sessions or cram. Longer hours devoted to studying and practicing for simulation courses were associated with stronger performance; lower performers reported spending significantly fewer hours practicing for simulation courses. Half of the dental students surveyed said that they felt their studying would be more productive in the morning, although 84% reported doing most of their studying in the evening or late night. Sound study decisions depend on accurate regulation of ongoing learning and appropriate use and timing of evidence-based study strategies, so these results suggest that dental students may require guidance in these areas.

  20. Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of Osseointegrated Dental Implant Failure: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xixi; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Abi-Nader, Samer; Daniel, Nach G; Nicolau, Belinda; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have a negative impact on bone accrual. Because osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study investigates the association between PPIs and the risk of osseointegrated implant failure. This retrospective cohort study included a total of 1,773 osseointegrated dental implants in 799 patients (133 implants in 58 PPIs users and 1,640 in 741 non-users) who were treated at the East Coast Oral Surgery Clinic in Moncton, Canada, from January 2007 to September 2015. Kaplan-Meier estimator was used to describe the hazard function of dental implant failure by PPIs usage. Multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analyses were used to test the association between PPIs exposure and risk of implant failure adjusting for potential confounders. The failure rates were 6.8% for people using PPIs compared to 3.2% for non-users. Subjects using PPIs had a higher risk of dental implant failure (HR = 2.73; 95% CI = 1.10-6.78) compared to those who did not use the drugs. The findings suggest that treatment with PPIs may be associated with an increased risk of osseointegrated dental implant failure.

  1. Fear Processing in Dental Phobia during Crossmodal Symptom Provocation: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Maslowski, Nina Isabel; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lueken, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    While previous studies successfully identified the core neural substrates of the animal subtype of specific phobia, only few and inconsistent research is available for dental phobia. These findings might partly relate to the fact that, typically, visual stimuli were employed. The current study aimed to investigate the influence of stimulus modality on neural fear processing in dental phobia. Thirteen dental phobics (DP) and thirteen healthy controls (HC) attended a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) symptom provocation paradigm encompassing both visual and auditory stimuli. Drill sounds and matched neutral sinus tones served as auditory stimuli and dentist scenes and matched neutral videos as visual stimuli. Group comparisons showed increased activation in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and thalamus in DP compared to HC during auditory but not visual stimulation. On the contrary, no differential autonomic reactions were observed in DP. Present results are largely comparable to brain areas identified in animal phobia, but also point towards a potential downregulation of autonomic outflow by neural fear circuits in this disorder. Findings enlarge our knowledge about neural correlates of dental phobia and may help to understand the neural underpinnings of the clinical and physiological characteristics of the disorder. PMID:24738049

  2. Predictors of academic performance for applicants to an international dental studies program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela; King, Patricia A; Chambers, David W

    2011-12-01

    The number of U.S. and Canadian dental schools offering programs for dentists with degrees from other countries leading to the D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree has increased recently. This fact, along with the diversity of educational systems represented by candidates for these programs, increases the importance of identifying valid admissions predictors of success in international dental student programs. Data from 148 students accepted into the international dental studies program at the University of the Pacific from 1994 through 2004 were analyzed. Dependent variables were comprehensive cumulative GPA at the end of both the first and second years of the two-year program. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and both Parts I and II of the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) were significant positive predictors of success. Performance on laboratory tests of clinical skill in operative dentistry and in fixed prosthodontics and ratings from interviewers were not predictive of overall success in the program. Although this study confirms the predictive value of written tests such as the TOEFL and NBDE, it also contributes to the literature documenting inconsistent results regarding other types of predictors. It may be the case that characteristics of individual programs or features of the applicant pools for each may require use of admissions predictors that are unique to schools.

  3. Plaque Removal and Gingival Health after Use of a Novel Dental Gel: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayudu, Anuradha; Lam, Tracie; Ho, Jessica; Forghany, Ali; Vu, Thinh; Ngo, William; Ajdaharian, Janet; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Background Goal of this in vivo prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded, cross over study was to compare the level of plaque control and gingivitis after use of a novel dental gel (test) vs. A Triclosan/copolymer dentifrice (control). Methods After coronal polishing, 22 subjects with moderate gingivitis were randomly assigned to brush twice daily with test or control dentifrice for the first study Arm. Plaque, gingival and sulcus bleeding indices were recorded at baseline, week 2 and week 4. Professional coronal polishing was repeated, and then subjects brushed with the second dentifrice for 4 weeks. Clinical indices were again recorded at Baseline, week 2 and week 4. The effects of each dentifrice on clinical indices were compared using Student’s t-test. Results Brushing with the test gel produced significantly greater levels of plaque reduction versus the Triclosan/copolymer control dentifrice at each time point. 45% less plaque was measured after 4 weeks of test agent use than after control agent use (p<0.000000005). A significant reduction in gingival inflammation from test vs control agent over w\\4 weeks was also observed (p=0.000342). Conclusions An activated edathamil dental gel formulation provides effective plaque control and reduced gingival inflammation compared to a Triclosan/Co-polymer dental gel. Practical Implications: A novel dental gel formulation that does not contain abrasives, detergents or antimicrobials may provide effective plaque control and support gingival health. PMID:28286702

  4. A Palaeozoic shark with osteichthyan-like branchial arches.

    PubMed

    Pradel, Alan; Maisey, John G; Tafforeau, Paul; Mapes, Royal H; Mallatt, Jon

    2014-05-29

    The evolution of serially arranged, jointed endoskeletal supports internal to the gills--the visceral branchial arches--represents one of the key events in early jawed vertebrate (gnathostome) history, because it provided the morphological basis for the subsequent evolution of jaws. However, until now little was known about visceral arches in early gnathostomes, and theories about gill arch evolution were driven by information gleaned mostly from both modern cartilaginous (chondrichthyan) and bony (osteichthyan) fishes. New fossil discoveries can profoundly affect our understanding of evolutionary history, by revealing hitherto unseen combinations of primitive and derived characters. Here we describe a 325 million year (Myr)-old Palaeozoic shark-like fossil that represents, to our knowledge, the earliest identified chondrichthyan in which the complete gill skeleton is three-dimensionally preserved in its natural position. Its visceral arch arrangement is remarkably osteichthyan-like, suggesting that this may represent the common ancestral condition for crown gnathostomes. Our findings thus reinterpret the polarity of some arch features of the crown jawed vertebrates and invert the classic hypothesis, in which modern sharks retain the ancestral condition. This study underscores the importance of early chondrichthyans in resolving the evolutionary history of jawed vertebrates.

  5. Characterization of the cephalic arch and location of stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Shelby; Hammes, Mary S.; Blicharski, Tom; Watson, Sydeaka; Funaki, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to accurately characterize the cephalic arch segments into four domains and to enable more specific evaluation of cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) and determine the frequency of stenosis in each domain. Methods After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a retrospective chart review was done to define a population of patients receiving hemodialysis who developed CAS as apparent on clinically indicated radiologic imaging. A standardized approach was devised to categorize four domains of the cephalic arch. Domain I was defined as the peripheral portion of the arch and Domain IV was the distal portion of the cephalic vein near termination with the axillary vein. The magnitude of stenosis as measured by percentage was determined and compared in the four domains. Results The most frequent location for stenosis was found in domain IV when compared with domains II or I (p<0.01). The magnitude of stenosis differed across all domains (p<0.001) with the least common place for CAS in domain I. Treatment of CAS included angioplasty in all, thrombectomy in eight, and stent placement in five. Conclusions CAS occurs most commonly in the terminal portion of the arch. Four standardized domains have been defined; future work will validate these findings and determine the best intervention for each domain. PMID:25198819

  6. Color Stability of Dental Restorative Materials Submitted to Heat Sources, for Forensic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Biancalana, Roberto Cesar; Vicente, Sergio Augusto de Freitas; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2017-03-01

    During postmortem examination of the dental arches of carbonized victims, dental restorative materials may be found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat source action on the color stability of composite resin (CR) and glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorations, to discriminate between them and compare with antemortem dental data. Sixty bovine teeth (30 CR and 30 GIC) were prepared (6 × 6 × 2 mm) and separated into groups (n = 10). The color readouts were taken by spectrophotometer, before and after heat action (100°C, 200°C, 300°C), in an oven for 15 min. There were color alterations for all coordinates (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa* eΔb*) for both materials. GIC presented greater change. The authors concluded that it is possible to distinguish between the materials by the color changes analyzed by instrumental method, helping victim identification.

  7. Is bisphosphonate therapy for benign bone disease associated with impaired dental healing? A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are common first line medications used for the management of benign bone disease. One of the most devastating complications associated with bisphosphonate use is osteonecrosis of the jaws which may be related to duration of exposure and hence cumulative dose, dental interventions, medical co-morbidities or in some circumstances with no identifiable aggravating factor. While jaw osteonecrosis is a devastating outcome which is currently difficult to manage, various forms of delayed dental healing may be a less dramatic and, therefore, poorly-recognised complications of bisphosphonate use for the treatment of osteoporosis. It is hypothesised that long-term (more than 1 year's duration) bisphosphonate use for the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis or other benign bone disease is associated with impaired dental healing. Methods/Design A case-control study has been chosen to test the hypothesis as the outcome event rate is likely to be very low. A total of 54 cases will be recruited into the study following review of all dental files from oral and maxillofacial surgeons and special needs dentists in Victoria where potential cases of delayed dental healing will be identified. Potential cases will be presented to an independent case adjudication panel to determine if they are definitive delayed dental healing cases. Two hundred and fifteen controls (1:4 cases:controls), matched for age and visit window period, will be selected from those who have attended local community based referring dental practices. The primary outcome will be the incidence of delayed dental healing that occurs either spontaneously or following dental treatment such as extractions, implant placement, or denture use. Discussion This study is the largest case-controlled study assessing the link between bisphosphonate use and delayed dental healing in Australia. It will provide invaluable data on the potential link between bisphosphonate use and osteonecrosis of the jaws

  8. The Responsiveness of Patients’ Quality of Life to Dental Caries Treatment—A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ding-Yu; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the responsiveness of oral health–related quality of life (OHRQoL) (oral health impact profile [OHIP] and oral impact on daily performance [OIDP]) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (World Health Organization quality of life scale, brief [WHOQOL-BREF]) in dental caries restoration treatment. The study also aimed to assess the influence of treatment on the responsiveness of patients’ quality of life (QoL). A total of 126 patients (aged 16–40 years) received dental caries restoration treatment with a 2-week follow-up and pre- and posttreatment interviews by questionnaire. Patients were assessed for their perceptions of OHRQoL and HRQoL by using the OHIP, OIDP, and WHOQOL-BREF measures. The responsiveness of all outcome measurements was assessed by effect size (ES). Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to examine the association with the responsiveness of all outcome measurements. Significant differences were found between OIDP (ES = 0.39), OHIP (ES = 0.54), and WHOQOL-BREF (ES = 0.13) with regard to pretreatment and posttreatment (p-values: <0.0001, <0.0001, and 0.0120, respectively). Sex and dental caries status at baseline were significantly associated with responsiveness by all measurements. This study suggests that dental caries treatment moderately improves OHRQoL, but is less related to HRQoL. Furthermore, the number of dental caries and restoration are important factors affecting the improvement of patients’ perceived OHRQoL. PMID:27776148

  9. Idiopathic dental pulp calcifications in a tertiary care setting in South India

    PubMed Central

    Satheeshkumar, PS; Mohan, Minu P; Saji, Sweta; Sadanandan, Sudheesh; George, Giju

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dental pulp calcifications are unique and represent the dental pulp regenerative process. Dental pulp calcifications are sometimes routine findings in oral radiographs and may later serve as an important diagnostic criterion for a hidden aspect of systemic illness. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and prevalence of idiopathic dental pulp calcifications in a tertiary care setting in South India. Materials and Methods: A total of 227 patients were included in the study fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Age range of the study population was from 15 to 70 years. Teeth were examined under digital panoramic radiograph. The presence or absence of pulp stones was recorded. The presence of pulp stone were categorized according to the types classified as Type I, Type IA, Type II, Type IIA, Type II B, and Type III. The frequency of occurrence of pulp stones with sex, tooth type, dental arches, and types were compared with the types of calcification. Results: Total no. of patients with pulpal calcification were 227 [females 133 (58.59%) and males 94 (41.40%)]. The most common type between both sexes was Type I (48%). Total no. of teeth with calcification was 697; maxilla (48%), mandible (52%). The prevalence of pulp stone was found to be higher in the molars in both the arches. Most no. of pulp stones are reported at the third and fourth decade of life. Conclusion: Idiopathic dental pulp calcifications are incidental radiographic findings of the pulp tissue and also may be an indicator of underlying disease. PMID:23349577

  10. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  11. A Study of Changes in Dental Health Care Behavior of 4-H Youth in Selected Louisiana Parishes. R and T--Summary 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael Alan

    The effectiveness of the Dental Hygiene Education Program in changing the dental health care practices of 4-H club youth in four Louisiana parishes and youth knowledge of dental care principles were studied in this before-after experimental design. The study sample consisted of 258 youth from 10 4-H clubs. Subjects completed a four-item…

  12. A case study on development of an integrated, multidisciplinary dental curriculum.

    PubMed

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Bender, Daniel J; Beck, Lynn; Alexander, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Calls for fundamental reform of dental education were made twice in the twentieth century. More recently, spurred by the work of the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI), North American dental educators have again begun advocating for major curriculum reform in order to develop in students the higher order thinking skills required for the contemporary practice of dentistry. This case study describes the process of curricular reform at one school designed to move from a traditional siloed curriculum to one that uses case-based, integrated multidisciplinary courses to improve teaching and learning. The process was broad-based and comprehensive and included a schoolwide values clarification exercise and agreement on desired characteristics of an ideal graduate. Stakeholders agreed that the reform curriculum should incorporate inter- and multidisciplinary courses, case-based and active learning strategies, and concepts from adult learning theory. The new curriculum model is comprised of five unique but related curriculum "strands," each managed by a small group of interdisciplinary faculty content experts. Challenges in the development and implementation of the reform curriculum are discussed, and an assessment plan is presented.

  13. Effects of a Novel Dental Gel on Plaque and Gingivitis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, M; Chung, NE; Ajdaharian, J; Wink, C; Klokkevold, P; Wilder-Smith, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on plaque and gingival health. The dental gel was designed to (1) break up and prevent re-accumulation of microbial biofilm, and (2) inhibit metal mediated inflammation. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. On Days 0, 7, 14 and 21, plaque levels (Quigley-Hein, Turesky Modification Plaque Index), gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index) and gingival bleeding (modified Sulcus Bleeding Index) were determined by one blinded, investigator using a pressure sensitive probe. Results After 3 weeks, all 3 clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P<0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P<0.05). Conclusion The novel dental gel formulation was provided effective plaque control and reduced gingival inflammation. Clinical Relevance A novel dentifrice formulation may be an effective tool for plaque removal and maintaining gingival health. PMID:26052472

  14. Adhesiveness of opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus to materials used in dental office: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Bekir, Karima; Kadmi, Yassine; Dallel, Ines; Janel, Sébastien; Bovio, Simone; Barois, Nicolas; Lafont, Frank; Mastouri, Maha

    2017-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of several opportunistic microbial pathogens associated with many healthcare problems. In the present study, S. aureus was assessed for its biofilm-forming ability on materials routinely used in dental offices, including stainless steel (SS), polyethylene (PE), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Materials that were tested were characterized for roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE). The adhesion forces exerted by S. aureus to each substratum were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and biofilm formation was quantitatively assessed by crystal violet staining assay. AFM measurements demonstrated that the strongest adhesion forces (20 nN) were exerted on the PE surfaces (P < 0.05) and depended more on Ra. In addition, the results of biofilm formation capability indicated that S. aureus exhibited more affinity to SS materials when compared to the other materials (P < 0.05). This ability of biofilm formation seems to be more correlated to SFE (R = 0.65). Hence, control of the surface properties of materials used in dental practices is of crucial importance for preventing biofilm formation on dental materials to be used for patients' dental care.

  15. Genetic susceptibility to dental caries differs between the sexes: a family-based study.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Wang, Xiaojing; McNeil, Daniel W; Weyant, Robert J; Crout, Richard; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting susceptibility to dental caries are likely influenced by genetics. In fact, genetics accounts for up to 65% of inter-individual variation in dental caries experience. Sex differences in dental caries experience have been widely reported, with females usually exhibiting a higher prevalence and severity of disease across all ages. The cause for this sex bias is currently uncertain, although it may be partly due to the differential effects of genetic factors between the sexes: gene-by-sex interactions. In this family based study (N = 2,663; 740 families; ages 1-93 years), we assessed dental caries via intra-oral examination and generated six indices of caries experience (DMFS, dfs, and indices of both pit-and-fissure surface caries and smooth surface caries in both primary and permanent dentitions). We used likelihood-based methods to model the variance in caries experience conditional on the expected genetic sharing among relatives in our sample. This modeling framework allowed us to test two lines of evidence for gene-by-sex interactions: (1) whether the magnitude of the cumulative effect of genes differs between the sexes, and (2) whether different genes are involved. We observed significant evidence of gene-by-sex interactions for caries experience in both the primary and permanent dentitions. In the primary dentition, the magnitude of the effect of genes was greater in males than females. In the permanent dentition, different genes may play important roles in each of the sexes. Overall, this study provides the first direct evidence that sex differences in dental caries experiences may be explained, in part, by gene-by-sex interactions.

  16. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. The Biomechanics of Zygomatic Arch Shape.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda L; Grosse, Ian R

    2016-12-01

    Mammalian zygomatic arch shape is remarkably variable, ranging from nearly cylindrical to blade-like in cross section. Based on geometry, the arch can be hypothesized to be a sub-structural beam whose ability to resist deformation is related to cross sectional shape. We expect zygomatic arches with different cross sectional shapes to vary in the degree to which they resist local bending and torsion due to the contraction of the masseter muscle. A stiffer arch may lead to an increase in the relative proportion of applied muscle load being transmitted through the arch to other cranial regions, resulting in elevated cranial stress (and thus, strain). Here, we examine the mechanics of the zygomatic arch using a series of finite element modeling experiments in which the cross section of the arch of Pan troglodytes has been modified to conform to idealized shapes (cylindrical, elliptical, blade-like). We find that the shape of the zygomatic arch has local effects on stain that do not conform to beam theory. One exception is that possessing a blade-like arch leads to elevated strains at the postorbital zygomatic junction and just below the orbits. Furthermore, although modeling the arch as solid cortical bone did not have the effect of elevating strains in other parts of the face, as had been expected, it does have a small effect on stress associated with masseter contraction. These results are counterintuitive. Even though the arch has simple beam-like geometry, we fail to find a simple mechanical explanation for the diversity of arch shape. Anat Rec, 299:1734-1752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pain and problems: a prospective cross-sectional study of the impact of dental emergencies.

    PubMed

    Currie, C C; Stone, S J; Durham, J

    2015-12-01

    One-third of the population will only attend the dentist for an acute problem, often waiting a period of time before presenting. The objective of this study was to investigate the levels of pain in patients presenting for a dental emergency and the impact this had on their quality of life. Questionnaires were provided to adult patients attending dental emergency services over 1 week. Demographic and clinical details were collected. Quality of life was measured using EQ-5D-5L. Pain and the interference it caused were examined using the graded chronic pain scale. Data were analysed in STATA using descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney and chi-squared tests. Results showed that majority of patients (64%) seen were male; the mean age was 36 (±14) years. Forty six per cent of patients reported having a general dental practitioner. One-third of the patients had attended this service previously for emergency care, and 13% consulted for the same problem. The mean duration of pain was 17·7 (±52·3) days prior to seeking care. The mean characteristic pain intensity was 53·6 (±23·6). The mean disability score was 43·4 (±33·6). The mean EQ-5D-5L score was 0·57 (±0·27). In conclusion, a large number of patients attend the emergency dental services despite being 'registered' with a general dental practitioner. A proportion of these individuals will re-attend for the same condition. Patients will often be in pain for over 2 weeks before attending, which may have a significant impact on their quality of life. Further research is warranted to investigate these care-seeking behaviours and patterns.

  19. PubMed-Indexed Dental Publications from Iran: A Scientometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Sabbagh, Sedigheh; Shirazi, Alireza Sarraf; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Shahravan, Arash; Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Scientometric methods and the resulting citations have been applied to investigate the scientific performance of a nation. The present study was designed to collect the statistical information of dental articles by Iranian authors published in PubMed. Materials and Methods: We searched the PubMed database for dental articles of Iranian authors until June 31, 2015. All abstracts were manually reviewed in order to exclude false retrievals. The number of articles per dental subspecialties, distribution of research designs, Scopus/Google Scholar citation of each article, number of authors and affiliation of the first/corresponding author were extracted and transferred to Microsoft Excel. The data were further analyzed to illustrate the related scientometric indicators. Results: A total of 3,835 articles were retrieved according to the selection criteria. The number of PubMed-indexed publications between 2008 and 2015 showed a seven-fold increase. The majority of articles were written by four authors (24.56%). Systematic reviews and clinical trials constituted 9.20% of all publications. The number and percentage of articles with ≥4 citations from Google Scholar (n=2024; 52.78%) were higher than those from Scopus (n=1015; 26.47%). According to affiliated departments of the first authors, the top three dental subspecialties with the highest number of publications belonged to endodontics (19.82%), orthodontics (11.13%) and oral and maxillofacial surgery (10.33%). Moreover, the majority of articles originated from Shahid Beheshti- (14.47%), Tehran- (13.72%) and Mashhad- (12.28%) University of Medical Sciences. Conclusions: Analysis of PubMed-indexed dental publications originating from Iran revealed a growing trend in the recent years. PMID:28392812

  20. Study of the impacts of patient-educators on the course of basic sciences in dental studies.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Alliot-Licht, B; Gross, O; Roger-Leroi, V; Marchand, C

    2015-02-01

    Ever since 2006, Nantes University dental educators have started organising lectures led by the mother of a young patient suffering from ectodermic dysplasia (patient-educator) to help second-year students to better understand how important it is for their future dental work to better understand basic sciences. In this study, we have analysed this training experience on students' motivation. For this purpose, students were asked to complete questionnaires 10 days after the patient-educator's lecture (early assessment; n = 193) and 4 years later, during the last year of their dental studies (delayed assessment; n = 47). Moreover, 3 years after the first lecture, we analysed the ability of students to diagnose a mother carrying the ectodermic dysplasia genetic disorder, using a case-based learning exercise with a patient showing dental features similar to those exposed by the patient-educator (measure of knowledge; n = 42). Ten days after the lecture, the early assessment shows that all the students were interested in the lecture and 59% of the students declared being motivated to find out more about genetics whilst 54% declared the same thing about embryology courses. Moreover, 4 years later, 67% of the students remembered the patient-educator's lecture a little or very well. Three years after the course, 83% of the students diagnosed ectodermal dysplasia whilst studying the case-based example that listed typical dental phenotypes. In conclusion, this study shows that this original educational approach enhances dental students' motivation in learning basic sciences and that patient-educators could offer many benefits for students and patients.

  1. Inflation/Foam/Shotcrete System for Rapid Construction of Circular Arches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    This study analyzed, designed, and fabricated a semicircular arch structure 32 ft (9.8 m) long by 13 ft (4 m) high using the inflation/foam/ shotcrete ...system can be used to construct arch-shaped structures. Skills required to operate the foam and shotcrete equipment are consistent with those available in

  2. Relation of Gothic arch apex to dentist-assisted centric relation.

    PubMed

    Myers, M; Dziejma, R; Goldberg, J; Ross, R; Sharry, J

    1980-07-01

    These data suggest that the widely held belief that thumb pressure can position the mandible consistently more posterior than the position indicated by the Gothic arch apex is unfounded. Furthermore, this study provides no evidence to support the contention that the dentist-assisted jaw relation is more reproducible than the relation indicated by the Gothic arch apex.

  3. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  4. Poverty, social exclusion and dental caries of 12-year-old children: a cross-sectional study in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Angulo, Elsa K; Hobdell, Martin H; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic differences in oral health have been reported in many countries. Poverty and social exclusion are two commonly used indicators of socioeconomic position in Latin America. The aim of this study was to explore the associations of poverty and social exclusion with dental caries experience in 12-year-old children. Methods Ninety families, with a child aged 12 years, were selected from 11 underserved communities in Lima (Peru), using a two-stage cluster sampling. Head of households were interviewed with regard to indicators of poverty and social exclusion and their children were clinically examined for dental caries. The associations of poverty and social exclusion with dental caries prevalence were tested in binary logistic regression models. Results Among children in the sample, 84.5% lived in poor households and 30.0% in socially excluded families. Out of all the children, 83.3% had dental caries. Poverty and social exclusion were significantly associated with dental caries in the unadjusted models (p = 0.013 and 0.047 respectively). In the adjusted model, poverty remained significantly related to dental caries (p = 0.008), but the association between social exclusion and dental caries was no longer significant (p = 0.077). Children living in poor households were 2.25 times more likely to have dental caries (95% confidence interval: 1.24; 4.09), compared to those living in non-poor households. Conclusion There was support for an association between poverty and dental caries, but not for an association between social exclusion and dental caries in these children. Some potential explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:19583867

  5. Patient management in aortic arch surgery†.

    PubMed

    Peterss, Sven; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Curtis, Alexander; Luehr, Maximilian; Born, Frank; Hagl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    SummaryAortic arch surgery requires complex patient management beyond the manual replacement of the diseased vessel. These procedures include (i) a thorough and pathologically adjusted preoperative evaluation, (ii) initiation and control of cardiopulmonary bypass, (iii) cerebral protection strategies and (iv) techniques to protect the abdominal end organs during prolonged operations. Due to the complexity of aortic arch procedures, multimodal real-time surveillance is required during all stages of the operation. Although having the patient survive the operation is the major goal, further observation is necessary because of the chronicity of the disease. This review summarizes specific aspects of patient management during and after operations requiring periods of circulatory arrest, without necessarily referring to all studies on this topic. The pros and cons of different strategies are weighed against each other, including the personal experience of the authors. A number of questions are raised without providing a 'right' or 'wrong' answer. We show that a number of different well-established strategies can result in comparable excellent long-lasting surgical results.

  6. Reliability of CBCT in the diagnosis of dental asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ruellas, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira; Koerich, Leonardo; Baratieri, Carolina; Mattos, Claudia Trindade; Alves Junior, Matheus; Brunetto, Daniel; Eidson, Lindsey

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to validate a method used to assess dental asymmetry, in relation to the skeletal midline, by means of CBCT. Methods Ten patients who had CBCT scans taken were randomly selected for this study. Five different observers repeated 10 landmarks (x, y and z variables for each) and 12 linear measurements within 10 days. Measurements were taken in both arches to evaluate symmetry of first molars, canines and dental midline in relation to the skeletal midline. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was carried out to assess intra- and interobserver reliability for landmarks and distances. Average mean difference was also assessed to check measurement errors between observers. Results ICC landmarks was ≥ 0.9 for 27 (90%) and 25 (83%) variables for intra- and interobserver, respectively. ICC for distances was ≥ 0.9 for 7 (58%) and 5 (42%), respectively. All ICC landmarks for distances were >0.75 for both intra- and interobserver. The mean difference between observers was ≤ 0.6 mm for all the distances. Conclusion The method used to assess dental asymmetry by means of CBCT is valid. Measurements of molars, canines and dental midline symmetry with the skeletal midline are reproducible and reliable when taken by means of CBCT and by different operators. PMID:24945519

  7. Type of treatment, prognosis, and estimation of time spent to manage dental trauma in late presentation cases at a dental teaching hospital: a longitudinal and retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Suhad H

    2004-02-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are emergencies that must be treated promptly and properly in order to reduce the suffering, costs, and time for patients, parents, and health care providers. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment, long-term prognosis, and number of visits needed to manage cases resulting from complications of late presentation of traumatic dental injuries. The sample consisted of 195 children, all presented with complications of dental trauma at the Pediatric Dentistry Clinics in the Dental Teaching Hospital of Jordan University of Science and Technology in Irbid city, Jordan. Retrospective data relied on trauma forms as well the clinical notes and radiographs in the patients' records. Prospective data was collected by examining patients at recall appointments. The treatment of traumatized teeth in this sample ranged from no active treatment to extraction and prosthetic replacement. It was estimated that the number of visits needed to carry out the planned treatment for these patients ranged between 3 and 17.2 visits according to the type of treatment. Apexification procedure was the most time consuming. Thirty-two per cent of teeth with apexification ended up with root fracture mainly subsequent to another minor trauma episode (in 85%), the rest were reported to be spontaneous fractures. Almost half of the teeth with luxation injuries became necrotic after 3 years. Teeth with avulsion actually kept on deteriorating even at the 36-month follow-up appointment. The long-term prognosis of teeth with middle root fracture was favorable in (80%) of the teeth in the sample, despite the fact that they were splinted late. Luxation injuries led to more necrotic teeth (50%) than uncomplicated crown fractures. Multiple dental trauma episodes (MDTE) were reported in about 30% of the patients in the sample and were responsible for some of the complications noticed in this report. As all cases followed up in this report are late presentation of dental

  8. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease.

    PubMed

    Bellows, J

    1993-08-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats.

  9. A Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Dental Anxiety for People with Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prangnell, Simon J.; Green, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Dental anxiety is a common form of anxiety problem, and research suggests that more people with learning disabilities experience dental anxiety than in the general population. Very little work has been done to investigate effective non-medical approaches for supporting people with a learning disability and dental anxiety to access dental care.…

  10. A Correlational Study of Preadmission Predictor Variables and Dental School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Gerard C.; Dogon, I. Leon

    1981-01-01

    Undergraduate performance and standardized test scores were correlated with dental school performance for 131 members of nine Harvard School of Dental Medicine classes to determine the predictive validity of the earlier variables. The only significant positive correlation was of the Dental Admission Test and dental National Board Examination, part…

  11. First hard x-ray detection of the non-thermal emission around the arches cluster: Morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Christensen, Finn E.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Hong, JaeSub; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-02-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Kα line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenarioþ.

  12. Simultaneous Individually Controlled Upper and Lower Body Perfusion for Valve-Sparing Root and Total Aortic Arch Replacement: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Philip; Mayer, Rick; Adams, Corey; Chu, Michael W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Optimal perfusion strategies for extensive aortic resection in patients with mega-aortic syndromes include: tailored myocardial preservation, antegrade cerebral perfusion, controlled hypothermia and selective organ perfusion. Typically, the aortic arch resection and elephant trunk procedure are performed under hypothermic circulatory arrest with myocardial and cerebral protection. However, mesenteric and systemic ischemia occur during circulatory arrest and commonly rely upon deep hypothermia alone for metabolic protection. We hypothesized that simultaneously controlled mesenteric and systemic perfusion can attenuate some of the metabolic debt accrued during circulatory arrest, which may help improve perioperative outcomes. The perfusion strategy consisted of delivering a 1 to 3 liter per minute flow at 25°C to the head/upper body via right axillary graft and simultaneous perfusion to the lower body/mesenteric organs of 1 to 3 liters per minute at 30°C via a right femoral arterial graft. We describe our technique of simultaneous mesenteric, systemic, cerebral and myocardial perfusion, and protection utilized for a young male patient with Marfan’s syndrome, while undergoing a valve sparing root replacement, total arch replacement and elephant trunk reconstruction. This perfusion technique allowed us to deliver differential flow rates and temperatures to the upper and lower body (cold head/warm lower body perfusion) to minimize ischemic debt and quickly reverse metabolic derangements. PMID:22416605

  13. Electronic vs. traditional textbook use: dental students' perceptions and study habits.

    PubMed

    Ditmyer, Marcia M; Dye, Jared; Guirguis, Nadim; Jamison, Kyle; Moody, Michael; Mobley, Connie C; Davenport, William D

    2012-06-01

    This descriptive study assessed dental students' attitudes about computer use as it relates to study habits and use of e-textbook technology. Academic deans and student leaders at all accredited dental education programs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada were asked to forward an e-mail to students explaining the purpose of the study and asking them to participate. The e-mail included an embedded URL link to the survey. A total of 703 complete responses from twenty-four dental schools were received and used in the final analysis. Because the number of students contacted could not be determined, the overall response rate cannot be calculated. Over 65 percent of the respondents reported spending >11 hours per week studying although over 75 percent said they spent little time studying from their textbooks. Over 55 percent were from schools that use e-textbooks exclusively, with 25 percent from schools that exclusively use print textbooks. One-fourth indicated they purchased a traditional printed textbook even when an e-textbook was provided; more than one-third printed information from the e-textbooks rather than reading on the computer. A majority (59 percent) preferred traditional textbook resources over e-textbooks, with over 50 percent reporting not using the required e-textbooks at all. E-textbooks were used by students in this study less frequently than materials/notes provided by dental school faculty. The majority preferred to use traditional resources as references and for augmenting lecture material.

  14. Clinical Advantages and Limitations of Monolithic Zirconia Restorations Full Arch Implant Supported Reconstruction: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Carames, Joao; Yu, Yung Cheng Paul; Pérez, Alejandro; Kang, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to evaluate the clinical advantages and limitations of monolithic zirconia restorations for full arch implant supported restorations and report the rate of complications up to 2 years after insertion. Materials and Methods. Fourteen patients received implant placement for monolithic zirconia full arch reconstructions. Four implants were placed in seven arches, eleven arches received six implants, two arches received seven implants, two arches received eight implants, and one arch received nine implants. Results. No implant failures or complications were reported for an implant survival rate of 100% with follow-up ranging from 3 to 24 months. Conclusions. Monolithic zirconia CAD-/CAM-milled framework restorations are a treatment option for full arch restorations over implants, showing a 96% success rate in the present study. Some of the benefits are accuracy, reduced veneering porcelain, and minimal occlusal adjustments. The outcome of the present study showed high success in function, aesthetics, phonetics, and high patient satisfaction. PMID:26124835

  15. [The study on chemical composition and crystalline structure of hypoplastic primary dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Zheng, S; Deng, H; Gao, X

    1997-11-01

    The present study, firstly, analyzed chemical composition of hypoplastic primary teeth by electron probe analyzer and compared the hypoplastic part with the normal part in the same tooth; secondly, by X-ray diffraction analyzer, studied the hypoplastic dental enamel and the normal dental enamel, and compared the crystalline structure between different dental enamel and with that of the hydroxyapatite. The aim was to find out any change of crystalline structure. Two exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth were used for the electron probe study. The normal part of each tooth served as control. Determinations of weight percentage (wt%) were made for P, Al, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Na, K and F. Four exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth and eight exfoliated normal deciduous anterior teeth were used for the X-ray diffraction study. We found by X-ray diffraction that the length of the alpha-axis of enamel crystallite and the distance of lattice plane (corresponding 300) were increased in defective enamel and could be associated with the increased content of magnesium detected by electron probe. Thus, the present study demonstrated that there were both quantity and quality changes in the enamel hypoplasia lesion, which may increase the susceptibility of the defective teeth to caries.

  16. Extramasticatory dental wear reflecting habitual behavior and health in past populations.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Petra

    2011-10-01

    In skeletal remains, teeth are valuable sources of information regarding age, diet, and health. Dental wear is especially helpful in reconstructions of dietary patterns in populations of varying subsistence. In past societies, teeth have also been used as "a third hand" or as a "tool." The present article examines this type of dental wear and traits attributed to habitual behavior during prehistoric and historic times. Terminology and classification of habitual dental wear are described mainly by appearance, for instance, notching, grooving, cuts, scrapes, and polished surfaces, and their characteristics are illuminated by different case studies. Secondary health effects caused by the extramasticatory use of teeth, such as periapical lesions, tilting, skeletal changes at the temporomandibular joint, chipping, and antemortem tooth loss are also examined. During the examination of extramasticatory dental wear, information should be recorded on morphology, size, frequency, intensity, and location within the dental arch, as well as descriptions and detailed photographic documentation. The advantage of using a low- to medium-resolution microscope in all dental examination is emphasized. By categorizing the wear marks, characteristics are emphasized rather than an exact causing agent. In this way, tentative analogies for the origin of different extramasticatory wear, and consequently for human behavior in the past, can be avoided.

  17. A comparative study of different intrusion methods and their effect on maxillary incisors

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Prachi; Tandon, Ragni; Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate and compare the rate of intrusion and root resorption of maxillary incisors by three different intrusion techniques: Rickett's utility arch, Kalra's Simultaneous Intrusion & Retraction arch and arch with Reverse Curve of Spee. Methods The study was conducted over 30 patients aged between 14 and 25 yrs with deep bite requiring at least 2–4 mm intrusion of maxillary incisors. These patients were equally divided into three groups based on intrusion technique used, Rickets utility arch (Group I), K-SIR arch (Group II) and RCS arch (Group III). For each patient, amount of intrusion and root resorption occurring during intrusion was measured. Seven angular and six linear cephalometric measurements were made to evaluate skeletal and dental changes before and after incisor intrusion. Results The mean true incisor intrusion achieved with utility arch was 1.6 mm, with K-SIR, 1.25 mm and with RCS, 0.70 mm respectively. The rate of intrusion of utility arch was 0.44 mm/month, K-SIR – 0.33 mm/month, RCS – 0.35 mm/month, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.451). Utility arch had significantly higher mean root resorption of 1.56 mm as compared to K-SIR of 1.08 mm and RCS of 0.96 mm. Conclusion Both the intrusion rate and root resorption is more by utility arch while with K-SIR arch, though the rate of intrusion is almost same; the root resorption is much less. PMID:25737942

  18. Chronic kidney disease and use of dental services in a united states public healthcare system: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As several studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD), regular dental care may be an important strategy for reducing the burden of CKD. Access to dental care may be limited in the US public health system. Methods In this retrospective cohort study of 6,498 adult patients with (n = 2,235) and without (n = 4,263) CKD and at least 12 months of follow-up within the San Francisco Department of Public Health Community Health Network clinical databases, we examined the likelihood of having a dental visit within the observation period (2005-2010) using Cox proportional hazards models. To determine whether dental visits reflected a uniform approach to preventive service use in this setting, we similarly examined the likelihood of having an eye visit among those with diabetes, for whom regular retinopathy screening is recommended. We defined CKD status by average estimated glomerular filtration rate based on two or more creatinine measurements ≥ 3 months apart (no CKD, ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2; CKD, < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Results Only 11.0% and 17.4% of patients with and without CKD, respectively, had at least one dental visit. Those with CKD had a 25% lower likelihood of having a dental visit [HR = 0.75, 95% CI (0.64-0.88)] than those without CKD after adjustment for confounders. Among the subgroup of patients with diabetes, 11.8% vs. 17.2% of those with and without CKD had a dental visit, while 58.8% vs. 57.8% had an eye visit. Conclusions Dental visits, but not eye visits, in a US public healthcare setting are extremely low, particularly among patients with CKD. Given the emerging association between oral health and CKD, addressing factors that impede dental access may be important for reducing the disparate burden of CKD in this population. PMID:22471751

  19. The Finnish Family Competence Study: the relationship between caries, dental health habits and general health in 3-year-old Finnish children.

    PubMed

    Paunio, P; Rautava, P; Helenius, H; Alanen, P; Sillanpää, M

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how dental health related habits, infectious diseases and long-term illness are associated with dental health at the age of 3 in first-born children resident in a Finnish province. The study was designed as a survey using stratified randomised cluster sampling, confidential questionnaires and clinical dental examinations. The results were analysed using polytomous logistic models. In the stepwise analysis the only statistically significant explanatory factors were the use of juice at night and dental cleanliness. Antibiotic treatment or long-term illness was not significantly associated with dental health.

  20. The contribution of embarrassment to phobic dental anxiety: a qualitative research study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rod; Brødsgaard, Inger; Rosenberg, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Background Embarrassment is emphasized, yet scantily described as a factor in extreme dental anxiety or phobia. Present study aimed to describe details of social aspects of anxiety in dental situations, especially focusing on embarrassment phenomena. Methods Subjects (Ss) were consecutive specialist clinic patients, 16 men, 14 women, 20–65 yr, who avoided treatment mean 12.7 yr due to anxiety. Electronic patient records and transcribed initial assessment and exit interviews were analyzed using QSR"N4" software to aid in exploring contexts related to social aspects of dental anxiety and embarrassment phenomena. Qualitative findings were co-validated with tests of association between embarrassment intensity ratings, years of treatment avoidance, and mouth-hiding behavioral ratings. Results Embarrassment was a complaint in all but three cases. Chief complaints in the sample: 30% had fear of pain; 47% cited powerlessness in relation to dental social situations, some specific to embarrassment and 23% named co-morbid psychosocial dysfunction due to effects of sexual abuse, general anxiety, gagging, fainting or panic attacks. Intense embarrassment was manifested in both clinical and non-clinical situations due to poor dental status or perceived neglect, often (n = 9) with fear of negative social evaluation as chief complaint. These nine cases were qualitatively different from other cases with chief complaints of social powerlessness associated with conditioned distrust of dentists and their negative behaviors. The majority of embarrassed Ss to some degree inhibited smiling/laughing by hiding with lips, hands or changed head position. Secrecy, taboo-thinking, and mouth-hiding were associated with intense embarrassment. Especially after many years of avoidance, embarrassment phenomena lead to feelings of self-punishment, poor self-image/esteem and in some cases personality changes in a vicious circle of anxiety and avoidance. Embarrassment intensity ratings were

  1. Sources of stress in Canadian dental students: a prospective mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Elani, Hawazin W; Bedos, Christophe; Allison, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe sources of stress in predoctoral dental students and first-year residents at one dental school and to understand how these sources evolved during the four-year curriculum and in the first year after graduation. The study used a mixed methods design. Quantitative data were collected from subjects in each of the five cohorts of students and residents, every month for a period of one year (other than the summer holiday period; N varied each month from 77 to 127). Sources of stress were measured using the Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES). The investigators administered the DES twice, once at the end of each academic semester, and used DES categories that emerged from factor analysis to assess monthly sources of stress. Qualitative data collected through individual interviews (N=6) were aimed at understanding the main sources of stress in each year of the curriculum. Results from both quantitative and qualitative phases demonstrated that the main stressors for all dental students throughout the year were examinations and grades as well as workload. Students in the clinical years were also concerned about patient treatment. The residents and final-year students reported future plans as an additional stressor. Over the year, there was a significant increase for workload stress in the fourth year (p<0.05); in the third year there was a significant increase in patient treatment stress (p<0.05) with a significant decrease for personal factors (p<0.05). The study demonstrated that sources of stress in these students and first-year residents varied according to their stage in the program and the period of the year.

  2. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  3. Arch mineral pursues multiple dipping seams

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouls, M.W.

    1981-07-01

    Arch Mineral's three Hanna Basin mines in Carbon County, WY, recover about eight million tpy from more than a dozen coal seams. Arch's experience has proven stripping techniques for dipping seams, and has revealed better methods for recontouring and revegetating mined land.

  4. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches.

  5. Prevalence and associated risk factors of latent tuberculosis infection among undergraduate and postgraduate dental students: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Monica; Muoio, Maria Rosaria; Westermann, Claudia; Nienhaus, Albert; Arnese, Antonio; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Garzillo, Elpidio Maria; Crispino, Vincenzo; Coppola, Nicola; De Rosa, Alfredo

    2017-03-04

    To estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) in Italian dental students exposed to the same occupational risks as dental health care personnel and to evaluate potential risk factors, a cross-sectional study was conducted on undergraduate and postgraduate students. After clinical evaluation, students were given a tuberculin skin test; in those found positive, an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) was conducted. Of the 281 students enrolled, 10 were only TST positive; 8 were TST or/and IGRA positive. We found that participants testing positive at TST and/or IGRA, a group in which the risk of false LTBI positives is minimal, were older and had been studying longer. Although the prevalence of LTBI among dental students in our study was low, a risk of acquiring a work-related infection exists even in a country with a low incidence of TB. Thus, dental students should be screened to catch LTBI early on.

  6. A retrospective study on the use of a dental dressing to reduce dry socket incidence in smokers.

    PubMed

    Murph, James T; Jaques, Susan H; Knoell, Alexander N; Archibald, Geoffrey D; Yang, Stan

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of using an oxidized cellulose dental dressing in order to reduce the rate of alveolar osteitis after posterior tooth extraction in smokers. Dry socket incidences of heavy smokers from 4 independent dental clinics, which routinely used oxidized cellulose dental dressings to mitigate dry socket formation between March 2011 and December 2012, were compiled and evaluated. All extraction sites healed uneventfully except for those cases that developed dry sockets. Overall, 1.7% of male patients and 2.2% of female patients developed dry sockets. No conclusive relationship was found between the number of cigarettes smoked and dry socket formation among patients in this study. The results of this study were consistent with the view that gender, age, postextraction regimen, and multiple extractions affect dry socket formation. The results indicate that an oxidized cellulose dental dressing postextraction is a safe and effective method for mitigating dry socket formation among smokers.

  7. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  8. Biomechanical and histomorphometric study of dental implants with different surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yeo, In-Sung; Han, Jung-Suk; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the early bone response to the titanium dental implants with different surface characteristics using the rabbit tibia model. Calcium metaphosphate coated, anodic oxidized, hydroxyapatite particle-blasted, and turned (control) surfaces were compared. Surface topography was evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscope and optical interferometer. Eighteen rabbits received 72 implants in the tibia. Resonance frequency was analyzed every week for 6 weeks. Removal torque values were measured 2 and 6 weeks after placement. The implant-bone interfaces were directly observed by light microscope and bone-to-implant contact ratios were measured 2 and 6 weeks after insertion. All the surface-modified implants showed superior initial bone responses to the control. No significant differences were found among the surface-modified groups. Data suggest that various surface modification methods can provide favorable bone responses for early functioning and healing of dental implants.

  9. A study of the abrasive resistance of metal alloys with applications in dental prosthetic fixators.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Fernández, E; Manero, J M; Planell, J A; Sabrià, J; Cortada, M; Giner, L

    1995-01-01

    Wear is one of the main surface failure mechanisms in materials and it will play a leading role in substitutive dental biomaterials. The aim of the present study is to compare the abrasive wear of different metallic materials used in dental applications. The results show that the abrasive wear of alloys based on precious metals such as Pt, Pd, Au and Ag is higher than for Ti and Ti based alloys. The alloy with the highest wear resistance is the Co-Cr which exhibits as well the highest hardness and Young's modulus. Since the method corresponds to a well-established abrasive wear standard, the behaviour of the different materials can be easily compared.

  10. Comparison of the Load-Deflection Characteristics of Aesthetic and Conventional Super Elastic Ni-Ti Orthodontic Arch Wires in Conventional and Metal-Insert Ceramic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Hosseinagha; Yassaei, Soghra; Joshan, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coated arch wires and ceramic brackets have been introduced to improve aesthetics during orthodontic treatment. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the effects of coating on the physical properties of aesthetic orthodontic wires. Material and Methods Five round wires (0.016 inch) were obtained from each of three brands: conventional uncoated super elastic Nickel Titanium (Ni-Ti) (Rematitian Lite; Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany), HUBIT (Teflon Coated, Korea), G&H (Epoxy Coated, Greenwood, Indiana, USA) which belonged to maxillary arch. Two types of standard ceramic brackets (conventional and metal-insert type, Ortho Technology, Tampa, Florida, USA) with the slot size of 0.022×0.028 inches were used. A simulation device was fabricated to resemble a model of human dental arch and each of the specimen was tested in three-point bending test. The test was conducted in the buccolingual plane with crosshead speed of 1mm/minute pressure from metal pole. Each sample was loaded until a deflection of 3.0 mm was produced. The mean values of maximum loading force, unloading force and clinical plateau length were recorded. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used at p<0.05. Results Uncoated Ni-Ti arch wire showed higher mean values of maximum loading and unloading force than that of coated aesthetic wires similar to ceramic brackets while G&H wire and metal-insert ceramic brackets presented the lowest values. The longest clinical plateau length was observed in G&H wires and metal-insert ceramic bracket. Conclusion The coating processes for HUBIT (Teflon Coated, Korea), G&H (Epoxy Coated, Greenwood, Indiana, USA) wires might influence bending behaviour which can cause decrease in loading and unloading force. PMID:28208994

  11. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  12. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Graduate Students' and Faculty Perspectives on Dental Hygienists' Professional Role and the Potential Contribution of a Peer Teaching Program.

    PubMed

    McComas, Martha J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    The changing role of dental hygienists deserves dental and dental hygiene educators' attention. The first aim of this survey study was to assess University of Michigan dental, dental hygiene, and graduate students' and faculty members' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles; their attitudes and behaviors related to clinical interactions between dental and dental hygiene students; and perceived benefits of engaging dental hygiene students as peer teachers for dental students. The second aim was to assess whether one group of dental students' experiences with dental hygiene student peer teaching affected their perceptions of the dental hygiene profession. Survey respondents were 57 dental hygiene students in all three years of the program (response rate 60% to 100%); 476 dental students in all four years (response rate 56% to 100%); 28 dental and dental hygiene graduate students (response rate 28%); and 67 dental and dental hygiene faculty members (response rate 56%). Compared to the other groups, dental students reported the lowest average number of services dental hygienists can provide (p≤0.001) and the lowest average number of patient groups for which dental hygienists can provide periodontal care (p<0.001). Dental students also had the least positive attitudes about clinical interactions between dental hygiene and dental students (p<0.001) and perceived the fewest benefits of dental hygiene student peer teaching (p<0.001) before experiencing peer teaching. After experiencing dental hygiene student peer teaching, the dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles, attitudes about clinical interactions with dental hygienists, and perceived benefits of dental hygiene student peer teachers improved and were more positive than the responses of their peers with no peer teaching experiences. These results suggest that dental hygiene student peer teaching may improve dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles and attitudes about

  13. M-OSCE as a method to measure dental hygiene students' critical thinking: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McComas, Martha J; Wright, Rebecca A; Mann, Nancy K; Cooper, Mary D; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-04-01

    Educators in all academic disciplines have been encouraged to utilize assessment strategies to evaluate students' critical thinking. The purpose of this study was to assess the viability of the modified objective structured clinical examination (m-OSCE) to evaluate critical thinking in dental hygiene education. This evaluation utilized a convenience sample of senior dental hygiene students. Students participated in the m-OSCE in which portions of a patient case were revealed at four stations. The exam consisted of multiple-choice questions intended to measure students' ability to utilize critical thinking skills. Additionally, there was one fill-in-the-blank question and a treatment plan that was completed at the fifth station. The results of this study revealed that the m-OSCE did not reliably measure dental hygiene students' critical thinking. Statistical analysis found no satisfactory reliability within the multiple-choice questions and moderately reliable results within the treatment planning portion of the examination. In addition, the item analysis found gaps in students' abilities to transfer clinical evidence/data to basic biomedical knowledge as demonstrated through the multiple-choice questioning results. This outcome warrants further investigation of the utility of the m-OSCE, with a focus on modifications to the evaluation questions, grading rubric, and patient case.

  14. Sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among Brazilian dental students: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Serra-Negra, Júnia Maria; Scarpelli, Ana Carolina; Tirsa-Costa, Débora; Guimarães, Flávia Helena; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among dental students of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed including 183 Brazilian dental students aged from 17 to 46 years old. The complete course curriculum consists of 9 semesters. Students enrolled in the first semester, the middle semester and the final semester of the course participated in the survey. The PSQI-BR (the Brazilian version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire Index) was used for data collection. The PSQI-BR was distributed during lecture classes. Sleep bruxism and awake bruxism diagnosis was based on self-reported data. Descriptive analysis, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Poisson regression with robust estimator were the statistical tests used. Sleep bruxism prevalence was 21.5% and awake bruxism prevalence was 36.5%. Sleep duration components were associated with sleep bruxism (PR=1.540; 95% CI: 1.00-2.37) and awake bruxism (PR=1.344; 95% CI: 1,008-1,790). There was an association between awake bruxism and habitual sleep efficiency component (PR=1.323; 95% CI: 1.03-1.70). Sleep disturbance component and awake bruxism were associated (PR=1.533; 95% CI: 1.03-2.27). Poor sleep quality was an important factor among dental students, who reported sleep bruxism as well as among those who presented awake bruxism.

  15. Longitudinal study of prolonged breast- or bottle-feeding on dental caries in Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Yonezu, Takuro; Ushida, Nagako; Yakushiji, Masashi

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of prolonged breast- or bottle-feeding on dental caries in Japanese infants. This longitudinal study was conducted by means of a questionnaire and clinical examination of 592 children at 18 months, 2 years and 3 years of age. The children were divided into three groups: 1) children still being breast-fed at 18 months of age (n=42); 2) children still being bottle-fed at 18 months of age (n=45); and 3) children weaned off of breast- or bottle-feeding and with no nonnutritive-sucking habits at 18 months of age (n=205). Results showed that breast-feeding at 18 months of age produced many significant differences to the control children, including a higher prevalence of caries and higher number of dft. However, no significant differences were observed between bottle-fed and control children. In conclusion, our results suggest that prolonged breast-feeding at an early age before primary dentition has fully erupted is a risk factor for dental caries. Therefore, breast-fed children need to be monitored more closely, and aggressive methods of preventive care need to be instituted. It is also important to identify factors related to dental caries among breastfed children as soon as possible, and develop effective preventive programs.

  16. Smart phone usage and addiction among dental students in Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Elluru; Jemal, Mohammad Yousef Al; Samani, Abdullah Saleh Al

    2017-04-06

    Purpose The main aim of this research is to explore measures of smart phone usage, smart phone addiction, and their associations with demographic and health behavior-related variables among dental students in Saudi Arabia. Methods A Cross sectional study involving sample of 205 dental students from Qaseem Private College were surveyed for smart phone use and addiction using the short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale for Adolescents (SAS-SV). Results Smart phone addiction was seen in 136 (71.9%) of the 189 students. The findings from our study revealed that high stress levels, low physical activity, higher body mass index (BMI), longer duration of smart phone usage, higher frequency of usage, shorter time period until first smart phone use in the morning and social networking sites (SNS) were associated significantly with the smart phone addiction. Conclusion The current research gives the information about the extent of smart phone over usage and addiction among the dental students in Saudi Arabia with indication of the predictors of addiction and the need for further research in the area with comprehensible interpretation to spread the awareness of the smart phone addiction.

  17. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration.

  18. Human dental pulp cell apoptosis: immunohistochemical study after applying orthodontic traction.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Angelova Volponi, A; Campanella, C; Guarnotta, C; Abdallah Hajj Hussein, I; Cappello, F; Gerbino, A; Jurjus, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare human dental pulp stress and programmed cell death after 3 and 6 months of orthodontic treatments by assessing the degree of apoptosis and related proteins. Human dental pulps were collected from twenty young patients orthodontically treated by Straight Wire technique. Samples were fixed, paraffin-embedded and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry using anti-heat shock protein 60 kDa (Hsp60), -caspase 3, -caspase 9, and -PCNA antibodies, as well as TUNEL reactions. Moreover, we performed immunoprecipitation for Hsp60 and caspase 3, and for Hsp60 and caspase 9, from paraffin extracted tissues. Increased levels of both caspases and Hsp60 occurred in 6-months treated samples; at the same time, we found increased levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells. Immunoprecipitation showed that Hsp60 forms a complex with both Pro-caspase 3 and Caspase 3, and this may accelerate Pro-caspase 3 activation, especially in the 6-months treated group. On the contrary, no complex between Hsp60 and Pro-caspase 9 was detected. The orthodontic tractions may be a cause of stress, apoptosis and proliferation in pulp tissue. These results suggest the need of further studies about the effects of long term orthodontic treatments on the dental pulp.

  19. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  1. Safety Assessment of Two Hybrid Instrumentation Techniques in a Dental Student Endodontic Clinic: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Card, Steven John; Tawil, Peter Zahi

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the safety potential of a hybrid technique combining nickel-titanium (NiTi) reciprocating and rotary instruments by third- and fourth-year dental students in the predoctoral endodontics clinic at one U.S. dental school. For the study, 3,194 root canal treatments performed by 317 dental students from 2012 through 2015 were evaluated for incidence of ledge creation and instrument separation. The hybrid reciprocating and rotary technique (RRT) consisted of a glide path creation with stainless steel hand files up to size 15/02, a crown down preparation with a NiTi reciprocating instrument, and an apical preparation with NiTi rotary instruments. The control was a traditional rotary and hand technique (RHT) that consisted of the same glide path procedure followed by a crown down preparation with NiTi rotary instruments and an apical preparation with NiTi hand instruments. The results showed that the RHT technique presented a rate of ledge creation of 1.4% per root and the RRT technique was 0.5% per root (p<0.05). Three stainless steel hand files separated: two in the RHT group and one in the RRT group. There was no separation of any NiTi file in any of the techniques. The use of the reciprocating and rotary technique for root canal instrumentation by these dental students provided good safety. This hybrid technique offered a low rate of ledge creation along with no NiTi instrument separation.

  2. A cone-beam CT based technique to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface.

    PubMed

    Swennen, G R J; Mommaerts, M Y; Abeloos, J; De Clercq, C; Lamoral, P; Neyt, N; Casselman, J; Schutyser, F

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for maxillofacial imaging. 3D virtual planning of orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery requires detailed visualisation of the interocclusal relationship. This study aimed to introduce and evaluate the use of a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface. The impressions of the dental arches and the wax bite wafer were scanned for ten patient separately using a high resolution standardized CBCT scanning protocol. Surface-based rigid registration using ICP (iterative closest points) was used to fit the virtual models on the wax bite wafer. Automatic rigid point-based registration of the wax bite wafer on the patient scan was performed to implement the digital virtual dental arches into the patient's skull model. Probability error histograms showed errors of < or =0.22 mm (25% percentile), < or =0.44 mm (50% percentile) and < or =1.09 mm (90% percentile) for ICP surface matching. The mean registration error for automatic point-based rigid registration was 0.18+/-0.10 mm (range 0.13-0.26 mm). The results show the potential for a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to set-up a 3D virtual augmented model of the skull with detailed dental surface.

  3. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  4. Surface effects after a combination of dental bleaching and enamel microabrasion: An in vitro and in situ study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Laura Molinar; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Salomão, Fabio Martins; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of combining enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching on the physical properties of enamel, using in vitro and in situ conditions and evaluating surface roughness, enamel microhardness and scanning electron microscopy images. One hundred sound bovine teeth were sectioned and cut into discs and randomly divided into 10 study groups (n=10). The results were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test, with significance at 5%. Enamel surface roughness was significantly influenced by microabrasion, regardless of being combined with dental bleaching, for both HS (Human Saliva) or AS (Artificial Saliva) condition. Enamel microhardness was significantly decreased in the groups in which enamel microabrasion was performed, regardless its combination with dental bleaching; although storage in HS reestablished the initial enamel microhardness. It was concluded that dental bleaching does not cause major damage to microabraided enamel, and that only human saliva recovered the initial enamel microhardness.

  5. Exploring Faculty Knowledge and Perceptions of Copyright at U.S. Dental Schools: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Alison F; Goben, Abigail

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to investigate current copyright training and support provided to faculty at North American dental schools and to examine faculty members' knowledge and attitudes related to specific copyright issues. In 2015, a survey with questions about faculty members' comfort about their own and their colleagues' knowledge and application of various copyright issues was designed and distributed. True/false questions were asked to determine the extent of knowledge about copyright. Participants were given eight scenarios depicting examples of behavior related to copyright issues and asked to indicate whether the behavior in the scenario was ethical or unethical and compliant with or infringing upon copyright. A total of 104 participants completed the survey, all at U.S. dental schools; the numbers in the non-faculty groups were small, so the analysis was limited to the 61 faculty respondents (approximately 0.5% of U.S. dental faculty members in 2015). The results showed that these dental faculty members were less confident in their colleagues' knowledge and application of copyright and fair use than they were in their own knowledge and application. Both knowledge and attitude were found to be important factors in the respondents' decision making related to copyright and fair use, although it appeared that in some contexts faculty members relied on either knowledge or attitude more strongly than the other. A large percentage (88%, n=53) said they would be open to receiving additional training in copyright from their institution. Faculty development on this topic should address attitudes about the ethics regarding application of copyright law in addition to providing factual information and should emphasize what is permissible under current copyright law rather than simply discussing actions that constitute violations.

  6. Which Way to Lean? A National Study of Women Dental Faculty Members' Career Aspirations and Choices.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Pyle, Marsha A; Van Ness, Christopher J; Overman, Pamela R; West, Karen P

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this first national study of women in academic dentistry was to explore factors and perceived barriers for why administrative/leadership positions were or were not sought via data collected from full-time women dental faculty members in the U.S. In fall 2015, the researchers conducted a survey that employed a combination of response formats: forced choice from a menu, multiple allowable answers, and open-ended written comments. The overall response rate for the survey was 35.6% (537/1504). Respondents were from 48 of the 65 U.S. dental schools. Half of the respondents indicated their primary appointment was in clinical sciences, 22.9% were in administration, 7.3% in research, 7.1% in basic science, and 2.5% in behavioral science. While a quarter of the respondents indicated administration as their primary appointment, over half reported holding administrative positions, and nearly all (92.4%) reported currently holding leadership roles at their institutions. For those not currently in administrative/leadership roles, 52.6% indicated a desire for an administrative role and 70.7% a leadership role. Of those in administrative/leadership roles, 62.1% indicated not receiving extra remuneration for those responsibilities. Half of the respondents perceived that they were paid less in their current position than men doing the same work. The most dominant theme emerging from qualitative analysis of barriers the respondents experienced was the difficulty women in dental education have in a traditionally male-dominated profession. The results confirmed that women faculty members are "leaning in" to seek administrative/leadership roles in academic dentistry. However, pay equity remains an issue, and faculty development and mentoring are needed for the advancement of academic dentistry and ultimately the dental profession.

  7. Sensory Neuropeptides and Endogenous Opioids Expression in Human Dental Pulp with Asymptomatic Inflammation: In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria-Bolaños, Daniel; Flores-Reyes, Hector; Lombana-Sanchez, Nelson; Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study quantified the expression of substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), β-endorphins (β-End), and methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk) in human dental pulp following orthodontic intrusion. Methods. Eight patients were selected according to preestablished inclusion criteria. From each patient, two premolars (indicated for extraction due to orthodontic reasons) were randomly assigned to two different groups: the asymptomatic inflammation group (EXPg), which would undergo controlled intrusive force for seven days, and the control group (CTRg), which was used to determine the basal levels of each substance. Once extracted, dental pulp tissue was prepared to determine the expression levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results. All samples from the CTRg exhibited basal levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids. By day seven, all patients were asymptomatic, even when all orthodontic-intrusive devices were still active. In the EXPg, the SP and CGRP exhibited statistically significant different levels. Although none of the endogenous opioids showed statistically significant differences, they all expressed increasing trends in the EXPg. Conclusions. SP and CGRP were identified in dental pulp after seven days of controlled orthodontic intrusion movement, even in the absence of pain. PMID:26538838

  8. Prevalence of dental caries among school-going children in Namakkal district: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Ramachandran; Somasundaram, Sujatha; Gawthaman, Murugesan; Vinodh, Selvaraj; Manikandan, Sundaram; Gokulnathan, Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of dental caries in primary teeth among 4-6 years old school going children in the Namakkal District. Materials and Methods: The study covered a total of 850 school going children in a total of 26 schools in the Namakkal district of Tamil Nadu. The age group selected for this study ranged from 4 to 6 years of age. Each child was examined in their respective schools by one of the four calibrated examiners and decay, missing and filled teeth (dmft) index was recorded along with demographic details. This study was done in September-October 2013 in a span of 1 month duration. Results: Of 850 children examined, 560 (65.88%) children had dental caries. Mean dmft score was 2.86. Prevalence of dental caries was higher in boys (69.6%) than in girls (61.5%). The untreated decay teeth accounted for 92.4%. Conclusion: The prevalence of dental caries among 4-6 years old children is high in the Namakkal district. The need for the creation of dental awareness among children and their primary caregivers is crucial and the need for developing immediate oral health promotion strategies including an increase in school dental health programs is recommended. PMID:25210362

  9. Attitude toward Public Health Dentistry as a career among dental students in Odisha: A Cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nupur; Jain, Kittu; Kabasi, Soumik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of dental students' expectations of their profession as well as their attitudes to study a particular specialty of dentistry is of great importance. These attitudes and expectations make studying dentistry meaningful to dental students and society and understanding these factors facilitate workforce planning in the dental sector The aim of the study was to assess the attitude of dental students towards considering Public Health Dentistry as their future career. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted, which included the 3rd year, 4th fourth year and dental interns studying in the State of Odisha. It consisted of 27 questions that were graded on 5-point Likert scale. The responses for the attitude questions toward selecting Public Health Dentistry for postgraduation were categorized into three factors, which are a negative attitude (includes score 0–21), neutral attitude (score 22–44), and positive attitude (score 45–64). Differences between groups were examined using Chi-square test for proportions. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Among 886 respondents, 302 (34.08%) were males and 584 (65.91%) were females. One-third (33.52%) of them had a positive attitude toward selecting public health dentistry as their future career, and nearly two-third of them (58.23%) had neutral attitude, with very few students having a negative attitude (8.23%) toward the specialty for pursuing postgraduation. Conclusion: Respondents had a considerable amount of interest in pursuing postgraduation in this specialty. Efforts should be intensified, both by the dental council and by the dental colleges, to develop this specialty, keeping in mind the increasing attitude of dental undergraduates toward it. PMID:28182073

  10. The application of autologous pulmonary artery in surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Shusheng; Cen, Jianzheng; Chen, Jimei; Xu, Gang; He, Biaochuan; Teng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the patients with longer-segment aortic arch hypoplasia or interruption with ventricular septal defect, surgery with homograft vessel or autologous pericardial patch to augment descending aortic arch will not result in adverse reactions caused by end-to-end anastomosis. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed primary experience of surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly with autologous main pulmonary artery. Methods From July 2010 to March 2016, the twenty-one cases of aortic arch complex anomalies were reconstructed with autologous main pulmonary artery. There were 5 patients with interrupted aortic arch and 16 patients with coarctation of aorta. In patients with interrupted aortic arch, anterior wall of main pulmonary artery was excised to form a conduit whose diameter varied according to the area of patient’s body surface. Both ends of the conduit were anastomosed to aortic arch and descending aorta, respectively. In other patients with coarctation of aorta, aortic arch was augmented with tailored pulmonary artery patch in oval shape. The defect of main pulmonary artery was repaired with autologous pericardial patch. Results There was only one patient died of multiple organ failure postoperatively. The other twenty patients survived without any neurologic complications. Differences of blood pressure between upper and lower limbs were not significant in all cases. During follow-up period, the echocardiography for all patients in the third, sixth, twelfth, and twenty-fourth months showed that blood flow in the descending aortic arch was fluent and there was no obvious blood pressure gradient. Conclusions Autologous main pulmonary artery can be used to repair complicated aortic arch anomalies completely without any anastomotic tension or bronchial obstruction postoperatively. This procedure is feasible and possesses predominant early and mid-term effects, and autologous main pulmonary artery can retain growth capacity during follow

  11. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context.

  12. Outcome-Based Quality Control by a Dental Reference Profile of a Population-Based Study (SHIP-0)

    PubMed Central

    Samietz, Stefanie; Söhnel, Andreas; Schwahn, Christian; Holtfreter, Birte; Mundt, Torsten; Meisel, Peter; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kocher, Thomas; Biffar, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to develop an instrument for quality control in dental practices. We compared the number of teeth of subjects of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-0) with those from patients of dental practices. Methods. Patients from seven dental practices (n = 1,497) were randomly sampled by age strata and gender for a period of two years. Dental status derived from patient files was transformed into practice profiles using age-specific number of teeth as a parameter. Practice profiles were compared with a nomogram, which was based on the age-specific number of teeth of 3,990 SHIP-0 participants regularly visiting the dentist. Further, negative binomial regression models were evaluated to model associations between the number of teeth with age and dental practices, including interactions. Results. The practice profiles ranged between the 45th and 95th quantile curves of the reference population SHIP-0. The rate ratios (RR) for the number of missing teeth ranged from 0.37 to 0.67 (p < 0.001) between the different dental practices, indicating lower risk for higher numbers of missing teeth in comparison to SHIP-0. Conclusions. This study showed considerable differences between dental practices and the reference population of SHIP-0 regarding the pattern of tooth loss and confirms the value of nomograms to compare age-specific numbers of teeth between patients of dental practices and a population-based-study as a tool for quality control. For further analyses, the socioeconomic status of patients and relevant risk factors will be used to adjust for structural differences in order to improve the validity of the comparisons. PMID:27347549

  13. Increased dental trauma in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder treated with methylphenidate--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Katz-Sagi, H; Redlich, M; Brinsky-Rapoport, T; Matot, I; Ram, D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the prevalence of trauma to incisor teeth in children with normal overjet and lip competence, treated with methylphenidate (Ritalin) for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study group consisted of 24 children (19 boys, 5 girls) aged 5-12 years (mean 8.45 +/- 2.25), diagnosed with ADHD and treated with methylphenidate at a minimal dosage of 10 mg per day. The control group consisted of 22 healthy children (13 boys, 9 girls) aged 5-12 years (mean 9.15 +/- 2.28). The dental examination included incisor relation measurements in the anterior segment (overjet), which was recorded using an orthodontic ruler. Lip competence was clinically determined, and anterior teeth were examined for dental trauma. The prevalence of dental trauma was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (29.1% vs. 4.5% P = 0.02, t-test one tail). In conclusion, children with ADHD treated with methylphenidate have a high-risk for dental trauma. We believe that preventing dental trauma in this high risk group is possible. Consequently, the pediatrician and all medical staff attending to these children should encourage parents to consult frequently with a pediatric dentist to diagnose dental trauma and provide early treatment when needed.

  14. [Studies on the cutting ability of dental diamond points--the trial manufacture of the cutting test apparatus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Miyairi, H; Nagai, M; Muramatsu, A

    1978-10-01

    Diamond points and tungstencarbite burs are used as the dental cutting tools for many appliance accordingly with the many purpose of used positions. Notwithstanding that the dental cutting tools have been usually applied for many purpose of dental treatment, the paper on these studies have scarcely been reported. In this studies the test of dental cutting tools curried out using the diamond points and examined these characteristics. As the problems on the cutting tests are the push load of cutting tools and the cutting quantities. This studies tried to make the test apparatus for the cutting test of dental diamond points considering to dental treatments. The glass plates used for photograph are used for cutting materials supposing to the enamel properties of teeth and the cutting tests put into practice for the types of diamond points with different diameter. The cutting characteristics of the diamond points are examined with the using of the test results and are appreciated with the considering to the test apparatus.

  15. Stereological Analysis of Bone Architecture in the Pig Zygomatic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shengyi; Choi, In W.; Herring, Susan W.; Rensberger, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stereological analysis of trabecular bone structure may reveal information about regional variations in stress distribution, especially in areas like the zygomatic arch in which those variations are difficult to assess mechanically. This study investigates regional differences in trabecular orientation, thickness, and density in the zygomatic and squamosal bones of pigs. Methods Zygomatic arches were serially sectioned frontally (n = 4), horizontally (n = 4), or parasagittally (n = 4), at a thickness of 0.8 mm. Sections were viewed under a stereomicroscope; video-images were digitized and analyzed with an automated program. Results All regions were anisotropic. Predominant orientation of trabeculae differed between and within bones. Three main patterns were seen. Anteriorly, zygomatic trabeculae were mainly arranged vertically and anteroposteriorly (relative to the occlusal plane). Posteriorly, including the jaw joint region, the squamosal featured primarily mediolateral trabeculae. In the midsection of the arch, where the two bones overlap, the trabeculae displayed a predominantly anteroposterior orientation with a secondary mediolateral peak. Trabeculae were typically 0.3–0.4 mm wide and occupied 40–50% of the area of the sections with few regional variations. Conclusions Trabecular bone in the pig zygomatic arch is arranged orthogonally, relative to the occlusal plane. In conjunction with information from strain gauge recording, these data suggest that the zygomatic bone is bent in the parasagittal plane whereas the squamosal is bent out-of-plane. The mediolateral trabeculae in the posterior regions are consistent with a cantilever effect at the jaw joint. PMID:9185986

  16. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  17. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  18. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-04

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function.

  19. Three-Dimensional Stiffness of the Carpal Arch

    PubMed Central

    Gabra, Joseph N.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n = 8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4 ± 4.6 N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.5 N/mm (p < 0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist's three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  20. The emerging dental workforce: why dentistry? A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their professional career

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Patel, Resmi; Donaldson, Nora; Wilson, Nairn HF

    2007-01-01

    Background Dental graduates are joining a profession experiencing changes in systems of care, funding and skill mix. Research into the motivation and expectations of the emerging workforce is vital to inform professional and policy decisions. The objective of this research was to investigate final year dental students' perceived motivation for their choice of career in relation to sex, ethnicity and mode of entry. Methods Self-administered questionnaire survey of all final year dental students at King's College London. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included Chi Squared tests for linear association, multiple regression, factor analysis and logistic regression. Results A response of 90% (n = 126) was achieved. The majority were aged 23 years (59%), female (58%) and Asian (70%). One in 10 were mature students. Eighty per cent identified 11 or more 'important' or 'very important' influences, the most common of which were related to features of the job: 'regular working hours' (91%), 'degree leading to recognised job' (90%) and 'job security' (90%). There were significant differences in important influences by sex (males > females: 'able to run own business'; females > males: 'a desire to work with people'), ethnic group (Asians > white: 'wish to provide public service', 'influence of friends', 'desire to work in healthcare', having 'tried an alternative career/course' and 'work experience') and mode of entry (mature > early entry: 'a desire to work with people'). Multivariate analysis suggested 61% of the variation in influences is explained by five factors: the 'professional job' (31%), 'healthcare-people' (11%), 'academic-scientific' (8%), 'careers-advising' (6%), and 'family/friends' (6%). The single major influence on choice of career was a 'desire to work with people'; Indian students were twice as likely to report this as white or other ethnic groups. Conclusion Final year dental students report a wide range of important influences on their

  1. Dental Erosion and Dentin Hypersensitivity among Adult Asthmatics and Non-asthmatics Hospital-based: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Zahra Hassan Abdelaziz; Awooda, Elhadi Mohieldin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the airways leading to spasm and swelling of the airways. The medications taken for the treatment of asthma can result in dental erosion and dentin hypersensitivity. Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the severity of dental erosion amongst adult asthmatics according to: gender, type and duration of medication taken and to compare dental erosion and dentin hypersensitivity between asthmatics and non-asthmatics. Subjects and Methods: Comparative, cross-sectional hospital based study among 40 asthmatics (M=15 & F=25) and 40 non-asthmatics (M=18 & F=22) in the age range of 18-60 year selected purposefully from Al-Shaab Teaching Hospital in Khartoum city. The Basic Erosive Wear Index was used for dental erosion assessment. Dentine hypersensitivity was determined by giving ice cold water and rated using the Visual Analogue Scale. Chi-square and Student’s t-test were used for statistical analysis with P value ≤.05. Results: There was an association between severity of dental erosion and presence of asthma (P=0.03), where asthmatics had a higher degree of erosion (moderate and severe) and non-asthmatics a lower degree. No significant association was found between dental erosion and gender, type and duration of medication among asthmatics group. A statistically significant difference was revealed in the degree of dentin hypersensitivity (P=0.00) among asthmatics (35.13%) and non-asthmatics (14.13%). Conclusion: Asthmatic patients had a higher degree of dental erosion and dentin hypersensitivity compared to non-asthmatics. Among asthmatic patients there was no association between severity of dental erosion and gender, type and duration medication was taken for. PMID:27924166

  2. Feasibility of implementing rapid oral fluid HIV testing in an urban University Dental Clinic: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 1 million individuals in the U.S. are infected with HIV; approximately 20% of whom do not know they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV infection results in earlier access to treatment and reductions in HIV transmission. In 2006, the CDC recommended that health care providers offer routine HIV screening to all adolescent and adult patients, regardless of community seroprevalence or patient lifestyle. Dental providers are uniquely positioned to implement these recommendations using rapid oral fluid HIV screening technology. However, thus far, uptake into dental practice has been very limited. Methods The study utilized a qualitative descriptive approach with convenience samples of dental faculty and students. Six in-depth one-on-one interviews were conducted with dental faculty and three focus groups were conducted with fifteen dental students. Results Results were fairly consistent and indicated relatively high levels of acceptability. Barriers and facilitators of oral fluid HIV screening were identified in four primary areas: scope of practice/practice enhancement, skills/knowledge/training, patient service/patient reactions and logistical issues. Conclusions Oral fluid HIV screening was described as having benefits for patients, dental practitioners and the public good. Many of the barriers to implementation that were identified in the study could be addressed through training and interdisciplinary collaborations. PMID:22571324

  3. Division of labor by sex and age in Neandertals: an approach through the study of activity-related dental wear.

    PubMed

    Estalrrich, Almudena; Rosas, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of activity-related dental wear patterns in prehistoric anatomically modern humans and modern hunter-gatherers has shown sex differences attributable to a gendered division of labor. Neandertals are known to have extensive anterior dental wear related to the use of their front teeth as a tool. In this study we analyze the i) cultural striations (scratches on the labial surface of the anterior teeth with a cut-mark morphology), and ii) dental chipping (ante-mortem microfracture involving enamel or both enamel and dentine) in 19 Neandertal individuals from the l'Hortus (France), Spy (Belgium), and El Sidrón (Spain) sites, and compare the characteristics of those traits with the age and sex estimation for the individuals and among samples. The study reveals that all individuals have cultural striations, but those detected on the adult females are longer than the striations found in adult males. Regarding the distribution of dental chipping, the prevalence of this trait is higher in the maxillary dentition of males whereas females have the majority of dental chipping on their mandibular teeth. The differences detected on the overall activity-related dental wear pattern denote a difference or a division of labor by age and sex in Neandertals while using the mouth as a third hand, i.e., in activities other than the provisioning of food, and provide new evidence for the lifestyle of this Pleistocene fossil human species.

  4. The distribution of cervical vertebrae anomalies among dental malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Hasan; Yildırım, Eren

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aims of our study were to investigate the distribution of cervical vertebrae anomalies (CVAs) among dental Angle Class I, II, and III malocclusions in Turkish population and whether a correlation between CVA and dental malocclusion. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on lateral cephalometric radiographs which were taken at the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Kirikkale University. The final sample of 318 orthodontic patients was included in the study. Dental malocclusions were performed according to Angle classification. CVAs were categorized: (1) fusion and (2) posterior arch deficiency (PAD). The Chi-square test was used to the analysis of the potential differences among dental malocclusions. Results: The final sample of 318 patients was examined. CVA was observed in 42 individuals (of 26 [8.17%] had fusion and 16 [5.03%] had PAD), with a frequency of 13.2%. Of the 26 fusion defect, 8 (30.7%) had Angle Class I, 8 (30.7%) had Angle Class II, and 10 (38.4%) had Angle Class III malocclusion. Of the 16 PAD, 8 (50%) had Angle Class I, 8 (50%) had Angle Class II but no patients with Angle Class III malocclusion was observed. The distribution of dental malocclusions regarding CVA was not statistically significant (P = 0.076). Of these 42 individuals with CVA, 52.3% (15 fusions and 7 PAD) were females and 47.7% (11 fusions and 9 PAD) were males. Conclusion: In our study, the prevalence of fusion and PAD were found 8.1% and 5.0% in Turkish population, respectively. Besides, no statistically significant correlation between CVA and Angle Class I, II, and III malocclusions were found. Our findings support the studies showing no gender dimorphism. PMID:26692691

  5. The Maxillary Arch and its Relationship to Cephalometric Landmarks of Selected Malay Ethnic Group

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Khin Myo; Winn, Than; Abdullah, Nizam; Jayasinghe, J.A.P.; Chandima., G.L.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the maxillary arch measurements, to assess the validity of Pont’s & Korkhaus’ Indices; to determine the relationship between maxillary arch form with head form; and to estimate the cephalic index (CI) of the study population. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 85 mature Malay students, 28 male students (32.98%), 57 females (67.02%) attending Teachers’ Training College. Their mean age was 23.9 yr, and Cephalic Index (CI) 86.4 (95% Confidence Interval 85.5–87.3). Arch and head dimensions were significantly larger in males than in females. CI was not significantly different between males and females. Means of anterior arch width (AAW), posterior-arch-width (PAW) and arch-length (Lu) were 35.57mm, 47.3mm and 18.01mm respectively. They were significantly different from their corresponding Indices. Correlation Coefficient between bizygomatic width and anterior-arch-width was 0.18 and was not significant in both sexes of the present population. PMID:22605945

  6. Dental care provided to sickle cell anemia patients stratified by age: A population-based study in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Cyrene Piazera Silva; Aires, Bárbara Tamires Cruz; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Souza, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess differences in the dental care provided to sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients depending on age. This retrospective study used secondary data from the dental records of the Center of Hematology and Hemotherapy in Maranhão (HEMOMAR). Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 574 dental records of patients with SCA treated or under treatment in the Dental Department of HEMOMAR from 2000 to 2011. Data on the gender, age, duration of dental treatment, number of patients submitted to periodontal treatment (PT), number of filled teeth (FT), teeth extracted (EX), endodontically treated teeth (ET), and reason for the dental procedures were collected. The Kruskal–Wallis test together with Dunn's post hoc test, Chi-square test, and Spearman's correlation was used for statistical analysis. An alpha error of 5% was considered acceptable. Results: Significant differences were found for FT, EX (P < 0.05), ET and PT (P < 0.001) between the age groups. There were fewer FT in children compared to other age groups (P < 0.001). The most common reasons for restorations and endodontic treatment were dental caries (100%) and irreversible pulpitis (55.6%), respectively. The main reasons for teeth extractions were residual roots (21.3%), chronic apical periodontitis (19.7%), and crown destruction (19.3%). There were positive correlations between age and EX (r = 0.93; P = 0.025) and ET (r = 0.92; P = 0.028). Conclusions: FT, ET, EX, and PT procedures become more common in older patients. Tooth decay is the main reason for dental treatment in SCA patients. PMID:27403053

  7. Arching in tapped deposits of hard disks.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Valluzzi, Marcos G; Valluzzi, Lucas G

    2006-05-01

    We simulate the tapping of a bed of hard disks in a rectangular box by using a pseudodynamic algorithm. In these simulations, arches are unambiguously defined and we can analyze their properties as a function of the tapping amplitude. We find that an order-disorder transition occurs within a narrow range of tapping amplitudes as has been seen by others. Arches are always present in the system although they exhibit regular shapes in the ordered regime. Interestingly, an increase in the number of arches does not always correspond to a reduction in the packing fraction. This is in contrast with what is found in three-dimensional systems.

  8. Study of corrosion between a titanium implant and dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Meyer, J M

    1994-06-01

    The infiltration of saliva into the multi-metallic structures on titanium implants brings different types of alloys into temporary or permanent contact. In this way a galvanic cell is established as a result of their potential difference. The galvanic cell phenomenon is compounded by another type of corrosion resulting from the geometry of the assembly: localized crevice corrosion. Fifteen galvanic couples (Ti/gold-based alloys, Ti/palladium-based alloy and Ti/non-precious alloys) were studied. Various electrochemical parameters (Ecorr, Ecommon, Ecouple corr, Ecrevice, icorr, icouple corr and Tafel slopes) were analysed. The galvanic currents measured are of the same order of magnitude (except Ti/stainless steel). They remain low. Application of the mixed-potential theory shows that titanium in coupling with the alloys studied will be under either cathodic or anodic control. According to the results obtained, an alloy that is potentially usable for superstructures in a galvanic coupling with titanium must fulfil a certain number of parameters: in a coupling, titanium must have a weak anodic polarization; the current generated by the galvanic cell must also be weak; the crevice potential must be markedly higher than the common potential.

  9. Attitudes of dental students towards using computers in education--a mixed design study.

    PubMed

    El Tantawi, M M A; Saleh, S M

    2008-01-01

    This mixed design study explored attitudes of dental students towards use of computers. It employed quantitative analyses of a questionnaire answered by 979 students and qualitative analysis of suggestions by a subgroup of 339. Positive attitudes towards computers were predicted by "computer use for > 1 year" and "year of study". Qualitative analysis of students' suggestions confirmed these findings and brought up new issues such as the need for establishing a website for the faculty. The results indicate that careful planning is needed to improve students' skills and incorporate computer applications in educational curricula.

  10. Connecting and Collaborating: Developing National Dental PBRN Study Concepts Through POD Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Mungia, Rahma; Buchberg, Meredith; Hayes, Holly; Dolan, Colleen; Reyes, Stephanie; Rankin, Kathleen; Oates, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article illustrates the process by which the Southwest Region of the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (www.NationalDentalPBRN.org) fosters collaboration among practitioners and researchers in study concept development through Protocol Development (POD) Groups. The Southwest Region begins this process by engaging POD Groups, which comprise dentists, hygienists, and/or academic faculty who share research interests related to improving dental care. Method The POD’s use the Tuckman four-stage model of group development (forming, storming, norming, and performing) to develop study concepts. This well-structured model encourages engagement among group members and enables quality discussion through organized sessions. This model provides milestones for the group’s progression and for the members’ interactions. The Southwest Region Directors play a crucial role in guiding and directing the development of PODs by aligning the members’ research interests with the goals of the National Network. Results POD engagement using Tuckman’s stages has been successful in developing study concepts for submission to the National Network. Between 2012 and 2014, the Southwest Region has developed 14 PODs from 275 research ideas. Five of these study concepts have been submitted to the National Network for approval, including the Novel Tobacco Products POD, which showcases the applicability of Tuckman’s model. Conclusion Overall, the POD concept is a collaborative effort that brings together practitioners and academicians through shared research interests and capitalizes on participants’ expertise and experiences. The Southwest Region will continue to develop PODs to foster new ideas for future studies in the Network. PMID:26715696

  11. Maternal dental caries and pre-term birth: results from the EPIPAP study.

    PubMed

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Kaminski, Monique; Lelong, Nathalie; Musset, Anne-Marie; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2011-07-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between maternal dental caries and pre-term birth (PTB), with a particular focus on the infection-suspected causes of pre-term births. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A secondary analysis was performed on data from the EPIPAP study, a French multi-centre case-control study. Cases were 1107 women giving birth to a singleton live-born infant before 37 weeks of gestation and controls were 1094 women delivering at 37 weeks or more. A sub-group of cases was defined as women with spontaneous labour and/or pre-term premature rupture of membranes (PPROM, n = 620). A full-mouth dental examination was performed after delivery. The main factor of interest was the presence of decay on at least one tooth. RESULTS. Crude associations between presence of tooth decay and PTB or spontaneous PTB/PPROM were significant (OR = 1.21 [1.01-1.45] and OR = 1.25 [1.01-1.55], respectively). After adjustment for two sets of potential confounders (four pre-term birth risk factors and four social characteristics), for periodontitis status and for inter-examiner variability, tooth decay was not significantly associated with either PTB or spontaneous PTB/PPROM (aOR = 1.10 [0.91-1.32] and aOR = 1.14 [0.91-1.42], respectively). CONCLUSIONS. This study failed to demonstrate a significant association between tooth decay and pre-term birth. However, future well-designed studies are needed to further assess the link between dental caries and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  12. Perspectives of studying fluorescence of dental solid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, M. T.; Taubinsky, Ilia M.; Kozma, S. J.; Romanov, A. M.

    1999-07-01

    As an object of study extracted human teeth were used. The whole was explored 30 teeth; measurements were conducted in intact regions of tooth: enamel, dentine, cement, root canal and in pathologically changed areas: caries of teeth and a solid teeth plaque. From present fluorescent spectrums of intact: enamel, dentine, cement; and of pathological: caries and teeth stone is seen that curves are likely shaped for each of the groups, but their amplitudes are not the same. Fluorescence maximum of all tooth areas falls on 700 nm, herewith possible to say that, spectrum shapes are specific for each tooth area, that can be used in diagnostic purposes, for example when processing a carious cavity. As to florescence intensity that teeth stone possesses the maximum of fluorescence, then an area submitted to caries, intact areas possess a weak fluorescence.

  13. Association between Knowledge about Comprehensive Food Education and Increase in Dental Caries in Japanese University Students: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Ekuni, Daisuke; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Yamane, Mayu; Kataoka, Kota; Taniguchi-Tabata, Ayano; Mizuno, Hirofumi; Miyai, Hisataka; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-02-25

    In Japan, comprehensive food education (shokuiku) programs are carried out with the aim of improving dietary practices and thereby reducing the incidence of lifestyle-related diseases, including dental caries. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the association between knowledge about shokuiku and the increase in dental caries among Japanese university students who had attended a shokuiku program while in junior/senior high school. A total of 562 students volunteered to undergo oral examinations over a three-year follow-up period, during which the number of cases of dental caries were recorded. Additional information was collected using a questionnaire survey regarding knowledge about shokuiku, dietary habits, and oral health behaviors. In logistic regression analysis, males who lacked knowledge about shokuiku had significantly higher odds for dental caries than those who did not (odds ratio (OR), 2.00; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.58; p = 0.019). On the other hand, among females, those who frequently consumed sugar-sweetened soft drinks had significantly higher odds for dental caries than those who did not (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.05-3.42; p = 0.035). These results suggest that having no knowledge about shokuiku is associated with a risk of increase in dental caries in Japanese male university students.

  14. Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices Among Dental and Medical Students in Eastern India – A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Harish; Behura, Shyam Sundar; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Nishat, Roquaiya; Dash, Kailash C.; Mohiddin, Gouse

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare oral health knowledge, attitude, and practices among dental and medical students in a Health care centre at Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty BDS and MBBS students each from Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences and Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences of KIIT University, Bhubaneswar respectively, were invited to participate in this survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire in English comprising 27 questions, which was designed to evaluate the oral health knowledge, attitude, and practices. The obtained data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 software. Results: On comparison of the scores of knowledge, attitude, and practice, the mean knowledge score was significantly higher among dental students than medical students. The study also showed that female students (both dental and medical) had better oral health knowledge and showed better oral health practices than male students. Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient test showed that, although dental students had better knowledge and attitude towards oral health, there was a lack of adequate practice among them. Conclusion: Further emphasis on oral health is necessary in undergraduate training to improve oral health knowledge, attitude, and practice among dental and medical students as they will act as role models for oral health education among individuals and community at large. PMID:28316951

  15. Genotoxicity evaluation of locally produced dental porcelain--an in vitro study using the Ames and Comet assays.

    PubMed

    Noushad, Mohammed; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Husein, Adam; Abdullah, Haswati; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genotoxicity of a locally produced dental porcelain (Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia) using the Ames and Comet assays. In the Ames assay, four genotypic variants of the Salmonella strains (TA98, TA100, TA1537 and TA1535) carrying mutations in several genes were used. The dental porcelain was incubated with these four strains in five different doses both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S9) and the result was assessed based on the number of revertant colonies. Concurrently, appropriate positive controls were used so as to validate the test. The average number of revertant colonies per plate treated with locally produced dental porcelain was less than double as compared to that of negative control. In the Comet assay, L929 (CCL-1 ATCC, USA) mouse fibroblast cells were treated with the dental porcelain in three different concentrations along with concurrent negative and positive controls. The tail moment which was used as a measurement of DNA damage was almost equal to that of the negative control, suggesting that the locally produced dental porcelain did not induce any DNA damage. The results indicated that the locally produced dental porcelain is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  16. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool for Dental Implant Osseointegration: an Experimental Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Botticelli, Daniele; Sivolella, Stefano; Bengazi, Franco; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Ricci, Sara; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Velez, Joaquin Urbizo; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The biological interaction between the jaw bones and dental implant is fundamental for the long-term success of dental implant placement. Nevertheless, the insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem, especially in case of immediate dental implant. Using a canine model, the present study proves the regenerative potential of adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) to repair peri-implant bone defects occurring in immediate dental implant placement. In six labradors, all mandibular premolars and the first molars were extracted bilaterally and three months later dental implants were installed with a marginal gap. The marginal defects were filled with hydroxyapatite (HA)-based scaffolds previously seeded with ADSCs. After one month of healing, specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric evaluations. Histological analyses of ground sections show that ADSCs significantly increase bone regeneration. Several new vessels, osteoblasts and new bone matrix were detected. By contrast, no inflammatory cells have been revealed. ADSCs could be used to accelerate bone healing in peri- implant defects in case of immediate dental implant placement. PMID:27014644

  17. [Provision and utilization of dental services in Amazonas State, Brazil: a case study in a riverine population in Coari municipality].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Salino, Alessandra Valle; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa

    2009-08-01

    This case study described the conditions in the provision and utilization of dental services in two riverine populations in the municipality (county) of Coari, Amazonas State, Brazil. Structured questionnaires were applied to individuals 18 years and older to measure dental services utilization rates. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with key informants to characterize the provision of such services. Although the bivariate analysis did not detect any statistically significant differences, residents of the area farthest from the county seat had gone more time since their last dental visit and received less care from public health services and riverboat clinics. The qualitative analysis showed: no permanent dental services in the communities; sporadic services provided by riverboat clinics, with less frequent visits to the remotest community; high transportation cost for river-dwellers to seek treatment in the county seat; and dental treatment focused on pain control, mainly through tooth extraction. Limited access to dental services for riverine populations highlights the need to implement comprehensive health promotion measures and expand the availability of services.

  18. Association between Knowledge about Comprehensive Food Education and Increase in Dental Caries in Japanese University Students: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Ekuni, Daisuke; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Yamane, Mayu; Kataoka, Kota; Taniguchi-Tabata, Ayano; Mizuno, Hirofumi; Miyai, Hisataka; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, comprehensive food education (shokuiku) programs are carried out with the aim of improving dietary practices and thereby reducing the incidence of lifestyle-related diseases, including dental caries. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the association between knowledge about shokuiku and the increase in dental caries among Japanese university students who had attended a shokuiku program while in junior/senior high school. A total of 562 students volunteered to undergo oral examinations over a three-year follow-up period, during which the number of cases of dental caries were recorded. Additional information was collected using a questionnaire survey regarding knowledge about shokuiku, dietary habits, and oral health behaviors. In logistic regression analysis, males who lacked knowledge about shokuiku had significantly higher odds for dental caries than those who did not (odds ratio (OR), 2.00; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12–3.58; p = 0.019). On the other hand, among females, those who frequently consumed sugar-sweetened soft drinks had significantly higher odds for dental caries than those who did not (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.05–3.42; p = 0.035). These results suggest that having no knowledge about shokuiku is associated with a risk of increase in dental caries in Japanese male university students. PMID:26927163

  19. Dental studies of a Finnish skeletal material: a paleopathologic approach.

    PubMed

    Varrela, J; Varrela, T M

    1991-05-01

    This paper reviews a series of paleo-pathologic studies made to investigate associations between dietary factors and development of occlusion, periodontal diseases and caries. The findings indicate that the change from hard to soft food, which has taken place during the last few hundred years, influences occlusion, craniofacial structures and oral health in several ways. Comparative studies show that the frequency of malocclusion has increased substantially. In the same time, a number of alterations have taken place in the morphology of the craniofacial skeleton. The results support the hypothesis that masticatory stress is a regulative factor in craniofacial growth and occlusal development. With soft food and low masticatory activity, jaw growth is not adequate for optimal occlusal development. Approximal wear itself, caused by the attritive diet, seems to be only a minor adjustive factor. Because of the occlusal wear, the crown height decreased with age and the teeth continued to erupt. As a result, root surfaces were exposed. This process has been equated with bone loss but the lack of inflammatory changes on the bone surface indicates that the alveolar bone was not affected by periodontal diseases. This suggests that the alveolar height was maintained at a constant level throughout life and no growth nor resorption took normally place at the crest. Only the exposure of the furcations increased the occurrence of periodontitis. The caries frequency was decreased by mechanical cleaning effect of attritive food but increased by exposure of the root surfaces. Furthermore, the oral microflora may have been modified by factors related to the chemical and physical properties of the diet.

  20. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2–8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  1. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial.

  2. Study of edge detection task in dental panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gráfová, L; Kasparová, M; Kakawand, S; Procházka, A; Dostálová, T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to introduce a new approach for edge detection in orthopantograms (OPGs) and an improved automatic parameter selector for common edge detectors, (2) to present a comparison between our novel approach with common edge detectors and (3) to provide faster outputs without compromising quality. A new approach for edge detection based on statistical measures was introduced: (1) a set of N edge detection results is calculated from a given input image and a selected type of edge detector, (2) N correspondence maps are constructed from N edge detection results, (3) probabilities and average probabilities are computed, (4) an overall correspondence is evaluated for each correspondence map and (5) the correspondence map providing the best overall correspondence is taken as the result of edge detection procedure. A comparison with common edge detectors (the Roberts, Prewitt, Sobel, Laplacian of the Gaussian and Canny methods) with various parameter settings (304 combinations for each test image) was carried out. The methods were assessed objectively [edge mismatch error (EME), modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) and principal component analysis] and subjectively by experts in dentistry and based on time demands. The suitability of the new approach for edge detection in OPGs was confirmed by experts. The current conventional methods in edge detection in OPGs are inadequate (none of the tested methods reach an EME value or MHD value below 0.1). Our proposed approach for edge detection shows promising potential for its implementation in clinical dentistry. It enhances the accuracy of OPG interpretation and advances diagnosis and treatment planning.

  3. Agreement between parents and adolescents on dental fluorosis: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria Eneide Leitão de; Teixeira, Ana Karine Macedo; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Paiva, Saul Martins; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis and compared the reports from adolescents aged 12 to 18 years with those of their parents regarding the perceptions and concerns arising from this disease. The study was conducted in the cities of Viçosa and Sobral and the District of Rafael Arruda (Sobral), Ceará. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2010 to March 2011, with 891 students examined and 780 parents or guardians interviewed. Dental fluorosis was measured using the Dean's Index, and the Child's and Parent's Questionnaire about Teeth Appearance was used to assess the reports from parents and adolescents. A chi-squared test for trends was used to compare the opinions of parents and adolescents about fluorosis, and the agreement was measured using the weighted kappa. For the dichotomous variables, we used the unweighted kappa coefficient. The prevalence of fluorosis was 29.7%, but in the District of Rafael Arruda, evidence of very mild and mild fluorosis was found in 32.5% of the subjects, and moderate and severe fluorosis was found in 28.7%. There was poor agreement between the data reported by the adolescents and their parents or guardians regarding areas of concern and their perceived satisfaction with the appearance and color of their teeth. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was high in one of the communities studied, but the clinical diagnosis of this condition should not necessarily equate with concern and dissatisfaction with aesthetic appearances among teenagers and their parents.

  4. Guidelines for reporting pre-clinical in vitro studies on dental materials.

    PubMed

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano

    2012-12-01

    In vitro pre-clinical research is an important aspect of the development of new dental materials and techniques, because it can provide essential information for further testing of therapeutic approaches in clinical trials. These pre-clinical experiments should therefore be reported with the same rigor as studies involving humans. The objectives of this paper were twofold: (a) to search and assess existing guidelines for reporting in vitro studies in dentistry, and (b) to present a methodology for reporting these studies, based on the CONSORT checklist for reporting randomized clinical trials. After a comprehensive search in PubMed database, no guidelines for reporting in vitro studies in dentistry were found. The proposed methodology is presented and the rationale for the choice of fourteen guidelines for producing the different sections of such papers is described in detail. The assessment of a sample of in vitro studies using the proposed guidelines showed that the standards of reporting should be improved. Good standards of reporting of studies are necessary for improvement of efficiency in dental research. The guidelines presented are the first standards for reporting in vitro studies in dentistry. As with the original CONSORT document, the modified checklist is evolving. It should, therefore, be further tested by researchers and the results of these assessments should be used for further improvement of this tool.

  5. The effects of short foot exercises and arch support insoles on improvement in the medial longitudinal arch and dynamic balance of flexible flatfoot patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jin Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to apply short foot exercises and arch support insoles in order to improve the medial longitudinal arch of flatfoot and compare the results to identify the effects of the foregoing exercises on the dynamic balance of the feet and the lower limbs. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen university students with flexible flatfoot were selected by conducting navicular drop tests and randomly assigned to a short foot exercise group of seven subjects and an arch support insoles group of seven subjects. The intervention in the experiment was implemented for 30 minutes per time, three times per week for five weeks in total. [Results] In inter-group comparison conducted through navicular drop tests and Y-balance tests, the short foot exercise group showed significant differences. Among intra-group comparisons, in navicular drop tests, the short foot exercise group showed significant decreases. In Y-balance tests, both the short foot exercise group and the arch support insoles group showed significant increases. [Conclusion] In the present study, it could be seen that to improve flatfoot, applying short foot exercises was more effective than applying arch support insoles in terms of medial longitudinal arch improvement and dynamic balance ability. PMID:27942135

  6. Dental health status in crack/cocaine-addicted men: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Cury, Patricia R; Oliveira, Maria G A; de Andrade, Katia Montanha; de Freitas, Maíra D S; Dos Santos, Jean N

    2017-01-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between crack/cocaine addiction and dental health in men. Forty crack/cocaine-addicted patients and 120 nonaddicted patients (≥18 years) underwent full-mouth dental examinations. Decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) were identified using the criteria recommended by the World Health Organization. Crack/cocaine addiction was determined, based on the medical records and interviews of each patient. All drug-addicted patients used both crack and cocaine. The chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were used to assess the association between DMFT and crack/cocaine addiction (p ≤ 0.05). Decayed teeth showed a positive association with crack/cocaine addiction (odds ratio (OR) = 3.65; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.68-7.92; p = 0.001), whereas filled and missing teeth showed a negative association (filled teeth: OR = 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18-0.76; p = 0.008; missing teeth: OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13-0.81; p = 0.02). The DMFT was only associated with age (OR = 2.12; 95% CI, 1.11-4.08, p = 0.023). In the present population, crack/cocaine addiction was associated with a greater decayed teeth index and a lower filled and missing teeth index. Programs aimed to encourage self-esteem and encourage individuals to seek dental care are required for this population. Further studies using a larger sample size and studies with women are required to confirm the results.

  7. Evaluation of different Diagnostic Modalities for Diagnosis of Dental Caries: An in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Rani; Jaidka, Shipra; Nishad, Muhamad; Singh, Shikha; Tomar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of different diagnostic aids for diagnosis of dental caries and to compare the validity in terms of sensitivity and specificity of all four diagnostic modalities for diagnosis of caries. Materials and methods Occlusal surfaces of 100 primary and permanent molars were examined using the four diagnostic systems (visual, intraoral camera, DIAGNOdent, and DIAGNOdent with dye). These results were compared with operative intervention gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each diagnostic system for both enamel and dentin caries. Interrater agreement was calculated for each diagnostic system using kappa statistics. Results For both enamel and dentin caries, the highest sensitivity values were provided by DIAGNOdent (0.91 and 0.72) and lowest for visual examination on wet surface (0.60 and 0.50). For both enamel and dentin caries, the specificity was found to be highest for intraoral camera on dry surface and lowest for visual examination. The DIAGNOdent gave the highest value of interrater agreement (kappa), i.e., 0.816 as compared with 0.03 for visual examination. Conclusion The study clearly demonstrated that DIAGNO-dent was the most accurate and valid system tested for the detection of occlusal caries. It has the advantage of quantifying the mineral content, helping to improve the diagnostic efficacy and treatment and accurate assessment of fissures where the visual examination alone is not adequate, thus complementing the traditional dental examination. How to cite this article Zaidi I, Somani R, Jaidka S, Nishad M, Singh S, Tomar D. Evaluation of different Diagnostic Modalities for Diagnosis of Dental Caries: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):320-325. PMID:28127163

  8. Dental profile of a community of recovering drug addicts: Biomedical aspects. Retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    del-Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Riobóo-García, Rafael; Solá- Ruiz, Maria F.; Celemín-Viñuela, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: to obtain a biomedical oral profile of a community of adult drug addicts in treatment by analysing their dental health, with a view to determining whether the state of their oral health could be attributed primarily to their lifestyle and the direct consequences of drug abuse on their overall condition, rather than to the effects of the drugs used. Experimental Design: the study was conducted under the terms of an agreement between the Complutense University of Madrid’s (UCM) Odontology Faculty and the City of Madrid’s Substance Abuse Institute. Seventy drug addicts and 34 control group subjects were examined. The study assessed oral hygiene habits, systemic pathology, type of drugs used and the duration of use, oral pathology, oral health indices, risk of caries based on saliva tests, oral candidiasis and periodontal microbiology. Results: statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found between the test and control groups for practically all the variables analysed. In the drug users group, dental hygiene was wanting, systemic and oral pathology prevailed and the decayed/missing/filled teeth or surface (DMFT/S) indices denoted very poor buccodental health. The saliva tests showed a substantial risk of caries and candidiasis rates were high. By contrast, with a single exception, the microbiological studies detected no statistically significant difference between drug users and control groups periodontal flora. Conclusions: drug-dependent patients had poor oral health and a significant increase in oral pathology, essentially caries and periodontal disease. Their risk of caries was high and the presence of candidiasis was representative of their poor general and oral health. Drug users’ poor buccodental condition was more closely related to lifestyle than to drug abuse itself. Key words:Buccal, dental, drug addicts. PMID:23722124

  9. Glowing Solar Material Arches Up and Out

    NASA Video Gallery

    An elongated, streaming arch of solar material rose up at the sun’s edge before breaking apart in this animation of imagery captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 28, 2016. While so...

  10. L'Arche: Its Philosophy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumarah, John

    1986-01-01

    The L'Arche movement in mental retardation based upon the work of J. Vanier stresses the value of the disabled person, the importance of mutual relationships, the importance of a sense of community, and the spiritual dimension. (CL)

  11. Factors associated with dental fluorosis in school children in southern Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Marina Sousa; Goettems, Marília Leão; Torriani, Dione Dias; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed risk factors for dental fluorosis (DF) among 8- to 12-year-old children in southern Brazil. Children attending 20 schools were randomly selected (n=1,196). They were interviewed and their parents answered a questionnaire that was sent home. Prevalence of DF was 8.53% (modified Dean's criteria), and the prevalence of severe DF was 0.17%. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that DF was associated with a higher frequency of tooth brushing and with initial use of fluoride toothpaste at the emergence of the first tooth. DF does not constitute a public health problem in southern Brazil.

  12. Changes in self-directed learning readiness in dental students: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Kalyani; Pahwa, Punam; Banerjee, Ankona; Baptiste, Kellen; Bhatt, Hitesh; Lim, Hyun J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify changes in dental students' self-directed learning (SDL) readiness during their education. Guglielmino's SDL readiness scale (SDLRS) was completed at admission by dental students at the University of Saskatchewan and at the end of each year of training. The response rates varied from year to year. Between twenty-seven and thirty students completed the questionnaire each year at admission (93-100 percent of the entering class). The numbers of participants were lower in succeeding years: numbers used for analysis ranged from eleven to twenty-six; years in which fewer than eleven students participated were not included in the analysis. At admission, the students' mean SDLRS score was 228.98 (on a scale from 58 to 290, with 290 the highest); this score was higher than that of the average adult population (214±25.59). There was no significant effect of years of predental education, prior unsuccessful applications to dental school, interview scores, age, or admission test scores. There was a significant drop in SDLRS scores at the end of the first year for most of the cohorts (p<0.001). In addition to the questionnaire part of the study, two instructors and five first- and second-year students participated in focus groups. Those results showed that the individuals defined SDL narrowly and had similar perceptions of curricular factors that affect SDL readiness. The drop in scores one year after admission and lack of change with increased training suggests that current educational interventions may require re-examination and alteration to those that promote self-direction.

  13. The effectiveness of virtual reality for dental pain control: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, H G; Garcia-Palacios, A; Patterson, D R; Jensen, M; Furness, T; Ammons, W F

    2001-08-01

    The present study explored whether immersive virtual reality can serve as an effective non-pharmacologic analgesic for dental pain. Two patients (aged 51 and 56 years old) with adult periodontitis, a chronic, progressive inflammatory disease that affects gums, ligaments, and bones around the teeth, were studied in the treatment room of a periodontist. Each patient received periodontal scaling and root planing (scraping off/removing plaque deposits below the gum line, hereafter referred to as scaling) under three treatment conditions: (1) virtual reality distraction, (2) movie distraction, and (3) a no-distraction control condition. Condition order was randomized and counterbalanced. For each of the three treatment conditions, five visual analog pain scores for each treatment condition served as the dependent variables. On 0-10 labeled scales, both patients provided sensory and affective pain ratings, and subjective estimates of time spent thinking about his pain during the procedure. For patient 1, mean pain ratings were in the severe range while watching a movie (7.2), or no distraction (7.2) but in the mild pain range (1.2) during the VR condition. Patient 2 reported mild to moderate pain with no distraction (mean = 4.4), mild pain while watching the movie (3.3), and essentially no pain while in VR (0.6) during his periodontal scaling. Although the small sample size limits generalizability, we contend that virtual reality is a uniquely attention-grabbing medium capable of maximizing the amount of attention drawn away from the "real world," allowing patients to tolerate painful dental procedures. These preliminary results suggest that immersive VR merits more attention as a potentially viable adjunctive nonpharmacologic analgesia for procedural dental/periodontal pain. Virtual reality may also have analgesic potential for other painful procedures or pain populations. Practical implications are discussed.

  14. Integrated exploration locates Cincinnati arch dolomite breccias

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, S.A. )

    1994-11-28

    Dolomite breccias or chimneys are prolific reservoirs found along the Cincinnati arch and adjacent basins from Tennessee to Ontario. An integrated approach using seismic and surface geochemistry, augmented by subsurface geology and magnetics, has led to a dramatic increase in the number of these fields being discovered in the past 10 years. Historically the reservoirs have been found by random drilling. The paper describes the geology of the arch, breccia characteristics, and case histories of discoveries using this integrated approach.

  15. Magnetically driven flows in arched plasma structures.

    PubMed

    Stenson, E V; Bellan, P M

    2012-08-17

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate high-speed plasma flows from both footpoints of arched magnetic flux tubes, resulting in bulk plasma transport into the flux tube and persistent axial collimation even as the flux tube lengthens and kinks. The measured flows are in agreement with the predictions of hoop force and collimation models involving fundamental MHD forces. These forces are expected to drive plasma acceleration in other open flux configurations with arched geometries, such as those found on the solar surface.

  16. Ultraviolet Events Observed in Active Regions. 2; An Interpretation of Flaring Arches and Associated Small Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J.; Rovira, M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze Hz, UV, and X-ray emissions in and around the spectacular arch system seen in the corona on 1980 March 27 during the Solar Maximum Mission. The flaring of the arch plasma is studied, and its dependence on triggering mechanisms related to the observed small limb flare in the arch footpoint is analyzed. To drive these events, we propose a mechanism in which small electric current circuits and the localized magnetic free energy are continuously generated at a magnetic null by a pressure gradient, which then compress or expand the plasma. This free energy dissipates by Joule effect and upward transport.

  17. Anomalous Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery from the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Evan H.; Song, Linda H.; Villela, Natalia L. A.; Fasani-Feldberg, Gregory B.; Jacobs, Jonathan L.; Kim, Dolly O.; Nathawat, Akshay; Patel, Devika; Bender, Roger B.; Peters, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic anomalies of the aortic arch have implications for clinical practice if their significance is understood. Our case study involves a cadaveric finding of the left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch. Although this anatomical variation has been documented, the prevalence of this anomaly may be generally underestimated. After noting this anomaly, we analyzed 27 cases and found that four female cadavers had the left vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch rather than the left subclavian artery. With a prevalence rate of 14.8%, it would seem that this anomaly is more significant than previously thought, which could have implications for surgical practice. PMID:27757404

  18. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  19. Allied dental personnel: will there be enough?

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2008-11-01

    The escalating number and size of dental practices mean greater dependency on a ready supply of allied dental personnel. However, despite the increasing number of entry places in allied dental training programs, many places remain unfilled and large numbers of individuals do not complete the course of studies. A review of the changes in dental practice sizes and dental assistant, dental hygienist and dental laboratory technician programs raises concerns as to whether there will be enough allied dental personnel to meet the future needs of the profession. The need for increasing attention to this potential eventuality is stressed.

  20. 7. View showing reinforced concrete arch, east approach. The 591 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View showing reinforced concrete arch, east approach. The 591 foot three-hinge steel arch that spans the Cuyahoga River is flanked by twelve such approach arches. Each concrete arch consists of four arch ribs, which support the beam and slab streetcar deck on spandrel columns. As the photograph illustrates, the spandrel columns continue above the lower deck to support the roadway. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  2. Footprint-based estimates of arch structure are confounded by body composition in adults.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Scott C; Grigg, Nicole L; Lau, Hin C; Smeathers, James E

    2012-08-01

    Previous research employing indirect measures of arch structure, such as those derived from footprints, have indicated that obesity results in a "flatter" foot type. In the absence of radiographic measures, however, definitive conclusions regarding the osseous alignment of the foot cannot be made. We determined the effect of body mass index (BMI) on radiographic and footprint-based measures of arch structure. The research was a cross-sectional study in which radiographic and footprint-based measures of foot structure were made in 30 subjects (10 males, 20 female) in addition to standard anthropometric measures of height, weight, and BMI. Multiple (univariate) regression analysis demonstrated that both BMI (β = 0.39, t(26) = 2.12, p = 0.04) and radiographic arch alignment (β = 0.51, t(26) = 3.32, p < 0.01) were significant predictors of footprint-based measures of arch height after controlling for all variables in the model (R(2) = 0.59, F(3,26) = 12.3, p < 0.01). In contrast, radiographic arch alignment was not significantly associated with BMI (β = -0.03, t(26) = -0.13, p = 0.89) when Arch Index and age were held constant (R(2) = 0.52, F(3,26) = 9.3, p < 0.01). Adult obesity does not influence osseous alignment of the medial longitudinal arch, but selectively distorts footprint-based measures of arch structure. Footprint-based measures of arch structure should be interpreted with caution when comparing groups of varying body composition.

  3. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kirsty A.; Stearne, Sarah M.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  4. The knowledge, efficacy, and practices instrument for oral health providers: a validity study with dental students.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Moore, Thomas E; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2013-08-01

    Valid and reliable instruments to measure and assess cultural competence for oral health care providers are scarce in the literature, and most published scales have been contested due to a lack of item analysis and internal estimates of reliability. The purposes of this study were, first, to develop a standardized instrument to measure dental students' knowledge of diversity, skills in culturally competent patient-centered communication, and use of culture-centered practices in patient care and, second, to provide preliminary validity support for this instrument. The initial instrument used in this study was a thirty-six-item Likert-scale survey entitled the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument for Oral Health Providers (KEPI-OHP). This instrument is an adaption of an initially thirty-three-item version of the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge, and Skills Scale-Counselor Edition (MAKSS-CE), a scale that assesses factors related to social justice, cultural differences among clients, and cross-cultural client management. After the authors conducted cognitive and expert interviews, focus groups, pilot testing, and item analysis, their initial instrument was reduced to twenty-eight items. The KEPI-OHP was then distributed to 916 dental students (response rate=48.6 percent) across the United States to measure its reliability and assess its validity. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test the scale's validity. The modification of the survey into a sensible instrument with a relatively clear factor structure using factor analysis resulted in twenty items. A scree test suggested three expressive factors, which were retained for rotation. Bentler's comparative fit and Bentler and Bonnett's non-normed indices were 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. A three-factor solution, including efficacy of assessment, knowledge of diversity, and culture-centered practice subscales, comprised of twenty-items was identified. The KEPI-OHP was found to

  5. Comparative study of dental enamel loss after debonding braces by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Chávez, Jacqueline Adelina; Arenas-Alatorre, Jesús; Belio-Reyes, Irma Araceli

    2017-02-05

    Clinical procedures when shear forces are applied to brackets suggest adhesion forces between 2.8 and 10.0 MPa as appropriate. In this study dental enamel was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after removing the brackets. Thirty bicuspids (previous prophylaxis) with metallic brackets (Roth Inovation 0.022 GAC), Transbond Plus SEP 3M Unitek adhesive and Transbond XT 3M resin were used. The samples were preserved to 37°C during 24 hr and submited to tangential forces with the Instron Universal machine 1.0 mm/min speed load strength resistance debonding. Also the Adhesive Remanent Index (ARI) test was made, evaluating the bracket base and the bicuspid surface. All the bracket SEM images were processed with AutoCAD to determine the enamel detached area. The average value was 6.86 MPa (SD ± 3.2 MPa). ARI value 1= 63.3%, value 2= 20%, value 3= 13.3% and 33% presented value 0. All those samples with dental enamel loss, presented different situations as fractures, ledges, horizontal, and vertical loss in some cases, and some scratch lines. There is no association between the debonding resistance and enamel presence. Less than half of the remanent adhesive on the dental enamel was present in most of the samples when the ARI test was applied. When the resin area increases, the debonding resistance also increases, and when the enamel loss increases, the resin free metallic area of the bracket base decreases in the debonding.

  6. A study of the dental treatment needs of children with disabilities in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Messer, L B; Calache, H

    2001-03-01

    A selected population of children with disabilities in Melbourne, Australia, was studied with reference to their oral disease and treatment needs. A total of 300 children (aged 9-13 years), 150 attending special developmental schools (SDS) and 150 attending special schools (SS), received an oral examination and the parent/guardian completed a questionnaire. Six levels of function were defined, based on the child's independence for five self-care activities (brushing teeth, feeding self, dressing self, walking and performing toilet). The caries experience of children in the SS was lower than in SDS (d + D: 1.3 +/- 1.6 versus 1.5 +/- 2.4; dmft + DMFT: 2.0 +/- 2.3 versus 2.5 +/- 3.1); those attending SDS had higher unmet preventive and restorative needs. Significant associations were seen between the number of decayed teeth, the dmft + DMFT index, and the level of function (p < 0.005). Periodontal disease was prevalent; significant associations were seen between periodontal status, the need for periodontal therapy, and the level of function (p < 0.005). Assessment of the level of function by staff could assist in triaging individuals for urgent dental examination. Despite 41 per cent of children requiring simple treatment, the preventive and treatment needs of many remained unmet. Following examination, diagnosis and treatment planning by a dentist, much of the preventive, simple treatment and oral health promotion could be performed by trained dental auxiliaries. An epidemiological survey followed by the implementation and evaluation of a long-range public dental health care plan for children and adolescents with disabilities is needed urgently.

  7. A faculty development course to enhance dental hygiene distance education: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone-Dodge, Vicki; Bowen, Denise M; Calley, Kristin H; Peterson, Teri S

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a dental hygiene faculty development course to enhance online teaching practices that foster a sense of community and satisfaction. The sampled population was drawn from the forty-seven U.S. dental hygiene programs that the American Dental Hygienists' Association identified as offering bachelor's degree completion or master's degree programs with 76-100 percent of coursework delivered in an online format. This requirement was applied to exclude programs using hybrid instruction (combination of online and face-to-face). Of the thirty-four faculty members who self-identified as meeting the criteria, seven agreed to participate (21 percent response rate); however, only five completed all parts of the study (a final response rate of 15 percent). A Community of Inquiry framework was the basis for the author-designed Distance Education Best Practices Survey used as a pretest and posttest to assess participants' use of and perceived importance of twenty-five best practices before and after taking the online faculty development course. Frequency of use ratings ranged from 4.0 (regularly) to 5.0 (always) on a response scale from 1.0 to 5.0. The results showed significant increases from before to after the course in participants' perceptions of the importance of four practices: activities promoting relevant, lifelong learning (p=0.03); faculty communication fostering a sense of community (p=0.04); encouraging students' self-introduction (p=0.04); and encouraging productive dialogue and respecting diverse opinions (p=0.04). The findings indicate a potential value for a faculty development course designed to enhance online teaching, sense of community, and satisfaction, even for faculty members with high self-ratings regarding best practices.

  8. Biocompatibility study of lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide ceramics for esthetic dental abutments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The increasing demand for esthetically pleasing results has contributed to the use of ceramics for dental implant abutments. The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of epithelial tissue cultivated on lithium disilicate (LS2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramics. Understanding the relevant physicochemical and mechanical properties of these ceramics will help identify the optimal material for facilitating gingival wound closure. Methods Both biomaterials were prepared with 2 different surface treatments: raw and polished. Their physicochemical characteristics were analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning white-light interferometry, and scanning electron microscopy. An organotypic culture was then performed using a chicken epithelium model to simulate peri-implant soft tissue. We measured the contact angle, hydrophobicity, and roughness of the materials as well as the tissue behavior at their surfaces (cell migration and cell adhesion). Results The best cell migration was observed on ZrO2 ceramic. Cell adhesion was also drastically lower on the polished ZrO2 ceramic than on both the raw and polished LS2. Evaluating various surface topographies of LS2 showed that increasing surface roughness improved cell adhesion, leading to an increase of up to 13%. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that a biomaterial, here LS2, can be modified using simple surface changes in order to finely modulate soft tissue adhesion. Strong adhesion at the abutment associated with weak migration assists in gingival wound healing. On the same material, polishing can reduce cell adhesion without drastically modifying cell migration. A comparison of LS2 and ZrO2 ceramic showed that LS2 was more conducive to creating varying tissue reactions. Our results can help dental surgeons to choose, especially for esthetic implant abutments, the most appropriate biomaterial as well as the most appropriate surface treatment to use in accordance with specific clinical

  9. A serial cross-sectional study of pediatric inpatient hospitalizations for non-traumatic dental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chi, D L; Masterson, E E

    2013-08-01

    Investigators have examined children's dental utilization in various settings (e.g., dental offices, emergency departments, operating rooms), but no studies have examined inpatient hospitalizations for non-traumatic dental conditions (NTDCs). The authors examined NTDC-related hospitalization trends in the United States and identified the relationship between complex chronic condition (CCCs) and NTDC-related inpatient hospitalizations. We analyzed data from the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000-2010) for children ages 3 to 17 years (N = 3,030,970). The predictor variable was number of CCCs (0/1/2+). The outcome variable was whether the child had a NTDC-related hospitalization (no/yes). Covariate-adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate prevalence odds ratios (PORs). From 2000 to 2010, there were 17,993 NTDC-related hospitalizations (0.59%) and a slight increase in NTDC-related hospitalizations (p = .049). This increase was not significant in the final regression model. There was no difference in odds of NTDCs for children with 0 or 1 CCCs (POR = 1.08; 95%CI = 0.99, 1.18), but children with 2+ CCCs had significantly greater odds (POR = 1.61; 95%CI = 1.42, 1.83), as did non-White, publicly insured, and lower income children. NTDC-related hospitalizations for children did not increase from 2000 to 2010. Children with 2+ CCCs had the greatest odds of being hospitalized for NTDCs, which highlights the need to develop preventive interventions targeting children with 2+ CCCs.

  10. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10units), Ti_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P<0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis.

  11. Analysis of dental hard tissues exposed to high temperatures for forensic applications: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Chauhan, Arunima

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe and record the macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic findings obtained after subjecting the teeth to high temperatures. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was conducted to observe macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic changes in dental hard tissues in 60 unrestored non carious extracted human teeth. The teeth were grouped based on age: Below 30 years, 30–40 years, and above 40 years The teeth from each age group were further divided into five subgroups, and each subgroup was subjected to a particular temperature: 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C. [C = Celsius]. Results: Various degrees of changes in relation to temperature were observed macroscopically, radiographically, and microscopically. The histological examination was limited for teeth exposed to 200°C. Conclusion: This investigation was carried out to study the gross changes, radiographic changes and histological changes in dental hard tissues exposed to high temperatures, which is an important part of forensic science. The aforementioned alterations caused by heat may provide useful information about temperature ranges and duration of exposure to high temperatures. PMID:27555725

  12. Three-dimensional assessment of the temporomandibular joint and mandibular dimensions after early correction of the maxillary arch form in patients with Class II division 1 or division 2 malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Ciger, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess three-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joint positions and mandibular dimensions after correction of dental factors restricting mandibular growth in patients with Class II division 1 or division 2 malocclusion in the pubertal growth period. Methods This prospective clinical study included 14 patients each with Class II division 1 (group I) and Class II division 2 (group II) malocclusions. The quad-helix was used for maxillary expansion, while utility arches were used for intrusion (group I) or protrusion and intrusion (group II) of the maxillary incisors. After approximately 2 months of treatment, an adequate maxillary arch width and acceptable maxillary incisor inclination were obtained. The patients were followed for an average of 6 months. Intraoral and extraoral photographs, plaster models, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained before and after treatment. Lateral cephalometric and temporomandibular joint measurements were made from the CBCT images. Results The mandibular dimensions increased in both groups, although mandibular positional changes were also found in group II. There were no differences in the condylar position within the mandibular fossa or the condylar dimensions. The mandibular fossa depth and condylar positions were symmetrical at treatment initiation and completion. Conclusions Class II malocclusion can be partially corrected by achieving an ideal maxillary arch form, particularly in patients with Class II division 2 malocclusion. Restrictions of the mandible in the transverse or sagittal plane do not affect the temporomandibular joint positions in these patients because of the high adaptability of this joint. PMID:26023540

  13. Evaluation of Groundwater Leakage into a Drainage Tunnel in Jinping-I Arch Dam Foundation in Southwestern China: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Hong, Jia-Min; Zheng, Hua-Kang; Li, Yi; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-03-01

    The Jinping-I double-curvature arch dam, located in the middle reach of Yalong River and with a maximum height of 305 m, is the world's highest dam of this type that has been completed. Since the second stage of reservoir impounding, after which the reservoir water level was gradually raised by about 232 m, a significant amount of leakage was observed from the drainage holes drilled in the lowest drainage tunnel at the left bank abutment at an elevation of 1595 m a.s.l. (above sea level), with an observed maximum pressure of about 0.3 MPa. A number of investigations, including water quality analysis, digital borehole imaging, tunnel geological mapping, and in situ groundwater monitoring, were performed to examine the source of leaking, the groundwater flow paths, and the performance of the grouting curtains. By defining two objective functions using the in situ time series measurements of flow rate and hydraulic head, respectively, a multiobjective inverse modeling procedure was proposed to evaluate the permeability of the foundation rocks that was underestimated in the design stage. This procedure takes advantage of the orthogonal design, finite element forward modeling of the transient groundwater flow, artificial neural network, and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, hence significantly reducing the computational cost and improving the reliability of the inversed results. The geological structures that lead to the leakage were identified and the seepage flow behaviors in the dam foundation and the left bank abutment were assessed. Based on the field measurements and the inverse modeling results, the effects of the engineering treatments of the leakage event on the dam safety were analyzed. It has been demonstrated that the seepage control system is effective in lowering the groundwater level and limiting the amount of seepage in the dam foundation, and the leakage event does not pose a threat to the safety of the dam.

  14. Lessons learned during the conduct of clinical studies in the dental PBRN.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Benjamin, Paul L; Wallace-Dawson, Martha; Williams, O Dale

    2011-04-01

    Effectively addressing challenges of conducting research in nonacademic settings is crucial to its success. A dental practice-based research network called The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) is comprised of practitioner- investigators in two health maintenance organizations, several universities, many U.S. states, and three Scandinavian countries. Our objective in this article is to describe lessons learned from conducting studies in this research context; the studies are conducted by clinicians in community settings who may be doing their first research study. To date, twenty-one studies have been completed or are in implementation. These include a broad range of topic areas, enrollment sizes, and study designs. A total of 1,126 practitioner-investigators have participated in at least one study. After excluding one study because it involved electronic records queries only, these studies included more than 70,000 patient/participant units. Because the DPBRN is committed to being both practitioner- and patient-driven, all studies must be approved by its Executive Committee and a formal study section of academic clinical scientists. As a result of interacting with a diverse range of institutional and regulatory entities, funding agencies, practitioners, clinic staff, patients, academic scientists, and geographic areas, twenty-three key lessons have been learned. Patients' acceptance of these studies has been very high, judging from high participation rates and their completion of data forms. Early studies substantially informed later studies with regard to study design, practicality, forms design, informed consent process, and training and monitoring methods. Although time-intensive and complex, these solutions improved acceptability of practice-based research to patients, practitioners, and university researchers.

  15. Lessons Learned During the Conduct of Clinical Studies in The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H.; Richman, Joshua S.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Benjamin, Paul L.; Wallace-Dawson, Martha; Williams, O. Dale

    2012-01-01

    Effectively addressing challenges of conducting research in nonacademic settings is crucial to its success. A dental practice-based research network called The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) is comprised of practitioner-investigators in two health maintenance organizations, several universities, many U.S. states, and three Scandinavian countries. Our objective in this article is to describe lessons learned from conducting studies in this research context; the studies are conducted by clinicians in community settings who may be doing their first research study. To date, twenty-one studies have been completed or are in implementation. These include a broad range of topic areas, enrollment sizes, and study designs. A total of 1,126 practitioner-investigators have participated in at least one study. After excluding one study because it involved electronic records queries only, these studies included more than 70,000 patient/participant units. Because the DPBRN is committed to being both practitioner- and patient-driven, all studies must be approved by its Executive Committee and a formal study section of academic clinical scientists. As a result of interacting with a diverse range of institutional and regulatory entities, funding agencies, practitioners, clinic staff, patients, academic scientists, and geographic areas, twenty-three key lessons have been learned. Patients’ acceptance of these studies has been very high, judging from high participation rates and their completion of data forms. Early studies substantially informed later studies with regard to study design, practicality, forms design, informed consent process, and training and monitoring methods. Although time-intensive and complex, these solutions improved acceptability of practice-based research to patients, practitioners, and university researchers. PMID:21460266

  16. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  17. A new chemical formulation for control of dental unit water line contamination: An 'in vitro' and clinical 'study'

    PubMed Central

    Montebugnoli, Lucio; Dolci, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Background Water delivered by dental units during routine dental practice is highly contaminated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a new chemical solution flushed through Dental Unit Water Lines (DUWL) for the control of contamination inside dental units. Materials and methods Six old dental units equipped with a device designed to automatically flush disinfecting solutions through the water system (Castellini Autosteril) were selected. Water samples from DUWL effluents were collected in each dental unit for 10 randomly selected days, before and after a 5 minute DUWL disinfecting cycle with TetraAcetylEthileneDiamine (TAED) and persalt (Ster4spray produced by Farmec spa, and distributed by Castellini spa). Water samples were plated in R2A Agar and cultured at room temperature for 7 days, and the total number of heterotrophic microorganisms counted and expressed in Log10 CFU/mL A general linear model was fitted and multiple regression ANOVA for repeated measures was used for the statistical analysis. Results The mean contamination in DUWL effluent at baseline was 5.45 ± 0.35 CFU/mL (range 4.79 to 5.93 CFU/mL). When water samples were tested "in vitro" against the chemical, no growth of heterotrophic bacteria was detected after a 5 minute contact in any of the water samples tested. After undergoing a 5 minute disinfecting cycle with the chemical, DUWL mean contamination in water effluents was 2.01 ± 0.32 CFU/mL (range 1.30 to 2.74 CFU/mL) (significant difference with respect to baseline). Conclusions An inbetween patient disinfecting procedure consisting of flushing DUWL with TAED and persalt equivalent to 0.26% peracetic acid could be useful in routine dental practice for cross-contamination control. PMID:11872153

  18. Reporting of research quality characteristics of studies published in 6 major clinical dental specialty journals.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Madianos, Phoebus; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this article was to record reporting characteristics related to study quality of research published in major specialty dental journals with the highest impact factor (Journal of Endodontics, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics; Pediatric Dentistry, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and International Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry). The included articles were classified into the following 3 broad subject categories: (1) cross-sectional (snap-shot), (2) observational, and (3) interventional. Multinomial logistic regression was conducted for effect estimation using the journal as the response and randomization, sample calculation, confounding discussed, multivariate analysis, effect measurement, and confidence intervals as the explanatory variables. The results showed that cross-sectional studies were the dominant design (55%), whereas observational investigations accounted for 13%, and interventions/clinical trials for 32%. Reporting on quality characteristics was low for all variables: random allocation (15%), sample size calculation (7%), confounding issues/possible confounders (38%), effect measurements (16%), and multivariate analysis (21%). Eighty-four percent of the published articles reported a statistically significant main finding and only 13% presented confidence intervals. The Journal of Clinical Periodontology showed the highest probability of including quality characteristics in reporting results among all dental journals.

  19. Dental Informatics tool “SOFPRO” for the study of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Erlewad, Dinesh Masajirao; Mundhe, Kalpana Anandrao; Hazarey, Vinay K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dental informatics is an evolving branch widely used in dental education and practice. Numerous applications that support clinical care, education and research have been developed. However, very few such applications are developed and utilized in the epidemiological studies of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) which is affecting a significant population of Asian countries. Aims and Objectives: To design and develop an user friendly software for the descriptive epidemiological study of OSF. Materials and Methods: With the help of a software engineer a computer program SOFPRO was designed and developed by using, Ms-Visual Basic 6.0 (VB), Ms-Access 2000, Crystal Report 7.0 and Ms-Paint in operating system XP. For the analysis purpose the available OSF data from the departmental precancer registry was fed into the SOFPRO. Results: Known data, not known and null data are successfully accepted in data entry and represented in data analysis of OSF. Smooth working of SOFPRO and its correct data flow was tested against real-time data of OSF. Conclusion: SOFPRO was found to be a user friendly automated tool for easy data collection, retrieval, management and analysis of OSF patients. PMID:27601808

  20. An Outcomes Study of 40 Years of Graduates of a General Practice Dental Residency.

    PubMed

    Lau, Agnes; Dodson, Thomas B; Sonis, Stephen T; Kaban, Leonard B

    2015-08-01

    Assessing program quality and outcomes is essential to improve postgraduate dental education. This study's aims were to document career direction and practice patterns of graduates of the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) General Practice Residency (GPR), to compare BWH GPR outcomes to those of other American GPRs, and to identify characteristics of the BWH GPR program that trainees valued. This was a retrospective cohort study with a sample comprised of BWH GPR graduates between 1973 and 2013. Outcomes examined included pursuit of specialty training and positions on academic or hospital staff. Data sources were a survey of BWH GPR graduates and published national surveys. Of the 190 BWH graduates (95% of total) who were located and contacted, 133 (70% response rate) completed the survey. Compared to national survey data, BWH GPR graduates were significantly more likely to be specialists, full-time hospital staff, or full-time or part-time dental school faculty. Most BWH graduates (96.2%) ranked the program as outstanding or good. Faculty characteristics were considered by BWH graduates to be the most important factors in judging program quality. Since faculty characteristics were the most important factors in residents' judgment of program quality, GPR programs should recruit, maintain, and develop a quality faculty in order to attract students.

  1. Comparative study of flexural strength test methods on CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongxiang; Han, Jianmin; Lin, Hong; An, Linan

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, fractures are the main cause of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) 3 mol%-yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) all-ceramic dental restorations failure because of repetitive occlusal loading. The goal of this work is to study the effect of test methods and specimen’s size on the flexural strength of five ceramic products. Both bi-axial flexure test (BI) and uni-axial flexure tests (UNI), including three-point flexure test (3PF) and four-point flexure test (4PF), are used in this study. For all five products, the flexural strength is as follows: BI > 3PF > 4PF. Furthermore, specimens with smaller size (3PF-s) have higher values than the bigger ones (3PF). The difference between BI and UNI resulted from the edge flaws in ceramic specimens. The relationship between different UNI (including 3PF-s, 3PF and 4PF) can be explained according to Weibull statistical fracture theory. BI is recommended to evaluate the flexural strength of CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics. PMID:26816646

  2. History of dental hygiene research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  3. An anatomical investigation of the superficial and deep palmar arches.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sadhna; Lazarus, Lelika; De Gama, Brenda Zola; Satyapal, Kapil Sewsaran

    2016-09-26

    The superficial and deep palmar arches provide the dominant vascular supply to the hand. The superficial palmar arch (SPA) is considered to be highly variable and can be classified as either complete or incomplete. The simplest definition states that the anastomosis between the vessels contributing to the arch represent a complete arch while an incomplete arch is described as having an absence of anastomosis between the vessels contributing to it. This study aimed to describe the anatomical landmarks, formation and branching patterns of the SPA and DPA. In this study, the SPA and deep palmar arch (DPA) were dissected in 50 specimens (n=100 adult hands), respectively. A complete SPA was observed in 92% of specimens and classified into three types. In Type A (44%), the SPA was formed by the anastomosis of the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery with the ulnar artery. Type B (46%) was formed by the ulnar artery alone and Type C (2%) was formed by anastomosis of the ulnar artery with the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery and the persistent median artery. An incomplete SPA was observed in 8% of the specimens and divided into three types formed by the radial and ulnar arteries. The DPA was divided into five types viz. Type G (72%), where the DPA was formed by anastomosis of the deep palmar branch of the radial artery (DPBRA) with the deep branch of the ulnar artery (DBUA). Type H (12%), was formed by anastomosis of the DPBRA, the DBUA and the interosseous artery. Type I (8%), was formed by the anastomosis of the DPBRA with the superior and inferior deep branch of the ulnar artery. Type J (4%), the deep ulnar artery had two branches whereby either one branch anastomosed with the DPBRA to form the DPA. Type K (4%), the DBUA exhibited two deep branches with one branch anastomosing with the DPBRA to complete the DPA. The interosseous artery anastomosed with either the DPA or the additional deep branch of the ulnar artery. Knowledge of the variability

  4. Risk factors for osteonecrosis of the jaws: a case-control study from the CONDOR Dental PBRN.

    PubMed

    Barasch, A; Cunha-Cruz, J; Curro, F A; Hujoel, P; Sung, A H; Vena, D; Voinea-Griffin, A E; Beadnell, Steven; Craig, Ronald G; DeRouen, Timothy; Desaranayake, Ananda; Gilbert, Ann; Gilbert, Gregg H; Goldberg, Ken; Hauley, Richard; Hashimoto, Mariko; Holmes, Jon; Latzke, Brooke; Leroux, Brian; Lindblad, Anne; Richman, Joshua; Safford, Monika; Ship, Jonathan; Thompson, Van P; Williams, O Dale; Wanrong, Yin

    2013-04-01

    Case reports and cohort studies have linked bisphosphonate therapy and osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), but neither causality nor specific risks for lesion development have been clearly established. We conducted a 1:3 case-control study with 3 dental practice-based research networks, using dentist questionnaires and patient interviews for collection of data on bisphosphonate therapy, demographics, co-morbidities, and dental and medical treatments. Multivariable logistic regression analyses tested associations between bisphosphonate use and other risk factors with ONJ. We enrolled 191 ONJ cases and 573 controls in 119 dental practices. Bisphosphonate use was strongly associated with ONJ (odds ratios [OR] 299.5 {95% CI 70.0-1282.7} for intravenous [IV] use and OR = 12.2 {4.3-35.0} for oral use). Risk markers included local suppuration (OR = 7.8 {1.8-34.1}), dental extraction (OR = 7.6 {2.4-24.7}), and radiation therapy (OR = 24.1 {4.9-118.4}). When cancer patients (n = 143) were excluded, bisphosphonate use (OR = 7.2 {2.1-24.7}), suppuration (OR = 11.9 {2.0-69.5}), and extractions (OR = 6.6 {1.6-26.6}) remained associated with ONJ. Higher risk of ONJ began within 2 years of bisphosphonate initiation and increased 4-fold after 2 years. Both IV and oral bisphosphonate use were strongly associated with ONJ. Duration of treatment >2 years; suppuration and dental extractions were independent risk factors for ONJ.

  5. Exploring attitudes and knowledge of climate change and sustainability in a dental practice: A feasibility study into resource management.

    PubMed

    Grose, J; Richardson, J; Mills, I; Moles, D; Nasser, M

    2016-02-26

    Objective To understand the attitudes and behaviour of staff in dental practice towards adopting a reduce, reuse, recycle approach to resource management.Design A qualitative interview study.Setting The site for the study was a mixed NHS/private dental practice in North Devon.Subjects All disciplines from one dental practice.Methods (1) A practice scoping exercise - provided context and identified an interview sample. (2) Qualitative interviews with practice staff - explored knowledge and attitudes about sustainability and identified opportunities and limitations for the sustainable management of resources.Results The main issue raised by staff was the amount of waste generated. There was a strong desire to implement changes, but deep concerns were expressed about the impact of challenging current guidance on infection control.Conclusions Primary care dentistry provides both surgical and non-surgical care to more than half the UK population. Therefore, lessons learned from general dental practice can encourage positive change. More research is needed across dental practice in order to generalise these findings.

  6. Green LED associated to 20% hydrogen peroxide for dental bleaching: nanomorfologic study of enamel by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    Dental bleaching is a much requested procedure in clinical dental practice and widely related to dental esthetics. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on the morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the effect of hydrogen peroxide at 20% at neutral pH, cured by the green LED, to evaluate the action of these substances on dental enamel. We selected 15 pre-molars, lingual surfaces were sectioned and previously marked with a central groove to take the experimental and control groups on the same specimen. The groups were divided as follows. The mesial hemi-faces were the experimental group and distal ones as controls. For morphological analysis were performed 75 electron micrographs SEM with an increase of X 43, X 220 and X 1000 and its images were evaluated by tree observers. Was also performed quantitative analysis of the determination of the surface atomic composition of the samples through microanalysis with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The use of hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 20% at photoactivated green LED showed no significant changes in mineral composition of the samples or the dental morphological structure of the same when compared to their controls, according to the study protocol.

  7. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... help keep the dental office running smoothly. Important Qualities Detail oriented. Dental assistants must follow specific rules and protocols, such as infection control procedures, when helping dentists treat patients. Assistants also ...

  8. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  9. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  10. Treatment effects of mandibular total arch distalization using a ramal plate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jonghan; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Sungkon; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Kim, Yoonji

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment effects after distalization of the mandibular dentition using ramal plates through lateral cephalograms. Methods Pre- and post-treatment lateral cephalograms and dental casts of 22 adult patients (11 males and 11 females; mean age, 23.9 ± 5.52 years) who received ramal plates for mandibular molar distalization were analyzed. The treatment effects and amount of distalization of the mandibular molars were calculated and tested for statistical significance. The significance level was set at p < 0.001. Results The mandibular first molar distalization at the crown and root were 2.10 mm (p < 0.001) and 0.81 mm (p = 0.011), respectively. In the evaluation of skeletal variables, there was a significant increase in the Wits appraisal (p < 0.001). In the evaluation of the soft tissue, there was no significant effect on upper lip position, but the lower lips showed a significant retraction of 2.2 mm (p < 0.001). Conclusions The mandibular molars showed a significant amount of distalization accompanied by limited extrusion and mesiobuccal rotation of the crowns. A ramal plate may be a viable device for mandibular total arch distalization in Class III patients who are reluctant to undergo orthognathic surgery. PMID:27478798

  11. Complex Atheromatosis of the Aortic Arch in Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Capmany, Ramón Pujadas; Ibañez, Montserrat Oliveras; Pesquer, Xavier Jané

    2010-01-01

    In many stroke patients it is not possible to establish the etiology of stroke. However, in the last two decades, the use of transesophageal echocardiography in patients with stroke of uncertain etiology reveals atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch, which often protrude into the lumen and have mobile components in a high percentage of cases. Several autopsy series and retrospective studies of cases and controls have shown an association between aortic arch atheroma and arterial embolism, which was later confirmed by prospectively designed studies. The association with ischemic stroke was particularly strong when atheromas were located proximal to the ostium of the left subclavian artery, when the plaque was ≥ 4 mm thick and particularly when mobile components are present. In these cases, aspirin might not prevent adequately new arterial ischemic events especially stroke. Here we review the evidence of aortic arch atheroma as an independent risk factor for stroke and arterial embolism, including clinical and pathological data on atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta as an embolic source. In addition, the impact of complex plaques (≥ 4 mm thick, or with mobile components) on increasing the risk of stroke is also reviewed. In non-randomized retrospective studies anticoagulation was superior to antiplatelet therapy in patients with stroke and aortic arch plaques with mobile components. In a retrospective case-control study, statins significantly reduced the relative risk of new vascular events. However, given the limited data available and its retrospective nature, randomized prospective studies are needed to establish the optimal secondary prevention therapeutic regimens in these high risk patients. PMID:21804777

  12. Hospital-based dental care for persons with disabilities: a study of patient selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Hulland, S; Sigal, M J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to generate a medical and dental profile of patients attending the Mount Sinai Hospital Dental Program for Persons with Disabilities, to determine if certain selected criteria could identify patients likely to require dental care in that setting. The need for dental care under general anesthesia was used as the prime indicator that care should be provided in a hospital setting. A retrospective review of all the charts of the patients enrolled in this hospital program was undertaken. Results indicated that patients who were treated in this hospital-based dental program had the following characteristics: moderate to profound mental retardation (39.5%), moderate to severe behavioral problems (31.1%), and/or a history of seizure activity (29.1%). Behavioral criteria appear to be the predominant reason for the provision of hospital-based dental care for persons with disabilities.

  13. [Determinants of dental services utilization by adults: a population-based study in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Camila Dal-Bó Coradini; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of dental services utilization by adults and to identify associated socioeconomic, demographic, behavioral, and self-awareness factors. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with adults living in the urban area of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in 2009. Associations were tested between use of dental services and predisposing, enabling, and needs-based variables. Multivariate analysis was conducted using Poisson regression with estimates of prevalence ratios and was stratified by place of last dental appointment. Prevalence of dental services utilization was 66% (95%CI: 62.9-70.7). Dental visits were 20% more frequent among women and 72% more frequent among individuals with more schooling (the latter in both public and private dental services). Individuals with private dental plans used dental services 13% more than those without. Schooling was the most important variable in predicting utilization. The study's results show the importance of monitoring associated factors in order to promote more equitable use of dental services.

  14. A light and scanning electron microscopy study of human direct laser metal forming dental implants.