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Sample records for dental bleaching agents

  1. Effect of bleaching agent on dental ceramics roughness.

    PubMed

    Vanderlei, Aleska D; Passos, Sheila P; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Pereira, Sarina Mb; Vásquez, Vanessa Zc; Bottino, Marco A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents (10% and 16% carbamide peroxide) on the roughness of two dental ceramics in vitro, and to analyze the surface by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Two bleaching agents (10% and 16%/Whiteness, FGM Gel) and two microparticle feldspathic ceramics (Vita VM7 and Vita VM13) were used. Forty disks of Vita VM7 and Vita VM13 ceramic were manufactured, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm high, in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations, and were divided into 4 groups (n = 10): (1) VM7 + Whiteness 10%; (2) VM7 + Whiteness 16%; (3) VM13 + Whiteness 10%; (4) VM13 + Whiteness 16%. The bleaching agent was applied for 8 hours a day for 15 days and during the intervals the test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The roughness (Ra) of the test specimens was evaluated before and after exposure to the bleaching agents using a laser roughness meter and the topographic description was analyzed by SEM. The statistical analysis of roughness data showed significant differences in the VM7 groups, using paired t-test, p = 0.05 (VM7 + Whiteness 10%: p = 0.002; VM7 + Whiteness 16%: p = 0.001) and two-sample t-test (VM7 p = 0.047), and no significant difference was found among VM13 groups. The qualitative SEM analysis showed different degrees of surface changes. The results suggest that the roughness of the tested ceramic surfaces increased after exposure to the bleaching agents.

  2. Influence of the coloring agent concentration on bleaching gel and pulp chamber temperatures during dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Castanho, Gisela Muassab; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Nogueira, Lafayette; Borges, Alessandra B; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the coloring agent concentration on the temperature of the gel layer and pulp chamber during dental bleaching with an LED/laser light source. Ten human incisors and a digital thermometer with K-type thermocouples were used. Using a high-speed spherical diamond bur, endodontic access was gained through openings on the lingual faces until pulp chamber was exposed. One end of the thermocouple was placed on the labial surface (immersed in bleaching gel) and the other end in the pulp chamber. The same 10 specimens were used in the 12 groups, according to the type and concentration of bleaching gel. Each bleaching gel was used in four different concentrations: manipulated without coloring, with normal quantity recommended by the manufacturer, with double the recommended amount of coloring, and with triple the recommended amount of coloring. The temperature rise was measured every 30 seconds for three minutes with a K-type thermocouple. The data were analyzed by ANOVA to examine the concentration and type of bleaching gel. This test was followed by Tukey's test, which was performed independently for the gel at the labial surface and the pulp chamber (a = 5%). For both surfaces, values of p = 0.00 were obtained for all factors and for the interaction between them. The varying concentrations of coloring agent produced statistically significant differences in terms of temperature increase for both the gel layer and the pulp chamber during activation.

  3. Effectiveness of dental bleaching in depth after using different bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Débora A N L.; Aguiar, Flávio H B.; Bertoldo, Carlos E S.; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B.; Lovadino, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of low- and high-concentration bleaching agents on enamel and deep dentin. Study design: Stained bovine incisors fragments were randomized placed into 10 groups (n=5), according to the sample thicknesses (2.0 mm or 3.5 mm) and bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (4 h a day/21 days); 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with calcium (1:30 h a day/21 days); HP 20% with calcium (50 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% (3 x 15 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% with calcium (40 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval). The samples were stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. The color change was evaluated using a spectrophotometer at the initial analysis, after artificially staining with black tea and after each of the bleaching weeks, and data was expressed in CIE Lab System values. The L* coordinate data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test and the ?E values data was submitted for analysis of variance in a split-plot ANOVA and Tukey’s test (?=0.05). Results: None of the bleaching agents tested differed from the reflectance values on the enamel surface. For deep dentin HP 20% and HP 35%, both with calcium, showed the lowest reflectance values, which differed from CP 10%. Conclusion: It is concluded that high concentration hydrogen peroxide with calcium was less effective in deep dentin than 10% carbamide peroxide. Key words:Dental bleaching; hydrogen peroxide; carbamide peroxide; dental staining. PMID:24455056

  4. [Benefits of antioxidant agents' use for dental filling consequent to the endo-bleaching].

    PubMed

    Kobakhidze, G D; Vadachkoriia, N R; Tkhilava, N G

    2006-08-01

    Efficacy of antioxidant agents' use after dental endo bleaching was studied in clinical trial. The study enrolled 169 patients, ranging age 16 to 60 years in age. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: control (63) and trial (106). In patients of the control group tooth cavity was left open after endo bleaching, and was filled only after 7 days. In patients of the trial group antioxidant agent was administered into the dental tissues consequently to the endo bleaching, and the cavity was filled immediately. Assessment of the immediate and distant effects revealed unwanted results of postponed dental filling (control group) in terms of tooth color stability and forming micro cracks. Results of antioxidant use and immediate dental filling after endo bleaching have proven our earlier experimental studies on benefits of antioxidant use to be right. Based on the results of our clinical study we can recommend use of antioxidant after endo bleaching to achieve successful dental fillings in clinical practice.

  5. DNA-damaging effects of dental bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Pligina, K L; Rodina, I A; Shevchenko, T V; Bekchanova, E S; Tikhonov, V P; Sirota, N P

    2012-05-01

    We studied DNA-damaging effects of dental bleaching systems containing hydrogen peroxide and/or carbamide peroxide by the "comet assay" (alkaline version). Dental bleaching systems in a hydrogen peroxide concentration range from 0.03 to 30 mM produced a genotoxic effect on isolated HeLa cells in vitro comparable with the effects of pharmacopoeial hydrogen peroxide or urea peroxide. Catalase protected the cells against products containing hydrogen peroxide and had no effect on the genotoxicity of samples containing carbamide peroxide.

  6. Influence of bleaching agents on surface roughness of sound or eroded dental enamel specimens.

    PubMed

    Azrak, Birgül; Callaway, Angelika; Kurth, Petra; Willershausen, Brita

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents on eroded and sound enamel specimens. Enamel specimens prepared from human permanent anterior teeth were incubated with different bleaching agents containing active ingredients as 7.5 or 13.5% hydrogen peroxide or 35% carbamide peroxide, ranging in pH from 4.9 to 10.8. The effect of the tooth whitening agents on surface roughness was tested for sound enamel surfaces as well as for eroded enamel specimens. To provoke erosive damage, the enamel specimens were incubated for 10 hours with apple juice (pH = 3.4). Afterwards, pretreated and untreated dental slices were incubated with one of the bleaching agents for 10 hours. The surface roughness (R(a)) of all enamel specimens (N = 80) was measured using an optical profilometric device. A descriptive statistical analysis of the R(a) values was performed. The study demonstrated that exposure to an acidic bleaching agent (pH = 4.9) resulted in a higher surface roughness (p = 0.043) than treatment with a high peroxide concentration (pH = 6.15). If the enamel surface was previously exposed to erosive beverages, subsequent bleaching may enhance damage to the dental hard tissue. Bleaching agents with a high concentration of peroxide or an acidic pH can influence the surface roughness of sound or eroded enamel. © 2010, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    PubMed

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P < .05. The measurements showed that hue and chroma of silorane-based composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P < .05). No statistically significant differences were found when testing the microhardness and surface roughness of composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  9. In Vitro Comparative Study of Two Different Bleaching Agents on Micro-hardness Dental Enamel.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nazish; Ali Abidi, Syed Yawar; Meo, Ashraf Ali

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent containing 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on enamel micro-hardness. An in vitroexperimental study. Department of Operative Dentistry and Science of Dental Materials at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences and Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from July to December 2014. Atotal of 90 enamel slabs from 45 sound human 3rd molar were randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained 30 specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator during the whole experiment. However, Groups 2 and 3 were treated with power whitening gel and tooth whitening pen respectively. After bleaching session, specimens were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water again for 10 seconds and then stored in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator. Artificial saliva was changed after every 2 days. The Vickers hardness tester (Wolpert 402 MVD, Germany) was adjusted to a load of 0.1 kg (100 gm) and dwell time of 5 seconds. Three Vickers were performed on each specimen using a hardness tester according to the ISO 6507-3:1998 specification. Micro-hardness measurements were performed before and after bleaching at day 1, 7 and 14. In the control group, the baseline micro-hardness was 181.1 ±9.3 which was reduced after the storage on day 1, 7 and 14 (p = 0.104). In Group 2, baseline micro-hardness was 180.4 ±10.1 which was reduced to 179.79 ±10.0 units after day 1. Whereas, on day 7 and 14, the values of micro-hardness were 179.8 ±10 and 179.7 ±10.29, respectively (p=0.091). Furthermore, the baseline micro-hardness in Group 3 was 174.0 ±22.9 units which was reduced to 173 ±23 on day 1, 170 ±30 on day 7 and 173 ±23 on day 14 (p = 0.256). The statistically insignificant difference was found

  10. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components.

  11. Effect of bleaching agent and topical fluoride application on color and gloss of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Vicente, Sergio Augusto de Freitas; Tonani, Rafaella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride application and their association with a change in color (ΔE*) and brightness of dental ceramic submitted to different finishing procedures. A total of 120 test specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 40) according to the type of finishing: glazing; polishing; or polishing and glazing. Initial color and brightness readouts were taken, and the finished specimens were divided into groups (n = 10) according to the treatment to which they were submitted: fluoride; bleaching; bleaching and fluoride; or control. After this, final color and brightness readouts were taken. The type of polishing had no influence on ΔE* or brightness (P > 0.05). Regardless of which solution was used, a decrease in brightness occurred only for the group treated with bleach and fluoride (P < 0.05). The results showed the use of fluoride after bleaching may interfere with the esthetics of a restoration.

  12. The effect of carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila P; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Azevedo, Sarina M B; Vasquez, Vanessa Z C; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface microhardness of micro-particulate feldspathic ceramics (VM7 and VM13, Vita Zahnfabrik). Forty specimens (8-mm diameter, 2-mm thickness) were divided into four groups (n=10): GI-VM7 + 10% Whiteness, G2-VM7 + 16% Whiteness, G3-VM13 + 10% and G4-VM13 + 16% Whiteness. The home-use bleaching agents were applied for 8 hours on 15 days, and the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The Vickers hardness number (HV) was determined for each specimen. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05). The microhardness values before exposure were: g1-433 (57); g2-486 (22); g3-509 (28); g4-518 (24), and after exposure: G1-349 (32); G2-496 (95); G3-519 (38); G4-502 (81). G2 exhibited a higher and significant difference than GI in VM7 groups, and the effect of bleaching concentration was shown to be significant by the Mann-Whitney test. And for VM13, both the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests showed no significant differences. When using 10% carbamide peroxide, the microhardness of VM7 ceramic was affected, and there were no effect on the microhardness between VM7 and VM13 ceramics when 16% carbamide peroxide was used.

  13. Bleaching agents with varying concentrations of carbamide and/or hydrogen peroxides: effect on dental microhardness and roughness.

    PubMed

    Faraoni-Romano, Juliana Jendiroba; Da Silveira, Alessandra Gonçalves; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of low and highly concentrated bleaching agents on microhardness and surface roughness of bovine enamel and root dentin. According to a randomized complete block design, 100 specimens of each substrate were assigned into five groups to be treated with bleaching agents containing carbamide peroxide (CP) at 10% (CP10); hydrogen peroxide (HP) at 7.5% (HP7.5) or 38% (HP38), or the combination of 18% of HP and 22% of CP (HP18/CP22), for 3 weeks. The control group was left untreated. Specimens were immersed in artificial saliva between bleaching treatments. Knoop surface microhardness (SMH) and average surface roughness (Ra) were measured at baseline and post-bleaching conditions. For enamel, there were differences between bleaching treatments for both SMH and Ra measurements (p = 0.4009 and p = 0.7650, respectively). SMH significantly increased (p < 0.0001), whereas Ra decreased (p = 0.0207) from baseline to post-bleaching condition. For root dentin, the group treated with CP10 exhibited the significantly highest SMH value differing from those groups bleached with HP18/CP22, HP7.5, which did not differ from each other. Application of HP38 resulted in intermediate SMH values. No significant differences were found for Ra (p = 0.5975). Comparing the baseline and post-bleaching conditions, a decrease was observed in SMH (p < 0.0001) and an increase in Ra (p = 0.0063). Bleaching agents with varying concentrations of CP and/or HP are capable of causing mineral loss in root dentin. Enamel does not perform in such bleaching agent-dependent fashion when one considers either hardness or surface roughness evaluations. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Bleaching did not alter the enamel microhardness and surface roughness, but in root dentin, microhardness seems to be dependent on the bleaching agent used.

  14. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  15. Effects of bleaching agents on surface roughness of filling materials.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Ljubisa; Jordan, Rainer Andreas; Glasser, Marie-Claire; Arnold, Wolfgang Hermann; Nebel, Jan; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Thomas; Zimmer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a non-tactile optical measurement system to assess the effects of three bleaching agents' concentrations on the surface roughness of dental restoration materials. Two composites (Grandio, Venus) and one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil Plus) were used in this in vitro study. Specimens were treated with three different bleaching agents (16% and 22% carbamide peroxide (Polanight) and 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost)). Surface roughness was measured with an optical profilometer (Infinite Focus G3) before and after the bleaching treatment. Surface roughness increased in all tested specimens after bleaching treatment (p<0.05). Our in vitro study showed that dental bleaching agents influenced the surface roughness of different restoration materials, and the restoration material itself was shown to have an impact on alteration susceptibility. There seemed to be no clinical relevance in case of an optimal finish.

  16. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  17. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Curado, J. F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-08-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  18. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled. PMID:23674914

  19. Depletion Rate of Hydrogen Peroxide from Sodium Perborate Bleaching Agent.

    PubMed

    Tran, Liliann; Orth, Rebecca; Parashos, Peter; Tao, Ying; Tee, Calvin W J; Thomas, Vineet Thenalil; Towers, Georgina; Truong, Diem Thuy; Vinen, Cynthia; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-03-01

    Internal bleaching of discolored teeth uses sodium perborate reacting with water to form the active agent, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Sodium perborate is replaced at varying time intervals depending on clinician preference and until esthetically acceptable results are achieved, but this is done without scientific basis. This study measured the depletion rate of hydrogen peroxide from sodium perborate as a bleaching agent. Two sodium perborate bleaching products (Odontobleach [Australian Dental Manufacturing, Kenmore Hills, Queensland, Australia] and Endosure Perborate Micro [Dentalife, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia]) and distilled deionized water mixtures at ratios of 25 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, and 100 μg/mL were placed into sealed microtubes and incubated at 37°C. H2O2 concentrations were measured at 23 time points over 4 weeks. Quantification of H2O2 concentrations was obtained using a ferrothiocyanate oxidation reduction reaction followed by spectrophotometry readings. The H2O2 concentration rapidly peaked within 27 hours and reached a plateau by about 3 days (75 hours). Low levels of H2O2 were evident beyond 3 days and for at least 28 days. No significant differences were found between the 2 sodium perborate products. There was also no significant difference in the depletion rate between the different ratios. Based on the chemistry of H2O2 depletion, the minimum replacement interval for the bleaching agent is 3 days. Frequent replacements of the perborate clinically may be unnecessary because of the continued presence of low H2O2 levels for at least 28 days. Although these data cannot be extrapolated to the clinical situation, they set a baseline for further studies to address the many clinical variables influencing internal bleaching. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2). PMID:27375906

  1. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2).

  2. Effects of dental bleaching on the color, translucency and fluorescence properties of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana M; Borges, Alessandra B; Torres, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the color, translucency and fluorescence of bovine enamel and dentin submitted to different bleaching modalities. Pairs of enamel and dentin discs (3 mm in diameter) were obtained from 150 bovine teeth. In 75 of the pairs, one specimen had the enamel removed (Dentin Group). The dentin was removed from one specimen of the remaining 75 pairs (Enamel Group) and the other specimen was left unaltered (Enamel + Dentin). The evaluation of color, translucency and fluorescence was performed with a spectrophotometer using the CIE L* a* b*. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: Control, composed of specimens that were not bleached, and two experimental subgroups, bleached with either 10% carbamide peroxide (CP10%) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP35%). The CP10% bleaching gel was applied 2 h/day for 14 days. The HP35% bleaching agent was applied using two applications of 30 min each, with a one week interval between each application. When not being bleached, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva. The color, translucency and fluorescence ratings were assessed using spectrophotometry 7 days after the treatment. Regarding color, significant differences were found between bleaching techniques in the groups Enamel and Enamel + Dentin, with a higher color difference for HP35%. Bleaching did not change the translucency of the dental tissues. There were significant differences for fluorescence for the HP35% subgroups of Dentin and Enamel + Dentin, and for the CP10% subgroup of Enamel. Dental bleaching changed the color and fluorescence of the dental tissues, however translucency was not affected.

  3. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  4. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  5. [The effect of 2 bleaching agents on the enamel surface. An in-vitro study].

    PubMed

    Llena Puy, M C; Forner Navarro, L; Ferrandez, A; Faus Llacer, J V

    1992-01-01

    We present a study "in vitro" of the effect of bleaching agents on dental surfaces using the "Walking bleaching technique". We found that hydrogen peroxide bleached more quickly than carbamide although, after a period of six weeks, the results were the same as far as whitening was concerned. In the scanning electron microscope we observed significantly different changes in each case. Carbamide caused a regular and uniform opening of the enamel prisms of the surface while hydrogen peroxide produced more severe superficial destruction with the appearance of patterning similar to the acid etching, and the presence of some crystalline areas emerging from the body of the prisms.

  6. Influence of potentially remineralizing agents on bleached enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Samezima, Leticia Yumi; Fonseca, Léila Pereira; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the addition of calcium and fluoride into a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on enamel surface and subsurface microhardness. Twenty extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain enamel fragments and they were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the bleaching treatment. Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control). Group 2 was treated with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Total Bleach), Groups 3 and 4 were bleached with Total Bleach modified by the addition of sodium fluoride and calcium chloride, respectively. The microhardness of the enamel surface was assessed using a Vickers microdurometer immediately after the bleaching treatment. The specimens were sectioned in the central portion, polished and evaluated to determine the microhardness of the enamel subsurface to a depth of 125 microm, with an interval of 25 microm between measures. There were significant differences among the groups. In terms of surface microhardness, the bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group exhibited the highest means. Regarding subsurface microhardness, there were no significant differences among the groups for the depth and interaction factors. The bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group presented the highest means. It was concluded that the bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the surface and subsurface microhardness of the enamel, and the addition of fluoride and calcium in the bleaching agent increased the microhardness means of the bleached enamel.

  7. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  8. Effect of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching of liquid Cheddar whey.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Barbano, D M; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2012-01-01

    The use of whey protein as an ingredient in foods and beverages is increasing, and thus demand for colorless and mild-tasting whey protein is rising. Bleaching is commonly applied to fluid colored cheese whey to decrease color, and different temperatures and bleach concentrations are used. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of hot and cold bleaching, the point of bleaching (before or after fat separation), and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of liquid colored and uncolored Cheddar whey. First, Cheddar whey was manufactured, pasteurized, fat-separated, and subjected to one of a number of hot (68°C) or cold (4°C) bleaching applications [hydrogen peroxide (HP) 50 to 500 mg/kg; benzoyl peroxide (BP) 25 to 100 mg/kg] followed by measurement of residual norbixin and color by reflectance. Bleaching agent concentrations were then selected for the second trial. Liquid colored Cheddar whey was manufactured in triplicate and pasteurized. Part of the whey was collected (no separation, NSE) and the rest was subjected to fat separation (FSE). The NSE and FSE wheys were then subdivided and bleaching treatments (BP 50 or 100 mg/kg and HP 250 or 500 mg/kg) at 68°C for 30 min or 4°C for 16 h were applied. Control NSE and FSE with no added bleach were also subjected to each time-temperature combination. Volatile compounds from wheys were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and norbixin (annatto) was extracted and quantified to compare bleaching efficacy. Proximate analysis, including total solids, protein, and fat contents, was also conducted. Liquid whey subjected to hot bleaching at both concentrations of HP or at 100mg/kg BP had greater lipid oxidation products (aldehydes) compared with unbleached wheys, 50mg/kg BP hot-bleached whey, or cold-bleached wheys. No effect was detected between NSE and FSE liquid Cheddar whey on the relative abundance of volatile lipid oxidation products. Wheys bleached with BP had

  9. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; de Souza, João Batista; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Nádia Lago; Torres, Érica Miranda; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p<.05. Results: The inflammation intensity and the number of macrophages were significantly greater in IO than in AH and CG (p<0.05). The results of CD31+ (blood vessels per mm2) were similar in CG (61.39±20.03), AH (52.29±27.62), and IO (57.43±8.69) groups (p>0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels. PMID:27812622

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms.

  11. Efficacy and cytotoxicity of a bleaching gel after short application times on dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; da Silveira Vargas, Fernanda; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2013-11-01

    diffusion through dental tissues and its cytotoxic effects were proportional to the contact time of the bleaching gel with enamel. However, shorter bleaching times reduced bleaching efficacy. Shortening the in-office tooth bleaching time could be an alternative to minimize the cytotoxic effects of this clinical procedure to pulp tissue. However, the reduced time of bleaching agent application on enamel may not provide adequate esthetic outcome.

  12. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate. PMID:28149472

  13. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on dentin microhardness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Daniel Pinto; Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents associated or unassociated with chlorhexidine gel on dentin microhardness. Sixty human maxillary incisor crowns were divided into six groups, and bleaching agents were sealed into the pulp chambers as follows: sodium perborate + water (SPW), sodium perborate + 2% chlorhexidine gel (SP + CHX), sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide solution (SP + HP), 37% carbamide peroxide gel (CP), 37% carbamide peroxide gel + 2% chlorhexidine gel (CP+CHX), and water (W). After the bleaching procedure, microhardness testing was carried out on the dentin surface at three different levels: inner, middle, and outer dentin. The greatest reduction in microhardness was observed for the SP + HP group. No differences were observed between the SPW and SP + CHX group. The 2% chlorhexidine gel did not adversely affect dentin microhardness when associated with the tested bleaching agents. CHX might be considered as an antimicrobial vehicle during intracoronal bleaching.

  14. Peroxide bleaching agent effects on enamel surface microhardness, roughness and morphology.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cristiane Franco; Oliveira, Rogério de; Cavalli, Vanessa; Giannini, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness, microhardness and morphology of human enamel exposed to six bleaching agents (at baseline and post-treatment). Human dental enamel samples were obtained from human third molars and randomly divided into seven groups (n = 11): control, Whiteness Perfect--10% carbamide peroxide (10% CP), Colgate Platinum--10% CP, Day White 2Z--7.5% hydrogen peroxide (7.5% HP), Whiteness Super--3% CP, Opalescence Quick--35% CP and Whiteness HP--35% HP. Bleaching agents were applied according to manufacturers' instructions. The control group remained not treated and stored in artificial saliva. Microhardness testing was performed with a Knoop indentor and surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Morphologic observations were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%), and revealed a significant decrease in microhardness values and a significant increase in surface roughness post-bleaching. Changes in enamel morphology after bleaching were observed under SEM. It was concluded that bleaching agents can alter the microhardness, roughness and morphology of dental enamel surface.

  15. [Bonding of resin cement to bleached dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Wakami, Masanobu; Masuda, Mikiko; Kato, Hitomi; Tabei, Naoko; Watanabe, Tsukasa; Muramori, Juri; Saikawa, Takahiro; Aida, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2008-07-01

    The effects of bleaching times, types of etching agent and storage period of bleached bovine tooth on the shear bond strength of resin cement to the enamel were examined. Bovine teeth were repeatedly bleached 0, 1, 3, and 5 times then stored in 37 degrees C water for 1 week. The effect of bleaching number of the bovine tooth on the bond strength of resin cement to the enamel was investigated using 40% phosphoric acid (EG) etching technique. Next, the effects of types of etching agent and of storage period of bleached bovine tooth with three times in 37 degrees C water on the bond strength were studied using 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 10% citric acid (10-0) solution. The bleaching of bovine tooth allowed for a dramatic decrease in the bond strength from 18.3 MPa to 9.8 MPa (1 time), and 3.9 MPa (3 times), even though the bovine enamel was etched by EG. However, when 10-3 or 10-0 solution was applied to the three times bleached enamel, bond strengths were 13.9 and 10.0 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, prolonging of the storage period of the three times bleached bovine tooth in water to 2 months resulted in a increase in the bond strength from 3.9 to 10.1 MPa, even if bovine enamel was etched by EG, and close to that obtained from the 10-3 etching. To obtain the expected bond strength to bleached enamel, it is better to wait for 2 months for a restoration and use the 10-3 etching.

  16. Clinical comparison between the bleaching efficacy of 37% peroxide carbamide gel mixed with sodium perborate with established intracoronal bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Lopes, Eduardo Biaggioni; Ciccone-Nogueira, Juliane Cristina; Silva, Regina Célia S P

    2009-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate the bleaching efficacy of sodium perborate/37% carbamide peroxide paste and traditional sodium perborate/distilled water for intracoronal bleaching. Thirty patients with dark anterior teeth were divided into 2 groups (n = 15): group A: sodium perborate/distilled water; and group B: sodium perborate/37% carbamide peroxide paste. The bleaching treatment limited each patient to the maximum of 4 changes of the bleaching agent. Initial and final color shades were measured using the Vita Lumin shade guide. Data was analyzed with Wilcoxon test for initial and final comparison according to the bleaching agent, demonstrating efficacy of the bleaching treatment with both agents. Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison of the efficacy of the bleaching agents, showing that there was no significant difference between them. The sodium perborate/37% carbamide peroxide association for intracoronal bleaching has proven to be as effective as sodium perborate/distilled water.

  17. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  18. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Lousada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals (control) were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents. PMID:27008262

  19. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    CINTRA, Luciano Tavares Angelo; BENETTI, Francine; FERREIRA, Luciana Louzada; RAHAL, Vanessa; ERVOLINO, Edilson; JACINTO, Rogério de Castilho; GOMES, João Eduardo; BRISO, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  20. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Lousada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals (control) were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents.

  1. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-04-01

    Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents.

  2. [A review of the effect of tooth bleaching agents on oral microbes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Huo, Sibei; Liu, Shiyu; Li, Mingyun

    2016-02-01

    Tooth bleaching agents contain powerful oxidizing agents, which serve as the main part of bleaching agents because of its release of effective bleaching component. It has been a hot topic whether tooth bleaching agents exert negative influence on oral health. In order to provide train of thoughts and reference for further clinical researches and treatments, this review paper focuses on bleaching agents' effects on the growth of oral microbes and the formation of biofilms.

  3. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  4. Effect of Toothpaste Application Prior to Dental Bleaching on Whitening Effectiveness and Enamel Properties.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Junior, W F; Lima, D A N L; Tabchoury, C P M; Ambrosano, G M B; Aguiar, F H B; Lovadino, J R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the enamel properties and effectiveness of bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) when applying toothpastes with different active agents prior to dental bleaching. Seventy enamel blocks (4 × 4 × 2 mm) were submitted to in vitro treatment protocols in a tooth-brushing machine (n=10): with distilled water and exposure to placebo gel (negative control [NC]) or HP bleaching (positive control [PC]); and brushing with differing toothpastes prior to HP bleaching, including potassium nitrate toothpaste (PN) containing NaF, conventional sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste (FT), arginine-based toothpastes (PA and SAN), or a toothpaste containing bioactive glass (NM). Color changes were determined using the CIE L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb), and a roughness (Ra) analysis was performed before and after treatments. Surface microhardness (SMH) and cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) were analyzed after treatment. Data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA for Ra, one-way ANOVA (SMH, ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb), split-plot ANOVA (CSMH), and Tukey post hoc test (α<0.05). The relationship between the physical surface properties and color properties was evaluated using a multivariate Canonical correlation analysis. Color changes were statistically similar in the bleached groups. After treatments, SMH and CSMH decreased in PC. SMH increased significantly in the toothpaste groups vs the negative and positive control (NM > PA = SAN > all other groups) or decreased HP effects (CSMH). Ra increased in all bleached groups, with the exception of NM, which did not differ from the NC. The variation in the color variables (ΔL, Δa, and Δb) explained 21% of the variation in the physical surface variables (Ra and SMH). The application of toothpaste prior to dental bleaching did not interfere with the effectiveness of treatment. The bioactive glass based toothpaste protected the enamel against the deleterious

  5. Genotoxic potential of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide in dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Aline Ferreira de; Torre, Eliana do Nascimento; Selayaran, Maicon Dos Santos; Leite, Fábio Renato Manzolli; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Etges, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Dental bleaching has become one of the most frequently requested esthetic treatments in dental offices. Despite the high clinical success observed with this procedure, some adverse effects have been reported, including a potential for developing premalignant lesions, root resorption and tooth sensitivity, especially when misused. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic response using a micronucleus (MN) assay, after the application of two concentrations of carbamide peroxide. Thirty-seven patients were divided into two groups and randomly received either a 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (19) or a 16% carbamide peroxide (18) concentration for 21 days in individual dental trays. Gingival margin cells were collected immediately before the first use (baseline), and then 15 and 45 days after baseline. The cells were placed on a histological slide, stained by the Feulgen technique, and evaluated by an experienced blinded examiner. One thousand cells per slide were counted, and the MN rate was determined. The two groups were analyzed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test. A slight increase in MN was observed for both groups, in comparison with the baseline, at 15 days. However, no difference was observed between the two groups (10% and 16%), at either 15 or 45 days (p = 0.90). When bleaching is not prolonged or not performed very frequently, bleaching agents containing carbamide peroxide alone will not cause mutagenic stress on gingival epithelial cells.

  6. Dental bleaching with ozone: effects on color and enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Santana, Manuella Sca; Bridi, Enrico C; Navarro, Ricardo S; de Lima, Carlos J; Fernandes, Adriana B; do Amaral, Flávia Lb; França, Fabiana Mg; Turssi, Cecilia P; Basting, Roberta T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of dental bleaching with ozone (O3) on color change and enamel microhardness. Enamel blocks (3 x 3 x 3mm) were randomly distributed for treatments (n=10). Color change (ΔE) and Knoop microhardness of the enamel blocks were evaluated before and after the following treatments: C - deionized water (control); HP - 37.5% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office+/ SDI); PLA - placebo gel; O3 - ozone; and O2 - oxygen. Four 8-minute applications were used for HP and PLA, and one 19-minute application for O3 and O2.One-way ANOVA revealed that ΔE was not significantly influenced by the treatment (p = 0.112). For the treatments with HP, PLA, O3 andO2, ΔE was greater than 3.3. The paired t test showed significant decrease in microhardness after treatments (p < 0.001) but no significant difference between treatments (ANOVA; p = 0.313). Dental bleaching treatments with O3, HP, O2 and PLA induced enamel color changes that may be clinically discernible, although enamel microhardeness decreased.

  7. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on ultrastructure and mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Ameri, Hamideh; Kianfar, Iman

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ultrastructural changes of dentin induced after exposure to different intracoronal tooth bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: Dental discs of 1 mm thickness were prepared from coronal dentin of sixty-four human maxillary premolars. Experimental specimens were divided into four subgroups: 45% carbamide peroxide, 35% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + water. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope to determine diameter of dentinal tubules and chemical analysis. Results: There was significant difference between dentinal tubule diameter of all test and control groups with the exception of sodium perborate + water. Chemical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between experimental subgroups regarding calcium and sulfur wt%. Conclusions: All bleaching agents increased dentinal tubule diameter and promote alterations in mineral content of dentin with the exception of Sodium perborate mixed with water. PMID:22557819

  8. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on ultrastructure and mineral content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Ameri, Hamideh; Kianfar, Iman

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ultrastructural changes of dentin induced after exposure to different intracoronal tooth bleaching agents. Dental discs of 1 mm thickness were prepared from coronal dentin of sixty-four human maxillary premolars. Experimental specimens were divided into four subgroups: 45% carbamide peroxide, 35% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + water. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope to determine diameter of dentinal tubules and chemical analysis. There was significant difference between dentinal tubule diameter of all test and control groups with the exception of sodium perborate + water. Chemical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between experimental subgroups regarding calcium and sulfur wt%. All bleaching agents increased dentinal tubule diameter and promote alterations in mineral content of dentin with the exception of Sodium perborate mixed with water.

  9. Effect of bleaching agents on bonding to pulp chamber dentine.

    PubMed

    Timpawat, S; Nipattamanon, C; Kijsamanmith, K; Messer, H H

    2005-04-01

    To determine the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on adhesion of bonding agents to pulp chamber dentine. Forty extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 10 teeth each. Bleaching agents were sealed in pulp chambers for 7 days, as in clinical use. Group 1 (control): distilled water, group 2: 35% hydrogen peroxide, group 3: sodium perborate mixed with water, and group 4: sodium perborate mixed with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Teeth were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 7 days. After the bleaching agent was removed, teeth were leached in water for a further 7 days prior to bonding. The crown was cut vertically from mesial to distal and the labial pulp chamber dentine was prepared for bonding with Clearfil SE-Bond and filled with resin composite (Clearfil AP-X). The bonded specimens were kept moist at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Microtensile bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine. Additional teeth were prepared using the same bleaching procedures to investigate the scanning electron microscopic appearance of the dentine surface. Mean values (+/-SD) of microtensile bond strength for the experimental groups were: group 1: 5.29 +/- 2.21 MPa, group 2: 5.99 +/- 1.51 MPa, group 3: 9.17 +/- 1.65 MPa and group 4: 3.99 +/- 1.31 MPa. Dentine treated with sodium perborate in water (group 3) had significantly higher mean bond strength when compared with the other three groups (P < 0.05, Tukey's test). Mean bond strength was lowest when dentine was treated with sodium perborate plus hydrogen peroxide (group 4). In terms of subsequent bond strength during restoration, sodium perborate mixed with distilled water appears to be the best intracoronal bleaching agent.

  10. Green LED associated to 20% hydrogen peroxide for dental bleaching: nanomorfologic study of enamel by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    Dental bleaching is a much requested procedure in clinical dental practice and widely related to dental esthetics. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on the morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the effect of hydrogen peroxide at 20% at neutral pH, cured by the green LED, to evaluate the action of these substances on dental enamel. We selected 15 pre-molars, lingual surfaces were sectioned and previously marked with a central groove to take the experimental and control groups on the same specimen. The groups were divided as follows. The mesial hemi-faces were the experimental group and distal ones as controls. For morphological analysis were performed 75 electron micrographs SEM with an increase of X 43, X 220 and X 1000 and its images were evaluated by tree observers. Was also performed quantitative analysis of the determination of the surface atomic composition of the samples through microanalysis with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The use of hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 20% at photoactivated green LED showed no significant changes in mineral composition of the samples or the dental morphological structure of the same when compared to their controls, according to the study protocol.

  11. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p < 0.05). We conclude that all the evaluated beverages produced changes of color in the composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  12. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p < 0.05). We conclude that all the evaluated beverages produced changes of color in the composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3). PMID:27034897

  13. Changes in patient evaluation of completed orthodontic esthetics after dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Krug, Ari Y; Green, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    As dental professionals, we tend to assess separately different treatment modalities; our patients, however, may only be aware of the total outcome, not discerning the contribution from each treatment. Orthodontists focus on dentoskeletal positioning, usually leaving other areas of esthetics such as tooth shade to other dental colleagues. Laypeople may not see the same differentiation. We suggested that patients would be more pleased with their orthodontic outcomes when cosmetic bleaching was done afterwards, not discriminating between the benefits derived from orthodontics alone and those derived from bleaching. Seventy-five orthodontic patients were selected for the study. Two experimental groups underwent different bleaching protocols, while the third control group received no bleaching. A visual analog scale questionnaire evaluating different aspects of their orthodontic outcome was given to each participant 2 days after treatment and again 1 month later. The first survey was filled out prior to the bleaching procedure, while the second survey was post bleaching. None of the participants were informed that the questionnaire was related to the bleaching. A calibrated photospectrometer was used to measure the dental shade prior to bleaching and again at 1-month follow-up. The two bleached groups had significant shade improvement and a significant overall increase in their orthodontic evaluation, while the patients in the control group displayed a decrease in their assessment of their orthodontic treatment. Altering smile esthetics through bleaching does not change any of the parameters that orthodontists strive to correct, yet it has a positive effect on the patients' perception of previous orthodontic treatment. Patients are more satisfied with previous orthodontic treatment when it is coupled with cosmetic bleaching. When providing multidisciplinary treatment, we dental professionals may tend to assess the outcome of each segment separately. To patients

  14. Influence of the quantity of coloring agent in bleaching gels activated with LED/laser appliances on bleaching efficiency.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; César, Patrícia Desiderio; Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Pucci, César Rogério; Borges, Alessandra Buhler

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the quantity of coloring agent on the bleaching efficiency of gels containing 35% H2O2. Sixty human third molars were sectioned mesiodistally, darkened in a coffee solution and sectioned in the occlusal-cervical direction, resulting in mesial (not bleached) and distal halves (bleached). They were distributed into three groups: Whiteness HP, Total Bleach, and Whiteform Perox Red Gel; and subdivided into four sub-groups: no coloring agent, manufacturer's standard, double the standard, and triple the standard. The gels were activated with light-ermitting diode/laser appliances. The images were analyzed with the Adobe Photoshop program (deltaEL*a*b*). The variation was submitted to the ANOVA test (two factors: type of gel and quantity of coloring agent) and Tukey test. Differences were observed for the quantity of coloring agent. The mean (+/-SD) was determined for each quantity of coloring used: no coloring agent -6.85 (+/-2.26)a, manufacturer's standard -794 (+/-2.55)ab, double the standard -8.65 (+/-2.47)b, triple the standard -9.05 (+/-2.72)b. In conclusion, the standard quantity of coloring agent did not provide significantly more intense bleaching than when it was completely absent. The use of double and triple the amount provided greater bleaching than that observed for the gel without coloring agent. No significant differences were observed between the tested gels.

  15. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Correr, Americo-Bortolazzo; Rastelli, Alessandra-Nara-Souza; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Consani, Rafael-Leonardo-Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate, through spectrophotometric reflectance, the effectiveness of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket. Material and Methods: Thirty-two bovine incisors crown blocks of 8 mm x 8 mm height lengths were used. Staining of tooth blocks with black tea was performed for six days. They were distributed randomly into 4 groups (1-home bleaching with bracket, 2- home bleaching without bracket, 3- office bleaching with bracket, 4 office bleaching without bracket). The color evaluation was performed (CIE L * a * b *) using color reflectance spectrophotometer. Metal brackets were bonded in groups 1 and 3. The groups 1 and 2 samples were subjected to the carbamide peroxide at 15%, 4 hours daily for 21 days. Groups 3 and 4 were subjected to 3 in-office bleaching treatment sessions, hydrogen peroxide 38%. After removal of the brackets, the second color evaluation was performed in tooth block, difference between the area under the bracket and around it, and after 7 days to verified color stability. Data analysis was performed using the paired t-test and two-way variance analysis and Tukey’s. Results: The home bleaching technique proved to be more effective compared to the office bleaching. There was a significant difference between the margin and center color values of the specimens that were subjected to bracket bonding. Conclusions: The bracket bond presence affected the effectiveness of both the home and office bleaching treatments. Key words:Tooth bleaching, spectrophotometry

  16. Effects of different concentrations of carbamide peroxide and bleaching periods on the roughness of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ourique, Sérgio Augusto Morey; Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Cassoni, Alessandra; Ota-Tsuzuki, Cláudia; Rodrigues, José Augusto

    2011-01-01

    The wide use of dental bleaching treatment has brought concern about the possible effects of hydrogen peroxide on dental tissue and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of nightguard bleaching on the surface roughness of dental ceramics after different periods of bleaching treatment. Fifteen specimens of 5 × 3 × 1 mm were created with three dental ceramics following the manufacturers' instructions: IPS Classic (Ivoclar-Vivadent); IPS d.Sign (Ivoclar-Vivadent); and VMK-95 (Vita). A profilometer was used to evaluate baseline surface roughness (Ra values) of all ceramics by five parallel measurements with five 0.25 mm cut off (Λc) at 0.1 mm/s. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to 6-h daily bleaching treatments with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness- FGM) for 21 days, while control groups from each ceramic system were stored in artificial saliva. The surface roughness of all groups was evaluated after 18 h, 42 h, 84 h, and 126 h of bleaching treatment. The surface roughness of each specimen (n = 5) was based on the mean value of five parallel measurements in each time and all data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). No significant differences in ceramic surface roughness were observed between untreated and bleached ceramic surfaces, regardless of bleaching intervals or bleaching treatments. This study provided evidence that at-home bleaching systems do not cause detrimental effects on surface roughness of dental ceramics.

  17. Ex vivo antimicrobial activity of several bleaching agents used during the walking bleach technique.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, D P; Gomes, B P F A; Zaia, A A; Souza-Filho, F J; Ferraz, C C R

    2008-12-01

    To investigate ex vivo the antimicrobial activity of a paste of sodium perborate associated with various vehicles comparing it with 37% carbamide peroxide and 35% hydrogen peroxide. The antimicrobial activity of these agents was evaluated against three microorganisms: Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans. One millilitre of each tested substance was placed on the bottom of wells of 24-well cell culture plates. Six wells were used for each time period and group. Two millilitres of the microbial suspension was ultrasonically mixed for 10 s with the bleaching pastes and placed in contact with them for 10, 30, 45 s; 1, 3, 5, 10, 20, 30 min; and 1 and 2 h. After each period of time, 1 mL from each well was transferred to tubes containing 2 mL of freshly prepared brain heart infusion agar + neutralizers. Agar plates were inoculated in appropriate gaseous conditions. Data were analysed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. In all groups containing chlorhexidine (groups 3, 5 and 7), the antimicrobial activity of the bleaching paste was significantly increased when compared with groups with other kinds of vehicle (groups 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8). For all tested groups, the most resistant microorganism was E. faecalis. Chlorhexidine when used as a vehicle for sodium perborate enhanced its antimicrobial activity.

  18. Evaluation of enamel by scanning electron microscopy green LED associated to hydrogen peroxide 35% for dental bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.

    2014-02-01

    Dental bleaching is a frequently requested procedure in clinical dental practice. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on both morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze by SEM the effect of 35% neutral hydrogen peroxide cured by green LED. Buccal surfaces of 15 pre-molars were sectioned and marked with a central groove to allow experimental and control groups on the same specimen. For SEM, 75 electron micrographs were evaluated by tree observers at 43X, 220X and 1000X. Quantitative analysis for the determination of the surface elemental composition of the samples through X-ray microanalysis by SEM was also performed. The protocol tested neither showed significant changes in mineral composition of the samples nor to dental enamel structure when compared to controls. SEM analysis allowed inferring that there were marked morphological differences between the enamel samples highlighting the need for the use of the same tooth in comparative morphological studies. The tested protocol did not cause morphological damage the enamel surface when compared to their respective controls.

  19. Clarifications, guidelines and questions about the dental bleaching "associated" with orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto; Consolaro, Renata Bianco; Francischone, Leda

    2013-01-01

    With regard to the best moment for carrying out or recommending dental bleaching to orthodontic patients, some explanations and orientations are given in order to answers the following questions: 1) Why orthodontic treatment completion is considered the best opportunity for carrying out the procedure? 2) Why dental bleaching should not be performed immediately before orthodontic treatment? 3) If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? 4) Why dental bleaching should not be performed during orthodontic treatment? 5) If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? This article highlights why it is essential to protect both the mucosa and the cervical region, regardless of the moment when dental bleaching is performed, whether associated with orthodontic treatment or not. The "how", "why" and "if" it is or not convenient to perform dental bleaching before orthodontic treatment are still a matter of clinical suggestion, as it is a procedure that is under analysis, empirical knowledge waiting for scientific proof or disproof! Although tooth enamel has adamantine fluid flowing within it, providing a specific metabolism that is peculiar to its own and which could scientifically explain and base the option of carrying out teeth whitening before and during orthodontic treatment, we must still be very careful.

  20. [Spectrophotometric and visual analysis of internal dental bleaching utilizing laser and heat as catalyzing sources].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Elaine Manso Oliveira Franco; Robazza, Carlos Roberto Colombo; Lage-Marques, José Luiz

    2002-01-01

    This experiment aimed at evaluating, in vitro, the chromatic alteration of dental crowns submitted to internal bleaching. Color alterations were evaluated by means of spectrophotometric analysis and visual observation, at the following experimental phases: initial reading (LI), after-darkening reading (LE), immediate after-bleaching reading (LC), bleaching checked after 15 days (LC15) and after 30 days (LC30). After finding the values of L* (luminosity), a* and b* (shade and saturation), which made it possible to quantify the chromatic alterations of the specimens, color differences (deltaE ) were assessed by means of the CIE Lab Program. The statistical analysis of the results did not reveal any significant difference between conventional bleaching and bleaching activated by Er:YAG laser. No statistical difference was observed between the results after 15 and 30 days, for both experimental groups.

  1. The effect of home-use and in-office bleaching treatments combined with experimental desensitizing agents on enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pintado-Palomino, Karen; Tirapelli, Camila

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate in vitro the effect of formulations containing Biosilicate to treat enamel and dentin bovine samples exposed to dental bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: On enamel and dentin bleached with commercial gels containing 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) (14 days/4 h) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (single session/45 min), desensitizing dentifrices (Sensodyne®; experimental dentifrice of Biosilicate®; Odontis RX®; Sorriso®) were applied along 14 days and desensitizing pastes (Biosilicate®/water 1:1; Dessensebilize NanoP®; Bioglass type 45S5/water 1:1) were applied on days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14. Distilled water was the control. Microhardness (MH) and roughness measurements were the variables measured on the samples before and after the treatments. Student's t-test analyzed differences before and after the treatments. Two-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey test analyzed differences among the factors desensitizing, bleaching agents and substrate. Results: Tukey test showed no differences in roughness for both bleaching treatments and among the desensitizing agents (P > 0.05). Differences in MH appeared on enamel treated with in-home bleaching when control group (lower values) was compared with Sensodyne, Biosilicate dentifrice, Biosilicate paste, and Bioglass paste (higher values). Comparisons between desensitizing agents on dentin treated with both bleaching gels showed no statistical differences. Conclusions: The effect of formulations containing Biosilicate (Biosilicate dentifrice and paste) was significant in the MH of enamel bleached with 16% CP. PMID:25713487

  2. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    PubMed

    Lago, Andréa Dias Neves; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Araújo, Erika Michele Dos Santos; Matos, Adriana Bona; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Despite all surface treatments, a reduction of enamel microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching.

  3. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Erika Michele dos Santos; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Despite all surface treatments, a reduction of enamel microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching. PMID:28280508

  4. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  5. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  6. Quantitative Sensory Testing of the Effect of Desensitizing Treatment After Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Vanessa; Gallinari, Marjorie O; Perdigão, Jorge; Cintra, Luciano T A; dos Santos, Paulo H; Briso, André L F

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify tooth sensitivity during bleaching and after a desensitizing treatment. Sensitivity was measured with a new device, TSA-II, which uses thermal stimuli for Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST). Ten patients underwent bleaching treatment using Whiteness HP Maxx (FGM Produtos Odontológicos Ltda) containing 35% hydrogen peroxide. After the bleaching session, the teeth were cleaned with air/water spray and the product Desensibilize KF 2% (FGM Produtos Odontológicos Ltda) was applied to the upper left teeth. Saline solution at room temperature was applied in the upper right teeth. QST was performed before bleaching, immediately after bleaching, and immediately after desensitizing treatment. In order to standardize tooth analysis, a 100% ethylene copolymer and vinyl acetate tray with circular perforations was used during measurements. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used (a=0.05). Mean temperatures (SD) of cold sensation threshold for the upper right quadrant were: BB-13.898 (4.81), AB- 19.241 (3.68), AD-20.646 (3.72) and for the upper left quadrant they were: BB-14.102 (3.22), AB-19.646 (4.82), AD- 13.835 (3.63). Dental bleaching with highly concentrated peroxides changed dental cold sensation thresholds, but the topical desensitizer changed the immediate cold sensation thresholds produced by the cold stimulus.

  7. Bleaching non vital primary teeth: case report.

    PubMed

    Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Roth, Faynna; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Fernandes, Kristiane Porta; Domingues, Manoela Martins; Wanderley, Márcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Trauma and pulpal infections in primary dentition are part of the routine of the pediatric dentist. Common consequences in these cases are alterations in dental color, compromising patient's esthetics and his interaction in social environment. Bleaching intends to preserve dental structure already weakened and to show immediate esthetic results. This clinical case shows a bleaching technique in devitalized primary teeth using bleaching agent with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by photo polymerizer. This technique is simple and shows immediate satisfactory results.

  8. Effects of bleaching agents and Tooth Mousse(™) on human enamel hardness.

    PubMed

    Alkhtib, Asmaa; Manton, David J; Burrow, Michael F; Saber-Samandari, Saeed; Palamara, Joseph E A; Gross, Kārlis A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate the effect of three commercial bleaching agents and Tooth Mousse(™) containing 10% w/w casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on the hardness of tooth enamel. Sixteen human enamel specimens were exposed to one of three commercial bleaching agents with or without subsequent exposure to Tooth Mousse(™) . Nanoindentation was used to measure the hardness and reduced modulus before and after treatments. When bleaching materials were applied for a short period of time following the manufacturers' instructions, there was an increase in enamel hardness and reduced modulus for some bleaching groups, with no statistically significant difference from the baseline values. After extended bleaching periods a statistically significant decrease in enamel hardness and reduced modulus was found and after applying Tooth Mousse(™) post-bleaching, the hardness and reduced modulus returned to close to baseline values. The application of bleaching agents for an extended period of time significantly decreases enamel hardness and the reduced modulus. The application of Tooth Mousse(™) after bleaching was able to reestablish the baseline enamel hardness and reduced modulus, decreasing the adverse effects of bleaching enamel. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Contemporary dental practice in the UK in 2008: aspects of direct restorations, endodontics and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Brunton, P A; Burke, F J T; Sharif, M O; Creanor, S; Hosey, M T; Mannocci, F; Wilson, N H F

    2012-01-27

    To investigate, by postal questionnaire, aspects of the selection and use of direct restorative materials, endodontic techniques and approaches to bleaching by general dental practitioners in the UK, and to compare and contrast the findings with those of a related study reported in 2004. A questionnaire comprising 18 questions, each of a number of elements, was sent to 1,000 general dental practitioners in the UK, selected at random from the Dentists Register. Non-responders were sent a second copy of the questionnaire after a period of four weeks had elapsed. A total of 662 useable responses were returned, giving a response rate of 66%. Key findings included: dental amalgam was found to be the most commonly used material in the restoration of occlusoproximal cavities in premolar (59% of respondents) and molar teeth (75% of respondents); glass-ionomer cements and related materials were applied extensively in the restoration of deciduous molars (81% of respondents) and for the luting of indirect restorations (67% of respondents); the use of rubber dam was limited, in particular as an adjunct to procedures in operative dentistry (18% of respondents); relatively few respondents used preformed stainless steel crowns, and among the users only occasionally in the restoration of deciduous molars (23%); and bleaching, predominantly home-based (nightguard) vital bleaching (81% of respondents) was widely practised. It is concluded that, for the practitioners surveyed, factors other than best available evidence influenced various aspects of the use of direct restorative materials and the clinical practice of endodontics. As a consequence, many of the features of general dental practice revealed in the process of the investigation were at variance with teaching in dental schools. Bleaching, in particular home-based (nightguard), vital bleaching, was provided by >80% of respondents, indicating widespread interest among patients in enhanced dental attractiveness.

  10. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  11. Ion release from a composite resin after exposure to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    BUENO, Renata Plá Rizzolo; VIARO, Paloma Salomone; NASCIMENTO, Paulo Cícero; POZZOBON, Roselaine Terezinha

    2012-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents - a commercial product (Opalescence PF; Ultradent Products, Inc.) and a bleaching agent prepared in a compounding pharmacy - on the chemical degradation of a light-activated composite resin by determining its release of ions before and after exposure to the agents. Material and Methods Thirty composite resin (Filtek Z250; 3M/ESPE) samples were divided into three groups: group I (exposed to Opalescence PF commercial bleaching agent), group II (exposed to a compounded bleaching agent) and group III (control - Milli-Q water). After 14 days of exposure, with a protocol of 8 h of daily exposure to the bleaching agents and 16 h of immersion in Milli-Q water, the analysis of ion release was carried out using a HP 8453 spectrophotometer. The values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, Tukey's test and the paired t-tests. The significance level was set at 5%. Results After 14 days of the experiment, statistically significant difference was found between group II and groups I and III, with greater ion release from the composite resin in group II. Conclusions The compounded bleaching agent had a more aggressive effect on the composite resin after 14 days of exposure than the commercial product and the control (no bleaching). PMID:22858700

  12. Influence of tooth bleaching on dental enamel microhardness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zanolla, J; Marques, Abc; da Costa, D C; de Souza, A S; Coutinho, M

    2017-09-01

    Several studies have investigated the effect of bleaching on dental tissues. The evaluation of the effect of home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide is important for assessing alterations in enamel microhardness that may affect dental health in terms of resistance to masticatory forces. This meta-analysis was performed in order to determine scientific evidence regarding the effects of home vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the microhardness of human dental enamel. A systematic electronic literature search was conducted in the PubMed and Web of Science databases using search terms. Two independent researchers evaluated the information and methodological quality of the studies. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established for article selection; further, only studies published in English were selected. Thirteen studies that met all of the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected and underwent statistical analysis. The results of this meta-analysis showed no significant changes in enamel microhardness when using the 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel over periods of 7, 14 and 21 days. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  14. Comparison of bleaching efficacy of two bleaching agents on teeth discoloured by different antibiotic combinations used in revascularization.

    PubMed

    Yasa, Bilal; Arslan, Hakan; Akcay, Merve; Kavrik, Fevzi; Hatirli, Huseyin; Ozkan, Bulent

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the whitening effects of different bleaching agents on teeth discoloured by different antibiotic combinations of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole with minocycline, doxycycline, amoxicillin or cefaclor. Forty extracted bovine incisors were collected and discoloured with triple antibiotic pastes (TAP) with minocycline, doxycycline, amoxicillin and cefaclor throughout 30 days. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups and each group received different bleaching materials: 35% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate. Spectrophotometric measurements were obtained on the buccal surfaces of the crown, firstly in the beginning, then on the 4th, 8th and 12th days after the placement of the bleaching materials. The acceptability threshold was set to 3.5. The ∆E values were calculated and the data was analysed using the repeated measures analysis of variance (P = .05). All the test groups induced colour changes exceeding the acceptability threshold 30 days after the antibiotic pastes were placed. The 35% hydrogen peroxide was more effective than sodium perborate in the whitening of discoloured teeth by antibiotic pastes (P = .001). The whitening effect after the 8th and 12th days was significantly more than after 4 days of treatment (P <.001). The discolouration caused by the TAP with minocycline and cefaclor showed greater whitening compared to the TAP with doxycycline and amoxicillin groups (P <.05). The whitening treatment effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide on teeth discoloured by antibiotic pastes seems to have significantly outperformed the sodium perborate treatment. Both bleaching agents were allowed to bleach the teeth gradually each day and the effects on the 8th and 12th days were superior to the one on the 4th day. The use of 35% hydrogen peroxide could be advantageous to bleach the teeth discoloured with antibiotic pastes compared to sodium perborate.

  15. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T. Prasanth; Charlie, K. M.; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent. PMID:26604568

  16. Determination of optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue samples using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative bleaching changes of human teeth induced changes in the optical properties of dental tissue. We introduced 1310 nm wavelengths of optical coherence tomography (OCT) attenuation coefficient method which is a relatively novel and rarely reported methodology to measure the correlation coefficient during the teeth oxidative bleaching procedure. And the quantitative parameters of enamel optical thickness and disruption of the entrance signal (DES) were extracted from the OCT images. The attenuation coefficient of the bleached tissue is 6.2 mm-1 which is significant (p < 0.001) higher than that unbleached sample is 1.4 mm-1. But attenuation coefficient varied significantly (p < 0.001) between 5.9 and 1.5 mm-1 in dentine which is downtrend. Furthermore, the persistence of bleaching oxidation in 35% hydrogen peroxide-induced optical thickness of enamel is similar with unbleached tissue which may indicate the refractive index of enamel is unchanged. Moreover, disruption of the entrance signal (DES) analysis showed that remarkable difference was appeared at enamel surface. The results indicate that optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue can be determined by attenuation coefficient using OCT system.

  17. Monomer Release from Nanofilled and Microhybrid Dental Composites after Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaee, Masumeh Hasani; Arami, Sakineh; Ghavam, Maryam; Rezaii, Asieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites. Materials and Methods: 80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness) of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate), TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate), UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate) and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate) were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05). Results: Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001); TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001). Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001). Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001). Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001). Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952). Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000). The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003); while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824). Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001). Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972) and (P=0.811) respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002), as well as polishing (P=0.024). Conclusion: Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled. PMID:24910677

  18. Evaluation of dentin permeability after light activated internal dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Zanello Guerisoli, Danilo M; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively the dentin permeability of human teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LEDs, halogen lamp or using the walking bleach technique. Forty human maxillary central incisors had standard access cavities performed and the cervical thirds of the canals were prepared with Gates-Glidden drills up to a size 130. Roots were resected between the coronal and middle thirds and the apical portions were discarded. A glass ionomer, 2 mm thick cervical plug was placed inside the canal, at the cement-enamel junction level. Group I received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by LEDs. Group II was submitted to 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by halogen lamp. Group III received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel and the walking bleach technique was followed. Group IV (control) received a dry cotton pellet inside the pulp chamber with temporary restoration. Dentinal permeability was quantified by copper ion penetration. Linear measurements were obtained by analysis of digital images under x 5 magnification. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I, 7.1% (+/-3.2%); II, 8.4% (+/-3.0%); III, 9.1% (+/-3.0%); IV, 1.3% (+/-2.8%). One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the results. Results showed an increase of permeability values for groups I, II and III when compared to group IV (control); however, no statistical differences were found between the three tested bleaching techniques. It can be concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED, halogen lamp or used following the walking bleach technique produced similar increase in dentinal permeability.

  19. Effect of vital tooth bleaching on solubility and roughness of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Londono, Jimmy; Abreu, Amara; Nelson, Steve; Hernandez, Jorge; Torres, Carlos; Mettenburg, Donald; Looney, Stephen; Rueggeberg, Frederick

    2009-09-01

    Vital tooth bleaching may affect properties of dental cements used for fixed prostheses. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a combined in-office and at-home bleaching regimen on changes in surface roughness and depth loss of a variety of commercially available dental cements. Five cement classifications were tested: glass ionomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, resin,self-adhesive resin cement, and zinc phosphate. Cements were placed in multiple wells in plastic blocks. After setting,the surface profile of each block was determined, and average roughness and vertical height of cement surface from the specimen holder were recorded. Blocks were water stored (control) or subjected to in-office and at-home bleaching(n=12). Surfaces were rescanned and pre- and posttest parameter changes were calculated. Statistical analysis consisted of Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon Rank Sum and Student t tests applied to control and bleaching parameterc hanges within the same cements. A family-wise alpha of .05 was maintained by using a Bonferroni-adjusted level of significance preset to .01 per test. Zinc phosphate showed the only significant depth increase (P=.004) from bleaching: 0.9 +/- 0.7 microm deeper than the water-control group. Only resin-modified glass ionomer showed a significant (P=.004) increase in roughness from bleaching; values increased by 0.05 +/- 0.03 microm over the water-control group. In-office and at-home bleaching significantly increased depth loss of zinc phosphate and increased resinmodified glass ionomer roughness. However, the absolute values of differences observed, as compared to the wateronly control, were considered to be clinically insignificant. (J Prosthet Dent 2009;102:148-154)

  20. Efficacy of desensitizing agents on postoperative sensitivity following an in-office vital tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nanjundasetty, Jyothi Kashi; Ashrafulla, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    To assess and compare the incidence and intensity of experienced after an in-office vital tooth bleaching in case of dental fluorosis using two different types of desensitizing agents, at different time periods. Sixty-nine subjects with mild-to-moderate fluorosis were randomly divided into three groups of 23 each. Group I - control group (placebo), group II-potassium nitrate 5% and sodium monofluorophosphate 0.7% (Sensodent KF), and group III-Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) (Tooth Mousse). In-office vital tooth bleaching was done using 35% hydrogen peroxide liquid (Pola office) in two sessions. Desensitizing agent was applied for 10 min after each session. Postoperative sensitivity was recorded after 24 h and 7 days. The statistical analysis was done using chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc Tukey's test. The experimental groups showed significantly less incidence and intensity of sensitivity compared to control group, whereas there was no difference between them. The desensitizing agents used in the study show effective reduction after an in-office vital tooth bleaching.

  1. Efficacy of desensitizing agents on postoperative sensitivity following an in-office vital tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundasetty, Jyothi Kashi; Ashrafulla, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess and compare the incidence and intensity of experienced after an in-office vital tooth bleaching in case of dental fluorosis using two different types of desensitizing agents, at different time periods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine subjects with mild-to-moderate fluorosis were randomly divided into three groups of 23 each. Group I — control group (placebo), group II—potassium nitrate 5% and sodium monofluorophosphate 0.7% (Sensodent KF), and group III—Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) (Tooth Mousse). In-office vital tooth bleaching was done using 35% hydrogen peroxide liquid (Pola office) in two sessions. Desensitizing agent was applied for 10 min after each session. Postoperative sensitivity was recorded after 24 h and 7 days. The statistical analysis was done using chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: The experimental groups showed significantly less incidence and intensity of sensitivity compared to control group, whereas there was no difference between them. Conclusion: The desensitizing agents used in the study show effective reduction after an in-office vital tooth bleaching. PMID:27217631

  2. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    PubMed

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  3. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  4. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ?200???m and a depth of ?2??mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94???m. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1??mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  5. Surface effects after a combination of dental bleaching and enamel microabrasion: An in vitro and in situ study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Laura Molinar; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Salomão, Fabio Martins; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of combining enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching on the physical properties of enamel, using in vitro and in situ conditions and evaluating surface roughness, enamel microhardness and scanning electron microscopy images. One hundred sound bovine teeth were sectioned and cut into discs and randomly divided into 10 study groups (n=10). The results were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test, with significance at 5%. Enamel surface roughness was significantly influenced by microabrasion, regardless of being combined with dental bleaching, for both HS (Human Saliva) or AS (Artificial Saliva) condition. Enamel microhardness was significantly decreased in the groups in which enamel microabrasion was performed, regardless its combination with dental bleaching; although storage in HS reestablished the initial enamel microhardness. It was concluded that dental bleaching does not cause major damage to microabraided enamel, and that only human saliva recovered the initial enamel microhardness.

  6. Effects of bleaching agent on physical and aesthetic properties of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Klaric Sever, Eva; Simenc, Nika; Rakic, Mario; Skenderovic, Hrvoje; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of bleaching agent on microhardness, color and light transmission of different restorative materials. Specimens (n=20) of Tetric EvoCeram (TEC), Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TECBF) and Equia Fill (EQUIA) were treated with either 40% hydrogen peroxide Opalesence Boost or destilled water for 45 min. Specimens were stained in tea solution or stored in deionized water for one and two weeks. Color, microhardness and light transmission were monitored at the baseline, after the bleaching and after the tea immersion or storage in deionized water. After the bleaching a significant reduction in surface microhardness (p<0.001) was recorded for all materials. Clinically visible color change (ΔE>3) was observed after the bleaching and after treatment in tea solution, but only in EQUIA samples. The absorption coefficient was the largest for the samples stained in tea solution. Bleaching can affect the microhardness and color of fillings; therefore, they should be sometimes replaced.

  7. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents.

    PubMed

    Rokaya, Mohammad E; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rokaya, Mohammad E.; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26257782

  9. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghasemi Monfared Rad, Hamidreza; Beygi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times. Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite). Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5) for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45%) for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control). Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms−1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001). However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites. PMID:27123014

  10. Electrochemical corrosion and surface analyses of a ni-cr alloy in bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Evşen; Aydın, A Kevser; Bilgiç, Semra

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of a Ni-Cr dental casting alloy subjected to 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching solutions and to determine the composition of the surface oxide layer formed on the alloy specimens. Ten cylindrical specimens (4 mm in diameter × 25 mm in height) were cast from a Ni-Cr alloy (Wiron 99) and divided into two groups (n = 5). A potentiodynamic polarization test was used to compare the corrosion rates of specimens in HP and CP (pH = 6.5). Before cyclic polarization tests, all alloy specimens were allowed to reach a steady open circuit potential (Ecorr ) for a period of 1 hour. Then tests were initiated at 100 mV versus standard calomel electrode (SCE) below Ecorr and scanned at a rate of 1 mV/s in the anodic direction until reaching 1000 mV over the Ecorr value. The scan then was reversed back to the Ecorr of the specimens. The open circuit potentials (Ecorr ) and the current densities (Icorr ) were determined using the anodic Tafel regions extrapolating from the curves. Differences in Ecorr and Icorr were determined using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). In addition, corrosion rates were calculated from these curves. Before and after polarization tests, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination accompanied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyze the surface morphology. The surface characterization of the passive film formed on alloy specimens was also performed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this study, bleaching agents had an effect on the anodic process for two groups. Although no statistical difference was identified between the groups for both corrosion parameters, results indicated that the effect of CP on the corrosion behavior was less than that of HP. These results agreed with the SEM observations. XPS data showed that oxide layers formed on all groups contained mainly Cr2 O3 , NiO, and MoO3 , and the amounts of oxides

  11. Investigation of photo-bleaching through transmittance method in pigmented solution: understanding possible mechanisms and advantages for photo dental whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Lins, E. C.; Portero, Priscila P.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Oliveira, O. B., Jr.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2007-02-01

    The dental bleaching is known for many years. Recently a technique employing light has open up new and exciting possibilities. Besides its vast application there are still many important points to be understood about teeth photon bleaching. In this work we present an "in vitro" experiment to explore the main mechanisms involved during the photon action in tooth whitening. Our results indicated that light at same wavelengths are great absorbed by pigments creating a local heating which considerably increase the bleaching rate. This results in a fast reaction without heating the whole dental structure. We discuss details of our experiment. Work supported by Fapesp and CNPq.

  12. The effectiveness of low-intensity red laser for activating a bleaching gel and its effect in temperature of the bleaching gel and the dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Pleffken, Patrícia Rondon; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Gonçalves, Sérgio Eduardo D E Paiva; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    The effectiveness of low-intensity red laser for activating a bleaching gel and its effect in pulp temperature was not investigated in dental literature. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of low-intensity red laser for activating a bleaching gel, as well as its effect in temperature of the bleaching gel and the dental pulp. Forty extracted bovine teeth were immersed in a solution of coffee 14 days for darkening. The initial colors were recorded by spectrophotometric analysis. The specimens were randomly distributed into two groups (N = 20): the control, which did not receive light and the experimental group that received light from an appliance fitted with three red light-emitting laser diodes (λ = 660 nm). A green-colored, 35% H(2) O(2) -based bleaching gel was applied for 30 minutes, and changed three times. After bleaching, the colors were again measured to obtain the L*a*b* values. Color variation was calculated (ΔE) and the data submitted to the non-paired t-test (5%). To assess temperature, 10 human incisors were prepared, in which one thermocouple was placed on the bleaching gel applied on the surface of the teeth and another inside the pulp chamber. There was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.016), and the experimental group presented a significantly higher mean variation (7.21 ± 2.76) in comparison with the control group (5.37 ± 1.76). There was an increase in pulp temperature, but it was not sufficient to cause damage to the pulp. Bleaching gel activation with low-intensity red laser was capable of increasing the effectiveness of bleaching treatment and did not increase pulp temperature to levels deleterious to the pulp. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Assessment of the effectiveness of light-emitting diode and diode laser hybrid light sources to intensify dental bleaching treatment.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Borges, Alessandra Buhler; Cassiano, Karla Viana; Pucci, César Rogério

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the color change of hybrid light-emitting diode (LED) and low-intensity infrared diode laser devices for activating dental bleaching and to verify the occurrence of a color regression with time. A total of 180 specimens obtained from human premolars were immersed in a coffee solution for 15 days for darkening and then divided into eight experimental groups (n = 20 in each) as follows: G1, bleaching without light; G2, bleaching with halogen light; G3, bleaching with a blue LED (1000 mW/470 nm) and a laser device (120 mW/795 nm) simultaneously; G4, bleaching with an LED emitting blue light (1000 mW/470 nm); G5, bleaching with a blue LED (800 mW/470 nm) and a laser device (500 mW/830 nm) simultaneously; G6, bleaching with a blue LED device (800 mW); G7, bleaching with a green LED (600 mW/530 nm) and a laser device (120 mW/795 nm) simultaneously; and G8, bleaching with a green LED (600 mW). Three measurements were performed (at baseline and 14 days and 12 months after bleaching) using a Vita Easyshade spectrophotometer. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test. All groups showed significantly higher ΔE values than Group G1, with the exception of Group G8. Variations in the ΔE values at 14 days were significant when compared with those obtained at baseline and after 12 months. Light activation of the bleaching gel provided faster and more intense bleaching than use of the bleaching gel without light activation. Combinations of low-intensity diode lasers are ineffective as a bleaching gel activator. Color regression was observed after 12 months of storage.

  14. Effect of bleaching agents on the flexural strength of bovine dentin.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Pazenhagen, Rafaela; Martinelli, Natan; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella de; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching on the flexural strength of bovine dentin, using bleaching agents containing calcium (Whiteness HP Blue and Whiteness Class) and not containing calcium (Whiteness HP and Whiteness Perfect). Sixty bovine incisor tooth slices were obtained and divided into fve experimental groups (n = 12), such as G1, untreated control group; G2, Whiteness HP Max [35% hydrogen peroxide (HP)]; G3, Whiteness HP Blue (35% HP); G4, Whiteness Class (7.5% HP) and G5, Whiteness Perfect (22% carbamide peroxide). Samples were submitted to bleaching treatment according to the manufacturers' instructions. The control group remained in artificial saliva during bleaching. After bleaching, the enamel was removed and dentin specimens (7 mm length × 1.7 mm width × 0.5 mm thickness) were prepared. Samples were tested in a universal testing machine (EMIC). Data were analyzed by analysis variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Differences between the groups were identified by ANOVA. The mean values (± standard deviation) for the experimental groups, such as (in MPa) G1 = 19.05 ± 2.68 a; G2 = 12.69 ± 4.52 b; G3 = 16.39 ± 3.74 ab; G4 = 14.90 ± 5.60 ab; and G5 = 12.71 ± 2.25 b. Groups with the same lowercase letter were significantly different from each other. The presence of calcium in bleaching agents appeared to influence the flexural strength of bovine dentin after bleaching treatment, for both office bleaching (35% HP) and home bleaching (7.5% HP).

  15. Changes in surface roughness and color stability of two composites caused by different bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Anna Paula Kalix França; Barceleiro, Marcos de Oliveira; dos Reis, Rodrigo Sant'Anna Aguiar; Bonato, Lucilei Lopes; Dias, Kátia Regina Hostílio Cervantes

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents (10% and 35% hydrogen peroxide) on the color stability and surface roughness of two composites, one nanohybrid and one nanoparticle. Specimens were polished, aged, stained, bleached and polished again. The action of the bleaching agents on the composites was analyzed using a profilometer (surface roughness) and a spectrophotometer (color stability). The effect of polishing the composites on the surface roughness and the resumption of the composite color was also evaluated. The results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The analysis indicated that the nanohybrid composite was more affected by staining. The bleaching agents were not able to promote bleaching of either composite over the evaluation period. Surface polishing returned nanohybrid composite to its original color condition, which did not occur for the nanoparticle composite. Additionally, polishing did not return the surface roughness of either composite to its original value. It may be concluded that polishing surface after bleaching should not be the treatment of choice, as it was not possible to reverse the roughness of the composites to their original values, suggesting that a more extensive and irreversible degradation might have occurred.

  16. In-Vitro Comparative Study of In-office and Home Bleaching Agents on Surface Micro-morphology of Enamel.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nazish

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent with 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on surface micro-morphology of enamel. An experimental study. The discs were prepared at Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, and surface morphology was analyzed at Centralized Science Laboratory of Karachi University, Pakistan. Duration of study was one year from January to December 2012. Forty five sound human third molar crowns, extracted for periodontal reason, were included in the study. Longitudinal sections were made using diamond disks (0.2 mm) under water lubrication to obtain enamel slabs measuring (3 mm x 3 mm). The slabs were embedded in polystyrene resin by using 2.0 cm diameter PVC molds, leaving the outer enamel surface uncovered by the resin. Ninety dental enamel slabs were prepared. The slabs were then randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained thirty specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator (Memart, Germany) during whole experiment. Group 2 was treated with power whitening gel (White Smile 2011, Germany). Group 3 was treated with tooth whitening pen (White Smile 2011, Germany). The most central region or the region that was most representative of the entire surface area was used. The SEM (Jeol-Japan-JSM6380A, JAPAN) micrographs were examined to determine the type of surface presented. The enamel changes were classified as no or mild alteration, moderate alteration and severe altered surface. Regarding micro-morphology, the enamel surface of control groups showed smooth surface in general with some scattered clear scratches due to the polishing procedure. The specimens bleached in group 2 and group 3, represented areas of mild erosion. Bleaching with 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) and 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) resulted in mild changes in surface micro-morphology of enamel.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber and dental permeability after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Tabchoury, Cinthia Pereira Machado; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to quantify the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (HP) in the pulp chamber and evaluate changes on dental permeability after bleaching with 3 HP concentrations (10%, 35%, and 50%). This study was divided into 2 experiments and the bleaching treatments consisted of 3 applications of HP for 30 minutes during a single session. The first experiment tested HP penetration into the pulp chamber of 4 experimental groups (n = 10) of bovine crowns, which were divided by HP concentration: an unbleached control group (0% HP), 10% HP, 35% HP, and 50% HP. Acetate buffer solution was placed into the pulp chamber and after each application of HP. This solution was collected to determine spectrophotometrically the concentration of HP that reached the pulp chamber. The second experiment evaluated dental permeability. Bovine crowns were divided into 3 groups (n = 10). The crowns were connected to a permeability device and the initial permeability was measured at 10 psi. Three different concentrations of HP gels (10%, 35% and 50%) were applied to the buccal enamel surfaces and the dental permeability was measured after the first, second, and third applications of HP. The data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey test (P ≤ 0.05). All concentrations of HP reached the pulp chamber, although no significant differences were noted between the 3 concentrations tested (P > 0.05). However, the increase of dental permeability in the group that received 50% HP was significantly higher than the 10% HP group (P < 0.05). The results indicate that the HP bleaching treatments increased dental permeability.

  18. Effects of hydrogen peroxide-containing bleaching agents on the morphology of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Ernst, C P; Marroquín, B B; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B

    1996-01-01

    The effects of four bleaching agents (Opalescence, HiLite, 30% hydrogen peroxide, and 30% hydrogen peroxide mixed with sodium perborate) and 37% phosphoric acid on the external surface of human enamel were examined with the scanning electron microscope. The materials were applied to the enamel surfaces of 60 specimens obtained from 10 teeth. Each test agent was applied to one specimen from each tooth. One specimen of each tooth was left untreated. Comparison to the untreated control surfaces revealed that enamel exposed to the bleaching agents underwent slight morphologic surface alterations. The enamel surfaces treated with phosphoric acid, in contrast, showed severe morphologic alterations.

  19. Teaching nightguard bleaching and other tooth-whitening procedures in North American dental schools.

    PubMed

    Frazier, K B; Haywood, V B

    2000-05-01

    Tooth-whitening using carbamide peroxide delivered in a custom-fitted tray (nightguard bleaching) is a relatively new procedure, yet it is currently one of the most commonly used types of esthetic dental treatment in private practice. This study determined the extent that nightguard bleaching (NGB) has been included in dental school curricula. All sixty-five dental schools in North America were surveyed about curriculum content and treatment protocol for the use of nightguard and other bleaching procedures, generating an 82 percent response. The survey covered eighteen subject areas related to NGB ranging from clinical requirements and indications to products and recall intervals used. The most commonly taught tooth-whitening procedure was NGB, which was most often taught by operative and restorative faculty. Although no schools had clinical requirements for NGB, 92 percent taught it. The most common indications for NGB were esthetic shade change and pre-restorative lightening of teeth. Unrestored caries, defective restorations, and pre-existing sensitivity were common contraindications. Most schools do not use a specific NGB consent form, but most use written patient instructions. Most schools use at least two different NGB products, bleach for two to four weeks, and use reservoired and scalloped trays. An average of 25 percent of NGB patients were estimated to develop sensitivity, for which treatment recommendations include fluoride, desensitizing toothpaste, and reduced exposure time. Curriculum time and safety concerns were reasons for not teaching NGB (8 percent schools). Most schools indicated that the relative importance of NGB in the curriculum was increasing.

  20. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.

  1. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  2. Effects of Tooth Coating Material and Finishing Agent on Bleached Enamel Surfaces by KTP Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Ayumi; Masuda, Yoshiko Murakami; Teruo, Toko; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth coating material and finishing agent on bleached enamel surfaces after using KTP laser with 27% hydrogen peroxide. Background data: There have been few reports on the effects of tooth coating materials and finishing agents after bleaching. Methods: After 40 crowns of human extracted maxillary incisors were bleached by KTP laser, bleached enamels were finished with fluoride only or both of fluoride and nano-hydroxyapatite as a finishing agent. After application(s) of fluoride and/or finishing agent, the enamel surfaces were divided into 2 groups, which were covered with the coating material or without coating material. After application of coating materials, all specimens were kept for 2 weeks at 37°C of 100% humidity. After removing the coating material, color changing was measured and enamel surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: SEM observation of enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material showed the most flattered surface compared to other groups. By measuring the color changing, few color changing was observed on the enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agents and coating material. Conclusion: These results suggested that applications of fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material made the enamel-surfaces flattered and kept effects of bleaching, could prevent the re-coloration. After applications of fluoride gel and finishing agent, covering the bleached-enamel surfaces with the coating material enhanced the keeping whiteness. It would give the patients satisfaction of whiteness. PMID:24155557

  3. Effects of a bleaching agent with calcium on bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrino, Larissa; Gomes, Yasmin; Alves, Eliane; Costi, Hilton; Rogez, Hervé; Silva, Cecy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study analyzed the effects of a bleaching treatment containing 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with or without calcium on bovine enamel, using the Knoop hardness number (KHN), tristimulus colorimetry (TC), and scanning electron microscopy. Materials and Methods: Forty-five specimens were randomly divided into groups (n = 5), which included artificial saliva (negative control [NC]), 35% HP (positive control [PC]), and 35% HP Blue Calcium (HP Blue). The specimens were subjected to three bleaching sessions. During the sessions, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva at 37°C. Before and after bleaching, KHN tests were conducted using a force of 25 gf for 5 s. TC was performed using the CIE-L*a*b* system and readouts were obtained at the following 4 time points: Before the bleaching treatment; after the first session, the second session, and the third session. The specimens were dehydrated and coated with gold, and the photomicrographs were analyzed in a double-blind manner with a LEO microscope. Results: Using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P < 0.05), a statistically significant difference was identified between the initial and final mean KHNs of the NC and PC groups, while the initial and final mean KHNs were not significantly different in the HP Blue group. The final mean values of ΔE, ΔL, and Δb of the PC and HP Blue groups were significantly higher than the initial values (P < 0.01 for both). The photomicrographs revealed no differences among the groups. Conclusions: Therefore, treatment with HP Blue prevented changes in the KHN without reducing the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:25202210

  4. Re-establishing esthetics of fluorosis-stained teeth using enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching techniques.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Correa, Ketlen Michele; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis manifests itself as white stains on the enamel of teeth exposed to excessive doses of fluoride during their formation. Fluorosis usually occurs as a result of the ingestion of dentifrices, gels and fluoridated solutions. It may be diagnosed as mild, moderate or severe, and in some cases, it may cause the loss of the surface structure of dental enamel. The aim of this study was to report the clinical case of a female patient of 18 years with moderate fluorosis, whose smile was reestablished by the use of an enamel microabrasion technique, followed by in-office bleaching. A microabrasion technique with 6% hydrochloric acid associated with silica carbide showed to be a safe and efficient method for removing white fluorosis stains, while dental bleaching was useful for obtaining a uniform tooth shade. The association of these techniques presented excellent results and the patient was satisfied. Both techniques are painless, fast and easy to perform, in addition to preserving the dental structure. Treatment showed immediate and permanent results; this technique must be divulged among professionals and their patients.

  5. Effect of several bleaching agents on teeth stained with a resin-based sealer.

    PubMed

    Feiz, A; Barekatain, B; Khalesi, S; Khalighinejad, N; Badrian, H; Swift, E J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of peroxide-based bleaching agents on teeth stained with AH26 sealer (Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany), using digital images and computer analysis. Thirty-five maxillary central incisors were root filled, and the internal walls of the access cavity were coated with AH26 sealer. Internal bleaching commenced 4 months after the root fillings. In three experimental groups (n = 10), the teeth were bleached for 21 days using 45% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel, 45% sodium perborate + carbamide peroxide (SP + CP) or sodium perborate + distilled water (SP + W). No bleaching was undertaken in the control group. Digital images of each specimen were made before treatment, 4 months after endodontic treatment and 2 weeks after bleaching. Colour differences (∆E) were calculated by determining L*a*b* values using digital images and imaging software. Differences between the original colour and sealer-stained teeth, between sealer-stained and bleached teeth and between original colour and bleached teeth were calculated. Data were analysed using one-way anova and Duncan tests (α = 0.05). Colour differences between baseline and sealer staining were in the range of 8.1-9.9, but differences between the groups were not significant. After bleaching, the degree of lightening was essentially identical for the carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate + carbamide peroxide groups, but was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in these two groups than in the sodium perborate + water group. For bleaching AH26 sealer-stained teeth, carbamide peroxide gel and carbamide peroxide gel mixed with sodium perborate were equally effective and significantly better than sodium perborate mixed with water. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF HOME BLEACHING AGENTS IN DISCOLORED TEETH AND INFLUENCE ON ENAMEL MICROHARDNESS

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laíse Daniela; Batista, Andrigo Reis; Fröner, Izabel Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of different home bleaching agents on color alteration and their influence on surface and subsurface microhardness of discolored bovine enamel. Material and Methods: Forty-five fragments of bovine incisors were randomly allocated into 3 groups (n=15) according to the bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide gel (CP10), 16% carbamide peroxide gel (CP16) and 6.5%-hydrogen-peroxide-based strip (HP6.5). Before bleaching treatment, initial values of Knoop surface microhardness and color (CIEL*a*b*) were obtained and the fragments were artificially stained in hemolyzed rat blood. Then, bleaching treatments were performed over a 21-day period. Color changes (ΔE) were assessed at 7, 14 and 21 days, and final surface microhardness reading was done after 21 days. Thereafter, the fragments were bisected to obtain subsurface microhardness. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=5%). Results: Color changes produced by CP16 were similar to those of CP10, and the color changes produced by these materials were significantly superior to those produced by HP6.5. Color changes at 21 days were superior to 7 days and similar to 14 days. The time did not influence color changes for CP16, which showed similarity between the 14- and 21-day results. No statistically significant differences were found among the home bleaching agents for surface and subsurface microhardness. Conclusions: Microhardness of bovine enamel was not affected by the bleaching agents. The 16% carbamide peroxide gel was the most effective for bleaching the stained substrate. PMID:19668986

  7. Effect of chlorine-containing bleaching agents on diffuse reflection of light by cellulose pulp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. P.; Pokoptseva, O. K.; Sherstobitova, A. S.; Yas'kov, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We have studied diffuse reflectance in the spectral range λ = 380-760 nm of sulfate cellulose pulp with initial hardness G = 30-70 after it was treated with a chlorine-containing bleaching agent with active chlorine concentration C = 0%-10% for different time intervals. We determined the general behavior and basic features of the concentration and time dependences of the brightness B and the diffuse reflectance spectral ratio ( R 437/ R 650)ṡ100% at λ = 457 nm and 650 nm. Based on the data obtained, we propose an optimal algorithm for using optical spectral technologies for metered addition of chlorine-containing bleaching agents.

  8. Effectiveness of a desensitizing agent before in-office tooth bleaching in restored teeth.

    PubMed

    Bonafé, Elize; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Kossatz, Stella

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness and tooth sensitivity associated with bleaching in patients with composite restorations in anterior teeth after the application of a desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35 % hydrogen peroxide gel in 30 patients with composite restorations in anterior teeth, divided according to the prior application of a desensitizing agent (De), or a placebo (Pl), on maxillary superior teeth. Color was recorded at baseline, 1 week after each session and 6 months after treatment. The experience of tooth sensitivity (TS) was recorded on an NRS (0-4) during bleaching and 24 h after each session. Bleaching effectiveness was evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The percentage of TS was evaluated by Fisher's exact test. For each treatment, periods were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (α = 0.05), and at each period, treatments were compared using Mann-Whitney U test. Both groups showed similar tooth color enhancement and color stability after 6 months (p < 0.05). No significant difference in prevalence of sensitivity was detected between groups (p < 0.001). Higher TS intensity (median [first/third quartiles]) was observed for Pl (1.5 [1/1.75]) compared with De (0.5 [0/1]) during treatment (p < 0.05). The use of a desensitizing gel (5 % potassium nitrate, 2 % sodium fluoride) before tooth bleaching in patients with composite restorations did not reduce the prevalence of tooth sensitivity, but reduced the intensity of TS during bleaching. Although the use of a desensitizing agent before bleaching, in patients with composite resin restorations, did not reduce the prevalence of TS, a reduction of the TS intensity during the protocol was observed without jeopardizing the whitening outcome.

  9. Influence of Different Types and Concentrations of Chemical Catalysts on Dental Bleaching Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Guimarães, Carolina Anne; Ribeiro, Zulene Eveline Abreu; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types and concentrations of chemical catalysts on the efficiency of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on dental bleaching. Enamel-dentin disks were obtained from bovine incisors and the initial color was assessed. The groups were divided according to the type and concentration of catalyst added to an experimental gel: ferrous sulphate (FS) (0.001, 0.002 and 0.003%); ferrous gluconate (Fg) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); ferric chloride (FC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); manganese gluconate (MG) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); and manganese chloride (MC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%). The positive control (PC) group received the bleaching gel without any catalyst, while in the negative control (NC) the specimens remained in artificial saliva. Three applications of the bleaching gels were performed for 10 minutes each, repeated after 7 days. Color assessments were performed 7 days after the first session and 7 days after the second. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva and assessed again after 1 year. The data were analyzed by parametric analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Some of the chemical catalysts tested were effective in reducing the yellowish color of the samples in relation to the positive control group after 1 and 2 applications and diminished the color relapse over time. After 1 year, the FS was the most effective catalyst tested. We concluded that some chemical catalysts increased the efficiency of dental bleaching.

  10. Detection of Hydroxyl and Perhydroxyl Radical Generation from Bleaching Agents with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Sharma, Divya S

    Children/adolescent's orodental structures are different in anatomy and physiology from that of adults, therefore require special attention for bleaching with oxidative materials. Hydroxyl radical (OH(.)) generation from bleaching agents has been considered directly related to both its clinical efficacy and hazardous effect on orodental structures. Nonetheless bleaching agents, indirectly releasing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are considered safer yet clinically efficient. Apart from OH(.), perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) too, were detected in bleaching chemistry but not yet in dentistry. Therefore, the study aims to detect the OH(.) and HO2(.) from bleaching agents with their relative integral value (RIV) using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)PNMR) spectroscope. Radicals were generated with UV light in 30% H2O2, 35% carbamide peroxide (CP), sodium perborate tetrahydrate (SPT) and; neutral and alkaline 30% H2O2. Radicals were spin-trapped with DIPPMPO in NMR tubes for each test agents as a function of time (0, 1, 2, 3min) at their original pH. Peaks were detected for OH(.) and HO2(.) on NMR spectrograph. RIV were read and compared for individual radicals detected. Only OH(.) were detected from acidic and neutral bleaching agent (30% acidic and neutral H2O2, 35%CP); both HO2(.) and OH(.) from 30% alkaline H2O2; while only HO2(.) from more alkaline SPT. RIV for OH(.) was maximum at 1min irradiation of acidic 30%H2O2 and 35%CP and minimum at 1min irradiation of neutral 30%H2O2. RIV for HO2(.)was maximum at 0min irradiation of alkaline 30%H2O2 and minimum at 2min irradiation of SPT. The bleaching agents having pH- neutral and acidic were always associated with OH(.); weak alkaline with both OH(.) and HO2(.); and strong alkaline with HO2(.) only. It is recommended to check the pH of the bleaching agents and if found acidic, should be made alkaline to minimize oxidative damage to enamel itself and then to pulp/periodontal tissues. H2O2: hydrogen peroxide CP: carbamide

  11. Clinical Comparison of At-Home and In-Office Dental Bleaching Procedures: A Randomized Trial of a Split-Mouth Design.

    PubMed

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this split-mouth clinical study was to compare a combination of in-office and at-home dental bleaching with at-home bleaching alone. Two applications of in-office bleaching were performed, with one appointment per week, using 38% hydrogen peroxide. At-home bleaching was performed with or without in-office bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide in a custom-made tray every night for 2 weeks. The factor studied was the bleaching technique on two levels: Technique 1 (in-office bleaching combined with home bleaching) and Technique 2 (home bleaching only). The response variables were color change, dental sensitivity, morphology, and surface roughness. The maxillary right and left hemiarches of the participants were submitted to in-office placebo treatment and in-office bleaching, respectively (Phase 1), and at-home bleaching (Phase 2) treatment was performed on both hemiarches, characterizing a split-mouth design. Enamel surface changes and roughness were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry using epoxy replicas. No statistically significant differences were observed between the bleaching techniques for either the visual or the digital analyses. There was a significant difference in dental sensitivity when both dental bleaching techniques were used, with in-office bleaching producing the highest levels of dental sensitivity after the baseline. Microscopic analysis of the morphology and roughness of the enamel surface showed no significant changes between the bleaching techniques. The two techniques produced similar results in color change, and the combination technique produced the highest levels of sensitivity. Neither technique promoted changes in morphology or surface roughness of enamel.

  12. Use of 37% carbamide peroxide in the walking bleach technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-02-01

    Dental bleaching represents an effective, conservative, and relatively low-cost method for improving the appearance of discolored pulpless teeth. Among the bleaching techniques, the walking bleach technique with sodium perborate associated with water or hydrogen peroxide stands out because of its esthetic results and safety. A modified walking bleach technique with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide as the bleaching agent is presented. Additionally, the adverse effects of dental bleaching in the following restorative procedures are discussed, showing the advantages with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide.

  13. The microhardness of bleached dentine and its bond strength to a dentine bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, M P; Bartlett, D W

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the hardness of a bleached dentine surface and its bond strength to a dentine-bonding agent. Thirty teeth were randomly divided into a test and control group. The teeth were hemi-sectioned, the cut surfaces ground flat and the test surfaces bleached with a 10% aqueous solution of carbamide peroxide continuously for 4 days. Hardness was determined using a Vickers microhardness test. The bond between Coltene 'One Coat Bond' and bleached and unbleached dentine was evaluated by measuring shear bond strength using an Instron machine. The mean hardness of dentine before and after bleaching was 62.5 (10.2) and 53.6 (7.3) and this difference was statistically different (p<0.001). For the controls immersed in water the hardness was before 60.8 (standard deviation: 7.2) and after 59.6 (8.2) respectively. The mean shear bond strength for the unbleached was 5.5MPa (1.6) and for the bleached samples was 3.3MPa (1.8) and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.002). Under these study conditions the Vickers hardness and bond strength to dentine was reduced by bleaching.

  14. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (p<0.05). Groups 7 and 9 provided similar results to group 2, but the results of those groups were different when compared with groups 8 and 10. The use of 6% HP and 10% CP associated with daily or weekly fluoridation regimens did not increase the susceptibility of enamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  15. The potential of low-power laser for reducing dental sensitivity after in-office bleaching: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Santos, Eric; Anhesini, Brunna Haddad; Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Eduardo, Carlos Paula; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative sensitivity is one of the most common side effects of in-office bleaching with hydrogen peroxide. Laser phototherapy (LPT) has been suggested as an adjunctive treatment to prevent or minimize tooth sensitivity. This case report aimed to verify the efficacy of LPT in the reduction of sensitivity after in-office bleaching. Tooth bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated with a hybrid LED-laser device. Immediately after the bleaching treatment, the patient reported dental sensitivity, as measured with a visual analog scale (VAS). To reduce sensitivity, LPT was applied with a 780-nm laser using the following parameters: 70 mW, exposure time of 10 seconds per point of irradiation (middle region of the buccal surfaces of each compromised tooth) in contact mode, energy of 1 J per point. Immediately after LPT, the patient reported a substantially lower level of pain on the VAS. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, the score on the VAS indicated that sensitivity levels had rebounded, and the patient received additional LPT. After 48 hours, the patient reported no dental sensitivity. The results in this patient indicated that irradiation with an infrared low-power laser substantially reduced dental pain generated by bleaching, suggesting that LPT should be considered as an auxiliary method to reduce postbleaching tooth sensitivity.

  16. Evaluating the effect of antioxidant agents on shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials after bleaching: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Mosleh, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to make a systematic review of how antioxidant agents affect shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials after bleaching. Electronic search was used to extract the related articles on the targeted key words such as "antioxidant", "dental bleaching" and "shear bond strength" (SBS) from MeSH, PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane electronic data bases. These articles were all published before 2016. Inclusion criteria were restricted to English journal articles concerning humans, clinical trials, cohorts and case-control studies. Therefore, systematic reviews, case reports, letters to editors, editorials and congress abstracts were excluded from the analysis. Most studies conducted on the issue have produced experimental data which are rather controversial, and there is no general agreement about the reported outcomes. As an illustration, most studies have not considered the relationship between the type of antioxidant materials and the shear bond strength. In point of fact, some researchers (e.g Kimyai et al.) have concluded that antioxidants like gel and solution leave similar effects on SBS. Alternatively, certain studies (e.g., Kunt et al.) have produced inconclusive data regarding the impact of one week postponement of the restorative process on SBS after the bleaching process. The results of the studies evaluating the role of various adhesive systems used after bleaching have demonstrated that regardless of the type of adhesive system used, applying antioxidants before restorative procedures can adversely affect the bleaching agents utilized for SBS. It has also been suggested that the type of the adhesive system used might be correlated with the magnitude of SBS. The results obtained from the systematic review of the articles under investigation reflected that the use of antioxidant agents, regardless of their type, form, concentration and duration of application, can improve SBS after bleaching. Copyright

  17. The effect of bleaching agent on the flavor of liquid whey and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Croissant, A E; Kang, E J; Campbell, R E; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2009-12-01

    and BPO. These results indicate that the bleaching of liquid whey may affect the flavor of WPC and that the type of bleaching agent used may affect WPC flavor.

  18. Antioxidant agents and their effects on shear bond strength of bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Horieh; Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Hoseinipour, Zahra; Hatami, Lila; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this study was to fnd a method to eliminate bond strength reduction after vital bleaching. Sixty fat surfaces of enamel central human incisors were prepared by diamond disks. In the frst group, the samples immediately bonded to the tooth after bleaching. For the second group, the bleached samples were treated by sodium ascorbate for 1 hours. In the third and fourth groups the treatment was down using a new antioxidant agent for 1 hour and 15 minutes respectively. For the ffth group no bleaching was done. Cylindrical composite resin (Z 100) with a Single Bond adhesive system was bonded to the enamel with a special metal mold. After thermocycling, the samples were loaded at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of failures was inspected by the Dino Lite microscope and the microstructure of the debonding surfaces was observed by SEM. Considering normal data, statistical analysis was conducted by ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05). The fourth group had maximum (21.82), while the frst group had the least (9.0971) shear bond strength. The ANOVA test showed a signifcant difference among the fve groups (p = 0.0002). There was not any signifcant statistical difference between the three types of debonding (p = 0.165). The usage of sodium ascorbate or sodium ascorbate with detergent after vital bleaching are effective methods for reducing the damaging effects of bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin restoration to enamel. CLINICAL SIGNIFCANCE: Using antioxidants is necessary post bleaching and before resin bonding.

  19. Clinical comparative study of the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide home-use and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching materials containing desensitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Basting, R T; Amaral, F L B; França, F M G; Flório, F M

    2012-01-01

    the study due to tooth sensitivity, and 43.2% of the participants experienced some type of sensitivity during bleaching treatment. The χ(2) test showed that there was a significant prevalence of tooth sensitivity during bleaching treatment using the home-use 20% CP agent, with 71.4% of volunteers reporting any level of tooth sensitivity (p=0.0032). A low prevalence of tooth sensitivity was observed for volunteers who used the in-office 38% HP agent (15.0%). The Wilcoxon test (p<0.05) showed that all of the bleaching treatments were effective in bleaching teeth and that there were no differences between the final color shade results among the treatments (Kruskal-Wallis, p<0.05). This study showed that 43.2% of all the volunteers experienced mild or moderate tooth sensitivity during the treatment with bleaching agents. A higher prevalence of tooth sensitivity was observed for 71.4% of the volunteers who used the 20% CP home-use bleaching agent, which may be ascribed to the peroxide concentration and/or the time/length the agent was in contact with the dental structures.

  20. Evaluation of the influence of dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide in orthodontic bracket shear bond strength.

    PubMed

    do Rego, Marcus Vinicius Neiva Nunes; dos Santos, Roanselli Marllon Lima; Leal, Leanne Matias Portela; Braga, Carlos Gustavo Silva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength of brackets bonded to premolars previously subjected to bleaching with a 35% hydrogen peroxide. Twenty one healthy premolars were selected and randomly divided into three groups (n = 7). Group I (G1) included teeth that were not submitted to bleaching. The enamel surfaces of Groups II (G2) and III (G3) were submitted to a bleaching process with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx). On Group II (G2), after bleaching, the teeth were stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 98.6 °F, and then, premolar metallic brackets were bonded using Transbond XT (3M) resin. Group III (G3) was submitted to the same procedure seven days after bleaching. After bonding, all teeth were stored in distilled water at 98.6 °F for 24 hours. All groups were submitted to a traction test using an EMIC DL2000 universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The bracket resistance to debonding was compared between the groups by the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test (p < 0.05) and it was verified that the bleaching agent significantly reduced bracket adhesion when bonded 24 hours after bleaching. However, seven days after bleaching, there was no significant difference on the resistance to debonding among groups G1 (19,52 kgf) and G3 (18,44 kgf), meaning that it is necessary to wait longer after bleaching to bond brackets.

  1. Vibrio shiloi sp. nov., the causative agent of bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica.

    PubMed

    Kushmaro, A; Banin, E; Loya, Y; Stackebrandt, E; Rosenberg, E

    2001-07-01

    The aetiological agent of bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica was characterized as a new Vibrio species on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence, DNA-DNA hybridization data and phenotypic properties, including the cellular fatty acid profile. Based on its 16S rDNA and DNA-DNA hybridization, the new Vibrio species is closely related to Vibrio mediterranei. The name Vibrio shiloi sp. nov. is proposed for the new coral-bleaching species, the type strain being AK1T (= ATCC BAA-91T = DSM 13774T).

  2. Comparative clinical study of the effectiveness of different dental bleaching methods - two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; de AZEVEDO, Juliana Felipi David e Góes; FRANCISCONI, Ana Carolina; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated color change, stability, and tooth sensitivity in patients submitted to different bleaching techniques. Material and methods In this study, 48 patients were divided into five groups. A half-mouth design was conducted to compare two in-office bleaching techniques (with and without light activation): G1: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Lase Peroxide - DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) + hybrid light (HL) (LED/Diode Laser, Whitening Lase II DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil); G2: 35% HP; G3: 38% HP (X-traBoost - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA) + HL; G4: 38% HP; and G5: 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (Opalescence PF - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA). For G1 and G3, HP was applied on the enamel surface for 3 consecutive applications activated by HL. Each application included 3x3' HL activations with 1' between each interval; for G2 and G4, HP was applied 3x15' with 15' between intervals; and for G5, 15% CP was applied for 120'/10 days at home. A spectrophotometer was used to measure color change before the treatment and after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. A VAS questionnaire was used to evaluate tooth sensitivity before the treatment, immediately following treatment, 24 h after and finally 1 week after. Results Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between in-office bleaching with or without HL activation related to effectiveness; nevertheless the time required was less with HL. Statistical differences were observed between the results after 24 h, 1 week and 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months (intergroup). Immediately, in-office bleaching increased tooth sensitivity. The groups activated with HL required less application time with gel. Conclusion All techniques and bleaching agents used were effective and demonstrated similar behaviors. PMID:23032205

  3. An in vitro evaluation of radicular penetration of hydrogen peroxide from bleaching agents during intra-coronal tooth bleaching with an insight of biologic response.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya S; Sharma, Sanjay; Natu, S M; Chandra, Satish

    2011-01-01

    External root resorption is the complication of intra-coronal bleaching done with 30% H2O2 alone or mixed with sodium perborate but not with sodium perborate mixed with water. The study was done to comparatively evaluate the H2O2 leakage from three H2O2 liberating bleaching agents. Fifty one single rooted human teeth were used. After root canal therapy gutta percha was removed below cemento-enamel junction. Three bleaching agents: sodium perborate mixed with water, sodium perborate mixed with 30% H2O2 and 30% H2O2 alone were used. Teeth without defect, with cervical root defect and with mid root defect constituted group A, group B and group C. According to various bleaching agents groups were subdivided into subgroup 1, 2 and 3. H2O2 leakage was measured with the help of spectrophotometer Almost all teeth showed H2O2 leakage. It was maximum in B1 followed by C1, B2, A1, A2, C2, B3, A3 and C3. Sodium perborate mixed with water was found to be the best bleaching agent.

  4. Comparison of the bleaching efficacy of three different agents used for intracoronal bleaching of discolored primary teeth: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, R; Aruna, S; Joyson, M

    2013-01-01

    Everyone wants whiter teeth to make them feel younger and to provide beautiful smiles with the accompanying increase in self-esteem. Bleaching is an established, simple, cost-effective and conservative method for improving the color of the discolored teeth. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bleaching efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide and 2g sodium perborate as bleaching agents on the artificially discolored human primary maxillary central incisors. Forty extracted human primary central incisors with intact crowns were selected for the study. Pulpectomy was performed and each tooth was artificially stained with 2 ml of fresh human blood and centrifuged. --The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 10 teeth each and the baseline color evaluation was performed. 0.04 ml of the bleaching agent is syringed into the access cavity of the tooth and, in the control group, 0.04 ml of distilled water was syringed into the access cavity and it was sealed with IRM and placed at 37°C in an incubator throughout the experiment. The color of the bleached teeth was determined at 0, 7 and 14 days. The data obtained were analyzed using ANOVA and Turkey's test. There was statistical significance (P = 0.00) among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate, hydrogen peroxide and control groups after 7 and 14 days and a significance of P = 0.013 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate and hydrogen peroxide after two bleaching sessions (day 14) was seen. The bleaching efficacy of 10% hydrogen peroxide gel was more effective than 10% carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate in bleaching the artificially discolored primary teeth.

  5. One-year follow-up of at-home bleaching in smokers before and after dental prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    de Geus, J L; de Lara, M B; Hanzen, T A; Fernández, E; Loguercio, A D; Kossatz, S; Reis, A

    2015-11-01

    This clinical study evaluated the color longevity after one-year of at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) in smokers and nonsmokers. Sixty patients, 30 smokers and 30 non-smokers were subjected to bleaching with 10% CP during three hours daily for three weeks. The color was measured at baseline and one week, one month and one year after the completion of dental bleaching using the spectrophotometer Vita Easyshade (ΔE*), shade guide Vita classical organized by value and Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER (ΔSGU). In the one-year recall, the color was assessed before and after dental prophylaxis with Robinson brush and prophylaxis paste. Data from color evaluation were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test for the contrast of means (α=0.05). Twenty-seven smokers and 28 non-smokers attended the one-year recall. For both study groups, only the main factor assessment time was statistically significant for ΔSGU (Vita classical) and ΔE* (p<0.001). Effective whitening was observed for both groups at baseline, which was stable at one-month and one year after dental prophylaxis. A slight darkening was observed after one year when the color was measured without prophylaxis. For the Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER, color rebound was observed irrespectively of dental prophylaxis. The bleaching with 10% CP remained stable in both groups as long as extrinsic stains from diet and cigarette smoke were removed by professional dental prophylaxis. NCT02017873. The results of this study indicate that the bleaching is effective in smokers even after one-year, but dental prophylaxis may be necessary to remove extrinsic stains caused by diet and smoking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of two remineralizing agents and natural saliva on bleached enamel hardness

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Miri, Yasaman; Fard, Mohamad Javad Kharrazi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to compensate the adverse consequences of bleaching agents, the use of fluoride-containing remineralizing agents has been suggested by many researchers. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of applying two remineralizing materials on bleached enamel hardness and in comparison to natural saliva. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. Microhardness (MH) of all specimens was measured and 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied 3 times to the specimens. After completion of the bleaching process, MH of samples was measured and then enamel specimens were divided into three groups each of 10, specimens of groups 1 and 2 were subjected to daily application of hydroxyl apatite (Remin Pro) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) (MI Paste Plus) pastes, respectively, for 15 days. In group 3, the specimens were stored in the operators' natural saliva at room temperature in this period of time. Final MH of all groups was measured. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: The hardness significantly decreased in all groups following bleaching. Application of either Remin Pro, CPP-ACPF or natural saliva increased the hardness significantly. The hardness of the three test groups after 15 days were statistically similar to each other. Conclusion: The hardness of enamel increases eventually after exposure to either MI Paste Plus, Remin Pro or natural saliva. PMID:26962316

  7. Effect of internal bleaching agents on dentinal permeability of non-vital teeth: quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively dentin permeability of pulpless teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with three different agents. Twenty-four maxillary central incisors were randomly assigned to four groups according to the bleaching agent used: I--non-bleached control; II--37% carbamide peroxide; III--sodium perborate/20% hydrogen peroxide paste; IV--27% carbamide peroxide. After standard access and root-canal preparation the access opening, biomechanical preparation and root-canal filling, a cervical glass ionomer plug was prepared and intracoronal bleaching procedures were carried out in a standardized fashion. The access cavities were opened and the teeth were externally sealed and immersed in a 10% copper sulfate aqueous solution for 30 min, in vacuum for the first 5 min. Then, samples were removed, dried with absorbing paper and immersed in a 1% rubianic acid alcohol solution, for the same above-mentioned period in solution and in vacuum. Copper ion penetration was indicated by the rubianic acid staining. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I--7.88% (+/-1.33), II--16.94% (+/-5.72); III--11.45% (+/-3.90) and IV--8.98% (+/-4.19). Data were submitted to one-way anova. The results showed that the 37% carbamide peroxide provided the highest increase in dentin permeability, followed by sodium perborate with 20% hydrogen peroxide. The 27% carbamide peroxide provided the lowest results and showed statistical similarity to the control group. On basis of these findings, it may be concluded that, among the tested intracoronal bleaching agents, 37% carbamide peroxide presented an optimized overall performance in increasing dentinal permeability.

  8. Effect of bleaching agents on enamel surface of bovine teeth: A SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta-Dutra, Ana-Cristina; Albuquerque, Rodrigo-de Castro; Morgan, Luís-Fernando-dos Santos-Alves; Pereira, Geraldo-Magela; Nunes, Eduardo; Horta, Martinho-Campolina-Rebello

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate changes in the enamel surface of bovine teeth after whitening with exogenous bleaching agents: 10% carbamide peroxide (group 1), 16% carbamide peroxide (group 2) and 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by a light-emitting diode (LED) (group 3). The evaluations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Material and Methods Ninety bovine teeth were divided into five groups (n = 18). The bleaching agents 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide were applied for eight hours a day for 14 consecutive days. The third agent, LED-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide, was used four times at seven-day intervals. Each of the four time points consisted of three applications of 10 minutes each. A 37% phosphoric acid solution and artificial saliva were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Results The evaluations by SEM showed changes in the enamel surfaces of the specimens. Based on the Mann-Whitney statistical test, the data showed significant differences (p<0.05) between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 2 and 3. However, no significant difference (p>0.05) was observed between groups 1 and 3. Conclusions Based on these results, it can be concluded that bleaching agents can cause changes in the structure of tooth enamel and that these changes are related to the concentration and the duration of contact with the tooth surface. Key words:Bovine teeth, carbamide peroxide, enamel, hydrogen peroxide, scanning electronic microscopy. PMID:28149462

  9. Comparison of Radicular Peroxide Leakage from four Commonly used Bleaching agents following Intracoronal Bleaching in Endodontically treated teeth - An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Ks; Hegde, Swaroop; Mathew, Sylvia; Lata, DA; Bhandi, Shilpa H; N, Shruthi

    2013-08-01

    Non vital bleaching is simple, conservative procedure for esthetic correction of discolored endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the amount of peroxide leakage from four different bleaching agents i.e superoxol, sodium perborate, combination of superoxol & sodium perborate and carbamide peroxide during intracoronal bleaching, as the safe and effective bleaching is the need of the hour. 50 extracted maxillary centrals were selected for the study. Following standardized protocol access, cleaning and shaping by step back technique and obturation was done using guttapercha and AH plus sealer. Access was sealed with Cavit G and outer root surface was coated with wax and nail varnish. The teeth were separated into crown and root and the root portion was placed in plastic tube containing distilled water for 7days.After incubation, 3mm of gutta-percha was removed below CEJ and 2mm glass ionomer cement base was placed. Grouped into five categories based on the bleaching agent placed in pulp chamber as -group1 (control)-distilled water, group 2-sodium perborate with distilled water , group 3- 30% hydrogen peroxide ,group 4-mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide and group 5-10% carbamide peroxide gel. Peroxide leakage was measured after 24hrs using ferrothiocyanate method and optical density using spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted using ANOVA and multiple comparisons within the groups was done using BONFERRONI method (Post-Hoc tests). The results showed highest peroxide penetration from 30% hydrogen peroxide followed by mixture of sodium perborate with 30% hydrogen peroxide, mixture of sodium perborate with distilled water and least penetration from 10% carbamide peroxide gel. The results were statistically significant. Radicular peroxide leakage in 10% carbamide peroxide was significantly lower than the other tested bleaching agents making it a very safe alternative for intracoronal

  10. Comparison of Radicular Peroxide Leakage from four Commonly used Bleaching agents following Intracoronal Bleaching in Endodontically treated teeth - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Madhu, KS; Hegde, Swaroop; Mathew, Sylvia; Lata, DA; Bhandi, Shilpa H; N, Shruthi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non vital bleaching is simple, conservative procedure for esthetic correction of discolored endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the amount of peroxide leakage from four different bleaching agents i.e superoxol, sodium perborate, combination of superoxol & sodium perborate and carbamide peroxide during intracoronal bleaching, as the safe and effective bleaching is the need of the hour. Materials & Methods: 50 extracted maxillary centrals were selected for the study. Following standardized protocol access, cleaning and shaping by step back technique and obturation was done using guttapercha and AH plus sealer. Access was sealed with Cavit G and outer root surface was coated with wax and nail varnish. The teeth were separated into crown and root and the root portion was placed in plastic tube containing distilled water for 7days.After incubation, 3mm of gutta-percha was removed below CEJ and 2mm glass ionomer cement base was placed. Grouped into five categories based on the bleaching agent placed in pulp chamber as –group1 (control)-distilled water, group 2-sodium perborate with distilled water , group 3- 30% hydrogen peroxide ,group 4-mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide and group 5-10% carbamide peroxide gel. Peroxide leakage was measured after 24hrs using ferrothiocyanate method and optical density using spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted using ANOVA and multiple comparisons within the groups was done using BONFERRONI method (Post-Hoc tests). Results: The results showed highest peroxide penetration from 30% hydrogen peroxide followed by mixture of sodium perborate with 30% hydrogen peroxide, mixture of sodium perborate with distilled water and least penetration from 10% carbamide peroxide gel. The results were statistically significant. Conclusion: Radicular peroxide leakage in 10% carbamide peroxide was significantly lower than the other tested bleaching

  11. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  12. Comparison of two different laser wavelengths' dental bleaching results by photo-Fenton reaction: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lagori, G; Rocca, J P; Brulat, N; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Fornaini, C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a preliminary in vitro test on the possible use of two different laser wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, to improve the dental bleaching results. To perform the test, the degradation of a dye, rhodamine B, under the effects of hydrogen peroxide was used. One hundred and twenty vials were divided into four groups of 30 samples each and, while three of them were irradiated with different wavelengths, 365 nm (reference), 405 nm and 532 nm, the fourth was the non-irradiated control group. Each of the four groups was further divided into three subgroups of 10 cuvettes (n = 10) each. The three subgroups included a group with a rhodamine (RH) solution, a rhodamine and hydrogen peroxide (RH + HP) solution and a rhodamine plus hydrogen peroxide and ferrous gluconate (RH + FR) solution. When hydrogen peroxide was present, only UVA irradiation was able to produce significant results, whereas when the photo-Fenton reaction occurred, all the three wavelengths were able to produce a significant degradation of rhodamine B, with better results for longer wavelengths in comparison with short wavelengths. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the light of the two laser devices, even remaining less effective than UV activation, showed its ability to improve the performance of bleaching agents based on Fenton photocatalysis, whereas when used in combination with hydrogen peroxide only, the 405-nm laser displayed a small effect and the 532-nm laser produced no effects.

  13. Photobiomodulation in the Prevention of Tooth Sensitivity Caused by In-Office Dental Bleaching. A Randomized Placebo Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Andrea Paiva Corsetti; Moreira, Maria Stella; Gonçalves, Flávia; Aranha, Ana Cecília Correa; Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Ramalho, Karen Müller

    2017-08-01

    Analyze the effect of photobiomodulation in the prevention of tooth sensitivity after in-office dental bleaching. Tooth sensitivity is a common clinical consequence of dental bleaching. Therapies for prevention of sensitivity have been investigated in literature. This study was developed as a randomized, placebo blind clinical trial. Fifty patients were selected (n = 10) and randomly divided into five groups: (1) control, (2) placebo, (3) laser before bleaching, (4) laser after bleaching, and (5) laser before and after bleaching. Irradiation was performed perpendicularly, in contact, on each tooth during 10 sec per point in two points. The first point was positioned in the middle of the tooth crown and the second in the periapical region. Photobiomodulation was applied using the following parameters: 780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J/cm(2), 0.4 J per point. Pain was analyzed before, immediately after, and seven subsequent days after bleaching. Patients were instructed to report pain using the scale: 0 = no tooth sensitivity, 1 = gentle sensitivity, 2 = moderate sensitivity, 3 = severe sensitivity. There were no statistical differences between groups at any time (p > 0.05). More studies, with others parameters and different methods of tooth sensitivity analysis, should be performed to complement the results found. Within the limitation of the present study, the laser parameters of photobiomodulation tested in the present study were not efficient in preventing tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

  14. The whitening effect of bleaching agents on tetracycline-stained rat teeth.

    PubMed

    Shin, D H; Summitt, J B

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the whitening effect of three bleaching agents on the teeth of rats and demonstrated differences in bleaching where dentin was exposed or enamel was thin. Thirty Albino rats were peritoneally injected with tetracycline solution daily for two weeks. Thirty-two disc-shaped specimens were cut from the crowns of incisors removed from sacrificed rats and were irradiated with UV light for 16 hours. Sections were stored in saline. Eight sections served as controls and were not bleached. Three bleaching agents (Opalescence, Rembrandt and Nite White) were applied to eight specimens each, five times a day for two weeks, and images of the sections were recorded at the following times: before bleaching (baseline), day 1, day 3, day 5, day 7, day 9, day 11 and day 14. Mean colors to demonstrate any change (deltaE) from baseline for each time period were as follows: control-9.78 (baseline), 9.17, 9.36, 9.65, 9.40, 9.99, 10.57, 11.36; Opalescence-10.08, (baseline) 7.63, 6.72, 6.04, 5.10, 4.87, 4.89, 4.27; Rembrandt-9.83 (baseline), 11.27, 9.55, 8.36, 7.75, 6.94, 7.11, 7.04; Nite White-10.44 (baseline), 9.92, 7.58, 6.80, 5.45, 5.05, 4.73, 4.01. All bleached teeth were lightened (p<.01). Another 56 tetracycline-stained rat incisors were UV irradiated for three days. Three different penetration depths were tested: penetration through lingual dentin and labial enamel (DN group), penetration through labial enamel only (RE group) and penetration through labial enamel covered with 1.0 mm human enamel (HE group). Specimens were bleached with Opalescence for one hour five times a day for one week or four weeks. A control group of unbleached teeth was also examined. Results (deltaE) were as follows: control--11.67; 1-week DN--13.55; 1-week RE--12.80; 1-week HE--12.07; 4-week DN--7.48; 4-week RE--7.50; 4-week HE--11.69. The color change in the 4-week DN and the 4-week RE groups showed the greatest reduction (p<.01).

  15. Susceptibility of Enamel Treated with Bleaching Agents to Mineral Loss after Cariogenic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tezel, Hüseyin; Atalayin, Cigdem; Erturk, Ozlem; Karasulu, Ercument

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Controversial reports exist whether bleaching agents cause a susceptibility to demineralization. The aim of this study was to compare the calcium loss of enamel treated with different bleaching agents and activation methods. Method and Materials. The specimens obtained from human premolars were treated in accordance with manufacturer protocols; 10% carbamide peroxide, 38% hydrogen peroxide light-activated, 38% hydrogen peroxide laser-activated, and no treatment (control). After cariogenic challenge calcium concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results. No differences were found between the calcium loss of the laser-activated group and 10% carbamide peroxide group (p > 0.05). However, the differences between laser-activated and control groups were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The differences between 10% carbamide peroxide and the control group were not significant (p > 0.05). On the other hand, the light-activated group showed a significantly higher calcium loss compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions. The results show that bleaching agents may cause calcium loss but it seems to be a negligible quantity for clinical aspects. PMID:23008715

  16. The walking bleach procedure: an in vitro study to measure microleakage of five temporary sealing agents.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, N; Cox, C F; Arai, T; Nakamura, J

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro sealing capacity of five materials, each used as a temporary sealing agent for the walking bleach technique. All teeth received traditional biomechanical root canal instrumentation, after which the walking bleach agent was placed in the pulp chamber space. The occlusal access was sealed with one of five temporary materials: two hydraulic filling materials, a photoactivated resin composite, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement, and a zinc oxide phosphate cement with/without the placement of a piece of rubber sheet that was placed as a barrier to isolate filling material from the bleaching agent. All teeth were stored in a 1% solution of Alcian blue with thermal cycling stress. After 1 wk, they were sectioned longitudinally, and ranked by graded scores of 0 to 3, according to the degree of the dye penetration. Significantly less dye microleakage was observed in the two hydraulic materials than in the photoactivated resin. Both zinc oxide-eugenol and zinc phosphate cements showed a considerable amount of microleakage. There were no significant differences between the groups with and without a rubber sheet. Our data demonstrate that hydraulic filling materials provide the most favorable cavosurface seal when they are firmly packed into the cavity space to prevent microleakage.

  17. AIDA: web agents in dental treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Finkeissen, E; Stamm, I; Müssig, M; Streicher, J; Koke, U; Helmstetter, C; Hassfeld, S; Wetter, T

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the AIDA project (Artificial Intelligent Dental Agents, http://aida.uni-hd.de) is the analysis of dental decision-making, the design of a computer-based decision support system, as well as the testing of the decision structure in interactions with dental experts, practicing dentists, and patients. The planning of the solution alternatives for an individual patient is based on a top-down structure for dental decision-making, aiming at a standardization of the argumentation. From a theoretical point of view, decision support can be provided only for anticipated decisions (planning). Moreover, only parts of these anticipated decisions can be supported. Accordingly, a separation of these partial aspects has to take place before one is able to build decision support systems. For prosthetic dentistry, clinicians have been shown how to use individual patient findings to sketch the possible treatment alternatives and later derive guidelines for the treatment. The planning module for fixed prostheses has already been integrated into a software agent. Planning modules for other types of prostheses are currently specified, implemented, and verified.

  18. A clinical, randomized, controlled study on the use of desensitizing agents during tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Pintado-Palomino, Karen; Peitl Filho, Oscar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Tirapelli, Camila

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of experimental proposals of desensitizing agents during tooth bleaching. 140 participants without tooth sensitivity (TS) received 16% carbamide peroxide (14 days-04 h each) (T1) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (single session-45 min) (T2). Participants used concomitantly (10 per group): desensitizing dentifrices (D1-experimental bioactive glass-ceramic; D2-commercial potassium nitrate; D3-commercial calcium and sodium phosphosilicate) in-home, daily and, desensitizing pastes (D4-experimental bioactive glass-ceramic; D5-experimental Bioglass type 45S5; D6-commercial calcium phosphate), in-office, immediately after the treatment and more 4 times. Participants in the control group did not use any desensitizing agent. We assessed TS with Visual Analogue Scale. Assessment point 1 was immediately after the first participant's exposure to the treatments; and points 2, 3, 4, and 5 were every 72 h along the period of the study. Two-way ANOVA (considering time and desensitizing as factors) and post-hoc Tukey test (α=0.05) analyzed the data. In the control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide, TS increased significantly on assessment points 1 and 2. The participants who used a 5% potassium nitrate dentifrice and in-office experimental pastes did not experience TS because of the 35% in-office bleaching treatment. TS caused by 35% hydrogen peroxide in-office tooth bleaching was controlled by experimental products prepared as pastes D4-experimental bioactive glass-ceramic and D5-experimental Bioglass type 45S5, but not by D1-experimental dentifrice containing bioactive glass-ceramic. There is no a gold standard protocol for TS caused by tooth bleaching. The study of novel desensitizing agents that can obliterate the dentinal tubules in a faster-acting and long-lasting way may help meet this clinical need. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of grape seed extracts on bond strength of bleached enamel using fifth and seventh generation bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sathish; Ghonmode, Wasudeo Namdeo; Saujanya, K P; Jaju, Neha; Tambe, Varsha H; Yawalikar, Priya P

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effect of grape seed extract (oligomericproanthocyanidin complexes [OPCs]) on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel using 5th and 7th generations of bonding agents. Materials & Methods: Eighty maxillary central incisors were randomly assigned to four groups as follows: Group I (n=20): no bleaching (control); Group II (n=20): bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide gel, without the use of an antioxidant; Group III (n=20): bleaching followed by the use of 10% sodium ascorbate; Group IV (n=20) : bleaching followed by the use of 5% proanthocyanidin solution. All the four groups were further subdivided into two groups of ten teeth each depending on the adhesive system used in order to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. Subgroup A: 5th generation bonding agent and subgroup B : 7th generation bonding agent. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under universal testing machine. Results: The shear bond strength values were observed to be significantly higher in teeth treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and 5% proanthocyanidin as compared to the group in which no antioxidant was used. Also, bonding with 5th generation bonding agent resulted in significantly higher shear bond strength when compared to the 7th generation bonding agent. Conclusion: The use of grape seed extract as an antioxidant after bleaching significantly improves the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. 5th generation bonding agents have higher shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel. How to cite this article: Abraham S, Ghonmode WN, Saujanya KP, Jaju N, Tambe VH, Yawalikar PP. Effect of grape seed extract on bond strength of bleached enamel using fifth and seventh generation bonding agents. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):101-7 . PMID:24453453

  20. Effect of bleaching agents and whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of human teeth enamel.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Pelin; Kansu, Gülay; Özak, Sule Tuğba; Kurtulmuş-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Kansu, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents at different times and also subjected to different superficial cleaning treatments. One hundred and forty flat enamel samples were divided into 14 groups, Group 1-Group 14 (G1-G14). G1-G7 were treated with 10% carbamide peroxide and different dentifrices, G8-G14 were treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide and different dentifrices (G1 and G8: not brushed as control groups; G2 and G9: brushed with Ipana® toothpaste; G3 and G10: brushed with Clinomyn® toothpaste; G4 and G11: brushed with Moos Dent® toothpaste; G5 and G12: brushed with Signal® toothpaste; G6 and G13: brushed with Colgate® toothpaste; G7 and G14: brushed without dentifrice). A profilometer was used to measure average roughness values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval. The bleaching was performed for 6 h a day and the surface cleaning treatment was performed 3-times a day, 2 min each time, for 4 weeks. The samples were stored in distilled water during the test period. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in surface roughness values over time for all groups except G1 and G8 (not brushed). The results of the surface roughness of all groups were nearly the same. The bleaching with 10% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with abrasive dentifrices, a significant increase in roughness values was observed.

  1. LED and low level laser therapy association in tooth bleaching using a novel low concentration H2O2/N-doped TiO2 bleaching agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra Dias, Hércules; Teixeira Carrera, Emanuelle; Freitas Bortolatto, Janaína; Ferrarezi de Andrade, Marcelo; Nara de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Since low concentration bleaching agents containing N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles have been introduced as an alternative to conventional agents, it is important to verify their efficacy and the hypersensitivity effect in clinical practice. Six volunteer patients were evaluated for color change and hypersensitivity after bleaching using 35% H2O2 (one session of two 12 min applications) and 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 (one session of three 12 min applications) and after low level laser therapy application (LLLT) (780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J.cm-2, 10 s). Based on this case study, the nanobleaching agent provided better or similar aesthetic results than the conventional agent under high concentration, and its association with LLLT satisfactorily decreased the hypersensitivity. The 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 agent could be used instead of conventional in-office bleaching agents under high concentrations to fulfill the rising patient demand for aesthetics.

  2. Attitudes of final-year dental students to bleaching of vital and non-vital teeth in Cardiff, Cork, and Malmö.

    PubMed

    Hatherell, S; Lynch, C D; Burke, F M; Ericson, D; Gilmour, A S M

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine attitudes of final-year dental students in Cardiff, Cork and Malmö towards tooth whitening. Following receipt of ethical approval, pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final-year dental students in Cork, Cardiff, and Malmö as close as possible to graduation. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of bleaching techniques including safety of bleaching, confidence in the provision of bleaching, recommendations to patients, teaching received, awareness of restrictions on the use of bleaching products and management of simulated clinical scenarios. Eighty three per cent (n = 116) of questionnaires were returned. Cork dental students had the most didactic teaching (2-h vital, 1-h non-vital bleaching) compared to Cardiff or Malmö students (0 h each). More Cork students regarded bleaching as safe (76%, n = 28) than Cardiff (70%, n = 32) or Malmö (36%, n = 12) students. More than 50% of Cork students feel they know enough about bleaching to provide it in practice, significantly more than Cardiff (< 25%) or Malmö (< 25%) students. The majority of students would provide vital bleaching after qualification (100% (n = 37) Cork; 82% (n = 27) Malmö; 76% (n = 35) Cardiff). In simulated clinical scenarios, more Cork students would propose bleaching treatments (89%n = 33) than Malmö (64%n = 21) or Cardiff (48%n= 22) students. Variations exist in the attitudes and approaches of three European dental schools towards bleaching. Dental students need to be best prepared to meet the needs of their future patients.

  3. Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Gulsahi, Kamran; Sahin, Cem; Altundasar, Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials. Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05). Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth. Key words:Tooth Bleaching, root canal filling materials, glass ionomer cement, mineral trioxide aggregate, micro leakage PMID:22322509

  4. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  5. Effects of pH values of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Li, Q; Wang, Y

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of pH values of bleaching agents on the properties of the enamel surface. Sixty freshly extracted premolars were embedded in epoxy resin and mesiodistally sectioned through the buccal aspect into two parts. The sectioned slabs were distributed among six groups (n=10) and treated using different solutions. Group HCl was treated with HCl solution (pH=3.0) and served as a positive control. Group DW, stored in distilled water (pH=7.0), served as a negative control. Four treatment groups were treated using 30% hydrogen peroxide solutions with different pH values: group HP3 (pH=3.0), group HP5 (pH=5.0), group HP7 (pH=7.0), and group HP8 (pH=8.0). The buccal slabs were subjected to spectrophotometric evaluations. Scanning electron microscopy investigation and Micro-Raman spectroscopy were used to evaluate enamel surface morphological and chemical composition alterations. pH value has a significant influence on the color changes after bleaching (p<0.001). Tukey's multiple comparisons revealed that the order of color changes was HP8, HP7>HP5, HP3>HCl>DW. No obvious morphological alterations were detected on the enamel surface in groups DW, HP7, and HP8. The enamel surface of groups HCl and HP3 showed significant alterations with an erosion appearance. No obvious chemical composition changes were detected with respect to Micro-Raman analysis. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that no obvious morphological or chemical composition alterations of enamel surface were detected in the neutral or alkaline bleaching solutions. Bleaching solutions with lower pH values could result in more significant erosion of enamel, which represented a slight whitening effect.

  6. Analysis of shade, temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration during dental bleaching: in vitro study with the KTP and diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Lagori, G; Merigo, E; Meleti, M; Manfredi, M; Guidotti, R; Serraj, A; Vescovi, P

    2013-01-01

    Many dental bleaching techniques are now available, several of them using a laser source. However, the literature on the exact role of coherent light in the biochemical reaction of the whitening process is very discordant. The aims of this in vitro study were: (1) to compare two different laser sources, a KTP laser with a wavelength of 532 nm and a diode laser with a wavelength of 808 nm, during dental bleaching, and (2) to investigate the relationships among changes in gel temperature, tooth shade and hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration during laser irradiation. Altogether, 116 bovine teeth were bleached using a 30% HP gel, some of them with gel only and others with gel plus one of the two lasers (532 or 808 nm) at two different powers (2 and 4 W). The KTP laser produced a significant shade variation with a minimal temperature increase. The diode laser led to a higher temperature increase with a greater reduction in HP concentration, but the change in shade was only statistically significant with a power of 4 W. At a power of 2 W, the KTP laser caused a greater change in shade than the diode laser. No significant correlations were found among temperature, HP concentration and shade variation. The KTP laser appears to provide better results with less dangerous thermal increases than the diode laser. This might call into question most of the literature affirming that the action of laser bleaching is by increasing the gel temperature and, consequently, the speed of the redox reaction. Further study is required to investigate the correlations between the parameters investigated and efficacy of the bleaching process.

  7. Comparative clinical and psychosocial benefits of tooth bleaching: different light activation of a 38% peroxide gel in a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Calderini, Angelo; Sciara, Simona; Semeria, Chiara; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Polizzi, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Tooth bleaching is a widespread dental treatment with important psychosocial antecedents and outcomes involved. In the activation of in-office bleaching agents, a selective light radiation, that is, a diode laser seems to be a positive choice to decrease the time of bleaching without surface modification and with no residual tooth sensitivity for maximum effect and minimal clinical and psychological side effects.

  8. Physicochemical and pulp tissue dissolution properties of some household bleach brands compared with a dental sodium hypochlorite solution.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Holger; Peters, Christine; Peters, Ove; Sener, Beatrice; Zehnder, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Many clinicians use household bleach to irrigate root canals. Sodium hypochlorite solutions are also available from dental suppliers. We compared physicochemical features of these products and investigated their impact on pulp tissue dissolution. Six different brands of household bleach were bought from drugstores. These were compared with Chlor-XTRA and technical NaOCl solutions of controlled concentration and alkalinity regarding their chlorine content (wt% NaOCl), pH, alkaline capacity, osmolarity, surface tension (Wilhelmy plate method), and price. Bovine pulp tissue (n = 10 specimens per group) dissolution at 37°C by test and control solutions adjusted to 1.0% NaOCl was assessed. Reduction in tissue weight was compared between groups by one-way analysis of variance, followed by Bonferroni correction (P < .05). The pH of undiluted solutions ranged between 11.1 and 12.7. Batches of the same product differed in NaOCl content. No product contained more than an equivalent of 0.1 mol/L NaOH. One household bleach brand (Safeway Bleach Summit Fresh) was slightly alkalized; the other solutions under investigation were not. Osmolarity was similar between products. The surface tension of Chlor-XTRA and Safeway Bleach Summit Fresh was about half that of the other solutions. Tissue dissolution was statistically similar (P > .05) among all solutions. Price was about 100-fold higher per liter of Chlor-XTRA compared with household bleach. Other than its price, the Chlor-XTRA solution had no unique features. In contrast to an earlier report, reduced surface tension did not result in greater soft tissue dissolution by NaOCl. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of bleaching agents on the surface hardness of tooth colored restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Taher, Nadia Malek

    2005-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of at-home (Opalesence/Dr. kit 15%, Ultradent, Products, Inc. South Jordan, UT, USA) and in-office (Superoxol 35%, Sultan Chemists, Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA) bleaching on the surface hardness of the following tooth colored restorative materials: composite resin, Point-4 (P4), Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA; ormocer, Admira (AD),VOCO, Germany; compomer Dyract AP (DY), Dentsply DeTrey GmbH, Germany; and resin modified glass ionomer cement, Fuji II LC (FL), GC Corporation, Japan. Sixty specimens were prepared; 15 specimens of each material (each group n = 5, control after 15 days, at-home and in-office). All specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hrs before testing. A universal testing machine (Micromet 2100 series micro hardness testers) was used for testing Vicker's surface hardness for the three groups for every tested material. All results were statistically analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Post hoc Tukey HSD tests (P < 0.05), and percentage changes for Tukey. All the tested materials showed an increase in Vicker's surface hardness between base line (24 hrs) and the control group after 15 days storage in distilled water except DY which showed a decrease in surface hardness. All tested materials showed a decrease in surface hardness from control group after 15 days and both at-home and in-office bleaching agents except DY which showed increased values. At-home as well as in-office bleaching agents have a softening effect on some tooth colored restorative material, and the patient must be aware before using them.

  10. Bleaching of a discoloured non-vital tooth: use of a sodium perborate/water paste as the bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    Macey-Dare, L V; Williams, B

    1997-03-01

    Bleaching materials containing hydrogen peroxide have been used successfully for the treatment of discoloured non-vital teeth; however, their use has occasionally been associated with external root resorption. Some evidence exists that sodium perborate mixed with water is as effective as sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide. A case is presented which supports this and a step-by-step technique is described.

  11. Assessment of the release of mercury from silver amalgam alloys exposed to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Paloma; Bueno, Renata Pla Rizzolo; Trinidade, Rodrigo Farcili; Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Tezezinha

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the amount of mercury (Hg) released from a silver amalgam alloy following the application of different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents. A total of 30 specimens (2 mm thick x 4 mm in diameter) were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Next, the control group (n = 10) remained in the deionized water for 15 days, while the remaining samples were exposed to 1 of 2 bleaching agents (n = 10) for 8 hours daily (total exposure = 120 hours); for the remaining 16 hours, specimens in the test groups were stored in deionized water at 37°C under relative humidity. After this period, the quantity of Hg in the deionized water was assessed (using atomic absorption spectrophotometry) and compared to the amount of Hg at baseline. The results indicate that exposing amalgam alloys to bleaching agents released greater amounts of Hg compared to exposing samples to deionized [corrected] water.

  12. Effect of traditional and alternative intracoronal bleaching agents on microhardness of human dentine.

    PubMed

    Chng, H K; Yap, A U J; Wattanapayungkul, P; Sim, C P C

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of traditional and alternative bleaching agents on microhardness of human dentine when used intracoronally. Thirty-six premolars were divided into six groups and bleaching agents were sealed into the pulp chambers as follows: group 1--distilled water (control), group 2--30% hydrogen peroxide solution, group 3--sodium perborate mixed with distilled water, group 4--sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide solution, group 5--35% carbamide peroxide gel, group 6--35% hydrogen peroxide gel. Access cavities were sealed and the teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. After 7 days, each tooth was sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction level and microhardness testing was carried out on dentine. The results showed that treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel, 30% hydrogen peroxide solution and 35% carbamide peroxide gel reduced the microhardness of outer dentine to a small extent while treatment with sodium perborate mixed with water and sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide solution did not significantly alter the microhardness of dentine. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Effects of three different bleaching agents on microhardness and roughness of composite sample surfaces finished with different polishing techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yikilgan, İhsan; Akgul, Sinem; Ozcan, Suat; Bala, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of different polishing methods and whitening agents on surface hardness and roughness of nano-hybrid composite resin. Material and Methods In total, one hundred twenty disc-shaped specimens were prepared to nano-hybrid composite (Charisma Diamond). 60 samples were used for microhardness measurements and the others were used for the evaluation of surface roughness. Samples were divided randomly into two subgroups (n = 30 each). In first group a low-viscosity liquid polishing agent (Biscover LV) was applied. In the second group, nothing was applied. All the samples were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h. After initial measurements were completed, samples were divided randomly into three subgroups for bleaching application. 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF), 45% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF Quick), 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost) was applied. Then microhardness and surface roughness measurements of samples were repeated and data were recorded as final values for each sample. Results When the polishing techniques were compared, no signicant difference was observed in surface hardness and roughness. When the bleaching agents were compared, the 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agent groups showed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-procedure hardness values (p<0.05). Conclusions Office-type bleaching agent containing CP was observed to be more secure for composite resins than other bleaching agents. No negative effect of glaze materials on the protection of surface roughness and hardness of composite resin was observed. Key words:Composite resin, bleaching, surface hardness, surface roughness. PMID:28298992

  14. Effects of three different bleaching agents on microhardness and roughness of composite sample surfaces finished with different polishing techniques.

    PubMed

    Yikilgan, İhsan; Kamak, Hanife; Akgul, Sinem; Ozcan, Suat; Bala, Oya

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of different polishing methods and whitening agents on surface hardness and roughness of nano-hybrid composite resin. In total, one hundred twenty disc-shaped specimens were prepared to nano-hybrid composite (Charisma Diamond). 60 samples were used for microhardness measurements and the others were used for the evaluation of surface roughness. Samples were divided randomly into two subgroups (n = 30 each). In first group a low-viscosity liquid polishing agent (Biscover LV) was applied. In the second group, nothing was applied. All the samples were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h. After initial measurements were completed, samples were divided randomly into three subgroups for bleaching application. 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF), 45% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF Quick), 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost) was applied. Then microhardness and surface roughness measurements of samples were repeated and data were recorded as final values for each sample. When the polishing techniques were compared, no signicant difference was observed in surface hardness and roughness. When the bleaching agents were compared, the 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agent groups showed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-procedure hardness values (p<0.05). Office-type bleaching agent containing CP was observed to be more secure for composite resins than other bleaching agents. No negative effect of glaze materials on the protection of surface roughness and hardness of composite resin was observed. Key words:Composite resin, bleaching, surface hardness, surface roughness.

  15. Effect of a Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites, Using Short Rod Design

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R.; Fani, M.; Barfi Ghasrodashti, AR.; Nouri Yadkouri, N.; Mousavi, SM.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. Purpose: To place various resin composites into distilled water at 37°C for 21 days and determine the effect of immersion time in distilled water, with and without exposure to 10% carbamide peroxide by employing short rod design fracture toughness test. Materials and Method: Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI), Esthet (Dentsply), and Estelite (Tokuyama). For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI). Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M 0.5) was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (p< 0.05).Tukey’s test showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent. PMID:24883344

  16. Crown discoloration promoted by materials used in regenerative endodontic procedures and effect of dental bleaching: spectrophotometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    dos SANTOS, Luciane Geanini Pena; FELIPPE, Wilson Tadeu; de SOUZA, Beatriz Dulcineia Mendes; KONRATH, Andrea Cristina; CORDEIRO, Mabel Mariela Rodríguez; FELIPPE, Mara Cristina Santos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) has been proposed as a new approach to treat immature permanent teeth. However, materials used in REP for root canal disinfection or cervical sealing may induce tooth discoloration. Objectives To assess tooth crown’s color after intracanal treatment with triple antibiotic paste (TAP) or calcium hydroxide (CH); cervical sealing with glass ionomer cement (GIC) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA); and bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Material and Methods After pulp removal and color spectrophotometer measurement, 50 bovine incisors were divided into 4 experimental groups and one control (untreated). Experiments were performed in phases (Ph). Ph1: TAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, minocycline), TAPM (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, amoxicillin), DAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole), or CH treatment groups. After 1 and 3 days (d); 1, 2, 3 weeks (w); and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months (m), color was measured and medications were removed. Ph2: GIC or MTA cervical sealing, each using half of the specimens from each group. Color was assessed after 1d, 3d; 1w, 2w, 3w; 1m and 2m. Ph3: Two bleaching sessions, each followed by color measurement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc Holm-Sidak method. Results Ph1: Specimens of TAP group presented higher color alteration (ΔE) mean than those of TAPM group. No significant difference was found among TAP or TAPM and CH, DAP or Control groups. Ph2: cervical sealing materials showed no influence on color alteration. Ph3: Different ΔE means (from different groups), prior to bleaching, became equivalent after one bleaching session. Conclusions TAP induces higher color alteration than TAPM; color alteration increases over time; cervical sealing material has no influence on color alteration; and, dental bleaching was able to recover, at least partially, the tooth crown’s color. PMID:28403365

  17. Crown discoloration promoted by materials used in regenerative endodontic procedures and effect of dental bleaching: spectrophotometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciane Geanini Pena Dos; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Souza, Beatriz Dulcineia Mendes de; Konrath, Andrea Cristina; Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodríguez; Felippe, Mara Cristina Santos

    2017-01-01

    To assess tooth crown's color after intracanal treatment with triple antibiotic paste (TAP) or calcium hydroxide (CH); cervical sealing with glass ionomer cement (GIC) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA); and bleaching with carbamide peroxide. After pulp removal and color spectrophotometer measurement, 50 bovine incisors were divided into 4 experimental groups and one control (untreated). Experiments were performed in phases (Ph). Ph1: TAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, minocycline), TAPM (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, amoxicillin), DAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole), or CH treatment groups. After 1 and 3 days (d); 1, 2, 3 weeks (w); and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months (m), color was measured and medications were removed. Ph2: GIC or MTA cervical sealing, each using half of the specimens from each group. Color was assessed after 1d, 3d; 1w, 2w, 3w; 1m and 2m. Ph3: Two bleaching sessions, each followed by color measurement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc Holm-Sidak method. Ph1: Specimens of TAP group presented higher color alteration (ΔE) mean than those of TAPM group. No significant difference was found among TAP or TAPM and CH, DAP or Control groups. Ph2: cervical sealing materials showed no influence on color alteration. Ph3: Different ΔE means (from different groups), prior to bleaching, became equivalent after one bleaching session. TAP induces higher color alteration than TAPM; color alteration increases over time; cervical sealing material has no influence on color alteration; and, dental bleaching was able to recover, at least partially, the tooth crown's color.

  18. Effect of various types of sodium perborate on the pH of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Weiger, R; Kuhn, A; Löst, C

    1993-05-01

    Time-dependent changes in the pH value of various types of sodium perborate solutions used as bleaching agents were evaluated. Sodium perborate-monohydrate (MH), sodium perborate-trihydrate (TRH), and sodium perborate-tetrahydrate are available. Each perborate was mixed with 10%, 15%, or 30% fresh hydrogen peroxide or with bidistilled water in a powder to liquid ratio of 2 g:1 ml, respectively. The pH values were recorded at baseline and after 1h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days, respectively. At baseline the pH values of MH, TRH, and tetrahydrate in conjunction with 30% H2O2 were 8.7, 7.0, and 7.5, respectively. The pH increased significantly with decreasing concentrations of H2O2. For TRH, MH, and tetrahydrate mixed with bidistilled water more alkaline values were measured at baseline and after 1 h. Due to solidification of the samples, the pH could not be determined for MH starting day 1 and for TRH starting day 3. In conclusion, the pH of bleaching pastes depends on the content of water of crystallization in sodium perborate, H2O2 concentration, and time of measurement. The bulk of the mixtures recorded reached alkaline pH values of 10 to 11. It is recommended that the pH of the mixture being used be checked to avoid potential postbleaching root resorption.

  19. Bleaching Agent Action on Color Stability, Surface Roughness and Microhardness of Composites Submitted to Accelerated Artificial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rattacaso, Raphael Mendes Bezerra; da Fonseca Roberti Garcia, Lucas; Aguilar, Fabiano Gamero; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bleaching agent action on color stability, surface roughness and microhardness of composites (Charisma, Filtek Supreme and Heliomolar - A2) submitted to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). Methods: A Teflon matrix (12 x 2 mm) was used to fabricate 18 specimens (n=6) which, after polishing (Sof-Lex), were submitted to initial color reading (ΔE), Knoop microhardness (KHN) (50 g/15 s load) and roughness (Ra) (cut-off 0.25 mm) tests. Afterwards, the samples were submitted to AAA for 384 hours and new color, microhardness and roughness readings were performed. After this, the samples were submitted to daily application (4 weeks) of 16% Carbamide Peroxide (NiteWhite ACP) for 8 hours and kept in artificial saliva for 16 hours. New color, microhardness and roughness readings were made at the end of the cycle, and 15 days after bleaching. Results: Comparison of the ΔE means (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni, P<.05) indicated clinically unacceptable color alteration for all composites after AAA, but without significant difference. Statistically significant increase in the KHN values after AAA was observed, but without significant alterations 15 days after bleaching. For Ra there was no statistically significant difference after AAA and 15 days after bleaching. Conclusions: The alterations promoted by the bleaching agent and AAA are material dependent. PMID:21494380

  20. Carbamide peroxide bleaching agents: effects on surface roughness of enamel, composite and porcelain.

    PubMed

    Moraes, R R; Marimon, J L M; Schneider, L F J; Correr Sobrinho, L; Camacho, G B; Bueno, M

    2006-03-01

    This study examined the effect of 10 and 35% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface roughness of enamel, feldspathic porcelain, and microfilled and microhybrid composite resins. Standardized cylindrical specimens were prepared for restorative materials. Enamel samples were obtained from buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. Samples from each substrate were divided in three subgroups (n=10), according to surface treatment: distilled water (control), and 10 and 35% carbamide peroxide. The 10% agent was applied 3 h daily and the 35% agent was applied for 30 min/week, at 37 degrees C, during 21 days. Control samples remained stored in distilled water, at 37 degrees C. Roughness measurements (Ra, microm) were made at 24 h and repeated after 7, 14 and 21 days of exposure. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (split-plot design) and Tukey's test (5% significance level). Samples from control groups showed no significant alteration during all test periods, while for exposure to 10% agent, only the porcelain presented a rougher surface after 21 days (p<0.05). For the 35% product, roughness means significantly increased during the first and second weeks for enamel (p<0.05), and after 21 days for porcelain (p<0.05) and for the microhybrid composite (p<0.05). Microfilled samples showed no significant alteration throughout the 21-day period, regardless of the surface treatment.

  1. The effects of two 10% carbamide peroxide nightguard bleaching agents, with and without desensitizer, on enamel and sensitivity: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Navarra, C O; Reda, B; Diolosà, M; Casula, I; Di Lenarda, R; Breschi, L; Cadenaro, M

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of two 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) agents with or without desensitizers on tooth sensitivity, colour and enamel morphological changes. Twenty subjects used a 10% carbamide peroxide gel with or without fluoride and potassium nitrate for 2 weeks. Sensitivity, spectrophotometric evaluation of colour and morphological analyses of replicas with scanning electron microscope (SEM) were performed before and after treatment. All data were analysed statistically. Both bleaching agents induced sensitivity; however, the 10% CP bleaching agent with fluoride and potassium nitrate produced significantly lower sensitivity (P < 0.05) than the bleaching product without desensitizing agents. In spectrophotometric evaluation, no difference in bleaching effectiveness was found between the tested bleaching gels, and the SEM analysis confirmed the absence of relevant alterations of the enamel surface in both groups. The use of 10% carbamide peroxide gel with fluoride and potassium nitrate reduced the incidence of sensitivity during the bleaching treatment compared to a bleaching agent that did not contain desensitizing agents. The bleaching effectiveness of the tested products was comparable. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Investigation of three home-applied bleaching agents on enamel structure and mechanical properties: an in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Ma, Xiao; Lei, Chang; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Lili; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2012-03-01

    The safety of at-home tooth bleaching, based upon carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the active agent, has been questioned. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three differently concentrated home-applied bleaching agents on human enamel under in situ conditions. Sixty specimens were divided randomly into four groups and treated with 10% CP, 15% CP, 20% CP, and distilled water, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness, and fracture toughness (FT) measurements were conducted to determine variations on enamel structure and mechanical properties before and after the bleaching process. Raman revealed little variation of Raman relative intensity after treatment with CP, which was consistent with the results of ATR-IR, AFM, and microhardness analyses. In addition, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity, and FT showed significant decreases on CP-treated specimens. These findings suggested there were minimal demineralization effects of the three at-home bleaching agents on enamel in situ. However, the decrease of LIF intensity and FT on enamel seemed to be inevitable.

  3. Efficacy and Stability of Two in-Office Bleaching Agents in Adolescents: 12 Months Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Bacaksiz, Ayca; Tulunoglu, Ozlem; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several clinical studies on in office vital bleaching in adults, there are no Randomized Clinical Trials for the efficacy of this application in adolescents. The aim the study was to evaluate the efficiency of two bleaching systems on adolescents for twelve-months follow-up. Twenty-eight volunteers, aged between 13-18, randomly divided into two groups. Two commercial in-office bleaching systems were used: G1 (n=14): Zoom2 25 % HP with UV light and G2 (n=14): Beaming White 36% HP with LED light in a single 3 x 15 minute procedure. The color assessment was made with a spectrophometer; before and after bleaching; 48 hours; 1, 6 and 12 months later. Color enhancement and maintenance of two techniques over 12 months were compared by two ways ANOVA and Student's t test. Sensitivity was evaluated on a scale with Wilcoxon test. Both groups demonstrated similar and significant tooth color enhancement and did not reveal any statistically significant differences between them. However, a relapse of the tooth shade was observed with the low concentration agent/ultraviolet light system. No sensitivity was observed in any patients. Two in-office bleaching systems can be used successfully on young permanent teeth. For long-term successful results, high concentration/LED light may be more effective.

  4. Dental Bleaching Techniques; Hydrogen-carbamide Peroxides and Light Sources for Activation, an Update. Mini Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Féliz-Matos, Leandro; Hernández, Luis Miguel; Abreu, Ninoska

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbamide peroxides have been successfully used for many years; in the past century the dental bleaching technique suffered several changes and almost 10 years before new millennium the technique was finally recognized by the international agencies of regulation. It is important that Dentists handle the peroxides with the essential knowledge, because it is demonstrated that satisfactory final results of this technique depend on the correct diagnosis of stains, management of the substrates (enamel and dentin) and as well sensitivity. Dentists are exposed to several dental bleaching techniques, products and brands, and in the last 2 decades the devices for light activation of the peroxides have become an extensive catalog. Today, the technique is also suffering changes based on the effectiveness of the different light sources for peroxide activation and its relation to satisfactory final results of the technique. The purpose of this literature review is to explain the determinant factors that influence satisfactory final results of the techniques and provide a general overview, in order to achieve a treatment decision based on evidence. PMID:25646134

  5. [Allergies to dental materials and dental pharmacologic agents].

    PubMed

    Gall, H

    1983-07-01

    Allergic reactions to dental materials and remedies cause stomatitis in the patient and a contact dermatitis in the dental personnel. Topical contact (acrylic resin denture materials, heat accumulation, plaques on the denture) and endogenic (symptom of internal and psychiatric illnesses) factors are the cause for denture sore mouth. In metallic alloys corrosions and electric currents can effect an irritation to the oral mucosa. The application of amalgam fillings can possibly result in a mercurialism. Dental remedies used for treatment of wounds and dental roots are potent sensitizers. Surface anesthetics with tetracaine are the most frequent contact allergens for dentists. Injectable local anesthetics produce anaphylactic type reactions as well as toxic side-effects in the patient.

  6. Effects of drying agents on bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to enamel immediately after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Niat, Alireza Boruzi; Yazdi, Fatmeh Maleknejad; Koohestanian, Niloufar

    2012-12-01

    To determine the effect of drying agents and adhesive solvents on the bond strength of resin composite to enamel immediately after bleaching. Sixty healthy human premolars were bleached using 15% carbamide peroxide gel and randomly divided into three groups according to the immersing solutions applied immediately after bleaching: 70% alcohol, acetone, and distilled water. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the adhesives that were applied: an alcohol-based adhesive (Single Bond) and an acetone-based adhesive (One Step). By using rubber washers, composite Z100 was placed onto the enamel and shear bond strength was evaluated in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The type of failure was also assessed using a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Fisher's Exact test was used to evaluate differences in the failure modes. Statistical analysis showed that the bond strength of the distilled water groups was significantly lower than that of the other groups, but the bond strengths of the two groups where a drying agent was applied were similar to that of the unbleached group. The acetone-based adhesive (One Step) provided higher bond strength than did the alcohol-based adhesive (Single Bond) (p < 0.05). There was no interaction between the two variables (p > 0.05). Fisher's Exact test showed there was no significant difference in the failure mode of all the experimental groups (p > 0.05). The application of drying agents improves the bond strength of resin composite to bleached enamel. Furthermore, the acetone-based adhesive used in the study had a higher bond strength to bleached enamel than did the alcohol-based adhesive used.

  7. Evaluation of Novel Microabrasion Paste as a Dental Bleaching Material and Effects on Enamel Surface.

    PubMed

    Bağlar, Serdar; Çolak, Hakan; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Dental fluorosis is an enamel dysplasia that can cause serious aesthetic and psychological problems. An examination of the literature shows that the microabrasion method is the most effective way to treat fluorosis. This study aimed to produce a prototype microabrasion paste for the treatment of fluorosis stains and to examine the effects of the paste on tooth structure and color in vitro. Forty extracted upper incisor teeth were used in this study. The teeth were divided into four treatment groups: a prototype microabrasion paste group (N = 10), an Opalustre paste group (N = 10), a 37% phosphoric acid gel group (N = 10), and a distilled water (control) group (N = 10). Following treatment, all specimens in each of the four groups were examined by scanning electron microscopy for changes in their surface enamel. Changes in tooth color changes of the 1st and 2nd groups were measured before and after treatment by a VITA Easyshade Advance spectrophotometer. In scanning electron microscopy evaluations, significant differences were not observed between the 1st and 2nd groups. Differences in three color-measuring coordinates between the 1st and 2nd were also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The study demonstrated that the prototype paste is a viable treatment option for dental fluorosis. The findings in this study demonstrated that the tested prototype microabrasion paste is extremely harmless, minimally invasive agent, and able to improve the color, shine and chrome values of the teeth. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical trial evaluating color change and tooth sensitivity throughout and following in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the color alteration and sensitivity of teeth throughout and following in-office bleaching. Twenty-two volunteers participated in this clinical trial of bleaching treatment (35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel and placebo) applied on maxillary incisors and canines. According to a split-mouth design, the volunteers' maxillary hemi-arches received either the bleaching or placebo agent, applied four times, at 1-week intervals. Color alteration and tooth sensitivity were assessed throughout and following bleaching. Statistical calculations were performed using gamma distribution and repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a statistically significant difference between teeth submitted to a bleaching agent and placebo (P < .001). At the end of the first, second, third, and fourth sessions, the bleached teeth presented color scores statistically lower than those observed immediately before bleaching. There was no difference in the color scale scores of the bleached teeth between bleaching sessions. The sensitivity data test showed a significant difference among treatments (P < .0001). Color alteration and dental sensitivity were altered by the bleaching agent.

  9. The effect of the bleaching agent sodium perborate on macrophage adhesion in vitro: implications in external cervical root resorption.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rubio, A; Segura, J J

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of sodium perborate, which is used as a bleaching agent in the treatment of discolored pulpless teeth, on substrate adherence capacity of macrophages. Inflammatory macrophages were obtained from Wistar rats and resuspended in RPMI-1640 medium. As a test of macrophage adhesion, the adherence capacity of macrophages to a plastic surface was determined. Assays were conducted in Eppendorf tubes for 15 min of incubation at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2. The adherence index was calculated. Results showed that sodium perborate decreased in a dose-dependent manner and decreased significantly (p < 0.05) the adherence index of rat peritoneal macrophages. Sodium perborate was less potent than sodium hypochlorite and eugenol in inhibiting macrophage adhesion. The inhibitory effect of sodium perborate on macrophage adhesion further supports the concept that this agent is not implicated in external cervical root resorption associated with intracoronal bleaching.

  10. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-03-01

    The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching.

  11. KTP and Er:YAG laser dental bleaching comparison: a spectrophotometric, thermal and morphologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, C; Augros, C; Rocca, J P; Lagori, G; Fornaini, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results, in terms of temperature, colour change and morphology, of two different laser wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP). The lasers used were KTP (potassium-titanyl-phosphate) laser (λ = 532 nm (PD = 1.98 W/cm2)) and Er:YAG laser (λ = 2940 nm (PD = 2.54 W/cm2)). The bleaching gels used were PolaOffice 35% HP gel and PolaOffice+ 6% HP gel (SDI, Australia). Thirty-six extracted human teeth were selected and divided into two groups. For the 35% HP treatment, 18 teeth were randomly assigned to three subgroups: (1) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + KTP laser irradiation; (2) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation; and (3) HP gel + KTP laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation. The same protocol was used for the 6% HP bleaching treatment. The bleaching results were analysed by a spectrophotometer, the thermal elevation by K thermocouples and the enamel surface by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney test were performed, and the data were analysed using the software StatView and the free Web statistics tool BiostaTGV. The thermal elevation of the Er:YAG groups was higher than KTP, while only the group 35% HP gel vs. 35% HP gel + Er:YAG showed significant colour differences (p < 0.05). SEM photographs showed slight enamel surface morphologic alterations after bleaching treatment. The Er:YAG laser may improve the bleaching results of 35% HP even if it increases the gel temperature, when compared to the KTP laser.

  12. Mineral loss and morphological changes in dental enamel induced by a 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel and a 10% CP gel on mineralized enamel content and morphology. Enamel blocks from bovine incisors were subjected to a 14-day treatment (8 h/day) with 10% or 16% CP gels. Knoop microhardness was evaluated before bleaching and at 1, 7 or 14 days after this treatment (50 g/15 s). Mineral content (energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy), surface roughness and topography (atomic force microscopy) were evaluated at the 14-day period. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Significant microhardness reduction was observed at the 7 th and 14 th days for 10% CP gel, and for all bleaching times for 16% CP gel (p<0.05). At the 14-day period, a significant decrease in Ca and P content, increase on surface roughness (p<0.05) as well as on picks and valleys distance were observed when both bleaching gels were used. These enamel alterations were more intense for 16% CP gel. It was concluded that both CP-based gels promoted loss of mineral structure from enamel, resulting in a rough and porous surface. However, 16% CP gel caused the most intense adverse effects on enamel.

  13. Coronal microleakage of three different dental biomaterials as intra-orifice barrier during nonvital bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Zarenejad, Nafiseh; Asgary, Saeed; Ramazani, Nahid; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Ramazani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to assess the microleakage of glass-ionomer (GI), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as coronal orifice barrier during walking bleaching. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was done for 70 extracted human incisors without canal calcification, caries, restoration, resorption, or cracks. The teeth were then divided into three experimental using “Simple randomization allocation” (n = 20) and two control groups (n = 5). The three cements were applied as 3-mm intra-orifice barrier in test groups, and bleaching process was then conducted using a mixture of sodium perborate powder and distilled water, for 9 days. For leakage evaluation, bovine serum albumin marker was traced in a dual-chamber technique with Bradford indicator. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean ± standard deviation leakage of samples from negative control, positive control, GI, MTA, and CEM cement groups were 0.0, 8.9 ± 0.03, 0.47 ± 0.02, 0.48 ± 0.02, and 0.49 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching. PMID:26759596

  14. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  15. Evaluation of the effect of a home bleaching agent on surface characteristics of indirect esthetic restorative materials--part II microhardness.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Kianoosh; Rasaeipour, Sasan; Ghodsi, Safoura; Khaledi, Amir Ali Reza; Vojdani, Mahroo

    2014-07-01

    The exponential usage of esthetic restorative materials is beholden to society needs and desires. Interaction between the bleaching agents and the esthetic restorative materials is of critical importance. This in vitro study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of a home bleaching agent, carbamide peroxide (CP) 38%, on the microhardness of the fiber reinforced composite (FRC), overglazed, autoglazed, or polished porcelain specimens. For overglazed, autoglazed, polished ceramics and also FRC cylindrical specimens (n = 20 per group) were prepared. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 hours prior to testing. Six samples from each group were selected randomly as negative controls which were stored in distilled water at 37°C that was changed daily. CP 38% was applied on the test specimens for 15 minutes, twice a day for 14 days. By using Knoop-microhardness tester microhardness testing for baseline, control and test specimens was conducted. Data were statistically analyzed using paired t-test, Mann-Whitney test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Home bleaching significantly decreased the surface microhardness of all the test samples (p < 0.05), whereas the control groups did not show statistically significant changes after 2 weeks. The polished porcelain and polished composite specimens showed the most significant change in microhard-ness after bleaching process (p < 0.05). Although the type of surface preparation affects the susceptibility of the porcelain surface to the bleaching agent, no special preparation can preclude such adverse effects. The contact of home bleaching agents with esthetic restorative materials is unavoidable. Therefore protecting these restorations from bleaching agents and reglazing or at least polishing the restorations after bleaching is recommended.

  16. A comparative study of different bleaching agents on the morphology of human enamel: an in vitro SEM study.

    PubMed

    Uthappa, Roshan; Suprith, M L; Bhandary, Shreetha; Dash, Sumit

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare two different commercial bleaching agents, Opalescence with Colgate Platinum, and 30% phosphoric acid used as aggressive agent on the morphology of human enamel. Ten freshly extracted, noncarious, human maxillary central incisors extracted for periodontal reasons were used in this study. The labial surface of the disinfected teeth were polished using a polishing paste with the help of rubber cup and a slow speed handpiece. Each tooth was sectioned at cement-enamel junction and the crown was separated into four specimens, all taken from labial surface. Group 1 was treated with Colgate Platinum for 7 hours, group 2 with Opalescence for 7 hours, group 3 was treated with 30% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds and group 4 was untreated and used as control. After the treatment period, the specimens were washed with normal saline and stored in sterile bottle and sealed. Photomicrographs obtained from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after surface treatments were examined for no alteration, slight alteration, moderate alteration and severe alterations. The specimens treated with commercial bleaching agents revealed no enamel surface morphologic alterations compared to control group. The specimen treated with phosphoric acid showed severe alterations. Ten percent carbamide peroxide evaluated in this study does not etch tooth enamel or alter enamel surface morphology as do conventional etching techniques. Carbamine peroxide is a safe and effective tooth whitening agent even when used for extended period of time. The enamel surface remains smooth which reduces caries due to plaque collection.

  17. The effect of a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on the phosphate concentration of tooth enamel assessed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santini, Ario; Pulham, Colin R; Rajab, Ahmed; Ibbetson, Richard

    2008-04-01

    The study assessed changes in phosphate concentrations of surface enamel treated with a proprietary bleaching agent ('PEROXIDE') containing 10% carbamide peroxide over a 28-day period using Raman spectroscopy. Six non-carious human molar teeth (age range 12-21 years), extracted for orthodontic reasons, were used. From the enamel face of each half tooth, a near flat enamel section, approximately 2 x 2 mm, was cut, providing 12 specimens. Each specimen was treated with 10% carbamide peroxide for 8 h day(-1) for 28 consecutive days, with Raman spectra being obtained prior to bleaching and after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Raman spectra were acquired on a confocal LabRam 300 spectrometer fitted with an Olympus B microscope (Olympus, Middlesex, UK). The difference in the maximum peak values for phosphate group concentrations were tested using the Friedman test (non-parametric anova) and Dunn's multiple comparison test. An intense broad band at 980 cm(-1), characteristic of phosphate groupings, was always observed. At 7 and 14 days, and again at 28 days, there was a significant decrease in the phosphate group concentration compared with base-line measurements (P < 0.05) but not at 21 days (P > 0.05). Ideally, bleaching should not be continued to a point where surface enamel is lost, and the present study suggests that a regime using 10% carbamide peroxide should not extend to 7 days.

  18. MICROMORPHOLOGY AND MICROHARDNESS OF ENAMEL AFTER TREATMENT WITH HOME-USE BLEACHING AGENTS CONTAINING 10% CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE AND 7.5% HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Arcanjo, Alex José; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of home-use bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness and surface micromorphology. Material and Methods: Enamel slabs (n=10) received the bleaching agents for 1 h/day and remained in artificial saliva solution for 23 h/day, during a total period of 21 days. Control group was composed of enamel slabs that were not subjected to treatment with the agents and were maintained in artificial saliva solution. Microhardness tests were performed before treatment application, 21 days of treatment and 14 days after the end of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed after 14 days after the end of bleaching treatment by 3 calibrated observers who attributed scores. Results: The Tukey's test (α=0.05) showed no significant differences in microhardness values among bleaching agents, at 21 days of treatment and a significant increase in microhardness for different agents after 14 days from the end of treatment. Fisher's exact test showed differences in micromorphology of enamel between control and experimental groups (p=0.0342). Conclusions: Bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide may change surface micromorphology of enamel, although no changes in microhardness were observed. PMID:20027436

  19. Micromorphology and microhardness of enamel after treatment with home-use bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Arcanjo, Alex José; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of home-use bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness and surface micromorphology. Enamel slabs (n=10) received the bleaching agents for 1 h/day and remained in artificial saliva solution for 23 h/day, during a total period of 21 days. Control group was composed of enamel slabs that were not subjected to treatment with the agents and were maintained in artificial saliva solution. Microhardness tests were performed before treatment application, 21 days of treatment and 14 days after the end of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed after 14 days after the end of bleaching treatment by 3 calibrated observers who attributed scores. The Tukey's test (alpha=0.05) showed no significant differences in microhardness values among bleaching agents, at 21 days of treatment and a significant increase in microhardness for different agents after 14 days from the end of treatment. Fisher's exact test showed differences in micromorphology of enamel between control and experimental groups (p=0.0342). Bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide may change surface micromorphology of enamel, although no changes in microhardness were observed.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of a home-bleaching agent on the surface characteristics of indirect esthetic restorative materials: part I--roughness.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Kianoosh; Rasaeipour, Sasan; Khaledi, Amir Alireza; Vojdani, Mahroo; Ghodsi, Safoura

    2014-05-01

    Pressing esthetic demands of good looking make people undergo bleaching procedures. However, the effect of bleaching agents on esthetic restorative materials with different surface preparations has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a homebleaching agent (carbamide peroxide: CP 38%) on the surface roughness of the polished fiber reinforced composite (FRC), overglazed, autoglazed, or polished ceramic samples. Twenty standardized cylindrical specimens were made of each of the following groups: over-glazed, autoglazed, polished porcelain and also FRC. The test specimens exposed to the CP 38%, 15 minutes, twice a day for 2 weeks according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Six samples from each group were selected randomly to form negative controls. Surface roughness measurements (Ra, micrometer) for baseline, test and control specimens were performed by use of a profilometer. Paired t-test, Mann-Whitney test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for statistical analyses. The data showed that bleaching with CP 38% significantly increased the surface roughness of all the test samples (p < 0.05). The type of surface preparation caused significant differences between the susceptibility of porcelain subgroups to bleaching (p < 0.05). The polished porcelain specimens showed the highest changes after bleaching. CP 38% significantly increases the surface roughness of the porcelains and FRC. The type of surface condition affects the amenability of the porcelain surface to the bleaching agent. Glazed porcelains were more resistant to roughness than the polished porcelains and also the composite. Roughening of porcelain and FRC occur following bleaching procedure. No special surface preparation of indirect esthetic restorative materials can completely preserve these materials from adverse effects of bleaching agents.

  1. Tooth bleaching increases dentinal protease activity.

    PubMed

    Sato, C; Rodrigues, F A; Garcia, D M; Vidal, C M P; Pashley, D H; Tjäderhane, L; Carrilho, M R; Nascimento, F D; Tersariol, I L S

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative agent commonly used for dental bleaching procedures. The structural and biochemical responses of enamel, dentin, and pulp tissues to the in vivo bleaching of human (n = 20) premolars were investigated in this study. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe enamel nanostructure. The chemical composition of enamel and dentin was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The enzymatic activities of dental cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were monitored with fluorogenic substrates. The amount of collagen in dentin was measured by emission of collagen autofluorescence with confocal fluorescence microscopy. The presence of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the pulp was evaluated with a fluorogenic 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) probe. Vital bleaching of teeth significantly altered all tested parameters: AFM images revealed a corrosion of surface enamel nanostructure; FTIR analysis showed a loss of carbonate and proteins from enamel and dentin, along with an increase in the proteolytic activity of cathepsin-B and MMPs; and there was a reduction in the autofluorescence of collagen and an increase in both cathepsin-B activity and ROS in pulp tissues. Together, these results indicate that 35% hydrogen peroxide used in clinical bleaching protocols dramatically alters the structural and biochemical properties of dental hard and soft pulp tissue.

  2. Agent neutralization study. II: Detoxification of HD with aqueous bleach. Final report, May-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.B.; Beaudry, W.T.; Rohrbaugh, D.K.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Butrow, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A series of neutralization studies was conducted by reacting varying amounts of HD with aqueous hydrochlorite (OCL-) solution to evaluate the use of bleach as an alternate means of destroying stockpiles of HD. A small vacuum jacketed glass reactor was used to react CASARM grade HD and one ton container HD sample. One mid-scale reaction with ton container HD was also conducted. Exotherms were observed in each reaction, and the heat of reaction was estimated. Analyses of selected products by NMR and GC/MS are reported. Sodium hydroxide as a stabilizer for the bleach was studied. Reaction products were titrated for active chlorine. Thiodiglycol was reacted with OCL- for comparison. The stability versus time for bleach solutions at 75 C is reported. A large variety of compounds are formed during the oxidation of HD, which proceeds by a complex and inexact stoichiometry. At least 5 moles of OCL- are required to destroy all of the HD, and significant heat is produced during the reaction. however, the reaction is more controlled and more efficient when caustic is used as a bleach stabilizer. Ton container HD required more OCL- due to the oxidation of the extra sulfides.

  3. Aesthetic considerations in endodontics: internal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Abbott, P V

    1997-09-01

    During endodontic treatment of any tooth, aesthetics must be considered in the same manner as during any other dental treatment. The most common aesthetic challenge associated with endodontics is the discoloration of natural tooth structure. The discoloration may be a result of pulp pathosis, especially pulpal hemorrhage prior to or during treatment, or it may be due to various endodontic and restorative materials placed in the pulp chamber. There are several simple measures that can be utilized during and following endodontic treatment to eliminate or reduce aesthetic deficiency. The learning objective of this article is to discuss internal bleaching of discolored pulpless teeth that have been endodontically treated. The discussion includes the chemical composition of bleaching agents and principles by which they function during the bleaching procedures.

  4. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED's for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  5. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-09-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode Laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED"s for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  6. The effect of home bleaching agents on the surface roughness of five different composite resins: A SEM evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Ulusoy, Nuran; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Yuksel-Devrim, Ece

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP) on the surface roughness of five different composite resins using profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty-six specimens (1 mm thick, 10 mm in diameter) of five composite resins were fabricated. Each composite group was equally divided into three subgroups as control, CP and HP. In control group, specimens were stored in daily refreshed distilled water during the 14-day testing period. In other groups, 10% HP (Opalescence Treswhite) and 10% CP (Opalescence PF) were applied and surface roughness values (Ra) of each specimen were measured with a profilometer at the end of 14 days. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to evaluate the surface deformations of composite resins. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Ra values of composite groups exposed to bleaching agents were statistically higher than control group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between Ra values after HP and CP application within each composite group while SEM micrographs showed higher surface alterations at HP group compared to CP. Among the composite resins tested, Ceram-X Mono revealed the lowest Ra values after CP and HP applications as seen at SEM images. Home bleaching agents increased the surface roughness of all composites. Except CP applied Ceram-X mono specimens, Ra values of all composite resins evaluated in this study exceeded the critical limit of 0.2 μm. Ceram-X mono was the least affected composite material after bleaching application. SCANNING 38:277-283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Material/Methods Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. Results The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Conclusions Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching. PMID:22367139

  8. A double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial of 10 percent versus 16 percent carbamide peroxide tooth-bleaching agents: one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Sônia Saeger; dos Santos, Iná da Silva; Della Bona, Alvaro; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2009-09-01

    The use of high-concentration tooth-bleaching agents has been associated with increased longevity of the whitening effect. The authors conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the longevity of the whitening effect at one year of two at-home tooth-bleaching agents. The authors randomly assigned 92 participants with a mean shade of C1 or darker for six maxillary anterior teeth into two equal-sized groups according to carbamide peroxide concentration: 10 percent (CP10) or 16 percent (CP16). Treatment involved the use of a whitening agent in a tray for two hours daily for three weeks. The authors evaluated tooth shade with a shade guide and a spectrophotometer at baseline and one week, six months and one year after bleaching. Participants in both groups answered questions about their dietary and oral hygiene behaviors. At the one-year recall appointment, the teeth in both groups remained significantly lighter than at baseline. At this time, participants from the CP10 and CP16 groups consumed staining beverages and foods at a level as high as at the six-month recall appointment, and this consumption level was not statistically significant between groups (P > .5). One year after bleaching, both treatment groups had the same median tooth shade, which remained lighter than at baseline. Higher carbamide peroxide concentration does not increase the longevity of the whitening effect of at-home tooth-bleaching agents.

  9. ["Power bleaching" with the KTP laser].

    PubMed

    Vanderstricht, K; Nammour, S; De Moor, R

    2009-01-01

    The most important constituent of the bleaching process is the hydrogen peroxyde. The bleaching effect is the result of a change in the chemical structure of organic molecules in the teeth. Different bleaching techniques are described on the basis of the concentration of the hydrogen peroxyde used and on the basis of the different methods of application. It has been demonstrated that a faster change in colour can be obtained when bleaching is performed in combination with a light source i.e. power bleaching aiming for a more in depth change of colour. Different investigations have demonstrated that negative effects associated with bleaching agents are seen earlier when light sources have been used as accelerators. So, light activation may not lead to 'heating of the pulp'. Different types of laser bleaching have been described, though, not all of them will lead to the desired result. There is only one exception at present and this is the KTP-laser bleaching with the Smart Bleach gel. The specific laser-tissue interaction is the result of different activation processes of the hydrogen peroxyde in the gel: as a result of the interaction with the laser a photocatalytic effect is induced (i.e. the activation of the gel by means of light--this is also referred to as a photochemical reaction), a limited photothermal effect (light absorption may result in a certain heating of the gel). The light activated gel also has an alkaline pH, which favours the ionisation of the hydrogen peroxyde into perhydroxyl ions (these are the most reactive free radicals). It is also possible to directly cut the tetracycline molecules (a good absorption of light by the tetracycline molecules at 532 nm). This will result in better decolouration of tetracycline stained teeth. This last process is described as direct photobleaching. It also needs to be emphasized that bleaching with a laser can only be performed by a dentist who has acquired a substantial knowledge on laser-tissue interaction

  10. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an in-office bleaching system and the effect of potassium nitrate as a desensitizing agent.

    PubMed

    Palé, Maria; Mayoral, Juan R; Llopis, Jaume; Vallès, Marta; Basilio, Joan; Roig, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate by spectrophotometer the in vivo colour changes resulting from the application of an in-office tooth bleaching system containing 28% H2O2 by light-emitting diode (LED) activation and to determine whether the application of 5% potassium nitrate 30 min before bleaching decreased tooth sensitivity. Thirty-two individuals were assigned randomly to two groups (n = 16). Group A received 5% potassium nitrate as a desensitizing agent 30 min before bleaching with 28% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED. Group B received glycerin as a placebo and the same bleaching protocol was applied. The colour of the right central incisor of each patient was measured visually and by spectrophotometer before bleaching, immediately thereafter, 15 days and 3 months later. Differences in L* a* b* values were tested with a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Differences in ΔΕ values were tested with ANOVA statistical analysis at a 0.05 level of significance. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were detected in L*, as well as in b* values, between initial (I) and post bleaching (PB) and between initial (I) and 3 months post-op. In contrast, there was no significant difference between PB and 3 months post-op. The a* values showed no statistically significant differences among the different time points. Tooth sensitivity decreased significantly when potassium nitrate was applied. In-office bleaching system gave quantitatively stable results over a 3-month period. Tooth sensitivity was reduced significantly, when a desensitizing agent was applied 30 min before treatment, but the efficacy of bleaching decreased.

  11. Evaluation of eye protection filters for use with dental curing and bleaching lamps.

    PubMed

    Bruzell, Ellen M; Johnsen, Bjørn; Aalerud, Tommy Nakken; Christensen, Terje

    2007-06-01

    Exposure to intense radiation sources in a dental clinic necessitates the use of eye protective filters to avoid blue-light photochemical retinal hazard. We have investigated the filtering quality and assessed whether the filters protect sufficiently against retinal hazards throughout the workday. Visible light transmittance of 18 protective filters was measured. These products consisted of spectacles, stationary lamp shields, and a hand-held shield intended for use in dental clinics. Nine of the 18 tested filters had adequate filtering capacity according to today's lamp technology and exposure limit values. These filters transmitted less than 0.1% of the radiation at any wavelength between 400 nm and 525 nm. Seven of the nine filters showed transmission values below the detection limit (approximately 10(-3)%) in the wavelength band between 400 nm and 500 nm. Filters of inferior quality may prove inadequate if the use and radiation intensity of the lamps further increase. Lack of protection may also occur if a filter is used to protect against emission from a lamp with properties other than the lamp for which the filter has been intended. It is of major importance that the spectacles/shields accommodate the emission from the lamp source. The suppliers of dental radiation sources should be responsible for information on the need for and proper use of eye protectors. In addition, the filters should be marked according to testing procedures appropriate for the specific use.

  12. Intra-pulpal temperature rise of different tooth types during dental bleaching supported by an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Strakas, D; Tolidis, K; Koliniotou-Koumpia, E; Vanweersch, L; Franzen, R; Gutknecht, N

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber of the teeth, during Er,Cr:YSGG bleaching, as well as to show which teeth are the most susceptible in terms of pulp temperature increase during laser-activated bleaching treatment. Although Er:YAG studies have been published on this subject, it is the first time Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is tested. Fifteen teeth were tested--3 each of the following--(maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, canines, premolars and mandibular incisors). The bleaching procedure comprised an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a yellow-coloured bleaching agent with a concentration of 38 % H2O2 (Power whitening, WHITEsmile GmbH, Germany). The tip used was a 6-mm long Z-type glass tip (MZ8) of a 800 μm diameter. Average output power was set to 1.25 W, pulse duration 700 μs (S-mode), whilst the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The results showed that the most susceptible teeth in terms of pulp temperature increase were the lateral maxillary incisors and the mandibular incisors. The mean temperature increase on these teeth was 1.06 and 1.00 °C, respectively, on 60 s Er,Cr:YSGG-supported bleaching.

  13. Analgesic agents and strategies in the dental pain model.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, E

    1994-12-01

    Pain following removal of impacted third molar teeth has proven to be a useful clinical model for evaluating oral analgesics. Moreover, as the underlying pathophysiology becomes elucidated the model serves as a tool for monitoring the relative contributions of different pain events, including peripheral and central sensitization. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) demonstrate high potency in this model, reflecting the large contribution that peripheral prostaglandins may make to the pathophysiology of postoperative pain. However, other analgesic agents, with weak activity against peripheral prostaglandin synthesis (e.g. paracetamol, opioid analgesics), may also provide pain relief in the dental pain model. The activity of these agents is dependent on the time and method of administration, and may be related to more centrally located analgesic activity, or to peripheral actions other than inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. In single dose studies it is possible to enhance pain relief by combining analgesic agents of different activities, e.g. ibuprofen 400 mg and codeine 20 mg. Such enhanced activity is also demonstrated by higher doses of certain NSAIDs, e.g. ketoprofen 100 mg. This may reflect the existence of complimentary analgesic activities within a single therapeutic agent. As a clinical research tool the dental pain model has several attributes which suggest that it will continue to be of value in identifying potentially improved analgesic strategies for postoperative pain.

  14. Efficacy of Home-use Bleaching Agents Delivered in Customized or Prefilled Disposable Trays: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carlos, N R; Bridi, E C; Amaral, Flb; França, Fmg; Turssi, C P; Basting, R T

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bleaching methods containing hydrogen peroxide (HP) or carbamide peroxide (CP), dispensed in customized or prefilled trays, in terms of color change, tooth sensitivity, gingival irritation, acceptance, and comfort. Seventy-five volunteers were randomly selected and distributed according to the whitening agent (n=25): 10% HP dispensed in prefilled trays (Opalescence Go 10%) and 9.5% HP (Pola Day) and 10% CP both delivered in customized trays (Opalescence PF 10%). HP was applied for 30 min/d for 14 days (d), and CP for 8 h/d for 14 days. Evaluations were performed at baseline and at 7 days and 14 days of treatment. Color change was measured with Commission internationale de l'éclairage color coordinates (L*, a*, b*), Vita Classical, and 3D Master scales. A visual analog scale was used to assess tooth sensitivity, acceptance of the method and degree of comfort of the tray. Gingival irritation was evaluated as present or absent and localized or generalized. Regarding gingival irritation, tray acceptance, and tooth sensitivity, no differences were observed among the groups at any time (p>0.05). As for degree of comfort, 10% HP showed lower scores (comfortable) than 10% CP, with significant differences (p<0.05) from the other groups (comfortable to very comfortable). In terms of ΔL, Δa, and ΔE, no difference was observed among the groups or between the time periods (p>0.05). The Δb average was higher at 14 days (p<0.05), and there was no difference among the groups (p>0.05). Localized gingival irritation was observed in both tray methods. Mild tooth sensitivity was observed with time, regardless of the bleaching agent concentration or the application time. Color change was similar for all the groups at 7 days and 14 days, but there was a greater reduction in the yellow hue at 14 days. All the bleaching methods were highly accepted and effective in promoting whitening. Although prefilled trays are generally comfortable, they

  15. Effect of nightguard vital bleaching gel on the color stability of provisional restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Bajunaid, Salwa Omar

    2016-01-01

    To assess the hypothesis that there was no difference in effect of 10% and 15% tooth bleaching agents on color stability of materials used for provisional fixed dental prosthesis. Fifteen samples from two materials used for provisional fixed dental prosthesis: methacrylate-based and composite-based materials and 15 preformed polycarbonate crowns soaked in bleaching gel or distilled water. Spectrophotometer recorded color of specimens at baseline, after 3, 7, and 14 days. Data were statistically analyzed using two-factor ANOVA test to compare the color stability of tested materials. Methyl-based provisional material exhibited statistically higher color change when exposed to 10% and 15% bleaching gel (delta EFNx01: 9.0 and 11.1, respectively) as compared to distilled water (delta EFNx01: 2.9). Delta EFNx01 of composite-based material specimens exposed to distilled water was statistically higher (6.3) than specimens exposed to 10% and 15% bleaching gel (1.5 and 1.1, respectively). Polycarbonate crowns showed a statistically lower color change when exposed to 15% (0.9) than to 10% bleaching gel (5.1) or distilled water (5.5). Composite-based provisional material showed highest color stability when exposed to vital tooth bleaching gel, whereas methacrylate-based material was the least color stable. Polycarbonate crowns were more color stable when exposed to 15% bleaching gel as opposed to 10% bleaching gel.

  16. Oxidative degradation of chemical warfare agents in water by bleaching powder.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lihong; Zuo, Guomin; Cheng, Zhenxing; Zhu, Haiyan; Li, Shanmao

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of sulfur mustard (HD), S-2-(di-isopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) and Soman (GD) in water by bleaching powder was investigated. The degradation products were comprehensively analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and ion chromatography. Degradation pathways were deduced based on the identified products. The product analysis results indicated that HD could be degraded through oxidation and chlorination reactions, and a small portion of sulfur atoms could be mineralized into SO(4)(2-) ion. Oxidative degradation of VX could finally generate O-ethyl methylphosphonate acid (EMPA), sulfonic acids, SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) ions. GD would be converted into non-toxic pinacolyl methylphosphonate via nucleophilic substitution.

  17. Colorimeter and scanning electron microscopy analysis of teeth submitted to internal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Martin-Biedma, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Lopes, Manuela; Lopes, Luis; Vilar, Rui; Bahillo, José; Varela-Patiño, Purificación

    2010-02-01

    This in vitro study compared the tooth color and the ultrastructure of internal dental tissues before and after internal bleaching. Sodium perborate was placed in the pulp chamber of endodontically treated molars and sealed with intermediate restorative material. The test samples were stored in a physiologic solution, and the bleaching agent was replaced every 7 days. A control group was used. After 1 month, the colors of the test and control samples were measured with a colorimeter, and the internal surfaces were observed under field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Statistically significant differences were found between the test and control sample colors. The FESEM ultrastructure analysis of the internal enamel and dentin surfaces did not show any changes after the internal bleaching. The results of the present study show that sodium perborate is effective in bleaching nonvital teeth and does not produce ultrastructural changes in the dental tissues. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel dental adhesive containing antibacterial agents and calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Melo, Mary Anne S; Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D; Hsia, Ru-Ching; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-05-01

    Secondary caries remains the main reason for dental restoration failure. Replacement of failed restorations accounts for 50%-70% of all restorations performed. Antibacterial adhesives could inhibit biofilm acids at tooth-restoration margins, and calcium phosphate (CaP) ions could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) incorporate nanoparticles of silver (NAg), quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) into bonding agent; and (2) investigate their effects on dentin bonding and microcosm biofilms. An experimental primer was made with pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). An adhesive was made with bisphenol-A-glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). NAg was incorporated into primer at 0.1 wt %. The adhesive contained 0.1% NAg and 10% QADM, and 0%-40% NACP. Incorporating NAg into primer and NAg-QADM-NACP into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength (p > 0.1). Scanning electron microscopy showed numerous resin tags, and transmission electron microscopy revealed NAg and NACP in dentinal tubules. Viability of human saliva microcosm biofilms on primer/adhesive/composite disks was substantially reduced via NAg and QADM. Metabolic activity, lactic acid, and colony-forming units of biofilms were much lower on the new bonding agents than control (p < 0.05). In conclusion, novel dental bonding agents containing NAg, QADM, and NACP were developed with the potential to kill residual bacteria in the tooth cavity and inhibit the invading bacteria along tooth-restoration margins, with NACP to remineralize tooth lesions. The novel method of combining antibacterial agents (NAg and QADM) with remineralizing agent (NACP) may have wide applicability to other adhesives for caries inhibition.

  19. Novel dental adhesive containing antibacterial agents and calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mary Anne S.; Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Hsia, Ru-ching; Rodrigues, Lidiany K. A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary caries remains the main reason for dental restoration failure. Replacement of failed restorations accounts for 50-70% of all restorations performed. Antibacterial adhesives could inhibit biofilm acids at tooth-restoration margins, and calcium phosphate (CaP) ions could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) incorporate nanoparticles of silver (NAg), quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) into bonding agent; and (2) investigate their effects on dentin bonding and microcosm biofilms. An experimental primer was made with pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). An adhesive was made with bisphenol-A-glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). NAg was incorporated into primer at 0.1wt%. The adhesive contained 0.1% NAg and 10% QADM, and 0-40% NACP. Incorporating NAg into primer and NAg-QADM-NACP into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength (p>0.1). SEM showed numerous resin tags, and TEM revealed NAg and NACP in dentinal tubules. Viability of human saliva microcosm biofilms on primer/adhesive/composite disks was substantially reduced via NAg and QADM. Metabolic activity, lactic acid, and colony-forming units of biofilms were much lower on the new bonding agents than control (p<0.05). In conclusion, novel dental bonding agents containing NAg, QADM and NACP were developed with the potential to kill residual bacteria in the tooth cavity and inhibit the invading bacteria along tooth-restoration margins, with NACP to remineralize tooth lesions. The novel method of combining antibacterial agents (NAg and QADM) with remineralizing agent (NACP) may have wide applicability to other adhesives for caries inhibition. PMID:23281264

  20. Color stability of bleached teeth over time: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Scaminaci Russo, Daniele; Viano, Martina; Bambi, Claudia; Nieri, Michele; Giachetti, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro color stability of bleached teeth by means of a 6-day staining procedure. 20 caries-free randomly divided into two groups. Test group: a bleaching agent (Zoom 2, Discus Dental) was applied to the labial surfaces following the manufacturer's instructions. no bleaching treatment. using a thermo-cycling device, all teeth were alternately immersed in a 0.9% saline solution at 37 °C for 1 hour, and in a coffee solution at 55 °C for another hour, in order to simulate the natural tooth-staining process. This procedure was repeated 12 times a day for 6 days. Teeth were polished once a day with a rubber cup and polishing paste. CIELAB color variables (L, a, b) were assessed by means of a spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade®) and a custom alignment device at baseline, after bleaching, and once a day throughout the 6-day staining treatment. The bleaching result and the color stability of bleached and control group teeth were assessed by matched pair t test and MANOVA. The bleaching agent had a significant whitening effect. The staining treatment did not produce any significant color change on bleached teeth, which maintained the same whiteness achieved after the bleaching treatment. The staining treatment did not produce any significant color change on control teeth. The two groups showed significant differences in both whiteness and lightness changes as a result of the polishing treatment. The Zoom 2 whitening agent produced immediate and long-lasting bleaching results, even if the reduction of b value mainly occurred 24 and 48 hours after the bleaching treatment.

  1. Effects of Bleaching Agents Combined with Regular and Whitening Toothpastes on Surface Roughness and Mineral Content of Enamel.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mariana Lerner; Cavalli, Vanessa; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Martin, Airton Abrahão; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; do Rego, Marcos Augusto; Cavalcanti, Andréa Nóbrega; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface roughness and changes in the composition of enamel submitted to different bleaching protocols and toothbrushing with regular and whitening toothpastes. Bleaching treatment could promote morphological and chemical changes in enamel surface. Enamel blocks were randomized into nine groups (n=10) according to the bleaching treatment (no bleaching, control group; 6% hydrogen peroxide, HP; or 10% carbamide peroxide, CP) and toothpaste used (placebo, PL; regular, R; or whitening dentifrice, W). Bleaching was performed according to manufacturers' instructions and all groups were submitted to 30,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing with toothpaste (PL, R, or W). Mineral content evaluation and enamel roughness were evaluated initially (T1), after bleaching (T2), and after toothbrushing (T3), using an energy-dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and profilometry, respectively. Data were statistically analyzed with two way ANOVA, Tukey, and Dunnett tests (5%). Enamel surface roughness was influenced by bleaching and toothbrushing. Surface roughness increased for the groups that brushed with the placebo dentifrice (CP+PL, HP+PL, C+PL) and for the control group that brushed with whitening dentifrice (C+W). Enamel Ca/P ratio decreased after bleaching, but toothbrushing, regardless of the dentifrice used, did not reduce the enamel mineral content. The bleaching treatment resulted in a decrease of enamel mineral content, but the studied dentifrices did not contribute to surface mineral loss.

  2. [Conservative treatment improved corrosive esophagitis and pneumomediastinum in a patient who ingested bleaching agent containing sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Iseki, Ken; Ozawa, Akiko; Tominaga, Aya; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Otani, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department 3 hours after ingestion of a bleaching agent containing hypochlorous acid and sodium hydroxide in a suicide attempt. Enhanced chest computed tomography scans taken on admission indicated an edematous esophagus and air bubbles in the mediastinum. He underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation until day 9 because of laryngeal edema. On day 10, his endoscopy indicated diffuse reddish mucosal hyperemia, erosions, and lacerated mucosal lesions in the esophagus that were indicative of grade 2b corrosive esophagitis. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor was initiated, with which the condition of the esophagus improved, and on day 44, a slight stricture of the upper part of the esophagus was observed. He was discharged on day 64 without any complaints. The ingestion of sodium hypochlorite induces corrosive esophagitis and acute phase of gastritis. Ingestion of any corrosive agent is known as a risk factor for esophagus cancer in the long-term. In such cases with esophageal stricture, esophagectomy is recommended for preventing esophagus cancer. Considering the age of the patient, however, he did not undergo esophagectomy.

  3. Vital tooth bleaching with Nightguard vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Robinson, F G

    1997-01-01

    Between July 1994 and May 1996, several landmark articles were published concerning the safety and efficacy of vital tooth bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in a customfitted tray. The American Dental Association (ADA) published guidelines for ADA acceptance, and three products received approval. Long-term clinical trials on 38 patients indicated 92% successful bleaching after 6 weeks of treatment. Results were stable in 74% of the patients at 1.5 years, and in 62% of the patients at 3-year follow-up with no further treatment. Clinical pulpal studies and periodontal studies indicated no detrimental safety problems, although some laboratory cell studies suggested concerns. The noncarcinogenic potential of 10% carbamide peroxide was established in animal studies. Successful bleaching of tetracycline-stained teeth was achieved after 6 months of treatment, with no tooth problems detected clinically or by scanning electron micrograph. Extended treatment times are effective on other stains from dentinogenesis imperfecta or nicotine. On insertion in the mouth, 10% carbamide peroxide elevated the pH in the tray and saliva. After 4 hours of clinical wear, over 60% of the newer, thicker materials (Opalescence [Ultraclent Products, South Jordon, UT] and Platinum [Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Canton, MA]) was present and active in the tray. Nightguard vital bleaching seems to be the most cost-efficient, user-friendly, patient-accepted method of bleaching teeth available to the profession and is safe and effective. Over-the-counter products can have harmful effects on tooth structure and may not lighten teeth.

  4. [Evaluation methods of nightguard teeth bleaching with opalescence (ultradent) based on clinical and experimental tests].

    PubMed

    Petrasz, Małgorzata

    2003-01-01

    In March 1989 Haywood and Heymann presented a new method for bleaching teeth called by them "nightguard vital bleaching". This procedure requires that the patient wears for 6 to 8 hours an individually designed guard filled with a viscous solution of carbamide peroxide. The aim of the present study was to determine the efficiency of the guard bleaching method and to address frequently asked questions concerning local complications and the influence of the preparation on the enamel surface. The scanning electron microscope was used in the experimental part to reveal changes in microhardness and on the surface of the bleached human enamel. The purpose of the clinical part was to determine the efficiency of bleaching, to estimate the frequency of pain and other symptoms and to check the influence of bleaching guard on accumulation of dental plaque and gingival status as reflected by the Plaque Index (Pl.I.) and the Gingival Index (G.I.). It was found that bleaching with 10, 20 or 35% carbamide peroxide reduced the microhardness and modified the morphology of enamel surface proportionally to the concentration of the bleaching agent. It was ascertained that 10% carbamide peroxide effectively bleached teeth and considerably improved the hygiene of the oral cavity and gingival status (Pl.I, G.I.). During bleaching, over half of the patients suffered from local complications--thermal hypersensitivity of teeth and irritation of gums. Some deterioration of the bleaching effect was observed after 12 months in females only. Almost 100% of the patients were satisfied with the results of bleaching and would recommend this procedure to family members.

  5. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  6. Comparison of the effects of two bleaching agents on the recording of phase holograms in silver halide emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2006-11-01

    Optical densities before bleaching and final Lin-curves of plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions were determined for combinations of the AAC developer with a solvent bleach (R-9) and a (fixation-free) rehalogenating bleach (R-10). To characterize the processing, the square root of the diffraction efficiency of the processed holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. Sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could thereby be compared directly.

  7. Evaluation of the efficacy of potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride as desensitizing agents during tooth bleaching treatment—A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yining; Gao, Jinxia; Jiang, Tao; Liang, Shanshan; Zhou, Yi; Matis, Bruce A

    2015-08-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride as desensitizing agents during tooth bleaching treatment. An electronic systematic literature search was conducted in Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and EmBase in April, 2014 in English and without time restrictions. Study information extraction and methodological quality assessments were accomplished by two reviewers independently. Methodological quality was assessed by using the "Criteria for judging risk of bias in the 'Risk of bias' assessment tool". Dichotomous data was summarized by odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and continuous data was summarized by mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Statistical analyses were carried out by using Review Manager 5.2. For evaluation of percent of patients experiencing tooth sensitivity (POTS), the pooled OR of desensitizers vs. placebo was 0.45 (95% CI: 0.28-0.73, P=0.29). The pooled SMD of desensitizers vs. placebo was -0.47 (95% CI: -0.77 to -0.18, P=0.13) in evaluation of level of tooth sensitivity (LOTS). The results of shade evaluation remained inconsistent by evaluating subjective shade guide unit difference (ΔSGU or SGU) and objective colour difference (ΔE). This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of desensitizing agents, potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride, for tooth bleaching treatments. Potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride reduce tooth sensitivity while no consistent conclusion of tooth colour change was found. Tooth sensitivity is a typical side effect associated with tooth bleaching procedures. Potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride are used widely to treat tooth sensitivity. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride as desensitizing agents during tooth bleaching treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Commonly asked questions about nightguard vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B

    1993-01-01

    There are three basic classes of materials and techniques used for the bleaching of vital teeth. These include the in-office bleaching technique with 35 percent hydrogen peroxide, the Nightguard vital bleaching technique with 10 percent carbamide peroxide, and the over-the-counter bleaching kits with three-to-six percent hydrogen peroxide. The most popular of these techniques is Nightguard vital bleaching, also referred to as dentist-prescribed, home-applied bleaching. This article looks at the current status of the Nightguard vital bleaching technique, with a special emphasis on the clinical aspects of the treatment, along with the most commonly asked questions concerning the procedure. It would still appear than this form of dentist-prescribed, home-applied bleaching, when preceded by a proper examination and correct diagnosis, applied with a properly fitted prosthesis, and monitored as needed by a dentist, is as safe as other accepted dental procedures or commonly ingested foodstuffs.

  9. Commonly asked questions about nightguard vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B

    1996-01-01

    There are three basic classes of materials and techniques used for the bleaching of vital teeth. These include the in-office bleaching technique with 35 percent hydrogen peroxide, the Nightguard vital bleaching technique with 10 percent carbamide peroxide, and the over-the counter bleaching kits with three-to-six percent hydrogen peroxide. The most popular of these techniques is Nightguard vital bleaching also referred to as dentist-prescribed, home-applied bleaching. This article looks at the current status of the Nightguard vital bleaching technique, with a special emphasis on the clinical aspects of the treatment, along with the most commonly asked questions concerning the procedure. It would still appear that this form of dentist-prescribed, home-applied bleaching, when preceded by a proper examination and correct diagnosis, applied with a properly fitted prosthesis, and monitored as needed by a dentist, is as safe as other accepted dental procedures or commonly ingested foodstuffs.

  10. Effect of bleaching on restorative materials and restorations--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Attin, Thomas; Hannig, Christian; Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Rengin

    2004-11-01

    Internal and external bleaching procedures utilizing 3-35% hydrogen peroxide solutions or hydrogen peroxide releasing agents, such as carbamide peroxide or sodium perborate, can be used for whitening of teeth. The purpose of the review article was to summarize and discuss the available information concerning the effects of peroxide releasing bleaching agents on dental restorative materials and restorations. Information from all original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed or ISI Web of Science (search term: bleaching AND (composite OR amalgam OR glass ionomer OR compomer OR resin OR alloy) were included in the review. Existing literature reveals that bleaching therapies may have a negative effect on physical properties, marginal integrity, enamel and dentin bond strength, and color of restorative materials as investigated in numerous in vitro studies. However, there are no reports in literature indicating that bleaching may exert a negative impact on existing restorations requiring renewal of the restorations under clinical conditions. Bleaching may exert a negative influence on restorations and restorative materials. Advice is provided based on the current literature to minimize the impact of bleaching therapies on restorative materials and restorations.

  11. Effect of two different tooth bleaching techniques on microhardness of giomer

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Behboodi, Soodabeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Tooth bleaching is a safe and conservative treatment modality to improve the esthetic appearance of discolored teeth. One of the problems with the use of bleaching agents is their possible effect on surface microhardness of resin-based materials. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of in-office and at-home bleaching on surface microhardness of giomer. Material and Methods Seventy-five disk-shaped giomer samples (Beautifil II) were prepared and cured with a light-curing unit. The samples were randomly assigned to three groups (n=25). In group 1 (control), the samples were stored in distilled water for 14 days. The samples in groups 2 and 3 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (8 hours daily) and 45% CP (30 minutes daily), respectively, for 14 days. Finally, the microhardness of samples was measured with Vickers hardness tester using a 100-g force for 20 seconds. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the mean microhardness values among the study groups, followed by post hoc Tukey test for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in the mean microhardness values among the study groups (P<0.001). Based on the results of Tukey test, microhardness in the bleached groups was significantly less than that in the control group (P<0.0005). In addition, microhardness in the 45% CP group was significantly less than that in the 15% CP group (P<0.0005). Conclusions Use of both bleaching agents during in-office and at-home bleaching techniques resulted in a decrease in surface microhardness of giomer. The unfavorable effect of in-office bleaching (45% CP) was greater than that of at-home bleaching (15% CP). Key words:Dental restorations, hardness, tooth bleaching. PMID:28210444

  12. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes.

  13. Beta-adrenergic blocking agents and dental vasoconstrictors.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Elliot V; Giannakopoulos, Helen

    2010-10-01

    A clinically significant interaction between epinephrine or levonordefrin with nonselective beta-adrenergic blocking agents, although apparently rare in the dental setting, is potentially serious and can lead to significant hypertension with a concomitant reflex bradycardia. Based on the results of epinephrine infusion studies, the severity of the interaction seems dose related; small epinephrine doses cause less of a pressor response than larger doses. The interaction can be seen after intraoral submucosal injections but is generally of a smaller magnitude, at least with only 1 or 2 cartridges of lidocaine plus 1:100,000 epinephrine. However as demonstrated by 1 case report, some individuals are hypersensitive to this interaction. Inadvertent intravascular injections of local anesthetic plus vasoconstrictor and the use of high doses of vasoconstrictor are likely to result in a more pronounced response. Patients with significant cardiovascular disease may be especially vulnerable to the most serious sequelae resulting from the pressor reactions of the drug combination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of cold-light-activated bleaching treatment on enamel surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xin-Chang; Ma, He; Zhou, Jing-Lin; Li, Wei

    2012-12-01

    This in vitro study aims to evaluate the crystal and surface microstructure of dental enamel after cold-light bleaching treatment. Twelve sound human premolars were cross-split into four specimens, namely, mesio-buccal (Group LP), disto-buccal (Group P), mesio-lingual (Group NP) and disto-lingual (Group L) specimens. These four groups were treated using the standard cold-light bleaching procedure, a bleaching agent, a peroxide-free bleaching agent and cold-light, respectively. Before and after treatment, all specimens were analyzed by high-resolution, micro-area X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using a spectrometer, tooth color of all specimens was measured before and after treatment. The phase of the enamel crystals was identified as hydroxyapatite and carbonated hydroxyapatite. After treatment, specimens in Groups LP and P showed significantly weaker X-ray diffraction peaks, significant reduction in crystal size and crystallinity, significant increase in L* but decrease in a* and b*, and obvious alterations in the surface morphology. However, specimens in Groups NP and L did not show any significant changes. The cold-light bleaching treatment leads to demineralization in the enamel surface. The acidic peroxide-containing bleaching agent was the major cause of demineralization, whereas cold-light did not exhibit significant increase or decrease effect on this demineralization.

  15. Ex vivo evaluation of the effectiveness of bleaching agents on the shade alteration of blood-stained teeth.

    PubMed

    Yui, K C K; Rodrigues, J R; Mancini, M N G; Balducci, I; Gonçalves, S E P

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate ex vivo effectiveness of the three formulations of bleaching materials for intracoronal bleaching of root filled teeth using the walking bleach technique. Extracted premolar teeth were stained artificially with human blood. After biomechanical preparation, the root canals were filled and a 3-mm thick intermediate base of zinc phosphate cement was placed at the level of the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into four groups (n = 12): C (control, without bleaching material), A1 (sodium perborate + distilled water), A2 (sodium perborate + 10% carbamide peroxide) and A3 (sodium perborate + 35% carbamide peroxide). The bleaching materials were changed at 7 and 14 days. Evaluation of shade was undertaken with aid of the VITA Easyshadetrade mark (DeltaE*ab) and was performed after tooth staining and at 7, 14 and 21 days after bleaching, based on the CIELAB system. Data were analysed by anova for repeated measurements, Tukey and Dunnett tests (alpha = 0.05). The Tukey test revealed that group A1 (10.58 +/- 4.83 DeltaE*ab) was statistically different from the others (A2, 19.57 +/- 4.72 DeltaE*ab and A3, 17.58 +/- 3.33 DeltaE*ab), which were not different from each other. At 7 days: A1 was significantly different from A2; at 14 and 21 days: A2 and A3 were significantly better than A1; the Dunnett test revealed that the control group was different from A1, A2 and A3 at all periods (P < 0.05). Sodium perborate associated with both 10% and 35% carbamide peroxide was more effective than when associated with distilled water.

  16. Effect of 2 Bleaching Agents with a Content of High Concentrated Hydrogen Peroxide on Stained 2 CAD/CAM Blocks and a Nanohybrid Composite Resin: An AFM Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate color stability of 3 restorative materials, discoloration ability of different solutions, efficacy of 2 office bleaching agents, and surface roughness and topography. Sixty specimens for Clearfil Majesty Esthetic (CME), Lava Ultimate (LU), and Vita Enamic (VE) were prepared. They were immersed into 3 staining solutions for 2 weeks and then they were bleached. According to the measured L⁎, a⁎, and b⁎ parameters described by CIELAB system, color changes (ΔE00), translucency parameters (TP), whiteness index values (W⁎), and changes in closeness to pure white (ΔW⁎) were calculated. Then 3 specimens from each group were scanned with an atomic force microscope for surface analysis. After staining, CME groups and control groups of LU and VE showed clinically acceptable color changes (ΔE00 < 1,8). After bleaching, while a reverse effect on color was observed, VE showed the furthest color values to pure white. There was no statistically significant difference between whiteness index values of LU and CME. LU was the most translucent material during the study and TP values of materials showed minimal differences. Most of the VE groups and a control group of LU showed surface roughness (Ra) values higher than critical value for biofilm accumulation (0,2 μm). PMID:28804719

  17. [Effects of tooth whitening agents and acidic drinks on the surface properties of dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoling; Chen, Zhiqun; Lin, Yao; Shao, Jinquan; Yin, Lu

    2013-10-01

    Using tooth whitening agents (bleaching clip) in vitro and acidic drinks, we conducted a comparative study of the changes in enamel surface morphology, Ca/P content, and hardness. Tooth whitening glue pieces, cola, and orange juice were used to soak teeth in artificial saliva in vitro. Physiological saline was used as a control treatment. The morphology of the four groups was observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after the teeth were soaked for 7 and 14 d. The changes in Ca/P content and microhardness were analyzed. The enamel surfaces of the teeth in the three test groups were demineralized. The Ca/P ratio and the average microhardness were significantly lower than those of the control group immediately after the teeth were soaked (P < 0.05). The Ca/P ratio and microhardness gradually increased after 7 d. No significant difference was observed between the control group and the test groups after 14 d (P > 0.05). Bleaching agents caused transient demineralization of human enamel, but these agents could induce re-mineralization and repair of enamel over time. Demineralization caused by bleaching covered a relatively normal range compared with acidic drinks and daily drinking.

  18. Nightguard vital bleaching: current concepts and research.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B

    1997-04-01

    Nightguard vital bleaching, or NGVB, which involves the use of a 10 percent carbamide peroxide in a custom-fitted mouthguard, has been used with much success since its introduction in 1989. Normal bleaching treatment time is one to two weeks, although times may be extended to months for difficult stains. When used in a professionally supervised manner, nightguard vital bleaching is as safe as any other routinely used dental treatment.

  19. Effect of enamel sealants on tooth bleaching and on the color stability of the result.

    PubMed

    Corcodel, N; Hassel, A J; Sen, S; Saure, D; Rammelsberg, P; Lux, C J; Zingler, S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of enamel sealants on bleaching of natural teeth by use of 40 % hydrogen peroxide in a dental surgery. The color stability of the results from bleaching was, furthermore, determined 10 months after the bleaching procedure. In a standardized setting, four sealants (Pro Seal(®), Light Bond™ Sealant, Protecto(®), and Clinpro™ XT Varnish) were applied to and removed from human teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Natural teeth served as medium; half of the teeth were sealed and the others served as controls. Hydrogen peroxide gel (40 %; Opalescence Boost; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA) was used as bleaching agent. Color measurement was performed with a spectroradiometer (Photoresearch PR670) before the bleaching process (T1) and 24 h (T2) and 10 months (T3) after bleaching. The spectroradiometer results were expressed by use of the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation. The L*, a*, and b* values of the sealed and the unsealed surfaces were not significantly different at any time during the study (p > 0.05), irrespective of the sealant used. Ten months after the bleaching process, mean L*, a*, and b* values were lower than at 1-day post-bleaching; the mean value of ΔE between 1-day post-bleaching and 10 months post-bleaching was 2.46 (±3.1). The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of professional tooth whitening is not appreciably affected by the application of the four sealants tested.

  20. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Doustfateme, Samaneh; Kaveh, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR) might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6): Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique. PMID:26681849

  1. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  2. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  3. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  4. IN VITRO STUDY OF THE PULP CHAMBER TEMPERATURE RISE DURING LIGHT-ACTIVATED BLEACHING

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)-laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38±0.66°C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29±0.13°C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35±0.15°C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41±0.64°C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33±0.12°C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44±0.11°C). LED and LED-laser system did not differ

  5. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38+/-0.66 degrees C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29+/-0.13 degrees C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35+/-0.15 degrees C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41+/-0.64 degrees C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33+/-0.12 degrees C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44+/-0.11 degrees C

  6. Clinical efficacy of a bleaching system based on hydrogen peroxide with or without light activation.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Jesús Oteo; Calatayud, Carlos Oteo; Zaccagnini, Alvaro Oteo; Box, Ma José Calvo

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the clinical efficacy of a dental bleaching system based on hydrogen peroxide with or without light activation. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of the light when applied to the hydrogen peroxide by using a split-mouth design with 21 patients, with light activation in one hemi-arch but not in the other. The bleaching agent was QuickWhite 35% hydrogen peroxide and activation was conducted with a diode lamp (Luma Cool). The Classic Vita Guide was used to score tooth shades. Two consecutive applications of hydrogen peroxide were made to one hemi-arch, each light-activated for 10 min. The other hemi-arch was then identically treated but without light activation. After removal of the bleaching agent, the shade was re-scored and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare differences in tooth shade values. The bleaching treatment produced significant shade changes (P < 0.01) in both hemi-arches. After treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between light-treated and non-light-treated tooth types (central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines). However, taking central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine as a group, comparison between each hemi-arch showed a significant effect in the hemi-arch with light activation (P < 0.05). The use of diode light with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel slightly improved the dental bleaching.

  7. Review of titanate coupling agents and their application for dental composite fabrication.

    PubMed

    Elshereksi, Nidal Wanis; Ghazali, Mariyam; Muchtar, Andanastuti; Azhari, Che Husna

    2017-09-26

    Silane is a dominant coupler that is widely used in dentistry to promote adhesion among the components of dental composites. Silica-based fillers can be easily silanized because of their similarly ordered structure. However, silane is hydrolytically degraded in the aqueous oral environment and inefficiently bonds to non-silica fillers. Thus, the development of hydrolytically stable dental composites is an important objective in the research on dental materials. Titanate coupling agents (TCAs) exhibit satisfactory interfacial bonding, enhanced homogeneous filler dispersion, and improved mechanical properties of the composites. Titanates also provide superior hydrolytic stability in wet environments, which should be considered in fabricating dental composites. The addition of a small amount of titanates can improve the resistance of the composites to moisture. This paper reviews the effects of the instability of silanes in moisture on the performance of dental composites and presents TCAs as alternative couplers to silanes for fabricating dental composites.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a...

  13. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive.

  14. Pulp reaction to vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fugaro, Jessica O; Nordahl, Inger; Fugaro, Orlando J; Matis, Bruce A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in dental pulp after nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel. Fifteen patients between 12 and 26 years of age with caries-free first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were treated with 10% Opalescence (Ultradent Products, Inc). Tooth #5 had four days of bleaching, tooth #12 was treated for two weeks, tooth #21 was bleached for two weeks followed by two weeks without treatment and tooth #28, serving as the control, was without treatment. All teeth were extracted at the same time. Immediately after extraction, 4 mm of the most apical portion of the root was sectioned off and each specimen was placed in a vial containing 10% neutral buffered formalin. The samples were prepared for histological evaluation at the Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials (NIOM) and microscopically examined independently at both NIOM and Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). Pulp reactions were semi-quantitatively graded as none, slight, moderate and severe. Slight pulpal changes were detected in 16 of the 45 bleached teeth. Neither moderate nor severe reactions were observed. The findings indicate that the slight histological changes sometimes observed after bleaching tend to resolve within two weeks post-treatment. Statistical differences existed only between the untreated control and the four-day (p=0.0109) and two-week (p=0.0045) treatment groups. The findings from this study demonstrated that nightguard vital bleaching procedures using 10% carbamide peroxide might cause initial mild, localized pulp reactions. However, the minor histological changes observed did not affect the overall health of the pulp tissue and were reversible within two weeks post-treatment. Therefore, two weeks of treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide used for nightguard vital bleaching is considered safe for dental pulp.

  15. Ytterbium trifluoride as a radiopaque agent for dental cements.

    PubMed

    Collares, F M; Ogliari, F A; Lima, G S; Fontanella, V R C; Piva, E; Samuel, S M W

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the radiopacity, degree of conversion (DC) and flexural strength of an experimental dental cement, with several added radiopaque substances. Titanium dioxide, quartz, zirconia, bismuth oxide, barium sulphate and ytterbium trifluoride were added to the experimental cement in five different concentrations. Radiopacity was evaluated with a phosphor plate system, and the radiodensity of specimens was compared with an aluminium step-wedge. DC was evaluated with FT-infrared spectroscopy following 20 s of photo-activation. Specimens with dimensions of 12 x 2 x 2 mm were used for the flexural strength test. Data were analysed with two-way anova and Tukey's post hoc test. Radiopacity of the experimental dental cements with barium sulphate and bismuth oxide at 40% and ytterbium fluoride at 30% and 40% showed no significant differences in comparison with 3 mm of Al (181, 96). The experimental dental cements with at least 30% added ytterbium trifluoride had satisfactory radiopacity without influencing other properties.

  16. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis.

    PubMed

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy.

  17. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy. PMID:27708725

  18. Synergistic Effects of Nonthermal Plasma and Disinfecting Agents against Dental Biofilms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Koban, Ina; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Holtfreter, Birte; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Matthes, Rutger; Masur, Kai; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Dental biofilms play a major role in the pathogenesis of many dental diseases. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and different agents in dentistry on the reduction of biofilms. Methods and Results. We used monospecies (S. mutans) and multispecies dental biofilm models grown on titanium discs in vitro. After treatment with one of the agents, the biofilms were treated with plasma. Efficacy of treatment was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFU) and by live-dead staining. For S. mutans biofilms no colonies could be detected after treatment with NaOCl or H2O2. For multispecies biofilms the combination with plasma achieved a higher CFU reduction than each agent alone. We found an additive antimicrobial effect between argon plasma and agents irrespective of the treatment order with cultivation technique. For EDTA and octenidine, antimicrobial efficacy assessed by live-dead staining differed significantly between the two treatment orders (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The effective treatment of dental biofilms on titanium discs with atmospheric pressure plasma could be increased by adding agents in vitro. PMID:24159388

  19. Analysis of grating profiles of phase holograms recorded in silver halide emulsions and processed with combinations of various developers and bleaching agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2004-09-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). The phase gratings were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100 X) objective. The phase contrast photomicrographs were Fourier-analyzed. Thus first- second- and third-order modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. The ratio of the amplitudes of the higher-order modulations to that of the first-order one can serve as a measure of the nonlinearity of the holographic recording.

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis of Set CEM Cement after Application of Different Bleaching Agents.

    PubMed

    Samiei, Mohammad; Janani, Maryam; Vahdati, Amin; Alemzadeh, Yalda; Bahari, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluated the element distribution in completely set calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement after application of 35% carbamide peroxide, 40% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate as commercial bleaching agents using an energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX) system. The surface structure was also observed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Twenty completely set CEM cement samples, measuring 4×4 mm(2), were prepared in the present in vitro study and randomly divided into 4 groups based on the preparation technique as follows: the control group; 35% carbamide peroxide group in contact for 30-60 min for 4 times; 40% hydrogen peroxide group with contact time of 15-20 min for 3 times; and sodium perborate group, where the powder and liquid were mixed and placed on CEM cement surface 4 times. Data were analyzed at a significance level of 0.05 through the one Way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. EDX showed similar element distribution of oxygen, sodium, calcium and carbon in CEM cement with the use of carbamide peroxide and hydroxide peroxide; however, the distribution of silicon was different (P<0.05). In addition, these bleaching agents resulted in significantly higher levels of oxygen and carbon (P<0.05) and a lower level of calcium (P<0.05) compared to the control group. SEM of the control group showed plate-like and globular structure. Sodium perborate was similar to control group due to its weak oxidizing properties. Globular structures and numerous woodpecker holes were observed on the even surface on the carbamide peroxide group. The mean elemental distribution of completely set CEM cement was different when exposed to sodium perborate, carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis of Set CEM Cement after Application of Different Bleaching Agents

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Janani, Maryam; Vahdati, Amin; Alemzadeh, Yalda; Bahari, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The present study evaluated the element distribution in completely set calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement after application of 35% carbamide peroxide, 40% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate as commercial bleaching agents using an energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX) system. The surface structure was also observed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Methods and Materials: Twenty completely set CEM cement samples, measuring 4×4 mm2, were prepared in the present in vitro study and randomly divided into 4 groups based on the preparation technique as follows: the control group; 35% carbamide peroxide group in contact for 30-60 min for 4 times; 40% hydrogen peroxide group with contact time of 15-20 min for 3 times; and sodium perborate group, where the powder and liquid were mixed and placed on CEM cement surface 4 times. Data were analyzed at a significance level of 0.05 through the one Way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests. Results: EDX showed similar element distribution of oxygen, sodium, calcium and carbon in CEM cement with the use of carbamide peroxide and hydroxide peroxide; however, the distribution of silicon was different (P<0.05). In addition, these bleaching agents resulted in significantly higher levels of oxygen and carbon (P<0.05) and a lower level of calcium (P<0.05) compared to the control group. SEM of the control group showed plate-like and globular structure. Sodium perborate was similar to control group due to its weak oxidizing properties. Globular structures and numerous woodpecker holes were observed on the even surface on the carbamide peroxide group. Conclusion: The mean elemental distribution of completely set CEM cement was different when exposed to sodium perborate, carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide. PMID:28512484

  2. Effect of dental surface treatment with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers on bond strength of resin composite to recently bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Del Moral de Lazari, Regina; Ribeiro, Carolina Ferraz; Borges, Alessandra Buhler

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of surface treatment with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers on resin composite bond strength to recently bleached enamel. In this study, 120 bovine incisors were distributed into two groups: group C: without bleaching treatment; group B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Each group was divided into three subgroups: subgroup N: without laser treatment; subgroup Nd: irradiation with Nd:YAG laser; subgroup Er: irradiation with Er:YAG laser. The adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2) was then applied and composite buildups were constructed with Filtek Supreme composite. The teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel-resin sticks (1 × 1 mm) and submitted to microtensile bond testing. The data were statistically analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey tests. The bond strength values in the bleached control group (5.57 MPa) presented a significant difference in comparison to the group bleached and irradiated with Er:YAG laser (13.18 MPa) or Nd:YAG (25.67 MPa). The non-bleached control group presented mean values of 30.92 MPa, with statistical difference of all the others groups. The use of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers on bleached specimens was able to improve the bond strengths of them.

  3. Effect of Postoperative Bleaching on Microleakage of Etch-and-Rinse and Self-etch Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Vajihesadat; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Soltani, Fereidon

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bleaching the discoloured teeth may affect the tooth/composite interface. The aim of this in vitro experimental study was to evaluate the effect of vital tooth bleaching on microleakage of existent class V composite resin restorations bonded with three dental bonding agents. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 72 intact, extracted human anterior teeth with gingival margins in dentin and occlusal margins in enamel, and randomly divided into 3 groups. Cavities in the three groups were treated with Scotch bond Multi-Purpose, a total etch system and Prompt L-Pop and iBond, two self-etch adhesives. All teeth were restored with Z250 resin composite material and thermo-cycled. Each group was equally divided into the control and the bleached subgroups (n = 12). The bleached subgroups were bleached with 15% carbamide peroxide gel for 8 hours a day for 15 days. Microleakage scores were evaluated on the incisal and cervical walls. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Bonferroni post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). Results: Bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel significantly increased the microleakage of composite restorations in Prompt L-Pop group at dentinal walls (P = 0.001). Bleaching had no effect on microleakage of restorations in the Scotch bond Multi-Purpose and iBond groups. Conclusion: Vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel has an adverse effect on marginal seal of dentinal walls of existent composite resin restorations bonded with prompt L-Pop self-etch adhesive. PMID:22132010

  4. Over-the-counter whitening agents: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Masotti, Alexandre Severo

    2009-01-01

    Tooth discoloration is commonly found in the dental clinic and tooth bleaching has been considered the preferred esthetic alternative, being more conservative, safe and with predictable results. Supervised home-use of 10% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) bleaching with custom-trays is the most common bleaching procedure dispensed by dentists to their patients. The good results obtained with this technique stimulated the flourishing of new products and techniques. Over-the-counter (OTC) bleaching products appeared as a low-cost alternative to bleach discolored teeth without dentist supervision. Different OTC products are available in supermarkets, drug stores or on the Internet, including rinses, paint-on brushes, toothpastes, chewing guns, dental floss, and whitening strips. There is lack of clinical evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of these products, being most of the studies supported by the manufacturers'. Basically, toothpastes, chewing gums, and dental floss are removal agents of superficial stains. Rinses and paint-on brushes with low levels of hydrogen peroxide have some whitening effect, but without clinical relevance. Strips present similar esthetic results and side-effects, compared to bleaching with 10% CP using trays; however, the studies have financial support from the manufacturers and were based on short term evaluations. Legislation varies widely in different countries regarding OTC dental bleaching. Concerns have appeared due to the potential abusive use of these self-medication agents, especially in young patients, with potential harmful results. Dentists should be acquainted with this kind of products to be able to inform their patients. In conclusion, there is a need for independent clinical trials to provide sufficient evidence regarding the use of OTC bleaching products.

  5. Bleaching effectiveness, hydrogen peroxide diffusion, and cytotoxicity of a chemically activated bleaching gel.

    PubMed

    Duque, Carla Caroline de Oliveira; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bleaching effectiveness, hydrogen peroxide diffusion (H2O2), and cytotoxicity of a bleaching gel with 35 % H2O2 either associated with ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) or not. Enamel/dentin discs adapted to artificial pulp chambers were placed in compartments containing a culture medium (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)) and distributed into the following groups: G1-no treatment (negative control), G2-10 % carbamide peroxide (one application for 4 h), G3-35 % H2O2 (three applications for 15 min), and G4-35 % H2O2 + 0.004 g FeSO4 (three applications for 15 min). After treatments, the extracts (DMEM + bleaching components that diffused across enamel and dentin) were applied on human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23). Cell viability (MTT assay, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney, α = 5 %), quantification of H2O2 diffusion, and color change of the enamel/dentin discs (Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage L*a*b* system) were assessed (analysis of variance and Tukey's tests, α = 5 %). For both cells, a significant reduction in cell viability was observed for G3 and G4 compared with G1 and G2. No statistical difference was observed between G3 and G4. The rate of H2O2 diffusion was significantly higher in G3 compared with that in G2 and G4. The ΔE value for G4 was statistically higher than that of the other groups. Chemical activation of H2O2 by FeSO4 improves the bleaching effectiveness. However, this metal ion has no significant protective effect against pulp cell cytotoxicity. Although the chemical activation of H2O2 by adding FeSO4 to the bleaching agent improved the bleaching effectiveness, this metal ion has no significant protective effect against pulp cell cytotoxicity.

  6. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals’ dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network’s nodes’ in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students’ brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results. PMID:28103260

  7. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals' dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network's nodes' in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students' brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results.

  8. Remineralizing potential of various agents on dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Rani; Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Deepti Jawa; Arora, Vanika

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP, Tooth Mousse) containing and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACPF, Tooth Mousse Plus) containing pastes on dental erosion. Materials and methods Thirty permanent non-carious premolars indicated for orthodontic extraction were included in this study and were sectioned in mesiodistal direction vertically. After immersion in the carbonated drink for 14 min, samples were treated with various remineralizing pastes which were CPP-ACP containing paste (Tooth Mousse) and CPP-ACPF containing paste (Tooth Mousse Plus) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Vickers Microhardness was recorded at baseline, after exposure to erosive drink and after treatment with remineralizing pastes. Data obtained was statistically analysed using Student t-test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results CPP-ACP (Tooth Mousse) and CPP-ACP with fluoride (Tooth Mousse Plus) resulted in 30.52% and 38.98% increase in post-erosion microhardness values respectively. The remineralizing potential of CPP-ACP with fluoride containing paste (Tooth Mousse Plus) was significantly better than that of CPP-ACP containing paste (Tooth Mousse) (p < 0.05). Conclusion Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACPF, Tooth Mousse Plus) can be recommended to be used in preventing erosive tooth wear from acidic beverages. PMID:25737926

  9. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent.

  10. Toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents: efficacy in reducing extrinsic dental staining.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristina Neves Girao Salgado; Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho do; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents in reducing the extrinsic discoloration of dental enamel. Sixty slabs of dentin from human teeth were sealed so that only the enamel surface was exposed. The enamel surfaces were photographed for initial color assessment. Staining was performed by immersing the dental slabs in 0.2% chlorhexidine solution for 2 minutes and then in black tea for 60 minutes. This process was repeated 15 times. Photographs were taken at the end of the staining process, and the slabs were divided into 5 groups (n = 12), 3 to be brushed with toothpastes containing chemical whitening agents (2 containing phosphate salts and 1 containing phosphate salts plus hydrogen peroxide) and 2 to represent control groups (ordinary/nonwhitening toothpaste and distilled water). The dental slabs were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing with toothpaste slurry or distilled water, according to each group's specifications. After brushing, more photographs were taken for color analysis. The results showed a significant reduction in luminosity after the staining process in addition to an increase in the colors red and yellow (P < 0.001). After brushing, there was a significant increase in luminosity and a reduction in both red and yellow (P < 0.001). However, there was no observed difference between the changes in color values in dental enamel slabs brushed with whitening toothpastes and the changes found in slabs brushed with ordinary toothpaste. The whitening toothpastes did not outperform an ordinary toothpaste in the removal of extrinsic staining.

  11. Effect of Nano-Tricalcium Phosphate and Nanohydroxyapatite on the Staining Susceptibility of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Atai, Mohammad; Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Malekhoseini, Kosar; Rezai, Hamideh; Hamze, Faeze

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of nano-tricalcium phosphate (n-TCP) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HAP) on prevention of restaining of enamel after dental bleaching. Methods. Forty bovine incisors were bleached with 20% carbamide peroxide for two weeks. Afterward, they were divided into five groups based on remineralization solution: no treatment (control), 10% n-TCP, 5% n-TCP, 10% n-HAP, and 5% n-HAP. Each group was daily immersed for 10 minutes in the restaining solution (tea) and for 3 minutes in the remineralization agent, respectively. This protocol was repeated for five days. Subsequently, three digital photographs (baseline, after bleaching, and after restaining) were analyzed by Adobe Photoshop software. The obtained L∗, a∗, b∗, and ΔE parameters were compared using ANOVA and Wilcoxon and Bonferroni tests. Results. After bleaching, there were significant changes in tooth colors (P < 0.001) while, after restaining and immersion in remineralization solutions, there were no significant differences in L∗, a∗, and b∗ values of different groups (P > 0.05). However, ΔE of 10% TCP was significantly lower than the control (P = 0.02) while there were no significant differences between the other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. 10% n-TCP could significantly maintain the resultant color and reconstruct the enamel structure after bleaching. PMID:27347555

  12. A theranostic dental pulp capping agent with improved MRI and CT contrast and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, S; Güvener, N; Dou, W; Alghamdi, H S; Camargo, W A; Cremers, J G O; Borm, P J A; Heerschap, A; Oosterwijk, E; Jansen, J A; Walboomers, X F

    2017-08-24

    Different materials have been used for vital dental pulp treatment. Preferably a pulp capping agent should show appropriate biological performance, excellent handling properties, and a good imaging contrast. These features can be delivered into a single material through the combination of therapeutic and diagnostic agents (i.e. theranostic). Calcium phosphate based composites (CPCs) are potentially ideal candidate for pulp treatment, although poor imaging contrast and poor dentino-inductive properties are limiting their clinical use. In this study, a theranostic dental pulp capping agent was developed. First, imaging properties of the CPC were improved by using a core-shell structured dual contrast agent (csDCA) consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and colloidal gold, as MRI and CT contrast agent respectively. Second, biological properties were implemented by using a dentinogenic factor (i.e. bone morphogenetic protein 2, BMP-2). The obtained CPC/csDCA/BMP-2 composite was tested in vivo, as direct pulp capping agent, in a male Habsi goat incisor model. Our outcomes showed no relevant alteration of the handling and mechanical properties (e.g. setting time, injectability, and compressive strength) by the incorporation of csDCA particles. In vivo results proved MRI contrast enhancement up to 7weeks. Incisors treated with BMP-2 showed improved tertiary dentin deposition as well as faster cement degradation as measured by µCT assessment. In conclusion, the presented theranostic agent matches the imaging and regenerative requirements for pulp capping applications. In this study, we combined diagnostic and therapeutic agents in order to developed a theranostic pulp capping agent with enhanced MRI and CT contrast and improved dentin regeneration ability. In our study we cover all the steps from material preparation, mechanical and in vitro characterization, to in vivo study in a goat dental model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a

  13. Use of Caries Prevention Agents in Children: Findings from the Dental Practice-based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Richman, Joshua S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Qvist, Vibeke; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Gordan, Valeria V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Scientific evidence supports the application of caries preventive agents in children and this knowledge must transfer into the practice of dentistry. There is little multi-region data that allow for comparisons of practice patterns between types of dental practices and geographic regions. The aim of this study was to characterize the use of caries preventive agents in pediatric patients in a large multi-region sample of dental practices. Methods This study surveyed Dental Practice-based Research Network dentists who perform restorative dentistry in their practices. The survey asked a range of questions about caries risk assessment and use of prevention techniques in children ages 6-18. Results Dental sealants (69%) or in-office fluoride (82%) were the most commonly used of the caries preventive regimens. The recommendation of at-home caries preventive agents ranged from 36%-7%, with non-prescription fluoride rinse the most common. Dentists who practiced in a large group practice model and dentists from the Scandinavian region more frequently use caries risk assessment than regions that were predominately dentists in private practice. Whether or not dentists used caries risk assessment with their pediatric patients was poorly correlated with the likelihood of actually using caries preventive treatments on patients. Conclusion Although dentists reported the use of some form of in-office caries prevention, there was considerable variability across practices. These differences could represent a lack of consensus across practicing dentists about the benefits of caries preventive agents or a function of differing financial incentives or patient pools with differing levels of overall caries risk. PMID:21180672

  14. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures.

  15. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures. PMID:27746520

  16. Nightguard vital bleaching: a review and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K; Ng, B

    1998-09-01

    Based on current clinical experience and research, dentist-prescribed home bleaching, also referred to as nightguard vital bleaching, is a safe and effective technique for whitening teeth when a carbamide peroxide material (up to 10 percent) is used. The bleaching material should be produced by a recognised and reputable manufacturer and must be used under a dentist's supervision over a relatively short time. Mild thermal sensitivity is a common side effect; however, no long-term pulpal effects have been shown. The reduction in the bond strength of resin to freshly bleached enamel and dentine has been shown to be transient, and no clinically significant changes in surface morphology or physical properties have been shown to occur to teeth or dental restorative materials as a result of vital bleaching. As a consequence, vital bleaching has gained favour with patients and dentists alike. Significant benefit was obtained in 12 subjects using two nightguard bleaching systems which were equally effective.

  17. Bleaching effects on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mariana M; de Oliveira Almeida, Marco A; Elias, Carlos N; de Moraes Mendes, Alvaro

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide on orthodontic bracket adhesion at zero hour, 24 hours, 7, 21 and 56 days after dental bleaching. Ninety bovine incisors were prepared for adhesion test and adhesive remnant index (ARI) determination. The 35% hydrogen peroxide was used as a bleaching agent and the Transbond XT as a bonding agent. Statiscally significant differences were observed between all the groups (p<0.001) and were observed in the comparison of zero hour and control group (p<0.001) and in the comparison of zero hour and 24 hours (p<0.001). ARI scores (0, 1, 2 e 3) also showed statiscally differences between all the groups (p=0.011) and at the comparison of all the test groups with the control: zero hour (p=0.001), 24 hours (p=0.009), 7 days (p=0.018), 21 days (p<0.001) e 56 days (p=0.004). The shear bond strength values became significantly lower when the bracket was bonded immediately after bleaching and quickly returned to control level in 24 hours. In seven days, there was a slight increase that was not significant and recovered to normal values in the next weeks. Different patterns of fractures were observed in bleached enamel when ARI scores were analyzed. The control group showed a high frequency of 3 score and none of zero score, the opposite behavior was observed in the test groups. Copyright © 2011 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia SIDO. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 17.0 (IBM Statistics, Chicago, Illinois, USA). Descriptive statistics was drawn with respective percentages to have a comparative overview. Results: The response rate was 97%, of which the effective and complete replies received were 77% (75). 56% respondents used paraformaldehyde containing pastes. Majority of general practitioners (61%) did not observe any post-operative complication following the use of devitalising agent. 33% (25) of the respondents were not aware of the complications of devitalizing agents. Conclusion: Thus, it can be concluded that general dental practitioners in Pune and Nashik district of Maharashtra, India do use pulp devitalizing agents in spite of possessing knowledge related to the complications. PMID:25878471

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 17.0 (IBM Statistics, Chicago, Illinois, USA). Descriptive statistics was drawn with respective percentages to have a comparative overview. Results: The response rate was 97%, of which the effective and complete replies received were 77% (75). 56% respondents used paraformaldehyde containing pastes. Majority of general practitioners (61%) did not observe any post-operative complication following the use of devitalising agent. 33% (25) of the respondents were not aware of the complications of devitalizing agents. Conclusion: Thus, it can be concluded that general dental practitioners in Pune and Nashik district of Maharashtra, India do use pulp devitalizing agents in spite of possessing knowledge related to the complications. PMID:26464546

  20. Influence of time on bond strength after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Cinthia Maria; Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Florio, Flavia Martao; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of time after treatment with a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength between composite resin and sound enamel and dentin. Eighty dental slabs - 40 enamel (E) slabs and 40 dentin (D) slabs - were embedded, flatted, and divided into four groups (n=10). In G1 the E and D slabs were kept in artificial saliva for 14 days. For the G2, G3, and G4 groups the E and D slabs were submitted to bleaching treatment with a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent. At different times after bleaching treatments (G2=immediate; G3=seven days; G4= fourteen days), composite resin cylinders were made using an adhesive system. Tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min to obtain the values in MPa. For enamel, the Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn Method showed G1 differed significantly from G2 (G1=13.40 a; G2=6.64 b; G3=16.76 a; G4=11.64 ab). For dentin, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests showed that G1 differed significantly from G2 and G3 (G1=12.11 a; G2=4.97 b; G3=8.67 c; G4=11.86 ac). It is recommended adhesive restorative procedures in enamel be delayed for seven days post-bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide, while restorations in dentin should be delayed for 14 days following bleaching treatment.

  1. [The effect of intracoronal bleaching on cervical periodontium of dogs

    PubMed

    Wei, X; Xu, X; Wang, X Y

    1998-09-01

    OBJECTIVE:To study the effects of two intracoronal bleaching techniques on dog's cervical periodontium.METHODS: The experimental animal modles of intracoronal bleaching were established and pathological slides were made. The histological changes of dogs' periodontium were examined by means of light micro-scope. RESULTS: A year following intracoronal bleaching,the group received thermocatalytic bleaching showed:(1)resorption of cementum or dentine;(2)ankylosis,(3)infiltratin of substantial inflamatory cells into resorption areas.The group received walking bleaching showed:(1)localized resorption of alveolar bone;(2)lacuna-shaped resorption of cementum. CONCLUSION: Whether heated or not,intracoronal bleaching with bleaching with bleaching agent including 30% hydrogen peroxide may innitiate external cervical resorption of dog's teeth.

  2. A review of the efficacy of tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Stephen

    2009-11-01

    Current tooth lightening systems use hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide which releases hydrogen peroxide as the bleaching agent. In vitro and in vivo studies, mostly comparing different bleaching systems, have demonstrated the efficacy of vital and non-vital tooth bleaching. Bleaching treatments are affected by a number of factors including the actual cause of tooth discoloration. All in-surgery bleaching agents are chemically activated and, whilst better results are possible with lights, these are not essential. Shade change can be evaluated subjectively and may be observed after only a few nights with Night Guard Vital Bleaching (NGVB). Objective methods of shade evaluation are used in most randomized controlled trials. There are a number of methods used to bleach teeth but NGVB using 10% carbamide peroxide in trays produces the optimal result with the least side-effects. The'inside/outside' bleaching technique using 10% carbamide peroxide is the most effective and safest method of bleaching non-vital teeth. Although more than 90% success has been reported, regression of the colour change is a common problem in vital and non-vital tooth bleaching and retreatment is necessary in many cases, usually after 1-3 years. The overwhelming evidence indicates that tooth bleaching is effective if supervised by a dentist. The clinician should be able to inform patients that both vital and non-vital tray bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide can produce excellent results when supervised. However, shade regression is likely in 1-3 years.

  3. Dental treatment in the era of new anti-thrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Sahar-Helft, Sharonit; Chackartchi, Tali; Polak, David; Findler, Mordechai

    2017-09-17

    In recent years, there have been dramatic changes in anti-thrombotic treatment as a result of new anti-thrombotic agents, as well as changes in the indications for their use. As a consequence, dentists are encountering larger numbers of patients who are undergoing anti-thrombotic treatment and who have increased risk for bleeding. The current paper aims to review the literature regarding up-to-date anti-thrombotic treatment and provide information regarding their implications on dentistry. An online search was performed of the literature published between 2000 and 2016. Articles dealing with evidence-based clinical guidelines for anti-thrombotic treatments, as well as literature reporting the use of anti-thrombotic medications were included. The manuscripts were screened according to their relevance to dentistry as well as their treatment protocol guidelines. In total, 5,539 publications were identified: 56 of 554 evidence-based clinical guidelines were found that dealt with treatment protocols with anti-thrombotic agents; and 132 of 5,539 articles describe direct anti-thrombotic medications. Dental treatment includes a risk for bleeding. As a result of the increasing number of patients taking new-generation anti-thrombotic drugs, dentists must be up to date regarding the implications of such drugs on dental treatment as well as the practical means to achieve haemostasis. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  4. Three-dimensional biofilm properties on dental bonding agent with varying quaternary ammonium charge densities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Liu, Huaibing; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    Tooth-restoration interfaces are the weak link with secondary caries causing restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop an antimicrobial bonding agent with dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and investigate the effects of quaternary amine charge density on three-dimensional (3D) biofilms on dental resin for the first time. DMAHDM was synthesized and incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose bonding agent at mass fractions of 0% (control), 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%. Streptococcus mutans bacteria were inoculated on the polymerized resin and cultured for two days to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to measure biofilm thickness, live and dead biofilm volumes, and live bacteria percentage in 3D biofilm vs. distance from resin surface. Charge density of the resin had a significant effect on the antibacterial efficacy (p<0.05). Biofilms on control resin had the greatest thicknesses. Biofilm thickness and live biofilm volume decreased with increasing surface charge density (p<0.05). There were significant variations in bacterial viability along the 3D biofilm thickness (p<0.05). At 2.5% and 5% DMAHDM, the bacterial inhibition was the greatest on or near the resin surface, and the killing effect decreased away from the resin surface. At 10% DMAHDM, the entire 3D biofilm was dead and the percentage of live bacteria was nearly 0% throughout the biofilm thickness. Adding new antibacterial monomer DMAHDM into dental bonding agent yielded a strong antimicrobial activity, substantially decreasing the 3D biofilm thickness, live biofilm volume, and percentage of live bacteria on cross-sections through the biofilm thickness. Novel DMAHDM-containing bonding agent with capability of inhibiting 3D biofilms is promising for a wide range of dental restorative and preventive applications to inhibit biofilms at the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioactive Dental Composites and Bonding Agents Having Remineralizing and Antibacterial Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Ning; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are typically inert and replace missing tooth structures. This article reviews efforts in the development of a new generation of bioactive materials designed to not only replace the missing tooth volume but also possess therapeutic functions. Composites and bonding agents with remineralizing and antibacterial characteristics have shown promise in replacing lost minerals, inhibiting recurrent caries, neutralizing acids, repelling proteins, and suppressing biofilms and acid production. Furthermore, they have demonstrated a low cytotoxicity similar to current resins, with additional benefits to protect the dental pulp and promote tertiary dentin formation. This new class of bioactive materials shows promise in reversing lesions and inhibiting caries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Technique for Staining Extracted Teeth: A Research and Teaching Aid for Bleaching.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    can then be used in research to evaluate bleaching techniques, or by students to practice bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods Ten extracted...patient and the dentist.4 Hence, the bleaching of these discolored non-vital teeth becomes an extremely important phase of endodontic therapy. 1-6...dentists at the Edward C. Penick Endodontic Study Club stated they never bleached a tooth as an undergraduate. Six chairmen of dental school

  7. Critical appraisal. Reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2012-10-01

    Bleaching with peroxide agents compromises the adhesion of resin-based materials to enamel and dentin. The problem is likely caused by delayed release of oxygen from the teeth that inhibits resin polymerization at the interface. The typical method for avoiding problems with bonding to bleached teeth is simply to delay the bonding procedure for a week or two after bleaching. However, there is evidence that bonding can be done immediately if bleaching is followed by the application of an antioxidant. This Critical Appraisal reviews some of the published reports on the reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching via the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate.

  8. Diametral tensile strength and film thickness of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil

    PubMed Central

    CARMELLO, Juliana Cabrini; FAIS, Laiza Maria Grassi; RIBEIRO, Lígia Nunes de Moraes; CLARO NETO, Salvador; GUAGLIANONI, Dalton Geraldo; PINELLI, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The need to develop new dental luting agents in order to improve the success of treatments has greatly motivated research. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and film thickness (FT) of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil (COP) with or without addition of different quantities of filler (calcium carbonate - CaCO3). Material and Methods Eighty specimens were manufactured (DTS N=40; FT N=40) and divided into 4 groups: Pure COP; COP 10%; COP 50% and zinc phosphate (control). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and submitted to the tests. The DTS test was performed in the MTS 810 testing machine (10 KN, 0.5 mm/min). For FT test, the cements were sandwiched between two glass plates (2 cm2) and a load of 15 kg was applied vertically on the top of the specimen for 10 min. The data were analyzed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The values of DTS (MPa) were: Pure COP- 10.94±1.30; COP 10%- 30.06±0.64; COP 50%- 29.87±0.27; zinc phosphate- 4.88±0.96. The values of FT (µm) were: Pure COP- 31.09±3.16; COP 10%- 17.05±4.83; COP 50%- 13.03±4.83; Zinc Phosphate- 20.00±0.12. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups (DTS - p=1.01E-40; FT - p=2.4E-10). Conclusion The experimental dental luting agent with 50% of filler showed the best diametral tensile strength and film thickness. PMID:22437672

  9. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries.

  10. Interface Between MTA and Dental Bonding Agents: Scanning Electron Microscope Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cervino, Gabriele; Fiorillo, Luca; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Bramanti, Ennio; Laino, Luigi; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the material that offers the best sealing characteristic in the field of endodontic treatment is the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), nevertheless, this material necessities an adhesive bonding agent to perfectly join to the dental surface. The aim of this study was to analyze using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) the possible microgap between the adhesive, MTA, and the dental surface. Fourteen extracted molars were divided into two groups - group A was prepared with MTA-component adhesive and group B was prepared with MTA and composite dual etching. The observations were carried out with a SEM Phenom G2 Pro mode S.E.I. JMP® software was used for statistical analysis, and a t-test was used for evaluating the difference between the two groups. The gap of the areas at higher magnification (1000×) with a size greater than 5 microns in width and 20 microns in length were considered significant, and only group A recorded significant data. The SEM analysis performed in the group A with interposition of adhesive and flow between the dental pulp chamber and MTA demonstrates the presence of a marginal gap of considerable amplitude in the all of the samples investigated.

  11. Interface Between MTA and Dental Bonding Agents: Scanning Electron Microscope Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cervino, Gabriele; Fiorillo, Luca; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Bramanti, Ennio; Laino, Luigi; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Nowadays, the material that offers the best sealing characteristic in the field of endodontic treatment is the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), nevertheless, this material necessities an adhesive bonding agent to perfectly join to the dental surface. The aim of this study was to analyze using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) the possible microgap between the adhesive, MTA, and the dental surface. Material and Methods: Fourteen extracted molars were divided into two groups – group A was prepared with MTA-component adhesive and group B was prepared with MTA and composite dual etching. The observations were carried out with a SEM Phenom G2 Pro mode S.E.I. JMP® software was used for statistical analysis, and a t-test was used for evaluating the difference between the two groups. Results: The gap of the areas at higher magnification (1000×) with a size greater than 5 microns in width and 20 microns in length were considered significant, and only group A recorded significant data. Conclusions: The SEM analysis performed in the group A with interposition of adhesive and flow between the dental pulp chamber and MTA demonstrates the presence of a marginal gap of considerable amplitude in the all of the samples investigated. PMID:28316952

  12. Screening of Quercus infectoria gall extracts as anti-bacterial agents against dental pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vermani, Archa

    2009-01-01

    A number of bacteria have now become antibiotic-resistant. This increases the importance of ayurvedic drugs. We report, here, the activity of different extracts (petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and water) of Quercus infectoria galls against dental pathogens -- Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus acidophilus (designated) and Streptococcus sanguis (isolated). The cup-plate method was used in anti-bacterial activity of the extracts at concentration of 200 mg/ml against dental pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of most effective extracts against the most susceptible bacteria were determined using a two-fold serial micro dilution method. Methanolic extract showed maximum anti-bacterial activity against all the bacteria. The most susceptible bacteria were S. sanguis followed by S. aureus, S. mutans, S. salivarius and L. acidophilus. The MIC values showed that methanolic extract was more effective than water extract. The plant has the potential to generate herbal metabolites. The crude extracts demonstrating anti-dental caries activity could result in the discovery of new chemical classes of antibiotics. These chemical classes of antibiotics could serve as selective agents for the maintenance of human health and provide bio-chemical tools for the study of infectious diseases.

  13. The impact of Prasugrel, a new anti-platelet agent, on dental care of patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Limei; Nizam, Sami Ii; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2013-05-01

    With increasing usage of Prasugrel (Effient), a new and highly efficient antiplatelet agent, in the management of cardiovascular events, the potential for bleeding complications has also increased. This is further compounded by the lack of a reversal agent, therefore poses a problem for clinicians engaged in oral invasive procedures. A case in which a patient taking daily Prasugrel suffered significantly prolonged bleeding following dental cleaning is reported. Local measures were used to achieve hemostasis. It is prudent to consult the prescribing physician about the risk of Prasugrel-induced bleeding, the potential for recurrence of cardiovascular events with disruption of medication, and the appropriate management strategy in advance of planned oral invasive procedures. Local measures are the first line of approach for management of hemostatic complications associated with Prasugrel, and patients should be referred to specialized centers if local approach fails. As more data become available, further evidence-based guidelines can be established.

  14. Effectiveness of Two Topical Anaesthetic Agents used along with Audio Visual Aids in Paediatric Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Jayata; Kumar, Dipanshu; Anand, Ashish; Tangri, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Topical anaesthetic agents enable pain free intraoral procedures, symptomatic pain relief for toothache, superficial mucosal lesions and pain related to post extraction time. Most common anxiety provoking and fearful experience for children in dental operatory is administration of local anaesthesia because on seeing the needle, children usually become uncooperative. One of recent trend of behaviour management technique is using non-aversive techniques out of which audiovisual distraction has emerged as a very successful technique for managing children in dental settings. Audio visual distraction could decrease the procedure related anxiety of patients undergoing dental treatment and can be very relaxing for highly anxious patients. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of topical anaesthetics EMLA (Eutectic Mixture of Local Anaesthetics) cream and benzocaine (20%) gel in reducing the pain during the needle insertion with and without the use of Audio Visual (AV) aids. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 120 children, the age range of 3-14 years attending the outpatient department for their treatment. EMLA and benzocaine gel (20%) were assessed for their effectiveness in reducing the pain on needle insertion during local anaesthesia administration. Based on the inclusion and the exclusion criteria, children requiring local anaesthesia for the dental treatment were randomly divided into four equal groups of 30 children based upon whether AV aids were used or not. AV aids were given using Sony Vaio laptop with earphones with nursery rhymes and cartoon movies DVD. The pain assessment was done by using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale and measurement of the physiological responses of pulse rate and oxygen saturation were done by pulse oximeter. Results There was a statistically significant difference in the mean pain score, pulse rate and mean oxygen saturation rate when it was compared between the four

  15. Determining Optimal Fluorescent Agent Concentrations in Dental Adhesive Resins for Imaging the Tooth/Restoration Interface.

    PubMed

    Bim Júnior, Odair; Cebim, Marco A; Atta, Maria T; Machado, Camila M; Francisconi-Dos-Rios, Luciana F; Wang, Linda

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent dyes like Rhodamine B (RB) have been used to identify the spatial distribution of adhesive restorative materials in the tooth/restoration interface. Potential effects of the addition of RB to dental adhesives were addressed in the past, but no further information is available on how to determine suitable concentrations of RB in these bonding agents for imaging in the confocal laser scanning microscope. This study provides systematical strategies for adding RB to viscous dental adhesive resins, focusing on the determination of the lowest range of dye concentrations necessary to achieve an acceptable image of the dentin/adhesive interface. It was demonstrated that optimized images of the resin distribution in dentin can be produced with 0.1-0.02 mg/mL of RB in the (tested) adhesives. Our approaches took into account aspects related to the dye concentration, photophysical parameters in different host media, specimen composition and morphology to develop a rational use of the fluorescent agent with the resin-based materials. Information gained from this work can help optimize labeling methods using dispersions of low-molecular-weight dyes in different monomer blend systems.

  16. Bleaching of kraft plus using dioxiranes: Structural effect of ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Wearing, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    Recent developments in totally chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching of kraft pulps have led to a new finding showing that dimethyldioxirane (DMD), formed by reaction of peroxymonosulphate with acetone, is a very effective and selective bleaching agent. Because of the high volatility of acetone, careful design and special equipment are needed for the DMD bleaching process in order to meet operational safety, health and emission control requirements. Other ketones are considered as alternatives to acetone for dioxirane bleaching; however, the use of alternative ketones exhibits different responses in bleaching compared to acetone. This paper examines the bleaching performance of a number of selected ketones in light of different chemical structures and properties of the ketones as well as bleaching variables.

  17. Effects of two antioxidants on the microleakage of resin-based composite restorations after nonvital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Horieh; Moghaddas, Mohammad Javad; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Rajabi, Omid

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the neutralizing effect of antioxidant agents on the microleakage of dental restorations in nonvital teeth after bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Also assessed was the correlation of the microleakage data between an electrochemical and a staining technique. Following root canal therapy, 40 sound and similar human maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into four groups of 10 specimens each (n=10). The groups were subjected to one of four treatments: Group 1, bleaching with 10 percent carbamide peroxide for periods of eight hours per day for one week without an antioxidant agent; Group 2, bleaching with 10 percent carbamide peroxide plus 10 percent sodium ascorbate gel; Group 3, bleaching with 10 percent carbamide peroxide plus 10 percent sodium ascorbate gel combined with a surfactant; and Group 4, no bleaching treatment (control group). In all groups, the access cavities were restored using the Single Bond Plus Adhesive system and Z100 resin-based composite. After 1,000 thermal cycles, the teeth were dried and three layers of nail varnish were applied over the entire surface area to within 1.0 mm of the restoration. A PVC-covered copper wire, with 3.0 mm of exposed bare wire, was inserted apically 5.0 mm into the canal, which was obturated with gutta-percha and sealed with sticky wax and varnish at the apex. Leakage was continuously monitored for 40 days using a conductimetric method. The teeth were immersed in 0.5 percent basic fuchsine for 24 hours, followed by sectioning for microscopic examination at 16x magnification. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Newman-Keuls multiple comparison, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman's rho tests (p<0.05). Based on the electrochemical results, cavities subjected to 10 percent sodium ascorbate gel combined with a surfactant displayed the least amount of microleakage while teeth that were bleached but not treated with an antioxidant exhibited significantly

  18. Efficacy of vital home bleaching.

    PubMed

    Simon, J F; Allen, H; Woodson, R G; Eilers, A S

    1993-01-01

    The nightguard vital bleaching technique has become a very common and accepted procedure for many dental practitioners. Much has been written about the procedure's history, safety and technique; little has been done to quantify the specific color changes of teeth resulting it. This clinical study attempted to give a numerical value to the color change through the use of a light transmission densitometer. The maxillary teeth of twenty-five patients were treated as the control. A significant whitening was observed for a majority of the patients during the four-week duration of the study.

  19. Effect of 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alpha-tocopherol in different formulations on the shear bond strength of enamel and dentin submitted to a home-use bleaching treatment.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the shear bond strength of human enamel and dentin submitted to a bleaching treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide and treatment with antioxidant agents containing 10% alpha-tocopherol and 10% sodium ascorbate formulated in solution and gel. Sixty human dental enamel slabs (E) and 60 human dental dentin slabs (D) were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Groups E1 and D1 were negative control groups and the bleaching agent was not applied. The bleaching agent was applied daily for two-hours on the dental slabs of all the other groups and, during the remaining 22 hours, the specimens were stored in an artificial saliva solution for a total of 14 days. Groups E2 and D2 were positive control groups and they only received application of the bleaching agents. Antioxidant agents were applied in Groups E3 and D3 (10% sodium ascorbate solution), E4 and D4 (10% alpha-tocopherol solution), E5 and D5 (10% sodium ascorbate gel) and E6 and D6 (10% alpha-tocopherol gel) for two hours. Cylinders were made with microhybrid resin composite and a total-etch adhesive system for shear bond strength tests. These tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute to obtain the values in MPa. ANOVA (p > 0.05) showed no significant differences among groups E4, E5, E6 and E1. However, groups E3, E5 and E6 presented statistically similar values to group E2. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant differences among D1 and all the other experimental groups; the same values occurred with D2, which did not differ from the experimental groups. Antioxidant treatment with 10% alpha-tocopherol solution was the only effective agent to revert the oxidizing effects of the bleaching treatment on enamel.

  20. The Food and Drug Administration and its influence on home bleaching.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B

    1993-01-01

    The era of bleaching vital teeth has captured the attention of the dental profession, the public, the media, and the government. This method, using a custom-fitted mouthguard and a carbamide peroxide solution, is known as home bleaching, matrix bleaching, nightguard vital bleaching, passive bleaching, and dentist-prescribed-home-applied bleaching. Recent action of the US Food and Drug Administration and continued research and clinical experience in the area have provided favorable and unfavorable information about the variations of the technique. This article discusses these variations, with the general conclusion that the technique of vital tooth bleaching, when administered by a dentist using a custom-fitted mouthguard, is as safe as many other routinely performed dental procedures.

  1. Effects of Crest Whitestrips bleaching on surface morphology and fracture susceptibility of teeth in vitro.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R; Duschner, Heinz J; Götz, Hermann

    2003-01-01

    morphology, microhardness or fracture susceptibility of human tooth enamel under in vitro cycling conditions of treatment matching clinical bleaching exposures. These results support the clinical safety of the selected commercial bleaching systems to vital dentition, matching results obtained from the long-term use of these ingredients applied in dental offices and available in commercial formulations.

  2. Preferences for caries prevention agents in adult patients: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ajmo, Craig T.; Amundson, Craig; Anderson, Gerald A.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To identify factors that are significantly associated with dentists’ use of specific caries preventive agents in adult patients, and whether dentists who use one preventive agent are also more likely to use certain others. Methods Data were collected from 564 practitioners in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, a multi-region consortium of participating practices and dental organizations. Results In-office topical fluoride was the method most frequently used. Regarding at-home preventive agents, there was little difference in preference between non-prescription fluoride, prescription fluoride, or chlorhexidine rinse. Dentists who most frequently used caries prevention were also those who regularly perform caries risk assessment and individualize caries prevention at the patient level. Higher percentages of patients with dental insurance were significantly associated with more use of in-office prevention modalities. Female dentists and dentists with more-recent training were more likely to recommend preventive agents that are applied by the patient. Dentists who reported more-conservative decisions in clinical treatment scenarios were also more likely to use caries preventive agents. Groups of dentist who shared a common preference for certain preventive agents were identified. One group used preventive agents selectively, whereas the other groups predominately used either in-office or at-home fluorides. Conclusions Caries prevention is commonly used with adult patients. However, these results suggest that only a subset of dentists base preventive treatments on caries risk at the individual patient level. PMID:20560997

  3. Preferences for caries prevention agents in adult patients: findings from the dental practice-based research network.

    PubMed

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Ajmo, Craig T; Amundson, Craig; Anderson, Gerald A; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2010-08-01

    To identify factors that are significantly associated with dentists' use of specific caries preventive agents in adult patients, and whether dentists who use one preventive agent are also more likely to use certain others. Data were collected from 564 practitioners in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, a multi-region consortium of participating practices and dental organizations. In-office topical fluoride was the method most frequently used. Regarding at-home preventive agents, there was little difference in preference between nonprescription fluoride, prescription fluoride, or chlorhexidine rinse. Dentists who most frequently used caries prevention were also those who regularly perform caries risk assessment and individualize caries prevention at the patient level. Higher percentages of patients with dental insurance were significantly associated with more use of in-office prevention modalities. Female dentists and dentists with more-recent training were more likely to recommend preventive agents that are applied by the patient. Dentists who reported more-conservative decisions in clinical treatment scenarios were also more likely to use caries preventive agents. Groups of dentist who shared a common preference for certain preventive agents were identified. One group used preventive agents selectively, whereas the other groups predominately used either in-office or at-home fluorides. Caries prevention is commonly used with adult patients. However, these results suggest that only a subset of dentists base preventive treatments on caries risk at the individual patient level.

  4. Modulation of Streptococcus mutans virulence by dental adhesives containing anti-caries agents.

    PubMed

    André, Carolina Bosso; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Fronza, Bruna Marin; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Ferracane, Jack Liborio; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the effect of the incorporation of two anti-caries agents into dental adhesives on the reduction of the virulence of Streptococcus mutans and on the adhesion to dentin. Apigenin (1mM) and tt-Farnesol (5mM) were added separately and in combination to a self-etch adhesive (CS3 - Clearfil S3 Bond Plus) and to an each-and-rinse adhesive (OPT - OptiBond S). Biofilm of S. mutans was grown on adhesive-coated hydroxyapatite disks for 115h and bacterial viability, dry-weight, alkali soluble, water soluble, intracellular polysaccharides and protein were quantified. Bond strength and dentin-adhesive interface were performed to analyze the effects of the incorporation on the physical properties and to identify changes in hybrid layer morphology. Addition of Apigenin and Apigenin+tt-Farnesol to CS3, and Apigenin or tt-Farnesol to OPT reduced the dry-weight of S. mutans biofilm. Insoluble polysaccharide decreased with the addition of Apigenin to CS3 and tt-Farnesol to OPT. Intracellular polysaccharide decreased with addition of Apigenin and Apigenin+tt-Farnesol to CS3. No changes in dentin bond strength, resin-dentin interfacial morphology, total amount of protein and soluble polysaccharide were observed with the additions. Biofilms that are less cariogenic around dental restorations could decrease secondary caries formation; in addition, the reduction of virulence of S. mutans without necessarily killing the microorganism is more unlikely to induce antimicrobial resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Braz, Ana K S; de Araujo, Renato E; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J; Gomes, Anderson S L; Prasad, Paras N

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  6. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  7. [Effect of cold-light bleaching technique on human permanent teeth enamel surface].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-wen; Shi, Xin-chang; Zhou, Jing-lin; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    To study the effects of the cold-light bleaching technique on crystals and microstructure of the dental enamel. The human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were treated by a standard cold-light bleaching procedure. After the treatment, all samples were detected by high resolution micro-area X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope and scanning electron microscope. After the permanent teeth were treated with cold-light bleaching technique, the enamels' crystal dimension, crystallinity decreased and irregular surfaces and shallow disk pits appeared. The cold-light bleaching technique could lead to the changes of crystals and microstructure in the surface layer of dental enamel.

  8. [Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism].

    PubMed

    Bolla, Edson Daruich; Goldenberg, Paulete

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us think that the offer of gingival bleaching is oriented by the Caucasian pattern of beauty evidencing the ethnocentric character of this procedure.

  9. Ability of 13 chemical agents used in dental practice to induce sister-chromatid exchanges in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Takashi; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic potential of 13 chemical agents used in dental practice, the abilities of these agents to induce sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Statistically significant increases in the frequencies of SCEs were observed in SHE cells treated with all seven of the chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments: p-chlorophenol, m-cresol, formaldehyde, guaiacol, hydrogen peroxide, p-phenolsulfonic acid, and sodium hypochlorite (P < 0.01; Student t test). Assessment of two chemical agents that are applied to the oral mucosa as antiseptics showed that SCEs were induced by iodine (P < 0.01), but not by chlorhexidine. Of three chemical agents that are used as dyes for disclosing dental plaque, erythrosine B had no effect on SCE induction, while acid fuchsin and basic fuchsin increased the SCE frequencies in SHE cells (P < 0.01). Glutaraldehyde, which is used as a disinfectant for dental instruments and impressions, also induced SCEs (P < 0.01). Because SCE assays are used as a sensitive indicator for evaluating genetic toxicity of chemicals, the chemical agents that had a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells.

  10. Post-bleaching sensitivity in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Guacyra M; Guedes, Verónica L; Luna, Maria do R Ml; Carneiro-Jr, Américo M; Stegun, Roberto C

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. This study analyzed the effectiveness of bleaching and tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching in patients with SCD. Forty volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 patients each (five with the SCD and five healthy controls) and treated using in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and different light activation protocols. No statistically significant difference was observed with relation to presence of tooth sensitivity, with or without use of a source of light for peroxide activation, and all bleaching therapies were effective, regardless of the technique employed and the presence/absence of sickle cell disease. The data showed that in-office dental bleaching is a viable alternative for improvement of oral esthetics for patients with SCD.

  11. Efficacy studies of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion, M291 Skin Decontamination Kit, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents, part 1: guinea pigs challenged with VX.

    PubMed

    Braue, Ernest H; Smith, Kelly H; Doxzon, Bryce F; Lumpkin, Horace L; Clarkson, Edward D

    2011-03-01

    This report, first in a series of five, directly compares the efficacy of 4 decontamination products and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to VX. In all experiments, guinea pigs were close-clipped and given anesthesia. In the decontamination experiments, the animals were challenged with VX and decontaminated after a 2-minute delay for the standard procedure or at longer times for the delayed-decontamination experiments. Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents was applied as a thin coating (0.1 mm thick), allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and challenged with VX. After a 2-hour challenge, any remaining VX was blotted off the animal, but no additional decontamination was done. Positive control animals were challenged with VX in the same manner as the treated animals, except that they received no treatment. In addition, the positive control animals were always challenged with 5% VX in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solution, whereas the treatment animals received either neat (undiluted) VX or 5% VX in IPA solution. All animals were observed during the first 4 hours and again at 24 hours after exposure for signs of toxicity and death. The protective ratio (PR, defined as the median lethal dose [LD(50)] of the treatment group divided by the LD(50) of the untreated positive control animals) was calculated from the probit dose-response curves established for each treatment group and nontreated control animals. Significance in this report was defined as p < .05. In the standard 2-minute neat VX decontamination experiments, the calculated PRs for Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK) were 66, 17, 16, and 1.1, respectively. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion was by far the most effective decontamination product tested and was significantly better than any of the other products. Bleach and

  12. Effectiveness of different carbamide peroxide concentrations used for tooth bleaching: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    MEIRELES, Sônia Saeger; FONTES, Silvia Terra; COIMBRA, Luiz Antônio Afonso; DELLA BONA, Álvaro; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of three carbamide peroxide concentrations used for tooth bleaching treatments. Material and Methods Sixty bovine dental slabs (6x6x3 mm) were obtained, sequentially polished, submitted to artificial staining (baseline) and randomized into four groups (n=15), according to the bleaching agent concentration: distilled water (control), 10% (CP10), 16% (CP16) or 37% (CP37) carbamide peroxide. CP10 and CP16 were covered with 0.2 mL of the respective bleaching gels, which were applied on enamel surface for 4 h/day during two weeks. Samples of CP37 were covered with 0.2 mL of the bleaching gel for 20 min. The gel was light activated by two 40-s applications spaced by 10-min intervals. The gel was renewed and applied 3 times per clinical session. This cycle was repeated at 3 sessions with 5 days of interval between them. Tooth shade evaluations were done with a digital spectrophotometer at T0 (baseline), T1 (after 1-week of treatment) and T2 (1-week post-bleaching). Tooth shade means were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman's tests and color parameters were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Results At T1 and T2 evaluations, tooth shade was significantly lighter than at baseline for all treatment groups, considering the color parameters ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*, ΔE* (p<0.001) or tooth shade means (p<0.001). CP37 group showed lower shade mean change than CP10 and CP16 at T1 (p<0.01), but this difference was not statistically significant at T2 (p>0.05). Conclusions One week after the end of the treatment, all carbamide peroxide concentrations tested produced similar tooth color improvement. PMID:22666835

  13. The effects of internal tooth bleaching regimens on composite-to-composite bond strength.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raphael; Attin, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian J; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Tauböck, Tobias T

    2012-12-01

    The authors conducted an in vitro study to investigate the influence of several internal bleaching regimens on the composite-to-composite shear bond strength of a dental core buildup material. The authors fabricated 72 specimens from a resin-based composite core buildup and assigned them randomly to six groups (four experimental and two control groups) (n = 12 per group), according to the following bleaching agents: sodium perborate mixed with distilled water (SP/W); sodium perborate mixed with 3 percent hydrogen peroxide (SP/HP-3); sodium perborate mixed with 30 percent hydrogen peroxide (SP/HP-30); 35 percent hydrogen peroxide (HP-35). After the 12-day bleaching procedures, the authors applied a calcium hydroxide dressing for two weeks. The two control groups consisted of unbleached specimens that either did not receive (C1) or did receive (C2) the calcium hydroxide dressing. The authors cleaned and silanized the resin-based composite specimens and coated them with an intermediate adhesive resin before applying fresh composite material. They measured composite surface roughness and shear bond strength and performed statistical analyses of the data. Unbleached specimens in groups C1 and C2 exhibited significantly lower composite-to-composite bond strength and significantly lower surface roughness than did specimens in groups SP/W and SP/HP-3. Bond strength in group HP-35 was significantly lower than that in group SP/W. Internal bleaching regimens that involve the use of sodium perborate mixed with water or 3 percent hydrogen peroxide might increase the composite-to-composite interfacial bond strength. None of the internal bleaching regimens in this study had an adverse effect on the composite-to-composite interfacial bond strength.

  14. Effect of bleaching on fracture toughness of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sopanis D; Bulpakdi, Panida; Matis, Bruce Allan; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the effect of bleaching agents on the fracture toughness of composite materials. Four nanofilled resin composites were evaluated: Filtek Supreme Plus, Tetric EvoCeram, Premise and Esthet-X. Four concentrations of bleaching agents were tested: Opalescence PF 10%, 20%, 35% and 45%. Fifty specimens of each composite conforming to ASTM guidelines for the single edge notch bar-shaped specimen were fabricated in a metal mold. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for a minimum of 24 hours prior to exposing them to the bleaching agents. Ten specimens of each material were used as controls. Forty specimens of each brand were evenly divided into four groups for bleaching agent application (n = 10). The resin composites were bleached on both sides for 14 days. The specimens were then subjected to a three-point bending test with a crosshead speed of 0.2 mm per second. The fracture toughness (K(Ic)) was calculated. The control group K(Ic) value of Esthet-X was significantly higher than that of the other composites in the controlled groups. Bleaching agents significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Filtek Supreme Plus. The application of bleaching agents did not significantly change the fracture toughness values of the other nanofilled resin composites tested.

  15. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. © 2013.

  16. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  17. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  18. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-09-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  19. The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching material on microhardness of sound and demineralized enamel and dentin in situ.

    PubMed

    Basting, R T; Rodrigues Júnior, A L; Serra, M C

    2001-01-01

    This in situ study evaluated the microhardness of sound and demineralized enamel and dentin submitted to treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide for three weeks. A 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent--Opalescence/Ultradent (OPA)--was evaluated against a placebo agent (PLA). Two hundred and forty dental fragments--60 sound enamel fragments (SE), 60 demineralized enamel fragments (DE), 60 sound dentin fragments (SD) and 60 demineralized dentin fragments (DD)--were randomly fixed on the vestibular surface of the first superior molars and second superior premolars of 30 volunteers. The volunteers were divided into two groups that received bleaching or the placebo agent at different sequences and periods at a double blind 2 x 2 crossover study with a wash-out period of two weeks. Microhardness tests were performed on the enamel and dentin surface. The SE and DE submitted to treatment with OPA showed lower microhardness values than the SE and DE submitted to treatment with PLA. There were no statistical differences in microhardness values for SD and DD submitted to the treatment with OPA and PLA. The results suggest that treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching material for three weeks alters the enamel microhardness, although it does not seem to alter the dentin microhardness.

  20. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release.

  1. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results: Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Conclusions: Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release. PMID:24883026

  2. A review of the effect of vital teeth bleaching on the mechanical properties of tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Swain, Michael V

    2013-09-01

    Tooth whitening is considered the easiest and most cost-effective procedure for treating tooth discoloration. Contemporary bleaching agents contain hydrogen peroxide as the active ingredient. It is either applied directly or produced from its precursor, carbamide peroxide. A review of the published literature was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of whitening products on dental enamel, with a focus on its mechanical properties and the influence of various parameters on study outcomes. There appear to be considerable differences in opinion as to whether changes in mechanical properties occur as a result of tooth whitening. However, the mechanical property findings of those studies appear to be related to the load applied during the indentation tests. Most studies which used loads higher than 500mN to determine enamel hardness showed no effect of bleaching, whereas those using lower loads were able to detect hardness reduction in the surface layer of enamel. In conclusion, bleaching reduces the hardness of the enamel surface of enamel, and that is more readily detected with instrumented low load testing systems. This hardness reduction may arise due to degradation or denaturation of enamel matrix proteins by the peroxide oxidation.

  3. [Study of the effect of fluoride removal agent and microabrasion technology in LED teeth whitening of dental fluorosis].

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Luo, Hong-Xia; Li, Ping; Zhang, Chun-Lei

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of fluoride removal agent and microabrasion technology in LED teeth whitening of dental fluorosis. One hundred and twelve patients with moderate dental fluorosis treated from August 2012 to July 2015 were divided into experimental group and control group according to random number table, with 61 cases in each group. In addition to pretreatment for all patients, patients in the control group were given combined treatment of Beyond LED whitening and fluoride removal agent; while patients in the experimental group were given microabrasion before LED whitening, with the same subsequent treatment process as that in the control group. The whitening effect and tooth sensitivity during whitening were compared between the two groups at the completion of treatment, 1 month and 6 months after treatment. SPSS 19.0 software package was employed for statistical analysis. There were no ineffective or lost patients in 2 groups. The effective rate of whitening for patients in the experimental group at completion of treatment, 1 month and 6 months after treatment was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). There was no case with tooth sensitivity during treatment. There was no significant difference in non-significant sensitivity rate or significant sensitivity rate between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Combined treatment with fluoride removal agent and microabrasion technology in LED teeth whitening for dental fluorosis can significantly improve the whitening effect and will not interfered by significantly increased tooth sensitivity.

  4. Randomized controlled trial of sealed in-office bleaching effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mário Artur Pereira; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Oliveira, Alaíde Hermínia de Aguiar; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    Regardless of the high success rate, patients commonly report the occurrence of tooth sensitivity during the in-office bleaching procedures. Recently, it has been demonstrated that using a customized tray (called sealed in-office bleaching technique) reduces peroxide penetration. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate tooth sensitivity and bleaching efficacy of sealed bleaching, in comparison with a conventional in-office technique. Twenty patients were randomized allocated in two groups in which 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was used in a single 45-min application. For the sealed technique, a customized bleaching tray was fabricated and carefully positioned over the bleaching agent during the session. The color was recorded at a baseline, 7 and 28 days after the bleaching session, using Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Tooth sensitivity was recorded during (20 and 40 min) and immediately after the treatment using a visual analogue scale. The bleaching efficacy was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA, while the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity and its intensity were evaluated by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). No significant difference on bleaching efficacy was observed between the conventional (7.4 and 8.1 ΔE) and sealed techniques (7.8 and 8.3 ΔE) at both evaluation periods. No significant difference was observed regarding the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity (p=0.15). Sealed technique showed a significant decrease of sensitivity intensity after 40 min (p=0.03). Sealed bleaching technique was able to reduce the sensitivity intensity during the bleaching procedure, without jeopardizing the bleaching efficacy.

  5. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  6. Efficacy studies of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion, M291 Skin Decontamination Kit, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents, part 2: guinea pigs challenged with soman.

    PubMed

    Braue, Ernest H; Smith, Kelly H; Doxzon, Bryce F; Lumpkin, Horace L; Clarkson, Edward D

    2011-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of five, directly compares the efficacy of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK), 0.5% bleach (sodium or calcium hypochlorite solution), 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to soman (GD). In all experiments, guinea pigs were close-clipped and given anesthesia. In the decontamination experiments, the animals were challenged with GD and decontaminated after a 2-minute delay for the standard procedure or at longer times for the delayed-decontamination experiments. Positive control animals were challenged with GD in the same manner as the treated animals, except that they received no treatment. All animals were observed during the first 4 hours and again at 24 hours after exposure for signs of toxicity and death. The protective ratio (PR, defined as the median lethal dose [LD(50)] of the treatment group divided by the LD(50) of the untreated positive control animals) was calculated from the derived probit dose-response curves established for each treatment group and nontreated control animals. SERPACWA was applied as a thin coating (0.1 mm thick), allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and challenged with GD. After a 2-hour challenge, any remaining GD was blotted off the animal, but no additional decontamination was done. Significance in this report is defined as p <.05. Neat (undiluted) GD was used to challenge all animals in these studies. In the standard 2-minute GD decontamination experiments, the calculated PRs for RSDL, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and M291 SDK were 14, 2.7, 2.2, and 2.6, respectively. RSDL was by far the most effective decontamination product tested and significantly better than any of the other products. Bleach, soapy water, and the M291 SDK provided equivalent and modest protection. Since only RSDL provided at least good protection (PR > 5), it was the only

  7. Bleaching a devital primary tooth using sodium perborate with walking bleach technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye; Sonmez, Hayriye

    2009-05-01

    Nowadays, both children and parents place a greater value on appearance and aesthetics than has previously been the case. Primary teeth with intrinsic discoloration may be treated by a number of methods, including facings and abrasion. However, dental bleaching may offer a safer alternative that can be completed with less chair time and without harming dental structures. This case report describes the treatment of a darkened primary tooth of a 4-year-old boy with sodium perborate using the walking bleach technique and its 1-year clinical and radiographical follow-up. During this 1-year follow-up period, no signs of any pathology were observed either clinically (sensitivity to percussion or palpation, fistulae, color change) or radiographically (external or internal root resorption, apical radiolucency). In this study, using sodium perborate with the walking bleach technique is found to be successful in whitening primary teeth and can be recommended as a safe alternative for the bleaching of devital primary teeth with intrinsic discoloration.

  8. An In Situ Study of the Influence of Staining Beverages on Color Alteration of Bleached Teeth.

    PubMed

    Briso, A L; Fagundes, T C; Gallinari, M O; Moreira, J; de Almeida, Lcag; Rahal, V; Gonçalves, R S; Santos, Ph Dos

    The aim of this study was to evaluate overall color change in bovine tooth fragments submitted to dental bleaching treatment performed simultaneously with the ingestion of beverages containing dyes. For this purpose, tooth fragments assembled into intraoral devices were submitted to at-home dental bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) for 14 days and to immersion in staining beverages for 10 minutes daily. The specimens were divided into the following study groups according to bleaching treatment and staining substance (n=12): G I (negative control): no bleaching + distilled water; G II (positive control): bleaching + distilled water; G III: bleaching + coffee; and G IV: bleaching + grape juice. Twelve volunteers used the device continually, except during meals, oral hygiene, dental bleaching, and pigment challenge. Color readings were performed using a spectrophotometer both before the bleaching treatment and after each treatment week. The results were submitted to the normality test. The data obtained were submitted to analysis of variance and the Tukey or Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (α=0.05). All bleached groups showed similar ΔE results at the end of treatment. Staining beverages generated negative ΔL mean values, and the lowest result was obtained in the treatment with coffee after 14 days. The Δa values in the groups that received treatment with staining beverages were higher when compared to the control groups. Dental bleaching associated with the consumption of staining substances may not affect overall tooth color change by the end of the treatment, although the consumption of staining substances did influence the different color dimensions.

  9. iBond: the seventh-generation, one-bottle dental bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Dunn, James R

    2003-02-01

    Dental adhesive systems used for bonding dental resins to enamel and dentin have evolved through several "generations," with changes in chemistries, mechanism, number of bottles, application technique, and clinical effectiveness. The trend in the latest generation of dental bonding systems is to reduce the number of components and clinical placement steps. The introduction of iBond, a single-bottle dental adhesive system, is the latest of the new generation materials, and combines etchant, adhesive, and desensitizer in one component. This article will show that laboratory test results comparing the bond strength and margin-gap sealing of iBond with other latest-generation dental adhesive systems have shown similar results.

  10. Comparative assessment of the organization of the colors of the Vita Classical color pallet by digital images and visual analysis for dental bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Júnior, O. B.; Cioffi, Mariana S.; Cesnik, R. M.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Corrêa-dos-Santos, Diego R.; Fornazari, Fabio P.

    2009-02-01

    New formularizations, techniques and devices have become the dental whitening most safe and with better results. Although this, the verification of the levels whitening is being continued for visual comparison, that is an empirical, subjective method, subject to errors and dependent of the individual interpretation. Normally the result of the whitening is express for the amplitude of displacement between the initial and the final color, being take like reference the tonalities of a scale of color commanded of darkest for more clearly. Although to be the most used scale , the ordinance of the Vita Classical ® - Vita, according to recommendations of the manufacturer, reveals inadequate for the evaluation of the whitening. From digital images and of algorithm OER (ordinance of the reference scale), especially developed for the ScanWhite ©, the ordinance of the tonalities of the scale Vita Classical® was made. For such, the values of the canals of color R, G, and B of medium part average of the crowns was adopted as reference for evaluation. The images had been taken with the camera Sony Cybershoot DSC F828. The results of the computational ordinance had been compared with the sequence proposal for the manufacturer and with the earned one for the visual evaluation, carried through by 10 volunteers, under standardized conditions of illumination. It statistics analyzes demonstrated significant differences between the ordinances.

  11. Pediatric cutaneous bleach burns.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cathleen; Cox, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Bleach is a common household product which can cause caustic injuries. Its effects on mucosal tissues and the eye have been well-described in the literature. However, there is little information published regarding the appearance and effect of bleach on a child's skin. We report three children who sustained chemical burns after contact with bleach. All three children sustained accidental bleach burns while at home, and each child had a distinct brown discoloration to the skin from the injury. All three children had treatment and follow-up for their burns. Two of the children sustained more severe burns, which were extensive and required more time to heal. There was also long-term scarring associated with the severe burns. Like most burns, pain control is required until the injury heals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  13. The essential oil of Allium sativum as an alternative agent against Candida isolated from dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Juache, Alejandro; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Bermeo-Escalona, Josué R; Gómez-Hernández, Araceli; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio

    The colonization of the surfaces of dental prostheses by Candida albicans is associated with the development of denture stomatitis. In this context, the use of fluconazole has been proposed, but its disadvantage is microbial resistance. Meanwhile, the oil of Allium sativum has shown an effect in controlling biofilm formation by C. albicans. The objective of this study was to determine the antifungal activities of the essential oil of A. sativum and fluconazole against clinical isolates of Candida species obtained from rigid, acrylic-based partial or total dentures and to compare these agents' effects on both biofilm and planktonic cells. A total of 48 clinical isolates obtained from the acrylic surface of partial or complete dentures were examined, and the following species were identified: C. albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. For each isolate, the antifungal activities of the essential oil of A. sativum and fluconazole against both biofilm and planktonic cells were evaluated using the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A3 method. The isolates were also evaluated by semiquantitative XTT reduction. All planktonic Candida isolates were susceptible to the essential oil of A. sativum, whereas 4.2% were resistant to fluconazole. Regarding susceptibilities in biofilms, 43.8% of biofilms were resistant to A. sativum oil, and 91.7% were resistant to fluconazole. All planktonic cells of the different Candida species tested are susceptible to <1mg/ml A. sativum oil, and the majority are susceptible to fluconazole. Susceptibility decreases in biofilm cells, with increased resistance to fluconazole compared with A. sativum oil. The essential oil of A. sativum is thus active against clinical isolates of Candida species obtained from dentures, with effects on both biofilm and planktonic cells in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of epicatechin, a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells cultured in collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-su; Lim, Myung-Jin; Min, Kyung-San; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Chan-Ui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological effects of epicatechin (ECN), a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured in collagen scaffolds. Material and Method To evaluate the effects of ECN on the proliferation of hDPCs, cell counting was performed using optical and fluorescent microscopy. Measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to assess odontogenic differentiation. The compressive strength and setting time of collagen scaffolds containing ECN were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to analyze the thermal behavior of collagen in the presence of ECN. Results Epicatechin increased ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and the mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a specific odontogenic-related marker. Furthermore, ECN upregulated the expression of DSPP in hDPCs cultured in collagen scaffolds. Epicatechin activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the treatment with an ERK inhibitor (U0126) blocked the expression of DSPP. The compressive strength was increased and the setting time was shortened in a dose-dependent manner. The number of cells cultured in the ECN-treated collagen scaffolds was significantly increased compared to the cells in the untreated control group. Conclusions Our results revealed that ECN promoted the proliferation and differentiation of hDPCs. Furthermore, the differentiation was regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. Changes in mechanical properties are related to cell fate, including proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, our study suggests the ECN treatment might be desirable for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. PMID:27008260

  15. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity - case series.

    PubMed

    Cartagena, Andrés Felipe; Parreiras, Sibelli Olivieri; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2015-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF) and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS) in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  16. Does the time interval after bleaching influence the adhesion of orthodontic brackets?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Glaucia Cristina Rodrigues; de Miranda, Cyndi Albuquerque; Machado, Sissy Maria Mendes; Brandão, Gustavo Antonio Martins; de Almeida, Haroldo Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that no difference exists between the effects of at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching on shear bond strength (SBS) with bracket bonding at 4 different time intervals after dental bleaching. Methods Ninety extracted human premolars were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 10) according to the bleaching methods used (at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching) and the storage time in artificial saliva (30 min, 1 day, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks before bonding). The control group was stored in artificial saliva for 7 days. Brackets were bonded with the Transbond XT adhesive system, and SBS testing was performed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of resin remaining on the enamel surfaces after debonding. The SBS data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. For the ARI, the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed. Significance for all statistical tests was predetermined to be p < 0.05. Results The SBS of the unbleached group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the bleached groups (except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching). Conclusions The null hypothesis was not totally rejected. All bleaching groups tested had decreased SBS of the brackets to the enamel, except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching. The SBS returned to values close to those of the unbleached enamel within 3 weeks following bleaching. PMID:24228239

  17. Cytotoxicity of one-step dentin-bonding agents toward dental pulp and odontoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Y; Inuyama, H; Maeda, H; Akamine, A; Nör, J E; Saito, T

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of five one-step dentin-bonding agents on human dental pulp and odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23). Photopolymerized and unpolymerized samples of these dentin-bonding agents were prepared and incubated with dental pulp or MDPC-23 cells. After 24 or 72 h of incubation, the number of unstained cells with trypan blue was counted. The staining of cells with trypan blue stands for a cytotoxicity. The pulp cell and MDPC-23 cytotoxicity of polymerized sample treatment increased in the order of AQ Bond Plus (AQ)agent, while AP was the strongest. All polymerized dentin-bonding agents exhibited lower cytotoxicity by 2-65% than their unpolymerized counterparts. The appearance of the cytotoxicity of dentin-bonding agents was time-dependent, and cell viability was lower at 72 h by 2-46% than at 24 h. The cytotoxicity to MDPC-23 cells was about 5-24% higher than that to pulp cells. These results indicate that one-step dentin-bonding agents differ markedly in their cytotoxicity. Differential cytotoxic effects of one-step dentin-bonding agents should be considered during clinical application of operative restoration.

  18. [Effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming-yi; Zhang, Xiu-yin

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker (ABW). ABW was surface-treated with 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% silan coupling agent (γ-MPS), and mixed with resin matrix to synthesize 5 groups of composite resins. After heat-cured at 120 degrees centigrade for 1 h, specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength according to ISO-4049. One specimen was selected randomly from each group and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed with SAS 9.2 software package. The flexural strength (117.93±11.9 Mpa) of the group treated with 2% silane coupling agent was the highest, and significantly different from that of the other 4 groups (α=0.01). The amount of silane coupling agent has impact on the flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with whiskers; The flexual strength will be reduced whenever the amount is higher or lower than the threshold. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (08DZ2271100).

  19. Sodium hypochlorite (dilute chlorine bleach) oral rinse in patient self-care.

    PubMed

    Rich, Sandra K; Slots, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), commonly known as "bleach," is widely accepted as being a safe and effective antiseptic against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. For over a century, bleach has been used to control or overcome infection in homes, hospitals, and even on battlefields, and in endodontics for disinfection of root canals. This paper reviews clinical studies on the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite oral rinse to combat dental plaque and gingival inflammation. Sodium hypochlorite is readily available as inexpensive household bleach, and we suggest that oral rinsing twice weekly with dilute bleach (0.25% sodium hypochlorite) constitutes a valuable adjunct to current methods of plaque removal.

  20. Tooth bleaching--a critical review of the biological aspects.

    PubMed

    Dahl, J E; Pallesen, U

    2003-01-01

    Present tooth-bleaching techniques are based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent. It is applied directly, or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide peroxide. More than 90% immediate success has been reported for intracoronal bleaching of non-vital teeth, and in the period of 1-8 years' observation time, from 10 to 40% of the initially successfully treated teeth needed re-treatment. Cervical root resorption is a possible consequence of internal bleaching and is more frequently observed in teeth treated with the thermo-catalytic procedure. When the external tooth-bleaching technique is used, the first subjective change in tooth color may be observed after 2-4 nights of tooth bleaching, and more than 90% satisfactory results have been reported. Tooth sensitivity is a common side-effect of external tooth bleaching observed in 15%-78% of the patients, but clinical studies addressing the risk of other adverse effects are lacking. Direct contact with hydrogen peroxide induced genotoxic effects in bacteria and cultured cells, whereas the effect was reduced or abolished in the presence of metabolizing enzymes. Several tumor-promoting studies, including the hamster cheek pouch model, indicated that hydrogen peroxide might act as a promoter. Multiple exposures of hydrogen peroxide have resulted in localized effects on the gastric mucosa, decreased food consumption, reduced weight gain, and blood chemistry changes in mice and rats. Our risk assessment revealed that a sufficient safety level was not reached in certain clinical situations of external tooth bleaching, such as bleaching one tooth arch with 35% carbamide peroxide, using several applications per day of 22% carbamide peroxide, and bleaching both arches simultaneously with 22% carbamide peroxide. The recommendation is to avoid using concentrations higher than 10% carbamide peroxide when one performs external bleaching. We advocate a selective use of external tooth bleaching based on

  1. Optical effects of experimental light-activated bleaching procedures.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Marcius, Marijan; Ristic, Mira; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of experimental light-activated bleaching procedures. The improved color effect may be attributed to the potential photochemical effect of light-emitting diode (LED405), organic LED (OLED), and femtosecond laser rather than to the photothermal effect of conventional lights used for tooth bleaching. Specially made pastilles of hydroxylapatite were immersed in green tea for 8 h and randomly divided into four groups (n=50) specified by the type of light source applied during a 30 min bleaching treatment: LED405, OLED, and femtosecond laser, or its absence (control group). Each group was treated with five bleaching gels: 10%, 16%, and 30% carbamide peroxide (CP), and 25% and 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Changes in color were determined by red-green-blue (RGB) colorimeter and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV/Vis/NIR) spectroscopy. Regardless of the applied bleaching gel, LED405 produced a larger increase in the value of RGB index than did OLED and bleaching without light activation (p<0.05). Femtosecond laser also produced significantly better results in combination with 16% CP and 38% HP. Furthermore, application of a bleaching agent with a higher concentration of peroxide boosted the value of the RGB index. Spectroscopic measurements revealed similar results, although treatments with OLED were rated relatively better than in RGB analysis. The mechanisms of light-activated bleaching procedures had a significant effect on the color change. The bleaching activation with LED405 and higher concentrations of peroxide in bleaching agents promoted better whitening effect.

  2. Dual antibacterial agents of nano-silver and 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide in dental adhesive to inhibit caries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Fang; Imazato, Satoshi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Huaibing; Arola, Dwayne D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Dental resins containing 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) showed potent antibacterial functions. Recent studies developed antibacterial resins containing nanoparticles of silver (NAg). The objectives of this study were to develop an adhesive containing dual agents of MDPB and NAg for the first time, and to investigate the combined effects of antibacterial adhesive and primer on biofilm viability, metabolic activity, lactic acid, dentin bond strength, and fibroblast cytotoxicity. MDPB and NAg were incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesive “A” and primer “P”. Five systems were tested: SBMP adhesive A; A+MDPB; A+NAg; A+MDPB+NAg; P+MDPB+NAg together with A+MDPB+NAg. Dental plaque microcosm biofilms were cultured using mixed saliva from ten donors. Metabolic activity, colony-forming units, and lactic acid production of biofilms were investigated. Human fibroblast cytotoxicity of bonding agents was determined. MDPB+NAg in adhesive/primer did not compromise dentin bond strength (p>0.1). MDPB or NAg alone in adhesive substantially reduced the biofilm activities. Dual agents MDPB+NAg in adhesive greatly reduced the biofilm viability compared to each agent alone (p<0.05). The greatest inhibition of biofilms was achieved when both adhesive and primer contained MDPB+NAg. Fibroblast viability of groups with dual antibacterial agents was similar to control using culture medium without resin eluents (p>0.1). In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that the antibacterial potency of MDPB adhesive could be substantially enhanced via NAg. Adding MDPB+NAg into both primer and adhesive achieved the strongest anti-biofilm efficacy. The dual agent (MDPB+NAg) method could have wide applicability to other adhesives, sealants, cements and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. PMID:23529901

  3. Dual antibacterial agents of nano-silver and 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide in dental adhesive to inhibit caries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Fang; Imazato, Satoshi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Huaibing; Arola, Dwayne D; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-08-01

    Dental resins containing 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) showed potent antibacterial functions. Recent studies developed antibacterial resins containing nanoparticles of silver (NAg). The objectives of this study were to develop an adhesive containing dual agents of MDPB and NAg for the first time and to investigate the combined effects of antibacterial adhesive and primer on biofilm viability, metabolic activity, lactic acid, dentin bond strength, and fibroblast cytotoxicity. MDPB and NAg were incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesive "A" and primer "P". Five systems were tested: SBMP adhesive A; A + MDPB; A+NAg; A + MDPB + NAg; P + MDPB + NAg together with A + MDPB + NAg. Dental plaque microcosm biofilms were cultured using mixed saliva from 10 donors. Metabolic activity, colony-forming units, and lactic acid production of biofilms were investigated. Human fibroblast cytotoxicity of bonding agents was determined. MDPB + NAg in adhesive/primer did not compromise dentin bond strength (p > 0.1). MDPB or NAg alone in adhesive substantially reduced the biofilm activities. Dual agents MDPB + NAg in adhesive significantly reduced the biofilm viability compared with each agent alone (p < 0.05). The greatest inhibition of biofilms was achieved when both adhesive and primer contained MDPB + NAg. Fibroblast viability of groups with dual antibacterial agents was similar to control using culture medium without resin eluents (p > 0.1). In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that the antibacterial potency of MDPB adhesive could be substantially enhanced via NAg. Adding MDPB + NAg into both primer and adhesive achieved the strongest antibiofilm efficacy. The dual agent (MDPB + NAg) method could have wide applicability to other adhesives, sealants, cements, and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries.

  4. Effect of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening.

    PubMed

    Barry, T N; Bailey, C W; Ashcraft-Olmscheid, D; Vandewalle, K S

    The purpose of this study was to compare the whitening efficacy of a novel bleaching agent containing a unique tribarrel hydremide-peroxide gel (KöR) with a traditional bleaching system of hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide (Opalescence). Bovine incisors were mounted into a custom resin, arch-shaped mounting device. Four groups of 10 teeth were created using mounting devices containing five teeth each. The in-office and home bleaching gels of KöR and Opalescence were applied to the teeth alone and in trays to simulate a combination of in-office and home bleaching or home bleaching only. Spectrophotometer readings of L* a* b* were performed at baseline, the end of active bleaching (immediate), and three and six months postbleaching. Immediately postbleaching, the use of Opalescence gel resulted in greater change in ΔE* and Δb* (less yellow) for combined and home bleaching techniques compared with KöR. After six months, Opalescence had significantly greater ΔE* and Δb* compared with KöR for home bleaching only. There was no significant difference in ΔL* between Opalescence and KöR at any time period with either technique.

  5. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  6. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  7. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonvital tooth bleaching: a review of the literature and clinical procedures.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    Tooth discoloration varies in etiology, appearance, localization, severity, and adhesion to tooth structure. It can be defined as being extrinsic or intrinsic on the basis of localization and etiology. In this review of the literature, various causes of tooth discoloration, different bleaching materials, and their applications to endodontically treated teeth have been described. In the walking bleach technique the root filling should be completed first, and a cervical seal must be established. The bleaching agent should be changed every 3-7 days. The thermocatalytic technique involves placement of a bleaching agent in the pulp chamber followed by heat application. At the end of each visit the bleaching agent is left in the tooth so that it can function as a walking bleach until the next visit. External bleaching of endodontically treated teeth with an in-office technique requires a high concentration gel. It might be a supplement to the walking bleach technique, if the results are not satisfactory after 3-4 visits. These treatments require a bonded temporary filling or a bonded resin composite to seal the access cavity. There is a deficiency of evidence-based science in the literature that addresses the prognosis of bleached nonvital teeth. Therefore, it is important to always be aware of the possible complications and risks that are associated with the different bleaching techniques.

  9. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    PubMed Central

    DANTAS, Andréa Abi Rached; BORTOLATTO, Janaina Freitas; RONCOLATO, Ávery; MERCHAN, Hugo; FLOROS, Michael Christopher; KUGA, Milton Carlos; de OLIVEIRA, Osmir Batista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments. PMID:26814462

  10. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Andréa Abi Rached; Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC - Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC - Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 - At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 - immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  11. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules.

  12. Warm waters, bleached corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-10-12

    Two researchers, Tom Goreau of the Discovery Laboratory in Jamaica and Raymond Hayes of Howard University, claim that they have evidence that nearly clinches the temperature connection to the bleached corals in the Caribbean and that the coral bleaching is an indication of Greenhouse warming. The incidents of scattered bleaching of corals, which have been reported for decades, are increasing in both intensity and frequency. The researchers based their theory on increased temperature of the seas measured by satellites. However, some other scientists feel that the satellites measure the temperature of only the top few millimeters of the water and that since corals lie on reefs perhaps 60 to 100 feet below the ocean surface, the elevated temperatures are not significant.

  13. Spectrophotometric evaluation of color changes of bleach-shade resin-based composites after staining and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Farah, Rafat Ibrahim; Elwi, Hytham

    2014-09-01

    Spectrophotometric evaluation of color changes of Bleach-shade resin-based composites after staining and bleaching. The aim of this study was to evaluate the color stability of two commercially available bleach-shade resin composites (RC) after exposure to 3 storage solutions and the effect of 3 bleaching agents on the color stability and stain removal from stained RC. Two bleach-shade RC were evaluated in this study, including a nanoflled RC, Filtek(TM) Z350 XT (FZ), and a nanohybrid RC, Tetric(®) N-Ceram (TC), in the extra-white body (shade) (XWB) and L shades, respectively. Twenty-seven disk-shaped specimens, each measuring 12 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness, were prepared for each RC, with a total of 54 specimens. Specimens were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 9 specimens each and immersed in 3 storage solutions (distilled water, tea and coffee) for 7 days period. The 9 specimens in each staining group were further divided into 3 subgroups. Specimens in each subgroup (n = 3) were bleached using one of the bleaching agents (10 and 16% Zoom NiteWhite amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), and Zoom 2 chairside with light activation) for 5 days period. The specimen colors were measured with spectrophotometer. The measurements were performed on each sample three times at baseline, after staining, and after bleaching. Color was expressed using the commission international de I'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color space. The color differences (ΔE) between the three measurements were calculated and the results were statistically analyzed using Two-way and Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's posthoc tests. Level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Tetric(®) N-ceram materials demonstrated significantly less color change than the FZ and the color change, which was greater after storage in coffee compared to tea, was statistically significant. The bleaching agents significantly influence the color changes of composite specimens. All groups showed (

  14. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  15. Effect of In-Office Bleaching on Color and Surface Roughness of Composite Restoratives

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Randa; Ahmed, Doa; Yousry, Mai; El-Badrawy, Wafa; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine color changes and surface roughness of composites when they were subjected to in-office bleaching. Methods: 12 discs 15 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared from two shades (A2 & A4) of two composites, Durafil VS (DF) and TPH3 (TPH). Specimens were polished and stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C before being subjected to bleaching, staining, and re-bleaching. Each of the groups of specimens (DF-A2, DF-A4, TPH-A2 and TPH-A4) were subdivided into three subgroups (n=4) and bleached with Beyond, LumaWhite-Plus, and Opalescence-Boost. Specimens were then stained by immersing them in a coffee solution for 48 hours at 37°C, and then they were re-bleached. Colorimetric measurements were performed at baseline, after bleaching, after staining, and after re-bleaching. Surface roughness was determined with environmental SEM before and after bleaching. Data were statistically-analyzed. Results: None of the bleaching systems notably changed the color of composites (delta-E<2). Coffee staining affected DF specimens more than TPH. Stained specimens showed variable responses to whitening with no significant color change observed with TPH (delta-E<2) and significant changes observed with DF. Surface roughness significantly changed with bleaching, but the degree varied according to composite shade and bleaching agent. Conclusions: Three in-office bleaching agents had no significant color changes on two composites. DF showed more color change than TPH when immersed in coffee. Stained composites showed different degrees of whitening, with DF showing more response. Bleaching may adversely affect the surface texture of composites. Dentists should take into consideration that composite restorations may not respond to bleaching in the same way that natural teeth do. PMID:20396441

  16. Fracture strength of incisor crowns after intracoronal bleaching with sodium percarbonate.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Milton Carlos; dos Santos Nunes Reis, José Mauricio; Fabrício, Semíramis; Bonetti-Filho, Idomeo; de Campos, Edson Alves; Faria, Gisele

    2012-06-01

    To compare the fracture resistance of bovine teeth after intracoronal bleaching with sodium percarbonate (SPC) or sodium perborate (SP) mixed with water or 20% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Fifty extracted bovine teeth were divided into four experimental groups (G1-G4) and one control (n = 10) after endodontic treatment. Following root canal obturation, a glass ionomer barrier was placed at the cemento-enamel junction. After that, the pulp chambers were filled with: G1 - SP with water; G2 - SP with 20% HP; G3 - SPC with water; and G4 - SPC with 20% HP. No bleaching agent was used in the control group. Coronal access cavities were sealed with glass ionomer and specimens were immersed in artificial saliva. The bleaching agents were replaced after 7 days, and teeth were kept in artificial saliva for an additional 7 days, after which the pastes were removed and the coronal access cavities were restored with glass ionomer. Crowns were subjected to compressive load at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm min(-1) applied at 135° to the long axis of the root by an EMIC DL2000 testing machine, until coronal fracture. Data were statistically analysed by anova and Tukey test. No differences in fracture resistance were observed between the experimental groups (P > 0.05). However, all experimental groups presented lower fracture resistance than the control group (P < 0.05).  SPC and SP led to equal reduction on fracture resistance of dental crowns, regardless of being mixed with water or 20% HP. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Genotoxicity Induced by Dental Materials: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; DE Moura, Carolina Foot Gomes; Handan, Bianca Andrade; DE Barros Viana, Milena; Yamauchi, Liria Yuri; Castelo, Paula Midori; Aguiar, Odair

    2017-08-01

    Genotoxicity is the capacity of an agent to produce damage in the DNA molecule. Considering the strong evidence for a relationship between genetic damage and carcinogenesis, evaluation of genotoxicity induced by dental materials is necessary for elucidating the true health risks to patients and professionals. The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive review of genotoxicity induced by dental materials. All published data showed some evidence of genotoxicity, especially related to dental bleaching, restorative materials and endodontic compounds. Certainly, such information will be added to that already established for regulatory purposes as a safe way to promote oral healthcare and prevent oral carcinogenesis. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of different enamel surface treatments and waiting times on the staining prevention after bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Allyson; Cornacchia, Tulimar; Magalhães, Cláudia

    2017-01-01

    Background Bleached dental enamel can be more susceptible to staining than the enamel that has never been bleached, especially right after tooth bleaching. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of surface treatments and waiting time prior to contact with dye on bleached enamel staining susceptibility. Material and Methods One hundred teeth were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP, FGM) and randomly assigned to G1 artificial saliva, G2 2% sodium fluoride (Flugel, Nova DFL), G3 casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride paste (CPP-ACPF, MI Paste Plus, GC America), G4 rinse for color maintenance after bleaching (Keep White Rinse, DMC) and G5 polishing with aluminum oxide-impregnated disks (Super Buff Disk, Shofu). Fifty specimens were immersed in red wine for 15 minutes, immediately after treatment, and the others one hour after. Color difference (∆E) was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Vita EasyShade). Surface treatments and waiting time effects were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney tests (p<0.05). Results Surface treatments (p>0.05) and waiting time (p>0.05) were not significant to decrease bleached enamel susceptibility to red wine staining. Conclusions Surface treatments were similar to artificial saliva for bleached enamel susceptibility to red wine staining. Immediate or one-hour-postponed contact with red wine did not affect bleached enamel color. Key words:Tooth bleaching, color, dental enamel, hydrogen peroxide, pigmentation. PMID:28512546

  19. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  20. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  1. Nightguard vital bleaching: how safe is it?

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Heymann, H O

    1991-07-01

    The conservative technique for bleaching vital teeth using a nightguard and a 10% carbamide peroxide solution has captured the esthetic interests of the dental profession. The purpose of this article is to assess the safety of the products used in this bleaching technique based on results from past related research and current research. Ten percent carbamide peroxide solutions used in numerous studies have demonstrated tissue-healing properties as well as a propensity for the reduction of plaque and gingivitis. None of these clinical studies revealed any untoward or detrimental side effects, and all demonstrated beneficial effects. Although some concern exists regarding the potentiating effects of peroxide solutions in the presence of known carcinogens, concerns of toxicity or damage to hard and soft tissues appear unfounded. The majority of current and past research and literature indicates that the current use of a 10% carbamide peroxide solution in the method advocated for bleaching vital teeth is apparently safe when administered properly under the supervision of a dentist.

  2. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M) were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control), each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline), 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16). The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.

  3. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  4. Arundo donax L. reed: new perspectives for pulping and bleaching. 5. Ozone-based TCF bleaching of organosolv pulps.

    PubMed

    Shatalov, A A; Pereira, H

    2008-02-01

    Three selected alkali-based organosolv pulps (alkali-sulfite-anthraquinone-methanol (ASAM), alkali-anthraquinone-methanol (organocell) and ethanol-soda) from agrofibre crop giant reed (Arundo donax L.) were bleached by an ozone-based TCF (totally chlorine- free) bleaching sequence AZE(R)QP (where A is an acidic pulp pre-treatment, Z is an ozone stage, (E(R)) is an alkaline extraction in the presence of reducing agent, Q is a pulp chelating, P is a hydrogen peroxide stage) without oxygen pre-bleaching, and compared with a conventional kraft pulp used as a reference. The different response on bleaching conditions within each bleaching stage was noted for all tested pulps. The pulp bleachability, in terms of brightness improvement or lignin removal per unit of applied chemicals, was found higher for the organocell pulp. The ASAM and ethanol-soda pulps showed the highest bleaching selectivity, expressed by viscosity loss per unit of lignin removed or brightness improved. The overall bleaching results of organosolv pulps were superior to kraft.

  5. General practitioners' use of caries-preventive agents in adult patients versus pediatric patients: findings from the dental practice-based research network.

    PubMed

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Rindal, D Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Williams, O Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the authors tested the frequency of dentists' recommendations for and use of caries-preventive agents for children as compared with adults. The authors surveyed 467 general dentists in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. They asked dentists to identify the percentage of their patients for whom they had administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse and xylitol gum. Dentists were less likely to provide adult patients than pediatric patients with in-office caries-preventive agents. However, the rate at which they recommended at-home preventive regimens for the two groups of patients was similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use and recommend the use of caries-preventive agents at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, dentists in practices with a greater number of patients who had dental insurance were significantly more likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to pediatric patients. General dentists use in-office caries-preventive agents more commonly with their pediatric patients than with their adult patients. General dentists should consider providing additional in-office caries-preventive agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk of experiencing dental caries.

  6. Chemical analysis of bleach and hydroxide-based solutions after decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, F B; Gravett, M R; Self, A J; Wang, M; Chua, Hoe-Chee; Hoe-Chee, C; Lee, H S Nancy; Sim, N Lee Hoi; Jones, J T A; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    Detailed chemical analysis of solutions used to decontaminate chemical warfare agents can be used to support verification and forensic attribution. Decontamination solutions are amongst the most difficult matrices for chemical analysis because of their corrosive and potentially emulsion-based nature. Consequently, there are relatively few publications that report their detailed chemical analysis. This paper describes the application of modern analytical techniques to the analysis of decontamination solutions following decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). We confirm the formation of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine following decontamination of VX with hypochlorite-based solution, whereas they were not detected in extracts of hydroxide-based decontamination solutions by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We report the electron ionisation and chemical ionisation mass spectroscopic details, retention indices, and NMR spectra of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine, as well as analytical methods suitable for their analysis and identification in solvent extracts and decontamination residues.

  7. Microhardness and color monitoring of nanofilled resin composite after bleaching and staining

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Isabel Cristina G. Bandeira; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Rodrigues, José Augusto; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of staining solutions on microhardness and shade changes of a nanofilled resin composite, which had been previously in contact with bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 disk-shaped specimens (10 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated with a nanofilled resin (Filtek Supreme) and photocured with a Light Emission Diode (LED) unit and then allocated into three groups to be bleached with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents or a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) product. Following bleaching, specimens within each group were subdivided into three groups to be immersed in coffee, red wine or distilled water. Microhardness and color were monitored at baseline, after bleaching and after staining. Results: Analysis of variance for split-plot design showed lower microhardness values when the composite had been in contact with HP (P < 0.0001). The specimens immersed in red wine and coffee provided lower microhardness values than those immersed in distilled water, regardless of the bleaching agent to which the composites were previously exposed. Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests demonstrated that the composite was lighter after bleaching with a 35% HP agent (P < 0.0500). Conclusion: The composite was darker as a result of being immersed either in red wine or coffee, regardless of the bleaching agent. PMID:24966764

  8. In vitro investigation of coupling-agent-free dental restorative composite based on nano-porous alumina fillers.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Sanjay B; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2014-03-01

    The study aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a novel type of coupling-agent-free resin composite based on nano-porous fillers. The fillers were obtained by ball-milling anodic alumina membranes. Composites were prepared with standard resin at maximum loading of 50% by weight. The resin matrix penetration into the pores was verified visually by scanning electron microscopy and mechanically by atomic force microscopy in force modulation mode. The dynamic flexural modulus at 1Hz was measured by dynamic mechanical analysis. Silver nanoparticles were also synthesized in the pores and their release was investigated with inductive coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. A storage modulus of 5GPa was measured, similar to the ∼6GPa ones of two coupling-agent-based dental restorative composites used for comparison, which is a promising starting point, additionally showing better one-year equivalent ageing as compared to both commercial materials. Loading the pores with silver nanoparticles was demonstrated as well as their subsequent release in a model system. The alumina micro-particles with interconnected nano-pores allow mechanical interlocking between fillers and matrix without the need for chemical bonding. This material is also promising for being made bio-active, after pore filling with different agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Manzello, Derek P; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C; Nemeth, Richard S

    2007-07-17

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community.

  10. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals

    PubMed Central

    Manzello, Derek P.; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B.; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C.; Nemeth, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community. PMID:17606914

  11. On the local applications of antibiotics and antibiotic-based agents in endodontics and dental traumatology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Z; Abbott, P V

    2009-07-01

    Antibiotics are a valuable adjunctive to the armamentarium available to health professionals for the management of bacterial infections. During endodontic treatment and when managing trauma to the teeth, antibiotics may be applied systemically (orally and/or parenterally) or locally (i.e. intra-dentally via irrigants and medicaments). Due to the potential risk of adverse effects following systemic application, and the ineffectiveness of systemic antibiotics in necrotic pulpless teeth and the periradicular tissues, the local application of antibiotics may be a more effective mode for delivery in endodontics. The aim of this article was to review the history, rationale and applications of antibiotic-containing irrigants and medicaments in endodontics and dental traumatology. The search was performed from 1981 to 2008 and was limited to English-language papers. The keywords searched on Medline were 'Antibiotics AND endodontics', 'Antibiotics AND root canal irrigation', 'Antibiotics AND intra-canal medicament', 'Antibiotics AND Dental trauma' and 'Antibiotics AND root resorption'. The reference section of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. It seems that local routes of antibiotic administration are a more effective mode than systemic applications. Various antibiotics have been tested in numerous studies and each has some advantages. Tetracyclines are a group of bacteriostatic antibiotics with antibacterial substantivity for up to 12 weeks. They are typically used in conjunction with corticosteroids and these combinations have anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-resorptive properties, all of which help to reduce the periapical inflammatory reaction including clastic-cell mediated resorption. Tetracyclines have also been used as part of irrigating solutions but the substantivity is only for 4 weeks. Clindamycin and a combination of three antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and minocycline) have also been

  12. Use of caries preventive agents on adult patients compared to pediatric patients by general practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Williams, O. Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that caries prevention reduces caries in adults. This study tested the frequency of recommended caries prevention agents for children compared to adult patients. Methods This study surveyed 467 Dental Practice-Based Research Network general dentists who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. Dentists were asked the percentage of their patients who are administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse, and xylitol gum. Results Adults were less likely to receive in-office caries preventive agents compared to pediatric patients. However, the rate of recommendation for at-home preventive regimens was very similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use caries prevention at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, practices with a greater number of patients with dental insurance were significantly less likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to their pediatric patients. Conclusion In-office caries prevention agents are more commonly used by general dentists for their pediatric patients compared to their adult patients. Practice Implications Some general dentists should consider providing additional in-office prevention agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk for dental caries. PMID:20516100

  13. At-home vs In-office Bleaching: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de Geus, J L; Wambier, L M; Kossatz, S; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity during in-office and at-home bleaching in adult patients. The efficacy of dental bleaching was also evaluated. A comprehensive search was performed in the MEDLINE via PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database, Brazilian Library in Dentistry, Cochrane Library, and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe without restrictions. The annual conference of the International Association for Dental Research abstracts (1990-2014) and unpublished and ongoing trials registry were also searched. Dissertations and theses were searched using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periódicos Capes Theses databases. Only randomized clinical trials that compared the prevalence or intensity of tooth sensitivity during in-office and at-home bleaching in adult patients were included and studies that evaluated the efficacy of these dental bleaching techniques, in terms of shade guide units (ΔSGU) and in terms of color difference measured with a spectrophotometer (ΔE*). After the removal of duplicates, 1139 articles were identified. After title and abstract screening, 29 studies remained. Fifteen studies were further excluded, whereas 12 studies remained for qualitative analyses and 8 for the meta-analysis of the primary and secondary outcomes. No significant difference in the risk/intensity of tooth sensitivity or in bleaching efficacy was observed in the present study. In an overall comparison of at-home and in-office bleaching, no differences were detected, either regarding risk/intensity of tooth sensitivity or the effectiveness of the bleaching treatment. This comparison, however, does not take into consideration variations in the protocols (daily usage time, number of bleaching sessions, and product concentration) of the bleaching techniques in the studies included.

  14. Ozone bleaching of recycled paper

    SciTech Connect

    Muguet, M.; Kogan, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Chlorinated bleaching chemicals, notably chlorine and hypochlorite, are still being used to bleach deinked, woodfree pulps. Increasing environmental concern about the use of these chemicals--coupled with the industry's efforts to increase the use of recycled fibers--highlight the need to develop better techniques for producing high-quality deinked pulp. Results presented in this report suggest that deinked fibers can be treated with ozone followed by a peroxide bleaching stage to produce a high-quality pulp.

  15. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues.

  16. Bleaching and desensitizer application effects on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Türkkahraman, Hakan; Adanir, Necdet; Güngör, A Yalcin

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of bleaching and desensitizer application on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets. Forty-eight extracted human premolar teeth were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 12 each. The first group of teeth was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide office bleaching agent. The second group was bleached the same as the first group and UltraEZ desensitizer was applied. No bleaching procedures were applied on the third and fourth groups. UltraEZ desensitizer alone was applied to teeth in the third group. The fourth group served as control. Orthodontic brackets were bonded with a LC (light cure) composite resin and cured with a halogen light. After bonding, the shear bond strengths of the brackets were tested with a Universal testing machine. The results showed that bleaching, bleaching plus desensitizer, and desensitizer procedures significantly reduced the bonding strengths of the orthodontic brackets (P < .05, P < .001, and P < .01, respectively). No statistically significant difference was found between bleaching, bleaching plus desensitizer, and desensitizer groups (P > .05). Because bleaching and desensitizer application significantly affected shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets on human enamel, they should be delayed until the completion of orthodontic treatment.

  17. Effect of Power Bleaching on the Fluorosis Stained Anterior Teeth Case Series

    PubMed Central

    M, Annapoorna B; Tejaswi, Sunil; Shetty, Suneeth; K, Sowmya H

    2014-01-01

    Bleaching is a conservative method for restoring the colour of intrinsic discoloration of teeth. The combination of McInnes solution and power bleaching is effective procedure for bleaching of fluorosis stained teeth. Definitely bleaching with McInnes bleaching agent gives instant results, not dependent on patient’s compliance as other office based procedures, no dehydration of the tooth occurs with no damage to the pulp. Bleaching with this solution is esthetically pleasing and minimally invasive option for young patients rather than a complete coronal covering. The dentist is in complete control of the process throughout the treatment. It is a fast process the results are evident even after a single visit. PMID:25302292

  18. In Situ and In Vitro Effects of Two Bleaching Treatments on Human Enamel Hardness.

    PubMed

    Henn-Donassollo, Sandrina; Fabris, Cristiane; Gagiolla, Morgana; Kerber, Ícaro; Caetano, Vinícius; Carboni, Vitor; Salas, Mabel Miluska Suca; Donassollo, Tiago Aurélio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in situ the effects of two bleaching treatments on human enamel surface microhardness. Sixty enamel slabs from recently extracted thirty molars were used. The specimens were polished with sandpapers under water-cooling. The enamel samples were randomly divided in four groups, treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or Whitening Strips (WS) containing 10% hydrogen peroxide and using two conditions: in vitro or in situ model. For in situ condition, six volunteers wore an intra-oral appliance containing enamel slabs, while for in vitro condition the specimens were kept in deionized water after the bleaching protocols. The bleaching treatments were applied one-hour daily for 14 days. Similar amounts of bleaching agents were used in both conditions. Before and after bleaching treatments, microhardness was measured. Statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test) showed that in the in situ condition there was no statistically significant microhardness reduction in the bleached enamel (p>0.05). Significant decrease in hardness was observed for enamel slabs bleached with both treatments in the in vitro condition (p<0.05). Regarding the bleaching agents, in situ results showed no difference between HP and WS, while in vitro WS produced the lowest hardness value. It could be concluded that there was no deleterious effect on enamel produced by any of the bleaching protocols used in the in situ model. The reduction of hardness was only observed in vitro.

  19. Color alteration in teeth subjected to different bleaching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briso, A. L. F.; Fonseca, M. S. M.; de Almeida, L. C. A. G.; Mauro, S. J.; Dos Santos, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the color alteration of teeth subjected to the action of different bleaching agents and the influence of light sources commonly used in association with these products, In GI, the specimens remained immersed in artificial saliva. The specimens in GII were bleached with a 10% carbamide peroxide gel 4 hours/day during 3 weeks; the teeth in the other three groups were subjected to three sessions of three 10-min applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel at 7-day intervals. In GIII, no light was used, while in GIV and GV the gel was associated with a quartz-tungsten-halogen light and a LED/laser source, respectively. The teeth color was evaluated before and 7 days after the bleaching sessions by reflectance spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Fisher's test (α = 0.05), and showed that a significant color change was obtained in all treated groups. After the first week of treatment and at the end of it, the bleaching protocols showed similar results. The results of the present study indicate that association of a light source is not necessary to obtain the bleaching effect and that optimal bleaching can be achieved with all techniques tested.

  20. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching. PMID:27508161

  1. An In Vitro Evaluation of Human Enamel Surfaces Subjected to Erosive Challenge After Bleaching.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Carvalho Vasconcelos, Maria; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa; de França, Adílis Kalina Alexandria; de Medeiros, Urubatan Vieira; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Queiroz, Celso Silva

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether tooth enamel bleached with hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) is more susceptible to erosion when compared with unbleached tooth enamel; and whether the presence of calcium (Ca) in the bleaching gel influenced this process. Enamel blocks were prepared from human molars, and submitted to surface microhardness analysis (baseline). Blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four treatment groups (n = 20): G1 and G2-bleached with 7.5% H2 O2 , with and without Ca, respectively; G3 and G4-bleached with 35% H2 O2 , with and without Ca, respectively. After bleaching, these groups were submitted to an erosive challenge with 1% citric acid. G5 and G6 (n = 20, each) were the negative (without bleaching) and positive controls (without bleaching, but with erosion), respectively. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL), the 3D non-contact profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed. G2 showed the highest %SHL after bleaching. G1 presented the lowest %SHL in comparison with G2, G3, G4, and G6 after erosion (p < 0.05), which was confirmed only by the SEM analysis. It is suggested that low concentration of H2 O2 with calcium can be recommended for at-home bleaching agents, which may avoid the mineral loss of bleached enamel after an erosive challenge. Low concentration of H2 02 with calcium can be recommended for at-home bleaching agents, which may avoid the mineral loss of bleached enamel after an erosive challenge. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:128-136, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Non-Lethal Control of the Cariogenic Potential of an Agent-Based Model for Dental Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Head, David A.; Marsh, Phil D.; Devine, Deirdre A.

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries or tooth decay is a prevalent global disease whose causative agent is the oral biofilm known as plaque. According to the ecological plaque hypothesis, this biofilm becomes pathogenic when external challenges drive it towards a state with a high proportion of acid-producing bacteria. Determining which factors control biofilm composition is therefore desirable when developing novel clinical treatments to combat caries, but is also challenging due to the system complexity and the existence of multiple bacterial species performing similar functions. Here we employ agent-based mathematical modelling to simulate a biofilm consisting of two competing, distinct types of bacterial populations, each parameterised by their nutrient uptake and aciduricity, periodically subjected to an acid challenge resulting from the metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. It was found that one population was progressively eliminated from the system to give either a benign or a pathogenic biofilm, with a tipping point between these two fates depending on a multiplicity of factors relating to microbial physiology and biofilm geometry. Parameter sensitivity was quantified by individually varying the model parameters against putative experimental measures, suggesting non-lethal interventions that can favourably modulate biofilm composition. We discuss how the same parameter sensitivity data can be used to guide the design of validation experiments, and argue for the benefits of in silico modelling in providing an additional predictive capability upstream from in vitro experiments. PMID:25144538

  3. A castor oil-containing dental luting agent: effects of cyclic loading and storage time on flexural strength.

    PubMed

    Derceli, Juliana Dos Reis; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Favorable results in the use of castor oil polyurethane (COP) as pulp capping, membrane material, sealer, mouthwash and in bone repair, associated with the fact that Ricinus communis is not derived from petroleum and it is abundant in Brazil, encourage researches in the development of luting agents. Objectives This study compared the flexural strength (FS) of a castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate (COP10) with RelyX ARC (RX) after mechanical cycling (MC) and distilled water storage. Material and Methods Sixty-four specimens (25x2x2 mm) were fabricated and divided into two groups, COP10 and RX (control). Each group was divided into 4 subgroups (n=8) according to the storage time, 24 hours (24 h) or 60 days (60 d), and the performance (MC+FS) or not (only FS) of the mechanical cycling test. The FS (10 kN; 0.5 mm/min) and MC tests (10,000 cycles, 5 Hz, 0.5 mm/min) were carried out using an MTS-810 machine. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Results The obtained FS (MPa) values were: COP10 24h- 19.04±2.41; COP10 60d- 17.92±3.54; RX 24h- 75.19±3.43; RX 60d- 88.77±6.89. All the RX specimens submitted to MC fractured, while the values for COP10 after MC were as follows: COP10 24h- 17.90±1.87 and COP10 60d- 18.60±1.60. Conclusions A castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate is resistant to mechanical cycling without decreases in flexural strength. However, mean COP10 showed only about 25% of the RelyX ARC mean flexural strength.

  4. Efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique with carbamide peroxides modified by CPP-ACP and its effect on the microhardness of bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Borges, B C D; Borges, J S; de Melo, C D; Pinheiro, I V A; Santos, A J S Dos; Braz, R; Montes, M A J R

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate in vitro the efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique using 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide modified by casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and its influence on the microhardness of bleached enamel. A total of 40 bovine incisors were divided into four groups (n=10) according to the bleaching agent used: 10% carbamide peroxide only; a blend of 10% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste; 16% carbamide peroxide only; and a blend of 16% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste. During the 14-day bleaching regimen, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. The Vickers microhardness and color of the teeth were assessed at baseline (T0) and immediately after the bleaching regimen (T14) using a microhardness tester and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The degree of color change was determined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclariage (CIE) L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) and Vita shade guide parameters. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p<0.05). The teeth that were bleached with a blend of peroxide (10% or 16%) and the CPP-ACP paste presented increased microhardness values at T14 compared with T0, whereas the samples that were bleached with peroxide only did not show any differences in their microhardness values. All of the bleaching agents were effective at whitening the teeth and did not show a statistically significant difference using the CIEL*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) or the Vita shade guide parameters. The use of a CPP-ACP paste with carbamide peroxide bleaching agents increased the bleached enamel's microhardness and did not have an influence on whitening efficacy.

  5. Effect of calcium hydroxide on ph changes of the external medium after intracoronal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Sa, Patricia Marra de; Jeronymo, Raffaela Di Iorio; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Silva, Eduardo Galera da; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Gomes, Ana Paula Martins

    2011-05-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of calcium hydroxide on pH changes of the external medium after intracoronal bleaching. A total of 50 extracted human premolars were prepared and filled with gutta-percha and endodontic sealer. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the bleaching agents employed: (a) Sterile cotton pellet with distilled water (control group); (b) sodium perborate and distilled water; (c) sodium perborate and 10% carbamide peroxide; (d) sodium perborate and 35% hydrogen peroxide; (e) 35% hydrogen peroxide. The teeth were stored in vials containing distilled water and the pH values of the medium surrounding the teeth were analyzed. After 7-day storage, the bleaching agent was removed and replaced by calcium hydroxide, and the distilled water was changed, in which the teeth were kept stored for further 14 days. Measurement of pH of the external medium (distilled water) was performed 7 days after insertion of the bleaching agents, immediately, 7 and 14 days after insertion of the calcium hydroxide. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by the two-way ANOVA and Tukey,s test. There were pH changes of the external medium at 7- day period after bleaching procedures. These results confirmed the diffusion of bleaching agents to the external medium. Calcium hydroxide increased the external medium pH and was effective for pH alkalinization after intracoronal bleaching. Intracoronal bleaching of endodontically treated teeth may cause cervical root resorption. A possible explanation for this process is the passage of bleaching agents to the periodontal tissues yielding an inflammatory process. In an attempt to keep the neutrality of the periodontal pH, the calcium hydroxide has been recommended.Results of this study showed that this material should be always used after intracoronal bleaching.

  6. Preliminary study of a novel in-office bleaching therapy modified with a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Pinheiro, Mônica Heloisa Morais; Feitosa, Diala Aretha De Sousa; Correia, Tereza Cristina; Braz, Rodivan; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassú Resende; Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira De Assunção

    2012-11-01

    Although in-office bleaching has been proven successful for bleaching teeth, controversy exists from morphological alterations in enamel morphology due to mineral loss and tooth sensitivity. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel in-office tooth bleaching technique modified with a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste (MI paste-MI) and its effect on the enamel morphology and tooth sensitivity. Three patients received a 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP-HP) dental bleaching system. HP was prepared and applied on the teeth on one of the hemiarches, whilst teeth on the other hemiarch were bleached with a mixture of HP and MI. Tooth color, epoxy resin replicas, and sensitivity levels were evaluated in the upper incisors. The results were analyzed descriptively. Right and left incisors showed similar color change after bleaching. Incisors bleached with the mixture of HP and MI presented unaltered enamel surfaces and lower sensitivity levels. The currently tested tooth bleaching technique did not reduce the gel effectiveness while decreasing hypersensitivity levels and protecting the enamel against surface alterations caused by the high-concentration bleaching peroxide tested. The concomitant use of MI Paste and high-concentration hydrogen peroxide might be a successful method for decreasing tooth sensitivity and limiting changes in the enamel morphology during in-office bleaching.

  7. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were not

  8. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were

  9. Frequently asked questions about bleaching.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Van B

    2003-04-01

    Nightguard vital bleaching, or at-home bleaching using a 10% carbamide peroxide material in a custom-fitted tray, has become the standard for tooth whitening. This article answers many of the questions associated with this process, and compares the procedure with other whitening options.

  10. Permeability of enamel following light-activated power bleaching.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Schiavoni, Renato J; Serra, Monica C; Froner, Izabel C

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain whether in-office photocured bleaching techniques would increase permeability to enamel. A 7.1 mm2 circular area located in the middle third of the coronal portion of 90 human canines was isolated by applying an acid-resistant varnish to the remaining surfaces of the tooth. According to a randomized complete block design (n = 15), specimens were treated using a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product activated by an integrated LED/diode laser (LED/laser) source or a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light. Bleaching was accomplished by applying the 35% hydrogen peroxide agent to the enamel surface in three 10-minute sessions, conducted at one-week intervals over a period of three weeks. For the photocured bleached groups, a bleaching agent was applied to the specimen and irradiated with the LED/laser device or the QTH light for 30 seconds. Negative control groups were exposed to artificial saliva or irradiated by the LED/laser device or the QTH light. Specimens were subjected to a histochemical coloring method that employed copper sulfate and dithio-oxamide solutions. Three 300-microm thick sections taken from the exposed area were imaged in an optical microscope. Permeability was measured in the digitized images as the percentage of copper ions penetration over the total enamel thickness. Friedman's test (alpha = 0.05) showed significant difference among groups. Least significant difference test revealed that in comparison with the group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide only, there was no significant increase in enamel permeability when bleaching was activated by either the LED/laser or QTH light devices but all bleached groups showed higher permeability than the unbleached/nonirradiated group.

  11. Assessment of genotoxicity of 14 chemical agents used in dental practice: ability to induce chromosome aberrations in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Makoto; Watanabe, Eiko; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2006-02-28

    To assess the genotoxicity of 14 chemical agents used as locally applied agents in dental practice, the ability of these agents to elicit chromosome aberrations was examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Chromosome aberrations in SHE cells were induced by treatment with three of eight chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments, i.e. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), formocresol (a mixture of formalin and tricresol), and sodium arsenite. The other five chemical agents, i.e. chloramphenicol, p-chlorophenol, p-phenolsulfonic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and tetracycline hydrochloride exhibited a negative response for chromosome aberrations. Assessment of three dyes used for disclosing dental plaque showed chromosome aberrations induced by basic fuchsin but not by acid fuchsin and erythrosine B. Three local anesthetics, lidocaine hydrochloride, prilocaine hydrochloride, and procaine hydrochloride, were negative for chromosome aberrations. Among the ten chemical agents that exhibited a negative response in the assay, p-chlorophenol, sodium hypochlorite, and erythrosine B induced chromosome aberrations in SHE cells when treated in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. The percentages of cells with polyploidy or endoreduplication were enhanced by formocresol, sodium arsenite, p-chlorophenol, p-phenolsulfonic acid, sodium hypochlorite, erythrosine B, prilocaine hydrochloride, and procaine hydrochloride in the absence or presence of exogenous metabolic activation. Our results indicate that the chemical agents that had a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells.

  12. Influence of bleaching treatment on flexural resistance of hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily M; Pagani, Clóvis

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the flexural resistance of three types of restorative materials: compomer (Freedom), resin-modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer) and composite resin (Esthet-X), observing whether the application of bleaching agent can cause alterations of their flexural properties. Sixty samples were made using a 10 x 1 x 1 mm brass mold, and divided into three groups: G1- Freedom (SDI); G2- Vitremer (3M ESPE); G3- Esthet-X (Dentsply). On half of the samples of each group (10 samples) the bleaching treatment was applied and the other half used as control, was stored in distilled water at a temperature of 37 degrees C. Whiteness HP Maxx bleaching system was applied on the sample surface following the manufacturer's recommendations, simulating the bleaching treatment at the clinic. After this period, a flexural strength (three-point bending) test was conducted using (EMIC DL 1000) machine until the samples fractured. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests. Of the restorative materials studied, G3-(87.24 +/- 31.40 MPa) presented the highest flexural strength, followed by G1-(61.67 +/- 21.32 MPa) and G2-(61.67 +/- 21.32 MPa). There was a statistical difference in flexural strength after the bleaching treatment. It was concluded that the use of a beaching agent can promote significant alteration of the flexural strength of these restorative materials.

  13. Solcoseryl, a tissue respiration stimulating agent, significantly enhances the effect of capacitively coupled electric field on the promotion of bone formation around dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Morio; Wang, Pao-Li; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Takashima, Shigenori; Kagami, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Yukito; Kaku, Tohru; Sakaguchi, Kunihiko

    2003-06-01

    In the present study we examined the combined effect of application of a capacitively coupled electric field (CCEF) and the tissue respiration stimulating agent, Solcoseryl, on the promotion of bone formation around dental implants histologically and mechanically. After a dental implant was inserted into each femur of Japanese white rabbits, Solcoseryl (2 ml/kg) was administered intravenously in the ear vein and a CCEF was applied for 4 h per day for 14 days. The degree of bone formation on microscopic observation, bone contact ratio, bone surface area ratio, and the level of removal torque of the implant in the Solcoseryl- and CCEF-treated group were significantly higher than the respective value in the control group, which had not been treated with Solcoseryl nor CCEF. Thus, the combination of CCEF stimulation and Solcoseryl effectively promoted the formation of new bone. It is suggested that the clinical use of a combination of CCEF stimulation and Solcoseryl for dental implants promotes osseointegration.

  14. Surface characteristic changes of dental ceramics after cyclic immersion in acidic agents and titratable acidity.

    PubMed

    Junpoom, Peerapong; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Hengtrakool, Chanothai

    2010-12-01

    The potential erosive effect of acidic food, sour fruits and drinks on all-ceramic restorations used in dentistry has not been clearly documented. Surface characteristic changes have been evaluated and compared for disc-shaped specimens (diameter 12.0 mm and thickness 2.0 mm) of fluorapatite-leucite and fluorapatite ceramics using various storage agents (deionized water, citrate buffer solution, pineapple juice, green mango juice, cola soft drink and 4% acetic acid). Immersion in pineapple juice, green mango juice, cola soft drink and 4% acetic acid for 16 hours produce significant increases in surface roughness for both types of ceramics investigated.

  15. Microtensile bond strength of a nanofilled composite resin to human dentin after nonvital tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Arcari, Gilberto Müller; Araújo, Elito; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the microtensile bond strength of a nanofilled composite resin to human dentin after nonvital bleaching at different post-bleaching time intervals, and to analyze the fracture mode under SEM. Thirty-six sound human maxillary premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were prepared in a standardized manner, and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 9): non bleached (control) (NB); bleached with sodium perborate and 35% hydrogen peroxide (SP-HP); bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP); and bleached with 37% carbamide peroxide (CP). Each group was subdivided into 3 subgroups (n = 3): restored immediately (RO); restored after 7 days (R7); and restored after 14 days (R14). The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 h, sectioned 4 mm below cementoenamel junction, and the crown was serially sectioned to obtain sticks (0.9 mm2 cross section) for microtensile bond strength testing. The microTBS samples were attached to a universal testing machine (Instron, model 4444), using a Geraldeli's device. The test was performed until the fracture of the specimens, and all specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope (Philips XL-30). Two-way ANOVA (p = 0.05) revealed that there were no statistically significant differences of bond strength values for the bleaching agents used, or at different post-bleaching time intervals. It was concluded that the definitive restoration can be accomplished immediately after nonvital bleaching treatment.

  16. Rheological characteristics of tooth bleaching materials.

    PubMed

    Wille, T; Combe, E C; Pesun, I J; Giles, D W

    2000-12-01

    Tooth bleaching materials need to flow easily on insertion but should have high viscosity at low stresses to stay in place on the teeth. Some degree of elasticity may also aid retention on the teeth thereby maximizing efficacy. The present work was undertaken to study the comparative rheology of three tooth bleaching systems: two gels (Opalescence, Ultradent; Perfecta Trio, American Dental Hygienics) and a paste (Colgate Platinum, Colgate). A dynamic stress rheometer (Rheometrics Scientific) with cone and plate geometry was used, with the materials maintained at 37.0+/-0.1 degrees C with a vapour hood to minimize volatilization. Stress creep and recovery experiments were carried out. Steady shear viscosity for all three systems was high (>10(6) Pa s(-1)) for stresses <20 Pa. Between 100 and 200 Pa stress, all three materials showed a large drop in viscosity and flowed readily. The recovery portion of the data showed a marked difference where the elasticity of the gels was nearly two orders of magnitude higher than that of the paste. It was concluded that all materials would flow readily on insertion into the mouth and all have desirable high viscosity at low stress, but the paste material had the lowest elasticity. The effect of elasticity on performance needs to be determined clinically.

  17. Non-operative anti-caries agents and dental caries increment among adults at high caries risk: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, Benjamin W; Cheng, Jing; Featherstone, John D B

    2015-09-24

    Consensus guidelines support non-operative preventives for dental caries management; yet, their use in practice is far from universal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-operative anti-caries agents in caries prevention among high caries risk adults at a university clinic where risk-based caries management is emphasized. This retrospective observational study drew data from the electronic patient records of non-edentulous adult patients deemed to be at high risk for dental caries during baseline oral evaluations that were completed between July 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 at a dental university in the United States. We calculated and compared adjusted mean estimates for the number of new decayed or restored teeth (DFT increment) from baseline to the next completed oral evaluation (N = 2,724 patients with follow-up) across three categories of delivery of non-operative anti-caries agents (e.g., high-concentration fluoride toothpaste, chlorhexidine rinse, xylitol products): never, at a single appointment, or at ≥2 appointments ≥4 weeks apart. Estimates were adjusted for patient and provider characteristics, baseline dental status, losses-to-follow-up, and follow-up time. Approximately half the patients did not receive any form of non-operative anti-caries agent. Most that received anti-caries agents were given more than one type of product in combination. One-time delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with a similar DFT increment as receiving no such therapy (difference in increment: -0.04; 95% CI: -0.28, 0.21). However, repeated, spaced delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with approximately one decayed or restored tooth prevented over 18 months for every three patients treated (difference in increment: -0.35; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.08). These results lend evidence that repeatedly receiving anti-caries agents can reduce tooth decay among high-risk patients engaged in regular dental care.

  18. Effect of bleaching on tooth discolouration from food colourant in vitro.

    PubMed

    Azer, Shereen S; Hague, Anne L; Johnston, William M

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching on tooth discolouration from neutral food colourant media (NFCM). Freshly extracted human molar teeth (n = 32) were divided into four groups (n = 8): non-bleached treatment-NBT, non-bleached control-NBC, bleached treatment-BT and bleached control-BC. Bleached teeth specimens were subjected to 20% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent for 10h. Colour measurements (pre-test) were done using a non-contact spectroradiometer. The teeth specimens were immersed in a neutral buffer solution. NBT and BT groups had 0.025% red food colour (Red 40) added to the buffer solution. The immersed specimens were incubated for 4h at 37°C. Colour was again measured after immersion/incubation (post-test) and after subsequent polishing using plain-pumice slurry (post-polish). Differences in CIE a* (redness parameter) were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni-corrected t-tests for the pairwise comparisons of interest. Tooth discolouration was measured as total stain (mean difference in a* between post-test minus pre-test), extrinsic stain (mean difference in a* post-polish minus post-test) and intrinsic stain (mean difference in a* post-polish minus pre-test) A statistically significant difference in the mean Δa* was observed (P = 0.009) between staining treatment for bleached and non-bleached teeth. Also, a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) was noted between control and treatment groups of bleached teeth that were subjected to staining. Bleaching resulted in total and extrinsic tooth discolouration by the NFCM. It might be beneficial to avoid highly pigmented foods immediately following bleaching in order to optimize the effects of tooth whitening. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  20. Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, P. W.

    1993-03-01

    Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt

  1. Effects of antibacterial agents on dental pulps of monkeys mechanically exposed and contaminated.

    PubMed

    Cannon, M; Cernigliaro, J; Vieira, A; Percinoto, C; Jurado, R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of antibacterial agents and mineral trioxide aggregate in the healing of bacterial contaminated primate pulps. The experiment required four adult male primates (Cebus opella) with 48 teeth prepared with buccal penetrations into the pulpal tissues. The preparations were performed under general anesthesia and the exposed pulps were exposed to cotton pellets soaked in a bacterial mixture consisting of microorganisms normally found in human pulpal abscesses obtained from the Endodontic Clinic of UNESP. Following bacterial inoculation (30 minute exposure), the pulpal tissue was immediately treated with either sterile saline, Cipro HC Otic solution (12), diluted Buckley' formecresol solution (12) or Otosporin otic solution (12) for 5 minutes. After removal of the pellet, hemostasis was obtained and a ZOE base applied to the DFC treated pulps and the non-treated controls (12). After hemostasis, the other exposed pulps were covered with mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot). The pulpal bases were all covered with a RMGI (Fuji II LC). The tissue samples were collected at one day, two days, one week and over four weeks (34 days). Following perfusion fixation, the samples were demineralized, sectioned, stained and histologically graded. After histologic analysis, presence of neutrophilic infiltrate and areas of hemorrhage with hyperemia were observed. The depth of the neutrophilic infiltrate depended on the agent or material used. The pulpal tissue treated with Otic suspensions demonstrated significantly less inflammation (Kruskal Wallis non parametric analysis, H = 9.595 with 1 degree of freedom; P = 0.0223) than the formocresol and control groups. The hard tissue bridges formed over the exposure sites were more organized in the MTA treatment groups than in the control and ZOE groups (Kruskal Wallis non parametric analysis, H = 18.291 with 1 degree of freedom; P = 0.0004). Otic suspensions and MTA are effective in

  2. Use of shade guides for color measurement in tooth-bleaching studies.

    PubMed

    Browning, William D

    2003-01-01

    Several different methods are used to measure tooth color in bleaching studies. The ADA Acceptance Program Guidelines for Home Use Tooth Whitening Products specify the use of a value-oriented shade guide and/or electronic color measurement devices. Since people perceive color differently, shade guides are a subjective measure. Differences between raters and by the same rater are well documented in the dental literature. The purposes of this article will be to discuss the advantages and disadvantages using shade guides to measure color change related to tooth whitening, and to evaluate the correlation of data gathered from the use of shade guides to electronic color measurement devices. Using an order published by the manufacturer, both the TRUBYTE Bioform and Vita Classical guides can be arranged by value. A study by O'Brien demonstrated however, that the order is flawed and the change in brightness from tab to tab varies greatly. Despite these disadvantages, a review of data from several clinical trials demonstrates that Vita Classical shade guide data is consistent with data gathered using electronic color measurements. Furthermore, the O'Brien data can be used to make both these guides better measurement systems. The ADA Certification program standards define the degree of overall color change that should be considered clinically important. This issue is as critical as the measurement system used. Reporting color changes that are neither detectable to the human eye nor considered by the public to be important offers the profession little usable information. Given that any standard for color change during bleaching must relate to the abilities of the human eye, it is the conclusion of the author that shade guides should remain a critical element of any bleaching study. Clinicians are frequently exposed to reports of bleaching agents that have been shown to result in a change of 6, 7, 8, etc., tabs. Without understanding the limitations of the shade guide used

  3. The Influence of Post Bleaching Treatments in Stain Absorption and Microhardness

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Darvishzadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effects of post bleaching treatments to prevent restaining and the change of enamel surface microhardness after dental bleaching in vitro. Methods: Sixty intact human incisor teeth were stained in tea solution and randomly assigned into four groups (n=15). Then samples were bleached for two weeks (8 hours daily) by 15% carbamide peroxide. Tooth color was determined both with a spectrophotometer and visually before bleaching (T1) and immediately after bleaching (T2). Next, it was applied in group 1 fluoride (Naf 2%) gel for 2 minutes, and in group 2 a fractional CO2 laser (10 mJ, 200 Hz, 10 s), and in group 3, nanohydroxyapatite gel for 2 minutes. The bleached teeth in group 4 remained untreated (control group). Then teeth placed in tea solution again. Color examinations were repeated after various post bleaching treatments (T3) and restaining with tea (T4) and color change values recorded. The microhardness was measured at the enamel surface of samples. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and Dunnett T3 (α = 0.05). Results: Directly after bleaching (ΔE T3-T2), the treatment with nanohydroxyapatite showed significantly the least color lapse in colorimetric evaluation. In experimental groups, the color change between T3 and T4 stages (ΔE T4-T3) was significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05). Different methods of enamel treatment caused a significant increase in surface microhardness compared to control group (P < 0.05). Significance: Application of fluoride, fractional CO2 laser and nanohydroxyapatite as post bleaching treatments are suggested for prevention of stain absorption and increasing the hardening of bleached enamel. PMID:27099635

  4. Toxicity of two carbamide peroxide products used in nightguard vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, C J; Haywood, V B; Heymann, H O

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two generic classes of 10% carbamide-peroxide (CP) oxygenating agents (currently under clinical assessment for nightguard vital tooth bleaching) for lethality and genetic mutation after oral administration to mice, and for cellular cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblasts in vitro. The single dose LD50 values for a non-carbopol-containing CP (Gly-Oxide) and a carbopol-containing CP (Proxigel) in mice were found to be 143.8 mg/kg and 87.2 mg/kg, respectively. Genotoxicity, as measured by the Mouse Micronucleus test for mutagenicity, was negative for both 10% CP agents in comparison with positive and negative controls. Cytotoxicity as measured in the L929 fibroblast lysis assay resulted in 50% killing of L929 fibroblasts at 0.62 for the non-carbopol-containing CP and 1.88 mmol/L for the carbopol-containing CP. Both 10% CP agents were compared with seven widely-used dental products in the L929 fibroblast lysis assay and found to be no more toxic than these products.

  5. Surface Hardness of Dental Composite Resin Restorations in Response to Preventive Agents.

    PubMed

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2016-12-01

    To assess the impact of using preventive mouthwash agents on the surface hardness of various resins composites. Hundred specimens were prepared from five types of composite resin material in a Teflon mold. Five specimens from each type of restorative materials (Herculite XRV Ultra, Estelite Σ Quick, Z Hermack, Versa Comp Sultan, and Empress Direct IPS) were evaluated posttreatment with immersion in four types of preventive mouthwashes gels and rinses - group 1: Flocare gel (0.4% stannous fluoride), group 2: Pascal gel (topical APF fluoride), group 3: Pro-relief mouthwash (Na fluoride), and group 4: Plax Soin mouthwash (Na fluoride) - at 37°C in a dark glass container at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Surface hardness measurement was made for each tested material. Statistically, we analyzed the mean values with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test, with significance level of p < 0.05. All composite resin materials showed decrease in their surface hardness with the time elapsed (24, 48, and 72 hours) postimmersion in the preventive mouthwashes and gels except the Herculite XRV Ultra and Versa Comp Sultan materials. Flocare gel group showed increase in the surface hardness after 48 hours of immersion than the other periods and in Estelite Σ Quick after 72 hours. There was significant differences in all materials tested with the immersion in the preventive mouthwashes and gels, such as Flocare gel (0.4% stannous fluoride), Pro-relief mouthwash (Na fluoride), and Plax Soin mouthwash (Na fluoride) except Pascal gel (topical APF fluoride) (p > 0.05), at time intervals mentioned earlier (p < 0.05). The effect of preventive mouthwashes and gels on resin composite materials was decreased surface hardness with the time elapse of immersion for all materials except the Flocare gel group, which contains 0.4% stannous fluoride as a preventive ingredient increases the surface hardness after 48 h for Herculite XRV Ultra and Versa Comp Sultan and Estelite Σ Quick after

  6. Dental whitening--revisiting the myths.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of dental bleaching has increased with the introduction of at-home whitening. Currently available whitening methods include those prescribed by a dental professional for use at home, those applied by the professional in the dental office, a combination of the two, or systems available over the counter. This article reviews the effect, efficacy, and safety of bleaching techniques and materials. Most whitening techniques are considered effective and safe when carried out under the supervision of a dental professional. This article also compares the efficacy and safety of some of the most popular bleaching techniques, including at-home whitening with carbamide peroxide, over-the-counter (OTC) systems, and in-office whitening. Some of these whitening techniques are illustrated in this article.

  7. Evaluation of conventional and digital radiography capacities for distinguishing dental materials on radiograms depending on the present radiopacifying agent.

    PubMed

    Antonijević, Djordje; Ilić, Dragan; Medić, Vesna; Dodić, Slobodan; Obradović-Djuriĉić, Kosovka; Rakoĉević, Zoran

    2014-11-01

    The radiopacity of an endodontic material can considerably vary as measured on film and a digital sensor. Digital radiography offers numerous advantages over conventional film-based radiography in dental clinical practice regarding both diagnostic capabilities and postintervention procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of conventional and charge-conpled device (CCD) based digital radiography to detect material on radiograph depending on the radio-pacifying agent present in the mate- rial. Experimental cements were formulated by mixing Portland cement with the following radiopacifying agents: zinc oxide (ZnO), zirconium oxide (ZrO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium sulphate (BaSO4), iodoform (CHI3), bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) and ytterbium trifluoride (YbF3). In addition, 5 endodontic materials comprising Endometh- asone, Diaket, N2, Roth 801 and Acroseal were investigated to serve as control. Per three specimens of each material were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge on film (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) and a CCD-based digital sensor (Trophy Radiologie, Cedex, France). Radiopacity values were calculated by converting the radiographic densities of the specimens expressed as a mean optical densities or mean grey scale values into equivalent thickness of aluminum. Two-way ANOVA detected no significant differences with respect to the imaging system (p > 0.05), but the differences were significant with respect to radiopacifier (p < 0.001) and the interaction of the two factors (p < 0.05). Paired t-test revealed significant differences between the methods used for pure Portland cement, all concentrations of BaSO4 and CHI3, 10% and 20% additions of ZrO2 and Bi2O3 and 10% and 30% additions of YbF3 (p < 0.05). The materials which incorporate CHI3 OR BaSO4 as radiopacifying agents are expected to be significantly more radiopaque on a digital sensor than on film. During clinical practice one should concern to the quality of contrast

  8. Effect of 10% Strontium Chloride and 5% Potassium Nitrate with Fluoride on Bleached Bovine Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Cristiane de Melo; Pedrinha, Victor Feliz; Araújo, Jesuína Lamartine Nogueira; Esteves, Renata Antunes; Silva da Silveira, Ana Daniela; Silva, Cecy Martins

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dental whitening has been increasingly sought out to improve dental aesthetics, but may cause chemical and morphological changes in dental enamel surfaces. Objective: This study evaluated in vitro the effect of 10% strontium chloride and 5% potassium nitrate with fluoride on bovine enamel, through tristimulus colorimetry, Knoop microhardness (KHN), and roughness after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Methods: The specimens were divided into three groups (n=15): GControl received bleaching treatment with 35% HP; GNitrate received bleaching with 35% HP followed by the application of 5% potassium nitrate with 2% sodium fluoride; and GStrontium received bleaching with 35% HP followed by the application of 10% strontium chloride on the enamel. Next, five specimens of each experimental group were subjected to KHN and tristimulus colorimetry tests, and 10 specimens were subjected to surface roughness (SR) tests. The values obtained for the different groups were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test in addition to Student’s T-test for paired data. Results: In the intergroup comparison, KHN final differed statistically (p<0.05). The mean SR final of the experimental groups differed statistically from the GControl group (p<0.05). In addition, the groups did not differ in color variation (p>0.05). Conclusion: 10% strontium chloride and 5% potassium nitrate combined with 2% fluoride downplayed morphological changes to the enamel, without interfering with the effectiveness of the bleaching process. PMID:28979576

  9. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  10. Effect of light activation on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Kossatz, S; Dalanhol, A P; Cunha, T; Loguercio, A; Reis, A

    2011-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED)/laser activation on bleaching effectiveness (BE) and tooth sensitivity (TS) during in-office bleaching. Thirty caries-free patients were divided into two groups: light-activated (LA) and non-activated (NA) groups. A 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Whiteness HP Maxx, FGM Dental Products, Joinville SC, Brazil) was used in three 15-minute applications for both groups. For the LA group, LED/laser energy (Whitening Lase Light Plus, DMC Odontológica, São Carlos SP, Brazil) was used, in accordance with the manufacturer's directions. Two sessions of bleaching were performed at one-week intervals. Color was registered at baseline and after the first and second bleaching sessions using a Vita shade guide. Patients recorded TS on a 0 to 4 scale during bleaching and within the next 24 and 48 hours of each session. BE at recall each week and intensity of TS were evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Tooth sensitivity was compared using the Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance by rank and the Wilcoxon sign-ranked test. Faster bleaching was observed for the LA group than for the NA group after the first session (4.8 and 3.8 shade guide units [SGUs]; p=0.0001). However, both techniques were capable of bleaching the same number of SGUs after the second bleaching session (p=0.52). Most of the LA group (53.3%) had sensitivity even 24 hours after each bleaching session, but only 26.6% from the NA group reported TS. The intensity of TS was similar for both groups immediately after bleaching but significantly higher for the LA group 24 hours after each bleaching session (p=0.001). After two bleaching sessions, the use of LED/laser light activation did not improve bleaching speed. Persistent tooth sensitivity and higher tooth sensitivity after 24 hours of bleaching were observed when light activation was used.

  11. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW) or ascorbic acid (AA) 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time. PMID:26877990

  12. In-Vitro Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide Amorphous Calcium Phosphate on Enamel Susceptibility to Staining by Tea during Bleaching Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemand, Homayoom; Hashemi Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat; Zarenegad, Nafiseh; Tabari, Negin; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bleached enamel is more susceptible to staining, and application of remineralizing agents may decrease enamel susceptibility to staining. This study sought to assess the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on enamel susceptibility to staining during bleaching treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty central and lateral incisors and first premolar teeth were evaluated in four groups of 10. Group one specimens were subjected to in-office bleaching. Group two underwent in-office bleaching followed by surface treatment with CPP-ACP. Group three specimens received home bleaching and group four underwent home bleaching followed by CPP-ACP surface treatment. After each course of daily bleaching, specimens were immersed in tea solution. Home bleaching (15% carbamide peroxide) was performed for 14 days and in-office bleaching (40% hydrogen peroxide) was carried out in two sessions with an eight-day interval. The color of specimens was analyzed at baseline and post-intervention using Easy Shade Shade-Selection Device. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of bleaching type and surface treatment on color change. Then, the means were compared by Tukey’s HSD test (P=0.05). Results: The interaction effect of surface treatment and type of bleaching was not significant on any color parameter (P>0.05). Surface treatment had significant effects on ΔL (P=0.004). Type of bleaching had a significant effect on “b” parameter (P=0.00). The effect of bleaching type on ΔE was significant (P=0.00) but the effect of surface treatment was not (P=0.34). Conclusion: CPP-ACP had no significant effect on preventing enamel staining by tea during bleaching treatment. PMID:27123021

  13. Attitudes of Students of Differenet Schools of University of Zagreb on Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Diklić, Dinka; Galić, Nada; Spajić, Jelena; Prskalo, Katica

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the awareness that students from four different faculties within the University of Zagreb have of oral health and tooth bleaching procedure. Materials and Methods The study included 158 subjects (both male and female) - 38 students from the School of Dental Medicine and 40 students from each of the following faculties: the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The respondents were asked to fill out the survey with multiple choices by marking the answers they considered correct. Results Only 12% of the respondents followed the information on oral health. More than two thirds of all subjects brush their teeth twice a day, but there were no statistically significant differences between the subjects with respect to college or gender. More than half of the participants (55%) were satisfied, and 12% were completely satisfied with their dental appearance. About 80% of the respondents were aware of differences between teeth bleaching and teeth polishing procedures, with greater prevalence among Dental Medicine and Medicine students. 80% of all subjects would go to a dental office if they decided to whiten their teeth while less than a half (46%) of all the subjects believed that a tooth bleaching has some adverse side-effects. Conclusions There is a difference in knowledge on oral hygiene and tooth bleaching between the students from the School of Dental Medicine, the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and those from the Faculty of Civil Engineering. Dental students have the best knowledge on tooth bleaching and oral health, which was in accordance with their educational guidance and level of education. PMID:28275277

  14. Influence of 30% hydrogen peroxide bleaching on compomers in their surface modifications and thermal expansion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Choong-Bo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2002-12-01

    The surface modifications and the coefficient of thermal expansion of compomers after treatment with a 30% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent were investigated. Three compomers (Compoglass F, Elan and F2000) were nonbleached and bleached for 1 and 3 days. The surface modification and the coefficient of thermal expansion of each bleached compomer were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope and a thermomechanical analyzer, respectively. As a result, Compoglass F and Elan showed slight surface degradation, whereas F2000 showed many cracks on its surface and these cracks were not observed in Compoglass F and Elan. Bleached Elan and F2000 has changed to the extent where their the coefficient of thermal expansion increased compared with those of nonbleached specimens. In addition, bleached compomers showed a strong inverse correlation between the coefficient of thermal expansion and the volume percent of filler.

  15. Multi stage peroxide and activated peroxide bleaching of kenaf bast pulp.

    PubMed

    Zeinaly, Farhad; Shakhes, Jalal; Zeinali, Nooshin

    2013-02-15

    Soda-anthraquinone kenaf bast pulp (12.5 kappa number and 32% ISO brightness) has been bleached with multi stage peroxide bleaching process. Bleaching process was carried out in different sequences of peroxide stage without and with activator (tetraacetylethylenediamine, TAED) to about 80% ISO brightness. Full bleached pulp production with high brightness and viscosity and also, low chemical oxygen demand (COD) and no adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in effluent are the aims of this study. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charges, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximize the brightness gain at the lowest viscosity loss. H(2)O(2) was activated as bleaching agent under milder conditions, such as low alkalinity or low temperature, by TAED activator. Therefore, TAED charge caused to an improvement in viscosity, pulp yield and effluent COD load. Pre-treatment with EDTA for 30 min and in acidic condition gave 2-4% gain in ISO brightness.

  16. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  17. Effect of pH values of two bleaching gels on enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Natalia Costa; da Costa Soares, Manuella Uilmann Silva; Nery, Marcela Maria; Sales, Wagno Silva; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Martinez

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH and the effect of remineralizing gels after bleaching in different time intervals. Sixty bovine incisors were divided into 2 groups (n = 30). Group 1 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) acid gel and Group 2 was bleached with a 35% HP neutral gel. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) according to the post-bleaching treatment used: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel, or application of a gel consisting of fluoride, potassium nitrate, and nanostructured calcium phosphate. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and enamel microhardness was evaluated at 24 hours and 15 days postbleaching. Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by means of 2-way ANOVA, with repeated measurements and Bonferroni's post-hoc test. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, no significant differences were found between the bleaching gels. At 15 days postbleaching, Group 2 samples demonstrated a significant reduction in microhardness. No significant differences were found between the remineralizing gels, though all of the postbleaching treatments after the use of 35% neutral gel were able to re-establish baseline microhardness. It was concluded that neutral bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness 15 days after bleaching and that the use of remineralizing gels did not significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel. However, in clinical situations, the acquired enamel pellicle protects tooth surfaces, and postbleaching, decalcified enamel would undergo recalcification. This study indicates that it is important to consider the bleaching agent's pH and composition when treating patients with reduced salivary secretion.

  18. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel treated with 10% sodium ascorbate gel: a case report with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Eugenio Jose; Mena-Serrano, Alexandra; de Andrade, Andrea Mello; Reis, Alessandra; Grande, Rosa Helena; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    It is generally not recommended that bonded restoration treatment should be carried out immediately after bleaching treatment. However, the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate can be useful to avoid a waiting period. This article is a brief review about in vitro proposals to overcome low bond strength values to bleached dental surfaces. It shows a one-year follow-up case report of a young female presenting agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors reshaped with direct resin composite immediately after dental bleaching. Teeth were bleached with a combination of in-office and at-home whitening protocols, followed by the application of a 10% sodium ascorbate gel for one hour, to allow the immediate reshaping with direct resin composite restoration. After one year, the clinical performance of the restoration was successful. The use of sodium ascorbate gel can help the clinician to perform bonding procedures immediately after bleaching treatments.

  19. In vitro comparison of various types of sodium perborate used for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth.

    PubMed

    Weiger, R; Kuhn, A; Löst, C

    1994-07-01

    Fifty-eight extracted incisors were artificially stained to compare the efficacy of sodium perborate preparations used for intracoronal bleaching. All teeth were bleached for a 6-day period and the bleaching pastes replaced at days 1 and 3 (walking bleach technique). Sodium perborate-monohydrate, trihydrate, or tetrahydrate in conjunction with 30% H2O2 as well as tetrahydrate, either mixed with H2O or prepared as an experimental gel, were placed intracoronally at a level of 1-mm below the vestibular cementoenamel junction. Standardized slides were used to evaluate the color changes during bleaching. Success rates between 46 and 77% could be achieved, but no significant differences in final bleaching results between any of the sodium perborate types were observed. The use of the experimental gel resulted in comparable esthetic results (54%), although the portion of tetrahydrate in the gel was lower than that of the other preparations. In contrast to general recommendations that bleaching agents be left for 3 to 7 days in the access cavity before replacement, shorter bleaching intervals did not seem to affect the success.

  20. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique: An In Situ Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Fujimaki, Mitsue; Pascotto, Renata Correa

    2016-03-01

    To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). Significant differences in the mineralization levels were observed as a function of time. No significant differences in W* were observed between groups, nor was W* significantly different at T3 and T4. Similar ΔW* was observed between groups after 7 or 14 days. The mineral loss after in-office bleaching was progressively reversed by contact with saliva for 14 days. The whiteness index was not affected by contact with coffee during the remineralization period. The results of this in situ study suggest that the mineral loss caused by in-office dental bleaching is minimal and is partly compensated by remineralization due to contact with saliva. Additionally, whiteness was not affected by daily exposition to coffee during the enamel remineralization, which indicates that avoiding the consumption of coffee immediately following in-office bleaching is unnecessary. (J Esthet Restor Dent 28:S23-S31, 2016). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (p<0.01). The GC group presented a significantly lower peroxide passage than did GD and GE (p<0.01). It can be concluded that the hydrogen peroxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the

  2. In vitro activity of readily available household materials against HIV-1: is bleach enough?

    PubMed

    Flynn, N; Jain, S; Keddie, E M; Carlson, J R; Jennings, M B; Haverkos, H W; Nassar, N; Anderson, R; Cohen, S; Goldberg, D

    1994-07-01

    This report describes experiments assessing the effectiveness against HIV of potential disinfecting agents that are commonly available to IDU when they are sharing syringes. We exposed cell-free HIV, HIV-infected cells, and HIV-infected blood containing known quantities of HIV to household cleaning agents, alcohols, peroxide, and highly acidic materials for 1 min, in order to examine the effects of these materials on the infectivity of the HIV. Undiluted liquid laundry bleach and dilute liquid dish detergent reduced the number of culturable HIV to an undetectable level under the experimental conditions used. Diluted bleach was not completely effective. Other potential disinfecting agents, including ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, and hydrogen peroxide, were unable to disinfect high numbers of HIV-infected cells or infected blood. Liquid dish detergent warrants further study as a possible acceptable alternative to bleach. Our data provide support for recommendations to IDU that they disinfect shared syringes every time between users with full-strength liquid laundry bleach to reduce their risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV. When bleach is not available, liquid dish detergent or other available disinfecting agents such as rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, or high alcohol content beverages are more effective than water at disinfecting HIV, recognizing that these materials are less effective than bleach. Although these materials are effective, they should not be viewed as a substitute for decreased sharing of injection equipment by IDU, or increased availability of sterile needles and syringes.

  3. The influence of chemical activation on tooth bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Torres, Carlos R G; Goto, Edson Hidenobu; Pucci, Cesar Rogério; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of manganese gluconate, a chemical activator of bleaching agents, at a concentration of 0.01% on the efficiency of a 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agent. Forty bovine incisors were immersed in a 25% instant coffee solution for seven days and randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was the control group and consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching gel only. Group 2 consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching gel and 0.01% manganese gluconate. Three readings of color were taken using the Vita Easyshade spectrophotometer: the initial reading, a reading at seven days, and a reading at 14 days. Total color variation was calculated by ΔE*Lab. Data were submitted to the statistical t-test (5%), which showed that after seven days group 2 had a significant increase in the degree of tooth bleaching compared with group 1. The mean values (±SD) were 16.33 (±3.95) for group 1 and 19.29 (±4.97) for group 2. However, the results for group 1 and group 2 were similar after 14 days. Adding 0.01% manganese gluconate to 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel increased the degree of tooth bleaching after a seven-day treatment and did not influence the resulting shade after 14 days.

  4. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  5. Does a toothpaste containing blue covarine have any effect on bleached teeth? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration.

  6. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used.

  7. The timing and operational management of the variables of bleaching in cases of rehabilitation in the esthetic field.

    PubMed

    Sibilla, Pietro; Cogo, Enrico; Turrini, Roberto; Calura, Giorgio; Fradeani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Managing esthetic restoration in the presence of discolored teeth is a challenge for both the clinical team and clinician, whose aim is to use methods that are as minimally invasive as possible, and materials that allow the preservation of dental tissue. Should one wish to act on the discoloration of teeth that are to be restored, or on adjacent ones, it becomes essential to take action on dental tissues. This is done through bleaching and dental restoration, using materials that allow various clinical situations to be managed, such as those with different tonalities between the teeth: prosthetic materials that offer adequate uniformity in their results in those areas where it is necessary to mask the discoloration. The use of technology such as bleaching, and ceramic materials simultaneously can achieve excellent cosmetic results. This article explains how to integrate bleaching compared to prosthetic treatment, in terms of time, in the various cases of discoloration, and what factors to consider when choosing the timing.

  8. Use of xylanase in the TCF bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Roncero, B.; Vidal, T.; Torres, A.L.; Colom, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental pressures are forcing the pulp and paper industry to develop new technologies that reduce or eliminate the presence of various contaminants in bleaching plant effluents. Oxygen delignification techniques, replacement of elemental chlorine with chlorine dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide and new agents as well as the use of xylanase enzymes for biobleaching, reduce o eliminate the production of chlorinated organic substances. This paper compares the sequence XOZP with OZP in the bleaching of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps. It has been studied the influence of enzymatic treatment on the consumption of bleaching agents: ozone and hydrogen peroxide. Chemical, physical, optical and refining properties of pulps, as well as COD and colour of effluent are also studied. The xylanase treatment is positive and it is possible to manufacture fully bleached pulps at high brightness and viscosity without using chlorine compounds at a low ozone and hydrogen peroxide consumption.

  9. History, safety, and effectiveness of current bleaching techniques and applications of the nightguard vital bleaching technique.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B

    1992-07-01

    This article reviews the literature on the use of hydrogen peroxide in three professionally administered bleaching techniques from historical, technique, and safety viewpoints. Safety over time, absolute safety, and relative safety of nonvital bleaching, in-office vital bleaching, nightguard vital bleaching, and over-the-counter bleaching kits are compared. The advantages and disadvantages of different bleaching options, as well as indications for individual or combined use of the techniques, are discussed. In addition, specific indications for the use of the nightguard vital bleaching technique are presented.

  10. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    PubMed Central

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  11. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel. PMID:25992987

  12. The effect of remin pro and MI paste plus on bleached enamel surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Jaberi, Solmaz; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharrazi

    2014-03-01

    The growing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has led to great developments in bleaching products. The exposure of hard tissues of the tooth to bleaching agents can affect the roughness of the enamel surface. The freshly bleached enamel surface exposed to various surface treatments such as fluoride and other remineralizing agents have been assessed in this study. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate with Fluoride (MI Paste Plus) and Remin Pro on the enamel surface roughness after bleaching. Thirty enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. After initial roughness measurement with profilometer, the samples were exposed to 37% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent 20 minutes twice, and randomly divided into three groups of ten. In group 1, a CPP-ACPF containing paste (MI Paste Plus) and in group 2, Remin Pro were applied to the teeth during a 15 day period for 5 minutes, twice a day. Samples of group 3 (control) were immersed in artificial saliva for 15 days. The roughness of all samples were measured at the beginning, after bleaching and after the study intervention and statistically analyzed. The surface roughness significantly increased in all groups following bleaching, and then it showed a decrease after application of both Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF in comparison to using bleaching agent (P<0.005). The surface roughness after using Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF was statistically similar to each other (P>0.05). There was no difference between surface roughness of MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro groups. Also the surface roughness was decreased compared to the initial enamel surface roughness.

  13. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  14. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  15. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of use...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of use...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  20. POZONE technology to bleach pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Shi, Y.; Le, L.; Wang, S.M.; Wei, J.; Chang, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    Currently, there has been a move in the pulp and paper industry to reduce or eliminate chlorine-based bleaching due to environmental concerns. The POZONE process, a chemical means of ozone production, has been used to bleach wood pulp. The brightness, Kappa number, and viscosity of wood pulp subjected to POZONE treatment have been determined. Brightness increases of up to 44 points and Kappa number decreases of as much as 22 points have been achieved. Promise for effective industrial application has been demonstrated.

  1. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2).

  2. External bleaching therapy with activation by heat, light or laser--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    External bleaching procedures utilizing highly concentrated 30-35% hydrogen peroxide solutions or hydrogen peroxide releasing agents can be used for tooth whitening. To enhance or accelerate the whitening process, heat-activation of the bleaching agent by light, heat or laser is described in the literature. The aim of the present review article was to summarize and discuss the available information concerning the efficacy, effects and side effects of activated bleaching procedures. Information from all original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed or ISI Web of Science (search term: (bleaching OR brightening OR whitening OR colour) AND (light OR laser OR heat OR activation)) were included in the review. Existing literature reveals that activation of bleaching agents by heat, light or laser may have an adverse effect on pulpal tissue due to an increase of intra-pulpal temperature exceeding the critical value of 5.5 degrees C. Available studies do not allow for a final judgment whether tooth whitening can either be increased or accelerated by additional activation. Therefore, application of activated bleaching procedures should be critically assessed considering the physical, physiological and patho-physiological implications.

  3. Esthetic rehabilitation with tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and direct adhesive restorations.

    PubMed

    Bezerra-Júnior, Douglas Machado; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Martins, Leandro de Moura; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to report esthetic rehabilitation with combined tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and anterior restoration replacement in a 26-year-old man. Clinical examination showed deficient restorations in the maxillary anterior teeth, significant discoloration of the maxillary left central incisor, and hypoplastic stains affecting the maxillary right lateral incisor. A radiograph of the left central incisor showed satisfactory endodontic treatment, allowing preparation for the walking bleach technique. For 3 weeks, 37% carbamide peroxide in the pulp chamber was renewed every week. In-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was also performed on the maxillary teeth. After 21 days, all teeth had been bleached to shade A1. After bleaching was completed, enamel microabrasion of the maxillary right lateral incisor was conducted with 6% hydrochloric acid. In later sessions, microhybrid composite resin restorations were placed in all 4 maxillary incisors. A combination of dental bleaching techniques, enamel microabrasion, and resin restorations was a successful and conservative choice for reestablishing the natural appearance of discolored teeth, improving the self-esteem of the patient.

  4. Evaluation of the effects of conventional versus laser bleaching techniques on enamel microroughness.

    PubMed

    Anaraki, Saeid Nemati; Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Assadian, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahareh

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, bleaching of the teeth within the dental office is one of the most widespread techniques to correct tooth discoloration. Variability of the materials and techniques accompanied with the trend toward esthetic restorations with minimally invasive approaches are increasing. The use of laser in this regard has also been taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office versus laser bleaching on surface roughness of enamel. Fifteen freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally to produce 30 lingual and buccal enamel blocks. Samples were mounted in transparent acrylic resin blocks and polished before treatment. Samples were randomly assigned to laser bleaching (LB) and office bleaching (OB) groups (n = 15 each). Pretreatment evaluation of microroughness was carried out for all samples using profilometer. Samples were treated twice in the OB group with Opalescent Xtra Boost and in the LB group using a laser-activated gel. Microroughness was evaluated after bleaching in both groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA. Both methods increased enamel surface roughness. Microroughness changes were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). Microroughness significantly increased in the OB group (p > 0.05), but there was no significant difference in pre- and post-treatment roughness evaluation in the LB group (p < 0.05). Laser was considered a safer technique because it demonstrated a less surface roughness increase in comparison with the conventional office bleaching procedure.

  5. Oral care and the use of bone-targeted agents in patients with metastatic cancers: A practical guide for dental surgeons and oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuk, Iryna; Mazzarello, Sasha; Butterfield, Kevin; Appleton, Anthony; Addison, Christina L.; Clemons, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone-targeted agents such as bisphosphonates and the RANKL antibody have revolutionised the care of patients with bone metastases. There has, however been increasing concern about the oral health of these patients and in particular osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), especially with the increasing use of these agents at higher potencies for greater periods of time. Methods A review of the published data in PubMed and meeting abstracts was performed to examine incidence, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical course and management of osteonecrosis of the jaw with focus on cancer patients treated with bone-targeted agents (BTA) for bone metastases. This manuscript takes the most frequent and pertinent questions raised by oncologists, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons and tries to give a pragmatic overview of the literature. Results The incidence of ONJ varies depending on types of bone-targeted agents, duration of treatment and additional risk factors. The causes and pathogenesis of ONJ is not fully elucidated, however bone-targeted therapy induced impaired bone remodelling, microtrauma secondary to jaw activity, and oral bacterial infection seem to be important factors. Since the treatment options for ONJ are limited and not well established, preventive strategies have to be included in patients management. Conclusions Many unanswered questions remain about the optimal oral care of patients receiving bone-targeted agents. Prospective data collection will remedy this and help to provide practical guidelines for the management and treatment of those patients that require dental intervention. PMID:26909271

  6. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  7. Intracoronal bleaching of discolored non-vital teeth using laser irradiation: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesan, Melissa A.; de Castro, Fabiana C.; Matarazzo, Alexandre T.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.

    2004-09-01

    Dissemination of blood into the dentinal tubules caused by pulp extirpation or traumatically induced internal pulp bleeding is a possible cause of discoloration of non-vital teeth. Discolored teeth, especially in the anterior region, can result in considerable cosmetic impairment. The whitening of these teeth is an alternative therapeutic method that is relatively non-invasive and conserves dental hard tissue. Recently, intracoronal bleaching of pulpless discolored teeth can be performed with the association of laser irradiation to hydrogen and carbamide peroxide and can even be accomplished in one session. This report shows a clinical case of an endodontically treated tooth submitted to bleaching using LED light and infrared LLLT therapy.

  8. Safety issues when using carbamide peroxide to bleach vital teeth--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, Maurice P; Bartlett, David W

    2003-03-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide is used to bleach discoloured teeth but since its introduction in the late nineteenth century there have been concerns about its safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the literature on hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide and assesses if these products can be recommended for clinical use. The authors used a Medline search to find the literature for review and from these the findings were divided into laboratory, animal and human studies. In conclusion no dental treatment is without risk but from the evidence it seems that bleaching teeth is comparatively safe.

  9. Temperature-regulated bleaching and lysis of the coral Pocillopora damicornis by the novel pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Yael; Zicherman-Keren, Maya; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-07-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of symbioses between coral animals and their photosynthetic microalgal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). It has been suggested that large-scale bleaching episodes are linked to global warming. The data presented here demonstrate that Vibrio coralliilyticus is an etiological agent of bleaching of the coral Pocillopora damicornis. This bacterium was present at high levels in bleached P. damicornis but absent from healthy corals. The bacterium was isolated in pure culture, characterized microbiologically, and shown to cause bleaching when it was inoculated onto healthy corals at 25 degrees C. The pathogen was reisolated from the diseased tissues of the infected corals. The zooxanthella concentration in the bacterium-bleached corals was less than 12% of the zooxanthella concentration in healthy corals. When P. damicornis was infected with V. coralliilyticus at higher temperatures (27 and 29 degrees C), the corals lysed within 2 weeks, indicating that the seawater temperature is a critical environmental parameter in determining the outcome of infection. A large increase in the level of the extracellular protease activity of V. coralliilyticus occurred at the same temperature range (24 to 28 degrees C) as the transition from bleaching to lysis of the corals. We suggest that bleaching of P. damicornis results from an attack on the algae, whereas bacterium-induced lysis and death are promoted by bacterial extracellular proteases. The data presented here support the bacterial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  10. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  11. Parametric bleaching of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the nonlinear bleaching of a dense plasma slab. In this new mechanism, the electromagnetic wave incident on the plasma decays into plasma waves and then reappears as a result of the coalescence of the plasma waves at the second boundary of the slab.

  12. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists' awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. All the bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, there were significant differences in microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (P<0.001). However, no significant differences were detected in microhardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used.

  13. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists’ awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. All the bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, there were significant differences in microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (P<0.001). However, no significant differences were detected in microhardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used. PMID:28096946

  14. Effects of bleaching on osteoclast activity and their modulation by osteostatin and fibroblast growth factor 2.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, Carolina; Portolés, M Teresa; Matesanz, M Concepción; Linares, Javier; Feito, M José; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Esbrit, Pedro; Vallet-Regí, María

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching with H2O2 is a common daily practice in dentistry to correct discoloration of anterior teeth. The aim of this study has been to determine whether this treatment of human teeth affects growth, differentiation and activity of osteoclast-like cells, as well as the putative modulatory action of osteostatin and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). Previously to the in vitro assays, structural, physical-chemical and morphological features of teeth after bleaching were studied. Osteoclast-like cells were cultured on human dentin disks, pre-treated or not with 38% H2O2 bleaching gel, in the presence or absence of osteostatin (100 nM) or FGF-2 (1 ng/ml). Cell proliferation and viability, intracellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS), pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6 and TNFα) secretion and resorption activity were evaluated. Bleaching treatment failed to affect either the structural or the chemical features of both enamel and dentin, except for slight morphological changes, increased porosity in the most superficial parts (enamel), and a moderate increase in the wettability degree. In this scenario, bleaching produced an increased osteoclast-like cell proliferation but decreased cell viability and cytokine secretion, while it augmented resorption activity on dentin. The presence of either osteostatin or FGF-2 reduced the osteoclast-like cell proliferation induced by bleaching. FGF-2 enhanced ROS content, whereas osteostatin decreased ROS but increased TNFα secretion. The bleaching effect on resorption activity was increased by osteostatin, but this effect was less evident with FGF-2. These findings further confirm the deleterious effects of tooth bleaching by affecting osteoclast growth and function as well as different modulatory actions of osteostatin and FGF-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of home bleaching preparations on composite resin color.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, P; Lim, E; Lautenschlager, E

    1992-10-01

    The lightening of teeth is done professionally by exposure to warm hydrogen peroxide solutions or at home with an active bleaching gel of perhydrol urea or carbamide peroxide. This study compared the effects of two commercial bleaching gels on the color of composite resin with those in a previous study using the dental office technique. Commercial composite resins test specimens were exposed to the bleaching gels or water (control) for 312 hours at 37 degrees C at 100% relative humidity. Color change value was calculated with before-and-after solution exposure L*a*b* color values. ANOVA (alpha = 0.01) revealed no differences in the color of the specimens after use of the test solutions. All color change values were less than 2 or the normal limit of visual acuity. No visual color change was evident for these composite resins. The at-home method recorded no shade-altering effects compared with the professional technique, which created a noticeable color change.

  16. Evaluation of physical properties of a nanocomposite after aging, bleaching and staining.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Thayla H N; Públio, Juliana C; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Paulillo, Luís A M S; Aguiar, Flávio H B; Lima, Débora A N L

    2016-07-26

    The objective of the in vitro study was to assess the effect accelerated artificial aging, bleaching agents and coffee staining on the color, gloss, roughness and microhardness of a nanocomposite. 120 (7 × 2 mm) were prepared and randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 60) depending on the aging. Each group was further subdivided into 6 subgroups (n = 10) according to the bleaching and staining as follows: 10% carbamide peroxide (10% CP), 10% CP + staining, 35% hydrogen peroxide (35% HP), 35% HP + staining, without bleaching treatment (WB) and WB + staining. Scanning electron microscopy was performed for qualitative analysis of the resin surface. Data were submitted to 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. As for ∆E, multiple comparisons were performed by using Tukey's and Dunnett's tests (α = 0.05). The bleaching reduced significantly the microhardness of the nanocomposite in without aging groups. All physical properties were found to be negatively changed after the aging process, with bleaching treatment with 10% CP increasing significantly the roughness and loss of gloss compared to the 35% HP. Staining reduced microhardness of both with and without aging nanocomposite as well as the color of the former (E>25), a significantly different result compared to controls. The bleaching reduced the microhardness of the nanocomposite, whereas the aging process changed all the properties studied. The bleaching favored extrinsic staining of the with aging nanocomposite.

  17. Inhibition of photosynthetic CO₂ fixation in the coral Pocillopora damicornis and its relationship to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ross; Szabó, Milán; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Vass, Imre; Ralph, Peter J; Larkum, Anthony W D

    2014-06-15

    Two inhibitors of the Calvin-Benson cycle [glycolaldehyde (GA) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] were used in cultured Symbiodinium cells and in nubbins of the coral Pocillopora damicornis to test the hypothesis that inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle triggers coral bleaching. Inhibitor concentration range-finding trials aimed to determine the appropriate concentration to generate inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle, but avoid other metabolic impacts to the symbiont and the animal host. Both 3 mmol l(-1) GA and 20 μmol l(-1) KCN caused minimal inhibition of host respiration, but did induce photosynthetic impairment, measured by a loss of photosystem II function and oxygen production. GA did not affect the severity of bleaching, nor induce bleaching in the absence of thermal stress, suggesting inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle by GA does not initiate bleaching in P. damicornis. In contrast, KCN did activate a bleaching response through symbiont expulsion, which occurred in the presence and absence of thermal stress. While KCN is an inhibitor of the Calvin-Benson cycle, it also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, and it is likely that this was the principal agent in the coral bleaching process. These findings do not support the hypothesis that temperature-induced inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle alone induces coral bleaching. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Clinical performance of topical sodium fluoride when supplementing carbamide peroxide at-home bleaching gel.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; da Silva, Melissa Aline; Pleffken, Patricia Rondon; Valera, Marcia Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the use of 0.11% topical sodium fluoride (SF) desensitizing agent to treat tooth sensitivity during a nightguard tooth whitening procedure. Thirty-two subjects bleached their teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel using an at-home bleaching technique with custom trays. During bleaching treatment, subjects were divided into 2 groups (n = 16). The subjects in Group 1 received a topical gel containing 0.11% SF; the subjects in Group 2 received a placebo gel (PG). Each subject was instructed to place the gel in his/her bleaching tray for 30 min every day following bleaching treatment. Results showed the use of SF did not affect the whitening efficacy of the 10% CP gel. Subjects who received the PG had significantly higher tooth sensitivity when compared with subjects who received SF (P < 0.00). The use of daily 0.11% SF after 10% CP bleaching gel reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching treatment.

  19. Effect of different intracoronal bleaching methods on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel: An in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vikas; Kumar, Piush; Sharma, Payal; Shetty, Divya

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different intracoronal bleaching methods on the shear bond strength and site of failure of ceramic brackets. Sixty freshly extracted human maxillary incisors were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15). Endodontic access cavity was prepared and root canals were filled, root fillings were removed 2mm apical to the cementoenamel junction, and a 2-mmthick layer of glass ionomer cement base was applied. Group 1 served as the control. Intracoronal bleaching was performed with 35% carbamide peroxide in group 2, sodium perborate in group 3, and 37.5% hydrogen peroxide in group 4. The teeth were immersed in artificial saliva for 4 weeks before bracket bonding. Ceramic brackets were bonded with composite resin and cured with LED light. After bonding, the shear bond strength of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. The site of bond failure was determined by modified ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index). The highest value of shear bond strength was measured in control group (18.67 ± 1.59 MPa), which was statistically significant from groups 2,3, and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 2 and 4. The lowest shear bond strength was measured in group 3. ARI scores were not significant from each other. Intracoronal bleaching significantly affected the shear bond strength of ceramic brackets even after 4 weeks of bleaching. Bleaching with sodium perborate affects shear bond strength more adversely than does bleaching with other agents like hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide.

  20. The Impact of a Customized Tray on In-Office Bleaching Tooth Sensitivity: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Correa, A C; Santana, T R; Nahsan, F P; Loguercio, A D; Faria-E-Silva, A L

    2016-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that using a tray over a bleaching agent reduces its pulpal chamber penetration, which can reduce tooth sensitivity. This study evaluated the effect of the sealed technique on the presence and level of sensitivity reported by patients during and after the bleaching procedure performed in office. Forty-six patients underwent a bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide used in a single application of 45 minutes for two sessions with an interval of seven days. A customized tray was maintained over the bleaching