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Sample records for dental bleaching agents

  1. Effect of bleaching agent on dental ceramics roughness.

    PubMed

    Vanderlei, Aleska D; Passos, Sheila P; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Pereira, Sarina Mb; Vásquez, Vanessa Zc; Bottino, Marco A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents (10% and 16% carbamide peroxide) on the roughness of two dental ceramics in vitro, and to analyze the surface by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Two bleaching agents (10% and 16%/Whiteness, FGM Gel) and two microparticle feldspathic ceramics (Vita VM7 and Vita VM13) were used. Forty disks of Vita VM7 and Vita VM13 ceramic were manufactured, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm high, in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations, and were divided into 4 groups (n = 10): (1) VM7 + Whiteness 10%; (2) VM7 + Whiteness 16%; (3) VM13 + Whiteness 10%; (4) VM13 + Whiteness 16%. The bleaching agent was applied for 8 hours a day for 15 days and during the intervals the test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The roughness (Ra) of the test specimens was evaluated before and after exposure to the bleaching agents using a laser roughness meter and the topographic description was analyzed by SEM. The statistical analysis of roughness data showed significant differences in the VM7 groups, using paired t-test, p = 0.05 (VM7 + Whiteness 10%: p = 0.002; VM7 + Whiteness 16%: p = 0.001) and two-sample t-test (VM7 p = 0.047), and no significant difference was found among VM13 groups. The qualitative SEM analysis showed different degrees of surface changes. The results suggest that the roughness of the tested ceramic surfaces increased after exposure to the bleaching agents.

  2. Effectiveness of dental bleaching in depth after using different bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Débora A N L.; Aguiar, Flávio H B.; Bertoldo, Carlos E S.; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B.; Lovadino, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of low- and high-concentration bleaching agents on enamel and deep dentin. Study design: Stained bovine incisors fragments were randomized placed into 10 groups (n=5), according to the sample thicknesses (2.0 mm or 3.5 mm) and bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (4 h a day/21 days); 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with calcium (1:30 h a day/21 days); HP 20% with calcium (50 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% (3 x 15 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% with calcium (40 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval). The samples were stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. The color change was evaluated using a spectrophotometer at the initial analysis, after artificially staining with black tea and after each of the bleaching weeks, and data was expressed in CIE Lab System values. The L* coordinate data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test and the ?E values data was submitted for analysis of variance in a split-plot ANOVA and Tukey’s test (?=0.05). Results: None of the bleaching agents tested differed from the reflectance values on the enamel surface. For deep dentin HP 20% and HP 35%, both with calcium, showed the lowest reflectance values, which differed from CP 10%. Conclusion: It is concluded that high concentration hydrogen peroxide with calcium was less effective in deep dentin than 10% carbamide peroxide. Key words:Dental bleaching; hydrogen peroxide; carbamide peroxide; dental staining. PMID:24455056

  3. [Benefits of antioxidant agents' use for dental filling consequent to the endo-bleaching].

    PubMed

    Kobakhidze, G D; Vadachkoriia, N R; Tkhilava, N G

    2006-08-01

    Efficacy of antioxidant agents' use after dental endo bleaching was studied in clinical trial. The study enrolled 169 patients, ranging age 16 to 60 years in age. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: control (63) and trial (106). In patients of the control group tooth cavity was left open after endo bleaching, and was filled only after 7 days. In patients of the trial group antioxidant agent was administered into the dental tissues consequently to the endo bleaching, and the cavity was filled immediately. Assessment of the immediate and distant effects revealed unwanted results of postponed dental filling (control group) in terms of tooth color stability and forming micro cracks. Results of antioxidant use and immediate dental filling after endo bleaching have proven our earlier experimental studies on benefits of antioxidant use to be right. Based on the results of our clinical study we can recommend use of antioxidant after endo bleaching to achieve successful dental fillings in clinical practice.

  4. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components.

  6. Effect of bleaching agent and topical fluoride application on color and gloss of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Vicente, Sergio Augusto de Freitas; Tonani, Rafaella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride application and their association with a change in color (ΔE*) and brightness of dental ceramic submitted to different finishing procedures. A total of 120 test specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 40) according to the type of finishing: glazing; polishing; or polishing and glazing. Initial color and brightness readouts were taken, and the finished specimens were divided into groups (n = 10) according to the treatment to which they were submitted: fluoride; bleaching; bleaching and fluoride; or control. After this, final color and brightness readouts were taken. The type of polishing had no influence on ΔE* or brightness (P > 0.05). Regardless of which solution was used, a decrease in brightness occurred only for the group treated with bleach and fluoride (P < 0.05). The results showed the use of fluoride after bleaching may interfere with the esthetics of a restoration.

  7. The effect of carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila P; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Azevedo, Sarina M B; Vasquez, Vanessa Z C; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface microhardness of micro-particulate feldspathic ceramics (VM7 and VM13, Vita Zahnfabrik). Forty specimens (8-mm diameter, 2-mm thickness) were divided into four groups (n=10): GI-VM7 + 10% Whiteness, G2-VM7 + 16% Whiteness, G3-VM13 + 10% and G4-VM13 + 16% Whiteness. The home-use bleaching agents were applied for 8 hours on 15 days, and the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The Vickers hardness number (HV) was determined for each specimen. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05). The microhardness values before exposure were: g1-433 (57); g2-486 (22); g3-509 (28); g4-518 (24), and after exposure: G1-349 (32); G2-496 (95); G3-519 (38); G4-502 (81). G2 exhibited a higher and significant difference than GI in VM7 groups, and the effect of bleaching concentration was shown to be significant by the Mann-Whitney test. And for VM13, both the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests showed no significant differences. When using 10% carbamide peroxide, the microhardness of VM7 ceramic was affected, and there were no effect on the microhardness between VM7 and VM13 ceramics when 16% carbamide peroxide was used.

  8. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  9. Effects of bleaching agents on surface roughness of filling materials.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Ljubisa; Jordan, Rainer Andreas; Glasser, Marie-Claire; Arnold, Wolfgang Hermann; Nebel, Jan; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Thomas; Zimmer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a non-tactile optical measurement system to assess the effects of three bleaching agents' concentrations on the surface roughness of dental restoration materials. Two composites (Grandio, Venus) and one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil Plus) were used in this in vitro study. Specimens were treated with three different bleaching agents (16% and 22% carbamide peroxide (Polanight) and 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost)). Surface roughness was measured with an optical profilometer (Infinite Focus G3) before and after the bleaching treatment. Surface roughness increased in all tested specimens after bleaching treatment (p<0.05). Our in vitro study showed that dental bleaching agents influenced the surface roughness of different restoration materials, and the restoration material itself was shown to have an impact on alteration susceptibility. There seemed to be no clinical relevance in case of an optimal finish.

  10. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  11. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Curado, J. F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-08-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  12. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled. PMID:23674914

  13. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2). PMID:27375906

  14. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2).

  15. Effects of dental bleaching on the color, translucency and fluorescence properties of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana M; Borges, Alessandra B; Torres, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the color, translucency and fluorescence of bovine enamel and dentin submitted to different bleaching modalities. Pairs of enamel and dentin discs (3 mm in diameter) were obtained from 150 bovine teeth. In 75 of the pairs, one specimen had the enamel removed (Dentin Group). The dentin was removed from one specimen of the remaining 75 pairs (Enamel Group) and the other specimen was left unaltered (Enamel + Dentin). The evaluation of color, translucency and fluorescence was performed with a spectrophotometer using the CIE L* a* b*. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: Control, composed of specimens that were not bleached, and two experimental subgroups, bleached with either 10% carbamide peroxide (CP10%) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP35%). The CP10% bleaching gel was applied 2 h/day for 14 days. The HP35% bleaching agent was applied using two applications of 30 min each, with a one week interval between each application. When not being bleached, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva. The color, translucency and fluorescence ratings were assessed using spectrophotometry 7 days after the treatment. Regarding color, significant differences were found between bleaching techniques in the groups Enamel and Enamel + Dentin, with a higher color difference for HP35%. Bleaching did not change the translucency of the dental tissues. There were significant differences for fluorescence for the HP35% subgroups of Dentin and Enamel + Dentin, and for the CP10% subgroup of Enamel. Dental bleaching changed the color and fluorescence of the dental tissues, however translucency was not affected.

  16. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  17. [The effect of 2 bleaching agents on the enamel surface. An in-vitro study].

    PubMed

    Llena Puy, M C; Forner Navarro, L; Ferrandez, A; Faus Llacer, J V

    1992-01-01

    We present a study "in vitro" of the effect of bleaching agents on dental surfaces using the "Walking bleaching technique". We found that hydrogen peroxide bleached more quickly than carbamide although, after a period of six weeks, the results were the same as far as whitening was concerned. In the scanning electron microscope we observed significantly different changes in each case. Carbamide caused a regular and uniform opening of the enamel prisms of the surface while hydrogen peroxide produced more severe superficial destruction with the appearance of patterning similar to the acid etching, and the presence of some crystalline areas emerging from the body of the prisms.

  18. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; de Souza, João Batista; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Nádia Lago; Torres, Érica Miranda; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p<.05. Results: The inflammation intensity and the number of macrophages were significantly greater in IO than in AH and CG (p<0.05). The results of CD31+ (blood vessels per mm2) were similar in CG (61.39±20.03), AH (52.29±27.62), and IO (57.43±8.69) groups (p>0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels. PMID:27812622

  19. Influence of potentially remineralizing agents on bleached enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Samezima, Leticia Yumi; Fonseca, Léila Pereira; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the addition of calcium and fluoride into a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on enamel surface and subsurface microhardness. Twenty extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain enamel fragments and they were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the bleaching treatment. Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control). Group 2 was treated with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Total Bleach), Groups 3 and 4 were bleached with Total Bleach modified by the addition of sodium fluoride and calcium chloride, respectively. The microhardness of the enamel surface was assessed using a Vickers microdurometer immediately after the bleaching treatment. The specimens were sectioned in the central portion, polished and evaluated to determine the microhardness of the enamel subsurface to a depth of 125 microm, with an interval of 25 microm between measures. There were significant differences among the groups. In terms of surface microhardness, the bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group exhibited the highest means. Regarding subsurface microhardness, there were no significant differences among the groups for the depth and interaction factors. The bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group presented the highest means. It was concluded that the bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the surface and subsurface microhardness of the enamel, and the addition of fluoride and calcium in the bleaching agent increased the microhardness means of the bleached enamel.

  20. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  1. Effect of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching of liquid Cheddar whey.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Barbano, D M; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2012-01-01

    The use of whey protein as an ingredient in foods and beverages is increasing, and thus demand for colorless and mild-tasting whey protein is rising. Bleaching is commonly applied to fluid colored cheese whey to decrease color, and different temperatures and bleach concentrations are used. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of hot and cold bleaching, the point of bleaching (before or after fat separation), and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of liquid colored and uncolored Cheddar whey. First, Cheddar whey was manufactured, pasteurized, fat-separated, and subjected to one of a number of hot (68°C) or cold (4°C) bleaching applications [hydrogen peroxide (HP) 50 to 500 mg/kg; benzoyl peroxide (BP) 25 to 100 mg/kg] followed by measurement of residual norbixin and color by reflectance. Bleaching agent concentrations were then selected for the second trial. Liquid colored Cheddar whey was manufactured in triplicate and pasteurized. Part of the whey was collected (no separation, NSE) and the rest was subjected to fat separation (FSE). The NSE and FSE wheys were then subdivided and bleaching treatments (BP 50 or 100 mg/kg and HP 250 or 500 mg/kg) at 68°C for 30 min or 4°C for 16 h were applied. Control NSE and FSE with no added bleach were also subjected to each time-temperature combination. Volatile compounds from wheys were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and norbixin (annatto) was extracted and quantified to compare bleaching efficacy. Proximate analysis, including total solids, protein, and fat contents, was also conducted. Liquid whey subjected to hot bleaching at both concentrations of HP or at 100mg/kg BP had greater lipid oxidation products (aldehydes) compared with unbleached wheys, 50mg/kg BP hot-bleached whey, or cold-bleached wheys. No effect was detected between NSE and FSE liquid Cheddar whey on the relative abundance of volatile lipid oxidation products. Wheys bleached with BP had

  2. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate. PMID:28149472

  3. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms.

  4. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  5. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  6. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    CINTRA, Luciano Tavares Angelo; BENETTI, Francine; FERREIRA, Luciana Louzada; RAHAL, Vanessa; ERVOLINO, Edilson; JACINTO, Rogério de Castilho; GOMES, João Eduardo; BRISO, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  7. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Lousada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals (control) were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents. PMID:27008262

  8. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-04-01

    Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents.

  9. [A review of the effect of tooth bleaching agents on oral microbes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Huo, Sibei; Liu, Shiyu; Li, Mingyun

    2016-02-01

    Tooth bleaching agents contain powerful oxidizing agents, which serve as the main part of bleaching agents because of its release of effective bleaching component. It has been a hot topic whether tooth bleaching agents exert negative influence on oral health. In order to provide train of thoughts and reference for further clinical researches and treatments, this review paper focuses on bleaching agents' effects on the growth of oral microbes and the formation of biofilms.

  10. Genotoxic potential of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide in dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Aline Ferreira de; Torre, Eliana do Nascimento; Selayaran, Maicon Dos Santos; Leite, Fábio Renato Manzolli; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Etges, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Dental bleaching has become one of the most frequently requested esthetic treatments in dental offices. Despite the high clinical success observed with this procedure, some adverse effects have been reported, including a potential for developing premalignant lesions, root resorption and tooth sensitivity, especially when misused. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic response using a micronucleus (MN) assay, after the application of two concentrations of carbamide peroxide. Thirty-seven patients were divided into two groups and randomly received either a 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (19) or a 16% carbamide peroxide (18) concentration for 21 days in individual dental trays. Gingival margin cells were collected immediately before the first use (baseline), and then 15 and 45 days after baseline. The cells were placed on a histological slide, stained by the Feulgen technique, and evaluated by an experienced blinded examiner. One thousand cells per slide were counted, and the MN rate was determined. The two groups were analyzed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test. A slight increase in MN was observed for both groups, in comparison with the baseline, at 15 days. However, no difference was observed between the two groups (10% and 16%), at either 15 or 45 days (p = 0.90). When bleaching is not prolonged or not performed very frequently, bleaching agents containing carbamide peroxide alone will not cause mutagenic stress on gingival epithelial cells.

  11. Dental bleaching with ozone: effects on color and enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Santana, Manuella Sca; Bridi, Enrico C; Navarro, Ricardo S; de Lima, Carlos J; Fernandes, Adriana B; do Amaral, Flávia Lb; França, Fabiana Mg; Turssi, Cecilia P; Basting, Roberta T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of dental bleaching with ozone (O3) on color change and enamel microhardness. Enamel blocks (3 x 3 x 3mm) were randomly distributed for treatments (n=10). Color change (ΔE) and Knoop microhardness of the enamel blocks were evaluated before and after the following treatments: C - deionized water (control); HP - 37.5% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office+/ SDI); PLA - placebo gel; O3 - ozone; and O2 - oxygen. Four 8-minute applications were used for HP and PLA, and one 19-minute application for O3 and O2.One-way ANOVA revealed that ΔE was not significantly influenced by the treatment (p = 0.112). For the treatments with HP, PLA, O3 andO2, ΔE was greater than 3.3. The paired t test showed significant decrease in microhardness after treatments (p < 0.001) but no significant difference between treatments (ANOVA; p = 0.313). Dental bleaching treatments with O3, HP, O2 and PLA induced enamel color changes that may be clinically discernible, although enamel microhardeness decreased.

  12. Green LED associated to 20% hydrogen peroxide for dental bleaching: nanomorfologic study of enamel by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    Dental bleaching is a much requested procedure in clinical dental practice and widely related to dental esthetics. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on the morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the effect of hydrogen peroxide at 20% at neutral pH, cured by the green LED, to evaluate the action of these substances on dental enamel. We selected 15 pre-molars, lingual surfaces were sectioned and previously marked with a central groove to take the experimental and control groups on the same specimen. The groups were divided as follows. The mesial hemi-faces were the experimental group and distal ones as controls. For morphological analysis were performed 75 electron micrographs SEM with an increase of X 43, X 220 and X 1000 and its images were evaluated by tree observers. Was also performed quantitative analysis of the determination of the surface atomic composition of the samples through microanalysis with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The use of hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 20% at photoactivated green LED showed no significant changes in mineral composition of the samples or the dental morphological structure of the same when compared to their controls, according to the study protocol.

  13. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p < 0.05). We conclude that all the evaluated beverages produced changes of color in the composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3). PMID:27034897

  14. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p < 0.05). We conclude that all the evaluated beverages produced changes of color in the composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  15. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Correr, Americo-Bortolazzo; Rastelli, Alessandra-Nara-Souza; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Consani, Rafael-Leonardo-Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate, through spectrophotometric reflectance, the effectiveness of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket. Material and Methods: Thirty-two bovine incisors crown blocks of 8 mm x 8 mm height lengths were used. Staining of tooth blocks with black tea was performed for six days. They were distributed randomly into 4 groups (1-home bleaching with bracket, 2- home bleaching without bracket, 3- office bleaching with bracket, 4 office bleaching without bracket). The color evaluation was performed (CIE L * a * b *) using color reflectance spectrophotometer. Metal brackets were bonded in groups 1 and 3. The groups 1 and 2 samples were subjected to the carbamide peroxide at 15%, 4 hours daily for 21 days. Groups 3 and 4 were subjected to 3 in-office bleaching treatment sessions, hydrogen peroxide 38%. After removal of the brackets, the second color evaluation was performed in tooth block, difference between the area under the bracket and around it, and after 7 days to verified color stability. Data analysis was performed using the paired t-test and two-way variance analysis and Tukey’s. Results: The home bleaching technique proved to be more effective compared to the office bleaching. There was a significant difference between the margin and center color values of the specimens that were subjected to bracket bonding. Conclusions: The bracket bond presence affected the effectiveness of both the home and office bleaching treatments. Key words:Tooth bleaching, spectrophotometry

  16. Effects of different concentrations of carbamide peroxide and bleaching periods on the roughness of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ourique, Sérgio Augusto Morey; Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Cassoni, Alessandra; Ota-Tsuzuki, Cláudia; Rodrigues, José Augusto

    2011-01-01

    The wide use of dental bleaching treatment has brought concern about the possible effects of hydrogen peroxide on dental tissue and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of nightguard bleaching on the surface roughness of dental ceramics after different periods of bleaching treatment. Fifteen specimens of 5 × 3 × 1 mm were created with three dental ceramics following the manufacturers' instructions: IPS Classic (Ivoclar-Vivadent); IPS d.Sign (Ivoclar-Vivadent); and VMK-95 (Vita). A profilometer was used to evaluate baseline surface roughness (Ra values) of all ceramics by five parallel measurements with five 0.25 mm cut off (Λc) at 0.1 mm/s. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to 6-h daily bleaching treatments with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness- FGM) for 21 days, while control groups from each ceramic system were stored in artificial saliva. The surface roughness of all groups was evaluated after 18 h, 42 h, 84 h, and 126 h of bleaching treatment. The surface roughness of each specimen (n = 5) was based on the mean value of five parallel measurements in each time and all data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). No significant differences in ceramic surface roughness were observed between untreated and bleached ceramic surfaces, regardless of bleaching intervals or bleaching treatments. This study provided evidence that at-home bleaching systems do not cause detrimental effects on surface roughness of dental ceramics.

  17. Evaluation of enamel by scanning electron microscopy green LED associated to hydrogen peroxide 35% for dental bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.

    2014-02-01

    Dental bleaching is a frequently requested procedure in clinical dental practice. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on both morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze by SEM the effect of 35% neutral hydrogen peroxide cured by green LED. Buccal surfaces of 15 pre-molars were sectioned and marked with a central groove to allow experimental and control groups on the same specimen. For SEM, 75 electron micrographs were evaluated by tree observers at 43X, 220X and 1000X. Quantitative analysis for the determination of the surface elemental composition of the samples through X-ray microanalysis by SEM was also performed. The protocol tested neither showed significant changes in mineral composition of the samples nor to dental enamel structure when compared to controls. SEM analysis allowed inferring that there were marked morphological differences between the enamel samples highlighting the need for the use of the same tooth in comparative morphological studies. The tested protocol did not cause morphological damage the enamel surface when compared to their respective controls.

  18. Clarifications, guidelines and questions about the dental bleaching "associated" with orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto; Consolaro, Renata Bianco; Francischone, Leda

    2013-01-01

    With regard to the best moment for carrying out or recommending dental bleaching to orthodontic patients, some explanations and orientations are given in order to answers the following questions: 1) Why orthodontic treatment completion is considered the best opportunity for carrying out the procedure? 2) Why dental bleaching should not be performed immediately before orthodontic treatment? 3) If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? 4) Why dental bleaching should not be performed during orthodontic treatment? 5) If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? This article highlights why it is essential to protect both the mucosa and the cervical region, regardless of the moment when dental bleaching is performed, whether associated with orthodontic treatment or not. The "how", "why" and "if" it is or not convenient to perform dental bleaching before orthodontic treatment are still a matter of clinical suggestion, as it is a procedure that is under analysis, empirical knowledge waiting for scientific proof or disproof! Although tooth enamel has adamantine fluid flowing within it, providing a specific metabolism that is peculiar to its own and which could scientifically explain and base the option of carrying out teeth whitening before and during orthodontic treatment, we must still be very careful.

  19. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Erika Michele dos Santos; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Despite all surface treatments, a reduction of enamel microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching. PMID:28280508

  20. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    PubMed

    Lago, Andréa Dias Neves; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Araújo, Erika Michele Dos Santos; Matos, Adriana Bona; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Despite all surface treatments, a reduction of enamel microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching.

  1. The effect of home-use and in-office bleaching treatments combined with experimental desensitizing agents on enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pintado-Palomino, Karen; Tirapelli, Camila

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate in vitro the effect of formulations containing Biosilicate to treat enamel and dentin bovine samples exposed to dental bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: On enamel and dentin bleached with commercial gels containing 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) (14 days/4 h) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (single session/45 min), desensitizing dentifrices (Sensodyne®; experimental dentifrice of Biosilicate®; Odontis RX®; Sorriso®) were applied along 14 days and desensitizing pastes (Biosilicate®/water 1:1; Dessensebilize NanoP®; Bioglass type 45S5/water 1:1) were applied on days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14. Distilled water was the control. Microhardness (MH) and roughness measurements were the variables measured on the samples before and after the treatments. Student's t-test analyzed differences before and after the treatments. Two-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey test analyzed differences among the factors desensitizing, bleaching agents and substrate. Results: Tukey test showed no differences in roughness for both bleaching treatments and among the desensitizing agents (P > 0.05). Differences in MH appeared on enamel treated with in-home bleaching when control group (lower values) was compared with Sensodyne, Biosilicate dentifrice, Biosilicate paste, and Bioglass paste (higher values). Comparisons between desensitizing agents on dentin treated with both bleaching gels showed no statistical differences. Conclusions: The effect of formulations containing Biosilicate (Biosilicate dentifrice and paste) was significant in the MH of enamel bleached with 16% CP. PMID:25713487

  2. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  3. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  4. Quantitative Sensory Testing of the Effect of Desensitizing Treatment After Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Vanessa; Gallinari, Marjorie O; Perdigão, Jorge; Cintra, Luciano T A; dos Santos, Paulo H; Briso, André L F

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify tooth sensitivity during bleaching and after a desensitizing treatment. Sensitivity was measured with a new device, TSA-II, which uses thermal stimuli for Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST). Ten patients underwent bleaching treatment using Whiteness HP Maxx (FGM Produtos Odontológicos Ltda) containing 35% hydrogen peroxide. After the bleaching session, the teeth were cleaned with air/water spray and the product Desensibilize KF 2% (FGM Produtos Odontológicos Ltda) was applied to the upper left teeth. Saline solution at room temperature was applied in the upper right teeth. QST was performed before bleaching, immediately after bleaching, and immediately after desensitizing treatment. In order to standardize tooth analysis, a 100% ethylene copolymer and vinyl acetate tray with circular perforations was used during measurements. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used (a=0.05). Mean temperatures (SD) of cold sensation threshold for the upper right quadrant were: BB-13.898 (4.81), AB- 19.241 (3.68), AD-20.646 (3.72) and for the upper left quadrant they were: BB-14.102 (3.22), AB-19.646 (4.82), AD- 13.835 (3.63). Dental bleaching with highly concentrated peroxides changed dental cold sensation thresholds, but the topical desensitizer changed the immediate cold sensation thresholds produced by the cold stimulus.

  5. Bleaching non vital primary teeth: case report.

    PubMed

    Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Roth, Faynna; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Fernandes, Kristiane Porta; Domingues, Manoela Martins; Wanderley, Márcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Trauma and pulpal infections in primary dentition are part of the routine of the pediatric dentist. Common consequences in these cases are alterations in dental color, compromising patient's esthetics and his interaction in social environment. Bleaching intends to preserve dental structure already weakened and to show immediate esthetic results. This clinical case shows a bleaching technique in devitalized primary teeth using bleaching agent with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by photo polymerizer. This technique is simple and shows immediate satisfactory results.

  6. Evaluation of dentin permeability after light activated internal dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Zanello Guerisoli, Danilo M; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively the dentin permeability of human teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LEDs, halogen lamp or using the walking bleach technique. Forty human maxillary central incisors had standard access cavities performed and the cervical thirds of the canals were prepared with Gates-Glidden drills up to a size 130. Roots were resected between the coronal and middle thirds and the apical portions were discarded. A glass ionomer, 2 mm thick cervical plug was placed inside the canal, at the cement-enamel junction level. Group I received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by LEDs. Group II was submitted to 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by halogen lamp. Group III received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel and the walking bleach technique was followed. Group IV (control) received a dry cotton pellet inside the pulp chamber with temporary restoration. Dentinal permeability was quantified by copper ion penetration. Linear measurements were obtained by analysis of digital images under x 5 magnification. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I, 7.1% (+/-3.2%); II, 8.4% (+/-3.0%); III, 9.1% (+/-3.0%); IV, 1.3% (+/-2.8%). One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the results. Results showed an increase of permeability values for groups I, II and III when compared to group IV (control); however, no statistical differences were found between the three tested bleaching techniques. It can be concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED, halogen lamp or used following the walking bleach technique produced similar increase in dentinal permeability.

  7. Monomer Release from Nanofilled and Microhybrid Dental Composites after Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaee, Masumeh Hasani; Arami, Sakineh; Ghavam, Maryam; Rezaii, Asieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites. Materials and Methods: 80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness) of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate), TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate), UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate) and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate) were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05). Results: Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001); TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001). Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001). Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001). Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001). Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952). Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000). The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003); while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824). Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001). Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972) and (P=0.811) respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002), as well as polishing (P=0.024). Conclusion: Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled. PMID:24910677

  8. Determination of optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue samples using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative bleaching changes of human teeth induced changes in the optical properties of dental tissue. We introduced 1310 nm wavelengths of optical coherence tomography (OCT) attenuation coefficient method which is a relatively novel and rarely reported methodology to measure the correlation coefficient during the teeth oxidative bleaching procedure. And the quantitative parameters of enamel optical thickness and disruption of the entrance signal (DES) were extracted from the OCT images. The attenuation coefficient of the bleached tissue is 6.2 mm-1 which is significant (p < 0.001) higher than that unbleached sample is 1.4 mm-1. But attenuation coefficient varied significantly (p < 0.001) between 5.9 and 1.5 mm-1 in dentine which is downtrend. Furthermore, the persistence of bleaching oxidation in 35% hydrogen peroxide-induced optical thickness of enamel is similar with unbleached tissue which may indicate the refractive index of enamel is unchanged. Moreover, disruption of the entrance signal (DES) analysis showed that remarkable difference was appeared at enamel surface. The results indicate that optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue can be determined by attenuation coefficient using OCT system.

  9. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  10. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  11. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  12. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    PubMed

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  13. Surface effects after a combination of dental bleaching and enamel microabrasion: An in vitro and in situ study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Laura Molinar; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Salomão, Fabio Martins; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of combining enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching on the physical properties of enamel, using in vitro and in situ conditions and evaluating surface roughness, enamel microhardness and scanning electron microscopy images. One hundred sound bovine teeth were sectioned and cut into discs and randomly divided into 10 study groups (n=10). The results were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test, with significance at 5%. Enamel surface roughness was significantly influenced by microabrasion, regardless of being combined with dental bleaching, for both HS (Human Saliva) or AS (Artificial Saliva) condition. Enamel microhardness was significantly decreased in the groups in which enamel microabrasion was performed, regardless its combination with dental bleaching; although storage in HS reestablished the initial enamel microhardness. It was concluded that dental bleaching does not cause major damage to microabraided enamel, and that only human saliva recovered the initial enamel microhardness.

  14. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T. Prasanth; Charlie, K. M.; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent. PMID:26604568

  15. Efficacy of desensitizing agents on postoperative sensitivity following an in-office vital tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundasetty, Jyothi Kashi; Ashrafulla, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess and compare the incidence and intensity of experienced after an in-office vital tooth bleaching in case of dental fluorosis using two different types of desensitizing agents, at different time periods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine subjects with mild-to-moderate fluorosis were randomly divided into three groups of 23 each. Group I — control group (placebo), group II—potassium nitrate 5% and sodium monofluorophosphate 0.7% (Sensodent KF), and group III—Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) (Tooth Mousse). In-office vital tooth bleaching was done using 35% hydrogen peroxide liquid (Pola office) in two sessions. Desensitizing agent was applied for 10 min after each session. Postoperative sensitivity was recorded after 24 h and 7 days. The statistical analysis was done using chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: The experimental groups showed significantly less incidence and intensity of sensitivity compared to control group, whereas there was no difference between them. Conclusion: The desensitizing agents used in the study show effective reduction after an in-office vital tooth bleaching. PMID:27217631

  16. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghasemi Monfared Rad, Hamidreza; Beygi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times. Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite). Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5) for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45%) for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control). Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms−1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001). However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites. PMID:27123014

  17. Investigation of photo-bleaching through transmittance method in pigmented solution: understanding possible mechanisms and advantages for photo dental whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Lins, E. C.; Portero, Priscila P.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Oliveira, O. B., Jr.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2007-02-01

    The dental bleaching is known for many years. Recently a technique employing light has open up new and exciting possibilities. Besides its vast application there are still many important points to be understood about teeth photon bleaching. In this work we present an "in vitro" experiment to explore the main mechanisms involved during the photon action in tooth whitening. Our results indicated that light at same wavelengths are great absorbed by pigments creating a local heating which considerably increase the bleaching rate. This results in a fast reaction without heating the whole dental structure. We discuss details of our experiment. Work supported by Fapesp and CNPq.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber and dental permeability after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Tabchoury, Cinthia Pereira Machado; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to quantify the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (HP) in the pulp chamber and evaluate changes on dental permeability after bleaching with 3 HP concentrations (10%, 35%, and 50%). This study was divided into 2 experiments and the bleaching treatments consisted of 3 applications of HP for 30 minutes during a single session. The first experiment tested HP penetration into the pulp chamber of 4 experimental groups (n = 10) of bovine crowns, which were divided by HP concentration: an unbleached control group (0% HP), 10% HP, 35% HP, and 50% HP. Acetate buffer solution was placed into the pulp chamber and after each application of HP. This solution was collected to determine spectrophotometrically the concentration of HP that reached the pulp chamber. The second experiment evaluated dental permeability. Bovine crowns were divided into 3 groups (n = 10). The crowns were connected to a permeability device and the initial permeability was measured at 10 psi. Three different concentrations of HP gels (10%, 35% and 50%) were applied to the buccal enamel surfaces and the dental permeability was measured after the first, second, and third applications of HP. The data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey test (P ≤ 0.05). All concentrations of HP reached the pulp chamber, although no significant differences were noted between the 3 concentrations tested (P > 0.05). However, the increase of dental permeability in the group that received 50% HP was significantly higher than the 10% HP group (P < 0.05). The results indicate that the HP bleaching treatments increased dental permeability.

  19. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents.

    PubMed

    Rokaya, Mohammad E; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rokaya, Mohammad E.; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26257782

  1. Re-establishing esthetics of fluorosis-stained teeth using enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching techniques.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Correa, Ketlen Michele; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis manifests itself as white stains on the enamel of teeth exposed to excessive doses of fluoride during their formation. Fluorosis usually occurs as a result of the ingestion of dentifrices, gels and fluoridated solutions. It may be diagnosed as mild, moderate or severe, and in some cases, it may cause the loss of the surface structure of dental enamel. The aim of this study was to report the clinical case of a female patient of 18 years with moderate fluorosis, whose smile was reestablished by the use of an enamel microabrasion technique, followed by in-office bleaching. A microabrasion technique with 6% hydrochloric acid associated with silica carbide showed to be a safe and efficient method for removing white fluorosis stains, while dental bleaching was useful for obtaining a uniform tooth shade. The association of these techniques presented excellent results and the patient was satisfied. Both techniques are painless, fast and easy to perform, in addition to preserving the dental structure. Treatment showed immediate and permanent results; this technique must be divulged among professionals and their patients.

  2. Influence of Different Types and Concentrations of Chemical Catalysts on Dental Bleaching Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Guimarães, Carolina Anne; Ribeiro, Zulene Eveline Abreu; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types and concentrations of chemical catalysts on the efficiency of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on dental bleaching. Enamel-dentin disks were obtained from bovine incisors and the initial color was assessed. The groups were divided according to the type and concentration of catalyst added to an experimental gel: ferrous sulphate (FS) (0.001, 0.002 and 0.003%); ferrous gluconate (Fg) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); ferric chloride (FC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); manganese gluconate (MG) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); and manganese chloride (MC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%). The positive control (PC) group received the bleaching gel without any catalyst, while in the negative control (NC) the specimens remained in artificial saliva. Three applications of the bleaching gels were performed for 10 minutes each, repeated after 7 days. Color assessments were performed 7 days after the first session and 7 days after the second. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva and assessed again after 1 year. The data were analyzed by parametric analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Some of the chemical catalysts tested were effective in reducing the yellowish color of the samples in relation to the positive control group after 1 and 2 applications and diminished the color relapse over time. After 1 year, the FS was the most effective catalyst tested. We concluded that some chemical catalysts increased the efficiency of dental bleaching.

  3. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  4. Effects of hydrogen peroxide-containing bleaching agents on the morphology of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Ernst, C P; Marroquín, B B; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B

    1996-01-01

    The effects of four bleaching agents (Opalescence, HiLite, 30% hydrogen peroxide, and 30% hydrogen peroxide mixed with sodium perborate) and 37% phosphoric acid on the external surface of human enamel were examined with the scanning electron microscope. The materials were applied to the enamel surfaces of 60 specimens obtained from 10 teeth. Each test agent was applied to one specimen from each tooth. One specimen of each tooth was left untreated. Comparison to the untreated control surfaces revealed that enamel exposed to the bleaching agents underwent slight morphologic surface alterations. The enamel surfaces treated with phosphoric acid, in contrast, showed severe morphologic alterations.

  5. Effects of Tooth Coating Material and Finishing Agent on Bleached Enamel Surfaces by KTP Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Ayumi; Masuda, Yoshiko Murakami; Teruo, Toko; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth coating material and finishing agent on bleached enamel surfaces after using KTP laser with 27% hydrogen peroxide. Background data: There have been few reports on the effects of tooth coating materials and finishing agents after bleaching. Methods: After 40 crowns of human extracted maxillary incisors were bleached by KTP laser, bleached enamels were finished with fluoride only or both of fluoride and nano-hydroxyapatite as a finishing agent. After application(s) of fluoride and/or finishing agent, the enamel surfaces were divided into 2 groups, which were covered with the coating material or without coating material. After application of coating materials, all specimens were kept for 2 weeks at 37°C of 100% humidity. After removing the coating material, color changing was measured and enamel surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: SEM observation of enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material showed the most flattered surface compared to other groups. By measuring the color changing, few color changing was observed on the enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agents and coating material. Conclusion: These results suggested that applications of fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material made the enamel-surfaces flattered and kept effects of bleaching, could prevent the re-coloration. After applications of fluoride gel and finishing agent, covering the bleached-enamel surfaces with the coating material enhanced the keeping whiteness. It would give the patients satisfaction of whiteness. PMID:24155557

  6. Effects of a bleaching agent with calcium on bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrino, Larissa; Gomes, Yasmin; Alves, Eliane; Costi, Hilton; Rogez, Hervé; Silva, Cecy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study analyzed the effects of a bleaching treatment containing 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with or without calcium on bovine enamel, using the Knoop hardness number (KHN), tristimulus colorimetry (TC), and scanning electron microscopy. Materials and Methods: Forty-five specimens were randomly divided into groups (n = 5), which included artificial saliva (negative control [NC]), 35% HP (positive control [PC]), and 35% HP Blue Calcium (HP Blue). The specimens were subjected to three bleaching sessions. During the sessions, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva at 37°C. Before and after bleaching, KHN tests were conducted using a force of 25 gf for 5 s. TC was performed using the CIE-L*a*b* system and readouts were obtained at the following 4 time points: Before the bleaching treatment; after the first session, the second session, and the third session. The specimens were dehydrated and coated with gold, and the photomicrographs were analyzed in a double-blind manner with a LEO microscope. Results: Using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P < 0.05), a statistically significant difference was identified between the initial and final mean KHNs of the NC and PC groups, while the initial and final mean KHNs were not significantly different in the HP Blue group. The final mean values of ΔE, ΔL, and Δb of the PC and HP Blue groups were significantly higher than the initial values (P < 0.01 for both). The photomicrographs revealed no differences among the groups. Conclusions: Therefore, treatment with HP Blue prevented changes in the KHN without reducing the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:25202210

  7. Clinical Comparison of At-Home and In-Office Dental Bleaching Procedures: A Randomized Trial of a Split-Mouth Design.

    PubMed

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this split-mouth clinical study was to compare a combination of in-office and at-home dental bleaching with at-home bleaching alone. Two applications of in-office bleaching were performed, with one appointment per week, using 38% hydrogen peroxide. At-home bleaching was performed with or without in-office bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide in a custom-made tray every night for 2 weeks. The factor studied was the bleaching technique on two levels: Technique 1 (in-office bleaching combined with home bleaching) and Technique 2 (home bleaching only). The response variables were color change, dental sensitivity, morphology, and surface roughness. The maxillary right and left hemiarches of the participants were submitted to in-office placebo treatment and in-office bleaching, respectively (Phase 1), and at-home bleaching (Phase 2) treatment was performed on both hemiarches, characterizing a split-mouth design. Enamel surface changes and roughness were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry using epoxy replicas. No statistically significant differences were observed between the bleaching techniques for either the visual or the digital analyses. There was a significant difference in dental sensitivity when both dental bleaching techniques were used, with in-office bleaching producing the highest levels of dental sensitivity after the baseline. Microscopic analysis of the morphology and roughness of the enamel surface showed no significant changes between the bleaching techniques. The two techniques produced similar results in color change, and the combination technique produced the highest levels of sensitivity. Neither technique promoted changes in morphology or surface roughness of enamel.

  8. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (p<0.05). Groups 7 and 9 provided similar results to group 2, but the results of those groups were different when compared with groups 8 and 10. The use of 6% HP and 10% CP associated with daily or weekly fluoridation regimens did not increase the susceptibility of enamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  9. EFFECTIVENESS OF HOME BLEACHING AGENTS IN DISCOLORED TEETH AND INFLUENCE ON ENAMEL MICROHARDNESS

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laíse Daniela; Batista, Andrigo Reis; Fröner, Izabel Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of different home bleaching agents on color alteration and their influence on surface and subsurface microhardness of discolored bovine enamel. Material and Methods: Forty-five fragments of bovine incisors were randomly allocated into 3 groups (n=15) according to the bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide gel (CP10), 16% carbamide peroxide gel (CP16) and 6.5%-hydrogen-peroxide-based strip (HP6.5). Before bleaching treatment, initial values of Knoop surface microhardness and color (CIEL*a*b*) were obtained and the fragments were artificially stained in hemolyzed rat blood. Then, bleaching treatments were performed over a 21-day period. Color changes (ΔE) were assessed at 7, 14 and 21 days, and final surface microhardness reading was done after 21 days. Thereafter, the fragments were bisected to obtain subsurface microhardness. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=5%). Results: Color changes produced by CP16 were similar to those of CP10, and the color changes produced by these materials were significantly superior to those produced by HP6.5. Color changes at 21 days were superior to 7 days and similar to 14 days. The time did not influence color changes for CP16, which showed similarity between the 14- and 21-day results. No statistically significant differences were found among the home bleaching agents for surface and subsurface microhardness. Conclusions: Microhardness of bovine enamel was not affected by the bleaching agents. The 16% carbamide peroxide gel was the most effective for bleaching the stained substrate. PMID:19668986

  10. Use of 37% carbamide peroxide in the walking bleach technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-02-01

    Dental bleaching represents an effective, conservative, and relatively low-cost method for improving the appearance of discolored pulpless teeth. Among the bleaching techniques, the walking bleach technique with sodium perborate associated with water or hydrogen peroxide stands out because of its esthetic results and safety. A modified walking bleach technique with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide as the bleaching agent is presented. Additionally, the adverse effects of dental bleaching in the following restorative procedures are discussed, showing the advantages with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide.

  11. Effect of chlorine-containing bleaching agents on diffuse reflection of light by cellulose pulp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. P.; Pokoptseva, O. K.; Sherstobitova, A. S.; Yas'kov, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We have studied diffuse reflectance in the spectral range λ = 380-760 nm of sulfate cellulose pulp with initial hardness G = 30-70 after it was treated with a chlorine-containing bleaching agent with active chlorine concentration C = 0%-10% for different time intervals. We determined the general behavior and basic features of the concentration and time dependences of the brightness B and the diffuse reflectance spectral ratio ( R 437/ R 650)ṡ100% at λ = 457 nm and 650 nm. Based on the data obtained, we propose an optimal algorithm for using optical spectral technologies for metered addition of chlorine-containing bleaching agents.

  12. The microhardness of bleached dentine and its bond strength to a dentine bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, M P; Bartlett, D W

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the hardness of a bleached dentine surface and its bond strength to a dentine-bonding agent. Thirty teeth were randomly divided into a test and control group. The teeth were hemi-sectioned, the cut surfaces ground flat and the test surfaces bleached with a 10% aqueous solution of carbamide peroxide continuously for 4 days. Hardness was determined using a Vickers microhardness test. The bond between Coltene 'One Coat Bond' and bleached and unbleached dentine was evaluated by measuring shear bond strength using an Instron machine. The mean hardness of dentine before and after bleaching was 62.5 (10.2) and 53.6 (7.3) and this difference was statistically different (p<0.001). For the controls immersed in water the hardness was before 60.8 (standard deviation: 7.2) and after 59.6 (8.2) respectively. The mean shear bond strength for the unbleached was 5.5MPa (1.6) and for the bleached samples was 3.3MPa (1.8) and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.002). Under these study conditions the Vickers hardness and bond strength to dentine was reduced by bleaching.

  13. The effect of bleaching agent on the flavor of liquid whey and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Croissant, A E; Kang, E J; Campbell, R E; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2009-12-01

    and BPO. These results indicate that the bleaching of liquid whey may affect the flavor of WPC and that the type of bleaching agent used may affect WPC flavor.

  14. Clinical comparative study of the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide home-use and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching materials containing desensitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Basting, R T; Amaral, F L B; França, F M G; Flório, F M

    2012-01-01

    the study due to tooth sensitivity, and 43.2% of the participants experienced some type of sensitivity during bleaching treatment. The χ(2) test showed that there was a significant prevalence of tooth sensitivity during bleaching treatment using the home-use 20% CP agent, with 71.4% of volunteers reporting any level of tooth sensitivity (p=0.0032). A low prevalence of tooth sensitivity was observed for volunteers who used the in-office 38% HP agent (15.0%). The Wilcoxon test (p<0.05) showed that all of the bleaching treatments were effective in bleaching teeth and that there were no differences between the final color shade results among the treatments (Kruskal-Wallis, p<0.05). This study showed that 43.2% of all the volunteers experienced mild or moderate tooth sensitivity during the treatment with bleaching agents. A higher prevalence of tooth sensitivity was observed for 71.4% of the volunteers who used the 20% CP home-use bleaching agent, which may be ascribed to the peroxide concentration and/or the time/length the agent was in contact with the dental structures.

  15. Vibrio shiloi sp. nov., the causative agent of bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica.

    PubMed

    Kushmaro, A; Banin, E; Loya, Y; Stackebrandt, E; Rosenberg, E

    2001-07-01

    The aetiological agent of bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica was characterized as a new Vibrio species on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence, DNA-DNA hybridization data and phenotypic properties, including the cellular fatty acid profile. Based on its 16S rDNA and DNA-DNA hybridization, the new Vibrio species is closely related to Vibrio mediterranei. The name Vibrio shiloi sp. nov. is proposed for the new coral-bleaching species, the type strain being AK1T (= ATCC BAA-91T = DSM 13774T).

  16. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  17. Comparison of two different laser wavelengths' dental bleaching results by photo-Fenton reaction: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lagori, G; Rocca, J P; Brulat, N; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Fornaini, C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a preliminary in vitro test on the possible use of two different laser wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, to improve the dental bleaching results. To perform the test, the degradation of a dye, rhodamine B, under the effects of hydrogen peroxide was used. One hundred and twenty vials were divided into four groups of 30 samples each and, while three of them were irradiated with different wavelengths, 365 nm (reference), 405 nm and 532 nm, the fourth was the non-irradiated control group. Each of the four groups was further divided into three subgroups of 10 cuvettes (n = 10) each. The three subgroups included a group with a rhodamine (RH) solution, a rhodamine and hydrogen peroxide (RH + HP) solution and a rhodamine plus hydrogen peroxide and ferrous gluconate (RH + FR) solution. When hydrogen peroxide was present, only UVA irradiation was able to produce significant results, whereas when the photo-Fenton reaction occurred, all the three wavelengths were able to produce a significant degradation of rhodamine B, with better results for longer wavelengths in comparison with short wavelengths. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the light of the two laser devices, even remaining less effective than UV activation, showed its ability to improve the performance of bleaching agents based on Fenton photocatalysis, whereas when used in combination with hydrogen peroxide only, the 405-nm laser displayed a small effect and the 532-nm laser produced no effects.

  18. The effect of two remineralizing agents and natural saliva on bleached enamel hardness

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Miri, Yasaman; Fard, Mohamad Javad Kharrazi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to compensate the adverse consequences of bleaching agents, the use of fluoride-containing remineralizing agents has been suggested by many researchers. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of applying two remineralizing materials on bleached enamel hardness and in comparison to natural saliva. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. Microhardness (MH) of all specimens was measured and 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied 3 times to the specimens. After completion of the bleaching process, MH of samples was measured and then enamel specimens were divided into three groups each of 10, specimens of groups 1 and 2 were subjected to daily application of hydroxyl apatite (Remin Pro) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) (MI Paste Plus) pastes, respectively, for 15 days. In group 3, the specimens were stored in the operators' natural saliva at room temperature in this period of time. Final MH of all groups was measured. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: The hardness significantly decreased in all groups following bleaching. Application of either Remin Pro, CPP-ACPF or natural saliva increased the hardness significantly. The hardness of the three test groups after 15 days were statistically similar to each other. Conclusion: The hardness of enamel increases eventually after exposure to either MI Paste Plus, Remin Pro or natural saliva. PMID:26962316

  19. Effect of internal bleaching agents on dentinal permeability of non-vital teeth: quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively dentin permeability of pulpless teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with three different agents. Twenty-four maxillary central incisors were randomly assigned to four groups according to the bleaching agent used: I--non-bleached control; II--37% carbamide peroxide; III--sodium perborate/20% hydrogen peroxide paste; IV--27% carbamide peroxide. After standard access and root-canal preparation the access opening, biomechanical preparation and root-canal filling, a cervical glass ionomer plug was prepared and intracoronal bleaching procedures were carried out in a standardized fashion. The access cavities were opened and the teeth were externally sealed and immersed in a 10% copper sulfate aqueous solution for 30 min, in vacuum for the first 5 min. Then, samples were removed, dried with absorbing paper and immersed in a 1% rubianic acid alcohol solution, for the same above-mentioned period in solution and in vacuum. Copper ion penetration was indicated by the rubianic acid staining. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I--7.88% (+/-1.33), II--16.94% (+/-5.72); III--11.45% (+/-3.90) and IV--8.98% (+/-4.19). Data were submitted to one-way anova. The results showed that the 37% carbamide peroxide provided the highest increase in dentin permeability, followed by sodium perborate with 20% hydrogen peroxide. The 27% carbamide peroxide provided the lowest results and showed statistical similarity to the control group. On basis of these findings, it may be concluded that, among the tested intracoronal bleaching agents, 37% carbamide peroxide presented an optimized overall performance in increasing dentinal permeability.

  20. Effect of bleaching agents on enamel surface of bovine teeth: A SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta-Dutra, Ana-Cristina; Albuquerque, Rodrigo-de Castro; Morgan, Luís-Fernando-dos Santos-Alves; Pereira, Geraldo-Magela; Nunes, Eduardo; Horta, Martinho-Campolina-Rebello

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate changes in the enamel surface of bovine teeth after whitening with exogenous bleaching agents: 10% carbamide peroxide (group 1), 16% carbamide peroxide (group 2) and 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by a light-emitting diode (LED) (group 3). The evaluations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Material and Methods Ninety bovine teeth were divided into five groups (n = 18). The bleaching agents 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide were applied for eight hours a day for 14 consecutive days. The third agent, LED-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide, was used four times at seven-day intervals. Each of the four time points consisted of three applications of 10 minutes each. A 37% phosphoric acid solution and artificial saliva were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Results The evaluations by SEM showed changes in the enamel surfaces of the specimens. Based on the Mann-Whitney statistical test, the data showed significant differences (p<0.05) between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 2 and 3. However, no significant difference (p>0.05) was observed between groups 1 and 3. Conclusions Based on these results, it can be concluded that bleaching agents can cause changes in the structure of tooth enamel and that these changes are related to the concentration and the duration of contact with the tooth surface. Key words:Bovine teeth, carbamide peroxide, enamel, hydrogen peroxide, scanning electronic microscopy. PMID:28149462

  1. Attitudes of final-year dental students to bleaching of vital and non-vital teeth in Cardiff, Cork, and Malmö.

    PubMed

    Hatherell, S; Lynch, C D; Burke, F M; Ericson, D; Gilmour, A S M

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine attitudes of final-year dental students in Cardiff, Cork and Malmö towards tooth whitening. Following receipt of ethical approval, pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final-year dental students in Cork, Cardiff, and Malmö as close as possible to graduation. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of bleaching techniques including safety of bleaching, confidence in the provision of bleaching, recommendations to patients, teaching received, awareness of restrictions on the use of bleaching products and management of simulated clinical scenarios. Eighty three per cent (n = 116) of questionnaires were returned. Cork dental students had the most didactic teaching (2-h vital, 1-h non-vital bleaching) compared to Cardiff or Malmö students (0 h each). More Cork students regarded bleaching as safe (76%, n = 28) than Cardiff (70%, n = 32) or Malmö (36%, n = 12) students. More than 50% of Cork students feel they know enough about bleaching to provide it in practice, significantly more than Cardiff (< 25%) or Malmö (< 25%) students. The majority of students would provide vital bleaching after qualification (100% (n = 37) Cork; 82% (n = 27) Malmö; 76% (n = 35) Cardiff). In simulated clinical scenarios, more Cork students would propose bleaching treatments (89%n = 33) than Malmö (64%n = 21) or Cardiff (48%n= 22) students. Variations exist in the attitudes and approaches of three European dental schools towards bleaching. Dental students need to be best prepared to meet the needs of their future patients.

  2. The walking bleach procedure: an in vitro study to measure microleakage of five temporary sealing agents.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, N; Cox, C F; Arai, T; Nakamura, J

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro sealing capacity of five materials, each used as a temporary sealing agent for the walking bleach technique. All teeth received traditional biomechanical root canal instrumentation, after which the walking bleach agent was placed in the pulp chamber space. The occlusal access was sealed with one of five temporary materials: two hydraulic filling materials, a photoactivated resin composite, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement, and a zinc oxide phosphate cement with/without the placement of a piece of rubber sheet that was placed as a barrier to isolate filling material from the bleaching agent. All teeth were stored in a 1% solution of Alcian blue with thermal cycling stress. After 1 wk, they were sectioned longitudinally, and ranked by graded scores of 0 to 3, according to the degree of the dye penetration. Significantly less dye microleakage was observed in the two hydraulic materials than in the photoactivated resin. Both zinc oxide-eugenol and zinc phosphate cements showed a considerable amount of microleakage. There were no significant differences between the groups with and without a rubber sheet. Our data demonstrate that hydraulic filling materials provide the most favorable cavosurface seal when they are firmly packed into the cavity space to prevent microleakage.

  3. LED and low level laser therapy association in tooth bleaching using a novel low concentration H2O2/N-doped TiO2 bleaching agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra Dias, Hércules; Teixeira Carrera, Emanuelle; Freitas Bortolatto, Janaína; Ferrarezi de Andrade, Marcelo; Nara de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Since low concentration bleaching agents containing N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles have been introduced as an alternative to conventional agents, it is important to verify their efficacy and the hypersensitivity effect in clinical practice. Six volunteer patients were evaluated for color change and hypersensitivity after bleaching using 35% H2O2 (one session of two 12 min applications) and 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 (one session of three 12 min applications) and after low level laser therapy application (LLLT) (780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J.cm-2, 10 s). Based on this case study, the nanobleaching agent provided better or similar aesthetic results than the conventional agent under high concentration, and its association with LLLT satisfactorily decreased the hypersensitivity. The 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 agent could be used instead of conventional in-office bleaching agents under high concentrations to fulfill the rising patient demand for aesthetics.

  4. Analysis of shade, temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration during dental bleaching: in vitro study with the KTP and diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Lagori, G; Merigo, E; Meleti, M; Manfredi, M; Guidotti, R; Serraj, A; Vescovi, P

    2013-01-01

    Many dental bleaching techniques are now available, several of them using a laser source. However, the literature on the exact role of coherent light in the biochemical reaction of the whitening process is very discordant. The aims of this in vitro study were: (1) to compare two different laser sources, a KTP laser with a wavelength of 532 nm and a diode laser with a wavelength of 808 nm, during dental bleaching, and (2) to investigate the relationships among changes in gel temperature, tooth shade and hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration during laser irradiation. Altogether, 116 bovine teeth were bleached using a 30% HP gel, some of them with gel only and others with gel plus one of the two lasers (532 or 808 nm) at two different powers (2 and 4 W). The KTP laser produced a significant shade variation with a minimal temperature increase. The diode laser led to a higher temperature increase with a greater reduction in HP concentration, but the change in shade was only statistically significant with a power of 4 W. At a power of 2 W, the KTP laser caused a greater change in shade than the diode laser. No significant correlations were found among temperature, HP concentration and shade variation. The KTP laser appears to provide better results with less dangerous thermal increases than the diode laser. This might call into question most of the literature affirming that the action of laser bleaching is by increasing the gel temperature and, consequently, the speed of the redox reaction. Further study is required to investigate the correlations between the parameters investigated and efficacy of the bleaching process.

  5. Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Gulsahi, Kamran; Sahin, Cem; Altundasar, Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials. Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05). Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth. Key words:Tooth Bleaching, root canal filling materials, glass ionomer cement, mineral trioxide aggregate, micro leakage PMID:22322509

  6. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  7. Comparative clinical and psychosocial benefits of tooth bleaching: different light activation of a 38% peroxide gel in a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Calderini, Angelo; Sciara, Simona; Semeria, Chiara; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Polizzi, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Tooth bleaching is a widespread dental treatment with important psychosocial antecedents and outcomes involved. In the activation of in-office bleaching agents, a selective light radiation, that is, a diode laser seems to be a positive choice to decrease the time of bleaching without surface modification and with no residual tooth sensitivity for maximum effect and minimal clinical and psychological side effects.

  8. Penetration of the pulp chamber by bleaching agents in teeth restored with various restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gökay, O; Yilmaz, F; Akin, S; Tunçbìlek, M; Ertan, R

    2000-02-01

    It is thought that externally applied bleaching agents may penetrate into the pulp chamber. This study was conducted to evaluate the diffusion of peroxide bleaching agents into the pulp chamber of teeth restored with various restorative materials. Sixty-five human extracted anterior maxillary teeth were separated into the 13 groups containing 5 teeth. Five teeth (control group) were not subjected to any cavity preparation and restoration. Standardized class V cavities were prepared in the other 60 teeth and restored using composite resin (Charisma), polyacid modified composite resin (Dyract), or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). All teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction to remove the intracoronal pulp tissue, and the pulp chamber was filled with acetate buffer to absorb and stabilize any peroxide that might penetrate. Vestibular crown surfaces of teeth in the experimental groups were subjected to four different bleaching agents for 30 min at 37 degrees C, whereas the teeth in the control groups were exposed only to distilled water. Then the acetate buffer solution in the pulp chamber of each tooth was removed, and the pulp chamber of each tooth was rinsed with 100 ml of distilled water twice. Leukocrystal violet and enzyme horseradish peroxidase were added to the mixture of the acetate buffer and rinse water. The optical density of the resulting blue solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations resulted in a higher pulpal peroxide penetration. The highest pulpal peroxide penetration was found in resin-modified glass ionomer cement groups, whereas composite resin groups showed the lowest pulpal peroxide penetration.

  9. Assessment of the release of mercury from silver amalgam alloys exposed to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Paloma; Bueno, Renata Pla Rizzolo; Trinidade, Rodrigo Farcili; Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Tezezinha

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the amount of mercury (Hg) released from a silver amalgam alloy following the application of different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents. A total of 30 specimens (2 mm thick x 4 mm in diameter) were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Next, the control group (n = 10) remained in the deionized water for 15 days, while the remaining samples were exposed to 1 of 2 bleaching agents (n = 10) for 8 hours daily (total exposure = 120 hours); for the remaining 16 hours, specimens in the test groups were stored in deionized water at 37°C under relative humidity. After this period, the quantity of Hg in the deionized water was assessed (using atomic absorption spectrophotometry) and compared to the amount of Hg at baseline. The results indicate that exposing amalgam alloys to bleaching agents released greater amounts of Hg compared to exposing samples to deionized [corrected] water.

  10. Effects of three different bleaching agents on microhardness and roughness of composite sample surfaces finished with different polishing techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yikilgan, İhsan; Akgul, Sinem; Ozcan, Suat; Bala, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of different polishing methods and whitening agents on surface hardness and roughness of nano-hybrid composite resin. Material and Methods In total, one hundred twenty disc-shaped specimens were prepared to nano-hybrid composite (Charisma Diamond). 60 samples were used for microhardness measurements and the others were used for the evaluation of surface roughness. Samples were divided randomly into two subgroups (n = 30 each). In first group a low-viscosity liquid polishing agent (Biscover LV) was applied. In the second group, nothing was applied. All the samples were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h. After initial measurements were completed, samples were divided randomly into three subgroups for bleaching application. 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF), 45% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF Quick), 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost) was applied. Then microhardness and surface roughness measurements of samples were repeated and data were recorded as final values for each sample. Results When the polishing techniques were compared, no signicant difference was observed in surface hardness and roughness. When the bleaching agents were compared, the 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agent groups showed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-procedure hardness values (p<0.05). Conclusions Office-type bleaching agent containing CP was observed to be more secure for composite resins than other bleaching agents. No negative effect of glaze materials on the protection of surface roughness and hardness of composite resin was observed. Key words:Composite resin, bleaching, surface hardness, surface roughness. PMID:28298992

  11. Effect of a Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites, Using Short Rod Design

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R.; Fani, M.; Barfi Ghasrodashti, AR.; Nouri Yadkouri, N.; Mousavi, SM.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. Purpose: To place various resin composites into distilled water at 37°C for 21 days and determine the effect of immersion time in distilled water, with and without exposure to 10% carbamide peroxide by employing short rod design fracture toughness test. Materials and Method: Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI), Esthet (Dentsply), and Estelite (Tokuyama). For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI). Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M 0.5) was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (p< 0.05).Tukey’s test showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent. PMID:24883344

  12. [Allergies to dental materials and dental pharmacologic agents].

    PubMed

    Gall, H

    1983-07-01

    Allergic reactions to dental materials and remedies cause stomatitis in the patient and a contact dermatitis in the dental personnel. Topical contact (acrylic resin denture materials, heat accumulation, plaques on the denture) and endogenic (symptom of internal and psychiatric illnesses) factors are the cause for denture sore mouth. In metallic alloys corrosions and electric currents can effect an irritation to the oral mucosa. The application of amalgam fillings can possibly result in a mercurialism. Dental remedies used for treatment of wounds and dental roots are potent sensitizers. Surface anesthetics with tetracaine are the most frequent contact allergens for dentists. Injectable local anesthetics produce anaphylactic type reactions as well as toxic side-effects in the patient.

  13. Dental Bleaching Techniques; Hydrogen-carbamide Peroxides and Light Sources for Activation, an Update. Mini Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Féliz-Matos, Leandro; Hernández, Luis Miguel; Abreu, Ninoska

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbamide peroxides have been successfully used for many years; in the past century the dental bleaching technique suffered several changes and almost 10 years before new millennium the technique was finally recognized by the international agencies of regulation. It is important that Dentists handle the peroxides with the essential knowledge, because it is demonstrated that satisfactory final results of this technique depend on the correct diagnosis of stains, management of the substrates (enamel and dentin) and as well sensitivity. Dentists are exposed to several dental bleaching techniques, products and brands, and in the last 2 decades the devices for light activation of the peroxides have become an extensive catalog. Today, the technique is also suffering changes based on the effectiveness of the different light sources for peroxide activation and its relation to satisfactory final results of the technique. The purpose of this literature review is to explain the determinant factors that influence satisfactory final results of the techniques and provide a general overview, in order to achieve a treatment decision based on evidence. PMID:25646134

  14. Carbamide peroxide bleaching agents: effects on surface roughness of enamel, composite and porcelain.

    PubMed

    Moraes, R R; Marimon, J L M; Schneider, L F J; Correr Sobrinho, L; Camacho, G B; Bueno, M

    2006-03-01

    This study examined the effect of 10 and 35% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface roughness of enamel, feldspathic porcelain, and microfilled and microhybrid composite resins. Standardized cylindrical specimens were prepared for restorative materials. Enamel samples were obtained from buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. Samples from each substrate were divided in three subgroups (n=10), according to surface treatment: distilled water (control), and 10 and 35% carbamide peroxide. The 10% agent was applied 3 h daily and the 35% agent was applied for 30 min/week, at 37 degrees C, during 21 days. Control samples remained stored in distilled water, at 37 degrees C. Roughness measurements (Ra, microm) were made at 24 h and repeated after 7, 14 and 21 days of exposure. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (split-plot design) and Tukey's test (5% significance level). Samples from control groups showed no significant alteration during all test periods, while for exposure to 10% agent, only the porcelain presented a rougher surface after 21 days (p<0.05). For the 35% product, roughness means significantly increased during the first and second weeks for enamel (p<0.05), and after 21 days for porcelain (p<0.05) and for the microhybrid composite (p<0.05). Microfilled samples showed no significant alteration throughout the 21-day period, regardless of the surface treatment.

  15. Investigation of three home-applied bleaching agents on enamel structure and mechanical properties: an in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Ma, Xiao; Lei, Chang; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Lili; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2012-03-01

    The safety of at-home tooth bleaching, based upon carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the active agent, has been questioned. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three differently concentrated home-applied bleaching agents on human enamel under in situ conditions. Sixty specimens were divided randomly into four groups and treated with 10% CP, 15% CP, 20% CP, and distilled water, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness, and fracture toughness (FT) measurements were conducted to determine variations on enamel structure and mechanical properties before and after the bleaching process. Raman revealed little variation of Raman relative intensity after treatment with CP, which was consistent with the results of ATR-IR, AFM, and microhardness analyses. In addition, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity, and FT showed significant decreases on CP-treated specimens. These findings suggested there were minimal demineralization effects of the three at-home bleaching agents on enamel in situ. However, the decrease of LIF intensity and FT on enamel seemed to be inevitable.

  16. KTP and Er:YAG laser dental bleaching comparison: a spectrophotometric, thermal and morphologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, C; Augros, C; Rocca, J P; Lagori, G; Fornaini, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results, in terms of temperature, colour change and morphology, of two different laser wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP). The lasers used were KTP (potassium-titanyl-phosphate) laser (λ = 532 nm (PD = 1.98 W/cm2)) and Er:YAG laser (λ = 2940 nm (PD = 2.54 W/cm2)). The bleaching gels used were PolaOffice 35% HP gel and PolaOffice+ 6% HP gel (SDI, Australia). Thirty-six extracted human teeth were selected and divided into two groups. For the 35% HP treatment, 18 teeth were randomly assigned to three subgroups: (1) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + KTP laser irradiation; (2) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation; and (3) HP gel + KTP laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation. The same protocol was used for the 6% HP bleaching treatment. The bleaching results were analysed by a spectrophotometer, the thermal elevation by K thermocouples and the enamel surface by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney test were performed, and the data were analysed using the software StatView and the free Web statistics tool BiostaTGV. The thermal elevation of the Er:YAG groups was higher than KTP, while only the group 35% HP gel vs. 35% HP gel + Er:YAG showed significant colour differences (p < 0.05). SEM photographs showed slight enamel surface morphologic alterations after bleaching treatment. The Er:YAG laser may improve the bleaching results of 35% HP even if it increases the gel temperature, when compared to the KTP laser.

  17. Clinical trial evaluating color change and tooth sensitivity throughout and following in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the color alteration and sensitivity of teeth throughout and following in-office bleaching. Twenty-two volunteers participated in this clinical trial of bleaching treatment (35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel and placebo) applied on maxillary incisors and canines. According to a split-mouth design, the volunteers' maxillary hemi-arches received either the bleaching or placebo agent, applied four times, at 1-week intervals. Color alteration and tooth sensitivity were assessed throughout and following bleaching. Statistical calculations were performed using gamma distribution and repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a statistically significant difference between teeth submitted to a bleaching agent and placebo (P < .001). At the end of the first, second, third, and fourth sessions, the bleached teeth presented color scores statistically lower than those observed immediately before bleaching. There was no difference in the color scale scores of the bleached teeth between bleaching sessions. The sensitivity data test showed a significant difference among treatments (P < .0001). Color alteration and dental sensitivity were altered by the bleaching agent.

  18. Mineral loss and morphological changes in dental enamel induced by a 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel and a 10% CP gel on mineralized enamel content and morphology. Enamel blocks from bovine incisors were subjected to a 14-day treatment (8 h/day) with 10% or 16% CP gels. Knoop microhardness was evaluated before bleaching and at 1, 7 or 14 days after this treatment (50 g/15 s). Mineral content (energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy), surface roughness and topography (atomic force microscopy) were evaluated at the 14-day period. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Significant microhardness reduction was observed at the 7 th and 14 th days for 10% CP gel, and for all bleaching times for 16% CP gel (p<0.05). At the 14-day period, a significant decrease in Ca and P content, increase on surface roughness (p<0.05) as well as on picks and valleys distance were observed when both bleaching gels were used. These enamel alterations were more intense for 16% CP gel. It was concluded that both CP-based gels promoted loss of mineral structure from enamel, resulting in a rough and porous surface. However, 16% CP gel caused the most intense adverse effects on enamel.

  19. Coronal microleakage of three different dental biomaterials as intra-orifice barrier during nonvital bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Zarenejad, Nafiseh; Asgary, Saeed; Ramazani, Nahid; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Ramazani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to assess the microleakage of glass-ionomer (GI), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as coronal orifice barrier during walking bleaching. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was done for 70 extracted human incisors without canal calcification, caries, restoration, resorption, or cracks. The teeth were then divided into three experimental using “Simple randomization allocation” (n = 20) and two control groups (n = 5). The three cements were applied as 3-mm intra-orifice barrier in test groups, and bleaching process was then conducted using a mixture of sodium perborate powder and distilled water, for 9 days. For leakage evaluation, bovine serum albumin marker was traced in a dual-chamber technique with Bradford indicator. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean ± standard deviation leakage of samples from negative control, positive control, GI, MTA, and CEM cement groups were 0.0, 8.9 ± 0.03, 0.47 ± 0.02, 0.48 ± 0.02, and 0.49 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching. PMID:26759596

  20. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  1. The effect of a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on the phosphate concentration of tooth enamel assessed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santini, Ario; Pulham, Colin R; Rajab, Ahmed; Ibbetson, Richard

    2008-04-01

    The study assessed changes in phosphate concentrations of surface enamel treated with a proprietary bleaching agent ('PEROXIDE') containing 10% carbamide peroxide over a 28-day period using Raman spectroscopy. Six non-carious human molar teeth (age range 12-21 years), extracted for orthodontic reasons, were used. From the enamel face of each half tooth, a near flat enamel section, approximately 2 x 2 mm, was cut, providing 12 specimens. Each specimen was treated with 10% carbamide peroxide for 8 h day(-1) for 28 consecutive days, with Raman spectra being obtained prior to bleaching and after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Raman spectra were acquired on a confocal LabRam 300 spectrometer fitted with an Olympus B microscope (Olympus, Middlesex, UK). The difference in the maximum peak values for phosphate group concentrations were tested using the Friedman test (non-parametric anova) and Dunn's multiple comparison test. An intense broad band at 980 cm(-1), characteristic of phosphate groupings, was always observed. At 7 and 14 days, and again at 28 days, there was a significant decrease in the phosphate group concentration compared with base-line measurements (P < 0.05) but not at 21 days (P > 0.05). Ideally, bleaching should not be continued to a point where surface enamel is lost, and the present study suggests that a regime using 10% carbamide peroxide should not extend to 7 days.

  2. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED's for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  3. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-09-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode Laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED"s for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  4. Agent neutralization study. II: Detoxification of HD with aqueous bleach. Final report, May-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.B.; Beaudry, W.T.; Rohrbaugh, D.K.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Butrow, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A series of neutralization studies was conducted by reacting varying amounts of HD with aqueous hydrochlorite (OCL-) solution to evaluate the use of bleach as an alternate means of destroying stockpiles of HD. A small vacuum jacketed glass reactor was used to react CASARM grade HD and one ton container HD sample. One mid-scale reaction with ton container HD was also conducted. Exotherms were observed in each reaction, and the heat of reaction was estimated. Analyses of selected products by NMR and GC/MS are reported. Sodium hydroxide as a stabilizer for the bleach was studied. Reaction products were titrated for active chlorine. Thiodiglycol was reacted with OCL- for comparison. The stability versus time for bleach solutions at 75 C is reported. A large variety of compounds are formed during the oxidation of HD, which proceeds by a complex and inexact stoichiometry. At least 5 moles of OCL- are required to destroy all of the HD, and significant heat is produced during the reaction. however, the reaction is more controlled and more efficient when caustic is used as a bleach stabilizer. Ton container HD required more OCL- due to the oxidation of the extra sulfides.

  5. Intra-pulpal temperature rise of different tooth types during dental bleaching supported by an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Strakas, D; Tolidis, K; Koliniotou-Koumpia, E; Vanweersch, L; Franzen, R; Gutknecht, N

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber of the teeth, during Er,Cr:YSGG bleaching, as well as to show which teeth are the most susceptible in terms of pulp temperature increase during laser-activated bleaching treatment. Although Er:YAG studies have been published on this subject, it is the first time Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is tested. Fifteen teeth were tested--3 each of the following--(maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, canines, premolars and mandibular incisors). The bleaching procedure comprised an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a yellow-coloured bleaching agent with a concentration of 38 % H2O2 (Power whitening, WHITEsmile GmbH, Germany). The tip used was a 6-mm long Z-type glass tip (MZ8) of a 800 μm diameter. Average output power was set to 1.25 W, pulse duration 700 μs (S-mode), whilst the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The results showed that the most susceptible teeth in terms of pulp temperature increase were the lateral maxillary incisors and the mandibular incisors. The mean temperature increase on these teeth was 1.06 and 1.00 °C, respectively, on 60 s Er,Cr:YSGG-supported bleaching.

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an in-office bleaching system and the effect of potassium nitrate as a desensitizing agent.

    PubMed

    Palé, Maria; Mayoral, Juan R; Llopis, Jaume; Vallès, Marta; Basilio, Joan; Roig, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate by spectrophotometer the in vivo colour changes resulting from the application of an in-office tooth bleaching system containing 28% H2O2 by light-emitting diode (LED) activation and to determine whether the application of 5% potassium nitrate 30 min before bleaching decreased tooth sensitivity. Thirty-two individuals were assigned randomly to two groups (n = 16). Group A received 5% potassium nitrate as a desensitizing agent 30 min before bleaching with 28% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED. Group B received glycerin as a placebo and the same bleaching protocol was applied. The colour of the right central incisor of each patient was measured visually and by spectrophotometer before bleaching, immediately thereafter, 15 days and 3 months later. Differences in L* a* b* values were tested with a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Differences in ΔΕ values were tested with ANOVA statistical analysis at a 0.05 level of significance. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were detected in L*, as well as in b* values, between initial (I) and post bleaching (PB) and between initial (I) and 3 months post-op. In contrast, there was no significant difference between PB and 3 months post-op. The a* values showed no statistically significant differences among the different time points. Tooth sensitivity decreased significantly when potassium nitrate was applied. In-office bleaching system gave quantitatively stable results over a 3-month period. Tooth sensitivity was reduced significantly, when a desensitizing agent was applied 30 min before treatment, but the efficacy of bleaching decreased.

  7. Novel dental adhesive containing antibacterial agents and calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Melo, Mary Anne S; Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D; Hsia, Ru-Ching; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-05-01

    Secondary caries remains the main reason for dental restoration failure. Replacement of failed restorations accounts for 50%-70% of all restorations performed. Antibacterial adhesives could inhibit biofilm acids at tooth-restoration margins, and calcium phosphate (CaP) ions could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) incorporate nanoparticles of silver (NAg), quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) into bonding agent; and (2) investigate their effects on dentin bonding and microcosm biofilms. An experimental primer was made with pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). An adhesive was made with bisphenol-A-glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). NAg was incorporated into primer at 0.1 wt %. The adhesive contained 0.1% NAg and 10% QADM, and 0%-40% NACP. Incorporating NAg into primer and NAg-QADM-NACP into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength (p > 0.1). Scanning electron microscopy showed numerous resin tags, and transmission electron microscopy revealed NAg and NACP in dentinal tubules. Viability of human saliva microcosm biofilms on primer/adhesive/composite disks was substantially reduced via NAg and QADM. Metabolic activity, lactic acid, and colony-forming units of biofilms were much lower on the new bonding agents than control (p < 0.05). In conclusion, novel dental bonding agents containing NAg, QADM, and NACP were developed with the potential to kill residual bacteria in the tooth cavity and inhibit the invading bacteria along tooth-restoration margins, with NACP to remineralize tooth lesions. The novel method of combining antibacterial agents (NAg and QADM) with remineralizing agent (NACP) may have wide applicability to other adhesives for caries inhibition.

  8. Novel dental adhesive containing antibacterial agents and calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mary Anne S.; Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Hsia, Ru-ching; Rodrigues, Lidiany K. A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary caries remains the main reason for dental restoration failure. Replacement of failed restorations accounts for 50-70% of all restorations performed. Antibacterial adhesives could inhibit biofilm acids at tooth-restoration margins, and calcium phosphate (CaP) ions could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) incorporate nanoparticles of silver (NAg), quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) into bonding agent; and (2) investigate their effects on dentin bonding and microcosm biofilms. An experimental primer was made with pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). An adhesive was made with bisphenol-A-glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). NAg was incorporated into primer at 0.1wt%. The adhesive contained 0.1% NAg and 10% QADM, and 0-40% NACP. Incorporating NAg into primer and NAg-QADM-NACP into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength (p>0.1). SEM showed numerous resin tags, and TEM revealed NAg and NACP in dentinal tubules. Viability of human saliva microcosm biofilms on primer/adhesive/composite disks was substantially reduced via NAg and QADM. Metabolic activity, lactic acid, and colony-forming units of biofilms were much lower on the new bonding agents than control (p<0.05). In conclusion, novel dental bonding agents containing NAg, QADM and NACP were developed with the potential to kill residual bacteria in the tooth cavity and inhibit the invading bacteria along tooth-restoration margins, with NACP to remineralize tooth lesions. The novel method of combining antibacterial agents (NAg and QADM) with remineralizing agent (NACP) may have wide applicability to other adhesives for caries inhibition. PMID:23281264

  9. Efficacy of Home-use Bleaching Agents Delivered in Customized or Prefilled Disposable Trays: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carlos, N R; Bridi, E C; Amaral, Flb; França, Fmg; Turssi, C P; Basting, R T

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bleaching methods containing hydrogen peroxide (HP) or carbamide peroxide (CP), dispensed in customized or prefilled trays, in terms of color change, tooth sensitivity, gingival irritation, acceptance, and comfort. Seventy-five volunteers were randomly selected and distributed according to the whitening agent (n=25): 10% HP dispensed in prefilled trays (Opalescence Go 10%) and 9.5% HP (Pola Day) and 10% CP both delivered in customized trays (Opalescence PF 10%). HP was applied for 30 min/d for 14 days (d), and CP for 8 h/d for 14 days. Evaluations were performed at baseline and at 7 days and 14 days of treatment. Color change was measured with Commission internationale de l'éclairage color coordinates (L*, a*, b*), Vita Classical, and 3D Master scales. A visual analog scale was used to assess tooth sensitivity, acceptance of the method and degree of comfort of the tray. Gingival irritation was evaluated as present or absent and localized or generalized. Regarding gingival irritation, tray acceptance, and tooth sensitivity, no differences were observed among the groups at any time (p>0.05). As for degree of comfort, 10% HP showed lower scores (comfortable) than 10% CP, with significant differences (p<0.05) from the other groups (comfortable to very comfortable). In terms of ΔL, Δa, and ΔE, no difference was observed among the groups or between the time periods (p>0.05). The Δb average was higher at 14 days (p<0.05), and there was no difference among the groups (p>0.05). Localized gingival irritation was observed in both tray methods. Mild tooth sensitivity was observed with time, regardless of the bleaching agent concentration or the application time. Color change was similar for all the groups at 7 days and 14 days, but there was a greater reduction in the yellow hue at 14 days. All the bleaching methods were highly accepted and effective in promoting whitening. Although prefilled trays are generally comfortable, they

  10. Oxidative degradation of chemical warfare agents in water by bleaching powder.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lihong; Zuo, Guomin; Cheng, Zhenxing; Zhu, Haiyan; Li, Shanmao

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of sulfur mustard (HD), S-2-(di-isopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) and Soman (GD) in water by bleaching powder was investigated. The degradation products were comprehensively analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and ion chromatography. Degradation pathways were deduced based on the identified products. The product analysis results indicated that HD could be degraded through oxidation and chlorination reactions, and a small portion of sulfur atoms could be mineralized into SO(4)(2-) ion. Oxidative degradation of VX could finally generate O-ethyl methylphosphonate acid (EMPA), sulfonic acids, SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) ions. GD would be converted into non-toxic pinacolyl methylphosphonate via nucleophilic substitution.

  11. [Conservative treatment improved corrosive esophagitis and pneumomediastinum in a patient who ingested bleaching agent containing sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Iseki, Ken; Ozawa, Akiko; Tominaga, Aya; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Otani, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department 3 hours after ingestion of a bleaching agent containing hypochlorous acid and sodium hydroxide in a suicide attempt. Enhanced chest computed tomography scans taken on admission indicated an edematous esophagus and air bubbles in the mediastinum. He underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation until day 9 because of laryngeal edema. On day 10, his endoscopy indicated diffuse reddish mucosal hyperemia, erosions, and lacerated mucosal lesions in the esophagus that were indicative of grade 2b corrosive esophagitis. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor was initiated, with which the condition of the esophagus improved, and on day 44, a slight stricture of the upper part of the esophagus was observed. He was discharged on day 64 without any complaints. The ingestion of sodium hypochlorite induces corrosive esophagitis and acute phase of gastritis. Ingestion of any corrosive agent is known as a risk factor for esophagus cancer in the long-term. In such cases with esophageal stricture, esophagectomy is recommended for preventing esophagus cancer. Considering the age of the patient, however, he did not undergo esophagectomy.

  12. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  13. Comparison of the effects of two bleaching agents on the recording of phase holograms in silver halide emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2006-11-01

    Optical densities before bleaching and final Lin-curves of plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions were determined for combinations of the AAC developer with a solvent bleach (R-9) and a (fixation-free) rehalogenating bleach (R-10). To characterize the processing, the square root of the diffraction efficiency of the processed holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. Sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could thereby be compared directly.

  14. Effect of two different tooth bleaching techniques on microhardness of giomer

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Behboodi, Soodabeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Tooth bleaching is a safe and conservative treatment modality to improve the esthetic appearance of discolored teeth. One of the problems with the use of bleaching agents is their possible effect on surface microhardness of resin-based materials. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of in-office and at-home bleaching on surface microhardness of giomer. Material and Methods Seventy-five disk-shaped giomer samples (Beautifil II) were prepared and cured with a light-curing unit. The samples were randomly assigned to three groups (n=25). In group 1 (control), the samples were stored in distilled water for 14 days. The samples in groups 2 and 3 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (8 hours daily) and 45% CP (30 minutes daily), respectively, for 14 days. Finally, the microhardness of samples was measured with Vickers hardness tester using a 100-g force for 20 seconds. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the mean microhardness values among the study groups, followed by post hoc Tukey test for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in the mean microhardness values among the study groups (P<0.001). Based on the results of Tukey test, microhardness in the bleached groups was significantly less than that in the control group (P<0.0005). In addition, microhardness in the 45% CP group was significantly less than that in the 15% CP group (P<0.0005). Conclusions Use of both bleaching agents during in-office and at-home bleaching techniques resulted in a decrease in surface microhardness of giomer. The unfavorable effect of in-office bleaching (45% CP) was greater than that of at-home bleaching (15% CP). Key words:Dental restorations, hardness, tooth bleaching. PMID:28210444

  15. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes.

  16. The effect of cold-light-activated bleaching treatment on enamel surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xin-Chang; Ma, He; Zhou, Jing-Lin; Li, Wei

    2012-12-01

    This in vitro study aims to evaluate the crystal and surface microstructure of dental enamel after cold-light bleaching treatment. Twelve sound human premolars were cross-split into four specimens, namely, mesio-buccal (Group LP), disto-buccal (Group P), mesio-lingual (Group NP) and disto-lingual (Group L) specimens. These four groups were treated using the standard cold-light bleaching procedure, a bleaching agent, a peroxide-free bleaching agent and cold-light, respectively. Before and after treatment, all specimens were analyzed by high-resolution, micro-area X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using a spectrometer, tooth color of all specimens was measured before and after treatment. The phase of the enamel crystals was identified as hydroxyapatite and carbonated hydroxyapatite. After treatment, specimens in Groups LP and P showed significantly weaker X-ray diffraction peaks, significant reduction in crystal size and crystallinity, significant increase in L* but decrease in a* and b*, and obvious alterations in the surface morphology. However, specimens in Groups NP and L did not show any significant changes. The cold-light bleaching treatment leads to demineralization in the enamel surface. The acidic peroxide-containing bleaching agent was the major cause of demineralization, whereas cold-light did not exhibit significant increase or decrease effect on this demineralization.

  17. Effect of enamel sealants on tooth bleaching and on the color stability of the result.

    PubMed

    Corcodel, N; Hassel, A J; Sen, S; Saure, D; Rammelsberg, P; Lux, C J; Zingler, S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of enamel sealants on bleaching of natural teeth by use of 40 % hydrogen peroxide in a dental surgery. The color stability of the results from bleaching was, furthermore, determined 10 months after the bleaching procedure. In a standardized setting, four sealants (Pro Seal(®), Light Bond™ Sealant, Protecto(®), and Clinpro™ XT Varnish) were applied to and removed from human teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Natural teeth served as medium; half of the teeth were sealed and the others served as controls. Hydrogen peroxide gel (40 %; Opalescence Boost; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA) was used as bleaching agent. Color measurement was performed with a spectroradiometer (Photoresearch PR670) before the bleaching process (T1) and 24 h (T2) and 10 months (T3) after bleaching. The spectroradiometer results were expressed by use of the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation. The L*, a*, and b* values of the sealed and the unsealed surfaces were not significantly different at any time during the study (p > 0.05), irrespective of the sealant used. Ten months after the bleaching process, mean L*, a*, and b* values were lower than at 1-day post-bleaching; the mean value of ΔE between 1-day post-bleaching and 10 months post-bleaching was 2.46 (±3.1). The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of professional tooth whitening is not appreciably affected by the application of the four sealants tested.

  18. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Doustfateme, Samaneh; Kaveh, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR) might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6): Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique. PMID:26681849

  19. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38+/-0.66 degrees C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29+/-0.13 degrees C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35+/-0.15 degrees C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41+/-0.64 degrees C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33+/-0.12 degrees C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44+/-0.11 degrees C

  20. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  1. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  2. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  3. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  8. Synergistic Effects of Nonthermal Plasma and Disinfecting Agents against Dental Biofilms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Koban, Ina; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Holtfreter, Birte; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Matthes, Rutger; Masur, Kai; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Dental biofilms play a major role in the pathogenesis of many dental diseases. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and different agents in dentistry on the reduction of biofilms. Methods and Results. We used monospecies (S. mutans) and multispecies dental biofilm models grown on titanium discs in vitro. After treatment with one of the agents, the biofilms were treated with plasma. Efficacy of treatment was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFU) and by live-dead staining. For S. mutans biofilms no colonies could be detected after treatment with NaOCl or H2O2. For multispecies biofilms the combination with plasma achieved a higher CFU reduction than each agent alone. We found an additive antimicrobial effect between argon plasma and agents irrespective of the treatment order with cultivation technique. For EDTA and octenidine, antimicrobial efficacy assessed by live-dead staining differed significantly between the two treatment orders (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The effective treatment of dental biofilms on titanium discs with atmospheric pressure plasma could be increased by adding agents in vitro. PMID:24159388

  9. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy. PMID:27708725

  10. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis.

    PubMed

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy.

  11. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals’ dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network’s nodes’ in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students’ brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results. PMID:28103260

  12. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals' dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network's nodes' in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students' brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results.

  13. Analysis of grating profiles of phase holograms recorded in silver halide emulsions and processed with combinations of various developers and bleaching agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2004-09-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). The phase gratings were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100 X) objective. The phase contrast photomicrographs were Fourier-analyzed. Thus first- second- and third-order modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. The ratio of the amplitudes of the higher-order modulations to that of the first-order one can serve as a measure of the nonlinearity of the holographic recording.

  14. Over-the-counter whitening agents: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Masotti, Alexandre Severo

    2009-01-01

    Tooth discoloration is commonly found in the dental clinic and tooth bleaching has been considered the preferred esthetic alternative, being more conservative, safe and with predictable results. Supervised home-use of 10% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) bleaching with custom-trays is the most common bleaching procedure dispensed by dentists to their patients. The good results obtained with this technique stimulated the flourishing of new products and techniques. Over-the-counter (OTC) bleaching products appeared as a low-cost alternative to bleach discolored teeth without dentist supervision. Different OTC products are available in supermarkets, drug stores or on the Internet, including rinses, paint-on brushes, toothpastes, chewing guns, dental floss, and whitening strips. There is lack of clinical evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of these products, being most of the studies supported by the manufacturers'. Basically, toothpastes, chewing gums, and dental floss are removal agents of superficial stains. Rinses and paint-on brushes with low levels of hydrogen peroxide have some whitening effect, but without clinical relevance. Strips present similar esthetic results and side-effects, compared to bleaching with 10% CP using trays; however, the studies have financial support from the manufacturers and were based on short term evaluations. Legislation varies widely in different countries regarding OTC dental bleaching. Concerns have appeared due to the potential abusive use of these self-medication agents, especially in young patients, with potential harmful results. Dentists should be acquainted with this kind of products to be able to inform their patients. In conclusion, there is a need for independent clinical trials to provide sufficient evidence regarding the use of OTC bleaching products.

  15. Toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents: efficacy in reducing extrinsic dental staining.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristina Neves Girao Salgado; Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho do; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents in reducing the extrinsic discoloration of dental enamel. Sixty slabs of dentin from human teeth were sealed so that only the enamel surface was exposed. The enamel surfaces were photographed for initial color assessment. Staining was performed by immersing the dental slabs in 0.2% chlorhexidine solution for 2 minutes and then in black tea for 60 minutes. This process was repeated 15 times. Photographs were taken at the end of the staining process, and the slabs were divided into 5 groups (n = 12), 3 to be brushed with toothpastes containing chemical whitening agents (2 containing phosphate salts and 1 containing phosphate salts plus hydrogen peroxide) and 2 to represent control groups (ordinary/nonwhitening toothpaste and distilled water). The dental slabs were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing with toothpaste slurry or distilled water, according to each group's specifications. After brushing, more photographs were taken for color analysis. The results showed a significant reduction in luminosity after the staining process in addition to an increase in the colors red and yellow (P < 0.001). After brushing, there was a significant increase in luminosity and a reduction in both red and yellow (P < 0.001). However, there was no observed difference between the changes in color values in dental enamel slabs brushed with whitening toothpastes and the changes found in slabs brushed with ordinary toothpaste. The whitening toothpastes did not outperform an ordinary toothpaste in the removal of extrinsic staining.

  16. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures.

  17. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures. PMID:27746520

  18. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 17.0 (IBM Statistics, Chicago, Illinois, USA). Descriptive statistics was drawn with respective percentages to have a comparative overview. Results: The response rate was 97%, of which the effective and complete replies received were 77% (75). 56% respondents used paraformaldehyde containing pastes. Majority of general practitioners (61%) did not observe any post-operative complication following the use of devitalising agent. 33% (25) of the respondents were not aware of the complications of devitalizing agents. Conclusion: Thus, it can be concluded that general dental practitioners in Pune and Nashik district of Maharashtra, India do use pulp devitalizing agents in spite of possessing knowledge related to the complications. PMID:26464546

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Devitalizing Agents: A Survey of General Dental Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Walimbe, Hrishikesh; Kontham, Ujjwal; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Wani, Vaibhav; Nankar, Meenakshi; Muchandi, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to analyze knowledge, attitude and practice of general dental practitioners regarding the use of devitalizing agents in their respective practice. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 practicing general dentists were randomly chosen as per the list of practitioners available to local state association. The questionnaire was designed to cover general information of the participating dentist and concerning different aspects of devitalizing agents. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 17.0 (IBM Statistics, Chicago, Illinois, USA). Descriptive statistics was drawn with respective percentages to have a comparative overview. Results: The response rate was 97%, of which the effective and complete replies received were 77% (75). 56% respondents used paraformaldehyde containing pastes. Majority of general practitioners (61%) did not observe any post-operative complication following the use of devitalising agent. 33% (25) of the respondents were not aware of the complications of devitalizing agents. Conclusion: Thus, it can be concluded that general dental practitioners in Pune and Nashik district of Maharashtra, India do use pulp devitalizing agents in spite of possessing knowledge related to the complications. PMID:25878471

  20. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent.

  1. Effect of Nano-Tricalcium Phosphate and Nanohydroxyapatite on the Staining Susceptibility of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Atai, Mohammad; Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Malekhoseini, Kosar; Rezai, Hamideh; Hamze, Faeze

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of nano-tricalcium phosphate (n-TCP) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HAP) on prevention of restaining of enamel after dental bleaching. Methods. Forty bovine incisors were bleached with 20% carbamide peroxide for two weeks. Afterward, they were divided into five groups based on remineralization solution: no treatment (control), 10% n-TCP, 5% n-TCP, 10% n-HAP, and 5% n-HAP. Each group was daily immersed for 10 minutes in the restaining solution (tea) and for 3 minutes in the remineralization agent, respectively. This protocol was repeated for five days. Subsequently, three digital photographs (baseline, after bleaching, and after restaining) were analyzed by Adobe Photoshop software. The obtained L∗, a∗, b∗, and ΔE parameters were compared using ANOVA and Wilcoxon and Bonferroni tests. Results. After bleaching, there were significant changes in tooth colors (P < 0.001) while, after restaining and immersion in remineralization solutions, there were no significant differences in L∗, a∗, and b∗ values of different groups (P > 0.05). However, ΔE of 10% TCP was significantly lower than the control (P = 0.02) while there were no significant differences between the other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. 10% n-TCP could significantly maintain the resultant color and reconstruct the enamel structure after bleaching. PMID:27347555

  2. Diametral tensile strength and film thickness of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil

    PubMed Central

    CARMELLO, Juliana Cabrini; FAIS, Laiza Maria Grassi; RIBEIRO, Lígia Nunes de Moraes; CLARO NETO, Salvador; GUAGLIANONI, Dalton Geraldo; PINELLI, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The need to develop new dental luting agents in order to improve the success of treatments has greatly motivated research. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and film thickness (FT) of an experimental dental luting agent derived from castor oil (COP) with or without addition of different quantities of filler (calcium carbonate - CaCO3). Material and Methods Eighty specimens were manufactured (DTS N=40; FT N=40) and divided into 4 groups: Pure COP; COP 10%; COP 50% and zinc phosphate (control). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and submitted to the tests. The DTS test was performed in the MTS 810 testing machine (10 KN, 0.5 mm/min). For FT test, the cements were sandwiched between two glass plates (2 cm2) and a load of 15 kg was applied vertically on the top of the specimen for 10 min. The data were analyzed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The values of DTS (MPa) were: Pure COP- 10.94±1.30; COP 10%- 30.06±0.64; COP 50%- 29.87±0.27; zinc phosphate- 4.88±0.96. The values of FT (µm) were: Pure COP- 31.09±3.16; COP 10%- 17.05±4.83; COP 50%- 13.03±4.83; Zinc Phosphate- 20.00±0.12. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups (DTS - p=1.01E-40; FT - p=2.4E-10). Conclusion The experimental dental luting agent with 50% of filler showed the best diametral tensile strength and film thickness. PMID:22437672

  3. Interface Between MTA and Dental Bonding Agents: Scanning Electron Microscope Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cervino, Gabriele; Fiorillo, Luca; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Bramanti, Ennio; Laino, Luigi; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Nowadays, the material that offers the best sealing characteristic in the field of endodontic treatment is the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), nevertheless, this material necessities an adhesive bonding agent to perfectly join to the dental surface. The aim of this study was to analyze using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) the possible microgap between the adhesive, MTA, and the dental surface. Material and Methods: Fourteen extracted molars were divided into two groups – group A was prepared with MTA-component adhesive and group B was prepared with MTA and composite dual etching. The observations were carried out with a SEM Phenom G2 Pro mode S.E.I. JMP® software was used for statistical analysis, and a t-test was used for evaluating the difference between the two groups. Results: The gap of the areas at higher magnification (1000×) with a size greater than 5 microns in width and 20 microns in length were considered significant, and only group A recorded significant data. Conclusions: The SEM analysis performed in the group A with interposition of adhesive and flow between the dental pulp chamber and MTA demonstrates the presence of a marginal gap of considerable amplitude in the all of the samples investigated. PMID:28316952

  4. The impact of Prasugrel, a new anti-platelet agent, on dental care of patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Limei; Nizam, Sami Ii; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2013-05-01

    With increasing usage of Prasugrel (Effient), a new and highly efficient antiplatelet agent, in the management of cardiovascular events, the potential for bleeding complications has also increased. This is further compounded by the lack of a reversal agent, therefore poses a problem for clinicians engaged in oral invasive procedures. A case in which a patient taking daily Prasugrel suffered significantly prolonged bleeding following dental cleaning is reported. Local measures were used to achieve hemostasis. It is prudent to consult the prescribing physician about the risk of Prasugrel-induced bleeding, the potential for recurrence of cardiovascular events with disruption of medication, and the appropriate management strategy in advance of planned oral invasive procedures. Local measures are the first line of approach for management of hemostatic complications associated with Prasugrel, and patients should be referred to specialized centers if local approach fails. As more data become available, further evidence-based guidelines can be established.

  5. Effectiveness of Two Topical Anaesthetic Agents used along with Audio Visual Aids in Paediatric Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Jayata; Kumar, Dipanshu; Anand, Ashish; Tangri, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Topical anaesthetic agents enable pain free intraoral procedures, symptomatic pain relief for toothache, superficial mucosal lesions and pain related to post extraction time. Most common anxiety provoking and fearful experience for children in dental operatory is administration of local anaesthesia because on seeing the needle, children usually become uncooperative. One of recent trend of behaviour management technique is using non-aversive techniques out of which audiovisual distraction has emerged as a very successful technique for managing children in dental settings. Audio visual distraction could decrease the procedure related anxiety of patients undergoing dental treatment and can be very relaxing for highly anxious patients. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of topical anaesthetics EMLA (Eutectic Mixture of Local Anaesthetics) cream and benzocaine (20%) gel in reducing the pain during the needle insertion with and without the use of Audio Visual (AV) aids. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 120 children, the age range of 3-14 years attending the outpatient department for their treatment. EMLA and benzocaine gel (20%) were assessed for their effectiveness in reducing the pain on needle insertion during local anaesthesia administration. Based on the inclusion and the exclusion criteria, children requiring local anaesthesia for the dental treatment were randomly divided into four equal groups of 30 children based upon whether AV aids were used or not. AV aids were given using Sony Vaio laptop with earphones with nursery rhymes and cartoon movies DVD. The pain assessment was done by using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale and measurement of the physiological responses of pulse rate and oxygen saturation were done by pulse oximeter. Results There was a statistically significant difference in the mean pain score, pulse rate and mean oxygen saturation rate when it was compared between the four

  6. Critical appraisal. Reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2012-10-01

    Bleaching with peroxide agents compromises the adhesion of resin-based materials to enamel and dentin. The problem is likely caused by delayed release of oxygen from the teeth that inhibits resin polymerization at the interface. The typical method for avoiding problems with bonding to bleached teeth is simply to delay the bonding procedure for a week or two after bleaching. However, there is evidence that bonding can be done immediately if bleaching is followed by the application of an antioxidant. This Critical Appraisal reviews some of the published reports on the reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching via the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate.

  7. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries.

  8. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Braz, Ana K S; de Araujo, Renato E; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J; Gomes, Anderson S L; Prasad, Paras N

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  9. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  10. Ability of 13 chemical agents used in dental practice to induce sister-chromatid exchanges in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Takashi; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic potential of 13 chemical agents used in dental practice, the abilities of these agents to induce sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Statistically significant increases in the frequencies of SCEs were observed in SHE cells treated with all seven of the chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments: p-chlorophenol, m-cresol, formaldehyde, guaiacol, hydrogen peroxide, p-phenolsulfonic acid, and sodium hypochlorite (P < 0.01; Student t test). Assessment of two chemical agents that are applied to the oral mucosa as antiseptics showed that SCEs were induced by iodine (P < 0.01), but not by chlorhexidine. Of three chemical agents that are used as dyes for disclosing dental plaque, erythrosine B had no effect on SCE induction, while acid fuchsin and basic fuchsin increased the SCE frequencies in SHE cells (P < 0.01). Glutaraldehyde, which is used as a disinfectant for dental instruments and impressions, also induced SCEs (P < 0.01). Because SCE assays are used as a sensitive indicator for evaluating genetic toxicity of chemicals, the chemical agents that had a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells.

  11. Bleaching of kraft plus using dioxiranes: Structural effect of ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Wearing, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    Recent developments in totally chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching of kraft pulps have led to a new finding showing that dimethyldioxirane (DMD), formed by reaction of peroxymonosulphate with acetone, is a very effective and selective bleaching agent. Because of the high volatility of acetone, careful design and special equipment are needed for the DMD bleaching process in order to meet operational safety, health and emission control requirements. Other ketones are considered as alternatives to acetone for dioxirane bleaching; however, the use of alternative ketones exhibits different responses in bleaching compared to acetone. This paper examines the bleaching performance of a number of selected ketones in light of different chemical structures and properties of the ketones as well as bleaching variables.

  12. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments.

  13. Post-bleaching sensitivity in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Guacyra M; Guedes, Verónica L; Luna, Maria do R Ml; Carneiro-Jr, Américo M; Stegun, Roberto C

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. This study analyzed the effectiveness of bleaching and tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching in patients with SCD. Forty volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 patients each (five with the SCD and five healthy controls) and treated using in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and different light activation protocols. No statistically significant difference was observed with relation to presence of tooth sensitivity, with or without use of a source of light for peroxide activation, and all bleaching therapies were effective, regardless of the technique employed and the presence/absence of sickle cell disease. The data showed that in-office dental bleaching is a viable alternative for improvement of oral esthetics for patients with SCD.

  14. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  15. A Technique for Staining Extracted Teeth: A Research and Teaching Aid for Bleaching.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    patient and the dentist.4 Hence, the bleaching of these discolored non-vital teeth becomes an extremely important phase of endodontic therapy. 1-6...dentists at the Edward C. Penick Endodontic Study Club stated they never bleached a tooth as an undergraduate. Six chairmen of dental school... endodontic department were also asked what percentage of their undergraduates had the opportunity to bleach teeth. Their answers ranged from 0% (two schools

  16. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  17. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  18. Effects of epicatechin, a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells cultured in collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-su; Lim, Myung-Jin; Min, Kyung-San; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Chan-Ui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological effects of epicatechin (ECN), a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured in collagen scaffolds. Material and Method To evaluate the effects of ECN on the proliferation of hDPCs, cell counting was performed using optical and fluorescent microscopy. Measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to assess odontogenic differentiation. The compressive strength and setting time of collagen scaffolds containing ECN were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to analyze the thermal behavior of collagen in the presence of ECN. Results Epicatechin increased ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and the mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a specific odontogenic-related marker. Furthermore, ECN upregulated the expression of DSPP in hDPCs cultured in collagen scaffolds. Epicatechin activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the treatment with an ERK inhibitor (U0126) blocked the expression of DSPP. The compressive strength was increased and the setting time was shortened in a dose-dependent manner. The number of cells cultured in the ECN-treated collagen scaffolds was significantly increased compared to the cells in the untreated control group. Conclusions Our results revealed that ECN promoted the proliferation and differentiation of hDPCs. Furthermore, the differentiation was regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. Changes in mechanical properties are related to cell fate, including proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, our study suggests the ECN treatment might be desirable for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. PMID:27008260

  19. Comparative assessment of the organization of the colors of the Vita Classical color pallet by digital images and visual analysis for dental bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Júnior, O. B.; Cioffi, Mariana S.; Cesnik, R. M.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Corrêa-dos-Santos, Diego R.; Fornazari, Fabio P.

    2009-02-01

    New formularizations, techniques and devices have become the dental whitening most safe and with better results. Although this, the verification of the levels whitening is being continued for visual comparison, that is an empirical, subjective method, subject to errors and dependent of the individual interpretation. Normally the result of the whitening is express for the amplitude of displacement between the initial and the final color, being take like reference the tonalities of a scale of color commanded of darkest for more clearly. Although to be the most used scale , the ordinance of the Vita Classical ® - Vita, according to recommendations of the manufacturer, reveals inadequate for the evaluation of the whitening. From digital images and of algorithm OER (ordinance of the reference scale), especially developed for the ScanWhite ©, the ordinance of the tonalities of the scale Vita Classical® was made. For such, the values of the canals of color R, G, and B of medium part average of the crowns was adopted as reference for evaluation. The images had been taken with the camera Sony Cybershoot DSC F828. The results of the computational ordinance had been compared with the sequence proposal for the manufacturer and with the earned one for the visual evaluation, carried through by 10 volunteers, under standardized conditions of illumination. It statistics analyzes demonstrated significant differences between the ordinances.

  20. Cytotoxicity of one-step dentin-bonding agents toward dental pulp and odontoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Y; Inuyama, H; Maeda, H; Akamine, A; Nör, J E; Saito, T

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of five one-step dentin-bonding agents on human dental pulp and odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23). Photopolymerized and unpolymerized samples of these dentin-bonding agents were prepared and incubated with dental pulp or MDPC-23 cells. After 24 or 72 h of incubation, the number of unstained cells with trypan blue was counted. The staining of cells with trypan blue stands for a cytotoxicity. The pulp cell and MDPC-23 cytotoxicity of polymerized sample treatment increased in the order of AQ Bond Plus (AQ)agent, while AP was the strongest. All polymerized dentin-bonding agents exhibited lower cytotoxicity by 2-65% than their unpolymerized counterparts. The appearance of the cytotoxicity of dentin-bonding agents was time-dependent, and cell viability was lower at 72 h by 2-46% than at 24 h. The cytotoxicity to MDPC-23 cells was about 5-24% higher than that to pulp cells. These results indicate that one-step dentin-bonding agents differ markedly in their cytotoxicity. Differential cytotoxic effects of one-step dentin-bonding agents should be considered during clinical application of operative restoration.

  1. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results: Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Conclusions: Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release. PMID:24883026

  2. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  3. Randomized controlled trial of sealed in-office bleaching effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mário Artur Pereira; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Oliveira, Alaíde Hermínia de Aguiar; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    Regardless of the high success rate, patients commonly report the occurrence of tooth sensitivity during the in-office bleaching procedures. Recently, it has been demonstrated that using a customized tray (called sealed in-office bleaching technique) reduces peroxide penetration. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate tooth sensitivity and bleaching efficacy of sealed bleaching, in comparison with a conventional in-office technique. Twenty patients were randomized allocated in two groups in which 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was used in a single 45-min application. For the sealed technique, a customized bleaching tray was fabricated and carefully positioned over the bleaching agent during the session. The color was recorded at a baseline, 7 and 28 days after the bleaching session, using Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Tooth sensitivity was recorded during (20 and 40 min) and immediately after the treatment using a visual analogue scale. The bleaching efficacy was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA, while the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity and its intensity were evaluated by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). No significant difference on bleaching efficacy was observed between the conventional (7.4 and 8.1 ΔE) and sealed techniques (7.8 and 8.3 ΔE) at both evaluation periods. No significant difference was observed regarding the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity (p=0.15). Sealed technique showed a significant decrease of sensitivity intensity after 40 min (p=0.03). Sealed bleaching technique was able to reduce the sensitivity intensity during the bleaching procedure, without jeopardizing the bleaching efficacy.

  4. Dual antibacterial agents of nano-silver and 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide in dental adhesive to inhibit caries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Fang; Imazato, Satoshi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Huaibing; Arola, Dwayne D; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-08-01

    Dental resins containing 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) showed potent antibacterial functions. Recent studies developed antibacterial resins containing nanoparticles of silver (NAg). The objectives of this study were to develop an adhesive containing dual agents of MDPB and NAg for the first time and to investigate the combined effects of antibacterial adhesive and primer on biofilm viability, metabolic activity, lactic acid, dentin bond strength, and fibroblast cytotoxicity. MDPB and NAg were incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesive "A" and primer "P". Five systems were tested: SBMP adhesive A; A + MDPB; A+NAg; A + MDPB + NAg; P + MDPB + NAg together with A + MDPB + NAg. Dental plaque microcosm biofilms were cultured using mixed saliva from 10 donors. Metabolic activity, colony-forming units, and lactic acid production of biofilms were investigated. Human fibroblast cytotoxicity of bonding agents was determined. MDPB + NAg in adhesive/primer did not compromise dentin bond strength (p > 0.1). MDPB or NAg alone in adhesive substantially reduced the biofilm activities. Dual agents MDPB + NAg in adhesive significantly reduced the biofilm viability compared with each agent alone (p < 0.05). The greatest inhibition of biofilms was achieved when both adhesive and primer contained MDPB + NAg. Fibroblast viability of groups with dual antibacterial agents was similar to control using culture medium without resin eluents (p > 0.1). In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that the antibacterial potency of MDPB adhesive could be substantially enhanced via NAg. Adding MDPB + NAg into both primer and adhesive achieved the strongest antibiofilm efficacy. The dual agent (MDPB + NAg) method could have wide applicability to other adhesives, sealants, cements, and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries.

  5. Dual antibacterial agents of nano-silver and 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide in dental adhesive to inhibit caries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Fang; Imazato, Satoshi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Huaibing; Arola, Dwayne D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Dental resins containing 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) showed potent antibacterial functions. Recent studies developed antibacterial resins containing nanoparticles of silver (NAg). The objectives of this study were to develop an adhesive containing dual agents of MDPB and NAg for the first time, and to investigate the combined effects of antibacterial adhesive and primer on biofilm viability, metabolic activity, lactic acid, dentin bond strength, and fibroblast cytotoxicity. MDPB and NAg were incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesive “A” and primer “P”. Five systems were tested: SBMP adhesive A; A+MDPB; A+NAg; A+MDPB+NAg; P+MDPB+NAg together with A+MDPB+NAg. Dental plaque microcosm biofilms were cultured using mixed saliva from ten donors. Metabolic activity, colony-forming units, and lactic acid production of biofilms were investigated. Human fibroblast cytotoxicity of bonding agents was determined. MDPB+NAg in adhesive/primer did not compromise dentin bond strength (p>0.1). MDPB or NAg alone in adhesive substantially reduced the biofilm activities. Dual agents MDPB+NAg in adhesive greatly reduced the biofilm viability compared to each agent alone (p<0.05). The greatest inhibition of biofilms was achieved when both adhesive and primer contained MDPB+NAg. Fibroblast viability of groups with dual antibacterial agents was similar to control using culture medium without resin eluents (p>0.1). In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that the antibacterial potency of MDPB adhesive could be substantially enhanced via NAg. Adding MDPB+NAg into both primer and adhesive achieved the strongest anti-biofilm efficacy. The dual agent (MDPB+NAg) method could have wide applicability to other adhesives, sealants, cements and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. PMID:23529901

  6. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity - case series.

    PubMed

    Cartagena, Andrés Felipe; Parreiras, Sibelli Olivieri; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2015-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF) and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS) in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  7. Does the time interval after bleaching influence the adhesion of orthodontic brackets?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Glaucia Cristina Rodrigues; de Miranda, Cyndi Albuquerque; Machado, Sissy Maria Mendes; Brandão, Gustavo Antonio Martins; de Almeida, Haroldo Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that no difference exists between the effects of at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching on shear bond strength (SBS) with bracket bonding at 4 different time intervals after dental bleaching. Methods Ninety extracted human premolars were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 10) according to the bleaching methods used (at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching) and the storage time in artificial saliva (30 min, 1 day, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks before bonding). The control group was stored in artificial saliva for 7 days. Brackets were bonded with the Transbond XT adhesive system, and SBS testing was performed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of resin remaining on the enamel surfaces after debonding. The SBS data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. For the ARI, the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed. Significance for all statistical tests was predetermined to be p < 0.05. Results The SBS of the unbleached group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the bleached groups (except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching). Conclusions The null hypothesis was not totally rejected. All bleaching groups tested had decreased SBS of the brackets to the enamel, except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching. The SBS returned to values close to those of the unbleached enamel within 3 weeks following bleaching. PMID:24228239

  8. Sodium hypochlorite (dilute chlorine bleach) oral rinse in patient self-care.

    PubMed

    Rich, Sandra K; Slots, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), commonly known as "bleach," is widely accepted as being a safe and effective antiseptic against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. For over a century, bleach has been used to control or overcome infection in homes, hospitals, and even on battlefields, and in endodontics for disinfection of root canals. This paper reviews clinical studies on the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite oral rinse to combat dental plaque and gingival inflammation. Sodium hypochlorite is readily available as inexpensive household bleach, and we suggest that oral rinsing twice weekly with dilute bleach (0.25% sodium hypochlorite) constitutes a valuable adjunct to current methods of plaque removal.

  9. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  10. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  11. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    PubMed Central

    DANTAS, Andréa Abi Rached; BORTOLATTO, Janaina Freitas; RONCOLATO, Ávery; MERCHAN, Hugo; FLOROS, Michael Christopher; KUGA, Milton Carlos; de OLIVEIRA, Osmir Batista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments. PMID:26814462

  13. Warm waters, bleached corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-10-12

    Two researchers, Tom Goreau of the Discovery Laboratory in Jamaica and Raymond Hayes of Howard University, claim that they have evidence that nearly clinches the temperature connection to the bleached corals in the Caribbean and that the coral bleaching is an indication of Greenhouse warming. The incidents of scattered bleaching of corals, which have been reported for decades, are increasing in both intensity and frequency. The researchers based their theory on increased temperature of the seas measured by satellites. However, some other scientists feel that the satellites measure the temperature of only the top few millimeters of the water and that since corals lie on reefs perhaps 60 to 100 feet below the ocean surface, the elevated temperatures are not significant.

  14. Nonvital tooth bleaching: a review of the literature and clinical procedures.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    Tooth discoloration varies in etiology, appearance, localization, severity, and adhesion to tooth structure. It can be defined as being extrinsic or intrinsic on the basis of localization and etiology. In this review of the literature, various causes of tooth discoloration, different bleaching materials, and their applications to endodontically treated teeth have been described. In the walking bleach technique the root filling should be completed first, and a cervical seal must be established. The bleaching agent should be changed every 3-7 days. The thermocatalytic technique involves placement of a bleaching agent in the pulp chamber followed by heat application. At the end of each visit the bleaching agent is left in the tooth so that it can function as a walking bleach until the next visit. External bleaching of endodontically treated teeth with an in-office technique requires a high concentration gel. It might be a supplement to the walking bleach technique, if the results are not satisfactory after 3-4 visits. These treatments require a bonded temporary filling or a bonded resin composite to seal the access cavity. There is a deficiency of evidence-based science in the literature that addresses the prognosis of bleached nonvital teeth. Therefore, it is important to always be aware of the possible complications and risks that are associated with the different bleaching techniques.

  15. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules.

  16. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  17. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  18. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M) were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control), each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline), 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16). The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.

  19. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  20. Arundo donax L. reed: new perspectives for pulping and bleaching. 5. Ozone-based TCF bleaching of organosolv pulps.

    PubMed

    Shatalov, A A; Pereira, H

    2008-02-01

    Three selected alkali-based organosolv pulps (alkali-sulfite-anthraquinone-methanol (ASAM), alkali-anthraquinone-methanol (organocell) and ethanol-soda) from agrofibre crop giant reed (Arundo donax L.) were bleached by an ozone-based TCF (totally chlorine- free) bleaching sequence AZE(R)QP (where A is an acidic pulp pre-treatment, Z is an ozone stage, (E(R)) is an alkaline extraction in the presence of reducing agent, Q is a pulp chelating, P is a hydrogen peroxide stage) without oxygen pre-bleaching, and compared with a conventional kraft pulp used as a reference. The different response on bleaching conditions within each bleaching stage was noted for all tested pulps. The pulp bleachability, in terms of brightness improvement or lignin removal per unit of applied chemicals, was found higher for the organocell pulp. The ASAM and ethanol-soda pulps showed the highest bleaching selectivity, expressed by viscosity loss per unit of lignin removed or brightness improved. The overall bleaching results of organosolv pulps were superior to kraft.

  1. Chemical analysis of bleach and hydroxide-based solutions after decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, F B; Gravett, M R; Self, A J; Wang, M; Chua, Hoe-Chee; Hoe-Chee, C; Lee, H S Nancy; Sim, N Lee Hoi; Jones, J T A; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    Detailed chemical analysis of solutions used to decontaminate chemical warfare agents can be used to support verification and forensic attribution. Decontamination solutions are amongst the most difficult matrices for chemical analysis because of their corrosive and potentially emulsion-based nature. Consequently, there are relatively few publications that report their detailed chemical analysis. This paper describes the application of modern analytical techniques to the analysis of decontamination solutions following decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). We confirm the formation of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine following decontamination of VX with hypochlorite-based solution, whereas they were not detected in extracts of hydroxide-based decontamination solutions by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We report the electron ionisation and chemical ionisation mass spectroscopic details, retention indices, and NMR spectra of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine, as well as analytical methods suitable for their analysis and identification in solvent extracts and decontamination residues.

  2. Microhardness and color monitoring of nanofilled resin composite after bleaching and staining

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Isabel Cristina G. Bandeira; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Rodrigues, José Augusto; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of staining solutions on microhardness and shade changes of a nanofilled resin composite, which had been previously in contact with bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 disk-shaped specimens (10 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated with a nanofilled resin (Filtek Supreme) and photocured with a Light Emission Diode (LED) unit and then allocated into three groups to be bleached with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents or a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) product. Following bleaching, specimens within each group were subdivided into three groups to be immersed in coffee, red wine or distilled water. Microhardness and color were monitored at baseline, after bleaching and after staining. Results: Analysis of variance for split-plot design showed lower microhardness values when the composite had been in contact with HP (P < 0.0001). The specimens immersed in red wine and coffee provided lower microhardness values than those immersed in distilled water, regardless of the bleaching agent to which the composites were previously exposed. Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests demonstrated that the composite was lighter after bleaching with a 35% HP agent (P < 0.0500). Conclusion: The composite was darker as a result of being immersed either in red wine or coffee, regardless of the bleaching agent. PMID:24966764

  3. A castor oil-containing dental luting agent: effects of cyclic loading and storage time on flexural strength.

    PubMed

    Derceli, Juliana Dos Reis; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Favorable results in the use of castor oil polyurethane (COP) as pulp capping, membrane material, sealer, mouthwash and in bone repair, associated with the fact that Ricinus communis is not derived from petroleum and it is abundant in Brazil, encourage researches in the development of luting agents. Objectives This study compared the flexural strength (FS) of a castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate (COP10) with RelyX ARC (RX) after mechanical cycling (MC) and distilled water storage. Material and Methods Sixty-four specimens (25x2x2 mm) were fabricated and divided into two groups, COP10 and RX (control). Each group was divided into 4 subgroups (n=8) according to the storage time, 24 hours (24 h) or 60 days (60 d), and the performance (MC+FS) or not (only FS) of the mechanical cycling test. The FS (10 kN; 0.5 mm/min) and MC tests (10,000 cycles, 5 Hz, 0.5 mm/min) were carried out using an MTS-810 machine. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Results The obtained FS (MPa) values were: COP10 24h- 19.04±2.41; COP10 60d- 17.92±3.54; RX 24h- 75.19±3.43; RX 60d- 88.77±6.89. All the RX specimens submitted to MC fractured, while the values for COP10 after MC were as follows: COP10 24h- 17.90±1.87 and COP10 60d- 18.60±1.60. Conclusions A castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate is resistant to mechanical cycling without decreases in flexural strength. However, mean COP10 showed only about 25% of the RelyX ARC mean flexural strength.

  4. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues.

  5. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Manzello, Derek P; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C; Nemeth, Richard S

    2007-07-17

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community.

  6. Solcoseryl, a tissue respiration stimulating agent, significantly enhances the effect of capacitively coupled electric field on the promotion of bone formation around dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Morio; Wang, Pao-Li; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Takashima, Shigenori; Kagami, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Yukito; Kaku, Tohru; Sakaguchi, Kunihiko

    2003-06-01

    In the present study we examined the combined effect of application of a capacitively coupled electric field (CCEF) and the tissue respiration stimulating agent, Solcoseryl, on the promotion of bone formation around dental implants histologically and mechanically. After a dental implant was inserted into each femur of Japanese white rabbits, Solcoseryl (2 ml/kg) was administered intravenously in the ear vein and a CCEF was applied for 4 h per day for 14 days. The degree of bone formation on microscopic observation, bone contact ratio, bone surface area ratio, and the level of removal torque of the implant in the Solcoseryl- and CCEF-treated group were significantly higher than the respective value in the control group, which had not been treated with Solcoseryl nor CCEF. Thus, the combination of CCEF stimulation and Solcoseryl effectively promoted the formation of new bone. It is suggested that the clinical use of a combination of CCEF stimulation and Solcoseryl for dental implants promotes osseointegration.

  7. Ozone bleaching of recycled paper

    SciTech Connect

    Muguet, M.; Kogan, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Chlorinated bleaching chemicals, notably chlorine and hypochlorite, are still being used to bleach deinked, woodfree pulps. Increasing environmental concern about the use of these chemicals--coupled with the industry's efforts to increase the use of recycled fibers--highlight the need to develop better techniques for producing high-quality deinked pulp. Results presented in this report suggest that deinked fibers can be treated with ozone followed by a peroxide bleaching stage to produce a high-quality pulp.

  8. Effect of Power Bleaching on the Fluorosis Stained Anterior Teeth Case Series

    PubMed Central

    M, Annapoorna B; Tejaswi, Sunil; Shetty, Suneeth; K, Sowmya H

    2014-01-01

    Bleaching is a conservative method for restoring the colour of intrinsic discoloration of teeth. The combination of McInnes solution and power bleaching is effective procedure for bleaching of fluorosis stained teeth. Definitely bleaching with McInnes bleaching agent gives instant results, not dependent on patient’s compliance as other office based procedures, no dehydration of the tooth occurs with no damage to the pulp. Bleaching with this solution is esthetically pleasing and minimally invasive option for young patients rather than a complete coronal covering. The dentist is in complete control of the process throughout the treatment. It is a fast process the results are evident even after a single visit. PMID:25302292

  9. In Situ and In Vitro Effects of Two Bleaching Treatments on Human Enamel Hardness.

    PubMed

    Henn-Donassollo, Sandrina; Fabris, Cristiane; Gagiolla, Morgana; Kerber, Ícaro; Caetano, Vinícius; Carboni, Vitor; Salas, Mabel Miluska Suca; Donassollo, Tiago Aurélio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in situ the effects of two bleaching treatments on human enamel surface microhardness. Sixty enamel slabs from recently extracted thirty molars were used. The specimens were polished with sandpapers under water-cooling. The enamel samples were randomly divided in four groups, treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or Whitening Strips (WS) containing 10% hydrogen peroxide and using two conditions: in vitro or in situ model. For in situ condition, six volunteers wore an intra-oral appliance containing enamel slabs, while for in vitro condition the specimens were kept in deionized water after the bleaching protocols. The bleaching treatments were applied one-hour daily for 14 days. Similar amounts of bleaching agents were used in both conditions. Before and after bleaching treatments, microhardness was measured. Statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test) showed that in the in situ condition there was no statistically significant microhardness reduction in the bleached enamel (p>0.05). Significant decrease in hardness was observed for enamel slabs bleached with both treatments in the in vitro condition (p<0.05). Regarding the bleaching agents, in situ results showed no difference between HP and WS, while in vitro WS produced the lowest hardness value. It could be concluded that there was no deleterious effect on enamel produced by any of the bleaching protocols used in the in situ model. The reduction of hardness was only observed in vitro.

  10. Surface characteristic changes of dental ceramics after cyclic immersion in acidic agents and titratable acidity.

    PubMed

    Junpoom, Peerapong; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Hengtrakool, Chanothai

    2010-12-01

    The potential erosive effect of acidic food, sour fruits and drinks on all-ceramic restorations used in dentistry has not been clearly documented. Surface characteristic changes have been evaluated and compared for disc-shaped specimens (diameter 12.0 mm and thickness 2.0 mm) of fluorapatite-leucite and fluorapatite ceramics using various storage agents (deionized water, citrate buffer solution, pineapple juice, green mango juice, cola soft drink and 4% acetic acid). Immersion in pineapple juice, green mango juice, cola soft drink and 4% acetic acid for 16 hours produce significant increases in surface roughness for both types of ceramics investigated.

  11. Color alteration in teeth subjected to different bleaching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briso, A. L. F.; Fonseca, M. S. M.; de Almeida, L. C. A. G.; Mauro, S. J.; Dos Santos, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the color alteration of teeth subjected to the action of different bleaching agents and the influence of light sources commonly used in association with these products, In GI, the specimens remained immersed in artificial saliva. The specimens in GII were bleached with a 10% carbamide peroxide gel 4 hours/day during 3 weeks; the teeth in the other three groups were subjected to three sessions of three 10-min applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel at 7-day intervals. In GIII, no light was used, while in GIV and GV the gel was associated with a quartz-tungsten-halogen light and a LED/laser source, respectively. The teeth color was evaluated before and 7 days after the bleaching sessions by reflectance spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Fisher's test (α = 0.05), and showed that a significant color change was obtained in all treated groups. After the first week of treatment and at the end of it, the bleaching protocols showed similar results. The results of the present study indicate that association of a light source is not necessary to obtain the bleaching effect and that optimal bleaching can be achieved with all techniques tested.

  12. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching. PMID:27508161

  13. Dental whitening--revisiting the myths.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of dental bleaching has increased with the introduction of at-home whitening. Currently available whitening methods include those prescribed by a dental professional for use at home, those applied by the professional in the dental office, a combination of the two, or systems available over the counter. This article reviews the effect, efficacy, and safety of bleaching techniques and materials. Most whitening techniques are considered effective and safe when carried out under the supervision of a dental professional. This article also compares the efficacy and safety of some of the most popular bleaching techniques, including at-home whitening with carbamide peroxide, over-the-counter (OTC) systems, and in-office whitening. Some of these whitening techniques are illustrated in this article.

  14. Efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique with carbamide peroxides modified by CPP-ACP and its effect on the microhardness of bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Borges, B C D; Borges, J S; de Melo, C D; Pinheiro, I V A; Santos, A J S Dos; Braz, R; Montes, M A J R

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate in vitro the efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique using 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide modified by casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and its influence on the microhardness of bleached enamel. A total of 40 bovine incisors were divided into four groups (n=10) according to the bleaching agent used: 10% carbamide peroxide only; a blend of 10% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste; 16% carbamide peroxide only; and a blend of 16% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste. During the 14-day bleaching regimen, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. The Vickers microhardness and color of the teeth were assessed at baseline (T0) and immediately after the bleaching regimen (T14) using a microhardness tester and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The degree of color change was determined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclariage (CIE) L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) and Vita shade guide parameters. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p<0.05). The teeth that were bleached with a blend of peroxide (10% or 16%) and the CPP-ACP paste presented increased microhardness values at T14 compared with T0, whereas the samples that were bleached with peroxide only did not show any differences in their microhardness values. All of the bleaching agents were effective at whitening the teeth and did not show a statistically significant difference using the CIEL*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) or the Vita shade guide parameters. The use of a CPP-ACP paste with carbamide peroxide bleaching agents increased the bleached enamel's microhardness and did not have an influence on whitening efficacy.

  15. Preliminary study of a novel in-office bleaching therapy modified with a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Pinheiro, Mônica Heloisa Morais; Feitosa, Diala Aretha De Sousa; Correia, Tereza Cristina; Braz, Rodivan; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassú Resende; Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira De Assunção

    2012-11-01

    Although in-office bleaching has been proven successful for bleaching teeth, controversy exists from morphological alterations in enamel morphology due to mineral loss and tooth sensitivity. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel in-office tooth bleaching technique modified with a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste (MI paste-MI) and its effect on the enamel morphology and tooth sensitivity. Three patients received a 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP-HP) dental bleaching system. HP was prepared and applied on the teeth on one of the hemiarches, whilst teeth on the other hemiarch were bleached with a mixture of HP and MI. Tooth color, epoxy resin replicas, and sensitivity levels were evaluated in the upper incisors. The results were analyzed descriptively. Right and left incisors showed similar color change after bleaching. Incisors bleached with the mixture of HP and MI presented unaltered enamel surfaces and lower sensitivity levels. The currently tested tooth bleaching technique did not reduce the gel effectiveness while decreasing hypersensitivity levels and protecting the enamel against surface alterations caused by the high-concentration bleaching peroxide tested. The concomitant use of MI Paste and high-concentration hydrogen peroxide might be a successful method for decreasing tooth sensitivity and limiting changes in the enamel morphology during in-office bleaching.

  16. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were not

  17. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were

  18. Permeability of enamel following light-activated power bleaching.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Schiavoni, Renato J; Serra, Monica C; Froner, Izabel C

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain whether in-office photocured bleaching techniques would increase permeability to enamel. A 7.1 mm2 circular area located in the middle third of the coronal portion of 90 human canines was isolated by applying an acid-resistant varnish to the remaining surfaces of the tooth. According to a randomized complete block design (n = 15), specimens were treated using a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product activated by an integrated LED/diode laser (LED/laser) source or a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light. Bleaching was accomplished by applying the 35% hydrogen peroxide agent to the enamel surface in three 10-minute sessions, conducted at one-week intervals over a period of three weeks. For the photocured bleached groups, a bleaching agent was applied to the specimen and irradiated with the LED/laser device or the QTH light for 30 seconds. Negative control groups were exposed to artificial saliva or irradiated by the LED/laser device or the QTH light. Specimens were subjected to a histochemical coloring method that employed copper sulfate and dithio-oxamide solutions. Three 300-microm thick sections taken from the exposed area were imaged in an optical microscope. Permeability was measured in the digitized images as the percentage of copper ions penetration over the total enamel thickness. Friedman's test (alpha = 0.05) showed significant difference among groups. Least significant difference test revealed that in comparison with the group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide only, there was no significant increase in enamel permeability when bleaching was activated by either the LED/laser or QTH light devices but all bleached groups showed higher permeability than the unbleached/nonirradiated group.

  19. Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, P. W.

    1993-03-01

    Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt

  20. The Influence of Post Bleaching Treatments in Stain Absorption and Microhardness

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Darvishzadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effects of post bleaching treatments to prevent restaining and the change of enamel surface microhardness after dental bleaching in vitro. Methods: Sixty intact human incisor teeth were stained in tea solution and randomly assigned into four groups (n=15). Then samples were bleached for two weeks (8 hours daily) by 15% carbamide peroxide. Tooth color was determined both with a spectrophotometer and visually before bleaching (T1) and immediately after bleaching (T2). Next, it was applied in group 1 fluoride (Naf 2%) gel for 2 minutes, and in group 2 a fractional CO2 laser (10 mJ, 200 Hz, 10 s), and in group 3, nanohydroxyapatite gel for 2 minutes. The bleached teeth in group 4 remained untreated (control group). Then teeth placed in tea solution again. Color examinations were repeated after various post bleaching treatments (T3) and restaining with tea (T4) and color change values recorded. The microhardness was measured at the enamel surface of samples. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and Dunnett T3 (α = 0.05). Results: Directly after bleaching (ΔE T3-T2), the treatment with nanohydroxyapatite showed significantly the least color lapse in colorimetric evaluation. In experimental groups, the color change between T3 and T4 stages (ΔE T4-T3) was significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05). Different methods of enamel treatment caused a significant increase in surface microhardness compared to control group (P < 0.05). Significance: Application of fluoride, fractional CO2 laser and nanohydroxyapatite as post bleaching treatments are suggested for prevention of stain absorption and increasing the hardening of bleached enamel. PMID:27099635

  1. Attitudes of Students of Differenet Schools of University of Zagreb on Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Diklić, Dinka; Galić, Nada; Spajić, Jelena; Prskalo, Katica

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the awareness that students from four different faculties within the University of Zagreb have of oral health and tooth bleaching procedure. Materials and Methods The study included 158 subjects (both male and female) - 38 students from the School of Dental Medicine and 40 students from each of the following faculties: the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The respondents were asked to fill out the survey with multiple choices by marking the answers they considered correct. Results Only 12% of the respondents followed the information on oral health. More than two thirds of all subjects brush their teeth twice a day, but there were no statistically significant differences between the subjects with respect to college or gender. More than half of the participants (55%) were satisfied, and 12% were completely satisfied with their dental appearance. About 80% of the respondents were aware of differences between teeth bleaching and teeth polishing procedures, with greater prevalence among Dental Medicine and Medicine students. 80% of all subjects would go to a dental office if they decided to whiten their teeth while less than a half (46%) of all the subjects believed that a tooth bleaching has some adverse side-effects. Conclusions There is a difference in knowledge on oral hygiene and tooth bleaching between the students from the School of Dental Medicine, the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and those from the Faculty of Civil Engineering. Dental students have the best knowledge on tooth bleaching and oral health, which was in accordance with their educational guidance and level of education. PMID:28275277

  2. Effect of light activation on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Kossatz, S; Dalanhol, A P; Cunha, T; Loguercio, A; Reis, A

    2011-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED)/laser activation on bleaching effectiveness (BE) and tooth sensitivity (TS) during in-office bleaching. Thirty caries-free patients were divided into two groups: light-activated (LA) and non-activated (NA) groups. A 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Whiteness HP Maxx, FGM Dental Products, Joinville SC, Brazil) was used in three 15-minute applications for both groups. For the LA group, LED/laser energy (Whitening Lase Light Plus, DMC Odontológica, São Carlos SP, Brazil) was used, in accordance with the manufacturer's directions. Two sessions of bleaching were performed at one-week intervals. Color was registered at baseline and after the first and second bleaching sessions using a Vita shade guide. Patients recorded TS on a 0 to 4 scale during bleaching and within the next 24 and 48 hours of each session. BE at recall each week and intensity of TS were evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Tooth sensitivity was compared using the Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance by rank and the Wilcoxon sign-ranked test. Faster bleaching was observed for the LA group than for the NA group after the first session (4.8 and 3.8 shade guide units [SGUs]; p=0.0001). However, both techniques were capable of bleaching the same number of SGUs after the second bleaching session (p=0.52). Most of the LA group (53.3%) had sensitivity even 24 hours after each bleaching session, but only 26.6% from the NA group reported TS. The intensity of TS was similar for both groups immediately after bleaching but significantly higher for the LA group 24 hours after each bleaching session (p=0.001). After two bleaching sessions, the use of LED/laser light activation did not improve bleaching speed. Persistent tooth sensitivity and higher tooth sensitivity after 24 hours of bleaching were observed when light activation was used.

  3. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  4. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  5. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW) or ascorbic acid (AA) 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time. PMID:26877990

  6. In-Vitro Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide Amorphous Calcium Phosphate on Enamel Susceptibility to Staining by Tea during Bleaching Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemand, Homayoom; Hashemi Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat; Zarenegad, Nafiseh; Tabari, Negin; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bleached enamel is more susceptible to staining, and application of remineralizing agents may decrease enamel susceptibility to staining. This study sought to assess the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on enamel susceptibility to staining during bleaching treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty central and lateral incisors and first premolar teeth were evaluated in four groups of 10. Group one specimens were subjected to in-office bleaching. Group two underwent in-office bleaching followed by surface treatment with CPP-ACP. Group three specimens received home bleaching and group four underwent home bleaching followed by CPP-ACP surface treatment. After each course of daily bleaching, specimens were immersed in tea solution. Home bleaching (15% carbamide peroxide) was performed for 14 days and in-office bleaching (40% hydrogen peroxide) was carried out in two sessions with an eight-day interval. The color of specimens was analyzed at baseline and post-intervention using Easy Shade Shade-Selection Device. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of bleaching type and surface treatment on color change. Then, the means were compared by Tukey’s HSD test (P=0.05). Results: The interaction effect of surface treatment and type of bleaching was not significant on any color parameter (P>0.05). Surface treatment had significant effects on ΔL (P=0.004). Type of bleaching had a significant effect on “b” parameter (P=0.00). The effect of bleaching type on ΔE was significant (P=0.00) but the effect of surface treatment was not (P=0.34). Conclusion: CPP-ACP had no significant effect on preventing enamel staining by tea during bleaching treatment. PMID:27123021

  7. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel treated with 10% sodium ascorbate gel: a case report with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Eugenio Jose; Mena-Serrano, Alexandra; de Andrade, Andrea Mello; Reis, Alessandra; Grande, Rosa Helena; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    It is generally not recommended that bonded restoration treatment should be carried out immediately after bleaching treatment. However, the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate can be useful to avoid a waiting period. This article is a brief review about in vitro proposals to overcome low bond strength values to bleached dental surfaces. It shows a one-year follow-up case report of a young female presenting agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors reshaped with direct resin composite immediately after dental bleaching. Teeth were bleached with a combination of in-office and at-home whitening protocols, followed by the application of a 10% sodium ascorbate gel for one hour, to allow the immediate reshaping with direct resin composite restoration. After one year, the clinical performance of the restoration was successful. The use of sodium ascorbate gel can help the clinician to perform bonding procedures immediately after bleaching treatments.

  8. Influence of 30% hydrogen peroxide bleaching on compomers in their surface modifications and thermal expansion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Choong-Bo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2002-12-01

    The surface modifications and the coefficient of thermal expansion of compomers after treatment with a 30% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent were investigated. Three compomers (Compoglass F, Elan and F2000) were nonbleached and bleached for 1 and 3 days. The surface modification and the coefficient of thermal expansion of each bleached compomer were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope and a thermomechanical analyzer, respectively. As a result, Compoglass F and Elan showed slight surface degradation, whereas F2000 showed many cracks on its surface and these cracks were not observed in Compoglass F and Elan. Bleached Elan and F2000 has changed to the extent where their the coefficient of thermal expansion increased compared with those of nonbleached specimens. In addition, bleached compomers showed a strong inverse correlation between the coefficient of thermal expansion and the volume percent of filler.

  9. Multi stage peroxide and activated peroxide bleaching of kenaf bast pulp.

    PubMed

    Zeinaly, Farhad; Shakhes, Jalal; Zeinali, Nooshin

    2013-02-15

    Soda-anthraquinone kenaf bast pulp (12.5 kappa number and 32% ISO brightness) has been bleached with multi stage peroxide bleaching process. Bleaching process was carried out in different sequences of peroxide stage without and with activator (tetraacetylethylenediamine, TAED) to about 80% ISO brightness. Full bleached pulp production with high brightness and viscosity and also, low chemical oxygen demand (COD) and no adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in effluent are the aims of this study. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charges, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximize the brightness gain at the lowest viscosity loss. H(2)O(2) was activated as bleaching agent under milder conditions, such as low alkalinity or low temperature, by TAED activator. Therefore, TAED charge caused to an improvement in viscosity, pulp yield and effluent COD load. Pre-treatment with EDTA for 30 min and in acidic condition gave 2-4% gain in ISO brightness.

  10. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  11. Effect of pH values of two bleaching gels on enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Natalia Costa; da Costa Soares, Manuella Uilmann Silva; Nery, Marcela Maria; Sales, Wagno Silva; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Martinez

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH and the effect of remineralizing gels after bleaching in different time intervals. Sixty bovine incisors were divided into 2 groups (n = 30). Group 1 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) acid gel and Group 2 was bleached with a 35% HP neutral gel. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) according to the post-bleaching treatment used: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel, or application of a gel consisting of fluoride, potassium nitrate, and nanostructured calcium phosphate. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and enamel microhardness was evaluated at 24 hours and 15 days postbleaching. Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by means of 2-way ANOVA, with repeated measurements and Bonferroni's post-hoc test. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, no significant differences were found between the bleaching gels. At 15 days postbleaching, Group 2 samples demonstrated a significant reduction in microhardness. No significant differences were found between the remineralizing gels, though all of the postbleaching treatments after the use of 35% neutral gel were able to re-establish baseline microhardness. It was concluded that neutral bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness 15 days after bleaching and that the use of remineralizing gels did not significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel. However, in clinical situations, the acquired enamel pellicle protects tooth surfaces, and postbleaching, decalcified enamel would undergo recalcification. This study indicates that it is important to consider the bleaching agent's pH and composition when treating patients with reduced salivary secretion.

  12. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (p<0.01). The GC group presented a significantly lower peroxide passage than did GD and GE (p<0.01). It can be concluded that the hydrogen peroxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the

  13. The timing and operational management of the variables of bleaching in cases of rehabilitation in the esthetic field.

    PubMed

    Sibilla, Pietro; Cogo, Enrico; Turrini, Roberto; Calura, Giorgio; Fradeani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Managing esthetic restoration in the presence of discolored teeth is a challenge for both the clinical team and clinician, whose aim is to use methods that are as minimally invasive as possible, and materials that allow the preservation of dental tissue. Should one wish to act on the discoloration of teeth that are to be restored, or on adjacent ones, it becomes essential to take action on dental tissues. This is done through bleaching and dental restoration, using materials that allow various clinical situations to be managed, such as those with different tonalities between the teeth: prosthetic materials that offer adequate uniformity in their results in those areas where it is necessary to mask the discoloration. The use of technology such as bleaching, and ceramic materials simultaneously can achieve excellent cosmetic results. This article explains how to integrate bleaching compared to prosthetic treatment, in terms of time, in the various cases of discoloration, and what factors to consider when choosing the timing.

  14. Oral care and the use of bone-targeted agents in patients with metastatic cancers: A practical guide for dental surgeons and oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuk, Iryna; Mazzarello, Sasha; Butterfield, Kevin; Appleton, Anthony; Addison, Christina L.; Clemons, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone-targeted agents such as bisphosphonates and the RANKL antibody have revolutionised the care of patients with bone metastases. There has, however been increasing concern about the oral health of these patients and in particular osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), especially with the increasing use of these agents at higher potencies for greater periods of time. Methods A review of the published data in PubMed and meeting abstracts was performed to examine incidence, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical course and management of osteonecrosis of the jaw with focus on cancer patients treated with bone-targeted agents (BTA) for bone metastases. This manuscript takes the most frequent and pertinent questions raised by oncologists, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons and tries to give a pragmatic overview of the literature. Results The incidence of ONJ varies depending on types of bone-targeted agents, duration of treatment and additional risk factors. The causes and pathogenesis of ONJ is not fully elucidated, however bone-targeted therapy induced impaired bone remodelling, microtrauma secondary to jaw activity, and oral bacterial infection seem to be important factors. Since the treatment options for ONJ are limited and not well established, preventive strategies have to be included in patients management. Conclusions Many unanswered questions remain about the optimal oral care of patients receiving bone-targeted agents. Prospective data collection will remedy this and help to provide practical guidelines for the management and treatment of those patients that require dental intervention. PMID:26909271

  15. The influence of chemical activation on tooth bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Torres, Carlos R G; Goto, Edson Hidenobu; Pucci, Cesar Rogério; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of manganese gluconate, a chemical activator of bleaching agents, at a concentration of 0.01% on the efficiency of a 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agent. Forty bovine incisors were immersed in a 25% instant coffee solution for seven days and randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was the control group and consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching gel only. Group 2 consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching gel and 0.01% manganese gluconate. Three readings of color were taken using the Vita Easyshade spectrophotometer: the initial reading, a reading at seven days, and a reading at 14 days. Total color variation was calculated by ΔE*Lab. Data were submitted to the statistical t-test (5%), which showed that after seven days group 2 had a significant increase in the degree of tooth bleaching compared with group 1. The mean values (±SD) were 16.33 (±3.95) for group 1 and 19.29 (±4.97) for group 2. However, the results for group 1 and group 2 were similar after 14 days. Adding 0.01% manganese gluconate to 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel increased the degree of tooth bleaching after a seven-day treatment and did not influence the resulting shade after 14 days.

  16. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used.

  17. Does a toothpaste containing blue covarine have any effect on bleached teeth? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration.

  18. Use of xylanase in the TCF bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Roncero, B.; Vidal, T.; Torres, A.L.; Colom, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental pressures are forcing the pulp and paper industry to develop new technologies that reduce or eliminate the presence of various contaminants in bleaching plant effluents. Oxygen delignification techniques, replacement of elemental chlorine with chlorine dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide and new agents as well as the use of xylanase enzymes for biobleaching, reduce o eliminate the production of chlorinated organic substances. This paper compares the sequence XOZP with OZP in the bleaching of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps. It has been studied the influence of enzymatic treatment on the consumption of bleaching agents: ozone and hydrogen peroxide. Chemical, physical, optical and refining properties of pulps, as well as COD and colour of effluent are also studied. The xylanase treatment is positive and it is possible to manufacture fully bleached pulps at high brightness and viscosity without using chlorine compounds at a low ozone and hydrogen peroxide consumption.

  19. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    PubMed Central

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  20. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  1. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  2. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel. PMID:25992987

  3. Esthetic rehabilitation with tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and direct adhesive restorations.

    PubMed

    Bezerra-Júnior, Douglas Machado; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Martins, Leandro de Moura; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to report esthetic rehabilitation with combined tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and anterior restoration replacement in a 26-year-old man. Clinical examination showed deficient restorations in the maxillary anterior teeth, significant discoloration of the maxillary left central incisor, and hypoplastic stains affecting the maxillary right lateral incisor. A radiograph of the left central incisor showed satisfactory endodontic treatment, allowing preparation for the walking bleach technique. For 3 weeks, 37% carbamide peroxide in the pulp chamber was renewed every week. In-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was also performed on the maxillary teeth. After 21 days, all teeth had been bleached to shade A1. After bleaching was completed, enamel microabrasion of the maxillary right lateral incisor was conducted with 6% hydrochloric acid. In later sessions, microhybrid composite resin restorations were placed in all 4 maxillary incisors. A combination of dental bleaching techniques, enamel microabrasion, and resin restorations was a successful and conservative choice for reestablishing the natural appearance of discolored teeth, improving the self-esteem of the patient.

  4. Evaluation of the effects of conventional versus laser bleaching techniques on enamel microroughness.

    PubMed

    Anaraki, Saeid Nemati; Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Assadian, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahareh

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, bleaching of the teeth within the dental office is one of the most widespread techniques to correct tooth discoloration. Variability of the materials and techniques accompanied with the trend toward esthetic restorations with minimally invasive approaches are increasing. The use of laser in this regard has also been taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office versus laser bleaching on surface roughness of enamel. Fifteen freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally to produce 30 lingual and buccal enamel blocks. Samples were mounted in transparent acrylic resin blocks and polished before treatment. Samples were randomly assigned to laser bleaching (LB) and office bleaching (OB) groups (n = 15 each). Pretreatment evaluation of microroughness was carried out for all samples using profilometer. Samples were treated twice in the OB group with Opalescent Xtra Boost and in the LB group using a laser-activated gel. Microroughness was evaluated after bleaching in both groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA. Both methods increased enamel surface roughness. Microroughness changes were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). Microroughness significantly increased in the OB group (p > 0.05), but there was no significant difference in pre- and post-treatment roughness evaluation in the LB group (p < 0.05). Laser was considered a safer technique because it demonstrated a less surface roughness increase in comparison with the conventional office bleaching procedure.

  5. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  10. POZONE technology to bleach pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Shi, Y.; Le, L.; Wang, S.M.; Wei, J.; Chang, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    Currently, there has been a move in the pulp and paper industry to reduce or eliminate chlorine-based bleaching due to environmental concerns. The POZONE process, a chemical means of ozone production, has been used to bleach wood pulp. The brightness, Kappa number, and viscosity of wood pulp subjected to POZONE treatment have been determined. Brightness increases of up to 44 points and Kappa number decreases of as much as 22 points have been achieved. Promise for effective industrial application has been demonstrated.

  11. Intracoronal bleaching of discolored non-vital teeth using laser irradiation: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesan, Melissa A.; de Castro, Fabiana C.; Matarazzo, Alexandre T.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.

    2004-09-01

    Dissemination of blood into the dentinal tubules caused by pulp extirpation or traumatically induced internal pulp bleeding is a possible cause of discoloration of non-vital teeth. Discolored teeth, especially in the anterior region, can result in considerable cosmetic impairment. The whitening of these teeth is an alternative therapeutic method that is relatively non-invasive and conserves dental hard tissue. Recently, intracoronal bleaching of pulpless discolored teeth can be performed with the association of laser irradiation to hydrogen and carbamide peroxide and can even be accomplished in one session. This report shows a clinical case of an endodontically treated tooth submitted to bleaching using LED light and infrared LLLT therapy.

  12. Safety issues when using carbamide peroxide to bleach vital teeth--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, Maurice P; Bartlett, David W

    2003-03-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide is used to bleach discoloured teeth but since its introduction in the late nineteenth century there have been concerns about its safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the literature on hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide and assesses if these products can be recommended for clinical use. The authors used a Medline search to find the literature for review and from these the findings were divided into laboratory, animal and human studies. In conclusion no dental treatment is without risk but from the evidence it seems that bleaching teeth is comparatively safe.

  13. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2).

  14. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  15. Parametric bleaching of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the nonlinear bleaching of a dense plasma slab. In this new mechanism, the electromagnetic wave incident on the plasma decays into plasma waves and then reappears as a result of the coalescence of the plasma waves at the second boundary of the slab.

  16. Temperature-regulated bleaching and lysis of the coral Pocillopora damicornis by the novel pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Yael; Zicherman-Keren, Maya; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-07-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of symbioses between coral animals and their photosynthetic microalgal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). It has been suggested that large-scale bleaching episodes are linked to global warming. The data presented here demonstrate that Vibrio coralliilyticus is an etiological agent of bleaching of the coral Pocillopora damicornis. This bacterium was present at high levels in bleached P. damicornis but absent from healthy corals. The bacterium was isolated in pure culture, characterized microbiologically, and shown to cause bleaching when it was inoculated onto healthy corals at 25 degrees C. The pathogen was reisolated from the diseased tissues of the infected corals. The zooxanthella concentration in the bacterium-bleached corals was less than 12% of the zooxanthella concentration in healthy corals. When P. damicornis was infected with V. coralliilyticus at higher temperatures (27 and 29 degrees C), the corals lysed within 2 weeks, indicating that the seawater temperature is a critical environmental parameter in determining the outcome of infection. A large increase in the level of the extracellular protease activity of V. coralliilyticus occurred at the same temperature range (24 to 28 degrees C) as the transition from bleaching to lysis of the corals. We suggest that bleaching of P. damicornis results from an attack on the algae, whereas bacterium-induced lysis and death are promoted by bacterial extracellular proteases. The data presented here support the bacterial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  17. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists’ awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. All the bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, there were significant differences in microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (P<0.001). However, no significant differences were detected in microhardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used. PMID:28096946

  18. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists' awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. All the bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, there were significant differences in microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (P<0.001). However, no significant differences were detected in microhardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used.

  19. Inhibition of photosynthetic CO₂ fixation in the coral Pocillopora damicornis and its relationship to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ross; Szabó, Milán; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Vass, Imre; Ralph, Peter J; Larkum, Anthony W D

    2014-06-15

    Two inhibitors of the Calvin-Benson cycle [glycolaldehyde (GA) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] were used in cultured Symbiodinium cells and in nubbins of the coral Pocillopora damicornis to test the hypothesis that inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle triggers coral bleaching. Inhibitor concentration range-finding trials aimed to determine the appropriate concentration to generate inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle, but avoid other metabolic impacts to the symbiont and the animal host. Both 3 mmol l(-1) GA and 20 μmol l(-1) KCN caused minimal inhibition of host respiration, but did induce photosynthetic impairment, measured by a loss of photosystem II function and oxygen production. GA did not affect the severity of bleaching, nor induce bleaching in the absence of thermal stress, suggesting inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle by GA does not initiate bleaching in P. damicornis. In contrast, KCN did activate a bleaching response through symbiont expulsion, which occurred in the presence and absence of thermal stress. While KCN is an inhibitor of the Calvin-Benson cycle, it also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, and it is likely that this was the principal agent in the coral bleaching process. These findings do not support the hypothesis that temperature-induced inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle alone induces coral bleaching.

  20. Clinical performance of topical sodium fluoride when supplementing carbamide peroxide at-home bleaching gel.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; da Silva, Melissa Aline; Pleffken, Patricia Rondon; Valera, Marcia Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the use of 0.11% topical sodium fluoride (SF) desensitizing agent to treat tooth sensitivity during a nightguard tooth whitening procedure. Thirty-two subjects bleached their teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel using an at-home bleaching technique with custom trays. During bleaching treatment, subjects were divided into 2 groups (n = 16). The subjects in Group 1 received a topical gel containing 0.11% SF; the subjects in Group 2 received a placebo gel (PG). Each subject was instructed to place the gel in his/her bleaching tray for 30 min every day following bleaching treatment. Results showed the use of SF did not affect the whitening efficacy of the 10% CP gel. Subjects who received the PG had significantly higher tooth sensitivity when compared with subjects who received SF (P < 0.00). The use of daily 0.11% SF after 10% CP bleaching gel reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching treatment.

  1. Influence of Concentration and Activation on Hydrogen Peroxide Diffusion through Dental Tissues In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Carlos R. G.; Souza, Cristiane S.; Borges, Alessandra B.; Huhtala, Maria Filomena R. L.; Caneppele, Taciana M. F.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of physical and chemical activation on the diffusion time of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching agents through enamel and dentin. One hundred and twenty bovine cylindrical specimens were divided into six groups (n = 20): 20% HP; 20% HP with light activation; 20% HP with manganese gluconate; 35% HP; 35% HP with light activation; and 35% HP with manganese gluconate. The specimens were fixed over transparent epoxy wells with internal cavities to simulate a pulpal chamber. This chamber was filled with an enzymatic reagent to simulate pulpal fluid. The bleaching gels were applied on enamel surface and the image of the pulpal fluid was captured by a video camera to monitor the time of peroxide penetration in each specimen. ANOVA analysis showed that concentration and type of activation of bleaching gel significantly influenced the diffusion time of HP (P < 0.05). 35% HP showed the lowest diffusion times compared to the groups with 20% HP gel. The light activation of HP decreased significantly the diffusion time compared to chemical activation. The highest diffusion time was obtained with 20% HP chemically activated. The diffusion time of HP was dependent on activation and concentration of HP. The higher concentration of HP diffused through dental tissues more quickly. PMID:24163616

  2. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  3. Body image disturbance and skin bleaching.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher A D; McLean, Shua-Kym

    2017-02-24

    This study looks at body image disturbance among Jamaicans who bleach their skin. The hypothesis states that there is a positive relationship between skin bleaching and body image disturbance. The study used a convenience sample of 160 participants with a skin bleaching group (n = 80) and a non-bleaching comparison group (n = 80). The instrument included demographic questions, the body image disturbance questionnaire (BIDQ), and questions about skin bleaching. The results of a t-test revealed that the skin bleaching group (M = 1.5255, SD = 0.42169) was not significantly different from the non-bleaching group (M = 1.4938, SD = 0.74217) in terms of body image disturbance, t(158) = 0.333, p = .740. The participants who bleached did not suffer from body image disturbance. Self-reports revealed that they bleached to acquire beauty, attract a partner, elude the police, and market skin bleaching products. The practice was fashionable and popular and it made some participants feel good, while others were fans of a popular musical artiste who bleached his skin. The majority of participants bleached because of the perceived personal, social, and entrepreneurial benefits of the practice and not because they suffered emotional distress, anxiety, and functional impairment because of their skin colour. However, there was some level of BID among the minority of participants who argued that they bleached because they wanted to be pretty so they were emotionally distressed about there body image and experienced functional impairment.

  4. Effect of chemical activation of 10% carbamide peroxide gel in tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Arantes, Paula Tamiao; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette; Torres, Carlos Rocha

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of chemical agents to increase the bleaching effectiveness of 10% carbamide peroxide. Two hundred and ninety enamel-dentin discs were prepared from bovine incisors. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b*system. The groups were divided according to the bleaching treatment: negative control group (NC): without bleaching; positive control group (PC): bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide gel without any chemical activator; Manganese gluconate (MG); Manganese chloride (MC); Ferrous gluconate (FG); Ferric chloride (FC); and Ferrous sulphate (FS). Three different concentrations (MG, MC, FG, FC: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% w/w; FS: 0.001, 0.002 and 0.003% w/w) for each agent were tested. The bleaching gel was applied on the specimens for 8 h, after which they were immersed in artificial saliva for 16 h, during 14 days. Color assessments were made after 7 and 14 days. The data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Generally, the test groups were unable to increase the bleaching effect (ΔE) significantly compared to the PC group. Only for ΔL, significant higher values compared to the PC group could be seen after 7 days in groups MG (0.02%), and FS (0.002 and 0.003%). The NC group showed significantly lower values than all tested groups. It was concluded that for home bleaching procedures, the addition of chemical activators did not produce a bleaching result significantly higher than the use of 10% carbamide peroxide without activation, and that the concentration of chemical activators used did not significantly influence the effectiveness of treatment.

  5. Adaptive bleaching: A general phenomenon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory and field data bearing on the adaptive bleaching hypothesis (ABH) are largely consistent with it; no data of which we are aware refute it. We generalize the ABH in light of these data and observations. The population of zooxanthellae within an organism is dynamic, the diversity of zooxanthellae is both surprising and difficult to ascertain, and field experiments demonstrate both turn-over in zooxanthella types and habitat-holobiont correlations. Dynamic change in symbiont communities, and the idea of an equilibrium or optimal community that matches the environment at a particular place and time, are concepts that underlie or emerge from much of the recent literature. The mechanism we proposed to explain responses to acute bleaching appears to operate continuously, thereby enabling the host-symbiont holobiont to track even subtle environmental changes and respond promptly to them. These findings enhance the potential importance of the ABH in the outcomes of acute bleaching, which can (1) accelerate this process of holobiont change, and (2) change the set of possible trajectories for how symbiont communities might recover.

  6. Conservative reconstruction of the smile by orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Santos, Eduardo Almada; Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The following is a clinical case report of a patient whose chief complaint was the presence of generalized spacing in the maxillary anterior segment following orthodontic treatment. After meticulous clinical analyses and discussions of the clinical procedures to be adopted, dental bleaching was performed in both arches with 10% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Trèswhite Supreme 10% Hydrogen Peroxide - Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) after the conclusion and stabilization of orthodontic treatment. Then, the orthodontic appliance was removed and the diastemas in the maxillary anterior teeth were closed with Amelogen Plus (Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) resin composite. It was observed that the association of orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures was capable of restoring dental shape, function, and esthetics, allowing the patient to smile without hesitation. PMID:22229015

  7. Effects of varying concentrations of bleach on in vitro HIV-1 replication and the relevance to injection drug use.

    PubMed

    Contoreggi, C; Jones, S; Simpson, P; Lange, W R; Meyer, W A

    2000-01-01

    The use of bleach (hypochlorite) as a disinfectant for drug injection equipment in the intravenous-drug-using population was recommended early in the HIV-1/AIDS epidemic. Epidemiological studies have challenged the use of bleach as an effective measure to prevent HIV-1 transmission. However, in vitro HIV-1 coculture studies have shown that a high concentration of bleach is an effective cytotoxic and potentially virucidal agent. In this study, we demonstrate that HIV-1 peripheral blood mononuclear cell cocultures containing low concentrations of hypochlorite in the media showed earlier conversion to HIV-1 positivity, as measured by the presence of p24 antigen. HIV-1 cocultures with high concentrations of hypochlorite in the culture media, which appeared to be highly cytotoxic, and HIV-1 cocultures without bleach in the media did not exhibit this early p24 antigen positivity. Hypochlorite chemically disinfects by releasing free chlorine that is a potent oxidant. In injection drug equipment, a low residual concentration of bleach is likely to remain in cleaned equipment despite rinsing with water. Low concentrations of oxidants have been shown to enhance tissue inflammation, in vivo, as well as HIV-1 replication in vitro. Previous studies have shown that despite vigorous cleaning of blood-contaminated injection syringes with bleach followed by water, microaggregates of residual blood remained in bleach-cleaned blood-contaminated syringes. Hypothetically, oxidant effects of the residual bleach in the bleach-cleaned syringes could enhance the possibility of infection by remaining HIV-1 contained in a contaminated syringe. We suggest that the likelihood of an injection drug user contracting HIV-1 through the sharing of a bleach-cleaned blood-contaminated syringe may be increased by the cotransmission of residual bleach and its localized tissue-inflammatory effects; however, this has not been statistically proven in epidemiological studies.

  8. Effect of 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching on sound and artificial enamel carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cristiane Franco; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Cavalli, Vanessa; Giannini, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching on Knoop surface microhardness (KHN) and morphology of sound enamel and enamel with early artificial caries lesions (CL) after pH-cycling model (pHcm). Human dental enamel blocks were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10): 1 - sound enamel bleached (S) with CP (Rembrandt/Den-Mat); 2 - S and submitted to pHcm; 3 - CL bleached with CP; 4 - CL stored in artificial saliva and submitted to pHcm; 5 - CL treated with placebo gel and submitted to pHcm; 6 - CL bleached with CP and submitted to pHcm. Enamel blocks with known initial KHN values were demineralized (groups 3 to 6) and submitted to 12 day pHcm (groups 2, 4, 5 and 6). After demineralization and treatments, KHN was determined and the specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The results showed that among CL groups (3 to 6) only the group 3 presented remineralization after treatments. S groups (1 and 2) showed higher KHN and presented less formation of porosities on enamel surface than CL groups after treatments. In conclusion, bleaching procedures on enamel with CL did not exacerbate the demineralization, but should be indicated with caution.

  9. Color and surface temperature variation during bleaching in human devitalized primary teeth: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, Isa T; Navarro, Ricardo S; Ciamponi, Ana Lídia; Miyakawa, Walter; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2008-01-01

    This study's purpose was to make an in vitro assessment of 2 whitening techniques in primary teeth, regarding color and temperature surface variation, during dental bleaching using different catalytic sources. Twenty-one extracted human upper central deciduous incisors were used in this in vitro study. The teeth were darkened with human blood for a period of 21 days. After preparing the teeth, they were randomly distributed into 2 groups, according to bleaching source of activation: (1) a diode laser (DL) group; and (2) a halogen lamp (HL) group. The bleaching process was performed, according to the manufacturer's guidelines, using Whiteness HP (FGM, Joinville, Brazil). The color was assessed by spectrophotometer (CIELab) and the VITA scale (3M) before and immediately after tooth whitening. The temperature increase in the radicular surface during the bleaching was registered with a thermographic camera ThermaCAM SC 3000 (Flir Systems, Danderyd, Sweden) at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN (São Paulo, Brazil). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of color changes, but there was a statistically significant difference for temperature variation. The use of a diode laser and halogen lamp both promoted whitening in devitalized primary teeth in vitro. As a catalytic source of energy, the diode laser--with the applied parameters--promoted a smaller temperature increase compared to the halogen lamp during the bleaching procedure on nonvital primary teeth.

  10. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

  11. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  12. Effects of light irradiation on bleaching by a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Igarashi, A.; Hirai, Y.; Kumagai, Y.; Kurata, H.

    2008-05-01

    A low-concentration hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has attracted attention as a safe office bleaching agent. In this study, the influence of different kinds of light on the bleaching effect of this agent was examined. The bleaching agent was applied to hematoporphyrin-stained paper strips that were then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2), a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2), or an LED (835 mW/cm2) for 5 minutes. The color was measured spectrophotometrically before treatment and every 30 seconds thereafter, and the effects of bleaching on the strip were assessed using the CIE 1976 L* a* b* color coordinate system. Of the three different irradiation conditions, 405-nm laser irradiation gave the strongest bleaching effect with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide containing titanium dioxide. The laser provides strong irradiance at 405 nm, which corresponds to the absorption range of the bleaching agent, and consequently the largest effect was obtained.

  13. Bleaching induced tooth sensitivity: do the existing enamel craze lines increase sensitivity? A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Abdin, Sam; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between the presence of enamel craze lines and the prevalence of tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching. Subjects that met the inclusion criteria (N = 23) were screened to detect the existence of enamel craze lines. In total, 460 teeth were subjected to bleaching where 49% of them presented enamel craze lines. After bleaching (15% hydrogen peroxide), the subjects were asked to rate the level of TS by answering a self-administered questionnaire. The majority of subjects (91%) experienced TS at the first day of bleaching. The TS prevalence decreased gradually to 22% at second day, to 17% at third day, and to 9% at fourth day. After the fourth day, no subject reported TS. While 15% of teeth with craze lines presented TS, 11% of teeth with no craze lines also showed TS. A positive but weak correlation (r = 0.214) was found between the existence of enamel craze lines and TS. In this clinical study, higher incidence of TS was found with the use of 15% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent compared to the previous studies. Patients who would undergo in-office bleaching should be informed that tooth sensitivity is a very often side effect but it may disappear within 1 week.

  14. House cleaning with chlorine bleach and the risks of allergic and respiratory diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Nickmilder, Marc; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Bernard, Alfred

    2007-02-01

    Chlorine bleach or sodium hypochlorite can inactivate common indoor allergens. In this cross-sectional study we evaluated to what extent regular house cleaning with bleach can influence the risks of respiratory and allergic diseases in children. We studied a group of 234 schoolchildren aged 10-13 yr among whom 78 children were living in a house cleaned with bleach at least once per week. Children examination included a questionnaire, an exercise-induced bronchoconstriction test and the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and of serum total and aeroallergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E, Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D). Children living in a house regularly cleaned with bleach were less likely to have asthma (OR, 0.10; CI, 0.02-0.51), eczema (OR, 0.22; CI, 0.06-0.79) and of being sensitized to indoor aeroallergens (OR, 0.53; CI, 0.27-1.02), especially house dust mite (OR, 0.43; CI, 0.19-0.99). These protective effects were independent of gender, ethnicity, previous respiratory infections, total serum IgE level and of family history of allergic diseases. They were however abolished by parental smoking, which also interacted with the use of bleach to increase the risk of recurrent bronchitis (OR, 2.03; CI, 1.12-3.66). House cleaning with bleach had effect neither on the sensitization to pollen allergens, nor on the levels of exhaled NO and of serum CC16 and SP-D. House cleaning with chlorine bleach appears to protect children from the risks of asthma and of sensitization to indoor allergens while increasing the risk of recurrent bronchitis through apparently an interaction with parental smoking. As chlorine bleach is one of the most effective cleaning agent to be found, these observations argue against the idea conveyed by the hygiene hypothesis that cleanliness per se increases the risk of asthma and allergy.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a new bleaching product "Polanight" in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Tsubura, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Ryuji

    2005-09-01

    Home bleaching techniques have been applied as a safe and effective bleaching procedure. Many manufacturers are now marketing home tooth-bleaching products. The purpose of this study was to compare a new bleaching product, Polanight (PN) with a widely used home bleaching product, Opalescence (OP). Fifty-eight healthy Japanese volunteers of both sexes (18 to 47 years of age) were selected. Using a simultaneous split-mouth protocol, custom-made trays with PN and OP were applied to the maxillary right anterior teeth and left anterior teeth, respectively. The shades of the maxillary canine teeth were measured with a portable chromameter (Shade Eye Ex) at the first examination and at 4 weeks (after 2-week bleaching and 2-week rest). Tooth shade changes were analyzed using the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) Lab units. Means of whiteness-blackness difference (DeltaL*), redness-greenness difference (Deltaa*), and yellowness-blueness difference (Deltab*) were 4.00, -1.28 and -7.53 for PN, and 2.54, -0.99, and -5.56 for OP, respectively. Means of color difference (DeltaE*) were 9.23 and 7.78 for PN and OP, respectively. Treatment with either agent demonstrated significant bleaching effects produced by the treatment. The new product, PN, showed significant differences in DeltaL* (P < 0.05) and Deltab* (P < 0.005), but not in the redness-greenness (a*) value when compared with OP. Bleaching with PN was considered more effective than that with OP in the young patient group and in the women.

  16. [Survey of methods of cleaning, decontamination, disinfection and sterilization in dental health services in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Clapeau, G; Decroix, B; Bakayoko-Ly, R; Varenne, B; Dosso-Hien, D; Decroix, M O

    1997-01-01

    The International Aid for Ontology (IAO) carried out this survey of hygiene in the dental health services of 5 French-speaking African countries in 1994, in association with the Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences of Paris. This study received support from the World Health Organization (WHO), the French Ministry for Cooperation and the European Community and the Ivory Coast Oral and Dental Hygiene and Health Committee (CIHSBD). Twenty-nine dental services from Benin (3), Burkina Faso (6), Ivory Coast (12), Mali (5), Niger (3) participated in this survey which gives an insight into the daily hygiene routines of these services. The cleaning, decontamination, disinfection and sterilization procedures for premises, dental equipment, instruments, hands and disposable items were investigated. No individual protocols are reported. Bench tops were cleaned or disinfected daily in 73% of centers and floors were cleaned or disinfected daily in 59% of centers. Walls were cleaned once per week in 44% of the centers. Hands were always washed between patients, with 68% of dental surgeons using only solid or liquid cleansing soaps and the others using antiseptic or disinfectant solutions. The dentist's chair was cleaned or disinfected daily in 68% of centers, mostly with soap (43%) or diluted bleach (23%). Vacuum equipment was cleaned with soap (50%) or diluted bleach (57%), with some surgeries using a combination of the two. Hand pieces and turbines were cleaned and disinfected after each use with alcohol (35%) or diluted bleach (26%) and were sterilized in 9% of centers. Instruments were sterilized with a Poupinel (63%), unspecified sterilizer (26%), autoclave (7%) or low temperature disinfection procedure (4%). Instruments were regularly sterilized in all centers. Single-use disposable items were often reused: 88% of centers reused gloves, 64% anesthetic cartridges and 32% disposable needles. This survey demonstrates that dentists do attempt to achieve appropriate

  17. Effect of an oxygenating agent on oral bacteria in vitro and on dental plaque composition in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez y Mostajo, Mercedes; van der Reijden, Wil A.; Buijs, Mark J.; Beertsen, Wouter; van der Weijden, Fridus; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2014-01-01

    Oral bacteria live in symbiosis with the host. Therefore, when mouthwashes are indicated, selective inhibition of taxa contributing to disease is preferred instead of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The potential selectivity of an oxygenating mouthwash, Ardox-X® (AX), has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. Material and methods: In vitro, 16 oral bacterial strains were tested using agar diffusion susceptibility, minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration tests. A pilot clinical study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers. Clinical assessments and microbiological sampling of supragingival plaque were performed at 1 month before the experiment (Pre-exp), at the start of the experiment (Baseline) and after the one-week experimental period (Post-exp). During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures. The microbiological composition of plaque was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Results: AX showed high inter-species variation in microbial growth inhibition. The tested Prevotella strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed the highest sensitivity, while streptococci and Lactobacillus acidophilus were most resistant to AX. Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193), nor did the microbial composition of plaque. During a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing plaque scores increased from 2.21 (0.31) at Baseline to 2.43 (0.39) Post-exp. A significant microbial shift in composition was observed: genus Streptococcus and Veillonella increased while Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Leptotrichia, Cardiobacterium and Capnocytophaga decreased (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: AX has the potential for selective inhibition of oral bacteria. The shift in oral microbiome after 1 week of rinsing deserves further research

  18. Microhardness of demineralized enamel following home bleaching and laser-assisted in office bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Akbari, Majid; Hamzei, Haniye

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little data regarding the effect of tooth whitening on microhardness of white spot lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of home-bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching on microhardness of demineralized enamel. Material and Methods Forty bovine incisors were selected and immersed in a demineralizing solution for 12 weeks to induce white spot lesions. Enamel blocks were prepared and randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each. The first group underwent home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide which was applied for 8 hours a day over a period of 15 days. In the second group, in-office bleaching was performed by 40% hydrogen peroxide and powered by irradiation from an 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (CW, 2W). This process was performed for 3 sessions every seven days, in 15 days. The specimens were stored in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva during the experiment. Surface microhardness was assessed before and after the bleaching therapies in both groups. Results Microhardness decreased significantly following both home bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in hardness values among the two groups either before (p=0.131) or after (p=0.182) the bleaching procedures. Conclusions Tooth whitening through home bleaching or laser-assisted in-office bleaching can result in a significant reduction in microhardness of white spot lesions. Therefore, it is suggested to take protective measures on bleached demineralized enamel. Key words:White spot lesion, bleaching, laser, microhardness, demineralized enamel, home bleaching, in-office bleaching. PMID:26330939

  19. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  20. Effects of new formulas of bleaching gel and fluoride application on enamel microhardness: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Juliana B; Mazur, Rui Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the new formulas of bleaching products and the effect of subsequent applications of fluoride on the hardness of enamel during and after tooth bleaching. The crowns of 60 extracted intact human molars were sectioned longitudinally; the buccal part was embedded in acrylic resin, the occlusal part was ground flat, exposing enamel and dentin, and then polished. Baseline Knoop microhardness (KHN) of enamel was determined. The specimens were then randomly divided into six groups of 10 specimens, and each group was assigned to a specific 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent. A: Opalescence, B: Opalescence PF (3% potassium nitrate and 0.11% fluoride), C: Nite White Excel 3 (ACP), D: Opalescence + F (acidulated phosphate fluoride 1.23%), E: Opalescence PF + F, F: Nite White Excel 3 + F. The teeth were bleached for eight hours; after each procedure, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Immediately after day 21 of bleaching, the specimens in groups D, E and F received fluoride 1.23% for five minutes. KHN tests w ere performedbefore (baseline = control), during (14, 21) and two weeks (35 days) after the bleaching procedure and were statistically compared using ANOVA/Tukey's t-test (alpha < 0.05). The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference among the bleaching materials (p = 0.123). A significant enamel KHN reduction (p < 0.001) was observed for all bleaching materials, with no difference among them. Two weeks after bleaching, all the groups that received fluoride showed a significant increase in microhardness. For the new bleaching formulas, the enamel was restored to a value similar to baseline.

  1. Effect of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength of hybrid composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Samanian, Noushmehr; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: The entire effects of different bleaching regimens on the mechanical properties of composite resins have remained unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength (FS) of hybrid composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 80 bar-shaped specimens of hybrid composite resins were fabricated and randomly divided into four groups, 20 specimens in each group. First group (C) was considered as control. The other groups were treated by home bleaching (HB) agent, in-office bleaching (IB) agent, and the combination regimens (HIB), respectively. The FS was evaluated by three-point bending test by using a Universal Testing Machine. All data were analyzed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 18, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Turkey's post hoc statistical tests (α = 0.05). Results: The maximum mean value of FS was seen in HB group with significant differences to other groups (P < 0.05). Also, the minimum FS was observed in group HIB. Conclusion: Application of different bleaching regimens does not have any adverse effect on the FS of hybrid composite resins. However, the administration of HB regimens seemed to have lesser negative impact on the FS. PMID:27099423

  2. Effect of 10% Sodium Ascorbate on Shear Bond Strength of Bleached Teeth - An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K C; Nitin, Mirdha; Ramesh, Sachhi; Sharanappa, Kambale; Nishant, Ajgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient often requires some additional interventions such as replacement of old restorations, laminates and veneers after bleaching, for aesthetic purposes. The residual oxygen inhibits polymerization of resin based materials which results in reduced bond strength of the restorations. Some techniques are available to solve the clinical problems related to the post bleach compromised bond strength. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate, the role of 10% sodium ascorbate on reversing the compromised bond strength and compare enamel shear bond strength of 5th and 6th generation dentine bonding agents on bleached and unbleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty freshly extracted human anterior teeth were assigned in to Group A and Group B of 40 teeth each. Samples in both groups were subdivided in to 4 subgroups of 10 teeth each. In Group A composite resins was bonded using 5th generation dentine bonding agent (3M Single Bond) and Group B was bonded using 6th generation (3M ESPE Adper SE Plus). Subgroups were subjected to the procedure as, A1;B1 etching and bonding (control), A2; B2 bleaching, etching and immediate bonding, A3; B3 bleaching,10% ascorbic acid treatment for 10 minutes after that etching and bonding immediately, A4; B4 bleaching, storage in artificial saliva for 4 days and then etching and bonding. Pola office, in office bleach (SDI (082216) was used for bleaching. The specimens were subjected to shear load in a Universal testing machine to evaluate bond strength. Results A decrease in bond strength was seen with 6th generation adhesive system compared to 5th generation bonding system, which is statistically significant, p<0.001. Conclusion Treating the bleached enamel surfaces when treated with 10% sodium ascorbate, which reverses the compromised bond strength and is a good alternative to delayed bonding. PMID:26393201

  3. Colorless and high strength MgO/Al2 O3 /SiO2 glass-ceramic dental material using zirconia as nucleating agent.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Marc; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Glasses in the system of MgO/Al2 O3 /SiO2 with different concentrations of zirconia as nucleating agent, some of them additionally doped with ZnO or P2 O5 , were annealed in a temperature range from 950 to 1150°C. The use of zirconia led to colorless glass-ceramics, which were transparent to opaque. In all studied compositions, α-/β-quartz-solid-solutions, zirconia as well as spinel or gahnite (ZnAl2 O4 )/spinel-solid-solution precipitated. The highest bending strength of 475 MPa was obtained after annealing at 1000°C for 3 h. The increase of the annealing temperature or an increase in the zirconia concentration resulted in an increase of the microhardness up to 13.3 GPa and of the fracture toughness up to 2.7 MPa m(1/2) . The addition of ZnO results in an increase of the hardness up to 12.5 GPa. The addition of ZnO or P2 O5 led to a fracture toughness of 2 MPa m(1/2) . The described physical properties had to be highly advantageous for the preparation of colorless high strength dental glass-ceramics.

  4. The potential optical coherence tomography in tooth bleaching quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we report the outcomes from a pilot study on using OCT functional imaging method to evaluate and quantify color alteration in the human teeth in vitro. The image formations of the dental tissues without and with treatment 35% hydrogen peroxide were obtained by an OCT system at a 1310 nm central wavelength. One parameter for the quantification of optical properties from OCT measurements is introduced in our study: attenuate coefficient (μ). And the attenuate coefficient have significant decrease ( p < 0.001) in dentine as well as a significant increase ( p < 0.001) in enamel was observed during tooth bleaching process. From the experimental results, it is found that attenuate coefficient could be useful to assess color alteration of the human tooth samples. OCT has a potential to become an effective tool for the assessment tooth bleaching. And our experiment offer a now method to evaluate color change in visible region by quantitative analysis of the infrared region information from OCT.

  5. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  6. The role of microorganisms in coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Kushmaro, Ariel; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Banin, Ehud; Yossi, Loya

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiosis between the coral host and its endosymbiotic algae. The prevalence and severity of the disease have been correlated with high seawater temperature. During the last decade, the major hypothesis to explain coral bleaching is that high water temperatures cause irreversible damage to the symbiotic algae resulting in loss of pigment and/or algae from the holobiont. Here, we discuss the evidence for an alternative but not mutually exclusive concept, the microbial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  7. Coral bleaching: the role of the host.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew H; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Ralph, Peter J; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. Very recently, research has focused on the possibility of corals switching symbionts as a means of adjusting to accelerating increases in sea surface temperature. Although symbionts are clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching cannot be readily explained by differences in symbionts among coral species. Here we outline several potential mechanisms by which the host might influence the bleaching response, and conclude that predicting the fate of corals in response to climate change requires both members of the symbiosis to be considered equally.

  8. Electrochemical mercerization, souring, and bleaching of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1995-10-10

    Economical, pollution-free treatment of textiles occurs in a low voltage electrochemical cell that mercerizes (or scours), sours, and optionally bleaches without effluents and without the purchase of bulk caustic, neutralizing acids, or bleaches. The cell produces base in the cathodic chamber for mercerization and an equivalent amount of acid in the anodic chamber for neutralizing the fabric. Gas diffusion electrodes are used for one or both electrodes and may simultaneously generate hydrogen peroxide for bleaching. The preferred configuration is a stack of bipolar electrodes, in which one or both of the anode and cathode are gas diffusion electrodes, and where no hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode. 5 figs.

  9. Electrochemical mercerization, souring, and bleaching of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Economical, pollution-free treatment of textiles occurs in a low voltage electrochemical cell that mercerizes (or scours), sours, and optionally bleaches without effluents and without the purchase of bulk caustic, neutralizing acids, or bleaches. The cell produces base in the cathodic chamber for mercerization and an equivalent amount of acid in the anodic chamber for neutralizing the fabric. Gas diffusion electrodes are used for one or both electrodes and may simultaneously generate hydrogen peroxide for bleaching. The preferred configuration is a stack of bipolar electrodes, in which one or both of the anode and cathode are gas diffusion electrodes, and where no hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode.

  10. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  11. A comparative study on dental pulp response to calcium hydroxide, white and grey mineral trioxide aggregate as pulp capping agents

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarizadeh, Ali; Shahpasandzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Shahpasandzadeh, Mahdieh; Torabi, Molok; Parirokh, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Context: Vital pulp therapy has been known as one of the treatment options to preserve pulp after being exposed by trauma or caries. Aim: To investigate human pulpal response to white and grey mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA, GMTA) and Dycal (MTA) as pulp capping agents. Setting and Design: Human volunteers were participated in this randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 90 intact first and second premolars of human maxillary and mandibular teeth. The teeth were randomly assigned into three groups of 30 each. Under local anesthesia, teeth were exposed and capped either with GMTA, WMTA, or Dycal. After 30, 60, and 90 days 10 teeth of each group were extracted and prepared for histologic observation. Statistical Analysis: Histopathologic data were analyzed by χ2, Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney tests. Results: the calcified bridge in teeth that were capped with GMTA was significantly thicker than Dycal at 30 and 60 days (P= 0.015 and P=0.002, respectively); whereas WMTA showed significantly thicker calcified bridge than Dycal at 90 days (P=0.02). In addition, GMTA specimens showed significantly less inflammation compared to Dycal samples at 90 days interval (P=0.019). No significant difference was found between GMTA and WMTA in terms of calcified bridge thickness and pulp inflammatory response to the capping materials (P>0.05). Conclusions: Based on the result of this study, both types of MTA can be suggested as the materials of choice for direct pulp capping procedure instead of Dycal as hard setting calcium hydroxide cement. PMID:22144801

  12. Effectiveness of treatment with carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide in subjects affected by dental fluorosis: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury de Jesus; Hernandez-Hernandez, Felipe; Berumen-Maldonado, Rocio; Patiño-Marin, Nuria

    2003-01-01

    Dental fluorosis is an endemic dental health problem around the world; so, it is important to develop clinical alternatives that are non-invasive and inexpensive. In this study, nightguard vital bleaching technique (NVBT), using carbamide and hydrogen peroxide as active agents, has shown itself to be effective in whitening teeth affected by dental fluorosis. Carbamide peroxide at 10 and 20% and hydrogen peroxide at 7.5% showed good clinical effectiveness in improving clinical appearence, but it is important to point out that clinical success is only in cases of class 1 to 3 of the Tooth Surface Index of Fluorosis. When comparing 10 and 20% concentrations of carbamide peroxide, there was no difference in the clinical effectiveness (p > 0.05); but when comparing both concentrations of carbamide peroxide against hydrogen peroxide, results showed that carbamide peroxide was more effective in whitening in cases of dental fluorosis, the difference being statistically significant (p < 0.05). NVBT has two advantages: it is a non-invasive technique and the relationship cost/benefit is excellent; only a few patients reported tenderness or mild tooth sensitivity.

  13. Efficacy of and effect on tooth sensitivity of in-office bleaching gel concentrations: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Reis, A; Kossatz, S; Martins, G C; Loguercio, A D

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the side effects of in-office bleaching agents, less-concentrated hydrogen peroxide (HP) gels have been released by manufacturers. We evaluated the tooth sensitivity (TS) and bleaching efficacy (BE) of two HP concentrations in this study. Gels containing 35% and 20% HP (HP35 and HP20, respectively) were applied on teeth of 60 caries-free patients. Color was recorded at baseline and one week after the first and second bleaching sessions using the Vita Classical shade guide. TS was recorded on a 0-4 scale. BE at each weekly recall was evaluated by Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Absolute risk of TS and its intensity was evaluated by Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). After two bleaching sessions, color change of approximately eight tabs was obtained with HP35; whereas, with HP20 it was six tabs (p<0.05). Only 26.7% (HP35) and 16.7% (HP20) of the participants reported TS, and no statistical differences were detected among them. Both in-office bleaching gels showed similar TS intensity, but the 35% HP agent produced faster bleaching.

  14. Laser Teeth Bleaching: Evaluation of Eventual Side Effects on Enamel and the Pulp and the Efficiency In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Light and heat increase the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide. There is no evidence that light activation (power bleaching with high-intensity light) results in a more effective bleaching with a longer lasting effect with high concentrated hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels. Laser light differs from conventional light as it requires a laser-target interaction. The interaction takes place in the first instance in the bleaching gel. The second interaction has to be induced in the tooth, more specifically in the dentine. There is evidence that interaction exists with the bleaching gel: photothermal, photocatalytical, and photochemical interactions are described. The reactivity of the gel is increased by adding photocatalyst of photosensitizers. Direct and effective photobleaching, that is, a direct interaction with the colour molecules in the dentine, however, is only possible with the argon (488 and 415 nm) and KTP laser (532 nm). A number of risks have been described such as heat generation. Nd:YAG and especially high power diode lasers present a risk with intrapulpal temperature elevation up to 22°C. Hypersensitivity is regularly encountered, being it of temporary occurrence except for a number of diode wavelengths and the Nd:YAG. The tooth surface remains intact after laser bleaching. At present, KTP laser is the most efficient dental bleaching wavelength. PMID:25874258

  15. Sensitization of bleached Stentor to far UV.

    PubMed

    Burchill, B R; Bordy, M; Grene, R B

    1979-10-01

    Stentors are more sensitive to far UV-induced delay of oral regeneration following bleaching of their UV-absorbant cortical pigment granules. This finding supports a subcortical location of UV-sensitive sites.

  16. Permeability of different groups of maxillary teeth after 38% hydrogen peroxide internal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lívia Maria; Vansan, Luis Pascoal; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Marchesan, Melissa Andréia

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of internal tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the permeability of the coronal dentin in maxillary anterior teeth and premolars. Seventy teeth (14 per group) were used: central incisors (CI), lateral incisor (LI), canines (C), first premolars (1PM) and second premolars (2PM). Pulp chamber access and transversal sectioning at 2 mm from the cementoenamel junction were performed and the specimens were divided into 2 groups (n= 7): a) no treatment and b) bleaching with 38% H2O2. The bleaching agent was applied to the buccal surface and to the pulp chamber for 10 min. This procedure was repeated 3 times. The specimens were processed histochemically with copper sulfate and rubeanic acid, sectioned longitudinally, and digitalized in a scanner. The area of stained dentin was measured using Image Tool software. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001) among the untreated groups, CI (0.23 +/- 0.26) having the lowest permeability and LI (10.14 +/- 1.89) the highest permeability. Among the bleached groups, dentin permeability was increased in all groups of teeth except for 2PM. It may be concluded that bleaching with 38% H2O2 affected dentin permeability near the pulp chamber in maxillary anterior teeth and in first and second premolars.

  17. Low Concentration H2O2/TiO_N in Office Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, J.F.; Pretel, H.; Floros, M.C.; Luizzi, A.C.C.; Dantas, A.A.R.; Fernandez, E.; Moncada, G.; de Oliveira, O.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this randomized double-blinded clinical trial was to test the efficacy and tooth sensitivity promoted by the use of an in-office 15% H2O2 bleaching agent containing nanoparticles of TiO_N photocatalyzed with LED/laser light (HP15) and a control of 35% H2O2 (HP35). Methods: Forty healthy volunteers, both sexes, aged 18 to 25 yr, were randomly distributed in 2 groups: HP15 (n = 20) was treated in 3 sessions of 48 min each, and HP35 (n = 20) was treated in 3 sessions of 45 min each. The efficacy (E) was evaluated by ΔE values measured via reflectance spectroscopy. The tooth sensitivity (S) was analyzed by visual analog scale (low, average, high, very high). The absolute risk reduction and the number needed to treat index were calculated. The data were analyzed by mixed repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni-correction t test (α = 0.05). Results: For the efficacy, significant differences were found for number of bleaching sessions (p = .0001; ηp2 = 0.73 and π = 1.000) and for the interaction of number of sessions and bleaching protocols (p = .0001; ηp2 = 0.319 and π = 1.000. The tooth sensitivity level showed significant differences only between the bleaching protocols. Absolute risk reduction calculated was 52% and number needed to treat, 1.92. Conclusions: The bleaching agent with the lower concentration (HP15) promoted lower levels of tooth sensitivity and presented greater efficacy compared to the control (HP35) in patients between 18 and 25 yr old. The limitation of short-term evaluation did not provide information about the longevity of the tooth bleaching (Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry Re Bec no. U1111-1150-4466). PMID:24868014

  18. In vitro evaluation of calcium and phosphorus concentrations in enamel submitted to an in-office bleaching gel treatment containing calcium.

    PubMed

    Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Antunes, Edina Veloso Goncalves; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; do Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Florio, Flavia Martao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the calcium and phosphorus concentrations in enamel surfaces before, during, and after treatment with in-office 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents with 2% calcium gluconate (WCa) or without calcium gluconate (W). Twenty sound human third molars were divided into 2 groups of 10. The bleaching agents were applied to the tooth surfaces in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions: WCa, 40 minutes per day at 3 sessions with 7-day intervals; W, 3 × 15 minutes per day at 3 sessions with 7-day intervals. Enamel microbiopsies were performed prior to the bleaching treatment, immediately after each bleaching session (first, second, and third applications), and 7 and 14 days following the last bleaching treatment. The concentration levels of calcium and phosphorus in the microbiopsy specimens were recorded spectrophotometrically. There was a statistically significant decrease in the calcium concentration 7 days after the last bleaching treatment, but there was a recovery to baseline values at 14 days, regardless of the bleaching agent used (WCa and W). When W was used, there was no difference in the phosphorus concentration over time. The phosphorus concentration in the WCa group decreased after the third application, showing a significant difference from the W group at this time. However, an increase in the phosphorus concentration was observed in the posttreatment period, and no significant differences were observed between values at baseline and those at 14 days posttreatment. The in-office bleaching gel containing 2% calcium gluconate did not affect the calcium and phosphorus concentrations in enamel as compared to a calcium-free bleaching agent.

  19. Quantification of the efficiency for photo-bleached pigments using cellulose matrixes as substrate and digitalized gray scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Correia Lins, E. C. C.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-02-01

    The bleaching process is been objective of many studies since the beginning of the XX century. Heat has been used to activate the hydrogen peroxide; the aesthetic results were satisfactory, but associated with this process high incidence of hypersensitivity as well as radical endodontic treatment was observed making this technique clinically hard to implemented. Nowadays the dental bleaching is one of the most wanted aesthetic procedures by the population at the dental office. With the utilization of new light sources as LASER and LED a technique to evaluate the efficiency of photo-bleaching of many pigments is necessary. This work demonstrates a new method to quantify the breakage of pigments on a cellulose matrix using a blue LED system with 1W/cm2. We employed a computational analysis and digital spectroscopy. These matrixes were used because of its inert physical-chemical properties. The obtained results are within the expectative, where the groups irradiated with light presents more broken pigments that the group with no light, it was also possible to observe on this experiment that light acts decreasing the free energy of the reaction and that way speeding up the rate of bleaching.

  20. Effects of pulp consistency and mixing intensity on ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, M.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that ozone bleaching is feasible only at low or high pulp consistencies. However, recent research suggests that ozone bleaching at medium consistency is possible under conditions of high-intensity mixing. This article presents experimental results for softwood and hardwood pulps that were ozone-bleached over a range of consistencies (3-40%) and mixing conditions. Ozone was pressurized and delivered by a proprietary automated system. Results indicate that ozone bleaching at medium consistency can be as effective as bleaching at high consistency. Medium-consistency bleaching has the advantage of greater selectivity, resulting in higher pulp viscosity.

  1. 3D Surface Profile and Color Stability of Tooth Colored Filling Materials after Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Irawan, Bryant Anthony; Irawan, Stacey Natalie; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Sukminingrum, Ninin; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide home bleaching and in-office bleaching on the color stability and 3D surface profile of dental restorative filling materials. Thirty discs (n = 30) measure 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick for each of three restorative materials. These are nanofilled composite Filtek Z350 XT, the submicron composite Estelite Σ Quick, and nanofilled glass ionomer Ketac N100 nanoionomer and were fabricated in shade A2. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n = 10): subgroup A (Opalescence PF), subgroup B (Opalescence Boost in-office bleaching), and subgroup C (distilled water) serving as control. Samples were bleached according to the manufacturer's instructions for a period of two weeks. The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE L*, a*, b*) system was chosen for image processing, while 3D surface profile was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Statistical analyses were performed with the Mann-Whitney tests and Krusal-Wallis with a P value of ≤0.05. The three restorative materials showed significant color changes (ΔE); P ≤ 0.05. In diminishing order, the mean color changes recorded were Estelite Σ (3.82 ± 1.6) > Ketac Nano (2.97 ± 1.2) > Filtek Z350 XT (2.25 ± 1.0). However, none of the tested materials showed statistically significant changes in surface roughness; P > 0.05. PMID:26558267

  2. Mineral loss and color change of enamel after bleaching and staining solutions combination.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Catelan, Anderson; Fraga Briso, André Luiz; Fraga Zaze, Ana Carolina Soares; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-10-01

    Pigments of food and beverages could affect dental bleaching efficacy. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate color change and mineral loss of tooth enamel as well as the influence of staining solutions normally used by adolescent patients undergoing home bleaching. Initial hardness and baseline color were measured on enamel blocks. Specimens were divided into five groups (n=5): G1 (control) specimens were kept in artificial saliva throughout the experiment (3 weeks); G2 enamel was exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide for 6 h daily, and after this period, the teeth were cleaned and stored in artificial saliva until the next bleaching session; and G3, G4, and G5 received the same treatments as G2, but after bleaching, they were stored for 1 h in cola soft drink, melted chocolate, or red wine, respectively. Mineral loss was obtained by the percentage of hardness reduction, and color change was determined by the difference between the data obtained before and after treatments. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and Fisher's test (α=0.05). G3 and G5 showed higher mineral loss (92.96 ± 5.50 and 94.46 ± 1.00, respectively) compared to the other groups (p ≤ 0.05). G5 showed high-color change (9.34 ± 2.90), whereas G1 presented lower color change (2.22 ± 0.44) (p ≤ 0.05). Acidic drinks cause mineral loss of the enamel, which could modify the surface and reduce staining resistance after bleaching.

  3. Spectroscopic features of native and bleached opio-melanins.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A; Mosca, L; De Marco, C

    1995-01-18

    Opioid peptides can be converted by tyrosinase into melanin-like compounds, in which the peptide moiety is retained. Such pigments, named opio-melanins, exhibit a characteristic absorption spectrum with a maximum at about 330 nm and a different solubility behaviour with respect to dopa-melanin, being completely soluble in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opio-melanins precipitate in aqueous solutions below pH 5.0, and show apparent pKa values of 3.1, 3.6 and 4.4 for Tyr-Gly-melanin, Tyr-Gly-Gly-melanin and leuenk-melanin, respectively. The concomitant oxidation of dopa and opioid peptides by tyrosinase produces mixed polymers, showing the distinctive absorption peak at 330 nm. In the dark, in the pH range 5.5-7.0 the pigments are completely stable, whereas H2O2 addition provokes a slight degradation. At higher pH values or under simulated solar illumination with or without hydrogen peroxide, bleaching occurs more rapidly than in dopa-melanin. Upon photoirradiation the absorption spectrum of opio-melanins undergoes a marked variation, the peak at 330 nm being replaced by a broad shoulder in the range 280-350 nm. The absorption spectra of native and bleached pigments and the extent of opio-melanins degradation by bleaching agents, confirm the hypothesis that the different initial structure of the precursors accounts for a final diverse polymeric architecture of these pigments with respect to dopa-melanin.

  4. Effects of home bleaching on surface hardness and surface roughness of an experimental nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Zuryati, Ab-Ghani; Qian, Ooi Qian; Dasmawati, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Home bleaching agents may not be safe for composite resins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 10 and 20% Opalescence® PF home bleaching agents on the surface roughness and hardness of universal nanocomposite (Filtek Z350), anterior nanocomposite (KeLFiL), and nanohybrid composite (TPH 3). Materials and Methods: Fifty-four composite resin samples with 18 samples for each type of composite resin were prepared using acrylic molds (4 × 2 mm). Each type of composite resin was further divided into three groups [n = 6 controls were placed in distilled water for 14 days and the other two groups of n = 6 were bleached with 10 and 20% carbamide peroxide (CP), respectively for 14 days]. Surface hardness of the composite resin was tested with a Vickers hardness tester, whereas surface roughness was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results: There were significant changes in the surface hardness of KeLFiL and TPH 3. However, all the tested materials showed no significant changes in the surface roughness. Conclusion: After 14 days of home bleaching treatment, there was no adverse effect on the surface roughness of all three composite resins, although the surface hardness for KeLFiL and TPH 3 were significantly reduced. PMID:23956541

  5. Removing polysaccharides-and saccharides-related coloring impurities in alkyl polyglycosides by bleaching with the H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system.

    PubMed

    Yanmei, Liu; Jinliang, Tao; Jiao, Sun; Wenyi, Chen

    2014-11-04

    The effect of H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system, namely NaHCO3 as alkaline agent with the (tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED)) TAED-activated peroxide system, bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution was studied by spectrophotometry. The results showed that the optimal bleaching conditions about H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution were as follows: molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 was 0.06, addition of H2O2 was 8.6%, addition of NaHCO3 was 3.2%, bleaching temperature of 50-65 °C, addition of MgO was 0.13%, and bleaching time was 8h. If too much amount of NaHCO3 was added to the system and maintained alkaline pH, the bleaching effect would be greatly reduced. Fixing molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 and increasing the amount of H2O2 were beneficial to improve the whiteness of alkyl polyglycosides, but adding too much amount of H2O2 would reduce the transparency. In the TAED-activated peroxide system, NaHCO3 as alkaline agent and buffer agent, could overcome the disadvantage of producing black precipitates when NaOH as alkaline agent.

  6. In vitro assessment of a gel base containing 2% chlorhexidine as a sodium perborate's vehicle for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniel Pinto de; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Souza-Filho, Francisco José de; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess a gel base containing 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) as a vehicle to be mixed with sodium perborate for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth, comparing its bleaching efficacy to sodium perborate mixed with other vehicles; 37% carbamide peroxide and 30% hydrogen peroxide. There were 110 fresh bovine incisors artificially stained using whole blood. The samples were divided into 11 groups and the intracoronal bleaching was performed using the "walking bleach technique". The bleaching agents were replaced three times at 7-day intervals. Using digital photos and a shade guide created for bovine teeth, the samples were evaluated at day 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28. On evaluation day, the photos were examined by three endodontists giving scores from 1 to 5 based on the shade guide created. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskall-Wallis test. After 28 days, all evaluated teeth received scores that were statistically similar. Groups that used sodium perborate and a liquid vehicle bleached faster than those that used a gel based vehicle. The CHX gel allowed dissociation for the bleaching agent. The 2% CHX gel exhibited a good potential for use as a vehicle for sodium perborate or as a complement for carbamide peroxide.

  7. Comparison between traditional and laser bleaching treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, Ilene C. R.; Redigolo, Marcela L.; Liporoni, Priscila C. S.; Munin, Egberto

    2001-10-01

    Fifteen human embedded third molars were used in this in vitro study to evaluate the effects of two bleaching products associated or not with Argon laser application. The samples received a cervical-apical cut and were longitudinally cut into 4 parts resulting in 75 specimens. These parts were divided at random into 5 groups and submitted to the traditional power bleaching procedure for enamel. Group 1 was separated as a control group. Group 2 was exposed to 37 % carbamide peroxide bleaching solution and developed with an Argon laser application. The same solution was used in Group 3 but the bleaching was developed with an halogen lamp irradiation. 35 % carbamide peroxide were used in Groups 4 and 5. One was developed as Group 2 and the other as Group 3. The samples were analyzed under a photoreflectance experiment. We observed that Group 2 presented more white spectra than Group 3. However, Groups 4 and 5 showed the same results independent of the use of the laser or the halogen lamp for the light curing. Comparing both bleaching products, the 35 % carbamide peroxide was more efficient on its purposes than the other one.

  8. Bleaching with lignin-oxidizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Pratima; Anand, Aradhna; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2006-01-01

    General concern about the environmental impact of chlorine bleaching effluents has led to a trend towards elementary chlorine-free or totally chlorine free bleaching methods. Considerable interest has been focused on the use of biotechnology in pulp bleaching, as large number of microbes and the enzymes produced by them are known to be capable of preferential degradation of native lignin and complete degradation of wood. Enzymes of the hemicellulolytic type, particularly xylan-attacking enzymes xylanases are now used commercially in the mills for pulp treatment and subsequent incorporation into bleach sequences. Certain white-rot fungi can delignify Kraft pulps increasing their brightness and their responsiveness to brightening with chemicals. The fungal treatments are too slow but the enzymes produced from the fungi can also delignify pulps and these enzymatic processes are likely to be easier to optimize and apply than the fungal treatments. This article presents an overview of the developments in the application of lignin-oxidizing enzymes in bleaching of chemical pulps. The present knowledge of the mechanisms on the action of enzymes as well as the practical results and advantages obtained on the laboratory and industrial scale are discussed.

  9. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer, Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0-4) during bleaching and up to 48 h after each session. The primary outcome of absolute risk of tooth sensitivity was compared using the Fisher's exact test (α = 0.05). The intensity of tooth sensitivity and the efficacy of in-office bleaching were also statistically evaluated. No significant differences in absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity were detected between the groups (p = 1.0 and p = 0.53, respectively). BE was also found to be similar between the groups (p = 0.67). Although the use of a nano-calcium phosphate paste associated with fluoride and potassium nitrate did not influence the whitening outcome, but it also did not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity.

  10. The bleaching efficiency of KTP and diode 810 nm lasers on teeth stained with different substances: An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Lagori, G; Vescovi, P; Merigo, E; Meleti, M.; Fornaini, C

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bleaching efficiency of two different lasers (KTP and diode 810 nm) on teeth, randomly divided by means an Excel function (Microsoft Excel 2010 “Fx causale”) and stored in physiological solution, that were previously stained with different substances commonly considered as a cause of tooth discoloration, such as coffee, tea and red fruits and to investigate the role of laser irradiation in an experimental model, during the dental bleaching process. Methods: Three groups of 45 bovine teeth were created and immersed for one week in a solution of tea, coffee or red fruits respectively. Each group was divided into three sub-groups of fifteen teeth. One was bleached with a 30% hydrogen peroxide gel for 30 min only as control, another 15 teeth group was bleached with the gel plus 810 nm diode laser irradiation and the last group was bleached with the gel plus KTP irradiation. The lasers were applied in three cycles of 30 sec each with a power of 1.5 W localized on a 10 mm spot on the teeth. The temperature of the gel was checked during the bleaching procedure using a thermometer and the colour of each tooth was measured by a spectrophotometer. Results: Statistical analysis of the collected data was performed using Graph Pad Prism, version 6.01 software, Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's multiple comparison test and Mann-Whitney test. P value <0.0001 was considered extremely significant (***), P value between 0.001 to 0.01 very significant (**), P value between 0.01 to 0.05 significant (*) and P value >0.05 not significant (ns). By these tests diode laser was effective only at bleaching teeth stained with coffee meanwhile the KTP laser was efficient at bleaching teeth with coffee, tea and red fruits stains. Conclusion: This study suggests that a relation between the laser wavelength and the type of staining on the dental enamel and the efficacy of the whitening treatment exists. PMID:24771968

  11. The influence of desensitizing dentifrices on pain induced by in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Carlos Henrique; Rodrigues Filho, Rubens; Prates, Luiz Henrique Maykot; Sartori, Neimar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of desensitizing dentifrices used 15 days prior to and after in-office tooth bleaching could eliminate or reduce tooth sensitivity. After institutional review board approval and informed consent, 45 subjects were selected and divided into 3 groups according to the dentifrice selected: Colgate Total (CT), Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (CS) or Sensodyne ProNamel (SP). The subjects used toothpaste and a toothbrush provided to them for 15 days prior to bleaching. They were then submitted to two in-office bleaching sessions (Whiteness HP Blue Calcium). Their tooth sensitivity was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for a week after each session. Their tooth shade alteration was measured with a Vitapan Classical shade guide to determine if the dentifrices could influence the effectiveness of the bleaching agent. The data were submitted to Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). The use of desensitizing dentifrices did not affect the bleaching efficacy. In regard to tooth sensitivity, there was a statistically significant difference between the results of the Control Group and Group T2 after the first session (p = 0.048). There was no statistically significant difference in the results for the other groups after the first session. In regard to the second session, there was no statistically significant difference in the results for all the groups. The use of a desensitizing dentifrice containing nitrate potassium reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching regimen. Dentifrices containing arginine and calcium carbonate did not reduce tooth sensitivity. Color change was not influenced by the dentifrices used.

  12. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... help keep the dental office running smoothly. Important Qualities Detail oriented. Dental assistants must follow specific rules and protocols, such as infection control procedures, when helping dentists treat patients. Assistants also ...

  13. An Evaluation of Various Permanent Restorative Materials’ Effect on the Shade of Bleached Teeth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-28

    O AD-Alt 9 628 ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/G 6/5 AN EVALUATION OF VARIOUS PERMANENT RESTORATIVE MATER! S’ EFFFC--ETC (U) DEC A1 W F... Materials ’ Effect on the Shade of Bleached Teeth William F. Freccia, BS, DDS, MS Donald D. Peters, BA, DDS, MS Lewis Lorton, BA, DDS, MSD Commercial materials ...or that the materials and equip- ment are necessarily the best available for the purpose. The opinions contained herein are the private views of the

  14. A clinical evaluation of bleaching using whitening wraps and strips.

    PubMed

    Matis, Bruce A; Cochran, Michael; Wang, Ge; Franco, Miguel; Eckert, George J; Carlotti, Ronald J; Bryan, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of color change of teeth and the sensitivities of teeth and gums in an in vivo study. Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW2) and Crest Whitestrips Premium (WP2) were used twice a day and Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW1) were used once a day. Color evaluations occurred at baseline, after five and seven-day use of bleaching agent and 14 days post-bleaching. Color change was evaluated objectively and subjectively. Sensitivity evaluations were also accomplished. Seventy-six of the 78 subjects enrolled completed the study. All three products significantly lightened teeth. WW2 lightened more than WP2 and WW1 in L*, a*, b*, E and shade guide value. WP2 lightened more than WW1 in a*, b*, E and shade guide value. There was no difference in tooth sensitivity, but WW1 and WP2 caused less gingival sensitivity than WW2. The mean age of smokers was seven years younger than nonsmokers who qualified.

  15. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  16. Bleaching and coating of organic nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Maibohm, C.; Brewer, J. R.; Sturm, H.; Balzer, F.; Rubahn, H.-G.

    2006-09-01

    Degradation of nanofibers made from organic molecules such as para-hexaphenylene or functionalized quaterphenylene via photoexcitation or thermal irradiation is investigated by optical and morphological studies. Under ambient air conditions and in the limit of strong excitation, the degradation of luminescence intensity is accompanied by an increasing surface roughness of the aggregates and by material depletion. Whereas the luminescence intensity is decreasing exponentially with increasing illumination time, the material removal follows a linear relationship. Ablation can be stopped and bleaching can be slowed down by irradiating the nanofibers in vacuum or by coating them with a few hundred nanometers thick layer of silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}). Since the latter treatments do not completely stop the bleaching, it is concluded that bleaching of nanofibers involves at least three independent processes, namely, intramolecular configuration change, photo-oxidation, and material removal.

  17. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  18. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  19. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  20. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  1. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  2. Detrimental effects of host anemone bleaching on anemonefish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz-Agudelo, P.; Jones, G. P.; Thorrold, S. R.; Planes, S.

    2011-06-01

    Coral bleaching and related reef degradation have caused significant declines in the abundance of reef-associated fishes. Most attention on the effects of bleaching has focused on corals, but bleaching is also prevalent in other cnidarians, including sea anemones. The consequences of anemone bleaching are unknown, and the demographic effects of bleaching on associated fish recruitment, survival, and reproduction are poorly understood. We examined the effect of habitat degradation including host anemone bleaching on fish abundance, egg production, and recruitment of the panda anemonefish ( Amphiprion polymnus) near Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Following a high-temperature anomaly in shallow waters of the region, most shallow anemones to a depth of 6 m (approximately 35% of all the anemones in this area) were severely bleached. Anemone mortality was low but bleached anemones underwent a ~34% reduction in body size. Total numbers of A. polymnus were not affected by bleaching and reduction in shelter area. While egg production of females living in bleached anemones was reduced by ~38% in 2009 compared to 2008, egg production of females on unbleached anemones did not differ significantly between years. Total recruitment in 2009 was much lower than in 2008. However, we found no evidence of recruiting larvae avoiding bleached anemones at settlement suggesting that other factors or different chemical cues were more important in determining recruitment than habitat quality. These results provide the first field evidence of detrimental effects of climate-induced bleaching and habitat degradation on reproduction and recruitment of anemonefish.

  3. Bleaching of fluorosis stains using sodium hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Sharanesha, Rajashekhara Bhari

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis staining is commonly considered an esthetic problem because of the psychological impact of unesthetic maxillary anterior teeth. Numerous treatment approaches have been proposed, ranging from bleaching to enamel reduction to restorative techniques. Bleaching of hypomineralized enamel lesions, using 5% sodium hypochlorite, has been useful clinically. The technique described, in this case, appears to have advantages over other methods for improving the appearance of fluorotic lesions. It is simple, low cost, noninvasive, so the enamel keeps its structure, relatively rapid, and safe; it requires no special materials, and it can be used with safety on young permanent teeth. PMID:26538964

  4. Stability improvement in bleached phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, K.

    1991-08-01

    An experimental study has been made of the influence of developer composition on the stability against the print-out effect of bleached, photographically recorded two-beam interference grating on Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates. The diffraction efficiency has been increased by using potassium iodide and an iodine bleach process that converts a silver image into a dielectric image. An improvement in stability against the print-out effect has been observed by using two new developer compositions. Variation of the maximum diffraction efficiency against exposure to white light is shown graphically.

  5. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching. PMID:27307669

  6. The effect of power bleaching actived by several light sources on enamel microhardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light sources for in-office bleaching on surface microhardness of human enamel. One hundred and five blocks of third molars were distributed among seven groups. The facial enamel surface of each block was polished and baseline Knoop microhardness of enamel was assessed with a load of 25 g for 5 s. Subsequently, the enamel was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent and photo-activated with halogen light (group A) during 38 s, LED (group B) during 360 s, and high intensity diode laser (group C) during 4 s. The groups D (38 s), E (360 s), and F (4 s) were treated with the bleaching agent without photo-activated. The control (group G) was only kept in saliva without any treatment. Microhardness was reassessed after 1 day of the bleaching treatment, and after 7 and 21 days storage in artificial saliva. The mean percentage and standard deviation of microhardness in Knoop Hardness Number were: A 97.8 ± 13.1 KHN; B 95.5 ± 12.7 KHN; C 84.2 ± 13.6 KHN; D 128.6 ± 20.5 KHN; E 133.9 ± 14.2 KHN; F 123.9 ± 14.2 KHN; G 129.8 ± 18.8 KHN. Statistical analysis ( p < 0.05; Tukey test) showed that microhardness percentage values were significantly lower in the groups irradiated with light when compared with the non-irradiated groups. Furthermore, the non-irradiated groups showed that saliva was able to enhance the microhardness during the measurement times. The enamel microhardness was decreased when light sources were used during the bleaching process and the artificial saliva was able to increase microhardness when no light was used.

  7. Comparison of various bleaching processes for silver halide holographic emulsions using the refractive index modulation versus before-bleach optical density characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2004-09-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). A pair of absorption and phase holograms was recorded at each value of the recording parameters. Optical densities before bleaching were determined using the absorption holograms. Then each phase grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100 X) objective. Thus modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. To characterize the processing, the modulation of the refractive index of the processed phase holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. These characteristics are especially useful for the comparison of various bleaching agents used with the same developer. Characteristics of similar forms were obtained for all the processing types, with significant differences in the slope and extent of the curves, so that sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could be compared directly.

  8. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  9. Occupational eczema and asthma in a hairdresser caused by hair-bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Hougaard, Majken G; Menné, Torkil; Søsted, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Occupational allergic contact eczema and asthma caused by bleaching agents is seen in hairdressers. Bleaching agents contain persulfate salts, which are known to induce immediate reactions such as rhinitis, asthma, contact urticaria, and anaphylaxis. The immunologic mechanism is not, however, fully understood. The specific inhalation challenge test is considered to be the gold standard for diagnosing occupational asthma and rhinitis. However, this test is not always accessible. Therefore, the diagnosis of occupational allergic asthma caused by persulfate salts is made by combining a clinical history, a diagnosis of asthma, and a positive skin prick test (SPT). Standardized methods for performing SPT with persulfate salts are warranted. A case of a young hairdresser with occupational asthma and hand eczema caused by persulfate salts is presented, and the procedure for performing the SPT with ammonium persulfate and potassium persulfate is described in detail.

  10. Higher-order harmonics in bleached silver halide holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2006-09-01

    A large number of plane wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). The phase gratings were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100×) objective. The phase-contrast photomicrographs were Fourier analysed. Thus, first-, second-, and third-order modulations of the refractive index as a function of bias exposure and visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. The ratio of the amplitudes of higher-order modulations to that of the first-order can serve as a measure of the nonlinearity of the holographic recording.

  11. Effect of Vital Bleaching on Disintegration Tendency of Glass Ionomer Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed to assess the effect of two bleaching agents on the disintegration tendency of three types of glass ionomers. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens were prepared by using a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer’s instructions. Dissolution measurements were made by calculating weight loss through different periods of the test; (one week, one month and three months) and they were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: All glass ionomer materials exhibited a degree of dissolution. Opalescence Xtra increased the dissolution of Photac Fil and F2000 significantly, while Opalescence Quick had no effect on dissolution of glass ionomer restoratives. Conclusion: Bleaching effect on dissolution of glass ionomers is material and time dependant. Care should be taken by clinicians When bleaching teeth that are restored by glass ionomer, because this dissolution may affect the physical properties of these restorations. PMID:24701538

  12. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranger, E.; Charles, A.; Daneault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  13. Effect of Fluoride Gels on Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    China, Ana L.P; Souza, Nayara M; Gomes, Yasmin do S. B. de L; Alexandrino, Larissa D; Silva, Cecy M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bleaching treatments containing added calcium and combined with neutral or acidic fluoride gels on tooth enamel was investigated in vitro through Knoop microhardness (KHN) and surface roughness (SR) measurements. A total of 60 bovine incisors were tested, including 30 for SR measurements and 30 for KHN measurements. The specimens were divided into 12 groups and subjected to a bleaching agent with hydrogen peroxide 35% (Whiteness HP 35% Maxx, FGM) or hydrogen peroxide 35% with calcium (Whiteness HP 35% Blue Calcium, FGM) and a fluoride treatment flugel acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) or flugel neutral fluoride (NF). Control specimens were submitted to bleaching treatments without fluoride. Microhardness tests were performed using a Knoop indentor. Roughness measurements were obtained using a roughness analyzer. Measurements were obtained before and after treatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C between treatments. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Treatments using APF combined with 35% HP caused a decrease in microhardness, while NF combined with HP 35% Ca increased the enamel hardness. Fluoride gels did not alter the SR of the bleached enamel. PMID:25419249

  14. Dust-free bleaching powder may not prevent symptoms in hairdressers with bleaching-associated rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jörn; Nilsson, Patrik; Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Kronholm Diab, Kerstin; Albin, Maria; Kåredal, Monica; Jönsson, Bo; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hairdressers have an increased risk for airway symptoms especially when using hair-bleaching powder containing persulfate. To minimize exposure, dust-free bleaching powder (DFP) has been made available. We studied the effects of regular powder (RP) or DFP on the airway symptoms of hairdressers with hair-bleaching associated rhinitis. Methods: Twelve hairdressers each performed three hair-bleachings on a wig in an exposure chamber. Half of the subjects used RP and half used DFP. Exposure to persulfate and ammonia was measured. Before and after each bleaching, the participants stated their degree of airway symptoms on a visual analogue scale. Nasal lavage and blood were sampled before exposure, after the last bleaching, and in the morning after exposure to measure inflammatory markers. Results: Exposure to persulfate was higher when using RP compared to DFP, 22 (11-55) vs. 12 (8-13) μg/m3; median (min-max). Exposure to ammonia did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported an increase in asthma-like symptoms and this increase was significant. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes increased after exposure in both groups; monocytes decreased the day after. In nasal lavage, IL-8 was increased the morning after for both types of powder, and the increase was significant in the total group. IL-6 increased immediately after exposure and the day after only in the group using RP. Conclusions: Although DFP powder emits lower levels of persulfate, effects are still elicited in symptomatic hairdressers. PMID:27488042

  15. Coronal microleakage with five different temporary restorative materials following walking bleach technique: An ex-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, G. P. V.; Varma, K. Ravi; Shetty, K. Harish; Kumar, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Context: Walking bleach technique uses 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate, and this paste mixture causes loosening of the coronal temporary restorative materials and thus decreasing its clinical effectiveness and causing irritation to the patients oral tissues. In the present study, sealing ability of hygroscopic coronal temporary restorative materials were compared with the other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Aim: To evaluate the effects of walking bleach material on the marginal sealing ability and coronal microleakage of the hydrophilic temporary restorative materials with that of the other commonly used temporary restorative materials in endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were prepared chemo-mechanically and obturated with gutta-percha in lateral condensation technique. Surface of each tooth was double coated with cyanoacrylate glue. All the teeth were randomly divided in to five groups. Out of 15 teeth in each group, 10 teeth served as experimental specimens, in which bleaching agent was placed in the pulp chamber and 5 teeth served as control, in which no bleaching agent was placed. The access cavities were restored with temporary restorative materials being tested per each group respectively. The specimens were then immersed in 1% India ink dye and subjected to thermo cycling for 7 days. All the teeth were longitudinally sectioned and observed with stereomicroscope and were graded according to the depth of linear dye penetration. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Hydrophilic temporary restorative materials Cavit G and Coltosol F have shown minimal coronal dye leakage with better sealing ability when exposed to walking bleach paste mixture in the dye penetration tests compared to other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Conclusion: Marginal sealing ability of Cavit G and Coltosol F were not influenced by the

  16. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Terry P.; Kerry, James T.; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G.; Anderson, Kristen D.; Baird, Andrew H.; Babcock, Russell C.; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R.; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C.; Butler, Ian R.; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E.; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R.; Cumming, Graeme S.; Dalton, Steven J.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C. Mark; Figueira, Will F.; Gilmour, James P.; Harrison, Hugo B.; Heron, Scott F.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Kennedy, Emma V.; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; McWilliam, Michael J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Pears, Rachel J.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J.; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R.; Willis, Bette L.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2017-03-01

    During 2015–2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  17. Chronic parrotfish grazing impedes coral recovery after bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotjan, Randi D.; Dimond, James L.; Thornhill, Daniel J.; Leichter, James J.; Helmuth, Brian; Kemp, Dustin W.; Lewis, Sara M.

    2006-08-01

    Coral bleaching, in which corals become visibly pale and typically lose their endosymbiotic zooxanthellae ( Symbiodinium spp.), increasingly threatens coral reefs worldwide. While the proximal environmental triggers of bleaching are reasonably well understood, considerably less is known concerning physiological and ecological factors that might exacerbate coral bleaching or delay recovery. We report a bleaching event in Belize during September 2004 in which Montastraea spp. corals that had been previously grazed by corallivorous parrotfishes showed a persistent reduction in symbiont density compared to intact colonies. Additionally, grazed corals exhibited greater diversity in the genetic composition of their symbiont communities, changing from uniform ITS2 type C7 Symbiodinium prior to bleaching to mixed assemblages of Symbiodinium types post-bleaching. These results suggest that chronic predation may exacerbate the influence of environmental stressors and, by altering the coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis, such abiotic-biotic interactions may contribute to spatial variation in bleaching processes.

  18. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Kerry, James T; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Anderson, Kristen D; Baird, Andrew H; Babcock, Russell C; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C; Butler, Ian R; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R; Cumming, Graeme S; Dalton, Steven J; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C Mark; Figueira, Will F; Gilmour, James P; Harrison, Hugo B; Heron, Scott F; Hoey, Andrew S; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Kennedy, Emma V; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M; Lowe, Ryan J; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Malcolm, Hamish A; McWilliam, Michael J; Pandolfi, John M; Pears, Rachel J; Pratchett, Morgan S; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R; Willis, Bette L; Wilson, Shaun K

    2017-03-15

    During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18.

  20. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-06-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  1. Dental management of anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, M M; Mason, R B

    1992-10-01

    Today's trend toward ambulatory medical care will bring more pharmacological problems into the dental office. While the dental management of patients taking oral anticoagulants is controversial, current research supports the contention that they can be safely treated on an outpatient basis. The use of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) has made better estimates of prothrombin time possible, and patients can be maintained in a narrow therapeutic range. Postoperative hemorrhage can be avoided or controlled with local hemostatic agents.

  2. Dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, P O; Lowder, M Q

    1998-08-01

    Dental sepsis or periapical abscess formation constitutes a large percentage of dental conditions that afflict horses. Dental sepsis occurs when the pulp chamber of the tooth is exposed to the oral cavity or external environment, allowing bacterial localization with resulting infection. Although acute, primary, septic pulpitis in horses is rare, dental sepsis often results from colonization of the pulp chamber with pathogenic bacteria secondary to maleruption or impaction of teeth with secondary alveolar bone lysis, primary fractures of the tooth, mandible, or maxilla, periodontal disease, or infundibular necrosis. The sequela to pulpal infection are extensions into the periradicular tissues and mandibular or maxillary periapical abscess formation.

  3. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  4. Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders.

    PubMed

    Anthony, K R N; Kline, D I; Diaz-Pulido, G; Dove, S; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-11-11

    Ocean acidification represents a key threat to coral reefs by reducing the calcification rate of framework builders. In addition, acidification is likely to affect the relationship between corals and their symbiotic dinoflagellates and the productivity of this association. However, little is known about how acidification impacts on the physiology of reef builders and how acidification interacts with warming. Here, we report on an 8-week study that compared bleaching, productivity, and calcification responses of crustose coralline algae (CCA) and branching (Acropora) and massive (Porites) coral species in response to acidification and warming. Using a 30-tank experimental system, we manipulated CO(2) levels to simulate doubling and three- to fourfold increases [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projection categories IV and VI] relative to present-day levels under cool and warm scenarios. Results indicated that high CO(2) is a bleaching agent for corals and CCA under high irradiance, acting synergistically with warming to lower thermal bleaching thresholds. We propose that CO(2) induces bleaching via its impact on photoprotective mechanisms of the photosystems. Overall, acidification impacted more strongly on bleaching and productivity than on calcification. Interestingly, the intermediate, warm CO(2) scenario led to a 30% increase in productivity in Acropora, whereas high CO(2) lead to zero productivity in both corals. CCA were most sensitive to acidification, with high CO(2) leading to negative productivity and high rates of net dissolution. Our findings suggest that sensitive reef-building species such as CCA may be pushed beyond their thresholds for growth and survival within the next few decades whereas corals will show delayed and mixed responses.

  5. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  6. The effect of three different mouthrinses on the surface hardness, gloss and colour change of bleached nano composite resins.

    PubMed

    Gurgan, Sevil; Yalcin Cakir, Filiz

    2008-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effects of three mouthrinses (Listerine--alcohol containing, Oral B--alcohol free and Rembrandt Plus--peroxide whitening rinse) on the surface hardness, gloss and colour of a nanofill (Filtek Supreme) and nanohybrid (Simile) composite resin that had been subjected to bleaching treatment. 30 specimens of each material were fabricated and randomly divided into three groups of 10. The hardness, gloss and CIE Lab colour parameters of each specimen were assessed prior to the experiments. Specimens were exposed to the 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent (Vivastyle) for 2 hours per day for 14 days. Following the bleaching treatment measurements were repeated. The specimens were then conditioned with mouthrinses for 12 hours which was equivalent in time to 1 year of two minutes daily use. The specimens were measured again for hardness, gloss and colour and data were subjected to the statistical analysis. The result of this study showed no statististical difference between the restorative materials after bleaching and the use of mouthrinses (p > 0.05). Bleaching treatment and the use of mouthrinses af fected the hardness, gloss and colour of both resins. Significant differences were observed with the use of mouthrinses for all parameters (p < 0.05). Rembrandt Plus promoted the greatest changes, followed by Listerine and Oral B.

  7. The effect of tooth bleaching on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using self-etching primer systems

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Mehmet; Aksakalli, Sertac; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Demir, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using self-etching primer systems. Methods: Forty five freshly extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 15 teeth each: control (group 1), 10% carbamide peroxide at-home bleached (group 2), and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleached (group 3). Three weeks later, all brackets were bonded using a self-etching primer system. The shear bond strength of these brackets was measured and recorded in MPa. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were determined after the brackets failed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis test, pairwise comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test and ARI scores were analyzed using a chi-square test at a significance level of P<.05. Results: The shear bond strengths of group 1 (mean: 17.7 ± 9.7 MPa) were significantly higher (P<.05) than those of group 3 (mean: 9.9 ± 5.4 MPa). No significant differences were found between group 2 (mean: 12.3 ± 4.7) and either group 1 or group 3 (P>.05). ARI scores did not differ significantly among the 3 groups. Conclusions: The use of 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching does not significantly reduce shear bond strength values. In contrast, use of 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching significantly reduces these values. PMID:23408777

  8. In-Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Herbal Antioxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khamverdi, Zahra; Khadem, Parvin; Soltanian, Aliraza; Azizi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A reduction in bond strength of composite to bleached enamel has been reported immediately after bleaching treatment. Application of some antioxidant agents may decrease the adverse effects of whitening agents on bond strength and enhance composite bond to enamel. This study aimed to assess the effect of green tea, sodium ascorbate, sage and grape seed extract on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 90 human enamel surfaces were randomly divided into six groups as follows (n=15): G1, no bleaching; G2, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP); G3, HP+1000 μmol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) for 10 minutes; G4, HP+10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; G5, HP+10% sage for 10 minutes and G6, HP+5% grape seed extract for 10 minutes. The specimens were bonded to composite in all groups. The shear bond strength of specimens was measured in Megapascals (MPa). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α=0.05). Results: The highest and the lowest mean shear bond strength values were observed in group 1 (22.61±3.29MPa) and group 2 (5.87±1.80MPa), respectively. The reduction in bond strength in group 2 was greater than that in other groups (P<0.001). No significant difference was found among groups 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (P>0.05). Conclusions: All the herbal antioxidants used in this study equally compensated for the reduced bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. PMID:28127316

  9. Inhibition of bleach-induced luminol chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erina J M; Elliot, Douglas A; Miskelly, Gordon M

    2003-01-01

    The luminol chemiluminescence presumptive test for blood is based on the mild peroxidase activity of hemoglobin in basic peroxide solution. However, this test is subject to interference by strong oxidants, certain transition metal ions, and true peroxidases. This paper reports methods for reducing the interference caused by hypochlorite-containing bleaches. Amines such as 1,2-diaminoethane react rapidly with hypochlorite without interfering significantly with the hemoglobin-catalyzed oxidation. Thus, addition of 0.1 mol/L 1,2-diaminoethane to a standard luminol-peroxide spray lead to almost complete inhibition of hypochlorite-induced chemiluminescence while satisfactory chemiluminescence was still observed from bloodstains. If time allows, an alternative method for reducing interference from hypochlorite bleach is to wait several days until the bloodstains have dried thoroughly, by which time the hypochlorite will have decomposed.

  10. Penetration of 38% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine and human teeth submitted to office bleach technique.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Gasparoto Mancini, Maria Nadir; Menezes, Marcia Maciel

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the pulp chamber penetration of peroxide bleaching agent in human and bovine teeth after office bleach technique. All the teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical of the cement-enamel junction and were divided into 2 groups, A (70 third human molars) and B (70 bovine lateral incisors), that were subdivided into A1 and B1 restored by using composite resin, A2 and B2 by using glass ionomer cement, and A3 and B3 by using resin-modified glass ionomer cement; A4, A5, B4, and B5 were not restored. Acetate buffer was placed in the pulp chamber, and the bleaching agent was applied for 40 minutes as follows: A1-A4 and B1-B4, 38% hydrogen peroxide exposure and A5 and B5, immersion into distilled water. The buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube in which leuco crystal violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Dunnett, Kruskal-Wallis, and Tukey tests (5%). A higher level of hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp chamber in resin-modified glass ionomer cements in bovine (0.79 +/- 0.61 microg) and human (2.27 +/- 0.41 microg) groups. The bleaching agent penetration into the pulp chamber was higher in human teeth for any experimental situation. The penetration of the hydrogen peroxide depends on restorative materials, and under the conditions of this study human teeth are more susceptible to penetration of bleaching agent into the pulp chamber than bovine teeth.

  11. Refractive index modulation vs. before-bleach optical density modulation characteristics of silver halide phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2005-01-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed with various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). A pair of absorption and phase holograms was recorded at each value of the recording parameters. Optical densities before bleaching were determined using the absorption holograms. Then each phase grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100×) objective. Thus modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. To characterize the processing, the modulation of the refractive index of the processed phase holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. These characteristics are especially useful for the comparison of various bleaching agents used with the same developer. Characteristics of similar forms were obtained for all the processing types, with significant differences in the slope and extent of the curves, so that sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could be compared directly.

  12. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  13. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  14. Decreasing effluent loads through bleaching modification.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ai Van

    2006-02-01

    Almost all of the kraft pulp bleach plants worldwide are now practicing elemental chlorine-free (ECF) process to comply with environmental regulations in different countries. Usually, these conventional ECF bleaching sequences contain one or two alkaline extraction stages of which the first one is often the principal source of color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the resulting effluent. However, the results of this study showed that the ECF sequences which did not include any alkaline extraction stage and contained solely chlorine dioxide decreased both the color and COD loads of the effluent. On the other hand, the ECF sequences containing both chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide but excluding the alkaline extraction stage could lower only the color but not the COD load. It is suggested that the total kappa factor (the ratio of the total active chlorine to the kappa number) affected the COD load and that the content of hexeneuronic acid groups influenced the color of the bleach effluent. Compared to the reference pulp, the viscosity of the pulp from the exclusively chlorine-dioxide-based ECF sequence without the alkaline extraction stage was lower but the tear index and sheet density at a given tensile index were similar.

  15. Efficacy of Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seoul Hee; Lee, Hae June; Hong, Jin Woo; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-01-01

    The conventional light source used for tooth bleaching has the potential to cause thermal damage, and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. In this study, we evaluated bleaching efficacy, temperature, and morphological safety after tooth bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma. Tooth bleaching combined with plasma had improved efficacy in providing a higher level of brightness. The temperature of the pulp chamber was maintained around 37°C, indicating that the plasma does not cause any thermal damage. The morphological results of tooth bleaching with plasma did not affect mineral composition under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. On the basis of these results, the application of plasma and low concentration of 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) has a high capability for effective tooth bleaching. It can be documented that plasma is a safe energe source, which has no deleterious effects on the tooth surface. PMID:25685843

  16. The 2014 summer coral bleaching event in subtropical Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Xie, James Y; Lau, Dickey C C; Kei, Keith; Yu, Vriko P F; Chow, Wing-Kuen; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2017-04-06

    We reported a coral bleaching event that occurred in August-September 2014 in Hong Kong waters based on video transect surveys conducted at eight sites. The bleaching affected eight species of corals with different growth forms. Bleaching at seven of the eight study sites was minor, affecting only 0.4-5.2% colonies and 0.8-10.0% coral-covered area. Sharp Island East, however, suffered from a moderate level of bleaching, with 13.1% colonies and 30.1% coral-covered area affected. Examination of the government's environmental monitoring data indicated abnormal water quality conditions preceding and during the bleaching event. Follow-up field surveys of tagged colonies showed that 76% of them had fully recovered, 12% partially recovered, and 12% suffered from mortality. These results indicate that the subtropical corals of Hong Kong are not immune to bleaching, and there is a need to study their responses under climate change scenarios.

  17. Combined bleaching and hydrolysis for isolation of cellulose nanofibrils from waste sackcloth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Jiang, Yaoquan; Song, Yuanyuan; Cao, Shaomei; Miao, Miao; Feng, Xin; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-10-20

    A convenient and low cost process to prepare cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) from waste sackcloth by using H2O2/HNO3 solution as both bleaching agent and hydrolysis medium was recommended. The resultant CNF with high crystallinity was initially synthesized by the chemical disintegration process for the removal of non-cellulosic components and the crystallinity of CNF was 68.11% compared with that of sackcloth fibers (48.28%). The decomposition temperature of CNF was about 340°C, which indicated that the thermal stability of the fibers was increased after the combined bleaching and hydrolysis. Subsequently, the homogenous CNF colloidal suspensions in water, ethanol and acetone were obtained after sonication treatment. The CNF in water suspensions with 20-50nm in width and hundreds of nanometers in length was ultimately prepared under the conditions of different ultrasonic time.

  18. Influence of exposure time to saliva and antioxidant treatment on bond strength to enamel after tooth bleaching: an in situ study

    PubMed Central

    MIRANDA, Thais Aglaet Matos; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; AMORIM, Vitor Hugo de Oliveira; TERADA, Raquel Sano Suga; PASCOTTO, Renata Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the influence of different exposure times to saliva in situ in comparison with an antioxidant treatment on composite resin bond strength to human enamel restored after tooth bleaching. Material and Methods Forty human teeth specimens measuring 5x5 mm were prepared and randomly allocated into 5 groups with 8 specimens each: Gct (control group, restored on unbleached enamel); Gbl (restored immediately after bleaching); Gsa (bleached, treated with 10% sodium ascorbate gel for 60 min and restored); G7d (bleached, exposed to saliva in situ for 7 days and restored); and G14d (bleached, exposed to saliva in situ for 14 days and restored). Restored samples were cut into 0.8 mm2 sticks that were tested in microtensile. Specimens were microscopically analyzed and failure modes were classified as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Pretest and cohesive failures were not considered in the statistical analysis, which was performed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=0.05), with the dental specimen considered as the experimental unit. Results Mean bond strength results found for Gbl in comparison with Gct indicated that bleaching significantly reduced enamel adhesiveness (P<0.01). However, no statistically significant differences were found between Gct, Gsa and G7d (P>0.05). Bond strength found for G14d was significantly higher than for Gsa (P<0.01). Fractures modes were predominantly of a mixed type. Conclusions Bonding strength to bleached enamel was immediately restored with the application of sodium ascorbate and exposure to human saliva in situ for at least 7 days. Best results were obtained with exposure to human saliva in situ for 14 days. Treatment with sodium ascorbate gel for 60 min may be recommended in cases patients cannot wait for at least 7 days for adhesive techniques to be performed. PMID:24473724

  19. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  20. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-02-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  1. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    PubMed Central

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  2. Internal bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vachon, C; Vanek, P; Friedman, S

    1998-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide to internally bleach discolored teeth. Following pulp removal, 38 tooth crowns were stained with erythrocytes and bleached 3 times over 14 days using either 10% carbamide peroxide or 30% H2O2 and sodium perborate. The pulp chambers were subsequently filled, and the tooth crowns stored for 3 months. The shades of the crowns were measured using reflectance spectroscopy prior to and at several time points following bleaching. Using statistical analysis, the authors determined that both materials significantly improved the shade of the crowns, and that 10% carbamide peroxide could be utilized clinically to internally bleach nonvital discolored teeth.

  3. Intracoronal bleaching of discolored non-vital teeth.

    PubMed

    Bizhang, Mozhgan; Heiden, Anke; Blunck, Uwe; Zimmer, Stefan; Seemann, Rainer; Roulet, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    This clinical study compared the effectiveness of bleaching non-vital teeth with an open pulp chamber during bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide compared to the modified walking bleach technique and extracoronal bleaching. Sixty discolored, non-vital teeth were treated. They were divided into three groups. Each group was treated with one of the bleaching materials and methods: extracoronally using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks as negative control (Group A), intracoronally using sodium perborate mixed with 3% hydrogen peroxide (modified walking bleach technique) (Rotstein, Mor & Friedman, 1993) for four weeks (Group B) and intracoronally and extracoronally using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks (Group C) (Liebenberg, 1997). Tooth color was measured at baseline, (BL), immediately post-bleaching (IP) and six months post-bleaching (SP) with a colorimeter (Castor, Sigma, Germany) using a tooth-positioning jig. The color was determined according to the CIELAB system, which records lightness as L* and chromaticity coordinates as a* and b*. The difference in L* and b* among the three groups was significant between BL and IP examination. The post-bleaching, whitening effect in Group C was significantly better, but after six months, in Group C, it was as effective as in Group B.

  4. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  5. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  6. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  7. Effect of in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without addition of calcium on the enamel surface.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Izadora Quintela Souza; Silva, Lucas Nunes de Brito; Porto, Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes; de Lima Neto, Cantídio Francisco; Dos Santos, Natanael Barbosa; Fragoso, Larissa Silveira de Mendonça

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effectiveness and effects of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without calcium on color, micromorphology, and the replacement of calcium and phosphate on the enamel surface. Thirty bovine enamel blocks (5.0 × 5.0 mm) were placed into the following groups: G1: artificial saliva (control); G2: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel without calcium (Whiteness HP Maxx-FGM); and G3: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with calcium (Whiteness HP Blue-FGM). Three color measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer: untreated (baseline), after performing staining, and after application of bleaching agents. Calcium deposition on the enamel was evaluated before and after the application of bleaching agents using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The enamel surface micromorphology was observed under scanning electron microscopy. The pH of each product was measured. The data were subjected to one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), and any differences were analyzed using Tukey's test (P < 0.05). G3 showed greater variation in total color after the experiment than G2 and G1; there was no significant difference in calcium or phosphorus concentration before and after the experimental procedures; morphological changes were observed only in G2 and G3; and the pH values of the Whiteness HP Maxx and Whiteness HP Blue bleaching agents were 5.77 and 7.79, respectively. The 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium showed greater bleaching potential, but the addition of calcium had no effect in terms of reducing morphological changes or increasing the calcium concentration on the enamel surface.

  8. Surface Decontamination of Blister Agents Lewisite, Sulfur ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L) are blister agents that have a high potential for terrorist use. Agent Yellow (HL) is the eutectic mixture of HD and L. Bench-scale testing was used to determine the residual amount of these chemical warfare agents remaining on three building materials coupons (wood, metal and glass) after application of various decontaminants (household bleach, full strength and dilute; hydrogen peroxide 3 % solution; and EasyDECON® DF200).

  9. Registered Dental Hygienists as Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Janet; Shugars, Daniel A.

    1985-01-01

    Surveys conducted to (1) investigate why dental hygienists choose to become dentists, (2) evaluate their success in dental school, (3) assess the experience of those who had entered dental school, and (4) gauge the level of interest among dental hygienists in applying to dental school are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  10. Bacterial and archaeal communities in bleached mottles of tropical podzols.

    PubMed

    Silva, K J; Vidal-Torrado, P; Lambais, M R

    2015-02-01

    Podzols frequently show bleached mottles depleted in organic matter, most readily visible in the Bh horizons. Even though the process of bleached mottles development is not understood, it has been suggested that the selective degradation of organic matter by soil microorganisms has a major contribution. In this study, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities along three Brazilian coastal podzol profiles, as well as in bleached mottles and their immediate vicinity, using 16S rRNA gene profiling. Our results showed that the bacterial and archaeal community structures in the studied podzols varied with depth and that the bacterial communities in the bleached mottles were significantly different from that in their immediate vicinity. In contrast, the archaeal communities in bleached mottles were significantly different from their vicinity only in the Bertioga (BT) profile, based on sequencing of amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene. Redundancy analyses showed that the bacterial community structures in the bleached mottles of BT were negatively associated mostly with the levels of organic carbon, exchangeable-aluminum (Al), exchangeable potassium, and Al-saturation, whereas in the surrounding soil, the opposite was observed. In the Ilha Comprida (IC) profiles, no such relationships were observed, suggesting distinct drivers of the bacterial community structures in bleached mottles of different podzols. In the bleached mottles of the BT profile, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas were the most abundant Bacteria, whereas in the IC profiles, OTUs related to Acidobacteria were predominant. Thermoprotei (Crenarchaeota) were the most abundant Archaea in the bleached mottles and in their immediate vicinity. Based on the diverse metabolic capabilities of Pseudomonas and Acidobacteria, our data suggest that these groups of bacteria may be involved in the development of bleached mottles in the podzols studied and that the selection of

  11. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... few quick steps. There is no drilling or scraping of the molars. Your dentist will: Clean the ... Dental sealants. Updated October 19, 2016. ADA.org Web site. www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral- ...

  12. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  13. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to...

  14. Dental Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with dental emergencies sometimes present to their physician. This article outlines the role of the physician in the management of dental patients who have suffered traumatic injuries, postoperative hemorrhage, pain, and infection. It deals with those difficulties for which the physician may easily prescribe treatment and outlines the treatment that would be undertaken by a dentist who receives such a patient on referral. PMID:21253249

  15. Does coral bleaching mean global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    This article discusses the implications of global warming on the marine ecosystems. In recent hearings of the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, plans were made to introduce legislation for control of greenhouse-gas emissions, conservation of biological diversity, forest conservation, world population planning, sustainable economic development , increased fuel efficiency, and increased research into Earth-system processes. Research is required to ascertain the meaning of coral bleaching, which is the mass expulsion of symbiotic algae, called zooxanthellae, which gives the coral its color. Many scientists think that the death of the algae is an early indicator for massive destruction of the marine ecosystem.

  16. Bleach Plant Capital Reduction with Rapid DO Bleaching and Simplified (D/E/D) Stages

    SciTech Connect

    T. J. McDonough; C. E. Courchene; J-C. Baromes

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the capabilities of a bleaching sequence that combined a short retention time initial chlorine dioxide stage, referred to as rapid D0, (D0R), with simplified bleaching stages, (D1/E/D2), that required only one final bleach washer. The test sequence DR(EPO)(D/E/D/) was compared to a control sequence, D(EPO)D, for both hardwood and softwood pulps. The capabilities of the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence were successfully demonstrated. An existing three- or four-stage bleach plan can be converted to the more powerful DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence without the major capital cost of additional washers. The results from this study showed that the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence can reach 85 brightness on SW with 2.8% total C1O2, while the control sequence, D(EPO)D, required 3.9% C1O2. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX for the test sequence. The strength of pulp bleached in the test sequence was similar to or slightly higher than the control. For the HW pu lp, the test sequence reached 88 brightness with 2.2% C1O2 compared to 3.3% C1O2 for the control. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX generation with the lower chemical requirements. The final viscosity and pulp strength for the test sequence on HW was significantly higher than the corresponding values for the control sequence.

  17. The Bleaching Syndrome: The Role of Educational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Per the Bleaching Syndrome, people of color, including African, Asian, and Latino Americans, are both victims and perpetrators of color discrimination. The Bleaching Syndrome encompasses perceptual, psychological, and behavioral sectors that affect students' schooling experiences. Education professionals, including teachers, administrators, and…

  18. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  19. Formation of organochlorine by-products in bleached laundry.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Anthony, Laura N

    2013-02-01

    Laundering fabrics with chlorine bleach plays a role in health and hygiene as well as aesthetics. However, laundry bleaching may create chlorinated by-products with potentially adverse human health effects. Studies have shown that toxic chlorinated gases are produced in the headspace of washing machines when hypochlorite-containing bleach is used. Laundry bleaching has also been implicated in contributing dissolved organochlorine to municipal wastewater. However, there have been no reports of organochlorines produced and retained in fabric as a result of laundry bleaching. We have used a chlorine-specific X-ray spectroscopic analysis to demonstrate the formation of organochlorine by-products in cotton fabrics laundered with chlorine bleach under typical household conditions. Organochlorine formation increases at higher wash temperature. At least two pools of organochlorine are produced in bleached fabric: a labile fraction that diminishes over several months of storage time as well as a more stable fraction that persists after more than 1 year. Our results also suggest that residual hypochlorite remains in fabric after laundering with bleach, presenting the possibility of direct and sustained dermal contact with reactive chlorine. This study provides a first step toward identifying a new risk factor for elevated organochlorine body burdens in humans.

  20. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  1. Coral bleaching: a potential biomarker of environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Meehan, W J; Ostrander, G K

    1997-04-25

    Coral bleaching refers to the loss of symbiotic algae by host corals, or to the loss of pigmentation by the algae themselves, causing corals to appear white or "bleached." Some corals may regain algae or pigmentation and survive, but when bleaching is severe the host coral dies. Coral bleaching events have increased dramatically in the last two decades, and coral reefs throughout the world have been extensively degraded as a result. This article reviews coral bleaching for investigators working in the field of toxicology and environmental health, a group of scientists not normally exposed to this issue. Several environmental stressors have been correlated with bleaching, including fluctuations in sea surface temperatures and salinity, increased sedimentation, increased solar radiation, and contaminants such as oil and herbicides. Molecular mechanisms of bleaching are only beginning to be investigated and are thus far poorly understood. Toxicologists have the potential to make significant contributions toward understanding anthropogenic aspects of coral bleaching and elucidating molecular mechanisms of this important environmental problem.

  2. Population dynamics of zooxanthellae during a bacterial bleaching event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkar, N.; Fine, M.; Kramarsky-Winter, E.; Loya, Y.

    2006-05-01

    Each summer 80-90% of the colonies of Oculina patagonica undergo bleaching off the Mediterranean coast of Israel. To investigate fluctuations through a yearly bleaching cycle, monthly measurements of zooxanthella density, mitotic index and chlorophyll- a concentration were conducted. Results showed (1) a significant negative correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) and zooxanthella density; (2) both significantly lower zooxanthella mitotic index and higher chlorophyll -a per zooxanthella content during the bleaching season compared with the non-bleaching period; (3) prior to bleaching, a lag between the peak of zooxanthella density and chlorophyll- a concentration followed by a similar lag during recovery. Zooxanthella density declined significantly between March and May while chlorophyll- a concentration peaked in April, and then declined. Zooxanthella density increased significantly in November while chlorophyll- a concentration increased significantly in January. We conclude that during bacterial bleaching events, zooxanthellae are severely damaged. However, by the time of the following bleaching event the coral tissues regain their “normal” (pre-bleaching) zooxanthella population density.

  3. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time.

  4. An In vitro Study on Post Bleaching Pigmentation Susceptibility of Teeth and Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Latha, S Pushpa; Hegde, Vani; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Background: To determine the susceptibility of teeth for repigmentation after bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were assigned to three groups (n = 12). Group 1 was bleached using 30% w/v hydrogen peroxide 15 min 3 times a day every other day for 4 days. In Group 2 was bleached using 16% carbamide peroxide (Polanight), 90 min a day for 15 days. 2 days later, the shades of the bleached teeth were recorded. Remaining 4 teeth were bleached according to Group 1 and 2 and were subjected to atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy analysis. Results: Specimens of athome bleaching were lighter than the specimens of inoffice bleaching. Conclusion: The susceptibility of enamel to pigmentation can be increased after bleaching, and pigmentation is greater if bleaching is performed with H2O2. The percentage change (lighter) was more for athome bleaching specimens as compared to inoffice bleaching specimens. PMID:25395800

  5. Effect of a Combined Bleaching Regimen on the Microhardness of a Sealed Methacrylate-based and a Silorane-based Composite

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, F; Doustfatemeh, S

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The use of tooth bleaching agents has been very popular treatment in dentistry. The bleaching agents have an inherent potential to impair surface properties of existing composite resin restorations. Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of a combined bleaching regimen on the surface microhardness of a Silorane-based and a sealed methacrylate-based composite. Materials and Method: Forty-five specimens of methacrylate-based composite (Ice) and 18 specimens of Silorane composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE; USA) were prepared and randomly divided into 5 (1-5) and 2 (6-7) groups (n=9), respectively. After 8-week aging, groups 1 and 6 were remained with no treatment. In groups 2, 4 and 5, the specimens were covered by a surface sealant and light cured. In groups 3, 4, 5 and 7, the specimens were bleached with hydrogen peroxide 40% and then carbamide peroxide 20% for seven days. In group 5, after bleaching, the sealant was removed by polishing. Surface microhardness was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results: The microhardness values of groups 2 to 4 were significantly lower than that of group1 (p <0.05). There was no significant difference among groups 1, 5, 6 and 7 (p> 0.05). Conclusion: The combined bleaching regimen used in this study had a substantial negative effect on methacrylate and sealed methacrylate composites but not on Silorane composite. Polishing following the bleaching on the sealed composite yielded a hardness value similar to that of unsealed methacrylate composite (control). PMID:24724132

  6. The microbiology of the acute dental abscess.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, A J

    2009-02-01

    The acute dental abscess is frequently underestimated in terms of its morbidity and mortality. The risk of potential serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess is still relevant today with many hospital admissions for dental sepsis. The acute dental abscess is usually polymicrobial comprising facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group, with predominantly strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species. The use of non-culture techniques has expanded our insight into the microbial diversity of the causative agents, identifying such organisms as Treponema species and anaerobic Gram-positive rods such as Bulleidia extructa, Cryptobacterium curtum and Mogibacterium timidum. Despite some reports of increasing antimicrobial resistance in isolates from acute dental infection, the vast majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment, with antimicrobials limited to spreading and severe infections. The microbiology and treatment of the acute localized abscess and severe spreading odontogenic infections are reviewed.

  7. Coral reef bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep atolls, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoth, Ramar; Gopi, Mohan; Kumar, Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith; Thangaradjou, Thirunavukarassu; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2012-03-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010. Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon, which triggered widespread bleaching of corals. The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%). The SST increased up to 34 °C with an average maximum SST of 32.5 during the study °C period between May and June 2010. Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side. This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST. Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010, at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  8. Local effects of bleaching in retinal rods of the toad.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, D A; Lamb, T D

    1982-01-01

    1. Suction electrode recordings were used to study the recovery of responsiveness in single toad rods after bleaching a small fraction (less than 5%) of the rhodopsin. 2. After a spatially uniform bleach that initially abolished the dark current over the entire length of the outer segment, the more proximal regions recovered faster than the more distal regions. For a time the most basal region was almost fully recovered while the tip remained fully saturated. 3. Such a gradient of responsiveness did not occur during uniform steady background illumination of dark-adapted cells. 4. The entire outer segment recovered uniformly after a longitudinally graded bleach that simulated the pattern produced by self-screening in the intact eye. 5. The recovery of the distal end of the outer segment was not affected by a bleach at the proximal end. This suggests that the differences in recovery rate reflect intrinsic local properties of the outer segment rather than longitudinal diffusion of a substance from the inner segment. 6. For at least the first 3 min after bleaching with a narrow transverse slit the reduction of responsiveness remained most pronounced in the bleached region, suggesting that this effect of bleaching does not spread extensively. 7. The increased noise induced by bleaching is shown to originate locally in the bleached region of outer segment. 8. When the tip was locally saturated after a bleach or during steady light, the current recorded from the tip was predominantly capacitive, resulting from intracellular voltage change. This indicates that when the dark current is abolished the outer segment plasma membrane has negligible leakage conductance. PMID:7131322

  9. Influence of Intermediary Filling Material on Microleakage of Intracoronally Bleached and Restored Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Feiz, Atieh; Ebadi, Maysam

    2009-01-01

    Background: Failure of composite restorations in terms of microleakage after intracoronal bleaching has been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro effect of sodium ascorbate and calcium hydroxide as intermediary filling materials to repair the microleakage associated with adhe-sive restoration following intracoronal bleaching. Methods: Sixty endodontically-treated incisors with access cavities extended to the cementoenamel junction in gingival margin were randomly divided into five equal groups. In group 1, cavities were restored by applying Single Bond and Z100 composite resin. In groups 2-5, 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was placed into the pulp chamber and sealed for 5 days. In group 2, teeth were then restored as in group 1. In groups 3 and 4, 10% sodium ascorbate gel and calcium hydroxide paste were applied in the pulp chamber for 40 hours, removed, rinsed and then, restored. In group 5, the cavities were incu-bated for 7 days and then, restored. Samples were thermocycled, immersed in basic fuschin, and sec-tioned. Dye penetration was scored using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in enamel margins (P = 0.163). In dentinal margins (P = 0.003), groups 1, 3 and 5 exhibited similar leakage patterns, each one of groups 1, 3 and 5 had sig-nificant differences with each one of groups 2 and 4. Conclusion: Intracoronal bleaching using 35% H2O2 gel increases the microleakage in dentinal margins. Application of the antioxidant agent or a seven-day delay following bleaching may improve the marginal integrity. Applying calcium hydroxide might jeopardize dentinal sealing. PMID:21528025

  10. Bleaching process preferred to decontaminate odorants

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The problem of decontaminating and disposing of out-of-service gas odorizers has long faced both gas transmission and distribution companies since the early 1980s. Finding a methodology to safely and effectively decontaminate odorant-contaminated equipment has caused many companies to simply cap the equipment and put it in storage. The recommended process of decontamination by odorant manufacturers is currently a bleaching-type process. A sodium hypochlorite solution is added to water and either circulated or left standing in the contaminated equipment. The sodium hypochlorite effectively neutralizes the smell of the odorant and slightly corrodes the inside of the equipment to neutralize any odorant which has permeated the metal. The waste sodium hypochlorite and water is then shipped as hazardous waste (pH of 12.5) or non-hazardous waste after the pH has been adjusted. The bleaching process has proven cost-effective and less time-consuming than most other methods including bioremediation. To effectively use it, there are several problems to overcome--most importantly the removal of residual product and the release of vapors into the atmosphere. River Valley Technologies, a contractor located in Cincinnati, OH, specializing in odorant-equipment decontamination, has developed several methods and engineering controls to eliminate most of the problems associated with decontaminating odorant equipment. The paper describes these methods.

  11. Antithrombotic agents: implications in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Little, James W; Miller, Craig S; Henry, Robert G; McIntosh, Bruce A

    2002-05-01

    Thrombosis and the complicating emboli that can result are important causes of illness and death. Thrombosis is of greater overall clinical importance in terms of morbidity and mortality than all of the hemorrhagic disorders combined. Agents such as heparin, low-molecular weight heparin, warfarin, aspirin, ticlopidine, clopidogrel, and tirofiban are used to prevent venous or arterial thrombosis. Patients taking these antithrombotic agents may be at risk for excessive bleeding after invasive dental procedures. The current antithrombotic agents used in medicine are reviewed, and the dental management of patients taking these agents is discussed.

  12. The efficacy of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home bleaching on sound and demineralized enamel

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Mohammadpour, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the effectiveness of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home-bleaching in sound and demineralized enamel. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 120 freshly-extracted bovine incisors. Half of the specimens were stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot lesions. Following exposure to a tea solution for 7.5 days, the specimens were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 30 according to the type of enamel and the bleaching procedure employed. Groups 1 and 2 consisted of demineralized teeth subjected to in-office bleaching and home bleaching, whereas in groups 3 and 4, sound teeth were subjected to in-office and home bleaching, respectively. A diode laser (810 nm, 2 W, continuous wave, four times for 15 seconds each) was employed for assisting the in-office process. The color of the specimens was measured before (T1) and after (T2) staining and during (T3) and after (T4) the bleaching procedures using a spectrophotometer. The color change (ΔE) between different treatments stages was compared among the groups. Results: There were significant differences in the color change between T2 and T3 (ΔE T2–T3) and T2 and T4 (ΔE T2–T4) stages among the study groups (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison by Duncan test revealed that both ΔET2–T3 and ΔET2–T4 were significantly greater in demineralized teeth submitted to laser-assisted in-office bleaching (group 1) as compared to the other groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Laser-assisted in-office bleaching could provide faster and greater whitening effect than home bleaching on stained demineralized enamel, but both procedures produced comparable results on sound teeth. PMID:26877590

  13. Effect of polyester blends in hydroentangled raw and bleached cotton nonwoven fabrics on the adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics (applicable for wipes) including raw cotton, bleached cotton, and their blends with polyester (PES) were stu...

  14. Evaluation of RSDL, M291 SDK, 0.5% Bleach, 1% Soapy Water and SERPACWA. Part 1: Challenge with VX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    compounds that act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that aids in the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. This neurotransmitter...decontamination (Sidell, 1997). If these items are not available, a solution of soap and water may be used to physically remove the agent. The M291 SDK was...decontaminated at the conclusion of each experiment. These experiments were conducted between 3 Nov 04 and 28 Mar 05, except that 5 bleach animals and 3 soap

  15. Phase holograms in silver halide emulsions without a bleaching step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belendez, Augusto; Madrigal, Roque F.; Pascual, Inmaculada V.; Fimia, Antonio

    2000-03-01

    Phase holograms in holographic emulsions are usually obtained by two bath processes (developing and bleaching). In this work we present a one step method to reach phase holograms with silver-halide emulsions. Which is based on the variation of the conditions of the typical developing processes of amplitude holograms. For this, we have used the well-known chemical developer, AAC, which is composed by ascorbic acid as a developing agent and sodium carbonate anhydrous as accelerator. Agfa 8E75 HD and BB-640 plates were used to obtain these phase gratings, whose colors are between yellow and brown. In function of the parameters of this developing method the resulting diffraction efficiency and optical density of the diffraction gratings were studied. One of these parameters studied is the influence of the grain size. In the case of Agfa plates diffraction efficiency around 18% with density < 1 has been reached, whilst with the BB-640 emulsion, whose grain is smaller than that of the Agfa, diffraction efficiency near 30% has been obtained. The resulting gratings were analyzed through X-ray spectroscopy showing the differences of the structure of the developed silver when amplitude and transmission gratings are obtained. The angular response of both (transmission and amplitude) gratings were studied, where minimal transmission is showed at the Braggs angle in phase holograms, whilst a maximal value is obtained in amplitude gratings.

  16. An in vitro thermal analysis during different light-activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Pereira, T. M.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-09-01

    This study measured the critical temperature reaching time and also the variation of temperature in the surface of the cervical region and within the pulp chamber of human teeth submitted to dental bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by three different light sources. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n = 15), according to the catalyst light source: Halogen Light (HL), High Intensity Diode Laser (DL), and Light Emmited Diode (LED). The results of temperature variation were submitted to the analysis of variance and Tukey test with p < 0.05. The temperature increase (mean value and standard deviation) inside the pulp chamber for the HL group was 6.8 ± 2.8°C; for the DL group was 15.3 ± 8.8°C; and for the LED group was 1.9 ± 1.0°C for. The temperature variation (mean value and standard deviation) on the tooth surface, for the group irradiated with HL was 9.1 ± 2.2°C; for the group irradiated with DL were 25.7 ± 18.9°C; and for the group irradiated with LED were 2.6 ± 1.4°C. The mean temperature increase values were significantly higher for the group irradiated with DL when compared with groups irradiated with HL and LED ( p < 0.05). When applying the inferior limits of the interval of confidence of 95%, an application time of 38.7 s was found for HL group, and 4.4 s for DL group. The LED group did not achieve the critical temperatures for pulp or the periodontal, even when irradiated for 360 s. The HL and DL light sources may be used for dental bleaching for a short period of time. The LED source did not heat the target tissues significantly within the parameters used in this study.

  17. Effects of LED-laser hybrid light on bleaching effectiveness and tooth sensitivity: a randomized clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolatto, Janaina F.; Pretel, Hermes; Neto, Carolina S.; Andrade, Marcelo F.; Moncada, Gustavo; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B.

    2013-08-01

    The study evaluated the effectiveness and the sensitivity of in-office tooth bleaching with the use of a hybrid photo-activation system composed by LEDs and lasers. 40 patients, both genders, aged 18 through 25 years, were randomly distributed into two treatment groups: group I, 35% hydrogen peroxide, with a total bleaching time of 135 min divided into three sessions, and group II, 35% hydrogen peroxide and photo-thermal catalysis by an LED-laser system (300 mW cm-2), for a total bleaching time of 72 min divided into three sessions. The treatment efficiency was measured by reflectance spectroscopy and sensitivity by a visual analog scale (VAS). The final luminosity value (ΔL), color variation (ΔE) and sensitivity (S) resulting from the treatments were analyzed by the generalized estimating equations method (GEEs), and Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparisons at 5% significance. The two groups presented similar colors (ΔE) and luminosities (ΔL) after treatment. Group I presented a greater sensitivity index (37.6 ± 5.9%) compared to group II (11.1 ± 3.3%), statistically significant at p < 0.05. The use of LED-laser hybrid light, as a catalyst of the bleaching agents, showed a significant decrease of provoked tooth sensitivity and a treatment time reduced by 53%, with the same aesthetic results as without a light source.

  18. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  19. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue. PMID:27688375

  1. Reactivity of Dual-Use Decontaminants with Chemical Warfare Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Used in this Evaluation Code Decontaminant Name Formulation Ingredients Rationale A Aero Wash IV Sodium nitrite, proprietary detergent blend...Surfactant designed for use on aircraft B Chlor Floc Sodium dichloroisocyanurate, water Previously used for chemical warfare agent decontamination...C Clorox bleach 6% Sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, water Previously used for chemical warfare agent decontamination D DI water Water

  2. Colloid formation and laser-induced bleaching in fluorite

    SciTech Connect

    LeBret, Joel B.; Cramer, Loren P.; Norton, M. Grant; Dickinson, J. T.

    2004-11-08

    Colloid formation and subsequent laser-induced bleaching in fluorite has been studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. At high incident electron-beam (e-beam) energies, Ca colloids with diameter {approx}10 nm form a simple cubic superlattice with lattice parameter a{approx}18 nm. The colloids themselves are topotactic with the fluorite matrix forming low-energy interfaces close to a {sigma}=21 special grain boundary in cubic materials. Laser irradiation using {lambda}=532 nm has been shown to effectively bleach the e-beam-irradiated samples returning the fluorite to its monocrystalline state. The bleached samples appear more resistant to further colloid formation.

  3. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  4. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  5. Evaluation Of The Shear Bond Strength Between Dentin And Dental Luting Cement Following Dentin Surface Treatment By 980 Nm Diode Laser And Desensitizing Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, T.; Gheith, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is described clinically as an exaggerated response to non-noxious sensory stimuli. Current treatment is concentrating on two approaches; to occlude the dentinal tubules or to block neural transmission. This is achieved through using dentin desensitizers and low power lasers. Forty eight freshly extracted human molar teeth were used in this study and divided equally into three groups. Group 1) control group, group 2) laser treated dentin surface group, and group 3) desensitizing agent dentin surface group. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of laser treated group showed melted globules, no carbonization, recrystalization and crystal growth of the apatite in some areas. In diode laser dentin surface treated group showed the highest shear bond strength mean value.

  6. Effect of 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel and delayed bonding on shear bond strength of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer to bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Danesh-Sani, Seyed Amir; Esmaili, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate the neutralizing effect of antioxidant treatment and delayed bonding after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide on the shear bond strength of a composite resin (CR) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI) to enamel. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six freshly extracted human 3rd molars with flat enamel surfaces were divided into six experimental groups (n=12/group) and two control groups (n=12/group). After initial preparation, specimens in Groups 1 and 5 (control groups) were not bleached and the buccal enamel surface of specimens were bonded immediately with CR and RmGI. The samples of the remaining groups were all bleached six hours a day for seven days consecutively. Immediately after bleaching, groups two and six specimens were bonded with CR and RmGI. Groups 3 and 7 specimens were immersed in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and the specimens in Groups 4 and 8 were treated with 10% sodium ascorbate as an antioxidant agent after bleaching. Specimens in Groups 3 and 4 were bonded with CR and Groups 7 and 8 specimens were bonded with RmGI immediately. After specimens were bonded, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The SBS data analyses were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test for comparison of specific mean values. Results: The mean SBS value in Group 2 (immediately bonded with CR after bleaching) was significantly lower than other CR groups (P=0.045). RmGI did not bond to buccal enamel surface of specimens in group 6. There was no significant difference between other groups bonded with RmGI (P>0.05). Conclusions: Applying 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel and one week delay before bonding resulted in reversal of reduced bond strength of CR and RmGI to bleached enamel. PMID:22025826

  7. Surface pH and bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system to intracoronal dentin after application of hydrogen peroxide bleach with sodium perborate.

    PubMed

    Elkhatib, Hanadi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Hiraishi, Noriko; Kitasako, Yuichi; Tagami, Junji; Nomura, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the dentin bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system with dentin surface pH with or without bleaching and observed the morphological changes in bleached dentin treated with a self-etching primer. Dentin disks were prepared from the coronal-labial region of 32 human anterior teeth. The pulpal surfaces of the dentin disks were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. The dentin surfaces on all specimens were bleached with a mixture of 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for one week. The bleaching agent was then rinsed off with water for 5, 15 or 30 seconds. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C. Half of the five-second rinsing specimens were stored in water for an additional week. Dentin surface pH with or without bleaching was examined using a pH-imaging microscope (SCHEM-100). A self-etching primer/adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond) was applied to bleached or unbleached dentin according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24-hour water storage, the bonded specimens were prepared for microtensile testing. Microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin was measured using a universal-testing machine (EZ test, Shimadzu, Japan) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test (alpha=0.05). The pH values of the dentin surfaces of the 5 and 15 second rinsing groups were significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), while the 30-second rinsing and one-week water storage groups had similar surface pH values to the control group (p<0.05). The microTBS of 5, 15 and 30 second rinsing specimens after bleaching were significantly lower than the control specimens (p<0.05). However, after one-week of water storage, the microTBS returned to the control group. The application of a bleaching agent increased the pH value of the dentin surface and decreased the bond strength of the self-etching primer/adhesive system. One

  8. Capping Agent-Dependent Toxicity and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles: An In Vitro Study. Concerns about Potential Application in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Niska, Karolina; Knap, Narcyz; Kędzia, Anna; Jaskiewicz, Maciej; Kamysz, Wojciech; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In dentistry, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have drawn particular attention because of their wide antimicrobial activity spectrum. However, controversial information on AgNPs toxicity limited their use in oral infections. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities against a panel of oral pathogenic bacteria and bacterial biofilms together with potential cytotoxic effects on human gingival fibroblasts of 10 nm AgNPs: non-functionalized - uncapped (AgNPs-UC) as well as surface-functionalized with capping agent: lipoic acid (AgNPs-LA), polyethylene glycol (AgNPs-PEG) or tannic acid (AgNPs-TA) using silver nitrate (AgNO3) as control. Methods: The interaction of AgNPs with human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1) was evaluated using the mitochondrial metabolic potential assay (MTT). Antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested against anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with oral cavity and respiratory tract infections, and selected aerobic Staphylococci strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by the agar dilution method for anaerobic bacteria or broth microdilution method for reference Staphylococci strains and Streptococcus mutans. These strains were also used for antibiofilm activity of AgNPs. Results: The highest antimicrobial activities at nontoxic concentrations were observed for the uncapped AgNPs and the AgNPs capped with LA. It was found that AgNPs-LA and AgNPs-PEG demonstrated lower cytotoxicity as compared with the AgNPs-TA or AgNPs-UC in the gingival fibroblast model. All of the tested nanoparticles proved less toxic and demonstrated wider spectrum of antimicrobial activities than AgNO3 solution. Additionally, AgNPs-LA eradicated Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus mutans 1-day biofilm at concentration nontoxic to oral cells. Conclusions: Our results proved that a capping agent had significant influence on the antibacterial

  9. Capping Agent-Dependent Toxicity and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles: An In Vitro Study. Concerns about Potential Application in Dental Practice.

    PubMed

    Niska, Karolina; Knap, Narcyz; Kędzia, Anna; Jaskiewicz, Maciej; Kamysz, Wojciech; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In dentistry, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have drawn particular attention because of their wide antimicrobial activity spectrum. However, controversial information on AgNPs toxicity limited their use in oral infections. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities against a panel of oral pathogenic bacteria and bacterial biofilms together with potential cytotoxic effects on human gingival fibroblasts of 10 nm AgNPs: non-functionalized - uncapped (AgNPs-UC) as well as surface-functionalized with capping agent: lipoic acid (AgNPs-LA), polyethylene glycol (AgNPs-PEG) or tannic acid (AgNPs-TA) using silver nitrate (AgNO3) as control. Methods: The interaction of AgNPs with human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1) was evaluated using the mitochondrial metabolic potential assay (MTT). Antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was tested against anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with oral cavity and respiratory tract infections, and selected aerobic Staphylococci strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by the agar dilution method for anaerobic bacteria or broth microdilution method for reference Staphylococci strains and Streptococcus mutans. These strains were also used for antibiofilm activity of AgNPs. Results: The highest antimicrobial activities at nontoxic concentrations were observed for the uncapped AgNPs and the AgNPs capped with LA. It was found that AgNPs-LA and AgNPs-PEG demonstrated lower cytotoxicity as compared with the AgNPs-TA or AgNPs-UC in the gingival fibroblast model. All of the tested nanoparticles proved less toxic and demonstrated wider spectrum of antimicrobial activities than AgNO3 solution. Additionally, AgNPs-LA eradicated Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus mutans 1-day biofilm at concentration nontoxic to oral cells. Conclusions: Our results proved that a capping agent had significant influence on the antibacterial

  10. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  11. Finding Dental Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Finding Dental Care Where can I find low-cost dental care? Dental schools often have clinics that allow dental ... can I find more information? See Finding Low Cost Dental Care . ​​​​ WWNRightboxRadEditor2 Contact Us 1-866-232-4528 nidcrinfo@ ...

  12. 1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD BRIDGE, FORMER SILVER SPRING BLEACHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD BRIDGE, FORMER SILVER SPRING BLEACHING AND DYEING COMPANY MILL IN BACKGROUND. - Charles Street Bridge, Spanning West River on Charles Street, Providence, Providence County, RI

  13. Ecology: Deep and complex ways to survive bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events can drive reefs from being the domains of corals to becoming dominated by seaweed. But longitudinal data show that more than half of the reefs studied rebound to their former glory. See Letter p.94

  14. Bleaching of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics without scouring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work investigated whether a hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabric made at a relatively high hydroentangling water pressure, say, 135-bar, could be successfully bleached to attain the desired whiteness, absorbency and other properties without traditional scouring. Accordingly, the scoured...

  15. Peroxy bleaches Part 1. Background and techniques for hazard evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carson, P A; Fairclough, C S; Mauduit, C; Colsell, M

    2006-08-25

    Fabric laundering is now a sophisticated chemical process involving a variety of operations including bleaching. The chemistry of peroxy bleaches is described including the use of novel organic compounds to provide effective bleaching at the lower temperatures of modern wash cycles. The instability of peroxy compounds is illustrated using cameo case histories to relate theory and practice. Techniques available for determining their thermochemistry are summarised. A model is provided for hazard and risk assessment of development projects in general (particularly those involving new molecules, processes or formulations) from ideas phase through exploratory laboratory investigations to pilot plant scale-up and eventual manufacture and commercial exploitation. This paper is a prelude to Part 2, which describes the determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of peroxy bleaches and discusses the implication of the results in terms of precautions for their safe storage and incorporation into detergent formulations during processing.

  16. Bleaching of the red anthocyanin induced by superoxide radical.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, H; Uefuji, H; Sakihama, Y

    1996-08-01

    Red anthocyanin prepared from petals of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. was photobleached in the EDTA-riboflavin system. The rate of bleaching monitored at 565 nm depended on the light intensity and EDTA concentrations. Anaerobic conditions and/or addition of superoxide dismutase prevented the bleaching of anthocyanin, whereas mannitol and catalase did not. A similar bleaching was observed under dark conditions in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The results indicate that anthocyanin is bleached by the nonenzymatic reaction with the superoxide radical and suggest that the pigment can function as an antioxidant. The antioxidative efficiency of cyanidin to superoxide was 10-fold higher than that of cyanidin-3-sophoroside as a Hibiscus anthocyanin.

  17. Ruins of the Dyeing and Bleach House of the Ivanhoe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ruins of the Dyeing and Bleach House of the Ivanhoe Paper Mill, from the north. The Rogers Locomotive and Machine Works Fitting Shop is visible in the background. - Ivanhoe Mill, Wheelhouse, Spruce & Market Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  18. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    PubMed

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet.

  19. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  20. Nitric oxide mediates coral bleaching through an apoptotic-like cell death pathway: evidence from a model sea anemone-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Thomas D; Bradley, Benjamin J; Davy, Simon K

    2013-12-01

    Coral bleaching (involving the loss of symbiotic algae from the cnidarian host) is a major threat to coral reefs and appears to be mediated at the cellular level by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we examined the specific role of NO in bleaching using the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, a model system for the study of corals. Exposure of A. pulchella to high-temperature shock (26-33°C over <1 h) or an NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione) resulted in significant increases in host caspase-like enzyme activity. These responses were reflected in the intensities of bleaching, which were significantly higher in heat- or NO-treated specimens than in controls maintained in seawater at 26°C. Notably, the inhibition of caspase-like activity prevented bleaching even in the presence of an NO donor or at elevated temperature. The additional use of an NO scavenger controlled for effects mediated by agents other than NO. We also exposed A. pulchella to a more ecologically relevant treatment (an increase from 26 to 33°C over 6-7 d). Again, host NO synthesis correlated with the activation of caspase-like enzyme activity. Therefore, we conclude that NO's involvement in cnidarian bleaching arises through the regulation of host apoptotic pathways.

  1. A new non-vital tooth bleaching method using titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with a 405-nm diode laser or a halogen lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.

    2008-06-01

    To establish a safer and more effective bleaching method for discolored pulpless teeth, we examined bleaching from the pulpal dentin side using a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide. The twenty bovine blood-stained discolored enamel-dentin plates of 1.0 mm enamel thickness and 2.0 mm dentin thickness were used. The bleaching agent was applied to the dentin side that was then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2) or a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2) for 15 minutes. The bleaching effect was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of the color of the specimens from the dentin and enamel side for every 5 minutes, and then dentin or enamel surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope. The 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide proved to have a strong bleaching effect. The color difference after laser irradiation was higher than that after halogen lamp irradiation, however, there was no significant difference between them. No changes in the enamel surface morphology were found and open dentinal tubules with no smear layer were clearly observed at the pulpal dentin surface in both groups.

  2. Coral bleaching: Thermal adaptation in reef coral symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Rob

    2004-08-01

    Many corals bleach as a result of increased seawater temperature, which causes them to lose their vital symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium spp.) - unless these symbioses are able to adapt to global warming, bleaching threatens coral reefs worldwide. Here I show that some corals have adapted to higher temperatures, at least in part, by hosting specifically adapted Symbiodinium. If other coral species can host these or similar Symbiodinium taxa, they might adapt to warmer habitats relatively easily.

  3. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    PubMed Central

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  4. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Soares, Ana Flávia; Pangrazio, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; Wang, Linda; Ishikiriama, Sergio Kiyoshi; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-04-01

    The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  5. Nonvital bleaching: general considerations and report of two failure cases.

    PubMed

    Dietschi, Didier

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the rationale and procedures for noninvasive treatment of discolored nonvital teeth using the walking bleach technique. The limitations of this procedure and, in particular, the unpredictable color stability following non-vital bleaching are discussed and illustrated with two cases of rapid discoloration relapse. The possible reasons for treatment failure are examined and show that current knowledge regarding the origin and prevention of discoloration is limited.

  6. Universal Approach to FRAP Analysis of Arbitrary Bleaching Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel; Goldstien, Leo; Edidin, Michael; Gheber, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    The original approach to calculating diffusion coefficients of a fluorescent probe from Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) measurements assumes bleaching with a circular laser beam of a Gaussian intensity profile. This method was used without imaging the bleached cell. An empirical equation for calculating diffusion coefficients from a rectangular bleaching geometry, created in a confocal image, was later published, however a single method allowing the calculation of diffusion coefficients for arbitrary geometry does not exist. Our simulation approach allows computation of diffusion coefficients regardless of bleaching geometry used in the FRAP experiment. It accepts a multiple-frame TIFF file, representing the experiment as input, and simulates the (pure) diffusion of the fluorescent probes (2D random walk) starting with the first post-bleach frame of the actual data. It then fits the simulated data to the real data and extracts the diffusion coefficient. We validate our approach using a well characterized diffusing molecule (DiIC18) against well-established analytical procedures. We show that the algorithm is able to calculate the absolute value of diffusion coefficients for arbitrary bleaching geometries, including exaggeratedly large ones. It is provided freely as an ImageJ plugin, and should facilitate quantitative FRAP measurements for users equipped with standard fluorescence microscopy setups. PMID:26108191

  7. Totally chlorine-free bleaching of flax pulp.

    PubMed

    Khristova, P; Tomkinson, J; Dimitrov, I; Valchev, I; Jones, G Lloyd

    2002-10-01

    Alkaline-sulphite Tamlin flax mill pulp of 34-41% brightness has been bleached with different totally chlorine-free (TCF) sequences (oxygen delignification, pressurised peroxide, peroxide without and with activator (TAED, tetraacetylethylenediamine) and with and without pre-treatment with ultrasound to 82% ISO brightness of the mill conventional CEH bleaching. Although the best results after oxygen delignification were obtained with pressurised peroxide, activated peroxide caused lower cellulose degradation and gave a higher pulp strength. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charge, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximise the brightness gain at lower viscosity loss. The chemistry and flexibility of TAED made it possible to activate the peroxide under conditions for which the peroxide alone is ineffective as a bleach, such as low alkalinity or low temperature. The presence of shives hindered the bleaching, but the bleached non-screened pulp was stronger than the screened one. Pre-treatment with ultrasound for 4 min of 1% pulp consistency gave 3-4% gain in ISO brightness for non-screened pulp and 2% for screened pulp and facilitated further delignification and peroxide bleaching.

  8. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with ... look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  9. Risk factors for developing tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation associated with nightguard vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Leonard, R H; Haywood, V B; Phillips, C

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors in the development of tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation associated with the nightguard vital bleaching technique. The potential risk factors evaluated (sex, age, reported allergy, whitening solution, number of times the solution was changed daily [its usage pattern], and dental arch) were collected from the daily log form turned in by each of the 64 participants after completion of the 6-week lightening process. Also evaluated for each participant, from color slides, were tooth characteristics such as gingival recession, defective restorations, abfraction lesions, enamel-cementum abrasion, etc, and reported side effects. The generalized Mantel-Haenszel statistic was used to assess the association between the potential risk factors and the development of tooth sensitivity and/or gingival irritation. No statistical relationship existed between age, sex, allergy, tooth characteristics, or the dental arch lightened and the development of side effects. Initially, a statistically significant association existed between side effects and the whitening solution used. However, when the analysis was controlled for usage pattern, this relationship disappeared. Patients who changed the whitening solution more than once a day reported statistically significantly more side effects than did those who did not change the whitening solution during their usage time.

  10. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  11. Validation of degree heating weeks as a coral bleaching index in the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayanne, Hajime

    2017-03-01

    Mass bleaching is the most significant threat to coral reefs. The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration monitors world sea surface temperature (SST) and releases warnings for bleaching based on degree heating weeks (DHW), which is the accumulation of temperature anomalies exceeding the monthly maximum mean SST for a given region. DHW values >4.0 °C-weeks are thought to induce bleaching, and those >8.0 °C-weeks are thought to result in widespread bleaching and some mortality. This study validates the effectiveness of DHW as a mass bleaching index by on-site historical observation at eight sites in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The mass bleaching events occurred during different years at different sites. The recorded years of the bleaching events matched well with DHW values >8 °C-weeks, and the logistically projected probability of bleaching against DHW showed a positive relationship. DHW provides a reasonable threshold for bleaching.

  12. Sedation in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    There is very little information about the practice of sedation in Japan. Despite the remarkable advances in dentistry, fear and anxiety continue to be significant deterrents for seeking dental services. Most dental procedures can fortunately be undertaken with the aid of sedation. A comprehensive survey of all the dental schools in Japan was carried out to determine what sedation practices were used in Japan. All 29 dental schools in Japan possessed a dedicated department of anesthesiology at the time of this survey. The survey attempted to determine the specific sedation methods (techniques, routes of administration, and agents used in sedation) as well as practices (monitoring, fasting, location, education, and fees involved in sedation). The results indicate that there was a broad range in sedation practices. The Japanese Dental Society of Anesthesiology may wish to examine the findings of this study and may wish to formulate guidelines appropriate for the practice of sedation in Japan. Others may also wish to compare their own practices with those of Japan. PMID:15497299

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18. PMID:28203432

  14. Coral bleaching--capacity for acclimatization and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Coles, S L; Brown, Barbara E

    2003-01-01

    Coral bleaching, i.e., loss of most of the symbiotic zooxanthellae normally found within coral tissue, has occurred with increasing frequency on coral reefs throughout the world in the last 20 years, mostly during periods of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Experiments and observations indicate that coral bleaching results primarily from elevated seawater temperatures under high light conditions, which increases rates of biochemical reactions associated with zooxanthellar photosynthesis, producing toxic forms of oxygen that interfere with cellular processes. Published projections of a baseline of increasing ocean temperature resulting from global warming have suggested that annual temperature maxima within 30 years may be at levels that will cause frequent coral bleaching and widespread mortality leading to decline of corals as dominant organisms on reefs. However, these projections have not considered the high variability in bleaching response that occurs among corals both within and among species. There is information that corals and their symbionts may be capable of acclimatization and selective adaptation to elevated temperatures that have already resulted in bleaching resistant coral populations, both locally and regionally, in various areas of the world. There are possible mechanisms that might provide resistance and protection to increased temperature and light. These include inducible heat shock proteins that act in refolding denatured cellular and structural proteins, production of oxidative enzymes that inactivate harmful oxygen radicals, fluorescent coral pigments that both reflect and dissipate light energy, and phenotypic adaptations of zooxanthellae and adaptive shifts in their populations at higher temperatures. Such mechanisms, when considered in conjunction with experimental and observational evidence for coral recovery in areas that have undergone coral bleaching, suggest an as yet undefined capacity in corals and zooxanthellae to adapt to

  15. 'Ethnic cleansing' bleaches the atrocities of genocide.

    PubMed

    Blum, Rony; Stanton, Gregory H; Sagi, Shira; Richter, Elihu D

    2008-04-01

    Genocide has been the leading cause of preventable violent death in the 20th-21st century, taking even more lives than war. The term 'ethnic cleansing' is used as a euphemism for genocide despite it having no legal status. Like 'Judenrein' and 'racial hygiene' in Nazi medicine, it expropriates pseudo-medical terminology to justify massacre. Use of the term reifies a dehumanized view of the victims as sources of filth and disease, and propagates the reversed social ethics of the perpetrators. Timelines for recent genocides (Bosnia, 1991-1996, 200,000; Kosovo 1998-2000, 10,000-20,000; Rwanda, 1994, 800,000; Darfur 2002-2006, >400,000) show that its use bears no relationship to death tolls or the scale of atrocity. Bystanders' use of the term 'ethnic cleansing' signals the lack of will to stop genocide, resulting in huge increases in deaths, and undermines international legal obligations to acknowledge genocide. The term 'ethnic cleansing' corrupts observation, interpretation, ethical judgment and decision-making, thereby undermining the aim of public health. Public health should lead the way in expunging the term 'ethnic cleansing' from official use. 'Ethnic cleansing' bleaches the atrocities of genocide, leading to inaction in preventing current and future genocides.

  16. Characterization of Hairdresser Exposure to Airborne Particles during Hair Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Patrik T; Marini, Sara; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Kåredal, Monica; Blomgren, Eva; Nielsen, Jörn; Buonanno, Giorgio; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms among hairdressers are often ascribed to the use of bleaching powders that contain persulfate salts. Such salts can act as allergens and airway irritants but the mechanisms behind the negative health effects are not fully known. In order to understand why some hairdressers experience respiratory symptoms during, and after, sessions of hair bleaching, it is of importance to characterize how exposure occurs. In this work we used time and particle size resolved instrumentation with the aim to measure the concentration of particles that hairdressers are exposed to during sessions of hair bleaching. We also used filter samples to collect particles for quantitative determination of persulfate (S2O8(2-)) content and for analysis by light microscopy. Two different types of bleaching powders were used, one marked as dust-free and one without this marking (denoted regular). The time resolved instrumentation revealed that particles <10 µm were emitted, specifically when the regular powder was prepared and mixed with hydrogen peroxide. In contrast to other research our work also revealed that supercoarse particles (>10 µm) were emitted during application of the bleaching, when both the regular and the dust-free powders were used. The measured level of persulfate, sampled in the breathing zone of the hairdressers, was on average 26 µg m(-3) when the regular powder was used and 11 µg m(-3) when the dust-free powder was used. This indicates that use of dust-free powder does not eliminate exposure to persulfates, it only lowers the concentration. We show that the site of sampling, or position of the hairdresser with regards to the hair being bleached, is of high importance in the determination of persulfate levels and exposure. This work focuses on the physical and chemical characterization of the particles released to the air and the results are important for accurate exposure assessments. Accurate assessments may in turn lead to a better understanding of

  17. Knowledge of dental health and diseases among dental patients, a multicentre study in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almas, K; Albaker, A; Felembam, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of dental patients about dental health and diseases. A questionnaire was developed with three sets of questions, 1-general knowledge of dental conditions, 2-use of alternate methods in prevention and treatment of dental diseases, 3-awareness about personal oral health. Six hundred questionnaires were distributed in 6 cities from 4 different regions (i.e. Makkah, Riyadh, Tabuk, Gizan). 367 respondents (61% response rate) constituted 233 (63.5%) male and 134 (36.5%) female with the age range 11-70 years (mean 30 +/- 11.9). The data were analyzed by SPSS version 9.0 and results presented in frequency distributions. 99% male and 96% female considered their teeth for chewing food, 97% male and 96% female knew that increased carbohydrate intake and poor oral hygiene are related to tooth decay, 89% male and 96% female used toothbrush and paste to prevent dental diseases and 75% male and 66% female were regular user of miswak (chewing sticks.) 67% male and 59% female visit dentist, only in pain. 46% used miswak after their meals, only 14% of the subjects used miswak on their lingual and palatal surfaces of teeth, while 38% of the subjects used clove as remedy for toothache, 25.6% used saline and 10% used lemon for bleaching their teeth. 15% considered honey important for their good oral health. Regarding personal oral health, 35% had pain in gums, 36.8% were with bad breath, 28% had tooth hypersensitivity, and almost 50% used toothbrush twice daily while 42% had bleeding gums. It is important to note that knowledge and awareness about dental health and disease conditions are better in male subjects, dietary habits and oral hygiene methods need to be addressed in future investigations. There is a need to provide more health education to female subjects to improve their oral health.

  18. Influence of remineralizing gels on bleached enamel microhardness in different time intervals.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; D'Avila, Thaís Corrêa; Takahashi, Camila Lurie; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alexandre Luis Souto

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH, the effect of applying remineralizing gels after bleaching and the effect of artificial saliva on enamel microhardness. Seventy bovine incisors were divided into three groups: Group 1 (n=10) received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide neutral gel (n=30) and Group 3 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide acid gel (n=30). Each experimental group was subdivided into three groups (n=10) according to the post-bleaching treatment: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel and application of a combination of calcium and fluoride gel. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 7, 15 and 30 days and enamel microhardness was evaluated. The Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by three-way RM ANOVA, which revealed a significant difference only for treatment factor. The Tukey's test showed that the groups bleached followed by no additional treatment exhibited microhardness means significantly lower than the bleached groups treated with remineralizing gels. The Dunnet's test showed a significant difference only for the group bleached with acid gel without remineralizing treatment compared to the control group measured immediately after bleaching. It was concluded that acid bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness and that use of remineralizing gels after bleaching can significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel.

  19. Bacteria associated with the bleached and cave coral Oculina patagonica.

    PubMed

    Koren, Omry; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2008-04-01

    The relative abundance of bacteria in the mucus and tissues of Oculina patagonica taken from bleached and cave (azooxanthellae) corals was determined by analyses of the 16S rRNA genes from cloned libraries of extracted DNA and from isolated colonies. The results were compared to previously published data on healthy O. patagonica. The bacterial community of bleached, cave, and healthy corals were completely different from each other. A tight cluster (>99.5% identity) of bacteria, showing 100% identity to Acinetobacter species, dominated bleached corals, comprising 25% of the 316 clones sequenced. The dominant bacterial cluster found in cave corals, representing 29% of the 97 clones sequenced, showed 98% identity to an uncultured bacterium from the Great Barrier Reef. Vibrio splendidus was the most dominant species in healthy O. patagonica. The culturable bacteria represented 0.1-1.0% of the total bacteria (SYBR Gold staining) of the corals. The most abundant culturable bacteria in bleached, cave, and healthy corals were clusters that most closely matched Microbulbifer sp., an alpha-proteobacterium previously isolated from healthy corals and an alpha-protobacterium (AB026194), respectively. Three generalizations emerge from this study on O. patagonica: (1) More bacteria are associated with coral tissue than mucus; (2) tissue and mucus populations are different; (3) bacterial populations associated with corals change dramatically when corals lack their symbiotic zooxanthellae, either as a result of the bleaching disease or when growing in the absence of light.

  20. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  1. Bleaching mechanism of silver halide photochromic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Gourier, D.; Vivien, D.; Prassas, M.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal bleaching of silver halide photochromic glasses is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of photoinduced CuII centers. During exposure to ultraviolet light, the only stable CuII species is the (CuIIVAg)A center, which is a CuII-silver vacancy complex with the vacancy in a nearest position. In the dark, this center rapidly decays via two parallel channels. The first involves the dissociation of the complex by displacement of the vacancy along a [110] direction, with an activation energy E3=0.44 eV and a frequency factor k30=3.4×105 s-1. The second channel involves the conversion of the (CuIIVAg)A center into a (CuIICl-VAg)B center, where the silver vacancy is in the next nearest position along the [100] direction. This process occurs with an activation energy E1=0.44 eV and a frequency factor k10=3.1×105 s-1. The (CuIICl-VAg)B center slowly decays by a vacancy hopping mechanism, with an activation energy E2=0.22 eV and a frequency factor k20=4.6 s-1. To explain these two decay channels, it is proposed that the (CuIIVAg)A and (CuIICl-VAg)B centers annihilate via the formation of a CuI ion and a neutral complex (AgIIVAg)A which migrates to the surface of the silver halide particle, where electron-hole recombination occurs.

  2. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  3. The effects of coral bleaching on settlement preferences and growth of juvenile butterflyfishes.

    PubMed

    Cole, A J; Lawton, R J; Pisapia, C; Pratchett, M S

    2014-07-01

    Coral bleaching and associated mortality is an increasingly prominent threat to coral reef ecosystems. Although the effects of bleaching-induced coral mortality on reef fishes have been well demonstrated, corals can remain bleached for several weeks prior to recovery or death and little is known about how bleaching affects resident fishes during this time period. This study compared growth rates of two species of juvenile butterflyfishes (Chaetodon aureofasciatus and Chaetodon lunulatus) that were restricted to feeding upon either bleached or healthy coral tissue of Acropora spathulata or Pocillopora damicornis. Coral condition (bleached vs. unbleached) had no significant effects on changes in total length or weight over a 23-day period. Likewise, in a habitat choice experiment, juvenile butterflyfishes did not discriminate between healthy and bleached corals, but actively avoided using recently dead colonies. These results indicate that juvenile coral-feeding fishes are relatively robust to short term effects of bleaching events, provided that the corals do recover.

  4. 8. Cloth Room Building/Bleach House of the Monadnock Mills complex. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Cloth Room Building/Bleach House of the Monadnock Mills complex. The Cloth Room structure dates from 1895; the Bleach House, in the background, from 1902. - Monadnock Mills, 15 Water Street, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  5. Ocean Acidification: A Major Driver of Coral Bleaching in the 21st Century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, K.; Eakin, M. C.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2009-05-01

    Heat stress long been known to drive patterns of coral bleaching. Recently, however, it was discovered that ocean acidification can drive coral bleaching independently of temperature. This raises the question: how important will acidification be in driving coral bleaching under climate change? Here, we develop and apply a model that accounts for both thermal stress and ocean acidification in the coral bleaching response. Our analyses, which combine experimental bleaching data under manipulated ocean chemistry and warming with projections of CO2 and SST based on global circulation models, show that ocean acidification will become a key driver of future mass bleaching events within a few decades. Our findings, based on highly conservative assumptions, reveal that coral bleaching alert systems based on warming alone could underestimate coral bleaching by up to 50% during the 21st century. This is a striking result that will affect coral reef management strategies worldwide and has policy implications relating to global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  7. Cellulose oxidation and bleaching processes based on recombinant Myriococcum thermophilum cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Flitsch, Annemarie; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-01-10

    Myriococcum thermophilum cellobiose dehydrogenase (MtCDH) was expressed in Pichia pastoris using the pPICZαA expression vector under the control of methanol inducible AOX promoter. The purified recombinant MtCDH with a specific activity of 3.1 Umg(-1) was characterized to obtain kinetic constants for various carbohydrate substrates. Additionally, the C1 oxidation of the reducing ends of cellobiose, cellotetraose and maltotriose by MtCDH was verified by HPLC-MS. MtCDH was employed to oxidize several different cellulose-based materials by production of hydrogen peroxide. Based on the obtained results a one-pot enzymatic scouring/bleaching process for cotton fabrics was developed using pectinases as scouring agent and MtCDH to produce H(2)O(2) for bleaching. An average increase in whiteness (Berger) ΔE of 26 and an average 95% increase in wettability were observed in all MtCDH treated fabrics. In addition, MtCDH oxidized typical colored cotton flavonoids (morin, rutin, isoquercitrin).

  8. Combined ultrasound-laccase assisted bleaching of cotton.

    PubMed

    Basto, Carlos; Tzanov, Tzanko; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the potential of using ultrasound to enhance the bleaching efficiency of laccase enzyme on cotton fabrics. Ultrasound of low intensity (7W) and relatively short reaction time (30 min) seems to act in a synergistic way with the enzyme in the oxidation/removal of the natural colouring matter of cotton. The increased bleaching effect could be attributed to improved diffusion of the enzyme from the liquid phase to the fibres surface and throughout the textile structure. On the other hand inactivation of the laccase occurred increasing the intensity of the ultrasound. However, at the ultrasound power applied in the bleaching experiments the loss of enzyme activity was not significant enough to justify the use stabilizer such as polyvinyl alcohol. Furthermore, the polyvinyl alcohol appears to be a substrate for the laccase.

  9. Bleach Gel: A Simple Agarose Gel for Analyzing RNA Quality

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Patrick S.; LaJoie, Dollie M.; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    RNA-based applications requiring high quality, non-degraded RNA are a foundational element of many research studies. As such, it is paramount that the integrity of experimental RNA is validated prior to cDNA synthesis or other downstream applications. In the absence of expensive equipment such as microfluidic electrophoretic devices, and as an alternative to the costly and time-consuming standard formaldehyde gel, RNA quality can be quickly analyzed by adding small amounts of commercial bleach to TAE buffer-based agarose gels prior to electrophoresis. In the presence of low concentrations of bleach, the secondary structure of RNA is denatured and potential contaminating RNases are destroyed. Because of this, the ‘bleach gel’ is a functional approach that addresses the need for an inexpensive and safe way to evaluate RNA integrity and will improve the ability of researchers to rapidly analyze RNA quality. PMID:22222980

  10. Modified Technique for Nonvital Tooth Bleaching: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkader, Naglaa Nabil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of a nonvital, discolored, maxillary central incisor bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with the use of glass ionomer cement as a mechanical barrier in an attempt to minimize the undesirable side effects of intracoronal bleaching. The patient was a 13-year-old boy complaining of a discolored nonvital upper-right central incisor and was selected for this study from the pedodontic clinic in the Shibin Elkom teaching hospital in June 2013. After successful endodontic treatment, the tooth was bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Opalescence Xtra), activated by a standard curing light unit, and evaluated for any periapical changes by a periapical radiograph for a nine-months follow-up period. Radiographically, there was no evidence of cervical or apical resorption during the study period. PMID:26516453

  11. Bleaching of red lake paints in encaustic mummy portraits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miliani, Costanza; Daveri, Alessia; Spaabaek, Lin; Romani, Aldo; Manuali, Valentina; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    The present paper reports on the study of the development of whitish opacity in pink paints in encaustic mummy portraits. Non-invasive measurements carried out on two encaustic portraits belonging to the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, by reflectance FTIR and UV-vis fluorescence have shown that the areas prone to the bleaching phenomenon had been painted with melted beeswax and an anthraquinone vegetal lake mixed with calcium sulphate hemihydrate and dihydrate. The hypothesis that the bleaching disease was neither related to a degradation of the dyes nor to an alteration of the wax but rather to a dehydration-hydration reaction of the CaSO4-H2O system, has been corroborated by the analyses of two microsamples from the bleached areas and ascertained by accelerated ageing experiments on encaustic models.

  12. Bleach gel: a simple agarose gel for analyzing RNA quality.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Patrick S; LaJoie, Dollie M; Jorcyk, Cheryl L

    2012-01-01

    RNA-based applications requiring high-quality, non-degraded RNA are a foundational element of many research studies. As such, it is paramount that the integrity of experimental RNA is validated prior to cDNA synthesis or other downstream applications. In the absence of expensive equipment such as microfluidic electrophoretic devices, and as an alternative to the costly and time-consuming standard formaldehyde gel, RNA quality can be quickly analyzed by adding small amounts of commercial bleach to TAE buffer-based agarose gels prior to electrophoresis. In the presence of low concentrations of bleach, the secondary structure of RNA is denatured and potential contaminating RNases are destroyed. Because of this, the 'bleach gel' is a functional approach that addresses the need for an inexpensive and safe way to evaluate RNA integrity and will improve the ability of researchers to rapidly analyze RNA quality.

  13. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison.

  14. Tooth-bleaching procedures and their controversial effects: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This review article will help clinicians improve their understanding of the history of bleaching procedures, bleaching types, components, mechanisms, and their effects on soft tissue, tooth structures, resin composite, and bonding. Methods The controversial issues about bleaching procedures and their effects are reviewed. Additionally, the consequences of pre- and post-bleaching on the bonding potential of composite resin restorations to tooth structure are discussed. Conclusion The overall goal of the paper is to help reduce risks for patients. PMID:25408594

  15. Human Pulpal Reaction to the Modified McInnes Bleaching Technique,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Bleaching,v ital bleaching, pulp reaction D LA- 2. ABSTR ACT (Cotinue aevrw L N nweoesY and Identily by block number); ; z Am.C~m,-,e... pulp . Under the conditions of this study, there were no significant pulpal reactions to the bleaching technique even when a substantial amount of the...Bleaching Technique had any adverse effects on the pulp . Under the conditions of this study, there were no significant pulpal reactions to the

  16. Dentin bonding agents and resin cements--current status.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, G; O'Mahony, A; Hansen, P A

    2000-01-01

    Contemporary restorative dentistry is a rapidly evolving science which challenges the progressive clinician with a plethora of "new and improved" products. Sound product choices should be couched in the prudent consideration of well conducted in vitro and in vivo product research. This review shall list the most recent product developments in dentin bonding agents (fifth generation agents), resin-containing dental cements and the newest generation of dental cements i.e., resin-ionomer dental cements.

  17. Change in CO2 Flux in Coral Reefs by Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayanne, H.; Kayanne, H.; Watanabe, A.; Hata, H.; Kudo, S.; Nozaki, K.; Kato, K.; Negishi, A.; Saito, H.

    2001-05-01

    Coral reefs are related with carbon cycles through photosynthesis, respiration and calcification. Photosynthesis acts as sink of CO2, though respiration and calcification act as source of CO2. The role of coral reef ecosystem to atmospheric CO2 changes with balance among these community-level metabolisms. The world-wide coral reef bleaching in 1997-1998 provided us with a chance to evaluate the role of the metabolic processes of coral reefs to carbon cycles. In Ishigaki Island, Ryukyu Islands, southwest Japan and Palau Islands, west of Caroline Islands, we measured CO2 in reef water and community metabolisms by change in seawater alkalinity and total inorganic carbon. The observtion were conducted during and after bleaching in Ishigaki Island, and before and after bleaching in Palau Islands. Higher rates of community gross primary production (Pg) and respiration (R), and lower rate of net community production (Pn) were observed for the community with extensive bleaching. Calcification rate (G) was almost the same. The resultant increase in magnitude of diurnal change in CO2 were observed, and the community acted as net source of CO2. Lower rates of Pg, R, Pn, G and resultant smaller variation in diurnal CO2 change were observed for the community of dead corals and filamentous brown algae. This also resulted in shift of the community CO2 flux to net source of CO2. Bleaching shifted the function of coral reef ecosystem from sink or small source to large source of CO2. More severe and extensive bleaching is predicted to be occurred during the global warming, which acted as positive feedback to CO2 increase, and thus, global warming.

  18. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Navas-Camacho, Raúl; Gil-Agudelo, Diego Luis; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto; Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC) has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá). The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10 x 2m) with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters) are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2), and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2). Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD), and White Plague Disease (WPD) were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A. grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years) variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few long

  19. Do different bleaching protocols affect the enamel microhardness?

    PubMed Central

    Lia Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Garrido Gabriel, Taisa R. Conti; Piola Rizzante, Fabio Antonio; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Soares Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tooth bleaching tends to increase enamel roughness and porosity, in addition to reducing surface microhardness. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching treatments using different hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentrations, with and without light activation on bovine enamel microhardness. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of sixty bovine incisors were flattened and polished and the enamel specimens were divided into six groups: G1 : c0 ontrol, exposed to artificial saliva; G2: 35% HP applied in two sessions (45’ each); G3: 35% HP applied in two sessions (3 × 15’ each); G4: 35% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus hybrid light (HL); G5: 25% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL; and G6: 15% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL. After the treatment, the enamel specimens were stored in artificial saliva. The surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at the baseline, 24 h and 7 days after bleaching. The data was analyzed using the ANOVA test, followed by the Tukey–Krummer test (P < 0.05). Results: All bleaching procedures lead to a decrease in surface microhardness when compared with the control group after 24 h. The lowest change in surface microhardness was found in the specimens treated with 15% HP plus HL. However, 35% HP plus HL induced the highest decrease in surface microhardness. After 7 days of remineralization, the surface microhardness returned to normal levels for all bleached specimens. Conclusion: Therefore, it can be concluded that the bleaching protocols caused a slight enamel surface alteration. However, the remineralization process minimized these effects. PMID:25713480

  20. A critical reinvestigation of the TAED-activated peroxide system for low-temperature bleaching of cotton.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Long, Xiaoxia; Du, Jinmei; Fu, Shaohai

    2013-01-30

    There exists a misunderstanding on the TAED-activated peroxide system in the textile industry that H(2)O(2) used in excess of the stoichiometric amount could produce an addition effect on bleaching of cotton under alkaline conditions. In this study, a critical reinvestigation was carried out on the TAED-activated peroxide system for bleaching of cotton. It was found that the TAED-activated peroxide system achieved its best performance under near-neutral pH conditions. No addition effect was observed when an excessive amount of H(2)O(2) was used under alkaline conditions, which is probably due to the base-catalyzed bimolecular decomposition of peracetic acid and the nucleophilic attack by H(2)O(2) on peracetic acid. NaHCO(3) was shown to be a desired alkaline agent for maintaining near-neutral pH for the TAED-activated peroxide system. This study provides new insight into the application of the TAED-activated peroxide system for low-temperature bleaching of cotton under more environmentally benign conditions.

  1. A novel technique for in-office bleaching with a 6% hydrogen peroxide paint-on varnish.

    PubMed

    da Mata, Antonio Duarte Sola Pereira; Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva

    2006-04-01

    In-office techniques for bleaching vital teeth are effective and expedient, but because they require the use of elevated concentrations of hydrogen peroxide-based agents, which are caustic and potentially toxic, they are found to be less appealing by practitioners compared with home whitening procedures. In this article we propose a new technique for in-office whitening of vital teeth using a 6% hydrogen peroxide paint-on whitening varnish, which enables the whitening procedure to be more economic and user-friendly, as well as less toxic and time consuming, compared with traditional in-office bleaching. A total of six patients with no caries or restorations in the maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth were selected for this study. Ten-minute applications of the paint-on whitening varnish were performed repeatedly with each patient for up to 1 hour and then repeated 1 week later. Initial shades were recorded with a Vita scale guide, and photographs were taken at the beginning and end of the study. A questionnaire assessing clinical parameters and patient satisfaction was performed. A change of 7 to 13 values on the Vita scale was observed in all cases. There were no reports of tooth sensitivity, and overall patient satisfaction was achieved. In-office bleaching with the use of paint-on varnishes seems to be effective, safe, and well accepted by patients, offering a viable alternative to high-peroxide-concentration in-office procedures.

  2. Characterization of fatty acid composition in healthy and bleached corals from Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachok, Zainudin; Mfilinge, Prosper; Tsuchiya, Makoto

    2006-11-01

    Under bleaching conditions, corals lose their symbiotic zooxanthellae, and thus, the ability to synthesize fatty acids (FAs) from photosynthetically derived carbon. This study investigated the lipid content and FA composition in healthy and bleached corals from the Odo reef flat in Okinawa, southern Japan, following a bleaching event. It was hypothesized that the FA composition and abundance would change as algae are lost or die, and possibly microbial abundance would increase in corals as a consequence of bleaching. The lipid content and FA composition of three healthy coral species ( Pavona frondifera, Acropora pulchra, and Goniastrea aspera) and of partially bleached and completely bleached colonies of P. frondifera were examined. The FA composition did not differ among healthy corals, but differed significantly among healthy, partially bleached, and completely bleached specimens of P. frondifera. Completely bleached corals contained significantly lower lipid and total FA content, as well as lower relative amounts of polyunsaturated FAs and higher relative amounts of saturated FAs, than healthy and partially bleached corals. Furthermore, there was a significantly higher relative concentration of monounsaturated FAs and odd-numbered branched FAs in completely bleached corals, indicating an increase in bacterial colonization in the bleached corals.

  3. Accelerating bleaching in vitiligo: balancing benefits versus risks.

    PubMed

    Seneschal, Julien; Boniface, Katia; Ezzedine, Khaled; Taieb, Alain

    2014-12-01

    While the goal of available treatment in vitiligo is to regain pigmentation, some patients affected by extensive and treatment-resistant vitiligo, with a major social and emotional impact, may benefit from depigmentation therapy. However, results from such therapy may not always be satisfactory. So to achieve better, faster and complete bleaching, Webb et al. propose a synergistic approach that combines topical application of bleaching phenols which targets melanocytes and initiate local inflammation with immune adjuvants so as to obtain an enhanced immune response against remaining melanocytes. This strategy could be reliable, but should be evaluated cautiously in future studies, in terms of potential side effects and induction of undesired autoimmunity.

  4. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  5. Effects of overmodulation in fixation-free rehalogenating bleached holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neipp, Cristian; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2001-07-01

    The mechanism for hologram formation by fixation-free rehalogenating bleaching has been treated by several authors. Experiments carried out with Kodak and Agfa photographic plates have led to the conclusion that the transfer of material from the exposed to the unexposed zones is the main mechanism that drives the process. We show that when BB-640 emulsion is used in the recording of holograms by means of fixation-free rehalogenating bleaching, the mechanism for the transfer of material from exposed to unexposed zones is efficient enough to create high refractive-index modulations. We also comment on the overmodulation effects, which result in a decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  6. Xylanase and laccase based enzymatic kraft pulp bleaching reduces adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) in bleach effluents: a pilot scale study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abha; Thakur, Vasanta Vadde; Shrivastava, Anita; Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Mathur, Rajeev Mohan; Gupta, Rishi; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2014-10-01

    In present study, xylanase and laccase were produced in a cost-effective manner up to 10 kg substrate level and evaluated in elemental chlorine free bleaching of Eucalyptus kraft pulp. Compared to the pulp pre-bleached with xylanase (15%) or laccase (25%) individually, the ClO2 savings were higher with sequential treatment of xylanase followed by laccase (35%) at laboratory scale. The sequential enzyme treatment when applied at pilot scale (50 kg pulp), resulted in improved pulp properties (50% reduced post color number, 15.71% increased tear index) and reduced AOX levels (34%) in bleach effluents. The decreased AOX level in effluents will help to meet AOX discharge limits, while improved pulp properties will be value addition to the paper.

  7. Spectrophotometric and computerized evaluation of tooth bleaching employing 10 different home-bleaching procedures: In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Peskersoy, Cem; Tetik, Ayhan; Ozturk, Veli Ozgen; Gokay, Necmi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of bleaching products, determine the applicability and validation of the measurement methods. Materials and Methods: Freshly extracted 110 human incisor teeth were stained with whole blood and hemolysate solution prior to the application of 10 different home-bleaching products. Spectrophotometric measurements of the tooth shades were performed for each specimen before and after bleaching at the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 14 days. Differences in lightness (Δl), chroma (Δc), hue (Δh) values and shade changes were measured to evaluate process. Computerized digital imaging analyses to determine the color changes were performed with Photoshop CS4 software (Adobe, San Jose, CA, USA). Statistical analyses were performed with analysis of variance, Scheffe and Tukey tests. Results: In all of the test groups regardless of the material used, a significant increase in lightness and hue, and decrease of chroma were observed, as compared to the control group. After recommended bleaching applications, Δl and Δh values respectively increased in group Zaris White and Brite (ZWB) and group Pola Night and Δc values showed significant decrease in groups ZWB and Rembrandt REM3 (P < 0.05). At the end of the procedure both spectrophotometric and digital imaging analysis showed ZWB was the most effective product among the others while Yotuel and Happy Smile were the least (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Home-bleaching systems showed slower but almost permanent bleaching effect likewise office-based methods. Both software and spectrophotometric analyses have advantages such as evaluating the results objectively and numerically, also treatment outcomes could be preserved. PMID:25512738

  8. Effect of bleaching protocols with 38% hydrogen peroxide and post-bleaching times on dentin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Vitussi, Lilian Oliveira Cambaúva; Milani, Camila; Alfredo, Edson; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of bleaching protocols with 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and post-bleaching times on shear bond strength of a composite resin to dentin. One-hundred slabs of intracoronary dentin were included and randomly assigned into 2 groups according to the bleaching protocol: HP (2 applications of 10 min each) and HP activated by LED laser (2 applications of 10 min each/45 s of light activation). Groups were subdivided according to the post-bleaching time (n=10): 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 10 days and 14 days. The control group was unbleached and restored (n=10). The specimens were restored with Single Bond adhesive system/Filtek Z250 resin using a polytetrafluorethylene matrix and were submitted to the shear bond strength testa after 24 h,. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Unbleached group (0.283 ± 0.134) had the highest bond strength and was statistically similar (p>0.05) to HP/10 days (0.278 ± 0.064), HP + LED laser/10 days (0.280 ± 0.078), HP/14 days (0.281 ± 0.104), HP + LED laser/14 days (0.277 ± 0.093). Lower bond strength were verified in HP/1 day (0.082 ± 0.012), HP/3 days (0.079 ± 0.013), HP + LED laser/1 day (0.073 ± 0.018) and HP + LED laser/3 days (0.080 ± 0.015), which were statistically similar (p>0.05). HP/7 days (0.184 ± 0.154) and HP + LED laser/7 days (0.169 ± 0.102) had intermediate values (p<0.05). The restorative procedure of intracoronary dentin bleached with 38% HP with or without the use of light source should be performed after at least 10 days after the bleaching treatment.

  9. Exposure to volatile methacrylates in dental personnel.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Stig; Ljungkvist, Göran; Andreasson, Harriet; Karlsson, Stig; Barregård, Lars

    2005-06-01

    Dental personnel are exposed to acrylates due to the acrylic resin-based composites and bonding agents used in fillings. It is well known that these compounds can cause contact allergy in dental personnel. However, in the 1990s, reports emerged on asthma also caused by methacrylates. The main volatile acrylates in dentistry are 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate. The aim of this study was to quantify the exposure to these acrylates in Swedish dental personnel. We studied the exposure to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate in five randomly selected public dental clinics and at the Faculty of Odontology at Göteborg University. In total, 21 whole-day and 46 task-specific short-term (1-18 min) measurements were performed. The median 8-hour time-weighted averages were 2.5 microg/m3 (dentists) and 2.9 microg/m3 (dental nurses) for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and 0.8 microg/m3 (dentists) and 0.3 microg/m3 (dental nurses) for methyl methacrylate. The maximum short-term exposure levels were 79 microg/m3 for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 15 microg/m3 for methyl methacrylate, similar in dentists and dental nurses. The observed levels are much lower than in complete denture fabrication. We found only one previous study in dentistry and it showed similar results (though it reported short-term measurements only). Irritant effects would not be expected in healthy people at these levels. Nevertheless, occupational respiratory diseases due to methacrylates may occur in dental personnel, and improvements in the handling of these chemicals in dentistry are warranted. This includes better vials for the bonding agents and avoiding evaporation from discarded materials.

  10. The effect of prolonged ``bleaching'' on skeletal banding and stable isotopic composition in Montastrea annularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, James J.; Szmant, Alina M.; Swart, Peter K.

    1991-07-01

    X-radiography and carbon and oxygen stable isotope analysis have been used to examine the effects of prolonged “bleaching” on the growth rate and chemical composition of the skeleton of the massive reef coral, Montastrea annularis. The post-bleaching linear growth of one colony that remained bleached for 10 to 12 months following the 1987 Caribbean-wide bleaching event was only 37% of mean annual growth from pre-bleaching years, and was manifest as a loss of the following year's low density band. Two colonies that did not bleach (normal) and two that bleached and regained their coloration (recovered) had linear growth rates over the same period that were 81 to 98% of mean pre-bleaching annual growth. Linear growth by a third recovered coral was 66% of pre-bleaching growth. No sub-annual stress bands were associated with the bleaching. The skeleton of the bleached colony had carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions that were reduced in range and enriched (increased) in both 13C and 18O in the post-bleaching year. The skeletons of two of the nine colonies, one bleached and one recovered, had depleted (reduced) δ18O values (-5.3 and -4.8%., respectively) during the bleaching episode that agree with the suggestion that positive temperature anomalies occurred during, and may have caused, the bleaching event. The range and values for all other normal and recovered corals, however, were not different between the post-bleaching year and previous years. Our data suggest that stress bands and isotopic analysis of coral skeletons may not always be reliable tools for examining the occurrence, cause or effects of certain discrete stress events that may interrupt skeletal growth.

  11. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Frisch, Ashley J.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Thums, Michele; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Furby, Kathryn A.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19–100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance. Conclusions/Significance Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of

  12. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 5. Ethical considerations for dental enhancement procedures.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I

    2010-09-11

    After the demise of the Industrial Age, we currently live in an 'Information Age' fuelled mainly by the Internet, with an ever-increasing medically and dentally literate population. The media has played its role by reporting scientific advances, as well as securitising medical and dental practices. Reality television such as 'Extreme makeovers' has also raised public awareness of body enhancements, with a greater number of people seeking such procedures. To satiate this growing demand, the dental industry has flourished by introducing novel cosmetic products such as bleaching kits, tooth coloured filling materials and a variety of dental ceramics. In addition, one only has to browse through a dental journal to notice innumerable courses and lectures on techniques for providing cosmetic dentistry. The incessant public interest, combined with unrelenting marketing by companies is gradually shifting the balance of dental care from a healing to an enhancement profession. The purpose of this article is to endeavour to answer questions such as, What is aesthetic or cosmetic dentistry? Why do patients seek cosmetic dentistry? Are enhancement procedures a part of dental practice? What, if any, ethical guidelines and constraints apply to elective enhancement procedures? What is the role of the dentist in providing or encouraging this type of 'therapy'? What treatment modalities are available for aesthetic dental treatment?

  13. A study of the mechanism of bleaching cotton using peracids and hydrogen peroxide as model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.

    1997-11-01

    The commercial interest for energy-saving and environmentally friendly bleaching systems has focused on hydrogen peroxide and peracids. Most available literature has been published in patents and little is known about the interfacial mechanism of bleaching. The mechanism of bleaching cotton dyed with the reactive dye 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl)aminofluorescein has been investigated using hydrogen peroxide as a model system. A general strategy for the study of the mechanism and kinetics of bleaching is presented followed by the relevant theory to enable a discriminatory assessment of the experimental data obtained. A brief extension to the industrially relevant class of peracid bleaches is given.

  14. Microhardness and Roughness of Enamel Bleached with 10% Carbamide Peroxide and Brushed with Different Toothpastes: An In Situ Study

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Carolina França de Medeiros; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This in situ study evaluated the roughness and microhardness of enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (PC10) and brushed with different toothpastes. Materials and Methods: Two groups of volunteers received PC10 and placebo agents for 21 days in two phases in a crossover 2 × 3 study. Fragments of human enamel were distributed among intraoral removable appliances (IRA). Nine fragments, divided into three triplets, were used in each IRA, and these were brushed with toothpastes R (Colgate), W (Colgate Total 12 Whiteness Gel) or BS (Colgate Whitening Oxygen Bubbles Fluoride). Treatments agents were applied for 8 h overnight. After brushing, the volunteers used the IRA for about 16 h/day. After a washout period, new IRAs were distributed and the volunteers were crossed over to the alternate agent for 21 days. Roughness and microhardness were measured before and after each phase. Results: According to the paired Student’s t-test, roughness of enamel increased and microhardness decreased (P < 0.05). According to analysis of variance generalized linear models, only the toothpaste factor was significant (P = 0.037) for roughness. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness and surface roughness are altered when PC10 bleaching is associated with tooth brushing using toothpastes BS, R, and W. PMID:25214727

  15. The effect of bleaching gel and (940 nm and 980 nm) diode lasers photoactivation on intrapulpal temperature and teeth whitening efficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Karadaghi, Tamara S; Al-Saedi, Asmaa A; Al-Maliky, Mohammed A; Mahmood, Ali S

    2016-12-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the whitening efficacy of 940 nm and 980 nm diode laser photoactivation in tooth bleaching by analysing pulp chamber temperature, as well as the change in tooth colour. Root canals of thirty extracted human lower premolars were prepared. Laserwhite* 20 bleaching agent containing 38% of hydrogen peroxide was photoactivated with 7 W output power of 940 nm and 980 nm diode lasers for 120 s. Bleaching gel reduced 27-29% of the temperature from reaching the pulp chamber. For shade assessment, only the groups photoactivated using diode lasers showed statistically significant differences from control group P < 0.001. Within the studied parameters, both 940 nm and 980 nm diode lasers produced a safe pulp temperature increase. Diode laser photoactivation of bleaching gel resulted in more efficient teeth whitening. Photoactivation with 940 nm diode laser yielded the highest change in colour with only minor increase in pulp chamber temperature.

  16. Wear and surface roughness of bovine enamel submitted to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Azevedo, Juliana Felippi David E Góes De; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, José

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated surface roughness and wear of bovine enamel following three different bleaching techniques and simulated brushing. Initial surface roughness (Ra) was evaluated and teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1, control; Group 2, 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) activated by a hybrid light; Group 3, 35% HP activated by a halogen light; and Group 4, 16% carbamide peroxide. After bleaching, surface roughness was measured and teeth were subjected to 100,000 cycles of simulated brushing. After brushing, the final roughness and wear was determined. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences among groups comparing initial and postbleaching roughness. After brushing, significant differences were found between the control and experimental groups. Group 4 showed a significant increase in roughness values compared with Group 2. The control group showed significantly less wear than other groups. Bleaching techniques promoted increased roughness and wear of bovine enamel, when submitted to simulated brushing. Tooth enamel after bleaching can present a larger alteration in the amount of roughness due to brushing.

  17. Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-05-01

    Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses.

  18. Bleached and unbleached MFC nanobarriers: properties and hydrophobisation with hexamethyldisilazane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Kuznetsova, Nina; Garaeva, Milyausha; Leirset, Ingebjørg; Galiullina, Guzaliya; Kostochko, Anatoly; Syverud, Kristin

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the production and surface modification of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), based on unbleached and bleached Pinus radiata pulp fibres. Unbleached Pinus radiata pulp fibres tend to fibrillate easier by homogenisation without pre-treatment, compared to the corresponding bleached MFC. The resulting unbleached MFC films have higher barrier against oxygen, lower water wettability and higher tensile strength than the corresponding bleached MFC qualities. In addition, it is demonstrated that carboxymethylation can also be applied for production of highly fibrillated unbleached MFC. The nanofibril size distribution of the carboxymethylated MFC is narrow with diameters less than 20 nm, as quantified on high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy images. The carboxymetylation had a larger fibrillation effect on the bleached pulp fibres than on the unbleached one. Importantly, the suitability of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as a new alternative for rendering MFC films hydrophobic was demonstrated. The HMDS-modified films made of carboxymethylated MFC had oxygen permeability levels better than 0.06 mL mm m-2 day-1 atm-1, which is a good property for some packaging applications.

  19. Project Overview: A Reef Manager's Guide to Coral Bleaching ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this report is to provide the latest scientific knowledge and discuss available management options to assist local and regional managers in responding effectively to mass coral bleaching events. Background A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) share the best available scientific information on climate-related coral bleaching; and (2) compile a tool kit of currently available strategies for adaptive management of coral reefs in a changing climate. The result is a compendium of current information, tools, and practical suggestions to aid managers in their efforts to protect reefs in a way that maximizes reef resilience in the face of continuing climate change. The Guide is a joint publication of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, and The World Conservation Union, with author contributions from a variety of international partners from government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academic institutions. EPA’s Office of Research and Development was a major contributor to the Guide through authorship and participation in the final review and editing process for the entire report. A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) share the best available scientific information on climate-related coral blea

  20. Chlorine bleaches - A significant long term source of mercury pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Eshleman, A.

    1975-01-01

    Products of industrial electrolysis of brine - NaOCl-based bleaches and NaOH - yielded 17 to 1290 ppb of Hg upon flameless atomic absorption analysis. Compared with current U.S. rejection value of 5 ppb for potable waters, the above levels seem sufficiently high to be a matter of environmental concern.

  1. General medicine and surgery for dental practitioners: part 4. Infections and infection control.

    PubMed

    Jakubovics, N; Greenwood, M; Meechan, J G

    2014-07-01

    Infection control and knowledge of common infectious agents is a cornerstone of safe dental practice. This paper summarises the measures that need to be taken to control cross infection and discusses some of the infectious agents of concern to dental practitioners.

  2. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  3. Clinical evaluation of the effectiveness of different bleaching therapies in vital teeth.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Leticia Cunha do Amaral Gonzaga de; Riehl, Heraldo; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos; Sundfeld, Maria Lucia Marcal Mazza; Briso, Andre Luiz Fraga

    2012-06-01

    The aims of this in vivo study were to compare the effectiveness and color stability of at-home and in-office bleaching techniques and to evaluate whether the use of light sources can alter bleaching results. According to preestablished criteria, 40 patients were selected and randomly divided into four groups according to bleaching treatment: (1) at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide, (2) in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) without a light source, (3) in-office bleaching with 35% HP with quartz-tungsten-halogen light, and (4) in-office bleaching with 35% HP with a light-emitting diode/laser. Tooth shade was evaluated using the VITA Classical Shade Guide before bleaching as well as after the first and third weeks of bleaching. Tooth shade was evaluated again using the same guide 1 and 6 months after the completion of treatment. The shade guide was arranged to yield scores that were used for statistical comparison. Statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant differences among the groups for any time point (P > .01). There was no color rebound in any of the groups. The bleaching techniques tested were equally effective. Light sources are unnecessary to bleach teeth.

  4. High spatial variability in coral bleaching around Moorea (French Polynesia): patterns across locations and water depths.

    PubMed

    Penin, Lucie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Schrimm, Muriel; Lenihan, Hunter Stanton

    2007-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events are one of the main threats to coral reefs. A severe bleaching event impacted Moorea, French Polynesia, between March and July 2002, causing 55+/-14% of colonies to suffer bleaching around the island. However, bleaching varied significantly across coral genera, locations, and as a function of water depth, with a bleaching level as high as 72% at some stations. Corals in deeper water bleached at a higher rate than those in shallow water, and the north coast was more impacted than the west coast. The relatively small scale of variability in bleaching responses probably resulted from the interaction between extrinsic factors, including hydrodynamic condition, and intrinsic factors, such as differential adaptation of the coral/algal association.

  5. A method to objectively optimize coral bleaching prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooidonk, R. J.; Huber, M.

    2007-12-01

    Thermally induced coral bleaching is a global threat to coral reef health. Methodologies, e.g. the Degree Heating Week technique, have been developed to predict bleaching induced by thermal stress by utilizing remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) observations. These techniques can be used as a management tool for Marine Protected Areas (MPA). Predictions are valuable to decision makers and stakeholders on weekly to monthly time scales and can be employed to build public awareness and support for mitigation. The bleaching problem is only expected to worsen because global warming poses a major threat to coral reef health. Indeed, predictive bleaching methods combined with climate model output have been used to forecast the global demise of coral reef ecosystems within coming decades due to climate change. Accuracy of these predictive techniques has not been quantitatively characterized despite the critical role they play. Assessments have typically been limited, qualitative or anecdotal, or more frequently they are simply unpublished. Quantitative accuracy assessment, using well established methods and skill scores often used in meteorology and medical sciences, will enable objective optimization of existing predictive techniques. To accomplish this, we will use existing remotely sensed data sets of sea surface temperature (AVHRR and TMI), and predictive values from techniques such as the Degree Heating Week method. We will compare these predictive values with observations of coral reef health and calculate applicable skill scores (Peirce Skill Score, Hit Rate and False Alarm Rate). We will (a) quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of existing coral reef bleaching predictive methods against state-of- the-art reef health databases, and (b) present a technique that will objectively optimize the predictive method for any given location. We will illustrate this optimization technique for reefs located in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

  6. Tropical cyclone cooling combats region-wide coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Adam D; Puotinen, Marji

    2014-05-01

    Coral bleaching has become more frequent and widespread as a result of rising sea surface temperature (SST). During a regional scale SST anomaly, reef exposure to thermal stress is patchy in part due to physical factors that reduce SST to provide thermal refuge. Tropical cyclones (TCs - hurricanes, typhoons) can induce temperature drops at spatial scales comparable to that of the SST anomaly itself. Such cyclone cooling can mitigate bleaching across broad areas when well-timed and appropriately located, yet the spatial and temporal prevalence of this phenomenon has not been quantified. Here, satellite SST and historical TC data are used to reconstruct cool wakes (n=46) across the Caribbean during two active TC seasons (2005 and 2010) where high thermal stress was widespread. Upon comparison of these datasets with thermal stress data from Coral Reef Watch and published accounts of bleaching, it is evident that TC cooling reduced thermal stress at a region-wide scale. The results show that during a mass bleaching event, TC cooling reduced thermal stress below critical levels to potentially mitigate bleaching at some reefs, and interrupted natural warming cycles to slow the build-up of thermal stress at others. Furthermore, reconstructed TC wave damage zones suggest that it was rare for more reef area to be damaged by waves than was cooled (only 12% of TCs). Extending the time series back to 1985 (n = 314), we estimate that for the recent period of enhanced TC activity (1995-2010), the annual probability that cooling and thermal stress co-occur is as high as 31% at some reefs. Quantifying such probabilities across the other tropical regions where both coral reefs and TCs exist is vital for improving our understanding of how reef exposure to rising SSTs may vary, and contributes to a basis for targeting reef conservation.

  7. Bleaching-induced colour change in plastic filling materials.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Filiz; Gurgan, Sevil

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study is to compare the colour changes of five different tooth-coloured restoratives: Ormocer (Definite/Degussa), compomer (Dyract AP/Dentsply De Tray), packable composite (Filtek P60/3M), flowable composite (Filtek Flow/3M) and hybrid composite (Filtek Z250/3M) after two different bleaching regimens [Vivastyle (10% carbamide peroxide)/Vivadent and Crest Professional Whitestrips (6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip bands)/Procter & Gamble]. Fifteen specimens of 30 x 30 x 2mm(3) size were fabricated from each material and randomly divided into three groups of five. Specimens in group one were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for two weeks and served as control. Group two specimens were treated with Vivastyle for two hours per day for two weeks and group three specimens were treated with Whitestrips for 30 min twice daily for two weeks. During the test period the specimens were kept at 37 C and in 100% relative humidity. At the end of the bleaching regimens colour measurements of the control and test groups were made with UV visible recording spectrophotometer. Colour changes were calculated with the use of the CIE-LAB uniform colour scale and compared by the use of Kruskall-Wallis test, followed by the Mann-Whitney U test. Control, Vivastyle and Whitestrips L*, a* and b* values differed significantly for all materials except Filtek Z250 (p < 0.05). All restorative materials demonstrated significantly higher colour change (DeltaE) with Whitestrips (p < 0.05). Dyract AP demonstrated the highest colour change both for the bleaching regimens followed by Filtek Flow, Definite, Filtek P60, and Filtek Z250 showed the smallest colour change. Colour change of plastic restorative materials during bleaching is both filling material and bleach specific.

  8. The cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species winners into losers.

    PubMed

    Grottoli, Andréa G; Warner, Mark E; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Schoepf, Verena; McGinley, Michael; Baumann, Justin; Matsui, Yohei

    2014-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching events caused by elevated seawater temperatures result in extensive coral loss throughout the tropics, and are projected to increase in frequency and severity. If bleaching becomes an annual event later in this century, more than 90% of coral reefs worldwide may be at risk of long-term degradation. While corals can recover from single isolated bleaching and can acclimate to recurring bleaching events that are separated by multiple years, it is currently unknown if and how they will survive and possibly acclimatize to annual coral bleaching. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that annual coral bleaching can dramatically alter thermal tolerance in Caribbean corals. We found that high coral energy reserves and changes in the dominant algal endosymbiont type (Symbiodinium spp.) facilitated rapid acclimation in Porites divaricata, whereas low energy reserves and a lack of algal phenotypic plasticity significantly increased susceptibility in Porites astreoides to bleaching the following year. Phenotypic plasticity in the dominant endosymbiont type of Orbicella faveolata did not prevent repeat bleaching, but may have facilitated rapid recovery. Thus, coral holobiont response to an isolated single bleaching event is not an accurate predictor of its response to bleaching the following year. Rather, the cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species 'winners' into 'losers', and can also facilitate acclimation and turn some coral species 'losers' into 'winners'. Overall, these findings indicate that cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching could result in some species becoming increasingly susceptible to bleaching and face a long-term decline, while phenotypically plastic coral species will acclimatize and persist. Thus, annual coral bleaching and recovery could contribute to the selective loss of coral diversity as well as the overall decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean.

  9. Dental Exam for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... and thumb sucking Toddlers, school-age children and adolescents During each regular checkup, the dentist or hygienist ... dental hygienist about proper oral health care for adolescents. American Dental Hygienists' Association. http://www.adha.org/ ...

  10. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... documents in the Related Resources section. Why is mercury used in dental amalgam? Approximately half of a ... about bioaccumulation, please see Related Resources. Is the mercury in dental amalgam the same as the mercury ...

  11. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II,...

  12. Accreditation in Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Dental Education cooperates with the American Dental Hygienists' Association in developing educational requirements for schools of dental hygiene. To be eligible for accreditation, schools must operate on a non-profit basis. A school applying for accreditation completes a previsitation questionnaire concerning its program. The…

  13. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  14. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  15. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  16. Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Sandra J.

    Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

  17. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  18. Sonochemical cleaning efficiencies in dental instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiong, T. Joyce; Walmsley, A. Damien; Price, Gareth J.

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasound has been widely used for cleaning purposes in a variety of situations, including in dental practice. Cleaning is achieved through a combination of acoustically driven streaming effects and sonochemical effects arising from the production of inertial cavitation in a liquid. In our work, various dental instruments used for endodontic (root canal) treatment have been evaluated for their efficiency in producing sonochemical effects in an in-vitro cleaning environment. The areas where cavitation was produced were mapped by monitoring chemiluminescence from luminol solutions and this was correlated with their cleaning efficiencies - assessed by the ability to bleach a dye, to form an emulsion by mixing immiscible components and also to remove ink from a glass surface. The results showed good correlation (Pearson's coefficient > 0.9) between the cavitation and cleaning efficiencies, suggesting that the former plays an important role in cleaning. The methods developed and the results will be beneficial in endodontics research in order to optimise future root canal instruments and treatments.

  19. Bonding Agents in Pit and Fissure Sealants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Usha Mohan; G, Suma

    2009-01-01

    Dental adhesive systems used for bonding dental resins to enamel and dentin have evolved through several "generations," with changes in chemistry, mechanism, number of bottles, application technique, and clinical effectiveness. The trend in the latest generation of dental bonding systems is to reduce the number of components and clinical placement steps. The introduction of i bond, a single-bottle dental adhesive system, is the latest of the new generation materials, and combines etchant, adhesive, and desensitizer in one component. This paper describes different dentin bonding agents, its evolution, mechanism of action and different commercially available dentin bonding agents and their role in the retention of pit and fissure sealant. PMID:25206115

  20. Implications of apixaban for dental treatments

    PubMed Central

    Albaladejo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin and acenocoumarol. In Europe, the European Medicines Agency has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Their advantages include: predictable pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and limited food, rapid onset of action and short half-life. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through November 2015 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library using the keywords “apixaban”, “rivaroxaban”, “dabigatran”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “dental treatment” and “dental implications”. We included studies published in English and Spanish over the last 10 years. Results Apixaban has been recently introduced in the daily medical practices for the control of thromboembolism. The number of patients taking apixaban is increasing. Management of patients on anticoagulation therapy requires that dentists can accurately assess the patient prior to dental treatments. It is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action and management guidelines for patients taking new oral anticoagulants. Conclusions The dentist should consider carefully the management of patients on apixaban. This paper sets out a clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients. There is a need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for dental patients requiring apixaban. Key words:Apixaban, new oral anticoagulants, dental treatment. PMID:27957279

  1. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  2. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo. PMID:26538821

  3. Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Roff, G; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The 'Bacterial Bleaching' hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further generated conclusions such as the coral probiotic hypothesis and coral hologenome theory of evolution. We aimed to investigate the natural microbial ecology of O. patagonica during the annual bleaching using fluorescence in situ hybridization to map bacterial populations within the coral tissue layers, and found that the coral bleaches on the temperate rocky reefs of the Israeli coastline without the presence of Vibrio shiloi or bacterial penetration of its tissue layers. Bacterial communities were found associated with the endolithic layer of bleached coral regions, and a community dominance shift from an apparent cyanobacterial-dominated endolithic layer to an algal-dominated layer was found in bleached coral samples. While bacterial communities certainly play important roles in coral stasis and health, we suggest environmental stressors, such as those documented with reef-building corals, are the primary triggers leading to bleaching of O. patagonica and suggest that bacterial involvement in patterns of bleaching is that of opportunistic colonization.

  4. Predicting coral bleaching in response to environmental stressors using 8 years of global-scale data.

    PubMed

    Yee, Susan Harrell; Barron, Mace G

    2010-02-01

    Coral reefs have experienced extensive mortality over the past few decades as a result of temperature-induced mass bleach